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Sample records for signals statistical mapping

  1. Controlling False Discovery Rate in Signal Space for Transformation-Invariant Thresholding of Statistical Maps

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junning; Shi, Yonggang; Toga, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    Thresholding statistical maps with appropriate correction of multiple testing remains a critical and challenging problem in brain mapping. Since the false discovery rate (FDR) criterion was introduced to the neuroimaging community a decade ago, various improvements have been proposed. However, a highly desirable feature, transformation invariance, has not been adequately addressed, especially for voxel-based FDR. Thresholding applied after spatial transformation is not necessarily equivalent to transformation applied after thresholding in the original space. We find this problem closely related to another important issue: spatial correlation of signals. A Gaussian random vector-valued image after normalization is a random map from a Euclidean space to a high-dimension unit-sphere. Instead of defining the FDR measure in the image’s Euclidean space, we define it in the signals’ hyper-spherical space whose measure not only reflects the intrinsic “volume” of signals’ randomness but also keeps invariant under images’ spatial transformation. Experiments with synthetic and real images demonstrate that our method achieves transformation invariance and significantly minimizes the bias introduced by the choice of template images. PMID:26213450

  2. Statistical Mapping by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utano, Jack J.

    The function of a statistical map is to provide readers with a visual impression of the data so that they may be able to identify any geographic characteristics of the displayed phenomena. The increasingly important role played by the computer in the production of statistical maps is manifested by the varied examples of computer maps in recent…

  3. Vascular Origins of BOLD and CBV fMRI Signals: Statistical Mapping and Histological Sections Compared.

    PubMed

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Mayhew, John E; Redgrave, Peter; Berwick, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of 3T blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) activation maps to histological sections enables the spatial discrimination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal changes into different vascular compartments. We use a standard gradient echo-echo planar imaging technique to measure BOLD signal changes in the somatosensory cortex in response to whisker stimulation. Corresponding changes in CBV were estimated following the infusion of a super-paramagnetic contrast agent. We imaged in a tangential imaging plane that covered the cortical surface. Images were associated with post mortem histological sections showing both the surface vasculature and cytochrome oxidase stained whisker barrel cortex. We found a significant BOLD signal change in the large draining veins which occurred in the absence of a corresponding CBV change. Results suggest that in the venous drainage system, ~3mm distant from the area of activity, there is a robust change in blood oxygen saturation with little or no volume change. CBV changes are localised over the somatosensory barrel cortex and overlying arterial supply, supporting the theory that CBV changes are greater in the arterial than in the venous vasculature. This work investigating BOLD signal and underlying hemodynamics provides more information on the vascular origins of these important neuroimaging signals. PMID:20563253

  4. The Statistical Value of Raw Fluorescence Signal in Luminex xMAP Based Multiplex Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Edmond J.; Tan, Woei; Khan, Alamgir

    2016-01-01

    Tissue samples (plasma, saliva, serum or urine) from 169 patients classified as either normal or having one of seven possible diseases are analysed across three 96-well plates for the presences of 37 analytes using cytokine inflammation multiplexed immunoassay panels. Censoring for concentration data caused problems for analysis of the low abundant analytes. Using fluorescence analysis over concentration based analysis allowed analysis of these low abundant analytes. Mixed-effects analysis on the resulting fluorescence and concentration responses reveals a combination of censoring and mapping the fluorescence responses to concentration values, through a 5PL curve, changed observed analyte concentrations. Simulation verifies this, by showing a dependence on the mean florescence response and its distribution on the observed analyte concentration levels. Differences from normality, in the fluorescence responses, can lead to differences in concentration estimates and unreliable probabilities for treatment effects. It is seen that when fluorescence responses are normally distributed, probabilities of treatment effects for fluorescence based t-tests has greater statistical power than the same probabilities from concentration based t-tests. We add evidence that the fluorescence response, unlike concentration values, doesn’t require censoring and we show with respect to differential analysis on the fluorescence responses that background correction is not required. PMID:27243383

  5. Plague Maps and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Plague in the United States Plague was first introduced ... per year in the United States: 1900-2012. Plague Worldwide Plague epidemics have occurred in Africa, Asia, ...

  6. Concept Maps in Introductory Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Concept maps are tools for organizing thoughts on the main ideas in a course. I present an example of a concept map that was created through the work of students in an introductory class and discuss major topics in statistics and relationships among them.

  7. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O.

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  8. Applications of statistics to thematic mapping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.; Melley, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two statistical problems occurring in the effort to analyze thematic maps and mapping are determining the accuracy of thematic content and comparing factors studied in thematic mapping. Statistical procedures applicable to thematic mapping involve sampling, determining accuracy, and comparing factors. A sampling procedure using an unaligned pattern within a square grid network is applicable for use with thematic maps. Sample size may be determined using the binomial distribution based upon the confidence interval to define the true mean of the population within certain limits. The confidence interval may also be used to define the upper and lower limits of the accuracy of the thematic map. - from Authors

  9. Statistical and computational challenges in physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-06-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like Huntington`s disease, cystic fibrosis, and myotonic dystrophy. Instrumental in these efforts has been the construction of so-called {open_quotes}physical maps{close_quotes} of large regions of human chromosomes. Constructing a physical map of a chromosome presents a number of interesting challenges to the computational statistician. In addition to the general ill-posedness of the problem, complications include the size of the data sets, computational complexity, and the pervasiveness of experimental error. The nature of the problem and the presence of many levels of experimental uncertainty make statistical approaches to map construction appealing. Simultaneously, however, the size and combinatorial complexity of the problem make such approaches computationally demanding. In this paper we discuss what physical maps are and describe three different kinds of physical maps, outlining issues which arise in constructing them. In addition, we describe our experience with powerful, interactive statistical computing environments. We found that the ability to create high-level specifications of proposed algorithms which could then be directly executed provided a flexible rapid prototyping facility for developing new statistical models and methods. The ability to check the implementation of an algorithm by comparing its results to that of an executable specification enabled us to rapidly debug both specification and implementation in an environment of changing needs.

  10. MAP kinase cascades: scaffolding signal specificity.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-01-22

    Scaffold proteins organize many MAP kinase pathways by interacting with several components of these cascades. Recent studies suggest that scaffold proteins provide local activation platforms that contribute to signal specificity by insulating different MAP kinase pathways. PMID:11818078

  11. Apparatus for statistical time-series analysis of electrical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, C. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for performing statistical time-series analysis of complex electrical signal waveforms, permitting prompt and accurate determination of statistical characteristics of the signal is presented.

  12. Spectral Kurtosis statistics of transient signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.

    2016-05-01

    We obtain analytical approximations for the expectation and variance of the Spectral Kurtosis estimator in the case of Gaussian and coherent transient time domain signals mixed with a quasi-stationary Gaussian background, which are suitable for practical estimations of their signal-to-noise ratio and duty-cycle relative to the instrumental integration time. We validate these analytical approximations by means of numerical simulations and demonstrate that such estimates are affected by statistical uncertainties that, for a suitable choice of the integration time, may not exceed a few per cent. Based on these analytical results, we suggest a multiscale Spectral Kurtosis spectrometer design optimized for real-time detection of transient signals, automatic discrimination based on their statistical signature, and measurement of their properties.

  13. Statistical physics approaches to understanding physiological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi

    This thesis applies novel statistical physics approaches to investigate complex mechanisms underlying some physiological signals related to human motor activity and stroke. The scale-invariant properties of motor activity fluctuations and the phase coupling between blood flow (BF) in the brain and blood pressure (BP) at the finger are studied. Both BF and BP signals are controlled by cerebral autoregulation, the impairment of which is relevant to stroke. Part I of this thesis introduces experimental methods of assessing human activity fluctuations, BF and BP signals. These signals are often nonstationary, i.e., the mean and the standard deviation of signals are not invariant under time shifts. This fact imposes challenges in correctly analyzing properties of such signals. A review of conventional methods and the methods from statistical physics in quantifying long-range power-law correlations (an important scale-invariant property) and phase coupling in nonstationary signals is provided. Part II investigates the effects of trends, nonstationarities and applying certain nonlinear filters on the scale-invariant properties of signals. Nonlinear logarithmic filters are shown to change correlation properties of anti-correlated signals and strongly positively-correlated signals. It is also shown that different types of trends may change correlation properties and thus mask true correlations in the original signal. A "superposition rule" is established to quantitatively describe the relationship among correlation properties of any two signals and the sum of these two signals. Based on this rule, simulations are conducted to show how to distinguish the correlations due to trends and nonstationaries from the true correlations in the real world signals. Part III investigates dynamics of human activity fluctuations. Results suggest that apparently random forearm motion possesses previously unrecognized dynamic patterns characterized by common distribution forms, scale

  14. Spatial Statistics of Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, I.

    2007-11-01

    Spatial statistics in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps are characterized by N-point correlation functions and their corresponding poly-spectra. I focus on basic statistical properties (noise, bias, optimality), and computational issues regarding two- and three-point functions, or angular power spectrum and bi-spectrum. Optimal estimators scale as D^3 for even the two-point statistics, where D is the number of data elements Even naive estimators scale scale D^N for N-point functions. I show that these daunting computational challenges can be met for present and future megapixel CMB maps with considerations about symmetries, multi-resolution techniques, and Monte Carlo methods and careful balancing of optimality, and resolution against computational resources. Once estimated, the interpretation of higher order correlation functions presents unique difficulties due to the large number of configurations: e.g., χ^2 fitting of parameters becomes non-trivial because of the large size of the corresponding covariance matrices. I show that False Discovery Rate based methods can be used for massive hypothesis testing, and I present techniques which help diagnosing and inverting covariance matrices obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Multivariate statistical mapping of spectroscopic imaging data.

    PubMed

    Young, Karl; Govind, Varan; Sharma, Khema; Studholme, Colin; Maudsley, Andrew A; Schuff, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    For magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging studies of the brain, it is important to measure the distribution of metabolites in a regionally unbiased way; that is, without restrictions to a priori defined regions of interest. Since magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging provides measures of multiple metabolites simultaneously at each voxel, there is furthermore great interest in utilizing the multidimensional nature of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging for gains in statistical power. Voxelwise multivariate statistical mapping is expected to address both of these issues, but it has not been previously employed for spectroscopic imaging (SI) studies of brain. The aims of this study were to (1) develop and validate multivariate voxel-based statistical mapping for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and (2) demonstrate that multivariate tests can be more powerful than univariate tests in identifying patterns of altered brain metabolism. Specifically, we compared multivariate to univariate tests in identifying known regional patterns in simulated data and regional patterns of metabolite alterations due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a devastating brain disease of the motor neurons. PMID:19953514

  16. Statistical mapping of count survey data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Link, W.A.; Sauer, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    We apply a Poisson mixed model to the problem of mapping (or predicting) bird relative abundance from counts collected from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). The model expresses the logarithm of the Poisson mean as a sum of a fixed term (which may depend on habitat variables) and a random effect which accounts for remaining unexplained variation. The random effect is assumed to be spatially correlated, thus providing a more general model than the traditional Poisson regression approach. Consequently, the model is capable of improved prediction when data are autocorrelated. Moreover, formulation of the mapping problem in terms of a statistical model facilitates a wide variety of inference problems which are cumbersome or even impossible using standard methods of mapping. For example, assessment of prediction uncertainty, including the formal comparison of predictions at different locations, or through time, using the model-based prediction variance is straightforward under the Poisson model (not so with many nominally model-free methods). Also, ecologists may generally be interested in quantifying the response of a species to particular habitat covariates or other landscape attributes. Proper accounting for the uncertainty in these estimated effects is crucially dependent on specification of a meaningful statistical model. Finally, the model may be used to aid in sampling design, by modifying the existing sampling plan in a manner which minimizes some variance-based criterion. Model fitting under this model is carried out using a simulation technique known as Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Application of the model is illustrated using Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) counts from Pennsylvania BBS routes. We produce both a model-based map depicting relative abundance, and the corresponding map of prediction uncertainty. We briefly address the issue of spatial sampling design under this model. Finally, we close with some discussion of mapping in relation to

  17. Statistics over features: EEG signals analysis.

    PubMed

    Derya Ubeyli, Elif

    2009-08-01

    This paper presented the usage of statistics over the set of the features representing the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Since classification is more accurate when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features, feature extraction and selection play an important role in classifying systems such as neural networks. Multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) architectures were formulated and used as basis for detection of electroencephalographic changes. Three types of EEG signals (EEG signals recorded from healthy volunteers with eyes open, epilepsy patients in the epileptogenic zone during a seizure-free interval, and epilepsy patients during epileptic seizures) were classified. The selected Lyapunov exponents, wavelet coefficients and the power levels of power spectral density (PSD) values obtained by eigenvector methods of the EEG signals were used as inputs of the MLPNN trained with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The classification results confirmed that the proposed MLPNN has potential in detecting the electroencephalographic changes. PMID:19555931

  18. Single photon laser altimeter simulator and statistical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Prochazka, Ivan

    2013-05-01

    Spaceborne altimeters are common instruments onboard the deep space rendezvous spacecrafts. They provide range and topographic measurements critical in spacecraft navigation. Simultaneously, the receiver part may be utilized for Earth-to-satellite link, one way time transfer, and precise optical radiometry. The main advantage of single photon counting approach is the ability of processing signals with very low signal-to-noise ratio eliminating the need of large telescopes and high power laser source. Extremely small, rugged and compact microchip lasers can be employed. The major limiting factor, on the other hand, is the acquisition time needed to gather sufficient volume of data in repetitive measurements in order to process and evaluate the data appropriately. Statistical signal processing is adopted to detect signals with average strength much lower than one photon per measurement. A comprehensive simulator design and range signal processing algorithm are presented to identify a mission specific altimeter configuration. Typical mission scenarios (celestial body surface landing and topographical mapping) are simulated and evaluated. The high interest and promising single photon altimeter applications are low-orbit (˜10 km) and low-radial velocity (several m/s) topographical mapping (asteroids, Phobos and Deimos) and landing altimetry (˜10 km) where range evaluation repetition rates of ˜100 Hz and 0.1 m precision may be achieved. Moon landing and asteroid Itokawa topographical mapping scenario simulations are discussed in more detail.

  19. Statistical signal processing in sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerriero, Marco

    approach to overcoming the difficulties in large-sensor surveillance, and we illustrate promising performance results with simulated surveillance data. The third topic of this dissertation deals with distributed target detection in SN using Scan Statistics. We introduce a sequential procedure to detect a target with distributed sensors in a two dimensional region. The detection is carried out in a mobile fusion center which successively counts the number of binary decisions reported by local sensors lying inside its moving field of view. This is a two-dimensional scan statistic an emerging tool from the statistics field that has been applied to a variety of anomaly detection problems such as of epidemics or computer intrusion, but that seems to be unfamiliar to the signal processing community. We show that an optimal size of the field of view exists. We compare the sequential two-dimensional scan statistic test and two other tests. We also present results for system level detection. In the last topic we study a Repeated Significance Test (RST) with applications to sequential detection in SN. We introduce a randomly truncated sequential hypothesis test. Using the framework of a RST, we study a sequential test with truncation time based on a random stopping time. Using the Functional Central Limit Theorem (FCLT) for a sequence of statistics, we derive a general result that can be employed in developing a repeated significance test with random sample size. We present effective methods for evaluating accurate approximations for the probability of type I error and the power function. Numerical results are presented to evaluate the accuracy of these approximations. We apply the proposed test to a decentralized sequential detection in sensor networks (SN) with communication constraints. Finally a sequential detection problem with measurements at random times is investigated.

  20. Statistical mechanics and visual signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, Marc; Bialek, William

    1994-11-01

    We show how to use the language of statistical field theory to address and solve problems in which one must estimate some aspect of the environnent from the data in an array of sensors. In the field theory formulation the optimal estimator can be written as an expectation value in an ensemble where the input data act as external field. Problems at low signal-to-noise ratio can be solved in perturbation theory, while high signal-to-noise ratios are treated with a saddle-point approximation. These ideas are illustrated in detail by an example of visual motion estimation which is chosen to model a problem solved by the fly's brain. The optimal estimator bas a rich structure, adapting to various parameters of the environnent such as the mean-square contrast and the corrélation time of contrast fluctuations. This structure is in qualitative accord with existing measurements on motion sensitive neurons in the fly's brain, and the adaptive properties of the optimal estimator may help resolve conficts among different interpretations of these data. Finally we propose some crucial direct tests of the adaptive behavior. Nous montrons comment employer le langage de la théorie statistique des champs pour poser et résoudre des problèmes où l'on doit estimer une caractéristique de l'environnement à l'aide de données provenant d'un ensemble de détecteurs. Dans ce formalisme, l'estimateur optimal peut être écrit comme la valeur moyenne d'un opérateur, l'ensemble des données d'entrée agissant comme un champ externe. Les problèmes à faible rapport signal-bruit sont résolus par la théorie des perturbations. La méthode du col est employée pour ceux à haut rapport signal-bruit. Ces idées sont illustrées en détails sur un modèle d'estimation visuelle du mouvement basé sur un problème résolu par la mouche. L'estimateur optimal a une structure très riche, s'adaptant à divers paramètres de l'environnement tels la variance du contraste et le temps de corr

  1. Statistical Diagnostics to Identify Galactic Foregrounds in B -Mode Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in the search for inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background polarization motivate the search for new diagnostics to distinguish the Galactic foreground contribution to B modes from the cosmic signal. We show that B modes from these foregrounds should exhibit a local hexadecapolar departure in power from statistical isotropy (SI). We present a simple algorithm to search for a uniform SI violation of this sort, as may arise in a sufficiently small patch of sky. We then show how to search for these effects if the orientation of the SI violation varies across the survey region, as is more likely to occur in surveys with more sky coverage. If detected, these departures from Gaussianity would indicate some level of Galactic foreground contamination in the B -mode maps. Given uncertainties about foreground properties, though, caution should be exercised in attributing a null detection to an absence of foregrounds.

  2. Maximally Informative Statistics for Localization and Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for localization and mapping for a mobile robot using monocular vision and odometry as its means of sensing. The approach uses the Variable State Dimension filtering (VSDF) framework to combine aspects of Extended Kalman filtering and nonlinear batch optimization. This paper describes two primary improvements to the VSDF. The first is to use an interpolation scheme based on Gaussian quadrature to linearize measurements rather than relying on analytic Jacobians. The second is to replace the inverse covariance matrix in the VSDF with its Cholesky factor to improve the computational complexity. Results of applying the filter to the problem of localization and mapping with omnidirectional vision are presented.

  3. A Statistical Approach for Ambiguous Sequence Mappings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When attempting to map RNA sequences to a reference genome, high percentages of short sequence reads are often assigned to multiple genomic locations. One approach to handling these “ambiguous mappings” has been to discard them. This results in a loss of data, which can sometimes be as much as 45% o...

  4. Efficient statistical mapping of avian count data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Wikle, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    We develop a spatial modeling framework for count data that is efficient to implement in high-dimensional prediction problems. We consider spectral parameterizations for the spatially varying mean of a Poisson model. The spectral parameterization of the spatial process is very computationally efficient, enabling effective estimation and prediction in large problems using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. We apply this model to creating avian relative abundance maps from North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Variation in the ability of observers to count birds is modeled as spatially independent noise, resulting in over-dispersion relative to the Poisson assumption. This approach represents an improvement over existing approaches used for spatial modeling of BBS data which are either inefficient for continental scale modeling and prediction or fail to accommodate important distributional features of count data thus leading to inaccurate accounting of prediction uncertainty.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Molecular Signal Recording

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Tyo, Keith; Boyden, Edward S.; Church, George; Kording, Konrad P.

    2013-01-01

    A molecular device that records time-varying signals would enable new approaches in neuroscience. We have recently proposed such a device, termed a “molecular ticker tape”, in which an engineered DNA polymerase (DNAP) writes time-varying signals into DNA in the form of nucleotide misincorporation patterns. Here, we define a theoretical framework quantifying the expected capabilities of molecular ticker tapes as a function of experimental parameters. We present a decoding algorithm for estimating time-dependent input signals, and DNAP kinetic parameters, directly from misincorporation rates as determined by sequencing. We explore the requirements for accurate signal decoding, particularly the constraints on (1) the polymerase biochemical parameters, and (2) the amplitude, temporal resolution, and duration of the time-varying input signals. Our results suggest that molecular recording devices with kinetic properties similar to natural polymerases could be used to perform experiments in which neural activity is compared across several experimental conditions, and that devices engineered by combining favorable biochemical properties from multiple known polymerases could potentially measure faster phenomena such as slow synchronization of neuronal oscillations. Sophisticated engineering of DNAPs is likely required to achieve molecular recording of neuronal activity with single-spike temporal resolution over experimentally relevant timescales. PMID:23874187

  6. Statistical properties of the universal limit map of grazing bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Denghui; Chen, Hebai; Xie, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the statistical properties of an interval map, having a square-root singular point which characterizes grazing bifurcations of impact oscillators, are studied. Firstly, we show that in some parameter regions the map admits an induced Markov structure with an exponential decay tail of the return times. Then we prove that the map has a unique mixing absolutely continuous invariant probability measure. Finally, by applying the Markov tower method, we prove that exponential decay of correlations and the central limit theorem hold for Hölder continuous observations.

  7. The standard map: From Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics to Tsallis statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Borges, Ernesto P.

    2016-03-01

    As well known, Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics is the correct way of thermostatistically approaching ergodic systems. On the other hand, nontrivial ergodicity breakdown and strong correlations typically drag the system into out-of-equilibrium states where Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics fails. For a wide class of such systems, it has been shown in recent years that the correct approach is to use Tsallis statistics instead. Here we show how the dynamics of the paradigmatic conservative (area-preserving) stan-dard map exhibits, in an exceptionally clear manner, the crossing from one statistics to the other. Our results unambiguously illustrate the domains of validity of both Boltzmann-Gibbs and Tsallis statistical distributions. Since various important physical systems from particle confinement in magnetic traps to autoionization of molecular Rydberg states, through particle dynamics in accelerators and comet dynamics, can be reduced to the standard map, our results are expected to enlighten and enable an improved interpretation of diverse experimental and observational results.

  8. Functional mapping of reaction norms to multiple environmental signals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiasheng; Zeng, Yanru; Huang, Jianqing; Hou, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wu, Rongling

    2007-02-01

    Whether there are different genes involved in response to different environmental signals and how these genes interact to determine the final expression of the trait are of fundamental importance in agricultural and biological research. We present a statistical framework for mapping environment-induced genes (or quantitative trait loci, QTLs) of major effects on the expression of a trait that respond to changing environments. This framework is constructed with a maximum-likelihood-based mixture model, in which the mean and covariance structure of environment-induced responses is modelled. The means for responses to continuous environmental states, referred to as reaction norms, are approximated for different QTL genotypes by mathematical equations that were derived from fundamental biological principles or based on statistical goodness-of-fit to observational data. The residual covariance between different environmental states was modelled by autoregressive processes. Such an approach to studying the genetic control of reaction norms can be expected to be advantageous over traditional mapping approaches in which no biological principles and statistical structures are considered. We demonstrate the analytical procedure and power of this approach by modelling the photosynthetic rate process as a function of temperature and light irradiance. Our approach allows for testing how a QTL affects the reaction norm of photosynthetic rate to a specific environment and whether there exist different QTLs to mediate photosynthetic responses to temperature and light irradiance, respectively. PMID:17517157

  9. SUBMILLIMETER NUMBER COUNTS FROM STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF BLAST MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Patanchon, Guillaume; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We describe the application of a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts from confusion-limited observations by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). Our method is based on a maximum likelihood fit to the pixel histogram, sometimes called 'P(D)', an approach which has been used before to probe faint counts, the difference being that here we advocate its use even for sources with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios. This method has an advantage over standard techniques of source extraction in providing an unbiased estimate of the counts from the bright end down to flux densities well below the confusion limit. We specifically analyze BLAST observations of a roughly 10 deg{sup 2} map centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South field. We provide estimates of number counts at the three BLAST wavelengths 250, 350, and 500 mum; instead of counting sources in flux bins we estimate the counts at several flux density nodes connected with power laws. We observe a generally very steep slope for the counts of about -3.7 at 250 mum, and -4.5 at 350 and 500 mum, over the range approx0.02-0.5 Jy, breaking to a shallower slope below about 0.015 Jy at all three wavelengths. We also describe how to estimate the uncertainties and correlations in this method so that the results can be used for model-fitting. This method should be well suited for analysis of data from the Herschel satellite.

  10. Statistical variations of ultrasound signals backscattered from flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2007-12-01

    The statistical distributions of ultrasonic signals backscattered from blood have recently been used to characterize hemodynamic properties, such as red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and blood coagulation. However, a thorough understanding of the relationship between blood properties and the statistical behavior of signals backscattered from flowing blood is still lacking. This prompted us to use the statistical parameter to characterize signals backscattered from both whole blood and RBC suspensions at different flow velocities (from 10 to 60 cm/s) and hematocrits (from 20% to 50%) under a steady laminar flow condition. The Nakagami parameter, scaling parameter, backscatter amplitude profile and flow velocity profile across a flow tube were acquired using a 10 MHz focused ultrasonic transducer. The backscattered signal peaked approximately at the centerline of the flow tube due to the effects of RBC aggregation, with the peak value increasing as the flow velocity of whole blood decreased. The Nakagami parameter increased from 0.45 to 0.78 as the flow velocity increased from 10 to 60 cm/s. The probability density function (PDF) of signals backscattered from flowing whole blood conformed with a pre-Rayleigh distribution. The Nakagami parameter was close to 1 for signals backscattered from RBC suspensions at all the flow velocities and hematocrits tested, for which the PDF was Rayleigh distributed. These differences in the statistical distributions of backscattered signals between whole blood and RBC suspensions suggest that variations in the size of dynamic scatterers in the flow affect the shape of the backscattered signal envelope, which should be considered in future statistical models used to characterize blood properties. PMID:17673357

  11. Statistical optimisation techniques in fatigue signal editing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopiah, Z. M.; Osman, M. H.; Baharin, N.; Abdullah, S.

    2015-02-01

    Success in fatigue signal editing is determined by the level of length reduction without compromising statistical constraints. A great reduction rate can be achieved by removing small amplitude cycles from the recorded signal. The long recorded signal sometimes renders the cycle-to-cycle editing process daunting. This has encouraged researchers to focus on the segment-based approach. This paper discusses joint application of the Running Damage Extraction (RDE) technique and single constrained Genetic Algorithm (GA) in fatigue signal editing optimisation.. In the first section, the RDE technique is used to restructure and summarise the fatigue strain. This technique combines the overlapping window and fatigue strain-life models. It is designed to identify and isolate the fatigue events that exist in the variable amplitude strain data into different segments whereby the retention of statistical parameters and the vibration energy are considered. In the second section, the fatigue data editing problem is formulated as a constrained single optimisation problem that can be solved using GA method. The GA produces the shortest edited fatigue signal by selecting appropriate segments from a pool of labelling segments. Challenges arise due to constraints on the segment selection by deviation level over three signal properties, namely cumulative fatigue damage, root mean square and kurtosis values. Experimental results over several case studies show that the idea of solving fatigue signal editing within a framework of optimisation is effective and automatic, and that the GA is robust for constrained segment selection.

  12. Statistical optimisation techniques in fatigue signal editing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Nopiah, Z. M.; Osman, M. H.; Baharin, N.; Abdullah, S.

    2015-02-03

    Success in fatigue signal editing is determined by the level of length reduction without compromising statistical constraints. A great reduction rate can be achieved by removing small amplitude cycles from the recorded signal. The long recorded signal sometimes renders the cycle-to-cycle editing process daunting. This has encouraged researchers to focus on the segment-based approach. This paper discusses joint application of the Running Damage Extraction (RDE) technique and single constrained Genetic Algorithm (GA) in fatigue signal editing optimisation.. In the first section, the RDE technique is used to restructure and summarise the fatigue strain. This technique combines the overlapping window and fatigue strain-life models. It is designed to identify and isolate the fatigue events that exist in the variable amplitude strain data into different segments whereby the retention of statistical parameters and the vibration energy are considered. In the second section, the fatigue data editing problem is formulated as a constrained single optimisation problem that can be solved using GA method. The GA produces the shortest edited fatigue signal by selecting appropriate segments from a pool of labelling segments. Challenges arise due to constraints on the segment selection by deviation level over three signal properties, namely cumulative fatigue damage, root mean square and kurtosis values. Experimental results over several case studies show that the idea of solving fatigue signal editing within a framework of optimisation is effective and automatic, and that the GA is robust for constrained segment selection.

  13. The standard map: From Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics to Tsallis statistics.

    PubMed

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Borges, Ernesto P

    2016-01-01

    As well known, Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics is the correct way of thermostatistically approaching ergodic systems. On the other hand, nontrivial ergodicity breakdown and strong correlations typically drag the system into out-of-equilibrium states where Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics fails. For a wide class of such systems, it has been shown in recent years that the correct approach is to use Tsallis statistics instead. Here we show how the dynamics of the paradigmatic conservative (area-preserving) stan-dard map exhibits, in an exceptionally clear manner, the crossing from one statistics to the other. Our results unambiguously illustrate the domains of validity of both Boltzmann-Gibbs and Tsallis statistical distributions. Since various important physical systems from particle confinement in magnetic traps to autoionization of molecular Rydberg states, through particle dynamics in accelerators and comet dynamics, can be reduced to the standard map, our results are expected to enlighten and enable an improved interpretation of diverse experimental and observational results. PMID:27004989

  14. The standard map: From Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics to Tsallis statistics

    PubMed Central

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Borges, Ernesto P.

    2016-01-01

    As well known, Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics is the correct way of thermostatistically approaching ergodic systems. On the other hand, nontrivial ergodicity breakdown and strong correlations typically drag the system into out-of-equilibrium states where Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics fails. For a wide class of such systems, it has been shown in recent years that the correct approach is to use Tsallis statistics instead. Here we show how the dynamics of the paradigmatic conservative (area-preserving) stan-dard map exhibits, in an exceptionally clear manner, the crossing from one statistics to the other. Our results unambiguously illustrate the domains of validity of both Boltzmann-Gibbs and Tsallis statistical distributions. Since various important physical systems from particle confinement in magnetic traps to autoionization of molecular Rydberg states, through particle dynamics in accelerators and comet dynamics, can be reduced to the standard map, our results are expected to enlighten and enable an improved interpretation of diverse experimental and observational results. PMID:27004989

  15. Statistical-uncertainty-based adaptive filtering of lidar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, P. L.; Friehe, C. A.; Hristov, T. S.; Cooper, D. I.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2000-02-10

    An adaptive filter signal processing technique is developed to overcome the problem of Raman lidar water-vapor mixing ratio (the ratio of the water-vapor density to the dry-air density) with a highly variable statistical uncertainty that increases with decreasing photomultiplier-tube signal strength and masks the true desired water-vapor structure. The technique, applied to horizontal scans, assumes only statistical horizontal homogeneity. The result is a variable spatial resolution water-vapor signal with a constant variance out to a range limit set by a specified signal-to-noise ratio. The technique was applied to Raman water-vapor lidar data obtained at a coastal pier site together with in situ instruments located 320 m from the lidar. The micrometerological humidity data were used to calibrate the ratio of the lidar gains of the H{sub 2}O and the N{sub 2} photomultiplier tubes and set the water-vapor mixing ratio variance for the adaptive filter. For the coastal experiment the effective limit of the lidar range was found to be approximately 200 m for a maximum noise-to-signal variance ratio of 0.1 with the implemented data-reduction procedure. The technique can be adapted to off-horizontal scans with a small reduction in the constraints and is also applicable to other remote-sensing devices that exhibit the same inherent range-dependent signal-to-noise ratio problem. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  16. Global flood hazard mapping using statistical peak flow estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, C.; Mouton, F.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim is to produce a world map of flooded areas for a 100 year return period, using a method based on large rivers peak flow estimates derived from mean monthly discharge time-series. Therefore, the map is supposed to represent flooding that affects large river floodplains, but not events triggered by specific conditions like coastal or flash flooding for instance. We first generate for each basin a set of hydromorphometric, land cover and climatic variables. In case of an available discharge record station at the basin outlet, we base the hundred year peak flow estimate on the corresponding time-series. Peak flow magnitude for basin outlets without gauging stations is estimated by statistical means, performing several regressions on the basin variables. These peak flow estimates enable the computation of corresponding flooded areas using hydrologic GIS processing on digital elevation model.

  17. Signal Processing For Chemical Sensing: Statistics or Biological Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Santiago

    2011-09-01

    Current analytical instrumentation and continuous sensing can provide huge amounts of data. Automatic signal processing and information evaluation is needed to overcome drowning in data. Today, statistical techniques are typically used to analyse and extract information from continuous signals. However, it is very interesting to note that biology (insects and vertebrates) has found alternative solutions for chemical sensing and information processing. This is a brief introduction to the developments in the European Project: Bio-ICT NEUROCHEM: Biologically Inspired Computation for Chemical Sensing (grant no. 216916) Fp7 project devoted to biomimetic olfactory systems.

  18. Optimum Receiver Structure for PPM Signals with Avalanche Photodiode Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Srinivasan, M.

    1998-01-01

    The maximum likelihood decision statistic for detection of pulse-position modulated signals with an avalanche photodiode is derived, using the more accurate Webb density rather than Poisson or Gaussian approximations for the distribution of avalanche photodiode output electrons. It is shown that for Webb-distributed output electtrons, the maximum likelihood rule is to choose the PPM word corresponding to the slot with the maximum electron count.

  19. Statistical properties of thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Dipak; Joudaki, Shahab; Smidt, Joseph; Coles, Peter; Kay, Scott T.

    2013-02-01

    On small angular scales, i.e. at high angular frequencies, beyond the damping tail of the primary power spectrum, the dominant contribution to the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations is the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. We investigate various important statistical properties of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich maps, using well-motivated models for dark matter clustering to construct statistical descriptions of the tSZ effect to all orders enabling us to determine the entire probability distribution function (PDF). Any generic deterministic biasing scheme can be incorporated in our analysis and the effects of projection, biasing and the underlying density distribution can be analysed separately and transparently in this approach. We introduce the cumulant correlators as tools to analyse tSZ catalogues and relate them to corresponding statistical descriptors of the underlying density distribution. The statistics of hot spots in frequency-cleaned tSZ maps are also developed in a self-consistent way to an arbitrary order, to obtain results complementary to those found using the halo model. We also consider different beam sizes to check the extent to which the PDF can be extracted from various observational configurations. The formalism is presented with two specific models for underlying matter clustering, the hierarchical ansatz and the lognormal distribution. We find both models to be in very good agreement with the simulation results, though the extension of the hierarchical model has an edge over the lognormal model. In addition to testing against simulations made using semi-analytical techniques, we have also used the maps made using Millennium Gas Simulations to prove that the PDF and bias can indeed be predicted with very high accuracy using these models. The presence of significant non-gravitational effects such as preheating, however, cannot be modelled using an analytical approach which is based on the modelling of

  20. Statistical properties of the gyro-averaged standard map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Julio D.; Sokolov, Igor M.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Caldas, Ibere L.

    2015-11-01

    A statistical study of the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM) is presented. The GSM is an area preserving map model proposed in as a simplified description of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on ExB chaotic transport in magnetized plasmas with zonal flows perturbed by drift waves. The GSM's effective perturbation parameter, gamma, is proportional to the zero-order Bessel function of the particle's Larmor radius. In the limit of zero Larmor radius, the GSM reduces to the standard, Chirikov-Taylor map. We consider plasmas in thermal equilibrium and assume a Larmor radius' probability density function (pdf) resulting from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Since the particles have in general different Larmor radii, each orbit is computed using a different perturbation parameter, gamma. We present analytical and numerical computations of the pdf of gamma for a Maxwellian distribution. We also compute the pdf of global chaos, which gives the probability that a particle with a given Larmor radius exhibits global chaos, i.e. the probability that Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) transport barriers do not exist.

  1. Statistically robust detection of spontaneous, non-stereotypical neural signals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Merwine, David K; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2006-06-15

    Neural signals of interest are often temporally spontaneous and non-stereotypical in waveform. Detecting such signals is difficult, since one cannot use time-locking or simple template-matching techniques. We have sought a statistical method for automatically estimating the baseline in these conditions, and subsequently detecting the occurrence of neural signals. One could consider the signals as outliers in the distribution of neural activity and thus separate them from the baseline with median-based techniques. However, we found that baseline estimators that rely on the median are problematic. They introduce progressively greater estimation errors as the neural signal's duration, amplitude or frequency increases. Therefore, we tested several mode-based algorithms, taking advantage of the most probable state of the neural activity being the baseline. We found that certain mode-based algorithms perform baseline estimation well, with low susceptibility to changes in event duration, amplitude or frequency. Once the baseline is properly established, its median absolute deviation (MAD) can be determined. One can then use it to detect spontaneous signals robustly as outliers from the noise distribution. We also demonstrate how the choice of detection threshold in terms of MADs can be used to bias against false positives, without creating too many false negatives or vice versa. PMID:16430965

  2. Statistical mapping of functional olfactory connections of the rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cross, Donna J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Anzai, Yoshimi; Flexman, Jennifer A; Keogh, Bartholomew P; Kim, Yongmin; Maravilla, Kenneth R

    2004-12-01

    The olfactory pathway is a unique route into the brain. To better characterize this system in vivo, rat olfactory functional connections were mapped using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and manganese ion (Mn2+) as a transport-mediated tracer combined with newly developed statistical brain image analysis. Six rats underwent imaging on a 1.5-T MR scanner at pre-administration, and 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 h and 5.5, 7.5, 10.5, and 13.5 days post-administration of manganese chloride (MnCl2) into the right nasal cavity. Images were coregistered, pixel-intensity normalized, and stereotactically transformed to the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas, then averaged across subjects using automated image analysis software (NEUROSTAT). Images at each time point were compared to pre-administration using a one-sample t statistic on a pixel-by-pixel basis in 3-D and converted to Z statistic maps. Statistical mapping and group averaging improved signal to noise ratios and signal detection sensitivity. Significant transport of Mn2+ was observed in olfactory structures ipsilateral to site of Mn2+ administration including the bulb, lateral olfactory tract (lo) by 12 h and in the tubercle, piriform cortex, ventral pallidum, amygdala, and in smaller structures such as the anterior commissure after 24 h post-administration. MR imaging with group-wise statistical analysis clearly demonstrated bilateral transsynaptic Mn2+ transport to secondary and tertiary neurons of the olfactory system. The method permits in vivo investigations of functional neuronal connections within the brain. PMID:15589097

  3. Statistical Signal Analysis for Systems with Interferenced Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, R. M.; Mielnicka-Pate, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is introduced, based on statistical signal analysis, which overcomes the error due to input signal interference. The model analyzed is given. The input signals u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t) are assumed to be unknown. The measurable signals x sub 1 (t) and x sub 2 (t) are interferened according to the frequency response functions, H sub 12 (f) and H sub 21 (f). The goal of the analysis was to evaluate the power output due to each input, u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t), for the case where both are applied to the same time. In addition, all frequency response functions are calculated. The interferenced system is described by a set of five equations with six unknown functions. An IBM XT Personal Computer, which was interfaced with the FFT, was used to solve the set of equations. The software was tested on an electrical two-input, one-output system. The results were excellent. The research presented includes the analysis of the acoustic radiation from a rectangular plate with two force inputs and the sound pressure as an output signal.

  4. The statistics of local motion signals in naturalistic movies.

    PubMed

    Nitzany, Eyal I; Victor, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of motion from visual input plays an important role in many visual tasks, such as separation of figure from ground and navigation through space. Several kinds of local motion signals have been distinguished based on mathematical and computational considerations (e.g., motion based on spatiotemporal correlation of luminance, and motion based on spatiotemporal correlation of flicker), but little is known about the prevalence of these different kinds of signals in the real world. To address this question, we first note that different kinds of local motion signals (e.g., Fourier, non-Fourier, and glider) are characterized by second- and higher-order correlations in slanted spatiotemporal regions. The prevalence of local motion signals in natural scenes can thus be estimated by measuring the extent to which each of these correlations are present in space-time patches and whether they are coherent across spatiotemporal scales. We apply this technique to several popular movies. The results show that all three kinds of local motion signals are present in natural movies. While the balance of the different kinds of motion signals varies from segment to segment during the course of each movie, the overall pattern of prevalence of the different kinds of motion and their subtypes, and the correlations between them, is strikingly similar across movies (but is absent from white noise movies). In sum, naturalistic movies contain a diversity of local motion signals that occur with a consistent prevalence and pattern of covariation, indicating a substantial regularity of their high-order spatiotemporal image statistics. PMID:24732243

  5. Statistical Analysis of Noisy Signals Using Classification Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Sandra E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Johnson, Timothy J.; Foster, Nancy S.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Amonette, James E.

    2005-06-04

    The potential use of chemicals, biotoxins and biological pathogens are a threat to military and police forces as well as the general public. Rapid identification of these agents is made difficult due to the noisy nature of the signal that can be obtained from portable, in-field sensors. In previously published articles, we created a flowchart that illustrated a method for triaging bacterial identification by combining standard statistical techniques for discrimination and identification with mid-infrared spectroscopic data. The present work documents the process of characterizing and eliminating the sources of the noise and outlines how multidisciplinary teams are necessary to accomplish that goal.

  6. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    PubMed Central

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ2 significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor. PMID:22505266

  7. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-04-01

    A likelihood-based metric for scoring the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density is described. The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ{sup 2} significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  8. Linear System Models for Ultrasonic Imaging: Application to Signal Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Roger J.; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Linear equations for modeling echo signals from shift-variant systems forming ultrasonic B-mode, Doppler, and strain images are analyzed and extended. The approach is based on a solution to the homogeneous wave equation for random inhomogeneous media. When the system is shift-variant, the spatial sensitivity function—defined as a spatial weighting function that determines the scattering volume for a fixed point of time—has advantages over the point-spread function traditionally used to analyze ultrasound systems. Spatial sensitivity functions are necessary for determining statistical moments in the context of rigorous image quality assessment, and they are time-reversed copies of point-spread functions for shift variant systems. A criterion is proposed to assess the validity of a local shift-invariance assumption. The analysis reveals realistic situations in which in-phase signals are correlated to the corresponding quadrature signals, which has strong implications for assessing lesion detectability. Also revealed is an opportunity to enhance near- and far-field spatial resolution by matched filtering unfocused beams. The analysis connects several well-known approaches to modeling ultrasonic echo signals. PMID:12839176

  9. FASTLens (FAst STatistics for weak Lensing): Fast Method for Weak Lensing Statistics and Map Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Amara, A.; Teyssier, R.; Refregier, A.; Fadili, J.

    2010-10-01

    The analysis of weak lensing data requires to account for missing data such as masking out of bright stars. To date, the majority of lensing analyses uses the two point-statistics of the cosmic shear field. These can either be studied directly using the two-point correlation function, or in Fourier space, using the power spectrum. The two-point correlation function is unbiased by missing data but its direct calculation will soon become a burden with the exponential growth of astronomical data sets. The power spectrum is fast to estimate but a mask correction should be estimated. Other statistics can be used but these are strongly sensitive to missing data. The solution that is proposed by FASTLens is to properly fill-in the gaps with only NlogN operations, leading to a complete weak lensing mass map from which one can compute straight forwardly and with a very good accuracy any kind of statistics like power spectrum or bispectrum.

  10. FAst STatistics for weak Lensing (FASTLens): fast method for weak lensing statistics and map making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Amara, A.; Teyssier, R.; Réfrégier, A.; Fadili, J.

    2009-05-01

    With increasingly large data sets, weak lensing measurements are able to measure cosmological parameters with ever-greater precision. However, this increased accuracy also places greater demands on the statistical tools used to extract the available information. To date, the majority of lensing analyses use the two-point statistics of the cosmic shear field. These can be either studied directly using the two-point correlation function or in Fourier space, using the power spectrum. But analysing weak lensing data inevitably involves the masking out of regions, for example to remove bright stars from the field. Masking out the stars is common practice but the gaps in the data need proper handling. In this paper, we show how an inpainting technique allows us to properly fill in these gaps with only NlogN operations, leading to a new image from which we can compute straightforwardly and with a very good accuracy both the power spectrum and the bispectrum. We then propose a new method to compute the bispectrum with a polar FFT algorithm, which has the main advantage of avoiding any interpolation in the Fourier domain. Finally, we propose a new method for dark matter mass map reconstruction from shear observations, which integrates this new inpainting concept. A range of examples based on 3D N-body simulations illustrates the results.

  11. Statistical isotropy violation in WMAP CMB maps resulting from non-circular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Rotti, Aditya; Pant, Nidhi; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Statistical isotropy (SI) of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations is a key observational test to validate the cosmological principle underlying the standard model of cosmology. While a detection of SI violation would have immense cosmological ramification, it is important to recognise their possible origin in systematic effects of observations. The WMAP seven year (WMAP-7) release claimed significant deviation from SI in the bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) coefficients and . Here we present the first explicit reproduction of the measurements reported in WMAP-7, confirming that beam systematics alone can completely account for the measured SI violation. The possibility of such a systematic origin was alluded to in WMAP-7 paper itself and other authors but not as explicitly so as to account for it accurately. We simulate CMB maps using the actual WMAP non-circular beams and scanning strategy. Our estimated BipoSH spectra from these maps match the WMAP-7 results very well. It is also evident that only a very careful and adequately detailed modelling, as carried out here, can conclusively establish that the entire signal arises from non-circular beam effect. This is important since cosmic SI violation signals are expected to be subtle and dismissing a large SI violation signal as observational artefact based on simplistic plausibility arguments run the serious risk of "throwing the baby out with the bathwater".

  12. A statistical procedure for fire risk mapping in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Paolo; Biondi, Guido; Campo, Lorenzo; D'Andrea, Mirko

    2015-04-01

    The high topographic and vegetation heterogeneity makes Italy vulnerable to forest fires both in the summer and in winter. In particular, northern regions are predominantly characterized by a winter fire regime, mainly due to frequent extremely dry winds from the north, while southern and central regions and the large islands are characterized by a severe summer fire regime, because of the higher temperatures and prolonged lack of precipitation. The threat of wildfires in Italy is not confined to wooded areas as they extend to agricultural areas and urban-forest interface areas. In view of the limited availability of fire risk management resources, most of which are used in the management of national and regional air services, it is necessary to precisely identify the areas most vulnerable to fire risk. The few resources available can thus be used on a yearly basis to mitigate problems in the areas at highest risk by defining a program of forest management interventions, which is expected to make a significant contribution to the problem in a few years' time. Given the availability of fire perimeters mapped over a period spanning from 5 to 10 years, depending by the region, a statistical procedure was defined in order to assess areas at risk based on objective criteria by observing past fire events. The availability of fire perimeters combined with a detailed knowledge of topography and land cover allowed to understand which are the main features involved in forest fire occurrences and their behavior. The seasonality of the fire regime was also considered, partitioning the analysis in two macro season (November-April and May- October). In addition, the total precipitation obtained from the interpolation of 30 years-long time series from 460 raingauges and the average air temperature obtained downscaling 30 years ERA-INTERIM data series were considered. The analysis consists on the subdivision of the territory in classes based on the named information layers

  13. Evaluation of current statistical approaches for predictive geomorphological mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miska, Luoto; Jan, Hjort

    2005-04-01

    Predictive models are increasingly used in geomorphology, but systematic evaluations of novel statistical techniques are still limited. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of generalized linear models (GLM), generalized additive models (GAM), classification tree analysis (CTA), neural networks (ANN) and multiple adaptive regression splines (MARS) in predictive geomorphological modelling. Five different distribution models both for non-sorted and sorted patterned ground were constructed on the basis of four terrain parameters and four soil variables. To evaluate the models, the original data set of 9997 squares of 1 ha in size was randomly divided into model training (70%, n=6998) and model evaluation sets (30%, n=2999). In general, active sorted patterned ground is clearly defined in upper fell areas with high slope angle and till soils. Active non-sorted patterned ground is more common in valleys with higher soil moisture and fine-scale concave topography. The predictive performance of each model was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the Kappa value. The relatively high discrimination capacity of all models, AUC=0.85 0.88 and Kappa=0.49 0.56, implies that the model's predictions provide an acceptable index of sorted and non-sorted patterned ground occurrence. The best performance for model calibration data for both data sets was achieved by the CTA. However, when the predictive mapping ability was explored through the evaluation data set, the model accuracies of CTA decreased clearly compared to the other modelling techniques. For model evaluation data MARS performed marginally best. Our results show that the digital elevation model and soil data can be used to predict relatively robustly the activity of patterned ground in fine scale in a subarctic landscape. This indicates that predictive geomorphological modelling has the advantage of providing relevant and useful information on earth surface

  14. Statistical diagnostics to identify galactic foregrounds in B-mode maps.

    PubMed

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in the search for inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background polarization motivate the search for new diagnostics to distinguish the Galactic foreground contribution to B modes from the cosmic signal. We show that B modes from these foregrounds should exhibit a local hexadecapolar departure in power from statistical isotropy (SI). We present a simple algorithm to search for a uniform SI violation of this sort, as may arise in a sufficiently small patch of sky. We then show how to search for these effects if the orientation of the SI violation varies across the survey region, as is more likely to occur in surveys with more sky coverage. If detected, these departures from Gaussianity would indicate some level of Galactic foreground contamination in the B-mode maps. Given uncertainties about foreground properties, though, caution should be exercised in attributing a null detection to an absence of foregrounds. PMID:25415897

  15. TSLP signaling pathway map: a platform for analysis of TSLP-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Sharma, Jyoti; Raju, Rajesh; Palapetta, Shyam Mohan; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Huang, Tai-Chung; Yoda, Akinori; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; van Bodegom, Diederik; Weinstock, David M.; Ziegler, Steven F.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a four-helix bundle cytokine that plays a critical role in the regulation of immune responses and in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. TSLP signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of an interleukin-7 receptor α chain and a unique TSLP receptor (TSLPR) [also known as cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2)]. Cellular targets of TSLP include dendritic cells, B cells, mast cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The TSLP/TSLPR axis can activate multiple signaling transduction pathways including the JAK/STAT pathway and the PI-3 kinase pathway. Aberrant TSLP/TSLPR signaling has been associated with a variety of human diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, eosinophilic eosophagitis and, most recently, acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A centralized resource of the TSLP signaling pathway cataloging signaling events is not yet available. In this study, we present a literature-annotated resource of reactions in the TSLP signaling pathway. This pathway map is publicly available through NetPath (http://www.netpath.org/), an open access signal transduction pathway resource developed previously by our group. This map includes 236 molecules and 252 reactions that are involved in TSLP/TSLPR signaling pathway. We expect that the TSLP signaling pathway map will provide a rich resource to study the biology of this important cytokine as well as to identify novel therapeutic targets for diseases associated with dysregulated TSLP/TSLPR signaling. Database URL: http://www.netpath.org/pathways?path_id=NetPath_24 PMID:24573880

  16. TSLP signaling pathway map: a platform for analysis of TSLP-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Sharma, Jyoti; Raju, Rajesh; Palapetta, Shyam Mohan; Prasad, T S Keshava; Huang, Tai-Chung; Yoda, Akinori; Tyner, Jeffrey W; van Bodegom, Diederik; Weinstock, David M; Ziegler, Steven F; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a four-helix bundle cytokine that plays a critical role in the regulation of immune responses and in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. TSLP signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of an interleukin-7 receptor α chain and a unique TSLP receptor (TSLPR) [also known as cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2)]. Cellular targets of TSLP include dendritic cells, B cells, mast cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The TSLP/TSLPR axis can activate multiple signaling transduction pathways including the JAK/STAT pathway and the PI-3 kinase pathway. Aberrant TSLP/TSLPR signaling has been associated with a variety of human diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, eosinophilic eosophagitis and, most recently, acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A centralized resource of the TSLP signaling pathway cataloging signaling events is not yet available. In this study, we present a literature-annotated resource of reactions in the TSLP signaling pathway. This pathway map is publicly available through NetPath (http://www.netpath.org/), an open access signal transduction pathway resource developed previously by our group. This map includes 236 molecules and 252 reactions that are involved in TSLP/TSLPR signaling pathway. We expect that the TSLP signaling pathway map will provide a rich resource to study the biology of this important cytokine as well as to identify novel therapeutic targets for diseases associated with dysregulated TSLP/TSLPR signaling. Database URL: http://www.netpath.org/pathways?path_id=NetPath_24. PMID:24573880

  17. A robust vector field correction method via a mixture statistical model of PIV signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong; Yang, Hua; Yin, Zhouping

    2016-03-01

    Outlier (spurious vector) is a common problem in practical velocity field measurement using particle image velocimetry technology (PIV), and it should be validated and replaced by a reliable value. One of the most challenging problems is to correctly label the outliers under the circumstance that measurement noise exists or the flow becomes turbulent. Moreover, the outlier's cluster occurrence makes it difficult to pick out all the outliers. Most of current methods validate and correct the outliers using local statistical models in a single pass. In this work, a vector field correction (VFC) method is proposed directly from a mixture statistical model of PIV signal. Actually, this problem is formulated as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables, labeling the outliers in the original field. The solution of this MAP estimation, i.e., the outlier set and the restored flow field, is optimized iteratively using an expectation-maximization algorithm. We illustrated this VFC method on two kinds of synthetic velocity fields and two kinds of experimental data and demonstrated that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 60 %). Besides, the proposed VFC method has high accuracy and excellent compatibility for clustered outliers, compared with the state-of-the-art methods. Our VFC algorithm is computationally efficient, and corresponding Matlab code is provided for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be seamlessly extended to three-dimensional-three-component (3D3C) PIV data.

  18. LOCALIZING NATIONAL FRAGMENTATION STATISTICS WITH FOREST TYPE MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragmmentation of forest types is an indicator of biodiversity in the Montreal Process, but the available national data permit assessment of only overall forestland fragmentation, not forest type fragmentation. Here we illustrate how to localize national statistics from the 2003...

  19. Planck 2013 results. XXI. Power spectrum and high-order statistics of the Planck all-sky Compton parameter map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. This map shows an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales (ℓ < 60), the major foreground contaminant is the diffuse thermal dust emission. At small angular scales (ℓ > 500) the clustered cosmic infrared background and residual point sources are the major contaminants. These foregrounds are carefully modelled and subtracted. We thus measure the tSZ power spectrum over angular scales 0.17° ≲ θ ≲ 3.0° that were previously unexplored. The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with clear evidence of additional signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. Marginalized band-powers of the Planck tSZ power spectrum and the best-fit model are given. The non-Gaussianity of the Compton parameter map is further characterized by computing its 1D probability distribution function and its bispectrum. The measured tSZ power spectrum and high order statistics are used to place constraints on σ8.

  20. Statistical Signal Processing Methods in Scattering and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano Nunez, Maytee

    This Ph.D. dissertation project addresses two related topics in wave-based signal processing: 1) Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) analysis of scattering systems formed by pointlike scatterers in one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) spaces. 2) Compressive optical coherent imaging, based on the incorporation of sparsity priors in the reconstructions. The first topic addresses for wave scattering systems in 1D and 3D spaces the information content about scattering parameters, in particular, the targets' positions and strengths, and derived quantities, that is contained in scattering data corresponding to reflective, transmissive, and more general sensing modalities. This part of the dissertation derives the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) for the estimation of parameters of scalar wave scattering systems formed by point scatterers. The results shed light on the fundamental difference between the approximate Born approximation model for weak scatterers and the more general multiple scattering model, and facilitate the identification of regions in parameter space where multiple scattering facilitates or obstructs the estimation of parameters from scattering data, as well as of sensing configurations giving maximal or minimal information about the parameters. The derived results are illustrated with numerical examples, with particular emphasis on the imaging resolution which we quantify via a relative resolution index borrowed from a previous paper. Additionally, this work investigates fundamental limits of estimation performance for the localization of the targets and the inverse scattering problem. The second topic of the effort describes a novel compressive-sensing-based technique for optical imaging with a coherent single-detector system. This hybrid opto-micro-electromechanical, coherent single-detector imaging system applies the latest developments in the nascent field of compressive sensing to the problem of computational imaging of wavefield intensity from a small number

  1. Visual Map Development: Bidirectional Signaling, Bifunctional Guidance Molecules, and Competition

    PubMed Central

    Feldheim, David A.; O’Leary, Dennis D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Topographic maps are a two-dimensional representation of one neural structure within another and serve as the main strategy to organize sensory information. The retina’s projection via axons of retinal ganglion cells to midbrain visual centers, the optic tectum/superior colliculus, is the leading model to elucidate mechanisms of topographic map formation. Each axis of the retina is mapped independently using different mechanisms and sets of axon guidance molecules expressed in gradients to achieve the goal of representing a point in the retina onto a point within the target. An axon’s termination along the temporal-nasal mapping axis is determined by opposing gradients of EphAs and ephrin-As that act through their forward and reverse signaling, respectively, within the projecting axons, each of which inhibits interstitial branching, cooperating with a branch-promoting activity, to generate topographic specific branching along the shaft of the parent axons that overshoot their correct termination zone along the anterior-posterior axis of the target. The dorsal-ventral termination position is then determined using a gradient of ephrin-B that can act as a repellent or attractant depending on the ephrin-B concentration relative to EphB levels on the interstitial branches to guide them along the medial-lateral axis of the target to their correct termination zone, where they arborize. In both cases, axon-axon competition results in axon mapping based on relative rather than absolute levels of repellent or attractant activity. The map is subsequently refined through large-scale pruning driven in large part by patterned retinal activity. PMID:20880989

  2. A network map of Interleukin-10 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Verma, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Sharma, Kusum; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Advani, Jayshree; Gowda, Harsha; Tripathy, Srikanth Prasad; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gandotra, Sheetal; Prasad, T S Keshava; Shankar, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with important immunoregulatory functions. It is primarily secreted by antigen-presenting cells such as activated T-cells, monocytes, B-cells and macrophages. In biologically functional form, it exists as a homodimer that binds to tetrameric heterodimer IL-10 receptor and induces downstream signaling. IL-10 is associated with survival, proliferation and anti-apoptotic activities of various cancers such as Burkitt lymphoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma and non-small scell lung cancer. In addition, it plays a central role in survival and persistence of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Trypanosoma cruzi inside the host. The signaling mechanisms of IL-10 cytokine are not well explored and a well annotated pathway map has been lacking. To this end, we developed a pathway resource by manually annotating the IL-10 induced signaling molecules derived from literature. The reactions were categorized under molecular associations, activation/inhibition, catalysis, transport and gene regulation. In all, 37 molecules and 76 reactions were annotated. The IL-10 signaling pathway can be freely accessed through NetPath, a resource of signal transduction pathways previously developed by our group. PMID:26253919

  3. A statistical approach for validating eSOTER and digital soil maps in front of traditional soil maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Michael; Baritz, Rainer; Köthe, Rüdiger; Melms, Stephan; Günther, Susann

    2015-04-01

    During the European research project eSOTER, three different Digital Soil Maps (DSM) were developed for the pilot area Chemnitz 1:250,000 (FP7 eSOTER project, grant agreement nr. 211578). The core task of the project was to revise the SOTER method for the interpretation of soil and terrain data. It was one of the working hypothesis that eSOTER does not only provide terrain data with typical soil profiles, but that the new products actually perform like a conceptual soil map. The three eSOTER maps for the pilot area considerably differed in spatial representation and content of soil classes. In this study we compare the three eSOTER maps against existing reconnaissance soil maps keeping in mind that traditional soil maps have many subjective issues and intended bias regarding the overestimation and emphasize of certain features. Hence, a true validation of the proper representation of modeled soil maps is hardly possible; rather a statistical comparison between modeled and empirical approaches is possible. If eSOTER data represent conceptual soil maps, then different eSOTER, DSM and conventional maps from various sources and different regions could be harmonized towards consistent new data sets for large areas including the whole European continent. One of the eSOTER maps has been developed closely to the traditional SOTER method: terrain classification data (derived from SRTM DEM) were combined with lithology data (re-interpreted geological map); the corresponding terrain units were then extended with soil information: a very dense regional soil profile data set was used to define soil mapping units based on a statistical grouping of terrain units. The second map is a pure DSM map using continuous terrain parameters instead of terrain classification; radiospectrometric data were used to supplement parent material information from geology maps. The classification method Random Forest was used. The third approach predicts soil diagnostic properties based on

  4. Develop Advanced Nonlinear Signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1997-01-01

    During the development of the SSME, a hierarchy of advanced signal analysis techniques for mechanical signature analysis has been developed by NASA and AI Signal Research Inc. (ASRI) to improve the safety and reliability for Space Shuttle operations. These techniques can process and identify intelligent information hidden in a measured signal which is often unidentifiable using conventional signal analysis methods. Currently, due to the highly interactive processing requirements and the volume of dynamic data involved, detailed diagnostic analysis is being performed manually which requires immense man-hours with extensive human interface. To overcome this manual process, NASA implemented this program to develop an Advanced nonlinear signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System (ATMS) to provide automatic/unsupervised engine diagnostic capabilities. The ATMS will utilize a rule-based Clips expert system to supervise a hierarchy of diagnostic signature analysis techniques in the Advanced Signal Analysis Library (ASAL). ASAL will perform automatic signal processing, archiving, and anomaly detection/identification tasks in order to provide an intelligent and fully automated engine diagnostic capability. The ATMS has been successfully developed under this contract. In summary, the program objectives to design, develop, test and conduct performance evaluation for an automated engine diagnostic system have been successfully achieved. Software implementation of the entire ATMS system on MSFC's OISPS computer has been completed. The significance of the ATMS developed under this program is attributed to the fully automated coherence analysis capability for anomaly detection and identification which can greatly enhance the power and reliability of engine diagnostic evaluation. The results have demonstrated that ATMS can significantly save time and man-hours in performing engine test/flight data analysis and performance evaluation of large volumes of dynamic test data.

  5. Structure-specific statistical mapping of white matter tracts.

    PubMed

    Yushkevich, Paul A; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony J; Gee, James C

    2008-06-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  6. Structure-Specific Statistical Mapping of White Matter Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony; Gee, James C.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  7. Effects of Concept Mapping Strategy on Learning Performance in Business and Economics Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Chei-Chang

    2009-01-01

    A concept map (CM) is a hierarchically arranged, graphic representation of the relationships among concepts. Concept mapping (CMING) is the process of constructing a CM. This paper examines whether a CMING strategy can be useful in helping students to improve their learning performance in a business and economics statistics course. A single…

  8. Interfacing US Census map files with statistical graphics software: Application and use in epidemiology

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzardi, M.; Mohr, M.S.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . School of Public Health)

    1993-03-01

    In 1990, the United States Bureau of the Census released detailed geographic map files known as TIGER/Line (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing). The TIGER files, accessible through purchase or Federal repository libraries, contain 24 billion characters of data describing various geographic features including coastlines, hydrography, transportation networks, political boundaries, etc. covering the entire United States. Many of these physical features are of potential interest in epidemiological case studies. Unfortunately, the TIGER database only provides raw alphanumeric data; no utility software, graphical or otherwise, is included. Recently, the S statistical software package has been extended to include a map display function. The map function augments S's high-level approach toward statistical analysis and graphical display of data. Coupling this statistical software with the map database developed for US Census data collection will facilitate epidemiological research. We discuss the technical background necessary to utilize the TIGER database for mapping with S. Two types of S maps, segment-based and polygon-based, are discussed along with methods to construct them from TIGER data. Polygon-based maps are useful for displaying regional statistical data; e.g., disease rates or incidence at the census tract level. Segment-based maps are easier to assemble and appropriate if the data are not regionalized. Census tract data of AIDS incidence in San Francisco (CA) and lung cancer case locations relative to petrochemical refinery sites in Contra Costa County (CA) are used to illustrate the methods and potential uses of interfacing the TIGER database with S.

  9. Statistical mapping of sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain using Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Zou, Jing; Babb, James S; Johnson, Glyn; Sanes, Dan H; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been developed to image brain activity in small animals, including normal and genetically modified mice. Here, we report the use of a MEMRI-based statistical parametric mapping method to analyze sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain, the inferior colliculus (IC). Acoustic stimuli with defined frequency and amplitude components were shown to activate and enhance neuronal ensembles in the IC. These IC activity patterns were analyzed quantitatively using voxel-based statistical comparisons between groups of mice with or without sound stimulation. Repetitive 40-kHz pure tone stimulation significantly enhanced ventral IC regions, which was confirmed in the statistical maps showing active regions whose volumes increased in direct proportion to the amplitude of the sound stimuli (65 dB, 77 dB, and 89 dB peak sound pressure level). The peak values of the activity-dependent MEMRI signal enhancement also increased from 7% to 20% for the sound amplitudes employed. These results demonstrate that MEMRI statistical mapping can be used to analyze both the 3D spatial patterns and the magnitude of activity evoked by sound stimuli carrying different energy. This represents a significant advance in the development of MEMRI for quantitative and unbiased analysis of brain function in the deep brain nuclei of mice. PMID:17919926

  10. Assessing the relative effectiveness of statistical downscaling and distribution mapping in reproducing rainfall statistics based on climate model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langousis, Andreas; Mamalakis, Antonios; Deidda, Roberto; Marrocu, Marino

    2016-01-01

    To improve the level skill of climate models (CMs) in reproducing the statistics of daily rainfall at a basin level, two types of statistical approaches have been suggested. One is statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs based on historical series of precipitation. The other, usually referred to as statistical rainfall downscaling, is the use of stochastic models to conditionally simulate rainfall series, based on large-scale atmospheric forcing from CMs. While promising, the latter approach attracted reduced attention in recent years, since the developed downscaling schemes involved complex weather identification procedures, while demonstrating limited success in reproducing several statistical features of rainfall. In a recent effort, Langousis and Kaleris () developed a statistical framework for simulation of daily rainfall intensities conditional on upper-air variables, which is simpler to implement and more accurately reproduces several statistical properties of actual rainfall records. Here we study the relative performance of: (a) direct statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs using nonparametric distribution mapping, and (b) the statistical downscaling scheme of Langousis and Kaleris (), in reproducing the historical rainfall statistics, including rainfall extremes, at a regional level. This is done for an intermediate-sized catchment in Italy, i.e., the Flumendosa catchment, using rainfall and atmospheric data from four CMs of the ENSEMBLES project. The obtained results are promising, since the proposed downscaling scheme is more accurate and robust in reproducing a number of historical rainfall statistics, independent of the CM used and the characteristics of the calibration period. This is particularly the case for yearly rainfall maxima.

  11. Construction of cosmic string induced temperature anisotropy maps with CMBFAST and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simatos, N.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2001-01-01

    We use the publicly available code CMBFAST, as modified by Pogosian and Vachaspati, to simulate the effects of wiggly cosmic strings on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the modified CMBFAST code, which takes into account vector modes and models wiggly cosmic strings by the one-scale model, we go beyond the angular power spectrum to construct CMB temperature maps with a resolution of a few degrees. The statistics of these maps are then studied using conventional and recently proposed statistical tests optimized for the detection of hidden temperature discontinuities induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We show, however, that these realistic maps cannot be distinguished in a statistically significant way from purely Gaussian maps with an identical power spectrum.

  12. Inferential statistics for transient signal detection in radio astronomy phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Natalia A.; Prestage, Richard M.; Alkhweldi, Marwan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we develop two statistical rules for the purpose of detecting pulsars and transients using signals from phased array feeds installed on a radio telescope in place of a traditional horn receiver. We assume a known response of the antenna arrays and known coupling among array elements. We briefly summarize a set of pre-processing steps applied to raw array data prior to signal detection and then derive two detection statistics assuming two models for the unknown radio source astronomical signal: (1) the signal is deterministic and (2) the signal is a random process. The performance of both detectors is analyzed using both real and simulated data.

  13. Three-Dimensional Statistical Gas Distribution Mapping in an Uncontrolled Indoor Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Reggente, Matteo; Lilienthal, Achim J.

    2009-05-23

    In this paper we present a statistical method to build three-dimensional gas distribution maps (3D-DM). The proposed mapping technique uses kernel extrapolation with a tri-variate Gaussian kernel that models the likelihood that a reading represents the concentration distribution at a distant location in the three dimensions. The method is evaluated using a mobile robot equipped with three 'e-noses' mounted at different heights. Initial experiments in an uncontrolled indoor environment are presented and evaluated with respect to the ability of the 3D map, computed from the lower and upper nose, to predict the map from the middle nose.

  14. Statistical denoising of signals in the S-transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishi, Man; Jinghuai, Gao

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the denoising of stochastic noise in the S-transform (ST) and generalized S-transform (GST) domains is discussed. First, the mean power spectrum (MPS) of white noise is derived in the ST and GST domains. The results show that the MPS varies linearly with the frequency in the ST and GST domains (with a Gaussian window). Second, the local power spectrum (LPS) of red noise is studied by employing the Monte Carlo method in the two domains. The results suggest that the LPS of Gaussian red noise can be transformed into a chi-square distribution with two degrees of freedom. On the basis of the difference between the LPS distribution of signals and noise, a denoising method is presented through hypothesis testing. The effectiveness of the method is confirmed by testing synthetic seismic data and a chirp signal.

  15. Statistical and signal-processing concepts in surface metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1986-03-01

    This paper proposes the use of a simple two-scale model of surface roughness for testing and specifying the topographic figure and finish of synchrotron-radiation mirrors. In this approach the effects of figure and finish are described in terms of their slope distribution and power spectrum, respectively, which are then combined with the system point spread function to produce a composite image. The result can be used to predict mirror performance or to translate design requirements into manufacturing specifications. Pacing problems in this approach are the development of a practical long-trace slope-profiling instrument and realistic statistical models for figure and finish errors.

  16. Statistical threshold determination method through noise map generation for two dimensional amplitude and time-of-flight mapping of guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenn Chong, See; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yik Park, Chan

    2013-03-01

    Conventional threshold crossing technique generally encounters the difficulty in setting a common threshold level in the extraction of the respective time-of-flights (ToFs) and amplitudes from the guided waves obtained at many different points by spatial scanning. Therefore, we propose a statistical threshold determination method through noise map generation to automatically process numerous guided waves having different propagation distances. First, a two-dimensional (2-D) noise map is generated using one-dimensional (1-D) WT magnitudes at time zero of the acquired waves. Then, the probability density functions (PDFs) of Gamma distribution, Weibull distribution and exponential distribution are used to model the measured 2-D noise map. Graphical goodness-of-fit measurements are used to find the best fit among the three theoretical distributions. Then, the threshold level is automatically determined by selecting the desired confidence level of the noise rejection in the cumulative distribution function of the best fit PDF. Based on this threshold level, the amplitudes and ToFs are extracted and mapped into a 2-D matrix array form. The threshold level determined by the noise statistics may cross the noise signal after time zero. These crossings are represented as salt-and-pepper noise in the ToF and amplitude maps but finally removed by the 1-D median filter. This proposed method was verified in a thick stainless steel hollow cylinder where guided waves were acquired in an area of 180 mm×126 mm of the cylinder by using a laser ultrasonic scanning system and an ultrasonic sensor. The Gamma distribution was estimated as the best fit to the verification experimental data by the proposed algorithm. The statistical parameters of the Gamma distribution were used to determine the threshold level appropriate for most of the guided waves. The ToFs and amplitudes of the first arrival mode were mapped into a 2-D matrix array form. Each map included 447 noisy points out of 90

  17. Statistical measures of Planck scale signal correlations in interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.; Kwon, Ohkyung

    2015-06-22

    A model-independent statistical framework is presented to interpret data from systems where the mean time derivative of positional cross correlation between world lines, a measure of spreading in a quantum geometrical wave function, is measured with a precision smaller than the Planck time. The framework provides a general way to constrain possible departures from perfect independence of classical world lines, associated with Planck scale bounds on positional information. A parametrized candidate set of possible correlation functions is shown to be consistent with the known causal structure of the classical geometry measured by an apparatus, and the holographic scaling of information suggested by gravity. Frequency-domain power spectra are derived that can be compared with interferometer data. As a result, simple projections of sensitivity for specific experimental set-ups suggests that measurements will directly yield constraints on a universal time derivative of the correlation function, and thereby confirm or rule out a class of Planck scale departures from classical geometry.

  18. Statistical properties of radio-frequency and envelope-detected signals with applications to medical ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.F.; Insana, M.F.; Brown, D.G.

    1987-05-01

    Both radio-frequency (rf) and envelope-detected signal anlayses have lead to successful tissue discrimination in medical ultrasound. The extrapolation from tissue discrimination to a description of the tissue structure requires an analysis of the statistics of complex signals. To that end, first- and second-order statistics of complex random signals are reviewed, and an example is taken from rf signal analysis of the backscattered echoes from diffuse scatterers. In this case the scattering form factor of small scatterers can be easily separated from long-range structure and corrected for the transducer characteristics, thereby yielding an instrument-independent tissue signature. The statistics of the more economical envelope- and square-law-detected signals are derived next and found to be almost identical when normalized autocorrelation functions are used. Of the two nonlinear methods of detection, the square-law or intensity scheme gives rise to statistics that are more transparent to physical insight. Moreover, an analysis of the intensity-correlation structure indicates that the contributions to the total echo signal from the diffuse scatter and from the steady and variable components of coherent scatter can still be separated and used for tissue characterization. However, this anlaysis is not system independent. Finally, the statistical methods of this paper may be applied directly to envelope signals in nuclear-magnetic-resonance imaging because of the approximate equivalence of second-order statistics for magnitude and intensity.

  19. Interfacing US Census map files with statistical graphics software: Application and use in epidemiology. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzardi, M.; Mohr, M.S.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. |

    1993-03-01

    In 1990, the United States Bureau of the Census released detailed geographic map files known as TIGER/Line (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing). The TIGER files, accessible through purchase or Federal repository libraries, contain 24 billion characters of data describing various geographic features including coastlines, hydrography, transportation networks, political boundaries, etc. covering the entire United States. Many of these physical features are of potential interest in epidemiological case studies. Unfortunately, the TIGER database only provides raw alphanumeric data; no utility software, graphical or otherwise, is included. Recently, the S statistical software package has been extended to include a map display function. The map function augments S`s high-level approach toward statistical analysis and graphical display of data. Coupling this statistical software with the map database developed for US Census data collection will facilitate epidemiological research. We discuss the technical background necessary to utilize the TIGER database for mapping with S. Two types of S maps, segment-based and polygon-based, are discussed along with methods to construct them from TIGER data. Polygon-based maps are useful for displaying regional statistical data; e.g., disease rates or incidence at the census tract level. Segment-based maps are easier to assemble and appropriate if the data are not regionalized. Census tract data of AIDS incidence in San Francisco (CA) and lung cancer case locations relative to petrochemical refinery sites in Contra Costa County (CA) are used to illustrate the methods and potential uses of interfacing the TIGER database with S.

  20. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature, pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system; (2) develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amount of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. High compression ratio can be achieved to allow minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities; and (3) integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of

  1. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    The SSME has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) Develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system. (2) Develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amounts of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. A high compression ratio can be achieved to allow the minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities. (3) Integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for a quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of malfunction, and indicate

  2. Fine Mapping Causal Variants with an Approximate Bayesian Method Using Marginal Test Statistics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenan; Larrabee, Beth R; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Kennedy, Richard B; Haralambieva, Iana H; Poland, Gregory A; Schaid, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Two recently developed fine-mapping methods, CAVIAR and PAINTOR, demonstrate better performance over other fine-mapping methods. They also have the advantage of using only the marginal test statistics and the correlation among SNPs. Both methods leverage the fact that the marginal test statistics asymptotically follow a multivariate normal distribution and are likelihood based. However, their relationship with Bayesian fine mapping, such as BIMBAM, is not clear. In this study, we first show that CAVIAR and BIMBAM are actually approximately equivalent to each other. This leads to a fine-mapping method using marginal test statistics in the Bayesian framework, which we call CAVIAR Bayes factor (CAVIARBF). Another advantage of the Bayesian framework is that it can answer both association and fine-mapping questions. We also used simulations to compare CAVIARBF with other methods under different numbers of causal variants. The results showed that both CAVIARBF and BIMBAM have better performance than PAINTOR and other methods. Compared to BIMBAM, CAVIARBF has the advantage of using only marginal test statistics and takes about one-quarter to one-fifth of the running time. We applied different methods on two independent cohorts of the same phenotype. Results showed that CAVIARBF, BIMBAM, and PAINTOR selected the same top 3 SNPs; however, CAVIARBF and BIMBAM had better consistency in selecting the top 10 ranked SNPs between the two cohorts. Software is available at https://bitbucket.org/Wenan/caviarbf. PMID:25948564

  3. A statistical analysis on the correlation between LF signal disturbances and strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Molchanov, Oleg; Hayakawa, Masashi; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Schwingenschuh, Konrad

    2010-05-01

    Data of seven years observations in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky are used for further statistical study on the correlation between disturbances in subionospheric LF signal and strong earthquakes. Nighttime difference amplitude and phase of the signal 40 kHz from JJY transmitter in Japan are analysed. It is found that anomalies of LF signal are observed in 15-20 % cases for earthquakes with М=5.5-6.5. The signal behavior about the date of nine the strongest earthquakes with М≥7, which occurred in the wave path sensitivity zone during 2000-2008, is analysed in detail. Clear anomalies in amplitude and phase of the signal are observed in five cases for quiet geomagnetic conditions. In two cases earthquakes were preceded by strong geomagnetic activity which could obscure effect from earthquakes. These results confirm our previous statistical works and testify the efficiency of VLF/LF radio signal method for strong earthquakes forecast.

  4. Statistical mapping of sheet aiquile SE-20-9 (national map) making use of ERTS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrez, J. G.; Brockman, C. E.; Castro, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    New possibilities of remote sensing by means of satellites to do research on natural resources are reported. These images make it possible to carry out integrated studies of natural resources in the shortest time possible and with small investments. Various maps and a complete description of each are included. With the use of these satellites, scientists can hopefully plan development projects at the national level.

  5. Tables of square-law signal detection statistics for Hann spectra with 50 percent overlap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Stanley R.; Cullers, D. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, currently being planned by NASA, will require that an enormous amount of data be analyzed in real time by special purpose hardware. It is expected that overlapped Hann data windows will play an important role in this analysis. In order to understand the statistical implication of this approach, it has been necessary to compute detection statistics for overlapped Hann spectra. Tables of signal detection statistics are given for false alarm rates from 10(exp -14) to 10(exp -1) and signal detection probabilities from 0.50 to 0.99; the number of computed spectra ranges from 4 to 2000.

  6. Ultrasound tissue characterization: Comparison of statistical results using fundamental and harmonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fanglue; Cristea, Anca; Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging has been studied for decades to characterize biological tissue. The QUS estimates can be obtained from the envelope statistics. Previous studies are mainly based on the whole backscattered signals analysis. The present study compares the statistics of filtered fundamental and harmonic signal envelopes. Results show that the statistical estimation using second-harmonic envelops can provide tissue characterization capabilities, similarly to the one obtained with the fundamental. In addition, the parameters are also related to the non-linear property of the investigated medium.

  7. Dynamic statistical parametric mapping for analyzing the magnetoencephalographic epileptiform activity in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Hideaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Knake, Susanne; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Sudo, Akira; Asahina, Naoko; Egawa, Kiyoshi; Hatanaka, Keisaku; Kohsaka, Shinobu; Saitoh, Shinji; Grant, P Ellen; Dale, Anders M; Halgren, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Our current purpose is to evaluate the applicability of dynamic statistical parametric mapping, a novel method for localizing epileptiform activity recorded with magnetoencephalography in patients with epilepsy. We report four pediatric patients with focal epilepsies. Magnetoencephalographic data were collected with a 306-channel whole-head helmet-shaped sensor array. We calculated equivalent current dipoles and dynamic statistical parametric mapping movies of the interictal epileptiform discharges that were based in the minimum-L2 norm estimate, minimizing the square sum of the dipole element amplitudes. The dynamic statistical parametric mapping analysis of interictal epileptiform discharges can demonstrate the rapid change and propagation of interical epileptiform discharges. According to these findings, specific epileptogenic lesion-focal cortical dysplasia could be found and patients could be operated on successfully. The presurgical analysis of interictal epileptiform discharges using dynamic statistical parametric mapping seems to be promising in patients with a possible underlying focal cortical dysplasia and might help to guide the placement of invasive electrodes. PMID:15921240

  8. How Narrative Focus and a Statistical Map Shape Health Policy Support Among State Legislators.

    PubMed

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Roh, Sungjong; Dreisbach, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to advance theorizing about health policy advocacy with combinations of narrative focus and a statistical map in an attempt to increase state legislators' support for policies to address the issue of obesity by reducing food deserts. Specifically, we examine state legislators' responses to variations in narrative focus (individual vs. community) about causes and solutions for food deserts in U.S. communities, and a statistical map (presence vs. absence) depicting the prevalence of food deserts across the United States. Using a Web-based randomized experiment (N=496), we show that narrative focus and the statistical map interact to produce different patterns of cognitive response and support for policies to reduce the prevalence of food deserts. The presence of a statistical map showing the prevalence of food deserts in the United States appeared to matter only when combined with an individual narrative, offsetting the fact that the individual narrative in isolation produced fewer thoughts consistent with the story's persuasive goal and more counterarguments in opposition to environmental causes and solutions for obesity than other message conditions. The image did not have an impact when combined with a story describing a community at large. Cognitive responses fully mediated message effects on intended persuasive outcomes. We conclude by discussing the study's contributions to communication theory and practice. PMID:26086340

  9. Statistical maps of geomagnetic perturbations as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Clauer, C. R.; Engebretson, M. J.; Hansen, T. L.; Gleisner, H.; Mann, I.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-10-01

    Mappings of geomagnetic perturbations are shown for different combinations of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and dipole tilt angle (season). Average maps were derived separately for the northward, eastward, and vertical (downward) components of the geomagnetic disturbances, using spherical cap harmonics in least error fits of sorted measurements. The source data are obtained from 104 ground-based magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere at geomagnetic latitudes over 40° during the years 1998 through 2001. Contour maps of statistical fits are shown along-side scatter plots of individual measurements in corrected geomagnetic apex coordinates. The patterns are consistent with previous mappings of ionospheric electric potential. Interestingly, the vertical component of the magnetic perturbations closely resembles maps of the overhead, field-aligned currents, including the Northward IMF configuration. The maximum and minimum values from the statistical mappings are graphed to show their changes as a function of southward IMF magnitude, solar wind velocity, and seasons. It is expected that this work will lead to better advance predictions of the geomagnetic perturbations that are based on real-time IMF measurements.

  10. Why a high statistical performance cannot be equated with a high plausibility of landslide susceptibility maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Stefan; Brenning, Alexander; Bell, Rainer; Petschko, Helene; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Statistical landslide susceptibility maps express a relative estimate of where landslides are more likely to occur in the future due to a set of geo-environmental conditions. Their predictive capability is regularly deduced by interpreting threshold independent performance measures like the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). These quantitative estimates frequently serve as a decision tool to favour a certain classifier over another and/or to select a suitable combination of predictors. Literature exposes that many authors consider their final maps as a valuable instrument for spatial planners and decision makers. However, most often the susceptibility maps are selected by solely interpreting such quantitative estimates. We assume that a high statistical quality is necessary but not sufficient in order to produce plausible landslide susceptibility maps. This assumption was tested by quantitatively and qualitatively validating 16 susceptibility models for a study area (1354 km²) located in Lower Austria. The models were generated by applying two statistical and two machine learning classifiers separately for two landslide inventories and two sets of predictors. Quantitative validation was conducted by estimating the AUROC with non spatial hold-out validation and a repeated spatial cross validation technique. The spatial differentiation of the final maps was evaluated at different scales by interpreting semivariograms. Maps of the location of major variations illustrate the spatial structure of the final susceptibility maps and allowed to deduce the most influential predictors and predictor classes. According to the hold-out validation, all 16 susceptibility models performed similarly well. However, spatial cross validation revealed considerable differences between models generated by different landslide inventories. Semivariograms exposed that the predicted landslide susceptibility pattern differs substantially between maps generated by

  11. Integrating field sampling, spatial statistics and remote sensing to map wetland vegetation in the Pantanal, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arieira, J.; Karssenberg, D.; de Jong, S. M.; Addink, E. A.; Couto, E. G.; Nunes da Cunha, C.; Skøien, J. O.

    2010-09-01

    To improve the protection of wetlands, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of their structuring elements and of the identification of efficient methods to describe and monitor them. This article uses sophisticated statistical classification, interpolation and error propagation techniques, in order to describe vegetation spatial patterns, map plant community distribution and evaluate the capability of statistical approaches to produce high-quality vegetation maps. The approach results in seven vegetation communities with a known floral composition that can be mapped over large areas using remotely sensed data. The relations between remotely sensing data and vegetation patterns, captured in four factorial axes, were formalized mathematically in multiple linear regression models and used in a universal kriging procedure to reduce the uncertainty in mapped communities. Universal kriging has shown to be a valuable interpolation technique because parts of vegetation variability not explained by the images could be modeled as spatially correlated residuals, increasing prediction accuracy. Differences in spatial dependence of the vegetation gradients evidenced the multi-scale nature of vegetation communities. Cross validation procedures and Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantify the uncertainty in the resulting map. Cross-validation showed that accuracy in classification varies according with the community type, as a result of sampling density and configuration. A map of uncertainty resulted from Monte Carlo simulations displayed the spatial variation in classification accuracy, showing that the quality of classification varies spatially, even though the proportion and arrangement of communities observed in the original map is preserved to a great extent. These results suggested that mapping improvement could be achieved by increasing the number of field observations of those communities with a scattered and small patch size distribution; or by

  12. Description and comparison of geologic maps with FRAGSTATS - A spatial statistics program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    FRAGSTATS is a public-domain GIS implementation of a set of spatial statistics that address a fundamental problem in GIS applications, description and comparison of maps. The spatial statistics from the 1:2,500,000-scale United States geologic map of Nevada, the central United States, and the northeastern United States quantify the differences in complexity and variability between these three geologic terranes. Nevada is defined by a large number of patches of small size and low size variability, whereas the Central area has a small number of patches with smaller relative size variability. All three areas have similar map-unit shape complexity with Nevada having the lowest. Based on the density of edges, the areas can be ranked from highest to lowest, as Nevada, Central, and Northeast. The Shannon diversity index ranks the areas from highest to lowest, as Northeast, Nevada, and Central, but the Shannon evenness index ranks them from highest to lowest, as Northeast, Central, and Nevada. These rankings may reflect the influence of folding in the Northeast and Central areas as opposed to basin and range extension in Nevada. The core areas statistic ranks the areas for spatial accuracy from highest to lowest, as Central, Northeast, and Nevada, with Northeast and Nevada being similar. For a scale comparison, the FRAGSTATS statistics quantify the increased complexity and spatial accuracy that is inherent in going from small- to larger-scale maps. For example for 1:2,500,000-1:500,000-scale maps of Nevada, respectively, the area weighted fractal dimension increase from 1.1 to 1.18, and the total core areas index almost doubles from 39.09 to 63.38. In addition, the fractal dimensions discriminate gross lithology and tectonic terranes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Statistics of cellular signal transduction as a race to the nucleus by multiple random walkers in compartment/phosphorylation space

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ting; Shen, Tongye; Zong, Chenghang; Hasty, Jeff; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction often involves a reaction network of phosphorylation and transport events arranged with a ladder topology. If we keep track of the location of the phosphate groups describing an abstract state space, a simple model of signal transduction involving enzymes can be mapped on to a problem of how multiple biased random walkers compete to reach their target in the nucleus yielding a signal. Here, the first passage time probability and the survival probability for multiple walkers can be used to characterize the response of the network. The statistics of the first passage through the network has an asymmetric distribution with a long tail arising from the hierarchical structure of the network. This distribution implies a significant difference between the mean and the most probable signal transduction time. The response patterns for various external inputs generated by our model agree with recent experiments. In addition, the model predicts that there is an optimal phosphorylation enzyme concentration for rapid signal transduction. PMID:17071742

  14. Probing the Dark Flow Signal in WMAP 9 -Year and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A.; Ebeling, H.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kocevski, D.

    2015-09-01

    The “dark flow” dipole is a statistically significant dipole found at the position of galaxy clusters in filtered maps of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. The dipole measured in WMAP 3-, 5-, and 7- year data releases was (1) mutually consistent, (2) roughly aligned with the all-sky CMB dipole, and (3) correlated with clusters’ X-ray luminosities. We analyzed WMAP 9 -year and Planck 1st- year data releases using a catalog of 980 clusters outside of the Kp0 mask to test our earlier findings. The dipoles measured on these new data sets are fully compatible with our earlier estimates, are similar in amplitude and direction to our previous results, and are in disagreement with the results of an earlier study by the Planck Collaboration. Furthermore, in the Planck data sets dipoles are found to be independent of frequency, ruling out the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich as the source of the effect. In the data of both WMAP and Planck we find a clear correlation between the dipole measured at the cluster location in filtered maps and the average anisotropy on the original maps, further proving that the dipole is associated with clusters. The dipole signal is dominated by the most massive clusters, with a statistical significance that is better than 99%, slightly larger than in WMAP. Since both data sets differ in foreground contributions, instrumental noise, and other systematics, the agreement between the WMAP and Planck dipoles argues against them being due to systematic effects in either of the experiments.

  15. Statistical nature of non-Gaussianity from cubic order primordial perturbations: CMB map simulations and genus statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2009-12-01

    We simulate CMB maps including non-Gaussianity arising from cubic order perturbations of the primordial gravitational potential, characterized by the non-linearity parameter g{sub NL}. The maps are used to study the characteristic nature of the resulting non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. We measure the genus and investigate how it deviates from Gaussian shape as a function of g{sub NL} and smoothing scale. We find that the deviation of the non-Gaussian genus curve from the Gaussian one has an antisymmetric, sine function like shape, implying more hot and more cold spots for g{sub NL} > 0 and less of both for g{sub NL} < 0. The deviation increases linearly with g{sub NL} and also exhibits mild increase as the smoothing scale increases. We further study other statistics derived from the genus, namely, the number of hot spots, the number of cold spots, combined number of hot and cold spots and the slope of the genus curve at mean temperature fluctuation. We find that these observables carry signatures of g{sub NL} that are clearly distinct from the quadratic order perturbations, encoded in the parameter f{sub NL}. Hence they can be very useful tools for distinguishing not only between non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations and Gaussian ones but also between g{sub NL} and f{sub NL} type non-Gaussianities.

  16. Comments on the statistical analysis of excess variance in the COBE differential microwave radiometer maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Tenorio, L.; Lineweaver, C.; Bennett, C. L.; Lubin, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic anisotrophy produces an excess variance sq sigma(sub sky) in the Delta maps produced by the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) on cosmic background explorer (COBE) that is over and above the instrument noise. After smoothing to an effective resolution of 10 deg, this excess sigma(sub sky)(10 deg), provides an estimate for the amplitude of the primordial density perturbation power spectrum with a cosmic uncertainty of only 12%. We employ detailed Monte Carlo techniques to express the amplitude derived from this statistic in terms of the universal root mean square (rms) quadrupole amplitude, (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5). The effects of monopole and dipole subtraction and the non-Gaussian shape of the DMR beam cause the derived (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5) to be 5%-10% larger than would be derived using simplified analytic approximations. We also investigate the properties of two other map statistics: the actual quadrupole and the Boughn-Cottingham statistic. Both the sigma(sub sky)(10 deg) statistic and the Boughn-Cottingham statistic are consistent with the (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5) = 17 +/- 5 micro K reported by Smoot et al. (1992) and Wright et al. (1992).

  17. Statistical analysis of surrogate signals to incorporate respiratory motion variability into radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Matthias; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Marx, Mirko; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory motion and its variability lead to location uncertainties in radiation therapy (RT) of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Current approaches for motion compensation in RT are usually driven by respiratory surrogate signals, e.g., spirometry. In this contribution, we present an approach for statistical analysis, modeling and subsequent simulation of surrogate signals on a cycle-by-cycle basis. The simulated signals represent typical patient-specific variations of, e.g., breathing amplitude and cycle period. For the underlying statistical analysis, all breathing cycles of an observed signal are consistently parameterized using approximating B-spline curves. Statistics on breathing cycles are then performed by using the parameters of the B-spline approximations. Assuming that these parameters follow a multivariate Gaussian distribution, realistic time-continuous surrogate signals of arbitrary length can be generated and used to simulate the internal motion of tumors and organs based on a patient-specific diffeomorphic correspondence model. As an example, we show how this approach can be employed in RT treatment planning to calculate tumor appearance probabilities and to statistically assess the impact of respiratory motion and its variability on planned dose distributions.

  18. Current practices in spatial analysis of cancer data: mapping health statistics to inform policymakers and the public

    PubMed Central

    Bell, B Sue; Hoskins, Richard E; Pickle, Linda Williams; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Background To communicate population-based cancer statistics, cancer researchers have a long tradition of presenting data in a spatial representation, or map. Historically, health data were presented in printed atlases in which the map producer selected the content and format. The availability of geographic information systems (GIS) with comprehensive mapping and spatial analysis capability for desktop and Internet mapping has greatly expanded the number of producers and consumers of health maps, including policymakers and the public. Because health maps, particularly ones that show elevated cancer rates, historically have raised public concerns, it is essential that these maps be designed to be accurate, clear, and interpretable for the broad range of users who may view them. This article focuses on designing maps to communicate effectively. It is based on years of research into the use of health maps for communicating among public health researchers. Results The basics for designing maps that communicate effectively are similar to the basics for any mode of communication. Tasks include deciding on the purpose, knowing the audience and its characteristics, choosing a media suitable for both the purpose and the audience, and finally testing the map design to ensure that it suits the purpose with the intended audience, and communicates accurately and effectively. Special considerations for health maps include ensuring confidentiality and reflecting the uncertainty of small area statistics. Statistical maps need to be based on sound practices and principles developed by the statistical and cartographic communities. Conclusion The biggest challenge is to ensure that maps of health statistics inform without misinforming. Advances in the sciences of cartography, statistics, and visualization of spatial data are constantly expanding the toolkit available to mapmakers to meet this challenge. Asking potential users to answer questions or to talk about what they see is

  19. Displaying R spatial statistics on Google dynamic maps with web applications created by Rwui

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The R project includes a large variety of packages designed for spatial statistics. Google dynamic maps provide web based access to global maps and satellite imagery. We describe a method for displaying directly the spatial output from an R script on to a Google dynamic map. Methods This is achieved by creating a Java based web application which runs the R script and then displays the results on the dynamic map. In order to make this method easy to implement by those unfamiliar with programming Java based web applications, we have added the method to the options available in the R Web User Interface (Rwui) application. Rwui is an established web application for creating web applications for running R scripts. A feature of Rwui is that all the code for the web application being created is generated automatically so that someone with no knowledge of web programming can make a fully functional web application for running an R script in a matter of minutes. Results Rwui can now be used to create web applications that will display the results from an R script on a Google dynamic map. Results may be displayed as discrete markers and/or as continuous overlays. In addition, users of the web application may select regions of interest on the dynamic map with mouse clicks and the coordinates of the region of interest will automatically be made available for use by the R script. Conclusions This method of displaying R output on dynamic maps is designed to be of use in a number of areas. Firstly it allows statisticians, working in R and developing methods in spatial statistics, to easily visualise the results of applying their methods to real world data. Secondly, it allows researchers who are using R to study health geographics data, to display their results directly onto dynamic maps. Thirdly, by creating a web application for running an R script, a statistician can enable users entirely unfamiliar with R to run R coded statistical analyses of health geographics

  20. Landslide susceptibility mapping using GIS-based statistical models and Remote sensing data in tropical environment

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Mazlan

    2015-01-01

    This research presents the results of the GIS-based statistical models for generation of landslide susceptibility mapping using geographic information system (GIS) and remote-sensing data for Cameron Highlands area in Malaysia. Ten factors including slope, aspect, soil, lithology, NDVI, land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from SAR data, SPOT 5 and WorldView-1 images. The relationships between the detected landslide locations and these ten related factors were identified by using GIS-based statistical models including analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) models. The landslide inventory map which has a total of 92 landslide locations was created based on numerous resources such as digital aerial photographs, AIRSAR data, WorldView-1 images, and field surveys. Then, 80% of the landslide inventory was used for training the statistical models and the remaining 20% was used for validation purpose. The validation results using the Relative landslide density index (R-index) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) demonstrated that the SMCE model (accuracy is 96%) is better in prediction than AHP (accuracy is 91%) and WLC (accuracy is 89%) models. These landslide susceptibility maps would be useful for hazard mitigation purpose and regional planning. PMID:25898919

  1. Landslide susceptibility mapping using GIS-based statistical models and Remote sensing data in tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Himan; Hashim, Mazlan

    2015-01-01

    This research presents the results of the GIS-based statistical models for generation of landslide susceptibility mapping using geographic information system (GIS) and remote-sensing data for Cameron Highlands area in Malaysia. Ten factors including slope, aspect, soil, lithology, NDVI, land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from SAR data, SPOT 5 and WorldView-1 images. The relationships between the detected landslide locations and these ten related factors were identified by using GIS-based statistical models including analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) models. The landslide inventory map which has a total of 92 landslide locations was created based on numerous resources such as digital aerial photographs, AIRSAR data, WorldView-1 images, and field surveys. Then, 80% of the landslide inventory was used for training the statistical models and the remaining 20% was used for validation purpose. The validation results using the Relative landslide density index (R-index) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) demonstrated that the SMCE model (accuracy is 96%) is better in prediction than AHP (accuracy is 91%) and WLC (accuracy is 89%) models. These landslide susceptibility maps would be useful for hazard mitigation purpose and regional planning. PMID:25898919

  2. Accuracy Evaluation of a Mobile Mapping System with Advanced Statistical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, I.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, P.; Remondino, F.; Minto, S.; Orlandini, S.; Fuller, A.

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses a methodology to evaluate the precision and the accuracy of a commercial Mobile Mapping System (MMS) with advanced statistical methods. So far, the metric potentialities of this emerging mapping technology have been studied in few papers, where generally the assumption that errors follow a normal distribution is made. In fact, this hypothesis should be carefully verified in advance, in order to test how well the Gaussian classic statistics can adapt to datasets that are usually affected by asymmetrical gross errors. The workflow adopted in this study relies on a Gaussian assessment, followed by an outlier filtering process. Finally, non-parametric statistical models are applied, in order to achieve a robust estimation of the error dispersion. Among the different MMSs available on the market, the latest solution provided by RIEGL is here tested, i.e. the VMX-450 Mobile Laser Scanning System. The test-area is the historic city centre of Trento (Italy), selected in order to assess the system performance in dealing with a challenging and historic urban scenario. Reference measures are derived from photogrammetric and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys. All datasets show a large lack of symmetry that leads to the conclusion that the standard normal parameters are not adequate to assess this type of data. The use of non-normal statistics gives thus a more appropriate description of the data and yields results that meet the quoted a-priori errors.

  3. System Science Tool for the Statistical Mapping of the Solar Wind - Magnetosheath - Magnetospheric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Osmane, A.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetosheath (MS) acts as a natural interface between the solar wind (SW) and magnetospheric (MSP) plasma and is therefore a key element in studying the driving of plasma properties in the inner MSP. However, understanding the behaviour of MS plasma properties due to the rapidly changing upstream conditions is no trivial matter and to date is not completely understood. Since the MS is situated between two very dynamic boundaries which respond directly to SW variations, their motion is significant to the order of several Earth radii. The combination of the spatial boundary variations and the non uniform nature of the SW not only make the compilation of statistical data problematic, but their interpretation is by no means straightforward. As a result, it is very difficult to build a complete picture of the global SW - MS - MSP system which accounts for upstream variations outside of the simulated environment. In the present study, we describe a statistical mapping methodology aimed at overcoming such difficulties. Our tool compiles statistical datasets for the MS and MSP in a normalised frame accounting for boundary motion, upstream SW variations and planetary aberration. We use THEMIS measurements for MS and MSP data whereas upstream estimates are provided by the OMNI database. Multiple datasets are compiled to produce statistical maps of the MS and MSP system and also to perform numerical analysis of the properties in each region. We use this methodology to study the presence of dawn/dusk asymmetries and their dependence on upstream conditions.

  4. Understanding the statistical persistence of dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signals.

    PubMed

    Sejdić, Ervin; Steele, Catriona M; Chau, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Swallowing accelerometry is a biomechanical approach for the assessment of difficulties during deglutition. However, the effects of various swallowing tasks and different anthropometric/demographic variables on the statistical behavior of these accelerometric signals are unknown. In particular, to understand the statistical persistence of these signals, we used detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to analyze accelerometric data collected from 408 healthy participants during dry, wet and wet chin tuck swallowing tasks. The results of DFA were then examined for potential influences of age, gender or body mass index. Several important conclusions were reached. First, the strongest persistence was observed for the wet chin tuck swallows. Second, the vibrations in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction generally have stronger temporal dependencies than those in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction. Both of these phenomena can be attributed to the dominating influence of head movements on the amplitude of vibrations in the S-I direction. Third, gender, age and body mass index of the participants did not impact the observed persistence for dry and wet chin tuck swallows, while a gender effect was identified for wet swallows. In particular, male participants experienced more Brownian-like statistical dependencies in their swallowing signals. Future developments in the field should attempt to remove signal components associated with strong statistical persistence, as they tend to be associated with non-swallowing phenomena. PMID:21035113

  5. Problems Associated with Statistical Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission Signals in a Compact Tension Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were acquired during fatigue testing of an aluminum 2024-T4 compact tension specimen using a commercially available AE system. AE signals from crack extension were identified and separated from noise spikes, signals that reflected from the specimen edges, and signals that saturated the instrumentation. A commercially available software package was used to train a statistical pattern recognition system to classify the signals. The software trained a network to recognize signals with a 91-percent accuracy when compared with the researcher's interpretation of the data. Reasons for the discrepancies are examined and it is postulated that additional preprocessing of the AE data to focus on the extensional wave mode and eliminate other effects before training the pattern recognition system will result in increased accuracy.

  6. Recurrence-time statistics in non-Hamiltonian volume-preserving maps and flows.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rafael M; Beims, Marcus W; Manchein, Cesar

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the recurrence-time statistics (RTS) in three-dimensional non-Hamiltonian volume-preserving systems (VPS): an extended standard map and a fluid model. The extended map is a standard map weakly coupled to an extra dimension which contains a deterministic regular, mixed (regular and chaotic), or chaotic motion. The extra dimension strongly enhances the trapping times inducing plateaus and distinct algebraic and exponential decays in the RTS plots. The combined analysis of the RTS with the classification of ordered and chaotic regimes and scaling properties allows us to describe the intricate way trajectories penetrate the previously impenetrable regular islands from the uncoupled case. Essentially the plateaus found in the RTS are related to trajectories that stay for long times inside trapping tubes, not allowing recurrences, and then penetrate diffusively the islands (from the uncoupled case) by a diffusive motion along such tubes in the extra dimension. All asymptotic exponential decays for the RTS are related to an ordered regime (quasiregular motion), and a mixing dynamics is conjectured for the model. These results are compared to the RTS of the standard map with dissipation or noise, showing the peculiarities obtained by using three-dimensional VPS. We also analyze the RTS for a fluid model and show remarkable similarities to the RTS in the extended standard map problem. PMID:26382489

  7. Report on 3 and 4-point correlation statistics in the COBE DMR anisotrophy maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary (Principal Investigator); Gorski, Krzystof M.; Banday, Anthony J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the work performed under NASA contract # NAS5-32648, we have computed the 3-point and 4-point correlation functions of the COBE-DNIR 2-year and 4-year anisotropy maps. The motivation for this study was to search for evidence of non-Gaussian statistical fluctuations in the temperature maps: skewness or asymmetry in the case of the 3-point function, kurtosis in the case of the 4-point function. Such behavior would have very significant implications for our understanding of the processes of galaxy formation, because our current models of galaxy formation predict that non-Gaussian features should not be present in the DMR maps. The results of our work showed that the 3-point correlation function is consistent with zero and that the 4-point function is not a very sensitive probe of non-Gaussian behavior in the COBE-DMR data. Our computation and analysis of 3-point correlations in the 2-year DMR maps was published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, volume 446, page L67, 1995. Our computation and analysis of 3-point correlations in the 4-year DMR maps will be published, together with some additional tests, in the June 10, 1996 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Copies of both of these papers are attached as an appendix to this report.

  8. The Effect of Kinetic Properties on Statistical Variations of Ultrasound Signals Backscattered from Flowing Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2009-02-01

    Yet very little is known about the effect of “black hole” (BH) phenomenon on backscattering signal statistics under the laminar flow. To further explore this issue, measurements were performed from the porcine blood (with hematocrits of 20 and 50%) circulating in a mock flow loop under various steady flows at velocities ranged from 15 to 122 mm/s using a 10 MHz ultrasonic transducer. Results showed that the BH was apparent for the 50% blood flowing at a low velocity. The BH tended to be decreased with the increase of flow velocity and that it was hardly observed from the 20% blood. The probability density function of signals backscattered from blood tended to distribute as pre-Rayleigh statistics and the Nakagami parameter was less than 1. The spatial distribution of red cell aggregation in the flow tube is a predominant factor leading to statistical variations of ultrasonic backscattering in the flowing blood.

  9. Fading statistics of C-band satellite signal during solar maximum years (1978 - 1980)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, D. J.; Liu, C. H.

    1983-03-01

    From January 1978 to June 1980, scintillation experiments were conducted at the Hong Kong Earth station. INTELSAT satellite signals at 4 GHz were received via both the Pacific Ocean Region (POR) and Indian Ocean Region (IOR) satellite-Earth links. Severe intensity scintillations with peak-to-peak fluctuations up to 14 dB were observed on many evenings during the equinoctial period. This paper presents detailed statistics of the scintillating signals. The level of fluctuations based on the scintillation index is evaluated, and fading rates in terms of the coherence time are examined and correlated with the level of scintillation. Power spectrum densities are also assessed. The high-frequency asymptotes, i.e., the roll-off slopes at frequencies above the Fresnel frequency, as approximated by f(-n), are derived for different levels of fluctuations. For system applications, various cumulative statistics, including annual and worst-month statistics, diurnal variations, and sunspot cycle dependence are summarized.

  10. GIS-based statistical mapping technique for block-and-ash pyroclastic flow and surge hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiwijayanti, C.; Voight, B.; Hidayat, D.; Schilling, S.

    2008-12-01

    Assessments of pyroclastic flow (PF) hazards are commonly based on mapping of PF and surge deposits and estimations of inundation limits, and/or computer models of varying degrees of sophistication. In volcanic crises a PF hazard map may be sorely needed, but limited time, exposures, or safety aspects may preclude fieldwork, and insufficient time or baseline data may be available for reliable dynamic simulations. We have developed a statistically constrained simulation model for block-and-ash PFs to estimate potential areas of inundation by adapting methodology from Iverson et al. (1998) for lahars. The predictive equations for block-and-ash PFs are calibrated with data from many volcanoes and given by A = (0.05-0.1)V2/3, B = (35-40)V2/3 , where A is cross-sectional area of inundation, B is planimetric area and V is deposit volume. The proportionality coefficients were obtained from regression analyses and comparison of simulations to mapped deposits. The method embeds the predictive equations in a GIS program coupled with DEM topography, using the LAHARZ program of Schilling (1998). Although the method is objective and reproducible, any PF hazard zone so computed should be considered as an approximate guide only, due to uncertainties on coefficients applicable to individual PFs, DEM details, and release volumes. Gradational nested hazard maps produced by these simulations reflect in a sense these uncertainties. The model does not explicitly consider dynamic behavior, which can be important. Surge impacts must be extended beyond PF hazard zones and we have explored several approaches to do this. The method has been used to supply PF hazard maps in two crises: Merapi 2006; and Montserrat 2006- 2007. We have also compared our hazard maps to actual recent PF deposits and to maps generated by several other model techniques.

  11. Exploring discrepancies between quantitative validation results and the geomorphic plausibility of statistical landslide susceptibility maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Stefan; Brenning, Alexander; Bell, Rainer; Petschko, Helene; Glade, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Empirical models are frequently applied to produce landslide susceptibility maps for large areas. Subsequent quantitative validation results are routinely used as the primary criteria to infer the validity and applicability of the final maps or to select one of several models. This study hypothesizes that such direct deductions can be misleading. The main objective was to explore discrepancies between the predictive performance of a landslide susceptibility model and the geomorphic plausibility of subsequent landslide susceptibility maps while a particular emphasis was placed on the influence of incomplete landslide inventories on modelling and validation results. The study was conducted within the Flysch Zone of Lower Austria (1,354 km2) which is known to be highly susceptible to landslides of the slide-type movement. Sixteen susceptibility models were generated by applying two statistical classifiers (logistic regression and generalized additive model) and two machine learning techniques (random forest and support vector machine) separately for two landslide inventories of differing completeness and two predictor sets. The results were validated quantitatively by estimating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) with single holdout and spatial cross-validation technique. The heuristic evaluation of the geomorphic plausibility of the final results was supported by findings of an exploratory data analysis, an estimation of odds ratios and an evaluation of the spatial structure of the final maps. The results showed that maps generated by different inventories, classifiers and predictors appeared differently while holdout validation revealed similar high predictive performances. Spatial cross-validation proved useful to expose spatially varying inconsistencies of the modelling results while additionally providing evidence for slightly overfitted machine learning-based models. However, the highest predictive performances were obtained for

  12. Statistical wall shear stress maps of ruptured and unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Goubergrits, L.; Schaller, J.; Kertzscher, U.; van den Bruck, N.; Poethkow, K.; Petz, Ch.; Hege, H.-Ch.; Spuler, A.

    2012-01-01

    Haemodynamics and morphology play an important role in the genesis, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. The goal of this study was to generate and analyse statistical wall shear stress (WSS) distributions and shapes in middle cerebral artery (MCA) saccular aneurysms. Unsteady flow was simulated in seven ruptured and 15 unruptured MCA aneurysms. In order to compare these results, all geometries must be brought in a uniform coordinate system. For this, aneurysms with corresponding WSS data were transformed into a uniform spherical shape; then, all geometries were uniformly aligned in three-dimensional space. Subsequently, we compared statistical WSS maps and surfaces of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. No significant (p > 0.05) differences exist between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms regarding radius and mean WSS. In unruptured aneurysms, statistical WSS map relates regions with high (greater than 3 Pa) WSS to the neck region. In ruptured aneurysms, additional areas with high WSS contiguous to regions of low (less than 1 Pa) WSS are found in the dome region. In ruptured aneurysms, we found significantly lower WSS. The averaged aneurysm surface of unruptured aneurysms is round shaped, whereas the averaged surface of ruptured cases is multi-lobular. Our results confirm the hypothesis of low WSS and irregular shape as the essential rupture risk parameters. PMID:21957117

  13. Biological Parametric Mapping: A Statistical Toolbox for Multi-Modality Brain Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Ramon; Ryali, Srikanth; Baer, Aaron; Laurienti, Paul J.; Burdette, Jonathan H.; Hayasaka, Satoru; Flowers, Lynn; Wood, Frank; Maldjian, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years multiple brain MR imaging modalities have emerged; however, analysis methodologies have mainly remained modality specific. In addition, when comparing across imaging modalities, most researchers have been forced to rely on simple region-of-interest type analyses, which do not allow the voxel-by-voxel comparisons necessary to answer more sophisticated neuroscience questions. To overcome these limitations, we developed a toolbox for multimodal image analysis called biological parametric mapping (BPM), based on a voxel-wise use of the general linear model. The BPM toolbox incorporates information obtained from other modalities as regressors in a voxel-wise analysis, thereby permitting investigation of more sophisticated hypotheses. The BPM toolbox has been developed in MATLAB with a user friendly interface for performing analyses, including voxel-wise multimodal correlation, ANCOVA, and multiple regression. It has a high degree of integration with the SPM (statistical parametric mapping) software relying on it for visualization and statistical inference. Furthermore, statistical inference for a correlation field, rather than a widely-used T-field, has been implemented in the correlation analysis for more accurate results. An example with in-vivo data is presented demonstrating the potential of the BPM methodology as a tool for multimodal image analysis. PMID:17070709

  14. Signal digitizing system and method based on amplitude-to-time optical mapping

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Jason; Bennett, Corey V; Hernandez, Vince

    2015-01-13

    A signal digitizing system and method based on analog-to-time optical mapping, optically maps amplitude information of an analog signal of interest first into wavelength information using an amplitude tunable filter (ATF) to impress spectral changes induced by the amplitude of the analog signal onto a carrier signal, i.e. a train of optical pulses, and next from wavelength information to temporal information using a dispersive element so that temporal information representing the amplitude information is encoded in the time domain in the carrier signal. Optical-to-electrical conversion of the optical pulses into voltage waveforms and subsequently digitizing the voltage waveforms into a digital image enables the temporal information to be resolved and quantized in the time domain. The digital image may them be digital signal processed to digitally reconstruct the analog signal based on the temporal information with high fidelity.

  15. Mapping growth-factor-modulated Akt signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-05-15

    Growth factors alter cellular behavior through shared signaling cascades, raising the question of how specificity is achieved. Here, we have determined how growth factor actions are encoded into Akt signaling dynamics by real-time tracking of a fluorescent sensor. In individual cells, Akt activity was encoded in an analog pattern, with similar latencies (∼2 min) and half-maximal peak response times (range of 5-8 min). Yet, different growth factors promoted dose-dependent and heterogeneous changes in signaling dynamics. Insulin treatment caused sustained Akt activity, whereas EGF or PDGF-AA promoted transient signaling; PDGF-BB produced sustained responses at higher concentrations, but short-term effects at low doses, actions that were independent of the PDGF-α receptor. Transient responses to EGF were caused by negative feedback at the receptor level, as a second treatment yielded minimal responses, whereas parallel exposure to IGF-I caused full Akt activation. Small-molecule inhibitors reduced PDGF-BB signaling to transient responses, but only decreased the magnitude of IGF-I actions. Our observations reveal distinctions among growth factors that use shared components, and allow us to capture the consequences of receptor-specific regulatory mechanisms on Akt signaling. PMID:27044757

  16. Double precision errors in the logistic map: statistical study and dynamical interpretation.

    PubMed

    Oteo, J A; Ros, J

    2007-09-01

    The nature of the round-off errors that occur in the usual double precision computation of the logistic map is studied in detail. Different iterative regimes from the whole panoply of behaviors exhibited in the bifurcation diagram are examined, histograms of errors in trajectories given, and for the case of fully developed chaos an explicit formula is found. It is shown that the statistics of the largest double precision error as a function of the map parameter is characterized by jumps whose location is determined by certain boundary crossings in the bifurcation diagram. Both jumps and locations seem to present geometric convergence characterized by the two first Feigenbaum constants. Eventually, a comparison with Benford's law for the distribution of the leading digit of compilation of numbers is discussed. PMID:17930330

  17. Simulated performance of an order statistic threshold strategy for detection of narrowband signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E.; Brady, R.; Deich, W.; Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E.

    1988-01-01

    The application of order statistics to signal detection is becoming an increasingly active area of research. This is due to the inherent robustness of rank estimators in the presence of large outliers that would significantly degrade more conventional mean-level-based detection systems. A detection strategy is presented in which the threshold estimate is obtained using order statistics. The performance of this algorithm in the presence of simulated interference and broadband noise is evaluated. In this way, the robustness of the proposed strategy in the presence of the interference can be fully assessed as a function of the interference, noise, and detector parameters.

  18. Identification of Statistical Invariance for Anodic Signals of Mk-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Supathorn Phongikaroon; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2007-09-01

    A statistical invariance technique is proposed for an analysis of anodic signals from the Mk-IV electrorefiner (ER) currently used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. Voltage and applied current signals obtained from the Data Archival Software System (DASS) were used in this study. In general, the plots of these signals from different experimental runs present complex patterns to analyze—the currents were adjusted and shut-off due to limited ampere-hr or cut-off cell voltage; the voltage would increase showing a sign that uranium in the fuel elements had been depleted. Rather than directly analyzing these sets of time-series signals, a simple nonlinear function of these signal sequences and division were observed, which returned resistance series information. The primary idea deriving the methodology presented in this paper is that “anodic resistance time series should show intrinsic kinetic progress of anodic ER process.” A simple histogram-based analysis reveals notable statistical information, which may be invariant under ideal ER operating conditions. For instance, the results suggest that mostly uranium dissolution would be preferentially transferred around 0.00217 - 0.00354 ohm and other minor distribution peaks may possibly represent other transfers of fission species in the system.

  19. Signal Waveform Detection with Statistical Automaton for Internet and Web Service Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiming; Huang, Nai-Lun; Zeng, Fufu; Lin, Fang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, many approaches have been suggested for Internet and web streaming detection. In this paper, we propose an approach to signal waveform detection for Internet and web streaming, with novel statistical automatons. The system records network connections over a period of time to form a signal waveform and compute suspicious characteristics of the waveform. Network streaming according to these selected waveform features by our newly designed Aho-Corasick (AC) automatons can be classified. We developed two versions, that is, basic AC and advanced AC-histogram waveform automata, and conducted comprehensive experimentation. The results confirm that our approach is feasible and suitable for deployment. PMID:25032231

  20. Mapping paths: new approaches to dissect eukaryotic signaling circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Nebibe; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells are precisely “wired” to coordinate changes in external and intracellular signals with corresponding adjustments in the output of complex and often interconnected signaling pathways. These pathways are critical in understanding cellular growth and function, and several experimental trends are emerging with applicability toward more fully describing the composition and topology of eukaryotic signaling networks. In particular, recent studies have implemented CRISPR/Cas-based screens in mouse and human cell lines for genes involved in various cell growth and disease phenotypes. Proteomic methods using mass spectrometry have enabled quantitative and dynamic profiling of protein interactions, revealing previously undiscovered complexes and allele-specific protein interactions. Methods for the single-cell study of protein localization and gene expression have been integrated with computational analyses to provide insight into cell signaling in yeast and metazoans. In this review, we present an overview of exemplary studies using the above approaches, relevant for the analysis of cell signaling and indeed, more broadly, for many modern biological applications. PMID:27540473

  1. The Kullback-Leibler divergence as an estimator of the statistical properties of CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Assaf; Liu, Hao; Jackson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-01

    The identification of unsubtracted foreground residuals in the cosmic microwave background maps on large scales is of crucial importance for the analysis of polarization signals. These residuals add a non-Gaussian contribution to the data. We propose the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence as an effective, non-parametric test on the one-point probability distribution function of the data. With motivation in information theory, the KL divergence takes into account the entire range of the distribution and is highly non-local. We demonstrate its use by analyzing the large scales of the Planck 2013 SMICA temperature fluctuation map and find it consistent with the expected distribution at a level of 6%. Comparing the results to those obtained using the more popular Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find the two methods to be in general agreement.

  2. Mapping irrigated lands at 250-m scale by merging MODIS data and National Agricultural Statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pervez, Md Shahriar; Brown, Jesslyn F.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate geospatial information on the extent of irrigated land improves our understanding of agricultural water use, local land surface processes, conservation or depletion of water resources, and components of the hydrologic budget. We have developed a method in a geospatial modeling framework that assimilates irrigation statistics with remotely sensed parameters describing vegetation growth conditions in areas with agricultural land cover to spatially identify irrigated lands at 250-m cell size across the conterminous United States for 2002. The geospatial model result, known as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Irrigated Agriculture Dataset (MIrAD-US), identified irrigated lands with reasonable accuracy in California and semiarid Great Plains states with overall accuracies of 92% and 75% and kappa statistics of 0.75 and 0.51, respectively. A quantitative accuracy assessment of MIrAD-US for the eastern region has not yet been conducted, and qualitative assessment shows that model improvements are needed for the humid eastern regions where the distinction in annual peak NDVI between irrigated and non-irrigated crops is minimal and county sizes are relatively small. This modeling approach enables consistent mapping of irrigated lands based upon USDA irrigation statistics and should lead to better understanding of spatial trends in irrigated lands across the conterminous United States. An improved version of the model with revised datasets is planned and will employ 2007 USDA irrigation statistics.

  3. Neural networks and the separation of cosmic microwave background and astrophysical signals in sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, C.; Bedini, L.; Burigana, C.; De Zotti, G.; Farusi, A.; Maino, D.; Maris, M.; Perrotta, F.; Salerno, E.; Toffolatti, L.; Tonazzini, A.

    2000-11-01

    We implement an independent component analysis (ICA) algorithm to separate signals of different origin in sky maps at several frequencies. Owing to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on either the frequency dependence or the angular power spectrum of the various signals; rather, it learns directly from the input data how to identify the statistically independent components, on the assumption that all but, at most, one of the components have non-Gaussian distributions. We have applied the ICA algorithm to simulated patches of the sky at the four frequencies (30, 44, 70 and 100GHz) used by the Low Frequency Instrument of the European Space Agency's Planck satellite. Simulations include the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the synchrotron and thermal dust emissions, and extragalactic radio sources. The effects of the angular response functions of the detectors and of instrumental noise have been ignored in this first exploratory study. The ICA algorithm reconstructs the spatial distribution of each component with rms errors of about 1per cent for the CMB, and 10per cent for the much weaker Galactic components. Radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to ~=0.7σCMB, where σCMB is the rms level of the CMB fluctuations. The signal recovered has equal quality on all scales larger than the pixel size. In addition, we show that for the strongest components (CMB and radio sources) the frequency scaling is recovered with per cent precision. Thus, algorithms of the type presented here appear to be very promising tools for component separation. On the other hand, we have been dealing here with a highly idealized situation. Work to include instrumental noise, the effect of different resolving powers at different frequencies and a more complete and realistic characterization of astrophysical foregrounds is in progress.

  4. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  5. A topographic instructive signal guides the adjustment of the auditory space map in the optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Hyde, P S; Knudsen, E I

    2001-11-01

    Maps of auditory space in the midbrain of the barn owl (Tyto alba) are calibrated by visual experience. When owls are raised wearing prismatic spectacles that displace the visual field in azimuth, the auditory receptive fields of neurons in the optic tectum shift to compensate for the optical displacement of the visual field. This shift results primarily from a shift in the tuning of tectal neurons for interaural time difference. The visually based instructive signal that guides this plasticity could be based on a topographic, point-by-point comparison between auditory and visual space maps or on a foveation-dependent visual assessment of the accuracy of auditory orienting responses. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we subjected owls to optical conditions that differed in the center of gaze and the visual periphery. A topographic signal would cause the portions of the space map representing the central and peripheral regions of visual space to adjust differently, according to the optical conditions that exist in each region. In contrast, a foveation-based signal would cause both portions of the map to adjust similarly, according to the optical conditions that exist at the center of gaze. In six of seven experiments, adaptive changes were as predicted by a topographic instructive signal. Although the results do not rule out the possible contribution of a foveation-based signal, they demonstrate that a topographic instructive signal is, indeed, involved in the calibration of the auditory space map in the barn owl optic tectum. PMID:11606646

  6. The Simulated Lyα Forest: Converged Statistics and Reconstructed Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Casey W.

    2015-01-01

    The Lyα Forest traces density fluctuations at high redshift and at moderate overdensities, making it an excellent tool for mapping large-scale structure and constraining cosmological parameters. Although the computational machinery for simulating the Lyα Forest has existed for over a decade, we are just now approaching the scale of computing required to simultaneously capture large cosmological scales and the smallest absorption systems. We will discuss the pitfalls of low-resolution simulations and present results from a suite of large hydrodynamic simulations demonstrating converged flux statistics. We have also compared flux statistics derived from simulations using different discretizations and hydrodynamic schemes (Eulerian finite volume vs. SPH) and will discuss differences in their convergence behavior and their overall agreement. Finally, we will show how we can use the Lyα Forest to construct high-redshift tomographic maps with Megaparsec resolution. We have developed a fast Wiener Filtering code to make this problem tractable, using new techniques to reduce the computational and memory complexity. We have found that large-scale flux decrements trace protocluster environments, which we will search for in the ongoing CLAMATO survey.

  7. Mapping toll-like receptor signaling pathway genes of Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) with FISH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bosong; Zhao, Liang; Liao, Huan; Cheng, Jie; Lian, Shanshan; Li, Xuan; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system. Studies on TLR signaling pathway genes in Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) have mainly focused on sequence analysis and expression profiling, no research has been carried out on their localization. The chromosomal position of TLR signaling pathway genes can be valuable for assemblying scallop genome and analysizing gene regulatory networks. In the present study, five key TLR signaling pathway genes ( CfTLR, CfMyd88, CfTRAF6, CfNFκB, and CfIκB) containing bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) were isolated and physically mapped through fluorescence in situ hybridization on five non-homologous chromosome pairs, showing a similar distribution to another five model species. The isolation and mapping of these key immune genes of C. farreri will aid to the research on innate immunity, assignment of interested genes to chromosomes, and integration of physical, linkage and cytogenetic maps of this species.

  8. Statistical analysis on the signals monitoring multiphase flow patterns in pipeline-riser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Guo, Liejin

    2013-07-01

    The signals monitoring petroleum transmission pipeline in offshore oil industry usually contain abundant information about the multiphase flow on flow assurance which includes the avoidance of most undesirable flow pattern. Therefore, extracting reliable features form these signals to analyze is an alternative way to examine the potential risks to oil platform. This paper is focused on characterizing multiphase flow patterns in pipeline-riser system that is often appeared in offshore oil industry and finding an objective criterion to describe the transition of flow patterns. Statistical analysis on pressure signal at the riser top is proposed, instead of normal prediction method based on inlet and outlet flow conditions which could not be easily determined during most situations. Besides, machine learning method (least square supported vector machine) is also performed to classify automatically the different flow patterns. The experiment results from a small-scale loop show that the proposed method is effective for analyzing the multiphase flow pattern.

  9. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    As reported in the monthly technical progress report for July 1993, a new signal analysis technique called instantaneous frequency correlation (IFC) for time delay estimation was developed which will be incorporated into the ATMS system. In this report, a different technique for time delay estimation called phase difference time derivative estimator (FDTDE) will be discussed. The FDTDE technique does not replace the IFC method since their application conditions are different. The IFC technique can estimate the time delay between two spectral components of two measurement signals when the center frequency of the components is constant, while the FDTDE method can provide accurate time delay estimation when the frequency of the subject component changes linearly such as during engine startup or shut-down.

  10. Mapping vegetation communities using statistical data fusion in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chastain, R.A., Jr.; Struckhoff, M.A.; He, H.S.; Larsen, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    A vegetation community map was produced for the Ozark National Scenic Riverways consistent with the association level of the National Vegetation Classification System. Vegetation communities were differentiated using a large array of variables derived from remote sensing and topographic data, which were fused into independent mathematical functions using a discriminant analysis classification approach. Remote sensing data provided variables that discriminated vegetation communities based on differences in color, spectral reflectance, greenness, brightness, and texture. Topographic data facilitated differentiation of vegetation communities based on indirect gradients (e.g., landform position, slope, aspect), which relate to variations in resource and disturbance gradients. Variables derived from these data sources represent both actual and potential vegetation community patterns on the landscape. A hybrid combination of statistical and photointerpretation methods was used to obtain an overall accuracy of 63 percent for a map with 49 vegetation community and land-cover classes, and 78 percent for a 33-class map of the study area. ?? 2008 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  11. Localization and quantification of intramuscular damage using statistical parametric mapping and skeletal muscle parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre; Le Troter, Arnaud; Guye, Maxime; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we proposed an original and robust methodology which combines the spatial normalization of skeletal muscle images, the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis and the use of a specific parcellation in order to accurately localize and quantify the extent of skeletal muscle damage within the four heads of the quadriceps femoris. T2 maps of thigh muscles were characterized before, two (D2) and four (D4) days after 40 maximal isometric electrically-evoked contractions in 25 healthy young males. On the basis of SPM analysis of coregistrated T2 maps, the alterations were similarly detected at D2 and D4 in the superficial and distal regions of the vastus medialis (VM) whereas the proportion of altered muscle was higher in deep muscle regions of the vastus lateralis at D4 (deep: 35 ± 25%, superficial: 23 ± 15%) as compared to D2 (deep: 18 ± 13%, superficial: 17 ± 13%). The present methodology used for the first time on skeletal muscle would be of utmost interest to detect subtle intramuscular alterations not only for the diagnosis of muscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions and clinical treatment strategies. PMID:26689827

  12. Limitations to mapping habitat-use areas in changing landscapes using the Mahalanobis distance statistic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, Steven T.; Rotenberry, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    We tested the potential of a GIS mapping technique, using a resource selection model developed for black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) and based on the Mahalanobis distance statistic, to track changes in shrubsteppe habitats in southwestern Idaho. If successful, the technique could be used to predict animal use areas, or those undergoing change, in different regions from the same selection function and variables without additional sampling. We determined the multivariate mean vector of 7 GIS variables that described habitats used by jackrabbits. We then ranked the similarity of all cells in the GIS coverage from their Mahalanobis distance to the mean habitat vector. The resulting map accurately depicted areas where we sighted jackrabbits on verification surveys. We then simulated an increase in shrublands (which are important habitats). Contrary to expectation, the new configurations were classified as lower similarity relative to the original mean habitat vector. Because the selection function is based on a unimodal mean, any deviation, even if biologically positive, creates larger Malanobis distances and lower similarity values. We recommend the Mahalanobis distance technique for mapping animal use areas when animals are distributed optimally, the landscape is well-sampled to determine the mean habitat vector, and distributions of the habitat variables does not change.

  13. Statistical aspect of trait mapping using a dense set of markers: A partial review

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a review of statistical methods used to locate trait loci using maps of markers spanning the whole genome. Such maps are becoming readily available and can be especially useful in mapping traits that are non Mendelian. Genome-wide search for a trait locus is often called a {open_quotes}global search{close_quotes}. Global search methods include, but are not restricted to, identifying disease susceptibility genes using affected relative pairs, finding quantitative trait loci in experimental organisms and locating quantitative trait loci in humans. For human linkage, we concentrate on methods using pairs of affected relatives rather than pedigree analysis. We begin in the next section with a review of work on the use of affected pairs of relatives to identify gene loci that increase susceptibility to a particular disease. We first review Risch`s 1990 series of papers. Risch`s method can be used to search the entire genome for such susceptibility genes. Using Risch`s idea Elston explored the issue of how many pairs and markers are necessary to reach a certain probability of detecting a locus if there exists one. He proposed a more economical two stage design that uses few markers at the first stage but adds markers around the {open_quotes}promising{close_quotes} area of the genome at the second stage. However, Risch and Elston do not use multipoint linkage analysis, which takes into account all markers at once (rather than one at a time) in the calculation of the test statistic. Such multipoint methods for affected relatives have been developed by Feingold and Feingold et al. The last authors` multipoint method is based on a continuous specification of identity by descent between the affected relatives but can also be used for a set of linked markers spanning the genome. A brief description of their method and treatment of more complex issues such as combining relative pairs is included. 29 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Statistical mapping of speckle autocorrelation for visualization of hyperaemic responses to cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Joseph S; Al Nashash, Hasan; Luft, Andreas R; Le, Thinh M

    2006-07-01

    Statistically mapped speckle autocorrelation images (SAR) were used to track the hemodynamically active perfusion regions in the rat cortex during and following DC current stimulation with high transverse spatial resolution (38 um). The SAR images provided a spatio-temporal information about the net activation patterns of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) changes over a period of time as against those changes for each frame interval estimated using spatial contrasts derived from the first order spatial statistics. Thus the information about the relative maxima of perfusion during a Transient Hyperaemic Episode (THE) across different regions in the imaging window could be identified without the need for actually having to estimate the spatial contrast maps of the imaged region for each frame contained in the time window of observation. With the application of DC stimulation, the regions with a high correlation in the temporal fluctuations were representative of the areas that underwent least changes in activation. By varying the intensity of stimulation, THEs were observed for stimulation current densities in the range 0.1-3.8 mA/mm2 using both the derived speckle contrast maps and concurrently on a Laser Doppler Flow meter, with its probe positioned 1 mm from the site of stimulation. For current densities below the lower threshold of stimulation, the SAR images revealed an unprecedented reduction in the surge amplitude at sites distal to the region of stimulation. This was accompanied by an increase in pixel areas representing minimally active regions of perfusion ("perfusion islets") with no identifiable peak in the hemodynamic responses estimated from speckle contrast variations. The SAR images can be a useful tool for visualization of slow wave perfusion dynamics during cortical stimulation. PMID:16786397

  15. Photon statistics of pulse-pumped four-wave mixing in fiber with weak signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan-Nan, Liu; Yu-Hong, Liu; Jia-Min, Li; Xiao-Ying, Li

    2016-07-01

    We study the photon statistics of pulse-pumped four-wave mixing in fibers with weak coherent signal injection by measuring the intensity correlation functions of individual signal and idler fields. The experimental results show that the intensity correlation function of individual signal (idler) field decreases with the intensity of signal injection. After applying narrow band filter in signal (idler) band, the value of decreases from 1.9 ± 0.02 (1.9 ± 0.02) to 1.03 ± 0.02 (1.05 ± 0.02) when the intensity of signal injection varies from 0 to 120 photons/pulse. The results indicate that the photon statistics changes from Bose–Einstein distribution to Poisson distribution. We calculate the intensity correlation functions by using the multi-mode theory of four-wave mixing in fibers. The theoretical curves well fit the experimental results. Our investigation will be useful for mitigating the crosstalk between quantum and classical channels in a dense wavelength division multiplexing network. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11527808), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2014CB340103), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120032110055), the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant No. 14JCQNJC02300), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China, and the Program of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China (Grant No. B07014).

  16. β-arrestin drives MAP kinase signaling from clathrin-coated structures after GPCR dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, K.; Jullié, D.

    2016-01-01

    β-arrestins critically regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, not only 'arresting' the G protein signal but also modulating endocytosis and initiating a discrete G protein-independent signal via MAP kinase1–3. Despite enormous recent progress toward understanding biophysical aspects of arrestin function4,5, its cell biology remains relatively poorly understood. Two key tenets underlie the present dogma: (1) β-arrestin accumulates in clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) exclusively in physical complex with its activating GPCR, and (2) MAP kinase activation requires endocytosis of formed GPCR - β-arrestin complexes6–9. We show here, using β1-adrenergic receptors, that β-arrestin-2 (Arrestin 3) accumulates robustly in CCSs after dissociating from its activating GPCR and transduces the MAP kinase signal from CCSs. Moreover, inhibiting subsequent endocytosis of CCSs enhances the clathrin and β-arrestin -dependent MAP kinase signal. These results demonstrate β-arrestin 'activation at a distance', after dissociating from its activating GPCR, and signaling from CCSs. We propose a β-arrestin signaling cycle that is catalytically activated by the GPCR and energetically coupled to the endocytic machinery. PMID:26829388

  17. β-Arrestin drives MAP kinase signalling from clathrin-coated structures after GPCR dissociation.

    PubMed

    Eichel, K; Jullié, D; von Zastrow, M

    2016-03-01

    β-Arrestins critically regulate G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, not only 'arresting' the G protein signal but also modulating endocytosis and initiating a discrete G-protein-independent signal through MAP kinase. Despite enormous recent progress towards understanding biophysical aspects of arrestin function, arrestin cell biology remains relatively poorly understood. Two key tenets underlie the prevailing current view: β-arrestin accumulates in clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) exclusively in physical complex with its activating GPCR, and MAP kinase activation requires endocytosis of formed GPCR-β-arrestin complexes. We show here, using β1-adrenergic receptors, that β-arrestin-2 (arrestin 3) accumulates robustly in CCSs after dissociating from its activating GPCR and transduces the MAP kinase signal from CCSs. Moreover, inhibiting subsequent endocytosis of CCSs enhances the clathrin- and β-arrestin-dependent MAP kinase signal. These results demonstrate β-arrestin 'activation at a distance', after dissociating from its activating GPCR, and signalling from CCSs. We propose a β-arrestin signalling cycle that is catalytically activated by the GPCR and energetically coupled to the endocytic machinery. PMID:26829388

  18. Statistical maps of small-scale electric field variability in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, E. D. P.; Shepherd, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    Statistical maps of small-scale electric field variability in the high-latitude ionosphere are derived for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres using 48 months of data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). Maps of variability magnitude (from scales of 45-450 km and 2-20 min) are derived for a range of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations and dipole tilt angles (the angle between the best fit dipole axis and the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line). It is found that the observed spatial distribution of average variability is significantly modified as the IMF and dipole tilt conditions change. Under negative (winter-like) and neutral (equinox-like) dipole tilt angles, variability is concentrated in the auroral and dayside cusp regions, and the spatial distributions of variability appear to be correlated to those of large- and small-scale field-aligned currents (FACs). Additionally, variability on the nightside is found to be more enhanced in the downward FAC region than it is in the upward FAC region. Under positive (summer-like) dipole tilt angles, the average variability magnitudes across the high-latitude regions are smaller than those observed under negative dipole tilt angles, and the spatial distributions are more uniform. These dipole tilt effects suggest that scale-size- and conductivity-dependent field-aligned potential drops and conductivity-dependent changes in the processes that generate variability are possible factors that impact the observed small-scale electric field variability. In general, Southern Hemisphere maps appear very similar to Northern Hemisphere maps, although some minor differences are observed that may result from interhemispheric asymmetries in the geomagnetic field.

  19. Downscaling climate variability associated with quasi-periodic climate signals: A new statistical approach using MSSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón, Julio; Domínguez, Francina; Valdés, Juan B.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryA statistical method is introduced to downscale hydroclimatic variables while incorporating the variability associated with quasi-periodic global climate signals. The method extracts statistical information of distributed variables from historic time series available at high resolution and uses Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis (MSSA) to reconstruct, on a cell-by-cell basis, specific frequency signatures associated with both the variable at a coarse scale and the global climate signals. Historical information is divided in two sets: a reconstruction set to identify the dominant modes of variability of the series for each cell and a validation set to compare the downscaling relative to the observed patterns. After validation, the coarse projections from Global Climate Models (GCMs) are disaggregated to higher spatial resolutions by using an iterative gap-filling MSSA algorithm to downscale the projected values of the variable, using the distributed series statistics and the MSSA analysis. The method is data adaptive and useful for downscaling short-term forecasts as well as long-term climate projections. The method is applied to the downscaling of temperature and precipitation from observed records and GCM projections over a region located in the US Southwest, taking into account the seasonal variability associated with ENSO.

  20. Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Links to sources of cancer-related statistics, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, SEER-Medicare datasets, cancer survivor prevalence data, and the Cancer Trends Progress Report.

  1. Systematic Mapping and Statistical Analyses of Valley Landform and Vegetation Asymmetries Across Hydroclimatic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, M. J.; Pierce, J. L.; McNamara, J. P.; Flores, A. N.; Benner, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Terrain aspect alters the spatial distribution of insolation across topography, driving eco-pedo-hydro-geomorphic feedbacks that can alter landform evolution and result in valley asymmetries for a suite of land surface characteristics (e.g. slope length and steepness, vegetation, soil properties, and drainage development). Asymmetric valleys serve as natural laboratories for studying how landscapes respond to climate perturbation. In the semi-arid montane granodioritic terrain of the Idaho batholith, Northern Rocky Mountains, USA, prior works indicate that reduced insolation on northern (pole-facing) aspects prolongs snow pack persistence, and is associated with thicker, finer-grained soils, that retain more water, prolong the growing season, support coniferous forest rather than sagebrush steppe ecosystems, stabilize slopes at steeper angles, and produce sparser drainage networks. We hypothesize that the primary drivers of valley asymmetry development are changes in the pedon-scale water-balance that coalesce to alter catchment-scale runoff and drainage development, and ultimately cause the divide between north and south-facing land surfaces to migrate northward. We explore this conceptual framework by coupling land surface analyses with statistical modeling to assess relationships and the relative importance of land surface characteristics. Throughout the Idaho batholith, we systematically mapped and tabulated various statistical measures of landforms, land cover, and hydroclimate within discrete valley segments (n=~10,000). We developed a random forest based statistical model to predict valley slope asymmetry based upon numerous measures (n>300) of landscape asymmetries. Preliminary results suggest that drainages are tightly coupled with hillslopes throughout the region, with drainage-network slope being one of the strongest predictors of land-surface-averaged slope asymmetry. When slope-related statistics are excluded, due to possible autocorrelation, valley

  2. Comparison of Signals from Gravitational Wave Detectors with Instantaneous Time-Frequency Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeer, A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy relies on the use of multiple detectors, so that coincident detections may distinguish real signals from instrumental artifacts, and also so that relative timing of signals can provide the sky position of sources. We show that the comparison of instantaneous time-frequency and time-amplitude maps provided by the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used effectively for relative signal timing of common signals, to discriminate between the case of identical coincident signals and random noise coincidences and to provide a classification of signals based on their time-frequency trajectories. The comparison is done with a X(sup 2) goodness-offit method which includes contributions from both the instantaneous amplitude and frequency components of the HHT to match two signals in the time domain. This approach naturally allows the analysis of waveforms with strong frequency modulation.

  3. Spatial-Temporal Change Detection in NDVI Data Through Statistical Parametric Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. A.; Yadav, V.; Gutierrez, K.

    2011-12-01

    Detection of significant changes in vegetation patterns provides a quantitative means of defining phenological response to changing climate. These changes may be indicative of long-term trends or shorter-duration conditions. In either case, quantifying the significance of the change patterns is critical in order to better understand the underlying processes. Spatial and temporal correlation within imaged data sets complicates change detection and must be taken into account. We apply a novel approach, Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), to change detection in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data. SPM has been developed for identification of regions of anomalous activation in human brain imaging given functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Here, we adapt SPM to work on identifying anomalous regions of vegetation density within 30 years of weekly NDVI imagery. Significant change in any given image pixel is defined as a deviation from the expected value. Expected values are calculated using sinusoidal regression models fit to previous data at that location. The amount of deviation of an observation from the expected value is calculated using a modified t-test that accounts for temporal correlation in the regression data. The t-tests are applied independently to each pixel to create a t-statistic map for every time step. For a given time step, the probability that the maximum t-value exceeds a given threshold can be calculated to determine times with significant deviations, but standard techniques are not applicable due to the large number of pixels searched to find the maximum. SPM takes into account the spatial correlation of the t-statistic map to determine the significance of the maximum observed t-value. Theory developed for truncated Gaussian fields as part of SPM provides the expected number and size of regions within the t-statistic map that exceed a given threshold. The significance of the excursion regions can be assessed and then

  4. Statistical parametric mapping applied to an autoradiographic study of cerebral activation during treadmill walking in rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Peter T; Holschneider, Daniel P; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Yang, Jun; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2004-09-01

    Autoradiographs are conventionally analyzed by a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. However, definition of ROIs on an image set is labor intensive, is subject to potential inter-rater bias, and is not well suited for anatomically variable structures that may not consistently correspond to specific ROIs. Most importantly, the ROI method is poorly suited for whole-brain analysis, where one wishes to detect all activations resulting from an experimental paradigm. A system developed for analysis of imaging data in humans, Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), avoids some of these limitations but has not previously been adapted as a tool for the analysis of autoradiographs. Here, we describe the application of SPM to an autoradiographic data set mapping cerebral activation in rats during treadmill walking. We studied freely moving, non-tethered rats that received injections of the cerebral blood flow tracer [14C]-iodoantipyrine, while they were performing a treadmill task (n = 7) or during a quiescent control condition (n = 6). Results obtained with SPM were compared to those previously reported using a standard ROI-based method of analysis [J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 23(2003) 925]. The SPM method confirmed most areas detected as significant using the ROI approach. However, in the subcortex, SPM detected additional significant regions that, because of their irregular structures, fell short of statistical significance when analyzed by ROI. The SPM approach offers the ability to perform a semi-automated whole-brain analysis, and coupled with autoradiography, provides an effective means to globally localize functional activity in small animals. PMID:15325372

  5. Mapping permeability in low-resolution micro-CT images: A multiscale statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, Pieter W. S. K.; Sheppard, Adrian P.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of predicting permeability in low-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (µCT). Lower-resolution whole core images give greater sample coverage and are therefore more representative of heterogeneous systems; however, the lower resolution causes connecting pore throats to be represented by intermediate gray scale values and limits information on pore system geometry, rendering such images inadequate for direct permeability simulation. We present an imaging and computation workflow aimed at predicting absolute permeability for sample volumes that are too large to allow direct computation. The workflow involves computing permeability from high-resolution µCT images, along with a series of rock characteristics (notably open pore fraction, pore size, and formation factor) from spatially registered low-resolution images. Multiple linear regression models correlating permeability to rock characteristics provide a means of predicting and mapping permeability variations in larger scale low-resolution images. Results show excellent agreement between permeability predictions made from 16 and 64 µm/voxel images of 25 mm diameter 80 mm tall core samples of heterogeneous sandstone for which 5 µm/voxel resolution is required to compute permeability directly. The statistical model used at the lowest resolution of 64 µm/voxel (similar to typical whole core image resolutions) includes open pore fraction and formation factor as predictor characteristics. Although binarized images at this resolution do not completely capture the pore system, we infer that these characteristics implicitly contain information about the critical fluid flow pathways. Three-dimensional permeability mapping in larger-scale lower resolution images by means of statistical predictions provides input data for subsequent permeability upscaling and the computation of effective permeability at the core scale.

  6. An experimental study of the temporal statistics of radio signals scattered by rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. W.; Hull, J. A.; Rice, P. L.; Wells, P. I.

    1973-01-01

    A fixed-beam bistatic CW experiment designed to measure the temporal statistics of the volume reflectivity produced by hydrometeors at several selected altitudes, scattering angles, and at two frequencies (3.6 and 7.8 GHz) is described. Surface rain gauge data, local meteorological data, surveillance S-band radar, and great-circle path propagation measurements were also made to describe the general weather and propagation conditions and to distinguish precipitation scatter signals from those caused by ducting and other nonhydrometeor scatter mechanisms. The data analysis procedures were designed to provide an assessment of a one-year sample of data with a time resolution of one minute. The cumulative distributions of the bistatic signals for all of the rainy minutes during this period are presented for the several path geometries.

  7. Damage localization by statistical evaluation of signal-processed mode shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulriksen, M. D.; Damkilde, L.

    2015-07-01

    Due to their inherent, ability to provide structural information on a local level, mode shapes and t.lieir derivatives are utilized extensively for structural damage identification. Typically, more or less advanced mathematical methods are implemented to identify damage-induced discontinuities in the spatial mode shape signals, hereby potentially facilitating damage detection and/or localization. However, by being based on distinguishing damage-induced discontinuities from other signal irregularities, an intrinsic deficiency in these methods is the high sensitivity towards measurement, noise. The present, article introduces a damage localization method which, compared to the conventional mode shape-based methods, has greatly enhanced robustness towards measurement, noise. The method is based on signal processing of spatial mode shapes by means of continuous wavelet, transformation (CWT) and subsequent, application of a generalized discrete Teager-Kaiser energy operator (GDTKEO) to identify damage-induced mode shape discontinuities. In order to evaluate whether the identified discontinuities are in fact, damage-induced, outlier analysis of principal components of the signal-processed mode shapes is conducted on the basis of T2-statistics. The proposed method is demonstrated in the context, of analytical work with a free-vibrating Euler-Bernoulli beam under noisy conditions.

  8. The PHD motif of Map3k1 activates cytokine-dependent MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Ewen; Suddason, Tesha

    2015-01-01

    We generated a mutation in the gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Map3k1) that results in a protein with an inactive plant homeodomain (PHD). Map3k1mPHD cells are defective in cytokine-mediated MAPK signaling. Protein array identified transforming growth factor (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 binding protein 1 (Tab1) as a PHD substrate. The Map3k1 PHD transfers Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin onto Tab1 to activate MAPKs. PMID:27308457

  9. An integrated user-friendly ArcMAP tool for bivariate statistical modeling in geoscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebur, M. N.; Pradhan, B.; Shafri, H. Z. M.; Yusof, Z.; Tehrany, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Modeling and classification difficulties are fundamental issues in natural hazard assessment. A geographic information system (GIS) is a domain that requires users to use various tools to perform different types of spatial modeling. Bivariate statistical analysis (BSA) assists in hazard modeling. To perform this analysis, several calculations are required and the user has to transfer data from one format to another. Most researchers perform these calculations manually by using Microsoft Excel or other programs. This process is time consuming and carries a degree of uncertainty. The lack of proper tools to implement BSA in a GIS environment prompted this study. In this paper, a user-friendly tool, BSM (bivariate statistical modeler), for BSA technique is proposed. Three popular BSA techniques such as frequency ratio, weights-of-evidence, and evidential belief function models are applied in the newly proposed ArcMAP tool. This tool is programmed in Python and is created by a simple graphical user interface, which facilitates the improvement of model performance. The proposed tool implements BSA automatically, thus allowing numerous variables to be examined. To validate the capability and accuracy of this program, a pilot test area in Malaysia is selected and all three models are tested by using the proposed program. Area under curve is used to measure the success rate and prediction rate. Results demonstrate that the proposed program executes BSA with reasonable accuracy. The proposed BSA tool can be used in numerous applications, such as natural hazard, mineral potential, hydrological, and other engineering and environmental applications.

  10. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling. PMID:26565030

  11. Landslide Mapping and Modeling Using Remote Sensing, GIS and Statistical Analysis of District Muzaffarabad, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Nimrah; Mushtaq, Saman

    2016-07-01

    Occurrence factors of Landslide hazard can be natural such as high slopes, geological conditions and lineaments, faults, rain, and river cutting. Man-made factors such as road cuttings, deforestation or development can also contribute to the landsliding. The focus of this study was to model those landslides susceptible prone to hazard areas which in turn can help for the development, urbanization and for setting up rules or regulations to save nature and environment of the area. The focal of the current research work was the Earthquake of October, 2005 also known as Kashmir Earthquake, the epicenter location of the earthquake 34°29'35″N 73°37'44″E at height of ~2000 from mean sea level and ~20 Km North-East from Muzaffarabad city, Azad Jammu & Kashmir, at the scale of 1:50000 Geological map of 43-F/11, tehsil Nauseri area. The techniques used in this research is based on theorem of Bayes's bivariat statistic (weight of evidence) which predicts the events geographically and on input layers and the relationship of event. A relationship between event of landslide and factors was studied and analyzed using this method. Subsequently a prediction of the occurrence of the spatial location of the landslide event was established successfully. The relationship of distribution of landslide and factors layers was calculated using the statistical methods which enabled to predict the landslides zones in different areas. The methodology applied proved that the success rate was 80% landslide occurred in 18% area and prediction rate was 70% of landslides occurred in 70% of area. The use satellite remote sensing data, and GIS with the integration of statistical method are definitely an effective tool for predicting the future landslide prone areas.

  12. SeqGL Identifies Context-Dependent Binding Signals in Genome-Wide Regulatory Element Maps

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide maps of transcription factor (TF) occupancy and regions of open chromatin implicitly contain DNA sequence signals for multiple factors. We present SeqGL, a novel de novo motif discovery algorithm to identify multiple TF sequence signals from ChIP-, DNase-, and ATAC-seq profiles. SeqGL trains a discriminative model using a k-mer feature representation together with group lasso regularization to extract a collection of sequence signals that distinguish peak sequences from flanking regions. Benchmarked on over 100 ChIP-seq experiments, SeqGL outperformed traditional motif discovery tools in discriminative accuracy. Furthermore, SeqGL can be naturally used with multitask learning to identify genomic and cell-type context determinants of TF binding. SeqGL successfully scales to the large multiplicity of sequence signals in DNase- or ATAC-seq maps. In particular, SeqGL was able to identify a number of ChIP-seq validated sequence signals that were not found by traditional motif discovery algorithms. Thus compared to widely used motif discovery algorithms, SeqGL demonstrates both greater discriminative accuracy and higher sensitivity for detecting the DNA sequence signals underlying regulatory element maps. SeqGL is available at http://cbio.mskcc.org/public/Leslie/SeqGL/. PMID:26016777

  13. Statistical Analysis of Photopyroelectric Signals using Histogram and Kernel Density Estimation for differentiation of Maize Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Lima, J. E.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2016-09-01

    Considering the necessity of photothermal alternative approaches for characterizing nonhomogeneous materials like maize seeds, the objective of this research work was to analyze statistically the amplitude variations of photopyroelectric signals, by means of nonparametric techniques such as the histogram and the kernel density estimator, and the probability density function of the amplitude variations of two genotypes of maize seeds with different pigmentations and structural components: crystalline and floury. To determine if the probability density function had a known parametric form, the histogram was determined which did not present a known parametric form, so the kernel density estimator using the Gaussian kernel, with an efficiency of 95 % in density estimation, was used to obtain the probability density function. The results obtained indicated that maize seeds could be differentiated in terms of the statistical values for floury and crystalline seeds such as the mean (93.11, 159.21), variance (1.64× 103, 1.48× 103), and standard deviation (40.54, 38.47) obtained from the amplitude variations of photopyroelectric signals in the case of the histogram approach. For the case of the kernel density estimator, seeds can be differentiated in terms of kernel bandwidth or smoothing constant h of 9.85 and 6.09 for floury and crystalline seeds, respectively.

  14. Time-REferenced data Kriging (TREK): mapping hydrological statistics given their time of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcheron, Delphine; Leblois, Etienne; Sauquet, Eric

    2016-04-01

    A major issue in water sciences is to predict runoff parameters at ungauged sites. Estimates can be obtained by various methods. Among them, geostatistical approaches provide interpolation methods that consequently use explicit assumptions on the variable of interest. Geostatistical techniques have been applied to precipitation and temperature fields and later extended to estimate runoff features considered as basin-support variates along the river network (e.g. Gottschalk, 1993; Sauquet et al., 2000; Skoien et al., 2006; Gottschalk et al., 2011). To obtain robust estimations, the first step is to collect a relevant dataset. Sauquet et al. (2000) and Sauquet (2006) suggest including a large number of catchments with long and common observation periods to ensure both reliability and temporal consistency in runoff estimates. However most observation networks evolve with time. Several choices are thus possible to define an optimal reference period maximizing either spatial or temporal overlap. However, the constraints usually lead to discard a significant number of stations. Time-REferenced data Kriging method (TREK) has been developed to overcome this issue. Here is proposed a method of geostatistical estimation considering the temporal support over which a hydrological statistic has been estimated. This allows attenuating the loss of data previously caused by the application of a strict reference period. The time reference remains for the targeted map itself. The weights depend on the observation period of the data included in the dataset and how near this is to the target period. In this presentation, the concepts of TREK will be introduced and thereafter illustrated to map mean annual runoff in France. References Gottschalk, L., 1993, Correlation and covariance of runoff. Stochastic Hydrology and Hydraulics 7(2), 85-101. Sauquet, E., Gottschalk, L. and Leblois, E., 2000, Mapping average annual runoff: a hierarchical approach applying a stochastic interpolation

  15. Statistical Modeling of Large-Scale Signal Path Loss in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel Perez

    2013-01-01

    In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation), we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc.), an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc.). PMID:23396190

  16. Statistical modeling of large-scale signal path loss in underwater acoustic networks.

    PubMed

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel Perez

    2013-01-01

    In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation), we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc.), an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc.). PMID:23396190

  17. Moment-to-moment brain signal variability: A next frontier in human brain mapping?

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Douglas D.; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.; Lindenberger, Ulman; McIntosh, Anthony R.; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists have long observed that brain activity is naturally variable from moment-to-moment, but neuroimaging research has largely ignored the potential importance of this phenomenon. An emerging research focus on within-person brain signal variability is providing novel insights, and offering highly predictive, complementary, and even orthogonal views of brain function in relation to human life-span development, cognitive performance, and various clinical conditions. As a result, brain signal variability is evolving as a bona fide signal of interest, and should no longer be dismissed as meaningless noise when mapping the human brain. PMID:23458776

  18. Statistical modeling and MAP estimation for body fat quantification with MRI ratio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wilbur C. K.; Johnson, David H.; Wilson, David L.

    2008-03-01

    We are developing small animal imaging techniques to characterize the kinetics of lipid accumulation/reduction of fat depots in response to genetic/dietary factors associated with obesity and metabolic syndromes. Recently, we developed an MR ratio imaging technique that approximately yields lipid/{lipid + water}. In this work, we develop a statistical model for the ratio distribution that explicitly includes a partial volume (PV) fraction of fat and a mixture of a Rician and multiple Gaussians. Monte Carlo hypothesis testing showed that our model was valid over a wide range of coefficient of variation of the denominator distribution (c.v.: 0-0:20) and correlation coefficient among the numerator and denominator (ρ 0-0.95), which cover the typical values that we found in MRI data sets (c.v.: 0:027-0:063, ρ: 0:50-0:75). Then a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate for the fat percentage per voxel is proposed. Using a digital phantom with many PV voxels, we found that ratio values were not linearly related to PV fat content and that our method accurately described the histogram. In addition, the new method estimated the ground truth within +1.6% vs. +43% for an approach using an uncorrected ratio image, when we simply threshold the ratio image. On the six genetically obese rat data sets, the MAP estimate gave total fat volumes of 279 +/- 45mL, values 21% smaller than those from the uncorrected ratio images, principally due to the non-linear PV effect. We conclude that our algorithm can increase the accuracy of fat volume quantification even in regions having many PV voxels, e.g. ectopic fat depots.

  19. Quantitative mapping and statistical evaluation of fracture minerals in the granitic bedrock at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, Martin; Sidborn, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Abstract This article provides quantitative data on occurrences and amounts of fracture minerals that coat discrete fractures in granitic rock at the Forsmark site in Sweden. The data are useful for retardation modelling of radionuclide and other contaminants, and for groundwater composition calculations. In a unique campaign, 2071 open fractures in groundwater conducting rock have been mapped with respect to chlorite, calcite, and pyrite. In total 767 m of drill core has been studied from very shallow rock down to ~1000 m depth. The occurrences of fracture minerals, their thicknesses, and their fractions of surface coverage have been recorded for up to eight layers for each fracture. Detection limits are, for each layer, 0.1 mm for the thickness and 1 % for the surface coverage, except for pyrite crystals where surface coverages down to 0.01 % are detectable. The abundance of data has permitted statistical treatment, using parametric and non-parametric methods. Parametric fittings have been made to log-normal, truncated log-normal, and beta distributions. Chlorite, calcite, and pyrite were found in 57 %, 52 %, and 10 % of all mapped fractures, respectively. The fracture mineral thickness was 0.1 mm for calcite, 0.2 mm for chlorite, and 2 μm for pyrite, as averaged over the fracture surface area. For 50 % and 99 % of all fractures the total fracture coating thickness was less than 0.1 mm and 1 mm, respectively, which is important for diffusion resistance estimates. Average surface coverages were 18 % for calcite, 38 % for chlorite, and 0.5 % for pyrite. These data may be used for calculating the reaction capacity of flow paths.

  20. Statistics and topology of the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Tenorio, L.; Banday, A. J.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    We use statistical and topological quantities to test the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps against the hypothesis that the observed temperature fluctuations reflect Gaussian initial density perturbations with random phases. Recent papers discuss specific quantities as discriminators between Gaussian and non-Gaussian behavior, but the treatment of instrumental noise on the data is largely ignored. The presence of noise in the data biases many statistical quantities in a manner dependent on both the noise properties and the unknown cosmic microwave background temperature field. Appropriate weighting schemes can minimize this effect, but it cannot be completely eliminated. Analytic expressions are presented for these biases, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the best strategy for determining cosmologically interesting information from noisy data. The genus is a robust discriminator that can be used to estimate the power-law quadrupole-normalized amplitude, Q(sub rms-PS), independently of the two-point correlation function. The genus of the DMR data is consistent with Gaussian initial fluctuations with Q(sub rms-PS) = (15.7 +/- 2.2) - (6.6 +/- 0.3)(n - 1) micro-K, where n is the power-law index. Fitting the rms temperature variations at various smoothing angles gives Q(sub rms-PS) = 13.2 +/- 2.5 micro-K and n = 1.7(sup (+0.3) sub (-0.6)). While consistent with Gaussian fluctuations, the first year data are only sufficient to rule out strongly non-Gaussian distributions of fluctuations.

  1. An integrated user-friendly ArcMAP tool for bivariate statistical modelling in geoscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebur, M. N.; Pradhan, B.; Shafri, H. Z. M.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Tehrany, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    Modelling and classification difficulties are fundamental issues in natural hazard assessment. A geographic information system (GIS) is a domain that requires users to use various tools to perform different types of spatial modelling. Bivariate statistical analysis (BSA) assists in hazard modelling. To perform this analysis, several calculations are required and the user has to transfer data from one format to another. Most researchers perform these calculations manually by using Microsoft Excel or other programs. This process is time-consuming and carries a degree of uncertainty. The lack of proper tools to implement BSA in a GIS environment prompted this study. In this paper, a user-friendly tool, bivariate statistical modeler (BSM), for BSA technique is proposed. Three popular BSA techniques, such as frequency ratio, weight-of-evidence (WoE), and evidential belief function (EBF) models, are applied in the newly proposed ArcMAP tool. This tool is programmed in Python and created by a simple graphical user interface (GUI), which facilitates the improvement of model performance. The proposed tool implements BSA automatically, thus allowing numerous variables to be examined. To validate the capability and accuracy of this program, a pilot test area in Malaysia is selected and all three models are tested by using the proposed program. Area under curve (AUC) is used to measure the success rate and prediction rate. Results demonstrate that the proposed program executes BSA with reasonable accuracy. The proposed BSA tool can be used in numerous applications, such as natural hazard, mineral potential, hydrological, and other engineering and environmental applications.

  2. Statistics of the epoch of reionization 21-cm signal - I. Power spectrum error-covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Rajesh; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Majumdar, Suman

    2016-02-01

    The non-Gaussian nature of the epoch of reionization (EoR) 21-cm signal has a significant impact on the error variance of its power spectrum P(k). We have used a large ensemble of seminumerical simulations and an analytical model to estimate the effect of this non-Gaussianity on the entire error-covariance matrix {C}ij. Our analytical model shows that {C}ij has contributions from two sources. One is the usual variance for a Gaussian random field which scales inversely of the number of modes that goes into the estimation of P(k). The other is the trispectrum of the signal. Using the simulated 21-cm Signal Ensemble, an ensemble of the Randomized Signal and Ensembles of Gaussian Random Ensembles we have quantified the effect of the trispectrum on the error variance {C}ii. We find that its relative contribution is comparable to or larger than that of the Gaussian term for the k range 0.3 ≤ k ≤ 1.0 Mpc-1, and can be even ˜200 times larger at k ˜ 5 Mpc-1. We also establish that the off-diagonal terms of {C}ij have statistically significant non-zero values which arise purely from the trispectrum. This further signifies that the error in different k modes are not independent. We find a strong correlation between the errors at large k values (≥0.5 Mpc-1), and a weak correlation between the smallest and largest k values. There is also a small anticorrelation between the errors in the smallest and intermediate k values. These results are relevant for the k range that will be probed by the current and upcoming EoR 21-cm experiments.

  3. Mapping Cosmic Structure Using 21-cm Hydrogen Signal at Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; GBT 21-cm Intensity Mapping Group

    2011-05-01

    We are using the Green Bank Telescope to make 21-cm intensity maps of cosmic structure in a 0.15 Gpc^3 box at redshift of z 1. The intensity mapping technique combines the flux from many galaxies in each pixel, allowing much greater mapping speed than the traditional redshift survey. Measurement is being made at z 1 to take advantage of a window in frequency around 700 MHz where terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI) is currently at a minimum. This minimum is due to a reallocation of this frequency band from analog television to wide area wireless internet and public service usage. We will report progress of our attempt to detect autocorrelation of the 21-cm signal. The ultimate goal of this mapping is to use Baryon Acoustic Oscillations to provide more precise constraints to dark energy models.

  4. Statistical synthesis of radiometric imaging formation in scanning radiometers with signal weight processing by Kravchenko windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosyuk, V. K.; Kravchenko, V. F.; Pavlikov, V. V.; Pustovoit, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    Statistical optimization of the radiometric images (RMIs) algorithms formation in scanning radiometers with weight correction of the antenna amplitude-phase distribution and synchronous sliding strobing of the received noise-like signal by a function describing the antenna pattern corrected by temporal Kravchenko windows is performed for the first time. The ambiguity function (AF) of the scanning radiometer, which determines the RMI quality, is found. It is established that the AF shape substantially depends on the amplitude field distribution (AFD) in the antenna. It is shown that the use of the AFD in the antenna in the form of weight functions (classic and Kravchenko) makes it possible to correct the AF shape and to increase the RMI quality. A simulation of the RMI formation algorithm is performed. It follows from the analysis of simulation data that the use of the weight Kravchenko functions provides higher accuracy of the RMI restoration compared with classic weight functions.

  5. GIS-aided Statistical Landslide Susceptibility Modeling And Mapping Of Antipolo Rizal (Philippines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumlao, A. J.; Victor, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Slope instability associated with heavy rainfall or earthquake is a familiar geotechnical problem in the Philippines. The main objective of this study is to perform a detailed landslide susceptibility assessment of Antipolo City. The statistical method of assessment used was logistic regression. Landslide inventory was done through interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite images with corresponding field verification. In this study, morphologic and non-morphologic factors contributing to landslide occurrence and their corresponding spatial relationships were considered. The analysis of landslide susceptibility was implemented in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The 17320 randomly selected datasets were divided into training and test data sets. K- cross fold validation is done with k= 5. The subsamples are then fitted five times with k-1 training data set and the remaining fold as the validation data set. The AUROC of each model is validated using each corresponding data set. The AUROC of the five models are; 0.978, 0.977, 0.977, 0.974, and 0.979 respectively, implying that the models are effective in correctly predicting the occurrence and nonoccurrence of landslide activity. Field verification was also done. The landslide susceptibility map was then generated from the model. It is classified into four categories; low, moderate, high and very high susceptibility. The study also shows that almost 40% of Antipolo City has been assessed to be potentially dangerous areas in terms of landslide occurrence.

  6. Statistical mapping of maize bundle intensity at the stem scale using spatial normalisation of replicated images.

    PubMed

    Legland, David; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Guillon, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    The cellular structure of plant tissues is a key parameter for determining their properties. While the morphology of cells can easily be described, few studies focus on the spatial distribution of different types of tissues within an organ. As plants have various shapes and sizes, the integration of several individuals for statistical analysis of tissues distribution is a difficult problem. The aim of this study is to propose a method that quantifies the average spatial organisation of vascular bundles within maize stems, by integrating information from replicated images. In order to compare observations made on stems of different sizes and shapes, a spatial normalisation strategy was used. A model of average stem contour was computed from the digitisation of several stem slab images. Point patterns obtained from individual stem slices were projected onto the average stem to normalise them. Group-wise analysis of the spatial distribution of vascular bundles was applied on normalised data through the construction of average intensity maps. A quantitative description of average bundle organisation was obtained, via a 3D model of bundle distribution within a typical maize internode. The proposed method is generic and could easily be extended to other plant organs or organisms. PMID:24622152

  7. Statistical Mapping of Maize Bundle Intensity at the Stem Scale Using Spatial Normalisation of Replicated Images

    PubMed Central

    Legland, David; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Guillon, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    The cellular structure of plant tissues is a key parameter for determining their properties. While the morphology of cells can easily be described, few studies focus on the spatial distribution of different types of tissues within an organ. As plants have various shapes and sizes, the integration of several individuals for statistical analysis of tissues distribution is a difficult problem. The aim of this study is to propose a method that quantifies the average spatial organisation of vascular bundles within maize stems, by integrating information from replicated images. In order to compare observations made on stems of different sizes and shapes, a spatial normalisation strategy was used. A model of average stem contour was computed from the digitisation of several stem slab images. Point patterns obtained from individual stem slices were projected onto the average stem to normalise them. Group-wise analysis of the spatial distribution of vascular bundles was applied on normalised data through the construction of average intensity maps. A quantitative description of average bundle organisation was obtained, via a 3D model of bundle distribution within a typical maize internode. The proposed method is generic and could easily be extended to other plant organs or organisms. PMID:24622152

  8. Quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for brain disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze data from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients with brain disorders and to assess its potential utility for analyzing brain function. DTI was obtained by performing 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), and the data were analyzed using Matlab-based SPM software. The two-sample t-test was used for error analysis of the location of the activated pixels. We compared regions of white matter where the fractional anisotropy (FA) values were low and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were increased. In the AD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right sub-lobar insula, and right occipital lingual gyrus whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus. In the VD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right limbic cingulate gyrus, and right sub-lobar caudate tail whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the left lateral globus pallidus and left medial globus pallidus. In conclusion by using DTI and SPM analysis, we were able to not only determine the structural state of the regions affected by brain disorders but also quantitatively analyze and assess brain function.

  9. Cerebral glucose metabolism in corticobasal degeneration comparison with progressive supranuclear palsy using statistical mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Juh, Rahyeong; Pae, Chi-Un; Kim, Tae-Suk; Lee, Chang-Uk; Choe, Boyoung; Suh, Taesuk

    This study measured the cerebral glucose metabolism in patients suffering from corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The aim was to determine if there is a different metabolic pattern using (18)F-labeled 2-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). The regional cerebral glucose metabolism was examined in 8 patients diagnosed clinically with CBD (mean age 69.6 +/- 7.8 years; male/female: 5/3), 8 patients with probable PSP (mean age 67.8 +/- 4.5 years; male/female: 4/4) and 22 healthy controls. The regional cerebral glucose metabolism between the three groups was compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) with a voxel-by-voxel approach (p < 0.001, 200-voxel level). Compared with the normal controls, asymmetry in the regional glucose metabolism was observed in the parietal, frontal and cingulate in the CBD patients. In the PSP patients, the glucose metabolism was lower in the orbitofrontal, middle frontal, cingulate, thalamus and mid-brain than their age matched normal controls. A comparison of the two patient groups demonstrated relative hypometabolism in the thalamus, the mid-brain in the PSP patients and the parietal lobe in CBD patients. These results suggest that when making a differential diagnosis of CBD and PSP, voxel-based analysis of the (18)F-FDG PET images using a SPM might be a useful tool in clinical examinations. PMID:15936506

  10. Global statistical maps of extreme-event magnetic observatory 1 min first differences in horizontal intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2016-05-01

    Analysis is made of the long-term statistics of three different measures of ground level, storm time geomagnetic activity: instantaneous 1 min first differences in horizontal intensity ΔBh, the root-mean-square of 10 consecutive 1 min differences S, and the ramp change R over 10 min. Geomagnetic latitude maps of the cumulative exceedances of these three quantities are constructed, giving the threshold (nT/min) for which activity within a 24 h period can be expected to occur once per year, decade, and century. Specifically, at geomagnetic 55°, we estimate once-per-century ΔBh, S, and R exceedances and a site-to-site, proportional, 1 standard deviation range [1 σ, lower and upper] to be, respectively, 1000, [690, 1450]; 500, [350, 720]; and 200, [140, 280] nT/min. At 40°, we estimate once-per-century ΔBh, S, and R exceedances and 1 σ values to be 200, [140, 290]; 100, [70, 140]; and 40, [30, 60] nT/min.

  11. Mathematical and Statistical Techniques for Systems Medicine: The Wnt Signaling Pathway as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Adam L; Harrington, Heather A; Stumpf, Michael P H; Byrne, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen an explosion in models that describe phenomena in systems medicine. Such models are especially useful for studying signaling pathways, such as the Wnt pathway. In this chapter we use the Wnt pathway to showcase current mathematical and statistical techniques that enable modelers to gain insight into (models of) gene regulation and generate testable predictions. We introduce a range of modeling frameworks, but focus on ordinary differential equation (ODE) models since they remain the most widely used approach in systems biology and medicine and continue to offer great potential. We present methods for the analysis of a single model, comprising applications of standard dynamical systems approaches such as nondimensionalization, steady state, asymptotic and sensitivity analysis, and more recent statistical and algebraic approaches to compare models with data. We present parameter estimation and model comparison techniques, focusing on Bayesian analysis and coplanarity via algebraic geometry. Our intention is that this (non-exhaustive) review may serve as a useful starting point for the analysis of models in systems medicine. PMID:26677193

  12. A Statistical Examination of Magnetic Field Model Accuracy for Mapping Geosynchronous Solar Energetic Particle Observations to Lower Earth Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, S. L.; Kress, B. T.; Rodriguez, J. V.; McCollough, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Operational specifications of space environmental hazards can be an important input used by decision makers. Ideally the specification would come from on-board sensors, but for satellites where that capability is not available another option is to map data from remote observations to the location of the satellite. This requires a model of the physical environment and an understanding of its accuracy for mapping applications. We present a statistical comparison between magnetic field model mappings of solar energetic particle observations made by NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to the location of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). Because CRRES followed a geosynchronous transfer orbit which precessed in local time this allows us to examine the model accuracy between LEO and GEO orbits across a range of local times. We examine the accuracy of multiple magnetic field models using a variety of statistics and examine their utility for operational purposes.

  13. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  14. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E.; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard, and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  15. MapStats for Kids: Making Geographic Statistical Facts Available to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhrmann, Sven; MacEachren, Alan; DeBerry, Marshall; Bosley, John; Taylor, Rachael LaPorte; Gahegan, Mark; Downs, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Statistical and geographical literacy is essential for our daily lives. A new web portal for middle school students, published on the federal government statistics website, supports geographic and statistical education by providing age-appropriate online learning activities that teach how to use statistical summaries and their graphic…

  16. Signal processing and statistical descriptive reanalysis of steady state chute-flow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    truong, hoan; eckert, nicolas; keylock, chris; naaim, mohamed; bellot, hervé

    2014-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of snow rheology is needed for the mitigation against avalanche hazard. Indeed snow avalanches have a significant impact on the livelihoods and economies of alpine communities. To do so, 60 small-scale in-situ flow experiments were performed with various slopes, temperatures and flow depths. The investigation of these data previously seemed to show the dense flow of dry snow may be composed of two layers; a sheared basal layer made of single snow grains and a less sheared upper layer made of large aggregates. These outcomes were mainly based on the mean velocity profile of the flow and on interpretation in terms of rheological behavior of granular materials and snow microstructure [Pierre G. Rognon et al., 2007]. Here, the main objective remains the same, but the rheological and physical viewpoints are put aside to extract as much information contained in the data as possible various using signal processing methods and descriptive statistics methods as the maximum overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT), transfer entropy (TE) and maximum cross-correlation (MCC). Specifically, we aim at the improving the velocity estimations as function of the depth particularly the velocity fluctuations around the mean profile to better document the behavior of dense dry snow flows during a steady and uniform chute regime. The data are composed of pairs of voltage signals (right and left), which makes that the velocity is known indirectly only. The MCC method is classically used to determine the time lag between both signals. Previously, the MCC method that showed the mean velocity profile may be fitted by a simple bilinear function [Pierre G. Rognon et al., 2007], but no interesting temporal dynamics could be highlighted. Hence, a new process method was developed to provide velocity series with much better temporal resolution. The process is mainly made of a MODWT-based denoising method and the choice of window size for correlation. The results prove to be

  17. Genotype to Phenotype Maps: Multiple Input Abiotic Signals Combine to Produce Growth Effects via Attenuating Signaling Interactions in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Makumburage, G. Buddhika; Richbourg, H. Lee; LaTorre, Kalindi D.; Capps, Andrew; Chen, Cuixen; Stapleton, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of allele interactions constrains crop improvement and the prediction of disease susceptibility. Additive allele effects are the foundation for selection in animal and plant breeding, and complex genetic and environmental interactions contribute to inefficient detection of desirable loci. Manipulation and modeling of other sources of variation, such as environmental variables, have the potential to improve our prediction of phenotype from genotype. As an example of our approach to analysis of the network linking environmental input to alleles, we mapped the genetic architecture of single and combined abiotic stress responses in two maize mapping populations and compared the observed genetic architecture patterns to simple theoretical predictions. Comparisons of single and combined stress effects on growth and biomass traits exhibit patterns of allele effects that suggest attenuating interactions among physiological signaling steps in drought and ultraviolet radiation stress responses. The presence of attenuating interactions implies that shared QTL found in sets of environments could be used to group environment types and identify underlying environmental similarities, and that patterns of stress-dependent genetic architecture should be studied as a way to prioritize prebreeding populations. A better understanding of whole-plant interactor pathways and genetic architecture of multiple-input environmental signaling has the potential to improve the prediction of genomic value in plant breeding and crop modeling. PMID:24142926

  18. How Can We Evaluate the Accuracy of Small Stream Maps? -Focusing on Sampling Method and Statistical Analysis -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.

    2010-12-01

    statistics such as stream length or stream order. In this study, we suggest linear transactional sampling method and, practically, a stream and road crossing points KHAT- based sampling method to collect field stream position. We also review existing estimation methods and feasibility of the application of the error matrix, and Z-statistics for stream maps, which have not been previously inspected. We find that the visual inspection, hydrological statistics, and headwater-based estimation methods provide insufficient information on the positional accuracy and that the error matrix and KHAT-statistics are effective in evaluating stream network positions by pairing a remote sensing data product with a field reference data, but Z-statistics still has limitation in comparing the two different remote sensing data-based stream map products since the variance converges to zero. In order to compare two stream maps, we develop a new statistical approach which is based on the McNemar test.

  19. SU-E-J-261: Statistical Analysis and Chaotic Dynamics of Respiratory Signal of Patients in BodyFix

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, D; Huq, M; Bednarz, G; Lalonde, R; Yang, Y; Heron, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory signal of patients in BodyFix undergoing 4DCT scan with and without immobilization cover. Methods: 20 pairs of respiratory tracks recorded with RPM system during 4DCT scan were analyzed. Descriptive statistic was applied to selected parameters of exhale-inhale decomposition. Standardized signals were used with the delay method to build orbits in embedded space. Nonlinear behavior was tested with surrogate data. Sample entropy SE, Lempel-Ziv complexity LZC and the largest Lyapunov exponents LLE were compared. Results: Statistical tests show difference between scans for inspiration time and its variability, which is bigger for scans without cover. The same is for variability of the end of exhalation and inhalation. Other parameters fail to show the difference. For both scans respiratory signals show determinism and nonlinear stationarity. Statistical test on surrogate data reveals their nonlinearity. LLEs show signals chaotic nature and its correlation with breathing period and its embedding delay time. SE, LZC and LLE measure respiratory signal complexity. Nonlinear characteristics do not differ between scans. Conclusion: Contrary to expectation cover applied to patients in BodyFix appears to have limited effect on signal parameters. Analysis based on trajectories of delay vectors shows respiratory system nonlinear character and its sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Reproducibility of respiratory signal can be evaluated with measures of signal complexity and its predictability window. Longer respiratory period is conducive for signal reproducibility as shown by these gauges. Statistical independence of the exhale and inhale times is also supported by the magnitude of LLE. The nonlinear parameters seem more appropriate to gauge respiratory signal complexity since its deterministic chaotic nature. It contrasts with measures based on harmonic analysis that are blind for nonlinear features. Dynamics of breathing, so crucial for

  20. Statistical Mapping of Bursty Bulk Flows in the Magnetosphere Supported by the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merka, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Narock, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Fast transient plasma flows in the magnetosphere are usually associated with magnetic reconnection and/or rapid changes in the magnetospheric configuration. Using a common methodology to analyze data from the THEMIS satellites we map the statistical occurrence rate of bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetosphere. Such a task involves obtaining and processing of large amount of data (5 THEMIS satellites provide measurements since spring of 2007), then writing custom code and searching for intervals of interests. The existence of a Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO) offers, however, a less laborious alternative. We discuss how the VMO made our research faster and easier and also point out the inherent limitations of the VMO use. The VMO's goal is to help researches by creating a single point of uniform discovery, access, and use of magnetospheric data. Available data can be searched based on various criteria as, for example, spatial location, time of observation, measurement type, parameter values, etc. The results can then be saved, downloaded or displayed as, for example, spatial-temporal plots that quickly reveal where and how often was the searched-for phenomenon observed. Our analysis revealed that the BBFs were found more frequently with increasing distance from Earth and the peak occurrence rate of earthward BBFs was at Xgsm = 29 Re and Ygsm = -2 Re. The tailward BBFs were very rarely observed even between Xgsm = -20 and -30 Re but they occurred over a wide range of local times. The positions with highest BBF occurrence rates differ from previous reports that used IRM and ISEE2 data.

  1. Evaluation of Waveform Mapping as a Signal Processing Tool for Quantitative Ultrasonic NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Kishoni, Doron

    1993-01-01

    The mapping of one pulsed waveform into another, more desirable waveform by the application of a time-domain filter has been employed in a number of NDE situations. The primary goal of these applications has been to improve the range resolution of an ultrasonic signal for detection of echoes arising from particular interfaces masked by the response of the transducer. The work presented here addresses the use of this technique for resolution enhancement in imaging situations and in mapping signals from different transducers to a common target waveform, allowing maintenance of quantitative calibration of ultrasonic systems. We also describe the use of this technique in terms of the frequency analysis of the resulting waveforms.

  2. Motion compensation of optical mapping signals from isolated beating rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, B.; Ernst, F.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Z. X.; Schlaefer, A.

    2013-09-01

    Optical mapping is a well established technique for recording monophasic action potential traces on the epicardial surface of isolated hearts. This measuring technique offers a high spatial resolution but it is sensitive towards myocardial motion. Motion artifacts occur because the mapping between a certain tissue portion sending out fluorescent light and a pixel of the photo detector changes over time. So far this problem has been addressed by suppressing the motion or ratiometric imaging. We developed a different approach to compensate the motion artifacts based on image registration. We could demonstrate how an image deformation field temporally changing with the heart motion could be determined. Using these deformation field time series for image transformation motion signals could be generated for each image pixel which were then successfully applied to remove baseline shift and compensate motion artifacts potentially leading to errors within maps of the first arrival time. The investigation was based on five different rat hearts stained with Di-4-ANEPPS.

  3. Application of Polynomial and Radial Basis Function Maps to Signal Masking

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and demonstrate a technique for encrypting information by using a masking signal that closely approximates local ambient noise. Signal masking techniques developed to date have used nonlinear differential equations, spread spectrum, and various modulation schemes to encode information. While these techniques can effectively hide a signal, the resulting masks may not appear as ambient noise to an observer. The advantage of the proposed technique over commonly used masking methods is that the transmitted signal will appear as normal background noise, thus greatly reducing the probability of detection and exploitation. A promising near-term application of this technology presents itself in the area of clandestine minefield reconnaissance in shallow water areas. Shallow water mine-counter-mine (SWMCM) activity is essential for minefield avoidance, efficient minefield clearance, and effective selection of transit lanes within minefields. A key technology area for SWMCM is the development of special sonar waveforms with low probability of exploitation/intercept (LPE/LPI) attributes. In addition to LPE/LPI sonar, this technology has the potential to enable significant improvements in underwater acoustic communications. For SWMCM, the chaotic waveform research provides a mechanism for encrypted communications between a submarine (SSN) and an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) via an acoustic channel. Acoustic SSN/UUV communications would eliminate the need for a fiberoptic link between the two vessels, thus increasing the robustness of SWMCM. Similar applications may exist in the areas of radar masking and secure communications. The original approach called for the use of polynomial maps to generate a masking signal. Because polynomial maps were found to have highly restrictive stability criteria, the approach was modified to use radial basis function (RBF) maps. they have shown that stable RBF maps that closely approximate an

  4. Current controlled vocabularies are insufficient to uniquely map molecular entities to mass spectrometry signal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The comparison of analyte mass spectrometry precursor (MS1) signal is central to many proteomic (and other -omic) workflows. Standard vocabularies for mass spectrometry exist and provide good coverage for most experimental applications yet are insufficient for concise and unambiguous description of data concepts spanning the range of signal provenance from a molecular perspective (e.g. from charged peptides down to fine isotopes). Without a standard unambiguous nomenclature, literature searches, algorithm reproducibility and algorithm evaluation for MS-omics data processing are nearly impossible. Results We show how terms from current official ontologies are too vague or ambiguous to explicitly map molecular entities to MS signals and we illustrate the inconsistency and ambiguity of current colloquially used terms. We also propose a set of terms for MS1 signal that uniquely, succinctly and intuitively describe data concepts spanning the range of signal provenance from full molecule downs to fine isotopes. We suggest that additional community discussion of these terms should precede any further standardization efforts. We propose a novel nomenclature that spans the range of the required granularity to describe MS data processing from the perspective of the molecular provenance of the MS signal. Conclusions The proposed nomenclature provides a chain of succinct and unique terms spanning the signal created by a charged molecule down through each of its constituent subsignals. We suggest that additional community discussion of these terms should precede any further standardization efforts. PMID:25952148

  5. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-01-01

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates. PMID:21347109

  6. Statistically Optimal Approximations of Astronomical Signals: Implications to Classification and Advanced Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Chinarova, L. L.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Marsakova, V. I.; Tkachenko, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    We have elaborated a set of new algorithms and programs for advanced time series analysis of (generally) multi-component multi-channel observations with irregularly spaced times of observations, which is a common case for large photometric surveys. Previous self-review on these methods for periodogram, scalegram, wavelet, autocorrelation analysis as well as on "running" or "sub-interval" local approximations were self-reviewed in (2003ASPC..292..391A). For an approximation of the phase light curves of nearly-periodic pulsating stars, we use a Trigonometric Polynomial (TP) fit of the statistically optimal degree and initial period improvement using differential corrections (1994OAP.....7...49A). For the determination of parameters of "characteristic points" (minima, maxima, crossings of some constant value etc.) we use a set of methods self-reviewed in 2005ASPC..335...37A, Results of the analysis of the catalogs compiled using these programs are presented in 2014AASP....4....3A. For more complicated signals, we use "phenomenological approximations" with "special shapes" based on functions defined on sub-intervals rather on the complete interval. E. g. for the Algol-type stars we developed the NAV ("New Algol Variable") algorithm (2012Ap.....55..536A, 2012arXiv1212.6707A, 2015JASS...32..127A), which was compared to common methods of Trigonometric Polynomial Fit (TP) or local Algebraic Polynomial (A) fit of a fixed or (alternately) statistically optimal degree. The method allows determine the minimal set of parameters required for the "General Catalogue of Variable Stars", as well as an extended set of phenomenological and astrophysical parameters which may be used for the classification. Totally more that 1900 variable stars were studied in our group using these methods in a frame of the "Inter-Longitude Astronomy" campaign (2010OAP....23....8A) and the "Ukrainian Virtual Observatory" project (2012KPCB...28...85V).

  7. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J.; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Mcdonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y.; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A.; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V.; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  8. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans.

    PubMed

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Mcdonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  9. Chemical Genetics Approach Reveals Importance of cAMP and MAP Kinase Signaling to Lipid and Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-E; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Ahn, Joon-Woo; Hwang, Hyemin; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we attempted to understand signaling pathways behind lipid biosynthesis by employing a chemical genetics approach based on small molecule inhibitors. Specific signaling inhibitors of MAP kinase or modulators of cAMP signaling were selected to evaluate the functional roles of each of the key signaling pathways in three different microalgal species: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris, and Haematococcus pluvialis. Our results clearly indicate that cAMP signaling pathways are indeed positively associated with microalgal lipid biosynthesis. In contrast, MAP kinase pathways in three microalgal species are all negatively implicated in both lipid and carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:25563422

  10. Mapping the functional versatility and fragility of Ras GTPase signaling circuits through in vitro network reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Scott M; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-superfamily GTPases are central controllers of cell proliferation and morphology. Ras signaling is mediated by a system of interacting molecules: upstream enzymes (GEF/GAP) regulate Ras’s ability to recruit multiple competing downstream effectors. We developed a multiplexed, multi-turnover assay for measuring the dynamic signaling behavior of in vitro reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems. By including both upstream regulators and downstream effectors, we can systematically map how different network configurations shape the dynamic system response. The concentration and identity of both upstream and downstream signaling components strongly impacted the timing, duration, shape, and amplitude of effector outputs. The distorted output of oncogenic alleles of Ras was highly dependent on the balance of positive (GAP) and negative (GEF) regulators in the system. We found that different effectors interpreted the same inputs with distinct output dynamics, enabling a Ras system to encode multiple unique temporal outputs in response to a single input. We also found that different Ras-to-GEF positive feedback mechanisms could reshape output dynamics in distinct ways, such as signal amplification or overshoot minimization. Mapping of the space of output behaviors accessible to Ras provides a design manual for programming Ras circuits, and reveals how these systems are readily adapted to produce an array of dynamic signaling behaviors. Nonetheless, this versatility comes with a trade-off of fragility, as there exist numerous paths to altered signaling behaviors that could cause disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12435.001 PMID:26765565

  11. Diffusion-Based Density-Equalizing Maps: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Visualizing Homicide Rates and Other Georeferenced Statistical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitello, Karina I.; Candia, Julián

    2012-12-01

    In every country, public and private agencies allocate extensive funding to collect large-scale statistical data, which in turn are studied and analyzed in order to determine local, regional, national, and international policies regarding all aspects relevant to the welfare of society. One important aspect of that process is the visualization of statistical data with embedded geographical information, which most often relies on archaic methods such as maps colored according to graded scales. In this work, we apply nonstandard visualization techniques based on physical principles. We illustrate the method with recent statistics on homicide rates in Brazil and their correlation to other publicly available data. This physics-based approach provides a novel tool that can be used by interdisciplinary teams investigating statistics and model projections in a variety of fields such as economics and gross domestic product research, public health and epidemiology, sociodemographics, political science, business and marketing, and many others.

  12. Universal renormalization-group dynamics at the onset of chaos in logistic maps and nonextensive statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldovin, F.; Robledo, A.

    2002-10-01

    We uncover the dynamics at the chaos threshold μ∞ of the logistic map and find that it consists of trajectories made of intertwined power laws that reproduce the entire period-doubling cascade that occurs for μ<μ∞. We corroborate this structure analytically via the Feigenbaum renormalization-group (RG) transformation and find that the sensitivity to initial conditions has precisely the form of a q exponential, of which we determine the q index and the q-generalized Lyapunov coefficient λq. Our results are an unequivocal validation of the applicability of the nonextensive generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics to critical points of nonlinear maps.

  13. NeuroVault.org: a web-based repository for collecting and sharing unthresholded statistical maps of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwarz, Yannick; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Maumet, Camille; Sochat, Vanessa V.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present NeuroVault—a web based repository that allows researchers to store, share, visualize, and decode statistical maps of the human brain. NeuroVault is easy to use and employs modern web technologies to provide informative visualization of data without the need to install additional software. In addition, it leverages the power of the Neurosynth database to provide cognitive decoding of deposited maps. The data are exposed through a public REST API enabling other services and tools to take advantage of it. NeuroVault is a new resource for researchers interested in conducting meta- and coactivation analyses. PMID:25914639

  14. A scalable neuroinformatics data flow for electrophysiological signals using MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Jayapandian, Catherine; Wei, Annan; Ramesh, Priya; Zonjy, Bilal; Lhatoo, Samden D; Loparo, Kenneth; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S

    2015-01-01

    Data-driven neuroscience research is providing new insights in progression of neurological disorders and supporting the development of improved treatment approaches. However, the volume, velocity, and variety of neuroscience data generated from sophisticated recording instruments and acquisition methods have exacerbated the limited scalability of existing neuroinformatics tools. This makes it difficult for neuroscience researchers to effectively leverage the growing multi-modal neuroscience data to advance research in serious neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. We describe the development of the Cloudwave data flow that uses new data partitioning techniques to store and analyze electrophysiological signal in distributed computing infrastructure. The Cloudwave data flow uses MapReduce parallel programming algorithm to implement an integrated signal data processing pipeline that scales with large volume of data generated at high velocity. Using an epilepsy domain ontology together with an epilepsy focused extensible data representation format called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF), the data flow addresses the challenge of data heterogeneity and is interoperable with existing neuroinformatics data representation formats, such as HDF5. The scalability of the Cloudwave data flow is evaluated using a 30-node cluster installed with the open source Hadoop software stack. The results demonstrate that the Cloudwave data flow can process increasing volume of signal data by leveraging Hadoop Data Nodes to reduce the total data processing time. The Cloudwave data flow is a template for developing highly scalable neuroscience data processing pipelines using MapReduce algorithms to support a variety of user applications. PMID:25852536

  15. Cellular context–mediated Akt dynamics regulates MAP kinase signaling thresholds during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellesøy, Monica; Lorens, James B.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting angiogenesis is tightly regulated by contextual cues that affect angiogeneic growth factor signaling. Both constitutive activation and loss of Akt kinase activity in endothelial cells impair angiogenesis, suggesting that Akt dynamics mediates contextual microenvironmental regulation. We explored the temporal regulation of Akt in endothelial cells during formation of capillary-like networks induced by cell–cell contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) and vSMC-associated VEGF. Expression of constitutively active Akt1 strongly inhibited network formation, whereas hemiphosphorylated Akt1 epi-alleles with reduced kinase activity had an intermediate inhibitory effect. Conversely, inhibition of Akt signaling did not affect endothelial cell migration or morphogenesis in vSMC cocultures that generate capillary-like structures. We found that endothelial Akt activity is transiently blocked by proteasomal degradation in the presence of SMCs during the initial phase of capillary-like structure formation. Suppressed Akt activity corresponded to the increased endothelial MAP kinase signaling that was required for angiogenic endothelial morphogenesis. These results reveal a regulatory principle by which cellular context regulates Akt protein dynamics, which determines MAP kinase signaling thresholds necessary drive a morphogenetic program during angiogenesis. PMID:26023089

  16. A scalable neuroinformatics data flow for electrophysiological signals using MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Jayapandian, Catherine; Wei, Annan; Ramesh, Priya; Zonjy, Bilal; Lhatoo, Samden D.; Loparo, Kenneth; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S.

    2015-01-01

    Data-driven neuroscience research is providing new insights in progression of neurological disorders and supporting the development of improved treatment approaches. However, the volume, velocity, and variety of neuroscience data generated from sophisticated recording instruments and acquisition methods have exacerbated the limited scalability of existing neuroinformatics tools. This makes it difficult for neuroscience researchers to effectively leverage the growing multi-modal neuroscience data to advance research in serious neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. We describe the development of the Cloudwave data flow that uses new data partitioning techniques to store and analyze electrophysiological signal in distributed computing infrastructure. The Cloudwave data flow uses MapReduce parallel programming algorithm to implement an integrated signal data processing pipeline that scales with large volume of data generated at high velocity. Using an epilepsy domain ontology together with an epilepsy focused extensible data representation format called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF), the data flow addresses the challenge of data heterogeneity and is interoperable with existing neuroinformatics data representation formats, such as HDF5. The scalability of the Cloudwave data flow is evaluated using a 30-node cluster installed with the open source Hadoop software stack. The results demonstrate that the Cloudwave data flow can process increasing volume of signal data by leveraging Hadoop Data Nodes to reduce the total data processing time. The Cloudwave data flow is a template for developing highly scalable neuroscience data processing pipelines using MapReduce algorithms to support a variety of user applications. PMID:25852536

  17. Activation of MAP kinase signaling pathway in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis as biomarker of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Châtel, A; Hamer, B; Talarmin, H; Dorange, G; Schröder, H C; Müller, W E G

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by various stressful stimuli was investigated in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. Analyses were performed in animals exposed in laboratory to selected pollutants and in mussels collected in winter and summer along the eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia). Effects of oxidative stress, induced by tributyltin, hydrogen peroxide and water soluble fraction of diesel fuel on the activation/phosphorylation of the three Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) p38, JNK and ERK using a newly developed ELISA procedure were evaluated. MAP kinase activation was analyzed 1h after exposure of mussels to chemical agents, and after recovery periods of 6 and 24h. Our results clearly indicated that pollutants generated different patterns of induction of the MAPK phosphorylation. Indeed, only pp38 and pJNK were activated with 11, 33 and 100 microg/L TBT, reaching a maximum activation after 6h in seawater following treatment of mussels with 11 microg/L TBT. Treatment with 0.074 and 0.222 mM H2O2 enhanced activation of both p38 and ERK. These two kinases were activated after 1h exposure, followed by a diminution after 6h of recovery in seawater and a reactivation after 24h. The levels of phosphorylated P38 and JNK were increased after mussel exposure with 7.5, 15 and 30% of water soluble fraction of diesel oil. P38 was activated concentration dependently at 1h exposure. Additionally, field study pointed out seasonal differences in MAP kinases activation as mussels collected during summer had a higher enzyme activation state than in winter, as well as sampling site differences which could be correlated to the industrial/tourism activity and environmental stresses (salinity). All the results converge towards MAP kinase signaling pathway being induced by various pollutants in M. galloprovincialis. This signaling cascade should be considered as a possible biomarker of environmental stress and pollution. PMID:19948362

  18. Enhancing Local Climate Projections of Precipitation: Assets and Limitations of Quantile Mapping Techniques for Statistical Downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Martin; Kotlarski, Sven; Schär, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The Swiss CH2011 scenarios provide a portfolio of climate change scenarios for the region of Switzerland, specifically tailored for use in climate impact research. Although widely applied by a variety of end-users, these scenarios are subject to several limitations related to the underlying delta change methodology. Examples are difficulties to appropriately account for changes in the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological fields and for changes in extreme events. The recently launched ELAPSE project (Enhancing local and regional climate change projections for Switzerland) is connected to the EU COST Action VALUE (www.value-cost.eu) and aims at complementing CH2011 by further scenario products, including a bias-corrected version of daily scenarios at the site scale. For this purpose the well-established empirical quantile mapping (QM) methodology is employed. Here, daily temperature and precipitation output of 15 GCM-RCM model chains of the ENSEMBLES project is downscaled and bias-corrected to match observations at weather stations in Switzerland. We consider established QM techniques based on all empirical quantiles or linear interpolation between the empirical percentiles. In an attempt to improve the downscaling of extreme precipitation events, we also apply a parametric approximation of the daily precipitation distribution by a dynamically weighted mixture of a Gamma distribution for the bulk and a Pareto distribution for the right tail for the first time in the context of QM. All techniques are evaluated and intercompared in a cross-validation framework. The statistical downscaling substantially improves virtually all considered distributional and temporal characteristics as well as their spatial distribution. The empirical methods have in general very similar performances. The parametric method does not show an improvement over the empirical ones. Critical sites and seasons are highlighted and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on investigating the

  19. Statistical pattern analysis of blood vessel features on retina images and its application to blood vessel mapping algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ying, Huajun; Wang, Xing; Liu, Jyh-Charn

    2014-01-01

    Computer based modeling and analysis of blood vessel (BV) networks is essential for automated detection and tracking of anomalies and structural changes in retina images. Among many published techniques for automated BV mapping, optimal selection of thresholds to delineate BV pixels from their background pixels remains an open problem. In this paper we propose a novel representation of a BV pixel feature, daisy graph, using rotational contrast transform (RCT), and two feature descriptors energy E(p) and symmetry difference S(p) of the daisy graph. Non-BV pixels are separated from BV and boundary pixels based on E(p). Fitness of the lognormal distribution to S(p) of BV pixels with negative E(p) has been tested extensively for images in the STARE and DRIVE databases. Based on statistical pattern analysis in the feature space, we propose a fast self-calibrated BV mapping algorithm which achieve comparable and statistically sound performance as contemporary solutions. PMID:25571441

  20. Automatic Mapping Of Large Signal Processing Systems To A Parallel Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Printz, Harry; Kung, H. T.; Mummert, Todd; Scherer, Paul M.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1988, Carnegie Mellon University and the Naval Air Development Center have been working together to implement several large signal processing systems on the Warp parallel computer. In the course of this work, we have developed a prototype of a software tool that can automatically and efficiently map signal processing systems to distributed-memory parallel machines, such as Warp. We have used this tool to produce Warp implementations of small test systems. The automatically generated programs compare favorably with hand-crafted code. We believe this tool will be a significant aid in the creation of high speed signal processing systems. We assume that signal processing systems have the following characteristics: •They can be described by directed graphs of computational tasks; these graphs may contain thousands of task vertices. • Some tasks can be parallelized in a systolic or data-partitioned manner, while others cannot be parallelized at all. • The side effects of each task, if any, are limited to changes in local variables. • Each task has a data-independent execution time bound, which may be expressed as a function of the way it is parallelized, and the number of processors it is mapped to. In this paper we describe techniques to automatically map such systems to Warp-like parallel machines. We identify and address key issues in gracefully combining different parallel programming styles, in allocating processor, memory and communication bandwidth, and in generating and scheduling efficient parallel code. When iWarp, the VLSI version of the Warp machine, becomes available in 1990, we will extend this tool to generate efficient code for very large applications, which may require as many as 3000 iWarp processors, with an aggregate peak performance of 60 gigaflops.

  1. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Lloyd A.; Paresol, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  2. Maps of zeros of the grand canonical partition function in a statistical model of high energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, M.; Giovannini, A.; Ugoccioni, R.

    2006-06-01

    Theorems on zeros of the truncated generating function in the complex plane are reviewed. When examined in the framework of a statistical model of high energy collisions based on the negative binomial (Pascal) multiplicity distribution, these results lead to maps of zeros of the grand canonical partition function which allow us to interpret in a novel way different classes of events in pp collisions at LHC c.m. energies.

  3. Statistical parametric mapping of LORETA using high density EEG and individual MRI: application to mismatch negativities in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Kwon, Jun Soo; Youn, Tak; Pae, Ji Soo; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Myung-Sun; Ha, Kyoo-Seob

    2002-11-01

    We describe a method for the statistical parametric mapping of low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) using high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and individual magnetic resonance images (MRI) to investigate the characteristics of the mismatch negativity (MMN) generators in schizophrenia. LORETA, using a realistic head model of the boundary element method derived from the individual anatomy, estimated the current density maps from the scalp topography of the 128-channel EEG. From the current density maps that covered the whole cortical gray matter (up to 20,000 points), volumetric current density images were reconstructed. Intensity normalization of the smoothed current density images was used to reduce the confounding effect of subject specific global activity. After transforming each image into a standard stereotaxic space, we carried out statistical parametric mapping of the normalized current density images. We applied this method to the source localization of MMN in schizophrenia. The MMN generators, produced by a deviant tone of 1,200 Hz (5% of 1,600 trials) under the standard tone of 1,000 Hz, 80 dB binaural stimuli with 300 msec of inter-stimulus interval, were measured in 14 right-handed schizophrenic subjects and 14 age-, gender-, and handedness-matched controls. We found that the schizophrenic group exhibited significant current density reductions of MMN in the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior parietal gyrus (P < 0. 0005). This study is the first voxel-by-voxel statistical mapping of current density using individual MRI and high-density EEG. PMID:12391570

  4. Definition of an Enhanced Map-Matching Algorithm for Urban Environments with Poor GNSS Signal Quality.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Felipe; Monzón, Sergio; Naranjo, Jose Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle positioning is a key factor for numerous information and assistance applications that are included in vehicles and for which satellite positioning is mainly used. However, this positioning process can result in errors and lead to measurement uncertainties. These errors come mainly from two sources: errors and simplifications of digital maps and errors in locating the vehicle. From that inaccurate data, the task of assigning the vehicle's location to a link on the digital map at every instant is carried out by map-matching algorithms. These algorithms have been developed to fulfil that need and attempt to amend these errors to offer the user a suitable positioning. In this research; an algorithm is developed that attempts to solve the errors in positioning when the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal reception is frequently lost. The algorithm has been tested with satisfactory results in a complex urban environment of narrow streets and tall buildings where errors and signal reception losses of the GPS receiver are frequent. PMID:26861320

  5. Definition of an Enhanced Map-Matching Algorithm for Urban Environments with Poor GNSS Signal Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Felipe; Monzón, Sergio; Naranjo, Jose Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle positioning is a key factor for numerous information and assistance applications that are included in vehicles and for which satellite positioning is mainly used. However, this positioning process can result in errors and lead to measurement uncertainties. These errors come mainly from two sources: errors and simplifications of digital maps and errors in locating the vehicle. From that inaccurate data, the task of assigning the vehicle’s location to a link on the digital map at every instant is carried out by map-matching algorithms. These algorithms have been developed to fulfil that need and attempt to amend these errors to offer the user a suitable positioning. In this research; an algorithm is developed that attempts to solve the errors in positioning when the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal reception is frequently lost. The algorithm has been tested with satisfactory results in a complex urban environment of narrow streets and tall buildings where errors and signal reception losses of the GPS receiver are frequent. PMID:26861320

  6. A MAP OF THE INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE SIGNAL FROM LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Granett, Benjamin R.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2009-08-10

    We construct a map of the time derivative of the gravitational potential traced by Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The potential decays on large scales due to cosmic acceleration, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. With a template fit, we directly measure this signature on the CMB at a 2{sigma} confidence level. The measurement is consistent with the cross-correlation statistic, strengthening the claim that dark energy is indeed the cause of the correlation. This new approach potentially simplifies the cosmological interpretation. Our constructed linear ISW map shows no evidence for degree-scale cold and hot spots associated with supervoid and supercluster structures. This suggests that the linear ISW effect in a concordance {lambda}CDM cosmology is insufficient to explain the strong CMB imprints from these structures that we previously reported.

  7. Attenuation of pattern recognition receptor signaling is mediated by a MAP kinase kinase kinase.

    PubMed

    Mithoe, Sharon C; Ludwig, Christina; Pel, Michiel J C; Cucinotta, Mara; Casartelli, Alberto; Mbengue, Malick; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Robatzek, Silke; Pieterse, Corné M J; Aebersold, Ruedi; Menke, Frank L H

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play a key role in plant and animal innate immunity. PRR binding of their cognate ligand triggers a signaling network and activates an immune response. Activation of PRR signaling must be controlled prior to ligand binding to prevent spurious signaling and immune activation. Flagellin perception in Arabidopsis through FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE 2 (FLS2) induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and immunity. However, the precise molecular mechanism that connects activated FLS2 to downstream MAPK cascades remains unknown. Here, we report the identification of a differentially phosphorylated MAP kinase kinase kinase that also interacts with FLS2. Using targeted proteomics and functional analysis, we show that MKKK7 negatively regulates flagellin-triggered signaling and basal immunity and this requires phosphorylation of MKKK7 on specific serine residues. MKKK7 attenuates MPK6 activity and defense gene expression. Moreover, MKKK7 suppresses the reactive oxygen species burst downstream of FLS2, suggesting that MKKK7-mediated attenuation of FLS2 signaling occurs through direct modulation of the FLS2 complex. PMID:26769563

  8. Acetaldehyde alters MAP kinase signalling and epigenetic histone modifications in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Lee, Youn Ju; Park, Pil-hoon; Aroor, Annayya R

    2007-01-01

    Although both oxidative and non-oxidative metabolites of ethanol are involved in generating ethanol matabolic stress (Emess), the oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde plays a critical role in the cellular actions of ethanol. We have investigated the effects of acetaldehyde on p42/44 MAP kinase, p46/p54 c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/JNK2) and p38 MAP kinase in hepatocytes. Acetaldehyde caused temporal activation of p42/44 MAPK followed by JNK, but the activation of the p42/44 MAPK was not a prerequisite for the JNK activation. Activation ofJNK1 by acetaldehyde was greater than JNK2. Ethanol and acetaldehyde activatedJNK have opposing roles; ethanol-induced JNK activation increased apoptosis whereas that by acetaldehyde decreased apoptosis. Acetaldehyde also caused histone H3 acetylation at Lys9 and phosphorylation of histone H3 at Serl0 and 28, the latter being dependent on p38 MAP kinase. Phosphorylation at Ser28 was higher than at Serl0. Thus acetaldehyde distinctively alters MAP kinase signalling and histone modifications, processes involved in transcriptional activation. PMID:17590997

  9. Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping and Probabilistic Atlas Generation of Hybrid Diffusion Imaging based on BFOR Signal Basis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jia; Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Suryawanshi, Gaurav; Alexander, Andrew L.; Qiu, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    We first propose a large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm to align multiple b-value diffusion weighted imaging (mDWI) data, specifically acquired via hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI).We denote this algorithm as LDDMM-HYDI. We then propose a Bayesian probabilistic model for estimating the white matter atlas from HYDIs. We adopt the work given in Hosseinbor et al. (2012) and represent the q-space diffusion signal with the Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR) signal basis. The BFOR framework provides the representation of mDWI in the q-space and the analytic form of the emsemble average propagator (EAP) reconstructure, as well as reduces memory requirement. In addition, since the BFOR signal basis is orthonormal, the L2 norm that quantifies the differences in the q-space signals of any two mDWI datasets can be easily computed as the sum of the squared differences in the BFOR expansion coefficients. In this work, we show that the reorientation of the q-space signal due to spatial transformation can be easily defined on the BFOR signal basis. We incorporate the BFOR signal basis into the LDDMM framework and derive the gradient descent algorithm for LDDMM-HYDI with explicit orientation optimization. Additionally, we extend the previous Bayesian atlas estimation framework for scalar-valued images to HYDIs and derive the expectation-maximization algorithm for solving the HYDI atlas estimation problem. Using real HYDI datasets, we show the Bayesian model generates the white matter atlas with anatomical details. Moreover, we show that it is important to consider the variation of mDWI reorientation due to a small change in diffeomorphic transformation in the LDDMM-HYDI optimization and to incorporate the full information of HYDI for aligning mDWI. Finally, we show that the LDDMM-HYDI outperforms the LDDMM algorithm with diffusion tensors generated from each shell of HYDI. PMID:24972378

  10. Landslide susceptibility mapping using a bivariate statistical model in a tropical hilly area of southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, J. P. C.; DA Silva, L. M.; Dourado, F. A. D.; Fernandes, N.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides are the most damaging natural hazard in the mountainous region of Rio de Janeiro State in Brazil, responsible for thousands of deaths and important financial and environmental losses. However, this region has currently few landslide susceptibility maps implemented on an adequate scale. Identification of landslide susceptibility areas is fundamental in successful land use planning and management practices to reduce risk. This paper applied the Bayes' theorem based on weight of evidence (WoE) using 8 landslide-related factors in a geographic information system (GIS) for landslide susceptibility mapping. 378 landslide locations were identified and mapped on a selected basin in the city of Nova Friburgo, triggered by the January 2011 rainfall event. The landslide scars were divided into two subsets: training and validation subsets. The 8 landslide-related factors weighted by WoE were performed using chi-square test to indicate which variables are conditionally independent of each other to be used in the final map. Finally, the maps of weighted factors were summed up to construct the landslide susceptibility map and validated by the validation landslide subset. According to the results, slope, aspect and contribution area showed the higher positive spatial correlation with landslides. In the landslide susceptibility map, 21% of the area presented very low and low susceptibilities with 3% of the validation scars, 41% presented medium susceptibility with 22% of the validation scars and 38% presented high and very high susceptibilities with 75% of the validation scars. The very high susceptibility class stands for 16% of the basin area and has 54% of the all scars. The approach used in this study can be considered very useful since 75% of the area affected by landslides was included in the high and very high susceptibility classes.

  11. A comparison of bivariate statistical model and deterministic model-based landslide susceptibility mapping methods: An example from North Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgun, Aykut; Erkan, Oguzhan

    2015-04-01

    In Turkey, landslide is one of the most important natural hazards. Due to landslide occurrence, several landforms and man made structures are adversely affected, and may cause many injuries and loss of life. In this context, landslide susceptibility assessment is important task to determine susceptible areas to landslide occurrence. Especially, several dam reservoir areas in Turkey are threated by landslide phenomena. For this reason, in this study, a dam reservoir area located in North Turkey was selected, and investigated in point of landslide susceptibility assessment. A landslide susceptibility assessment for the Kurtun dam reservoir area (Gumushane, North Turkey) was carried out by geographical information systems (GIS)-based statistical and deterministic models. For this purpose, frequency ratio (FR) and stability index mapping (SINMAP) methodologies were applied. In this context, eight conditioning parameters such as altitude, lithology, slope gradient, slope aspect, distance to drainage, distance to lineament, stream power index (SPI) and topographical wetness index (TWI) were considered. After assessment of these parameters by FR and SINMAP methods in a GIS environment, two landslide susceptibility maps were obtained. Then, the maps obtained were analyzed for verification purpose. For this purpose, area under curvature (AUC) approach was used. At the end of this process, the AUC values of 0.73 and 0.70 were found for FR and SINMAP methods, respectively. Additionally, the SINMAP statistical results showed that the 93.8% of the observed landslides in the area falls into the lower and upper threshold showing the stability index classes. These values indicate that the accuracies of landslide susceptibility maps are acceptable, and the maps are feasible for further natural hazard management affairs in the area.

  12. Statistical analysis on the evolution of OpenStreetMap road networks in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengxiang; Jia, Tao; Qin, Kun; Shan, Jie; Jiao, Chenjing

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, extensive efforts have been paid on the investigation of OpenStreetMap (OSM) in developed countries, but little attention has been given to the cities in developing countries. This paper presents the results regarding the evolution of OSM road networks in Beijing, China, from four aspects. First, findings from general analysis indicate that (1) the overall growth pattern could be mainly explained by the increasing number of volunteers and their mapping contributions. Second, findings from geometric analysis suggest: (2) mapping intensity exhibits heavy-tailed pattern both for a certain time period and across time; (3) mapping direction moves from outskirts to downtown distinguished from other regions; and (4) mapping behaviors are mainly constrained by the underlying structure of road networks. Third, results of topological analysis indicate that (5) OSM road networks resemble the growth of real road networks and are undergoing an evolution process depicted by exploration and densification. Last, from the perspective of centrality analysis, (6) two kinds of nodes are identified with the ones accounting for the exploration and the other ones for the densification, which further hints the evolution process of continuous strong exploration accompanied by weak densification.

  13. Information capacity and pattern formation in a tent map network featuring statistical periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Touchette, H.; Mackey, M. C.

    2003-02-01

    We provide quantitative support to the observation that lattices of coupled maps are “efficient” information coding devices. It has been suggested recently that lattices of coupled maps may provide a model of information coding in the nervous system because of their ability to create structured and stimulus-dependent activity patterns which have the potential to be used for storing information. In this paper, we give an upper bound to the effective number of patterns that can be used to store information in the lattice by evaluating numerically its information capacity or information rate as a function of the coupling strength between the maps. We also estimate the time taken by the lattice to establish a limiting activity pattern.

  14. The Research of Feature Extraction Method of Liver Pathological Image Based on Multispatial Mapping and Statistical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiling; Xia, Bingbing; Yi, Dehui

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new feature extraction method of liver pathological image based on multispatial mapping and statistical properties. For liver pathological images of Hematein Eosin staining, the image of R and B channels can reflect the sensitivity of liver pathological images better, while the entropy space and Local Binary Pattern (LBP) space can reflect the texture features of the image better. To obtain the more comprehensive information, we map liver pathological images to the entropy space, LBP space, R space, and B space. The traditional Higher Order Local Autocorrelation Coefficients (HLAC) cannot reflect the overall information of the image, so we propose an average correction HLAC feature. We calculate the statistical properties and the average gray value of pathological images and then update the current pixel value as the absolute value of the difference between the current pixel gray value and the average gray value, which can be more sensitive to the gray value changes of pathological images. Lastly the HLAC template is used to calculate the features of the updated image. The experiment results show that the improved features of the multispatial mapping have the better classification performance for the liver cancer. PMID:27022407

  15. The statistical mapping of magnetosheath plasma properties based on THEMIS measurements in the magnetosheath interplanetary medium reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.

    2013-08-01

    The magnetosheath operates as a natural filter between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma. As a result of this, the magnetosheath plays a crucial role in the plasma momentum and energy transport from the interplanetary medium into the magnetosphere. Statistical studies of the magnetosheath are difficult due to the dynamic nature of the terrestrial bow shock and the magnetopause. As a result of this, the spatial and temporal dependence of magnetosheath plasma properties under varying solar wind conditions is still not completely understood. We present a study of magnetosheath plasma properties using 5 years of THEMIS and OMNI data to produce statistical maps of fundamental magnetosheath plasma properties. The magnetosheath interplanetary medium reference frame is applied to present data in a normalized reference frame which accounts for both boundary and orbital motion. The statistical maps are compared with the MHD runs from the CCMC-BATS-R-US model which agree favorably. The results are also used to investigate the presence of any magnetosheath plasma parameter asymmetries and their possible causes.

  16. Overlapping functions of the MAP4K family kinases Hppy and Msn in Hippo signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangxi; Cho, Yong Suk; Yue, Tao; Ip, Y Tony; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) tumor suppressor pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that controls tissue growth and organ size in species ranging from Drosophila to human, and its malfunction has been implicated in many types of human cancer. In this study, we conducted a kinome screen and identified Happyhour (Hppy)/MAP4K3 as a novel player in the Hpo pathway. Our biochemical study showed that Hppy binds and phosphorylates Wts. Our genetic experiments suggest that Hppy acts in parallel and partial redundantly with Misshapen (Msn)/MAP4K4 to regulate Yki nuclear localization and Hpo target gene expression in Drosophila wing imaginal discs. Furthermore, we showed that cytoskeleton stress restricts Yki nuclear localization through Hppy and Msn when Hpo activity is compromised, thus providing an explanation for the Wts-dependent but Hpo-independent regulation of Yki in certain contexts. Our study has unraveled an additional layer of complexity in the Hpo signaling pathway and laid down a foundation for exploring how different upstream regulators feed into the core Hpo pathway.

  17. A statistical model for QTL mapping in polysomic autotetraploids underlying double reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: As a group of economically important species, linkage mapping of polysomic autotetraploids, including potato, sugarcane and rose, is difficult to conduct due to their unique meiotic property of double reduction that allows sister chromatids to enter into the same gamete. We desc...

  18. Infants Rapidly Learn Word-Referent Mappings via Cross-Situational Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda; Yu, Chen

    2008-01-01

    First word learning should be difficult because any pairing of a word and scene presents the learner with an infinite number of possible referents. Accordingly, theorists of children's rapid word learning have sought constraints on word-referent mappings. These constraints are thought to work by enabling learners to resolve the ambiguity inherent…

  19. Glial and neuronal Semaphorin signaling instruct the development of a functional myotopic map for Drosophila walking.

    PubMed

    Syed, Durafshan Sakeena; Gowda, Swetha B M; Reddy, O Venkateswara; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2016-01-01

    Motoneurons developmentally acquire appropriate cellular architectures that ensure connections with postsynaptic muscles and presynaptic neurons. In Drosophila, leg motoneurons are organized as a myotopic map, where their dendritic domains represent the muscle field. Here, we investigate mechanisms underlying development of aspects of this myotopic map, required for walking. A behavioral screen identified roles for Semaphorins (Sema) and Plexins (Plex) in walking behavior. Deciphering this phenotype, we show that PlexA/Sema1a mediates motoneuron axon branching in ways that differ in the proximal femur and distal tibia, based on motoneuronal birth order. Importantly, we show a novel role for glia in positioning dendrites of specific motoneurons; PlexB/Sema2a is required for dendritic positioning of late-born motoneurons but not early-born motoneurons. These findings indicate that communication within motoneurons and between glia and motoneurons, mediated by the combined action of different Plexin/Semaphorin signaling systems, are required for the formation of a functional myotopic map. PMID:26926907

  20. Glial and neuronal Semaphorin signaling instruct the development of a functional myotopic map for Drosophila walking

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Durafshan Sakeena; Gowda, Swetha B.M.; Reddy, O Venkateswara; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2016-01-01

    Motoneurons developmentally acquire appropriate cellular architectures that ensure connections with postsynaptic muscles and presynaptic neurons. In Drosophila, leg motoneurons are organized as a myotopic map, where their dendritic domains represent the muscle field. Here, we investigate mechanisms underlying development of aspects of this myotopic map, required for walking. A behavioral screen identified roles for Semaphorins (Sema) and Plexins (Plex) in walking behavior. Deciphering this phenotype, we show that PlexA/Sema1a mediates motoneuron axon branching in ways that differ in the proximal femur and distal tibia, based on motoneuronal birth order. Importantly, we show a novel role for glia in positioning dendrites of specific motoneurons; PlexB/Sema2a is required for dendritic positioning of late-born motoneurons but not early-born motoneurons. These findings indicate that communication within motoneurons and between glia and motoneurons, mediated by the combined action of different Plexin/Semaphorin signaling systems, are required for the formation of a functional myotopic map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11572.001 PMID:26926907

  1. Statistical mapping of the effect of knee extension on thigh muscle viscoelastic properties using magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Eric; Kennedy, Paul; Hammer, Steven; van Beek, Edwin J R; Brown, Colin; Roberts, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties reflect muscle microstructure and neuromuscular activation. Elastographic methods, including magnetic resonance elastography, have been used to characterize muscle viscoelastic properties in terms of region of interest (ROI) measurements. The present study extended this approach to create thresholded pixel-by-pixel maps of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle during rest and knee extension in eleven subjects. ROI measurements were taken for individual quadricep muscles and the quadriceps region as a whole, and the viscoelastic parameter map pixels were statistically tested at positive false discovery rate q ≤ 0.25. ROI measurements showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″), with G″ increasing more than G', in agreement with previous findings. The q-value maps further identified the vastus intermedius as the primary driver of this change, with greater G″/G' increase than surrounding regions. Additionally, a cluster of significant decrease in G″/G' was found in the region of vastus lateralis below the fulcrum point of the lift. Viscoelastic parameter mapping of contracted muscle allows new insight into the relationship between physiology, neuromuscular activation, and human performance. PMID:24254405

  2. A similarity retrieval method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) statistical maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungaraza, R. F.; Guan, J.; Rolfe, S.; Atmosukarto, I.; Poliakov, A.; Kleinhans, N. M.; Aylward, E.; Ojemann, J.; Brinkley, J. F.; Shapiro, L. G.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a method for retrieving similar fMRI statistical images given a query fMRI statistical image. Our method thresholds the voxels within those images and extracts spatially distinct regions from the voxels that remain. Each region is defined by a feature vector that contains the region centroid, the region area, the average activation value for all the voxels within that region, the variance of those activation values, the average distance of each voxel within that region to the region's centroid, and the variance of the voxel's distance to the region's centroid. The similarity between two images is obtained by the summed minimum distance of their constituent feature vectors. Results on a dataset of fMRI statistical images from experiments involving distinct cognitive tasks are shown.

  3. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  4. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-10-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  5. Statistical analysis of polarizing maps of blood plasma laser images for the diagnostics of malignant formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungurian, V. P.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Ushenko, V. O.

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at searching the interconnections between the statistic structure of blood plasma microscopic images and manifestations of optical anisotropy of liquid crystal protein network. The model of linear birefringence of albumin and globulin crystals underlies in the ground of this work. The results of investigating the interrelation between statistical moments of the 1st-4th order are presented that characterize the coordinate distributions of polarization ellipticity of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in human organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  6. Statistical analysis of polarizing maps of blood plasma laser images for the diagnostics of malignant formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungurian, V. P.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Ushenko, V. O.

    2011-09-01

    This work is aimed at searching the interconnections between the statistic structure of blood plasma microscopic images and manifestations of optical anisotropy of liquid crystal protein network. The model of linear birefringence of albumin and globulin crystals underlies in the ground of this work. The results of investigating the interrelation between statistical moments of the 1st-4th order are presented that characterize the coordinate distributions of polarization ellipticity of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in human organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  7. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  8. Mapping sea ice using reflected GNSS signals in a bistatic radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Clara; Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Mannucci, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be used as a kind of bistatic radar, with receivers opportunistically recording ground-reflected signals transmitted by the GNSS satellites themselves. This technique, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), has primarily been explored using receivers flown on aircraft or balloons, or in modeling studies. Last year's launch of the TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) satellite represents an enormous opportunity to investigate the potential of using spaceborne GNSS receivers to sense changes in the land and ocean surface. Here, we examine the ability of reflected GNSS signals to estimate sea ice extent and sea ice age, as well as comment on the possibility of using GNSS-R to detect leads and polynyas within the ice. In particular, we quantify how the peak power of Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) generated within the GNSS receiver responds as the satellite flies over the Polar Regions. To compute the effective peak power of each DDM, we first normalize the peak power of the DDM by the noise floor. We also correct for antenna gain, range, and incidence angle. Once these corrections are made, the effective peak power across DDMs may be used as a proxy for changes in surface permittivity and surface roughness. We compare our calculations of reflected power to existing sea ice remote sensing products such as data from the SSMI/S as well as Landsat imagery. Our analysis shows that GNSS reflections are extremely sensitive to the sea ice edge, with increases in reflected power of more than 10 dB relative to reflected power over the open ocean. As the sea ice ages, it thickens and roughens, and reflected power decreases, though it does not decrease below the power over the open ocean. Given the observed sensitivity of GNSS reflections to small features over land and the sensitivity to the sea ice edge, we hypothesize that reflection data could help map the temporal evolution of leads and polynyas.

  9. Mapping Transient Hyperventilation Induced Alterations with Estimates of the Multi-Scale Dynamics of BOLD Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Remes, Jukka; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Haapea, Marianne; Silven, Olli; Tervonen, Osmo

    2009-01-01

    Temporal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast signals in functional MRI during rest may be characterized by power spectral distribution (PSD) trends of the form 1/fα. Trends with 1/f characteristics comprise fractal properties with repeating oscillation patterns in multiple time scales. Estimates of the fractal properties enable the quantification of phenomena that may otherwise be difficult to measure, such as transient, non-linear changes. In this study it was hypothesized that the fractal metrics of 1/f BOLD signal trends can map changes related to dynamic, multi-scale alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) after a transient hyperventilation challenge. Twenty-three normal adults were imaged in a resting-state before and after hyperventilation. Different variables (1/f trend constant α, fractal dimension Df, and, Hurst exponent H) characterizing the trends were measured from BOLD signals. The results show that fractal metrics of the BOLD signal follow the fractional Gaussian noise model, even during the dynamic CBF change that follows hyperventilation. The most dominant effect on the fractal metrics was detected in grey matter, in line with previous hyperventilation vaso-reactivity studies. The α was able to differentiate also blood vessels from grey matter changes. Df was most sensitive to grey matter. H correlated with default mode network areas before hyperventilation but this pattern vanished after hyperventilation due to a global increase in H. In the future, resting-state fMRI combined with fractal metrics of the BOLD signal may be used for analyzing multi-scale alterations of cerebral blood flow. PMID:19636388

  10. Gaussian statistics of the cosmic microwave background: Correlation of temperature extrema in the COBE DMR two-year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function of the extrema points (peaks and valleys) in the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 2 year sky maps as a test for non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. A maximum-likelihood analysis compares the DMR data to n = 1 toy models whose random-phase spherical harmonic components a(sub lm) are drawn from either Gaussian, chi-square, or log-normal parent populations. The likelihood of the 53 GHz (A+B)/2 data is greatest for the exact Gaussian model. There is less than 10% chance that the non-Gaussian models tested describe the DMR data, limited primarily by type II errors in the statistical inference. The extrema correlation function is a stronger test for this class of non-Gaussian models than topological statistics such as the genus.

  11. Report on 3- and 4-Point Correlation Statistics in COBE DMR Anisotropy Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Gorski, Krzystof M.; Bennett, Charles L.; Banday, Anthony J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the work performed under this contract, we have computed the 3- and 4-point correlation functions of the COBE-DMR 2-year and 4-year anisotropy maps. The results of our work showed that the 3-point correlation function is consistent with zero and that the 4-point function is not a very sensitive probe of non-Gaussian behavior in the COBE-DMR data.

  12. Statistical mapping of metabolites in the medial wall of the brain: a proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging study.

    PubMed

    Niddam, David M; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lin, Yi-Ru

    2015-03-01

    With magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), it is possible to simultaneously map distributions of several brain metabolites with relatively good spatial resolution in a short time. Although other functional imaging modalities have taken advantage of population-based inferences using spatially extended statistics, this approach remains little utilized for MRSI. In this study, statistical nonparametric mapping (SnPM) was applied to two-dimensional MRSI data from the medial walls of the human brain to assess the effect of normal aging on metabolite concentrations. The effects of different preprocessing steps on these results were then explored. Short echo time MRSI of left and right medial walls was acquired in conjunction with absolute quantification of total choline, total creatine (tCr), glutamate and glutamine, myo-inositol, and N-acetyl-aspartate. Individual images were spatially warped to a common anatomical frame of reference. Age effects were assessed within SnPM as were the effects of voxel subsampling, variance smoothing, and spatial smoothing. The main findings were: (1) regions in the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate and in the left posterior cingulate exhibited higher tCr concentrations with age; (2) voxel subsampling but not spatial smoothing enhanced the cluster-level statistical sensitivity; and (3) variance smoothing was of little benefit in this study. Our study shows that spatially extended statistics can yield information about regional-specific changes in metabolite concentrations obtained by short echo time MRSI. This opens up the possibility for systematic comparisons of metabolites in the medial wall of the brain. PMID:25338521

  13. Mapping Brain Injury with Symmetrical-channels' EEG Signal Analysis – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Yi, LI; Xiao-ping, LIU; Xian-hong, LING; Jing-qi, LI; Wen-wei, YANG; Dan-ke, ZHANG; Li-hua, LI; Yong, YANG

    2014-01-01

    A technique for detecting brain injury at the bedside has great clinical value, but conventional imaging techniques (such as computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging) are impractical. In this study, a novel method–the symmetrical channel electroencephalogram (EEG) signal analysis–was developed for this purpose. The study population consisted of 45 traumatic brain injury patients and 10 healthy controls. EEG signals in resting and stimulus states were acquired, and approximate entropy (ApEn) and slow-wave coefficient were extracted to calculate the ratio values of ApEn and SWC for injured and uninjured areas. Statistical analyses showed that the ratio values for both ApEn and SWC between injured and uninjured brain areas differed significantly (P < 0.05) for both resting and name call stimulus states. A set of criteria (range of ratio values) to determine whether a brain area is injured or uninjured was proposed and its reliability was verified by statistical analyses and CT images. PMID:24846704

  14. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianinov, Alex; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1-xSex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  15. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  16. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  17. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W-Y; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1(+/-) embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  18. Statistical Maps of Geomagnetic Disturbance and Climatological Validation of Geospace Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigler, E. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Gannon, J. L.; Love, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Considerable recent effort has gone into event-based validation of global geospace models using ground magnetometer data. Less attention has been paid to the statistical characterization and comparison of model output and real measurements. We attempt to ascertain the climatological similarity of model output with observations by comparing not just the means and variances of magnetic field fluctuations, but their linear dependencies as functions of local time. Near-equatorial ground magnetometers exhibit substantial correlation with each other. Given a complete time series of observations at all local times, it is straight-forward to construct a variance-covariance matrix that describes the 2nd statistical moment of each observatory's data, as well as any linear relationships between data obtained from different local times. Observations are not available at all local times for all time periods because magnetic observatories are sparsely distributed in longitude. However, each observatory does pass through every local time once per day, which allows a covariance matrix to be built up incrementally. We do this using statistical imputation: starting with a best initial guess for the covariance matrix, "missing" observations are replaced with the most-likely value obtained by regressing on available observations; the covariance matrix is updated; and the process is repeated until convergence is achieved (this is guaranteed by the well-known expectation maximization (EM) algorithm). Finally, a comparable covariance matrix is constructed from the geospace model output, and the two multivariate distributions are compared.

  19. Statistical parametric mapping of the regional distribution and ontogenetic scaling of foot pressures during walking in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Pataky, Todd C; Hill, Zoe; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-05-01

    Foot pressure distributions during locomotion have causal links with the anatomical and structural configurations of the foot tissues and the mechanics of locomotion. Elephant feet have five toes bound in a flexible pad of fibrous tissue (digital cushion). Does this specialized foot design control peak foot pressures in such giant animals? And how does body size, such as during ontogenetic growth, influence foot pressures? We addressed these questions by studying foot pressure distributions in elephant feet and their correlation with body mass and centre of pressure trajectories, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM), a neuro-imaging technology. Our results show a positive correlation between body mass and peak pressures, with the highest pressures dominated by the distal ends of the lateral toes (digits 3, 4 and 5). We also demonstrate that pressure reduction in the elephant digital cushion is a complex interaction of its viscoelastic tissue structure and its centre of pressure trajectories, because there is a tendency to avoid rear 'heel' contact as an elephant grows. Using SPM, we present a complete map of pressure distributions in elephant feet during ontogeny by performing statistical analysis at the pixel level across the entire plantar/palmar surface. We hope that our study will build confidence in the potential clinical and scaling applications of mammalian foot pressures, given our findings in support of a link between regional peak pressures and pathogenesis in elephant feet. PMID:22496296

  20. Image informative maps for component-wise estimating parameters of signal-dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uss, Mykhail L.; Vozel, Benoit; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Chehdi, Kacem

    2013-01-01

    We deal with the problem of blind parameter estimation of signal-dependent noise from mono-component image data. Multispectral or color images can be processed in a component-wise manner. The main results obtained rest on the assumption that the image texture and noise parameters estimation problems are interdependent. A two-dimensional fractal Brownian motion (fBm) model is used for locally describing image texture. A polynomial model is assumed for the purpose of describing the signal-dependent noise variance dependence on image intensity. Using the maximum likelihood approach, estimates of both fBm-model and noise parameters are obtained. It is demonstrated that Fisher information (FI) on noise parameters contained in an image is distributed nonuniformly over intensity coordinates (an image intensity range). It is also shown how to find the most informative intensities and the corresponding image areas for a given noisy image. The proposed estimator benefits from these detected areas to improve the estimation accuracy of signal-dependent noise parameters. Finally, the potential estimation accuracy (Cramér-Rao Lower Bound, or CRLB) of noise parameters is derived, providing confidence intervals of these estimates for a given image. In the experiment, the proposed and existing state-of-the-art noise variance estimators are compared for a large image database using CRLB-based statistical efficiency criteria.

  1. Probabilistic storm surge inundation maps for Metro Manila based on Philippine public storm warning signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tablazon, J.; Caro, C. V.; Lagmay, A. M. F.; Briones, J. B. L.; Dasallas, L.; Lapidez, J. P.; Santiago, J.; Suarez, J. K.; Ladiero, C.; Gonzalo, L. A.; Mungcal, M. T. F.; Malano, V.

    2015-03-01

    A storm surge is the sudden rise of sea water over the astronomical tides, generated by an approaching storm. This event poses a major threat to the Philippine coastal areas, as manifested by Typhoon Haiyan on 8 November 2013. This hydro-meteorological hazard is one of the main reasons for the high number of casualties due to the typhoon, with 6300 deaths. It became evident that the need to develop a storm surge inundation map is of utmost importance. To develop these maps, the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST-Project NOAH) simulated historical tropical cyclones that entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility. The Japan Meteorological Agency storm surge model was used to simulate storm surge heights. The frequency distribution of the maximum storm surge heights was calculated using simulation results of tropical cyclones under a specific public storm warning signal (PSWS) that passed through a particular coastal area. This determines the storm surge height corresponding to a given probability of occurrence. The storm surge heights from the model were added to the maximum astronomical tide data from WXTide software. The team then created maps of inundation for a specific PSWS using the probability of exceedance derived from the frequency distribution. Buildings and other structures were assigned a probability of exceedance depending on their occupancy category, i.e., 1% probability of exceedance for critical facilities, 10% probability of exceedance for special occupancy structures, and 25% for standard occupancy and miscellaneous structures. The maps produced show the storm-surge-vulnerable areas in Metro Manila, illustrated by the flood depth of up to 4 m and extent of up to 6.5 km from the coastline. This information can help local government units in developing early warning systems, disaster preparedness and mitigation plans, vulnerability assessments, risk-sensitive land use plans, shoreline

  2. Ex Vivo Signaling Protein Mapping in T Lymphocytes in the Psoriatic Arthritis Joints.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Molena, Beatrice; Zambello, Renato; Ramonda, Roberta; Cozzi, Franco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We assessed signaling protein mapping in total T cells, to analyze the proportions of T regulatory (Treg) and TCD4+ effector (Teff) cell phenotypes, and the respective interleukin 6Rα (IL-6Rα) expression in the inflammatory microenvironment of synovial fluid (SF) of patients with sustained psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Our approach was to measure the IL-6 level in SF using a multiplex bead immunoassay. Reverse-phase protein array was used to assess Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK2, extra-cellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), signal transducer and activator and transcription (STAT) 1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of patients with PsA. Frequencies of CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17A and IL-17F (Th17) and CD4+CD25high intracellular forkhead box transcription factor+ (FOXP3+) phenotypes, and the percentage of Treg- and Teff- cells were quantified in SF and matched peripheral blood (PB) of patients with PsA and PB of healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometry. Our results were the following: In PsA SF samples, a coordinate increase of JAK1, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins was found in total T cells in SF of PsA; where IL-6 levels were higher than in PB from HC. Expanded CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ Th17, CD4+ CD25- Teff- and CD4+CD25(high) FoxP3+Treg subsets, showing similar levels of enhanced IL-6Rδ expression, were confined to PsA joints. In our studies, the transcriptional network profile identified by ex vivo signaling protein mapping in T lymphocytes in PsA joints revealed the complex interplay between IL-1, IL-6, and IL-23 signaling and differentiation of Th17 cells and CD4+Tregs in sustained joint inflammation in PsA. PMID:26523057

  3. Landslide susceptibility mapping in Mawat area, Kurdistan Region, NE Iraq: a comparison of different statistical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A. A.; Gloaguen, R.; Andreani, L.; Rahnama, M.

    2015-03-01

    During the last decades, expansion of settlements into areas prone to landslides in Iraq has increased the importance of accurate hazard assessment. Susceptibility mapping provides information about hazardous locations and thus helps to potentially prevent infrastructure damage due to mass wasting. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare frequency ratio (FR), weight of evidence (WOE), logistic regression (LR) and probit regression (PR) approaches in combination with new geomorphological indices to determine the landslide susceptibility index (LSI). We tested these four methods in Mawat area, Kurdistan Region, NE Iraq, where landslides occur frequently. For this purpose, we evaluated 16 geomorphological, geological and environmental predicting factors mainly derived from the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) satellite. The available reference inventory includes 351 landslides representing a cumulative surface of 3.127 km2. This reference inventory was mapped from QuickBird data by manual delineation and partly verified by field survey. The areas under curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC), and relative landslide density (R index) show that all models perform similarly and that focus should be put on the careful selection of proxies. The results indicate that the lithology and the slope aspects play major roles for landslide occurrences. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates that using hypsometric integral as a prediction factor instead of slope curvature gives better results and increases the accuracy of the LSI.

  4. Automated Brain Tissue Segmentation Based on Fractional Signal Mapping from Inversion Recovery Look-Locker Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Wanyong; Geng, Xiujuan; Gu, Hong; Zhan, Wang; Zou, Qihong; Yang, Yihong

    2010-01-01

    Most current automated segmentation methods are performed on T1- or T2-weighted MR images, relying on relative image intensity that is dependent on other MR parameters and sensitive to B1 magnetic field inhomogeneity. Here, we propose an image segmentation method based on quantitative longitudinal magnetization relaxation time (T1) of brain tissues. Considering the partial volume effect, fractional volume maps of brain tissues (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) were obtained by fitting the observed signal in an inversion recovery procedure to a linear combination of three exponential functions, which represents the relaxations of each of the tissue types. A Look-Locker acquisition was employed to accelerate the acquisition process. The feasibility and efficacy of this proposed method were evaluated using simulations and experiments. The potential applications of this method in the study of neurological disease as well as normal brain development and aging are discussed. PMID:20452444

  5. Statistical mapping of effects of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) on blood flow and oxygen consumption in porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Sakoh, Masaharu; Andersen, Flemming; Rodell, Anders; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Østergaard, Leif; Mouridsen, Kim; Cumming, Paul

    2007-02-15

    The volume of cerebral tissue perturbed in experimental models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) can be highly variable. Thus, the territories of reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) or oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) following MCAO might properly be defined using statistical parametric mapping within a population. In order to establish such a method, we mapped CBF and CMRO(2) in 18 pigs with acute MCAO. Parametric maps were flipped about the axis of symmetry, and CBF and CMRO(2) in the infarcted hemisphere were calculated as percentages of the magnitudes in mirror-image pixels. There were log-linear relationships between the volumes of affected tissue and the percentages of normal CFB or CMRO(2). This graphical analysis showed that the volume of the core deficit was smaller for CBF that for CMRO(2), but expanded more rapidly with decreasing CBF deficit than did the corresponding volumes of reduced CMRO(2). Thus, acute changes in CBF and CMRO(2) following MCAO in the pig can be defined as probabilistic volumes. PMID:17129609

  6. The characterisation of blood rotation in a human heart chamber based on statistical analysis of vorticity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Kelso, Richard M.; Worthley, Stephen G.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Abbott, Derek

    2008-12-01

    Modelling of non-stationary cardiac structures is complicated by the complexity of their intrinsic and extrinsic motion. The first known study of haemodynamics due to the beating of heart was made by Leonardo Da Vinci, giving the idea of fluid-solid interaction by describing how vortices develop during cardiac structural interaction with the blood. Heart morphology affects in changes of cardio dynamics during the systolic and diastolic phrases. In a chamber of the heart, vortices are discovered to exist as the result of the unique morphological changes of the cardiac chamber wall by using flow-imaging techniques such as phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of this paper attempts to quantify vortex characteristics by means of calculating vorticity numerically and devising two dimensional vortical flow maps. The technique relies on determining the properties of vorticity using a statistical quantification of the flow maps and comparison of these quantities based on different scenarios. As the characteristics of our vorticity maps vary depending on the phase of a cardiac cycle, there is a need for robust quantification method to analyse vorticity. In the second part of the paper, the approach is then utilised for examining vortices within the human right atrium. Our study has shown that a proper quantification of vorticity for the flow field can indicate the strength and number of vortices within a heart chamber.

  7. Mobility statistics and automated hazard mapping for debris flows and rock avalanches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griswold, Julia P.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Power-law equations that are physically motivated and statistically tested and calibrated provide a basis for forecasting areas likely to be inundated by debris flows, rock avalanches, and lahars with diverse volumes. The equations A=α1V2/3 and B=α2V2/3 are based on the postulate that the maximum valley cross-sectional area (A) and total valley planimetric area (B) likely to be inundated by a flow depend only on its volume (V) and the topography of the flow path. Testing of these equations involves determining whether or not they fit data for documented flows satisfactorily, and calibration entails determining best-fit values of the coefficients α1 and α2 for debris flows, rock avalanches, and lahars. This report describes statistical testing and calibration of the equations by using field data compiled from many sources, and it describes application of the equations to delineation of debris-flow hazard zones. Statistical results show that for each type of flow (debris flows, rock avalanches, and lahars), the dependence of A and B on V is described well by power laws with exponents equal to 2/3. This value of the exponent produces fits that are effectively indistinguishable from the best fits obtained by using adjustable power-law exponents. Statistically calibrated values of the coefficients α1 and α2 provide scale-invariant indices of the relative mobilities of rock avalanches (α1 = 0.2, α2 = 20), nonvolcanic debris flows (α1 = 0.1, α2 = 20), and lahars (α1 = 0.05, α2 = 200). These values show, for example, that a lahar of specified volume can be expected to inundate a planimetric area ten times larger than that inundated by a rock avalanche or nonvolcanic debris flow of the same volume. The utility of the calibrated debris-flow inundation equations A=0.1V2/3 and B=20V2/3 is demonstrated by using them within the GIS program LAHARZ to delineate nested hazard zones for future debris flows in an area bordering the Umpqua River in the south-central Oregon

  8. Mapping of Planetary Surface Age Based on Crater Statistics Obtained by AN Automatic Detection Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, A. L.; Mühlbauer, M.; Grumpe, A.; Pasckert, J. H.; Wöhler, C.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) is a well-established approach to the determination of the age of planetary surfaces. Classically, estimation of the CSFD is achieved by manual crater counting and size determination in spacecraft images, which, however, becomes very time-consuming for large surface areas and/or high image resolution. With increasing availability of high-resolution (nearly) global image mosaics of planetary surfaces, a variety of automated methods for the detection of craters based on image data and/or topographic data have been developed. In this contribution a template-based crater detection algorithm is used which analyses image data acquired under known illumination conditions. Its results are used to establish the CSFD for the examined area, which is then used to estimate the absolute model age of the surface. The detection threshold of the automatic crater detection algorithm is calibrated based on a region with available manually determined CSFD such that the age inferred from the manual crater counts corresponds to the age inferred from the automatic crater detection results. With this detection threshold, the automatic crater detection algorithm can be applied to a much larger surface region around the calibration area. The proposed age estimation method is demonstrated for a Kaguya Terrain Camera image mosaic of 7.4 m per pixel resolution of the floor region of the lunar crater Tsiolkovsky, which consists of dark and flat mare basalt and has an area of nearly 10,000 km2. The region used for calibration, for which manual crater counts are available, has an area of 100 km2. In order to obtain a spatially resolved age map, CSFDs and surface ages are computed for overlapping quadratic regions of about 4.4 x 4.4 km2 size offset by a step width of 74 m. Our constructed surface age map of the floor of Tsiolkovsky shows age values of typically 3.2-3.3 Ga, while for small regions lower (down to 2.9 Ga) and higher

  9. A method for modelling peak signal statistics on a mobile satellite transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilodeau, Andre; Lecours, Michel; Pelletier, Marcel; Delisle, Gilles Y.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation method is proposed. The simulation was developed to model the peak duration and energy content of signal peaks in a mobile communication satellite operating in a Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) mode and presents an estimate of those power peaks for a system where the channels are modeled as band limited Gaussian noise, which is taken as a reasonable representation for Amplitude Commanded Single Sideband (ACSSB), Minimum Shift Keying (MSK), or Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated signals. The simulation results show that, under this hypothesis, the level of the signal power peaks for 10 percent, 1 percent, and 0.1 percent of the time are well described by a Rayleigh law and that their duration is extremely short and inversely proportional to the total FDM system bandwidth.

  10. The ElderSmile TimeMap: Benefits of Connecting Statistics With Time and Place.

    PubMed

    Kum, Susan S; Wang, Hua; Wang, Peng; Jin, Zhu; De La Cruz, Leydis; Northridge, Mary E; Kunzel, Carol; Marshall, Stephen E; Metcalf, Sara S

    2015-09-01

    Community-based programs are critical for locally targeted public health education and accessible service delivery. Deriving useful information from such programs is important for their own evaluation and improvement and may facilitate research collaboration with partners and experts. Here we present an interactive Web-based application designed for a community-based oral health outreach program called ElderSmile to demonstrate how data can be summarized, filtered, compared, and visualized by time and place to inform program planning, evaluation, and research. The ElderSmile TimeMap ( http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/∼smetcalf/resources/timemap.html ) is an emergent product of a US National Institutes of Health-funded collaboration of knowledge sharing among multidisciplinary team members at the University at Buffalo, Columbia University, and New York University. PMID:26180989

  11. High-resolution statistical mapping reveals gene territories in live yeast.

    PubMed

    Berger, Axel B; Cabal, Ghislain G; Fabre, Emmanuelle; Duong, Tarn; Buc, Henri; Nehrbass, Ulf; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Gadal, Olivier; Zimmer, Christophe

    2008-12-01

    The nonrandom positioning of genes inside eukaryotic cell nuclei is implicated in central nuclear functions. However, the spatial organization of the genome remains largely uncharted, owing to limited resolution of optical microscopy, paucity of nuclear landmarks and moderate cell sampling. We developed a computational imaging approach that creates high-resolution probabilistic maps of subnuclear domains occupied by individual loci in budding yeast through automated analysis of thousands of living cells. After validation, we applied the technique to genes involved in galactose metabolism and ribosome biogenesis. We found that genomic loci are confined to 'gene territories' much smaller than the nucleus, which can be remodeled during transcriptional activation, and that the nucleolus is an important landmark for gene positioning. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify territory positions relative to each other and to nuclear landmarks, and should advance studies of nuclear architecture and function. PMID:18978785

  12. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45} (T{sub c} = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  13. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signaturemore » and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.« less

  14. MAPPING THE LOCAL HALO: STATISTICAL PARALLAX ANALYSIS OF SDSS LOW-MASS SUBDWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J.; Savcheva, Antonia; West, Andrew A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2013-02-01

    We present a statistical parallax study of nearly 2000 M subdwarfs with photometry and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Statistical parallax analysis yields the mean absolute magnitudes, mean velocities, and velocity ellipsoids for homogenous samples of stars. We selected homogeneous groups of subdwarfs based on their photometric colors and spectral appearance. We examined the color-magnitude relations of low-mass subdwarfs and quantified their dependence on the newly refined metallicity parameter, {zeta}. We also developed a photometric metallicity parameter, {delta}{sub (g-r)}, based on the g - r and r - z colors of low-mass stars and used it to select stars with similar metallicities. The kinematics of low-mass subdwarfs as a function of color and metallicity were also examined and compared to main-sequence M dwarfs. We find that the SDSS subdwarfs share similar kinematics to the inner halo and thick disk. The color-magnitude relations derived in this analysis will be a powerful tool for identifying and characterizing low-mass metal-poor subdwarfs in future surveys such as Gaia and LSST, making them important and plentiful tracers of the stellar halo.

  15. A spatial, statistical approach to map the risk of milk contamination by β-hexachlorocyclohexane in dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Sabrina; Caminiti, Antonino; Ciotoli, Giancarlo; Panetta, Valentina; Rombolà, Pasquale; Sala, Marcello; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2013-11-01

    In May 2005, beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) was found in a sample of bovine bulk milk from a farm in the Sacco River valley (Latium region, central Italy). The primary source of contamination was suspected to be industrial discharge into the environment with the Sacco River as the main mean of dispersion. Since then, a surveillance programme on bulk milk of the local farms was carried out by the veterinary services. In order to estimate the spatial probability of β- HCH contamination of milk produced in the Sacco River valley and draw probability maps of contamination, probability maps of β-HCH values in milk were estimated by indicator kriging (IK), a geo-statistical estimator, and traditional logistic regression (LR) combined with a geographical information systems approach. The former technique produces a spatial view of probabilities above a specific threshold at non-sampled locations on the basis of observed values in the area, while LR gives the probabilities in specific locations on the basis of certain environmental predictors, namely the distance from the river, the distance from the pollution site, the elevation above the river level and the intrinsic vulnerability of hydro-geological formations. Based on the β-HCH data from 2005 in the Sacco River valley, the two techniques resulted in similar maps of high risk of milk contamination. However, unlike the IK method, the LR model was capable of estimating coefficients that could be used in case of future pollution episodes. The approach presented produces probability maps and define high-risk areas already in the early stages of an emergency before sampling operations have been carried out. PMID:24258885

  16. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiaoyong; Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Ma, Yaxian; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yin, Weiyao; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Xu, Wenming; Ming Xu, Wen; Xu, Liangzhi; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued. PMID:26738434

  17. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Ming Xu, Wen; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued. PMID:26738434

  18. Real time moving object detection using motor signal and depth map for robot car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Siu, Wan-Chi

    2013-12-01

    Moving object detection from a moving camera is a fundamental task in many applications. For the moving robot car vision, the background movement is 3D motion structure in nature. In this situation, the conventional moving object detection algorithm cannot be use to handle the 3D background modeling effectively and efficiently. In this paper, a novel scheme is proposed by utilizing the motor control signal and depth map obtained from a stereo camera to model the perspective transform matrix between different frames under a moving camera. In our approach, the coordinate relationship between frames during camera moving is modeled by a perspective transform matrix which is obtained by using current motor control signals and the pixel depth value. Hence, the relationship between a static background pixel and the moving foreground corresponding to the camera motion can be related by a perspective matrix. To enhance the robustness of classification, we allowed a tolerance range during the perspective transform matrix prediction and used multi-reference frames to classify the pixel on current frame. The proposed scheme has been found to be able to detect moving objects for our moving robot car efficiently. Different from conventional approaches, our method can model the moving background in 3D structure, without online model training. More importantly, the computational complexity and memory requirement are low making it possible to implement this scheme in real-time, which is even valuable for a robot vision system.

  19. A Critical Examination of the Statistic Used for Processing Speech Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Keith

    This paper assesses certain properties of human mental processes by focusing on the tactics utilized in perceiving speech signals. Topics discussed in the paper include the power spectrum approach to fluctuations and noise, with particular reference to biological structures; "l/f-like" fluctuations in speech and music and the functioning of a…

  20. Distinguishing transient signals and instrumental disturbances in semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves with line-robust statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, David

    2016-05-01

    Non-axisymmetries in rotating neutron stars emit quasi-monochromatic gravitational waves. These long-duration ‘continuous wave’ signals are among the main search targets of ground-based interferometric detectors. However, standard detection methods are susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts that resemble a continuous-wave signal. Past work [Keitel, Prix, Papa, Leaci and Siddiqi 2014, Phys. Rev. D 89 064023] showed that a Bayesian approach, based on an explicit model of persistent single-detector disturbances, improves robustness against such artefacts. Since many strong outliers in semi-coherent searches of LIGO data are caused by transient disturbances that last only a few hours or days, I describe in a recent paper [Keitel D 2015, LIGO-P1500159] how to extend this approach to cover transient disturbances, and demonstrate increased sensitivity in realistic simulated data. Additionally, neutron stars could emit transient signals which, for a limited time, also follow the continuous-wave signal model. As a pragmatic alternative to specialized transient searches, I demonstrate how to make standard semi-coherent continuous-wave searches more sensitive to transient signals. Focusing on the time-scale of a single segment in the semi-coherent search, Bayesian model selection yields a simple detection statistic without a significant increase in computational cost. This proceedings contribution gives a brief overview of both works.

  1. Predicting the intensity mapping signal for multi-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Sternberg, Amiel; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel approach to estimating the intensity mapping signal of any CO rotational line emitted during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Our approach is based on large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling, a radiative transfer modeling technique that generates the full CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) for a specified gas kinetic temperature, volume density, velocity gradient, molecular abundance, and column density. These parameters, which drive the physics of CO transitions and ultimately dictate the shape and amplitude of the CO SLED, can be linked to the global properties of the host galaxy, mainly the star formation rate (SFR) and the SFR surface density. By further employing an empirically derived SFR-M relation for high redshift galaxies, we can express the LVG parameters, and thus the specific intensity of any CO rotational transition, as functions of the host halo mass M and redshift z. Integrating over the range of halo masses expected to host CO-luminous galaxies, we predict a mean CO(1-0) brightness temperature ranging from ~ 0.6 μK at z = 6 to ~ 0.03 μK at z = 10 with brightness temperature fluctuations of ΔCO2 ~ 0.1 and 0.005 μK respectively, at k = 0.1 Mpc-1. In this model, the CO emission signal remains strong for higher rotational levels at z = 6, with langle TCO rangle ~ 0.3 and 0.05 μK for the CO J = 6arrow5 and CO J = 10arrow9 transitions respectively. Including the effects of CO photodissociation in these molecular clouds, especially at low metallicities, results in the overall reduction in the amplitude of the CO signal, with the low- and high-J lines weakening by 2-20% and 10-45%, respectively, over the redshift range 4 < z < 10.

  2. A Self-Organizing Map-Based Approach to Generating Reduced-Size, Statistically Similar Climate Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabell, R.; Delle Monache, L.; Alessandrini, S.; Rodriguez, L.

    2015-12-01

    Climate-based studies require large amounts of data in order to produce accurate and reliable results. Many of these studies have used 30-plus year data sets in order to produce stable and high-quality results, and as a result, many such data sets are available, generally in the form of global reanalyses. While the analysis of these data lead to high-fidelity results, its processing can be very computationally expensive. This computational burden prevents the utilization of these data sets for certain applications, e.g., when rapid response is needed in crisis management and disaster planning scenarios resulting from release of toxic material in the atmosphere. We have developed a methodology to reduce large climate datasets to more manageable sizes while retaining statistically similar results when used to produce ensembles of possible outcomes. We do this by employing a Self-Organizing Map (SOM) algorithm to analyze general patterns of meteorological fields over a regional domain of interest to produce a small set of "typical days" with which to generate the model ensemble. The SOM algorithm takes as input a set of vectors and generates a 2D map of representative vectors deemed most similar to the input set and to each other. Input predictors are selected that are correlated with the model output, which in our case is an Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion (T&D) model that is highly dependent on surface winds and boundary layer depth. To choose a subset of "typical days," each input day is assigned to its closest SOM map node vector and then ranked by distance. Each node vector is treated as a distribution and days are sampled from them by percentile. Using a 30-node SOM, with sampling every 20th percentile, we have been able to reduce 30 years of the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data for the month of October to 150 "typical days." To estimate the skill of this approach, the "Measure of Effectiveness" (MOE) metric is used to compare area and overlap

  3. TU-C-12A-02: Development of a Multiparametric Statistical Response Map for Quantitative Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bosca, R; Mahajan, A; Brown, PD; Stafford, RJ; Johnson, VE; Dong, L; Jackson, EF

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIB) are becoming increasingly utilized in early phase clinical trials as a means of non-invasively assessing treatment response and associated response heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a flexible multiparametric statistical framework to predict voxel-by-voxel response of several potential MRI QIBs. Methods: Patients with histologically proven glioblastomas (n=11) were treated with chemoradiation (with/without bevacizumab) and underwent one baseline and two mid-treatment (3–4wks) MRIs. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D FSPGR, 6.3sec/phase, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), dynamic susceptibility contrast (2D GRE-EPI, 1.5sec/phase, 0.2mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), and diffusion tensor (2D DW-EPI, b=0, 1200 s/mm{sup 2}, 27 directions) imaging acquisitions were obtained during each study. Mid-treatment and pre-treatment images were rigidly aligned, and regions of partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD) were contoured in consensus by two experienced radiation oncologists. Voxels in these categories were used to train ordinal (PRstatistical framework for incorporating longitudinal multiparametric

  4. Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network: a systems biology resource for integrative analysis of cancer data with Google Maps

    PubMed Central

    Kuperstein, I; Bonnet, E; Nguyen, H-A; Cohen, D; Viara, E; Grieco, L; Fourquet, S; Calzone, L; Russo, C; Kondratova, M; Dutreix, M; Barillot, E; Zinovyev, A

    2015-01-01

    Cancerogenesis is driven by mutations leading to aberrant functioning of a complex network of molecular interactions and simultaneously affecting multiple cellular functions. Therefore, the successful application of bioinformatics and systems biology methods for analysis of high-throughput data in cancer research heavily depends on availability of global and detailed reconstructions of signalling networks amenable for computational analysis. We present here the Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network (ACSN), an interactive and comprehensive map of molecular mechanisms implicated in cancer. The resource includes tools for map navigation, visualization and analysis of molecular data in the context of signalling network maps. Constructing and updating ACSN involves careful manual curation of molecular biology literature and participation of experts in the corresponding fields. The cancer-oriented content of ACSN is completely original and covers major mechanisms involved in cancer progression, including DNA repair, cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle, EMT and cell motility. Cell signalling mechanisms are depicted in detail, together creating a seamless ‘geographic-like' map of molecular interactions frequently deregulated in cancer. The map is browsable using NaviCell web interface using the Google Maps engine and semantic zooming principle. The associated web-blog provides a forum for commenting and curating the ACSN content. ACSN allows uploading heterogeneous omics data from users on top of the maps for visualization and performing functional analyses. We suggest several scenarios for ACSN application in cancer research, particularly for visualizing high-throughput data, starting from small interfering RNA-based screening results or mutation frequencies to innovative ways of exploring transcriptomes and phosphoproteomes. Integration and analysis of these data in the context of ACSN may help interpret their biological significance and formulate mechanistic hypotheses

  5. Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network: a systems biology resource for integrative analysis of cancer data with Google Maps.

    PubMed

    Kuperstein, I; Bonnet, E; Nguyen, H-A; Cohen, D; Viara, E; Grieco, L; Fourquet, S; Calzone, L; Russo, C; Kondratova, M; Dutreix, M; Barillot, E; Zinovyev, A

    2015-01-01

    Cancerogenesis is driven by mutations leading to aberrant functioning of a complex network of molecular interactions and simultaneously affecting multiple cellular functions. Therefore, the successful application of bioinformatics and systems biology methods for analysis of high-throughput data in cancer research heavily depends on availability of global and detailed reconstructions of signalling networks amenable for computational analysis. We present here the Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network (ACSN), an interactive and comprehensive map of molecular mechanisms implicated in cancer. The resource includes tools for map navigation, visualization and analysis of molecular data in the context of signalling network maps. Constructing and updating ACSN involves careful manual curation of molecular biology literature and participation of experts in the corresponding fields. The cancer-oriented content of ACSN is completely original and covers major mechanisms involved in cancer progression, including DNA repair, cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle, EMT and cell motility. Cell signalling mechanisms are depicted in detail, together creating a seamless 'geographic-like' map of molecular interactions frequently deregulated in cancer. The map is browsable using NaviCell web interface using the Google Maps engine and semantic zooming principle. The associated web-blog provides a forum for commenting and curating the ACSN content. ACSN allows uploading heterogeneous omics data from users on top of the maps for visualization and performing functional analyses. We suggest several scenarios for ACSN application in cancer research, particularly for visualizing high-throughput data, starting from small interfering RNA-based screening results or mutation frequencies to innovative ways of exploring transcriptomes and phosphoproteomes. Integration and analysis of these data in the context of ACSN may help interpret their biological significance and formulate mechanistic hypotheses

  6. A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, C.; Neilson, R.P.; Phillips, D.L.

    1994-02-01

    The demand for climatological precipitation fields on a regular grid is growing dramatically as ecological and hydrological models become increasingly linked to geographic information systems that spatially represent and manipulate model output. This paper presents an analytical model that distributes point measurements of monthly and annual precipitation to regularly spaced grid cells in midlatitude regions. PRISM (Precipitation-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) brings a combination of climatological and statistical concepts to the analysis of orographic precipitation. Specifically, PRISM (1) uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to estimate the {open_quotes}orographic{close_quotes} elevations of precipitation stations; (2) uses the DEM and a windowing technique to group stations onto individual topographic facets; (3) estimates precipitation at a DEM grid cell through a regression of precipitation versus DEM elevation developed from stations on the cell`s topographic facet; and (4) when possible, calculates a prediction interval for the estimate, which is an approximation of the uncertainty involved. PRISM exhibited the lowest cross-validation bias and absolute error when compared to kriging, detrended kriging, and cokriging in the Willamette River basin, Oregon. PRISM was also applied to northern Oregon and to the entire western United States; detrended kriging and cokriging could not be used, because there was no overall relationship between elevation and precipitation. Cross-validation errors in these applications were confined to relatively low levels because PRISM continually adjusts its frame of reference by using localized precipitation-DEM elevation relationships. 39 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Mapping Individual Brain Networks Using Statistical Similarity in Regional Morphology from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-zhen; Liu, Zhaoguo; Huang, Lijie; Wang, Xu; Yang, Zetian; Zhou, Guangfu; Zhen, Zonglei; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Representing brain morphology as a network has the advantage that the regional morphology of ‘isolated’ structures can be described statistically based on graph theory. However, very few studies have investigated brain morphology from the holistic perspective of complex networks, particularly in individual brains. We proposed a new network framework for individual brain morphology. Technically, in the new network, nodes are defined as regions based on a brain atlas, and edges are estimated using our newly-developed inter-regional relation measure based on regional morphological distributions. This implementation allows nodes in the brain network to be functionally/anatomically homogeneous but different with respect to shape and size. We first demonstrated the new network framework in a healthy sample. Thereafter, we studied the graph-theoretical properties of the networks obtained and compared the results with previous morphological, anatomical, and functional networks. The robustness of the method was assessed via measurement of the reliability of the network metrics using a test-retest dataset. Finally, to illustrate potential applications, the networks were used to measure age-related changes in commonly used network metrics. Results suggest that the proposed method could provide a concise description of brain organization at a network level and be used to investigate interindividual variability in brain morphology from the perspective of complex networks. Furthermore, the method could open a new window into modeling the complexly distributed brain and facilitate the emerging field of human connectomics. PMID:26536598

  8. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  9. Statistical physics approach to categorize biologic signals: From heart rate dynamics to DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Yang, Albert C.-C.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2007-03-01

    We recently proposed a novel approach to categorize information carried by symbolic sequences based on their usage of repetitive patterns. A simple quantitative index to measure the dissimilarity between two symbolic sequences can be defined. This information dissimilarity index, defined by our formula, is closely related to the Shannon entropy and rank order of the repetitive patterns in the symbolic sequences. Here we discuss the underlying statistical physics assumptions of this dissimilarity index. We use human cardiac interbeat interval time series and DNA sequences as examples to illustrate the applicability of this generic approach to real-world problems.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) integrates developmental signals for eyelid closure

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond; Meng, Qinghang; Mongan, Maureen; Wang, Jingcai; Takatori, Atsushi; Zheng, Yi; Puga, Alvaro; Lang, Richard A.; Xia, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Developmental eyelid closure is an evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic event requiring proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton reorganization, and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelid. Many signaling events take place during eyelid closure, but how the signals converge to regulate the morphogenetic process remains an open and intriguing question. Here we show that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) highly expressed in the developing eyelid epithelium, forms with c-Jun, a regulatory axis that orchestrates morphogenesis by integrating two different networks of eyelid closure signals. A TGF-α/EGFR-RhoA module initiates one of these networks by inducing c-Jun expression which, in a phosphorylation-independent manner, binds to the Map3k1 promoter and causes an increase in MAP3K1 expression. RhoA knockout in the ocular surface epithelium disturbs this network by decreasing MAP3K1 expression, and causes delayed eyelid closure in Map3k1 hemizygotes. The second network is initiated by the enzymatic activity of MAP3K1, which phosphorylates and activates a JNK-c-Jun module, leading to AP-1 transactivation and induction of its downstream genes, such as Pai-1. MAP3K1 inactivation reduces AP-1 activity and PAI-1 expression both in cells and developing eyelids. MAP3K1 is therefore the nexus of an intracrine regulatory loop connecting the TGF-α/EGFR/RhoA-c-Jun and JNK-c-Jun-AP-1 pathways in developmental eyelid closure. PMID:21969564

  11. Mapping cell populations in flow cytometry data for cross-sample comparison using the Friedman-Rafsky test statistic as a distance measure.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiaowen; Liu, Mengya; Stanton, Rick; McGee, Monnie; Qian, Yu; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a fluorescence-based single-cell experimental technology that is routinely applied in biomedical research for identifying cellular biomarkers of normal physiological responses and abnormal disease states. While many computational methods have been developed that focus on identifying cell populations in individual FCM samples, very few have addressed how the identified cell populations can be matched across samples for comparative analysis. This article presents FlowMap-FR, a novel method for cell population mapping across FCM samples. FlowMap-FR is based on the Friedman-Rafsky nonparametric test statistic (FR statistic), which quantifies the equivalence of multivariate distributions. As applied to FCM data by FlowMap-FR, the FR statistic objectively quantifies the similarity between cell populations based on the shapes, sizes, and positions of fluorescence data distributions in the multidimensional feature space. To test and evaluate the performance of FlowMap-FR, we simulated the kinds of biological and technical sample variations that are commonly observed in FCM data. The results show that FlowMap-FR is able to effectively identify equivalent cell populations between samples under scenarios of proportion differences and modest position shifts. As a statistical test, FlowMap-FR can be used to determine whether the expression of a cellular marker is statistically different between two cell populations, suggesting candidates for new cellular phenotypes by providing an objective statistical measure. In addition, FlowMap-FR can indicate situations in which inappropriate splitting or merging of cell populations has occurred during gating procedures. We compared the FR statistic with the symmetric version of Kullback-Leibler divergence measure used in a previous population matching method with both simulated and real data. The FR statistic outperforms the symmetric version of KL-distance in distinguishing equivalent from nonequivalent cell

  12. Structure-based statistical thermodynamic analysis of T4 lysozyme mutants: structural mapping of cooperative interactions.

    PubMed

    Hilser, V J; Townsend, B D; Freire, E

    1997-02-28

    The recent development of a structural parameterization of the energetics of protein folding has permitted the incorporation of the functions that describe the enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes, i.e. the individual components of the Gibbs energy, into a statistical thermodynamic formalism that describes the distribution of conformational states under equilibrium conditions. The goal of this approach is to construct with the computer a large ensemble of conformational states, and then to derive the most probable population distribution, i.e. the distribution of states that best accounts for a wide array of experimental observables. This analysis has been applied to four different mutants of T4 lysozyme (S44A, S44G, V131A, V131G). It is shown that the structural parameterization predicts well the stability of the protein and the effects of the mutations. The entire set of folding constants per residue has been calculated for the four mutants. In all cases, the effect of the mutations propagates beyond the mutation site itself through sequence and three-dimensional space. This phenomenon occurs despite the fact that the mutations are at solvent-exposed locations and do not directly affect other interactions in the protein. These results suggest that single amino acid mutations at solvent-exposed locations, or other locations that cause a minimal perturbation, can be used to identify the extent of cooperative interactions. The magnitude and extent of these effects and the accuracy of the algorithm can be tested by means of NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. PMID:9127939

  13. Mapping and monitoring net primary productivity with AVHRR NDVI time-series: statistical equivalence of cumulative vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotta, Carlo; Avena, Giancarlo; De Palma, Alessandra

    In the last two decades, numerous investigators have proposed cumulative vegetation indices (i.e., functions which encode the cumulative effect of NDVI maximum value composite time-series into a single variable) for net primary productivity (NPP) mapping and monitoring on a regional to continental basis. In this paper, we investigate the relationships among three of the most commonly used cumulative vegetation indices, expanding on the definition of equivalence of remotely sensed vegetation indices for decision making. We consider two cumulative vegetation indices as equivalent, if the value of one index is statistically predictable from the value of the other index. Using an annual time-series of broad-scale AVHRR NDVI monthly maximum value composites of the island of Corsica (France), we show that the pairwise linear association among the analysed cumulative vegetation indices shows coefficients of determination ( R2) higher than 0.99. That is, knowing the value of one index is statistically equivalent to knowing the value of the other indices for application purposes.

  14. Role of p38 MAP Kinase Signal Transduction in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Mintu; Koul, Sweaty

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) mediate a wide variety of cellular behaviors in response to extracellular stimuli. One of the main subgroups, the p38 MAP kinases, has been implicated in a wide range of complex biologic processes, such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cell death, cell migration, and invasion. Dysregulation of p38 MAPK levels in patients are associated with advanced stages and short survival in cancer patients (e.g., prostate, breast, bladder, liver, and lung cancer). p38 MAPK plays a dual role as a regulator of cell death, and it can either mediate cell survival or cell death depending not only on the type of stimulus but also in a cell type specific manner. In addition to modulating cell survival, an essential role of p38 MAPK in modulation of cell migration and invasion offers a distinct opportunity to target this pathway with respect to tumor metastasis. The specific function of p38 MAPK appears to depend not only on the cell type but also on the stimuli and/or the isoform that is activated. p38 MAPK signaling pathway is activated in response to diverse stimuli and mediates its function by components downstream of p38. Extrapolation of the knowledge gained from laboratory findings is essential to address the clinical significance of p38 MAPK signaling pathways. The goal of this review is to provide an overview on recent progress made in defining the functions of p38 MAPK pathways with respect to solid tumor biology and generate testable hypothesis with respect to the role of p38 MAPK as an attractive target for intervention of solid tumors. PMID:24349632

  15. ErbB2, EphrinB1, Src Kinase and PTPN13 Signaling Complex Regulates MAP Kinase Signaling in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Paola D.; Bell, Megan; Lee, Kimberly; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Wieking, Byrant G.; Bilal, Erhan; Bhanot, Gyan; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Ganesan, Shridar; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Hendriks, Wiljan J.; Lee, John H.

    2012-01-01

    In non-cancerous cells, phosphorylated proteins exist transiently, becoming de-phosphorylated by specific phosphatases that terminate propagation of signaling pathways. In cancers, compromised phosphatase activity and/or expression occur and contribute to tumor phenotype. The non-receptor phosphatase, PTPN13, has recently been dubbed a putative tumor suppressor. It decreased expression in breast cancer correlates with decreased overall survival. Here we show that PTPN13 regulates a new signaling complex in breast cancer consisting of ErbB2, Src, and EphrinB1. To our knowledge, this signaling complex has not been previously described. Co-immunoprecipitation and localization studies demonstrate that EphrinB1, a PTPN13 substrate, interacts with ErbB2. In addition, the oncogenic V660E ErbB2 mutation enhances this interaction, while Src kinase mediates EphrinB1 phosphorylation and subsequent MAP Kinase signaling. Decreased PTPN13 function further enhances signaling. The association of oncogene kinases (ErbB2, Src), a signaling transmembrane ligand (EphrinB1) and a phosphatase tumor suppressor (PTPN13) suggest that EphrinB1 may be a relevant therapeutic target in breast cancers harboring ErbB2-activating mutations and decreased PTPN13 expression. PMID:22279592

  16. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mu; Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Kunjie; Tian, Zengshan; Wang, Yanmeng; He, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN), received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL) by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR) algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization. PMID:26404274

  17. PRIMAL: Page Rank-Based Indoor Mapping and Localization Using Gene-Sequenced Unlabeled WLAN Received Signal Strength

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Kunjie; Tian, Zengshan; Wang, Yanmeng; He, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the wide deployment of wireless local area networks (WLAN), received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor WLAN localization has attracted considerable attention in both academia and industry. In this paper, we propose a novel page rank-based indoor mapping and localization (PRIMAL) by using the gene-sequenced unlabeled WLAN RSS for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Specifically, first of all, based on the observation of the motion patterns of the people in the target environment, we use the Allen logic to construct the mobility graph to characterize the connectivity among different areas of interest. Second, the concept of gene sequencing is utilized to assemble the sporadically-collected RSS sequences into a signal graph based on the transition relations among different RSS sequences. Third, we apply the graph drawing approach to exhibit both the mobility graph and signal graph in a more readable manner. Finally, the page rank (PR) algorithm is proposed to construct the mapping from the signal graph into the mobility graph. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves satisfactory localization accuracy and meanwhile avoids the intensive time and labor cost involved in the conventional location fingerprinting-based indoor WLAN localization. PMID:26404274

  18. Regional patterns of cropland and pasture burning: Statistical separation of signals from remote sensing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, S. S.; Pacala, S. W.; Magi, B. I.; Shevliakova, E.

    2013-12-01

    The use of fire in agriculture--to manage crop residues and pastoral grasses, and for clearing land--has consequences worldwide for air quality, human health, and climate. Airborne particulate matter from such burning aggravates respiratory ailments and can influence regional precipitation, while associated greenhouse gases and aerosols affect global climate. Little research, however, has focused on understanding patterns of cropland and pasture fire use with an eye towards simulation at global scales. Previous work by these authors showed that the separate seasonal trends of agricultural and non-agricultural fire could be extracted from large-scale fire observation and land use datasets. This study builds on that research, describing the derivation and application of a statistical method to estimate both the seasonality and amount of cropland, pasture, and other fire based on observations from satellite-based remote sensing products. We demonstrate that our approach is flexible enough to allow the incorporation of alternative high-quality observations of fire and/or land use that might be available only for certain regions. Results for a number of large regions around the world show that these two kinds of agricultural fire often differ in their extent and seasonality from each other and from burning on other land in ways that reflect known management practices. For example, we find that pasture in north-central sub-Saharan Africa tends to burn earlier than non-agricultural land; this can be attributed to pastoralists preventively burning their land early in the dry season so as to avoid severe, uncontrolled burns under more dangerous fire conditions later. Both the timing and extent of agricultural fires prove to be regionally specific; our method allows these geographically distinct patterns to be fully appreciated. The local and global differences in seasonality and amount of fire between different land-use types suggest that dynamic global vegetation models

  19. Statistical mapping analysis of lesion location and neurological disability in multiple sclerosis: application to 452 patient data sets.

    PubMed

    Charil, Arnaud; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Taylor, Jonathan; Boelman, Cyrus; Worsley, Keith J; Evans, Alan C; Dagher, Alain

    2003-07-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), the correlation between disability and the volume of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is usually weak. This may be because lesion location also influences the extent and type of functional disability. We applied an automatic lesion-detection algorithm to 452 MRI scans of patients with relapsing-remitting MS to identify the regions preferentially responsible for different types of clinical deficits. Statistical parametric maps were generated by performing voxel-wise linear regressions between lesion probability and different clinical disability scores. There was a clear distinction between lesion locations causing physical and cognitive disability. Lesion likelihood correlated with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) in the left internal capsule and in periventricular white matter mostly in the left hemisphere. Pyramidal deficits correlated with only one area in the left internal capsule that was also present in the EDSS correlation. Cognitive dysfunction correlated with lesion location at the grey-white junction of associative, limbic, and prefrontal cortex. Coordination impairment correlated with areas in interhemispheric and pyramidal periventricular white matter tracts, and in the inferior and superior longitudinal fascicles. Bowel and bladder scores correlated with lesions in the medial frontal lobes, cerebellum, insula, dorsal midbrain, and pons, areas known to be involved in the control of micturition. This study demonstrates for the first time a relationship between the site of lesions and the type of disability in large scale MRI data set in MS. PMID:12880785

  20. Statistical Evaluation of Efficiency and Possibility of Earthquake Predictions with Gravity Field Variation and its Analytic Signal in Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Jiang, Changsheng; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed at assessing gravity variations as precursors for earthquake prediction in the Tibet (Xizang)-Qinghai-Xinjiang-Sichuan Region, western China. We here take a statistical approach to evaluate efficiency and possibility of earthquake prediction. We used the most recent spatiotemporal gravity field variation datasets of 2002-2008 for the region that were provided by the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONC). The datasets were space sparse and time discrete. In 2007-2010, 13 earthquakes (> M s 6.0) occurred in the region. The observed gravity variations have a statistical correlation with the occurrence of these earthquakes through the Molchan error diagram tests that lead to alarms over a good fraction of space-time. The results show that the prediction efficiency of amplitude of analytic signal of gravity variations is better than seismicity rate model and THD and absolute value of gravity variation, implying that gravity variations before earthquake may include precursory information of future large earthquakes.

  1. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  2. Identifying Senior High School Students' Misconceptions about Statistical Correlation, and Their Possible Causes: An Exploratory Study Using Concept Mapping with Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tzu-Chien; Lin, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2009-01-01

    Correlation is an essential concept in statistics; however, students may hold misconceptions about correlation, even after receiving instruction. This study aimed to elucidate (1) the misconceptions held by senior high school students about correlation, using the tool of concept mapping along with interviewing, (2) the possible causes of these…

  3. Characterization of infrared imaging performance within a general statistical framework for environmental impacts on battlefield signals and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Borden, Christopher T.; Bettencourt, Elizabeth S.; Yamamoto, Kenneth K.

    2013-05-01

    The Environmental Awareness for Sensor and Emitter Employment (EASEE) software models the impacts of terrain and weather on a diverse range of battlefield sensing systems. The goal is to provide mission planning tools that realistically capture complex environmental factors impacting sensor performance, yet are simple enough for users with little specialized training. This paper describes incorporation of infrared (IR) modeling into EASEE, and the subsequent challenges of supporting imaging sensors within a framework that had previously evolved primarily for non-imaging sensors, such as acoustic and seismic. The design requires independently interchangeable modules for signature generation, propagation, and signal processing. Sensor performance metrics, such as probability of detection, are characterized statistically rather than through simulation of actual images. Some key enhancements needed to support imaging sensors were: (1) geometric models for targets, (2) packaging of multiple attributes representing target image properties (radiance, projected area, and spatial spectrum), (3) explicitly distinguishing between signals for the background, target of interest, and nuisance targets, and (4) calculation of apparent temperature differences (as opposed to incoherent energy summation). Target signatures are generated using MuSES (Multi-Service Electro-optic Signature), whereas the IR background properties are generated using FASST (Fast All-Season Soil STrength) and numerical weather prediction models. Propagation is handled primarily with MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission), although simpler models such as a line-of-sight calculation can also be employed. The Johnson criteria were added to the available library of detection algorithms.

  4. High-Resolution fMRI Maps of Cortical Activation in Nonhuman Primates: Correlation with Intrinsic Signal Optical Images

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Anna W.; Chen, Li Min

    2009-01-01

    One of the most widely used functional brain mapping tools is blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This method has contributed to new understandings of the functional roles of different areas in the human brain. However, its ability to map cerebral cortex at high spatial (submillimeter) resolution is still unknown. Other methods such as single- and multiunit electrophysiology and intrinsic signal optical imaging have revealed submillimeter resolution of sensory topography and cortical columnar activations. However, they are limited either by spatial scale (electrophysiology characterizes only local groups of neurons) or by the inability to monitor deep structures in the brain (i.e., cortical regions buried in sulci or subcortical structures). A method that could monitor all regions of the brain at high spatial resolution would be ideal. This capacity would open the doors to investigating, for example, how networks of cerebral cortical columns relate to or produce behavior. In this article we demonstrate that, without benefit of contrast agents, at a magnetic field strength of 9.4 tesla, BOLD fMRI can reveal millimeter-sized topographic maps of digit representation in the somatosensory cortex of the anesthetized squirrel monkey. Furthermore, by mapping the “funneling illusion,” it is possible to detect even submillimeter shifts in activation in the cortex. Our data suggest that at high magnetic field strength, the positive BOLD signal can be used to reveal high spatial resolution maps of brain activity, a finding that weakens previous notions about the ultimate spatial specificity of the positive BOLD signal. PMID:18172338

  5. Defective IL-1A expression in patients with Crohn's disease is related to attenuated MAP3K4 signaling.

    PubMed

    van der Pouw Kraan, C T M; Baggen, J M; van Bodegraven, A A; Mulder, C J J; Zwiers, A; Geerts, D; Kraal, G; Horrevoets, A J; Bouma, G

    2012-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by an aberrant immune response to bacterial products stimulating TLR, in genetically susceptible hosts. Next to mutations in the TLR signaling molecule NOD2, several other immune response- and autophagy-genes contribute to CD. Since only 10-20% of cases can be explained by a NOD2 defect, we searched for additional TLR-related disease-causing factors. We analyzed the LPS response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 23 CD patients in remission, compared to 16 controls in a time course experiment. Individuals with any of the three major contributing NOD2 mutations were excluded. Overall, the LPS-responsive gene transcript levels, determined by low density arrays, were significantly lower in CD patients. In particular IL-1A expression was severely reduced in CD patients (ninefold reduction, p=0.001). Quantification of several important TLR4 signal transducers and cytokines identified MAP3K4 as a candidate signaling molecule with reduced expression in CD patients, which might explain the low IL-1A expression. Silencing of MAP3K4 by lentiviral shRNA transduction indeed showed that the expression of IL-1A was specifically dependent on this kinase. Furthermore, the expression of GSK3β, an inhibitor of MAP3K4, was increased in CD patients. In conclusion, we identified a novel TLR signaling defect in CD patients involving MAP3K4 and IL-1A. This confirms the hypothesis that CD patients, despite their massive intestinal inflammation, suffer from a relative immune deficiency in TLR-mediated cytokine production. PMID:22732089

  6. Discrete wavelet-aided delineation of PCG signal events via analysis of an area curve length-based decision statistic.

    PubMed

    Homaeinezhad, M R; Atyabi, S A; Daneshvar, E; Ghaffari, A; Tahmasebi, M

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a robust unified framework for segmentation of the phonocardiogram (PCG) signal sounds based on the false-alarm probability (FAP) bounded segmentation of a properly calculated detection measure. To this end, first the original PCG signal is appropriately pre-processed and then, a fixed sample size sliding window is moved on the pre-processed signal. In each slid, the area under the excerpted segment is multiplied by its curve-length to generate the Area Curve Length (ACL) metric to be used as the segmentation decision statistic (DS). Afterwards, histogram parameters of the nonlinearly enhanced DS metric are used for regulation of the α-level Neyman-Pearson classifier for FAP-bounded delineation of the PCG events. The proposed method was applied to all 85 records of Nursing Student Heart Sounds database (NSHSDB) including stenosis, insufficiency, regurgitation, gallop, septal defect, split sound, rumble, murmur, clicks, friction rub and snap disorders with different sampling frequencies. Also, the method was applied to the records obtained from an electronic stethoscope board designed for fulfillment of this study in the presence of high-level power-line noise and external disturbing sounds and as the results, no false positive (FP) or false negative (FN) errors were detected. High noise robustness, acceptable detection-segmentation accuracy of PCG events in various cardiac system conditions, and having no parameters dependency to the acquisition sampling frequency can be mentioned as the principal virtues and abilities of the proposed ACL-based PCG events detection-segmentation algorithm. PMID:21181267

  7. Border collision bifurcations and power spectral density of chaotic signals generated by one-dimensional discontinuous piecewise linear maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltekh, Kais; Jemaa, Zouhair Ben; Fournier-Prunaret, Danièle; Belghith, Safya

    2014-08-01

    Recently, many papers have appeared which study the power spectral density (PSD) of signals issued from some specific maps. This interest in the PSD is due to the importance of frequency in the telecommunications and transmission security. With the large number of wireless systems, the availability of frequencies for transmission and reception is increasingly uncommon for wireless communications. Also, guided media have limitations related to the bandwidth of a signal. In this paper, we investigate some properties associated to the border-collision bifurcations in a one-dimensional piecewise-linear map with three slopes and two parameters. We derive analytical expressions for the autocorrelation sequence, power spectral density (PSD) of chaotic signals generated by our piecewise-linear map. We prove the existence of strong relation between different types of the power spectral density (low-pass, high-pass or band-stop) and the parameters. We also find a relation between the type of spectrum and the order of attractive cycles which are located after the border collision bifurcation between chaos and cycles.

  8. Development of an imaging modality utilizing 2D optical signals during an EPI-fluorescent optical mapping experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Phillip; Roth, Bradley J.

    2009-05-01

    Optical mapping is a commonly used technique to visualize the electrical activity in the heart. Recently, several groups have attempted to use the signals acquired in optical mapping to image the transmembrane potential in the heart, which would be particularly advantageous when studying the effects of defibrillation-type shocks throughout the wall of the heart. Our work presents an alternative imaging method that makes use of data obtained using multiple wavelengths and therefore multiple optical decay constants. A modified form of the diffusion equation Green's function for a semi-infinite slab of tissue is derived and used to relate the detected optical signals to the source of emission photons. Images using the optical signals are reconstructed using Gaussian quadrature and matrix inversion. Our results show that images can be obtained for source terms located below the tissue surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our reconstruction method's susceptibility to noise can be alleviated using sophisticated matrix inverse techniques, such as singular value decomposition. Sources that rapidly decay with depth or are highly localized in the image plane require more sophisticated techniques (e.g., regularization methods) to image the electrical activity in the heart. The work presented here demonstrates the feasibility of a new imaging technique of cardiac electrical activity using optical mapping.

  9. The Arabidopsis MAP kinase kinase 7: A crosstalk point between Auxin signaling and defense responses?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-pathogen interaction induces a complex host response that coordinates various signaling pathways through multiple signal molecules. Besides the well-documented signal molecules salicylic acid (SA), ethylene and jasmonic acid, auxin is emerging as an important player in this response. We recent...

  10. fMRI brain mapping during motion capture and FES induced motor tasks: signal to noise ratio assessment.

    PubMed

    Gandolla, Marta; Ferrante, Simona; Casellato, Claudia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Molteni, Franco; Martegani, Alberto; Frattini, Tiziano; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-10-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a well known clinical rehabilitation procedure, however the neural mechanisms that underlie this treatment at Central Nervous System (CNS) level are still not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a suitable tool to investigate effects of rehabilitative treatments on brain plasticity. Moreover, monitoring the effective executed movement is needed to correctly interpret activation maps, most of all in neurological patients where required motor tasks could be only partially accomplished. The proposed experimental set-up includes a 1.5 T fMRI scanner, a motion capture system to acquire kinematic data, and an electro-stimulation device. The introduction of metallic devices and of stimulation current in the MRI room could affect fMRI acquisitions so as to prevent a reliable activation maps analysis. What we are interested in is that the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal, marker of neural activity, could be detected within a given experimental condition and set-up. In this paper we assess temporal Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) as image quality index. BOLD signal change is about 1-2% as revealed by a 1.5 T scanner. This work demonstrates that, with this innovative set-up, in the main cortical sensorimotor regions 1% BOLD signal change can be detected at least in the 93% of the sub-volumes, and almost 100% of the sub-volumes are suitable for 2% signal change detection. The integrated experimental set-up will therefore allows to detect FES induced movements fMRI maps simultaneously with kinematic acquisitions so as to investigate FES-based rehabilitation treatments contribution at CNS level. PMID:21550290

  11. Map of Pseudo-F-statistics of seismic noise parameters as an indicator of current seismic danger in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubushin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    The problem of estimate of current seismic danger based on monitoring of seismic noise properties from broadband seismic network F-net in Japan (84 stations) is considered. Variations of the following seismic noise parameters are analyzed: multifractal singularity spectrum support width, generalized Hurst exponent, minimum Hölder-Lipschitz exponent and minimum normalized entropy of squared orthogonal wavelet coefficients. These parameters are estimated within adjacent time windows of the length 1 day for seismic noise waveforms from each station. Calculating daily median values of these parameters by all stations provides 4-dimensional time series which describes integral properties of the seismic noise in the region covered by the network. Cluster analysis is applied to the sequence of clouds of 4-dimensional vectors within moving time window of the length 365 days with mutual shift 3 days starting from the beginning of 1997 up to the current time. The purpose of the cluster analysis is to find the best number of clusters (BNC) from probe numbers which are varying from 1 up to the maximum value 40. The BNC is found from the maximum of pseudo-F-statistics (PFS). A 2D map could be created which presents dependence of PFS on the tested probe number of clusters and the right-hand end of moving time window which is rather similar to usual spectral time-frequency diagrams. In the paper [1] it was shown that the BNC before Tohoku mega-earthquake on March 11, 2011, has strongly chaotic regime with jumps from minimum up to maximum values in the time interval 1 year before the event and this time intervals was characterized by high PFS values. The PFS-map is proposed as the method for extracting time intervals with high current seismic danger. The next danger time interval after Tohoku mega-EQ began at the end of 2012 and was finished at the middle of 2013. Starting from middle of 2015 the high PFS values and chaotic regime of BNC variations were returned. This could be

  12. Performance mapping of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine using a statistical design of experiments method

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-12-31

    A kinetic Stirling cycle engine, the Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) STM4-120, was tested at the Sandia National Laboratories Engine Test Facility (ETF) from March 1989--August 1992. Sandia is interested in determining this engine`s potential for solar-thermal-electric applications. The last round of testing was conducted from July--August 1992 using Sandia-designed gas-fired heat pipe evaporators as the heat input system to the engine. The STM4-120 was performance mapped over a range of sodium vapor temperatures, cooling water temperatures, and cycle pressures. The resulting shaft power output levels ranged from 5--9 kW. The engine demonstrated high conversion efficiency (24--31%) even though the power output level was less than 40% of the rated output of 25 kW. The engine had been previously derated from 25 kW to 10 kW shaft power due to mechanical limitations that were identified by STM during parallel testing at their facility in Ann Arbor, MI. A statistical method was used to design the experiment, to choose the experimental points, and to generate correlation equations describing the engine performance given the operating parameters. The testing was trunacted due to a failure of the heat pipe system caused by entrainment of liquid sodium in the condenser section of the heat pipes. Enough data was gathered to generate the correlations and to demonstrate the experimental technique. The correlation is accurate in the experimental space and is simple enough for use in hand calculations and spreadsheet-based system models. Use of this method can simplify the construction of accurate performance and economic models of systems in which the engine is a component. The purpose of this paper is to present the method used to design the experiments and to analyze the performance data.

  13. Performance mapping of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine using a statistical design of experiments method

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    A kinetic Stirling cycle engine, the Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) STM4-120, was tested at the Sandia National Laboratories Engine Test Facility (ETF) from March 1989--August 1992. Sandia is interested in determining this engine's potential for solar-thermal-electric applications. The last round of testing was conducted from July--August 1992 using Sandia-designed gas-fired heat pipe evaporators as the heat input system to the engine. The STM4-120 was performance mapped over a range of sodium vapor temperatures, cooling water temperatures, and cycle pressures. The resulting shaft power output levels ranged from 5--9 kW. The engine demonstrated high conversion efficiency (24--31%) even though the power output level was less than 40% of the rated output of 25 kW. The engine had been previously derated from 25 kW to 10 kW shaft power due to mechanical limitations that were identified by STM during parallel testing at their facility in Ann Arbor, MI. A statistical method was used to design the experiment, to choose the experimental points, and to generate correlation equations describing the engine performance given the operating parameters. The testing was trunacted due to a failure of the heat pipe system caused by entrainment of liquid sodium in the condenser section of the heat pipes. Enough data was gathered to generate the correlations and to demonstrate the experimental technique. The correlation is accurate in the experimental space and is simple enough for use in hand calculations and spreadsheet-based system models. Use of this method can simplify the construction of accurate performance and economic models of systems in which the engine is a component. The purpose of this paper is to present the method used to design the experiments and to analyze the performance data.

  14. Performance mapping of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine using a statistical design of experiments method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, M. A.; Rawlinson, K. S.

    A kinetic Stirling cycle engine, the Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) STM4-120, was tested at the Sandia National Laboratories Engine Test Facility (ETF) from March 1989-August 1992. Sandia is interested in determining this engine's potential for solar-thermal-electric applications. The last round of testing was conducted from July-August 1992 using Sandia-designed gas-fired heat pipe evaporators as the heat input system to the engine. The STM4-120 was performance mapped over a range of sodium vapor temperatures, cooling water temperatures, and cycle pressures. The resulting shaft power output levels ranged from 5-9 kW. The engine demonstrated high conversion efficiency (24-31%) even though the power output level was less than 40% of the rated output of 25 kW. The engine had been previously derated from 25 kW to 10 kW shaft power due to mechanical limitations that were identified by STM during parallel testing at their facility in Ann Arbor, MI. A statistical method was used to design the experiment, to choose the experimental points, and to generate correlation equations describing the engine performance given the operating parameters. The testing was truncated due to a failure of the heat pipe system caused by entrainment of liquid sodium in the condenser section of the heat pipes. Enough data was gathered to generate the correlations and to demonstrate the experimental technique. The correlation is accurate in the experimental space and is simple enough for use in hand calculations and spreadsheet-based system models. Use of this method can simplify the construction of accurate performance and economic models of systems in which the engine is a component. The purpose of this paper is to present the method used to design the experiments and to analyze the performance data.

  15. Human pre-B cell receptor signal transduction: evidence for distinct roles of PI3kinase and MAP-kinase signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Isabelle, Piec; Stella, Ibata; Céline, Alleaume-De Martel; Bissac, Eliane; Bertrand, Brassart; Rémy, Nyga; Naomi, Taylor; Vincent, Fuentes; Rochette, Jacques; Lassoued, Kaïss

    2013-01-01

    Pre-BCR acts as a critical checkpoint in B cell development. However, its signalling cascade still remains indistinctly characterised in human. We investigated pre-BCR signalling pathway to examine its regulation in normal primary pre-B lymphocytes and pre-B cell lines. In cell lines, early signalling events occurring after pre-BCR stimulation include phosphorylation of Lyn, Blk and Syk together with ZAP70, Btk, Vav, PLC-γ2 and various adaptor proteins, such as BLNK, LAB, LAT and SLP-76. Further downstream, these molecules induced activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAP-kinase resulting in an augmentation of canonical NF-κB pathways and cFos/AP1 activation. PI3K and MAPK exerted opposing effects on the pre-BCR-induced activation of the canonical NF-κB and c-Fos/AP1 pathways. Immediate nuclear export of FoxO3A and delayed import of IRF4 were additional events observed after pre-BCR crosslinking in primary cells. Pre-BCR-induced down-regulation of Rag1, Rag2, E2A and Pax5 transcripts occurred in a PI3K-dependent manner. Finally we bring evidence that pre-BCR stimulation or co stimulation with CD19 enhances cell cycle signal. PMID:25400915

  16. FAK Acts as a Suppressor of RTK-MAP Kinase Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster Epithelia and Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Macagno, Juan Pablo; Diaz Vera, Jesica; Yu, Yachuan; MacPherson, Iain; Sandilands, Emma; Palmer, Ruth; Norman, Jim C.; Frame, Margaret; Vidal, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) regulate multiple signalling pathways, including mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. FAK interacts with several RTKs but little is known about how FAK regulates their downstream signalling. Here we investigated how FAK regulates signalling resulting from the overexpression of the RTKs RET and EGFR. FAK suppressed RTKs signalling in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia by impairing MAPK pathway. This regulation was also observed in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, suggesting it is a conserved phenomenon in humans. Mechanistically, FAK reduced receptor recycling into the plasma membrane, which resulted in lower MAPK activation. Conversely, increasing the membrane pool of the receptor increased MAPK pathway signalling. FAK is widely considered as a therapeutic target in cancer biology; however, it also has tumour suppressor properties in some contexts. Therefore, the FAK-mediated negative regulation of RTK/MAPK signalling described here may have potential implications in the designing of therapy strategies for RTK-driven tumours. PMID:24676055

  17. On the optimality of the MAP estimation loop for carrier phase tracking BPSK and QPSK signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    Starting with MAP estimation theory as a basis for optimally estimating carrier phase of BPSK and QPSK modulations, it is shown in this paper that the closed loop phase trackers, which are motivated by this approach, are indeed closed loop optimum in the minimum mean-square phase tracking jitter sense. The corresponding squaring loss performance of these so-called MAP estimation loops is compared with that of more practical implementations wherein the hyperbolic tangent nonlinearity is approximated by simpler functions.

  18. Mapping Neuronal Activation and the Influence of Adrenergic Signaling during Contextual Memory Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei-Ping; Guzowski, John F.; Thomas, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    We recently described a critical role for adrenergic signaling in the hippocampus during contextual and spatial memory retrieval. To determine which neurons are activated by contextual memory retrieval and its sequelae in the presence and absence of adrenergic signaling, transcriptional imaging for the immediate-early gene "Arc" was used in…

  19. TRAF2 multitasking in TNF receptor-induced signaling to NF-κB, MAP kinases and cell death.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alice; Verstrepen, Lynn; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-09-15

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that exerts its functions through the activation of two distinct receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Both receptors can activate canonical NF-κB and JNK MAP kinase signaling, while TNFR2 can also activate non-canonical NF-κB signaling, leading to numerous changes in gene expression that drive inflammation, cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, TNFR1 also activates signaling pathways leading to cell death by either apoptosis or necroptosis, depending on the cellular context. A key player in TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signaling is the RING finger protein TRAF2, which is recruited to both receptors upon their stimulation. TRAF2 exerts multiple receptor-specific functions but also mediates cross-talk between TNFR1 and TNFR2, dictating the outcome of TNF stimulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the positive and negative regulatory role of TRAF2 in different TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling pathways. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanism of action, distinguishing between TRAF2 scaffold and E3 ubiquitin ligase functions, and the regulation of TRAF2 by specific post-translational modifications. Finally, we elaborate on some possible strategies to modulate TRAF2 function in the context of therapeutic targeting in autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26993379

  20. The Design and Use of an Optical Mapping System for the Study of Intracardiac Electrical Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Maneesh; Ghai, Megan B; Singal, Ashish; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent optical mapping of electrically active cardiac tissues provides a unique method to examine the excitation wave dynamics of underlying action potentials. Such mapping can be viewed as a bridge between cellular level and organ systems physiology, e.g., by facilitating the development of advanced theoretical concepts of arrhythmia. We present the design and use of a high-speed, high-resolution optical mapping system composed entirely of "off the shelf" components. The electrical design integrates a 256 element photodiode array with a 16 bit data acquisition system. Proper grounding and shielding at various stages of the design reduce electromagnetic interference. Our mechanical design provides flexibility in terms of mounting positions and applications (use for whole heart or tissue preparations), while maintaining precise alignment between all optical components. The system software incorporates a user friendly graphical user interface, e.g., spatially recorded action potentials can be represented as intensity graphs or in strip chart format. Thus, this system is capable of displaying cardiac action potentials with high spatiotemporal resolution. Results from cardiac action potential mapping with intact mouse hearts are provided. It should be noted that this system could be readily configured to study isolated myocardial biopsies (e.g., isolated ventricular trabeculae). We describe the details of a versatile, user-friendly system that could be employed for a magnitude of study protocols. PMID:22912535

  1. Hail statistic in Western Europe based on a hyrid cell-tracking algorithm combining radar signals with hailstone observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, Elody

    2015-04-01

    Hail statistic in Western Europe based on a hybrid cell-tracking algorithm combining radar signals with hailstone observations Elody Fluck¹, Michael Kunz¹ , Peter Geissbühler², Stefan P. Ritz² With hail damage estimated over Billions of Euros for a single event (e.g., hailstorm Andreas on 27/28 July 2013), hail constitute one of the major atmospheric risks in various parts of Europe. The project HAMLET (Hail Model for Europe) in cooperation with the insurance company Tokio Millennium Re aims at estimating hail probability, hail hazard and, combined with vulnerability, hail risk for several European countries (Germany, Switzerland, France, Netherlands, Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg). Hail signals are obtained from radar reflectivity since this proxy is available with a high temporal and spatial resolution using several hail proxies, especially radar data. The focus in the first step is on Germany and France for the periods 2005- 2013 and 1999 - 2013, respectively. In the next step, the methods will be transferred and extended to other regions. A cell-tracking algorithm TRACE2D was adjusted and applied to two dimensional radar reflectivity data from different radars operated by European weather services such as German weather service (DWD) and French weather service (Météo-France). Strong convective cells are detected by considering 3 connected pixels over 45 dBZ (Reflectivity Cores RCs) in a radar scan. Afterwards, the algorithm tries to find the same RCs in the next 5 minute radar scan and, thus, track the RCs centers over time and space. Additional information about hailstone diameters provided by ESWD (European Severe Weather Database) is used to determine hail intensity of the detected hail swaths. Maximum hailstone diameters are interpolated along and close to the individual hail tracks giving an estimation of mean diameters for the detected hail swaths. Furthermore, a stochastic event set is created by randomizing the parameters obtained from the

  2. Membrane localization of scaffold proteins promotes graded signaling in the yeast MAP kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade pathways can show various input-output behaviors, including either switch-like or graded responses to increasing levels of stimulus. Prior studies suggest that switch-like behavior is promoted by positive feedback loops and nonprocessive phosphorylation reactions, but it is unclear whether graded signaling is a default behavior or if it must be enforced by separate mechanisms. Scaffold proteins have been hypothesized to promote graded behavior. Results Here, we experimentally probe the determinants of graded signaling in the yeast mating MAPK pathway. We find that graded behavior is robust, as it resists perturbation by loss of several negative feedback regulators. However, the pathway becomes switch-like when activated by a crosstalk stimulus that bypasses multiple upstream components. To dissect the contributing factors, we developed a method for gradually varying the signal input at different pathway steps in vivo. Input at the beginning of the kinase cascade produced a sharp, threshold-like response. Surprisingly, the scaffold protein Ste5 increased this threshold behavior when limited to the cytosol. However, signaling remained graded whenever Ste5 was allowed to function at the plasma membrane. Conclusions The results suggest that the MAPK cascade module is inherently ultrasensitive, but is converted to a graded system by the pathway-specific activation mechanism. Scaffold-mediated assembly of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane allows faithful propagation of weak signals, which consequently reduces pathway ultrasensitivity. These properties help shape the input-output properties of the system to fit the physiological context. PMID:18722124

  3. Non extensive statistical physics applied in fracture-induced electric signals during triaxial deformation of Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We have conducted room-temperature, triaxial compression experiments on samples of Carrara marble, recording concurrently acoustic and electric current signals emitted during the deformation process as well as mechanical loading information and ultrasonic wave velocities. Our results reveal that in a dry non-piezoelectric rock under simulated crustal pressure conditions, a measurable electric current (nA) is generated within the stressed sample. The current is detected only in the region beyond (quasi-)linear elastic deformation; i.e. in the region of permanent deformation beyond the yield point of the material and in the presence of microcracking. Our results extend to shallow crustal conditions previous observations of electric current signals in quartz-free rocks undergoing uniaxial deformation and support the idea of a universal electrification mechanism related to deformation. Confining pressure conditions of our slow strain rate (10-6 s-1) experiments range from the purely brittle regime (10 MPa) to the semi-brittle transition (30-100MPa) where cataclastic flow is the dominant deformation mechanism. Electric current is generated under all confining pressures,implying the existence of a current-producing mechanism during both microfracture and frictional sliding. Some differences are seen in the current evolution between these two regimes, possibly related to crack localisation. In all cases, the measured electric current exhibits episodes of strong fluctuations over short timescales; calm periods punctuated by bursts of strong activity. For the analysis, we adopt an entropy-based statistical physics approach (Tsallis, 1988), particularly suited to the study of fracture related phenomena. We find that the probability distribution of normalised electric current fluctuations over short time intervals (0.5 s) can be well described by a q-Gaussian distribution of a form similar to that which describes turbulent flows. This approach yields different entropic

  4. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  5. Detection of prostate cancer by integration of line-scan diffusion, T2-mapping and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; a multichannel statistical classifier.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ian; Wells, William; Mulkern, Robert V; Haker, Steven; Zhang, Jianqing; Zou, Kelly H; Maier, Stephan E; Tempany, Clare M C

    2003-09-01

    A multichannel statistical classifier for detecting prostate cancer was developed and validated by combining information from three different magnetic resonance (MR) methodologies: T2-weighted, T2-mapping, and line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI). From these MR sequences, four different sets of image intensities were obtained: T2-weighted (T2W) from T2-weighted imaging, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) from LSDI, and proton density (PD) and T2 (T2 Map) from T2-mapping imaging. Manually segmented tumor labels from a radiologist, which were validated by biopsy results, served as tumor "ground truth." Textural features were extracted from the images using co-occurrence matrix (CM) and discrete cosine transform (DCT). Anatomical location of voxels was described by a cylindrical coordinate system. A statistical jack-knife approach was used to evaluate our classifiers. Single-channel maximum likelihood (ML) classifiers were based on 1 of the 4 basic image intensities. Our multichannel classifiers: support vector machine (SVM) and Fisher linear discriminant (FLD), utilized five different sets of derived features. Each classifier generated a summary statistical map that indicated tumor likelihood in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate gland. To assess classifier accuracy, the average areas under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves over all subjects were compared. Our best FLD classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.839(+/-0.064), and our best SVM classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.761(+/-0.043). The T2W ML classifier, our best single-channel classifier, only achieved an average ROC area of 0.599(+/-0.146). Compared to the best single-channel ML classifier, our best multichannel FLD and SVM classifiers have statistically superior ROC performance (P=0.0003 and 0.0017, respectively) from pairwise two-sided t-test. By integrating the information from multiple images and capturing the textural and anatomical features in tumor areas, summary

  6. Signal environment mapping of the Automatic Identification System frequencies from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skauen, Andreas Nordmo; Olsen, Øystein

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents received signal strength data recorded by the NORAIS Receiver on the four VHF channels allocated to the use of the Automatic Identification System (AIS). The NORAIS Receiver operated on-board the Columbus module of the International Space Station from June 2010 to February 2015. The data shows that a space-based AIS receiver must handle transient strong signals from land-based interference and that the effectiveness of the two long range AIS channels recently allocated is severely reduced in select areas due to land based interference.

  7. The ternary complex factor Net contains two distinct elements that mediate different responses to MAP kinase signalling cascades.

    PubMed

    Ducret, C; Maira, S M; Lutz, Y; Wasylyk, B

    2000-10-19

    The ternary complex factors (TCFs), Elk-1, Sap-1a and Net, are key integrators of the transcriptional response to different signalling pathways. Classically, three MAP kinase pathways, involving ERK, JNK, and p38, transduce various extracellular stimuli to the nucleus. Net is a repressor that is converted into an activator by Ras/ERK signalling. Net is also exported from the nucleus in response to stress stimuli transduced through the JNK pathway, leading to relief from repression. Here we show that ERK and p38 bind to the D box and that binding is required for phosphorylation of the adjacent C-terminally located C-domain. The D box as well as the phosphorylation sites in the C-domain (the DC element) are required for transcription activation by Ras. On the other hand, JNK binds to the J box in the middle of the protein, and binding is required for phosphorylation of the adjacent EXport motif. Both the binding and phosphorylation sites (the JEX element) are important for Net export. In conclusion, specific targeting of Net by MAP kinase pathways involves two different docking sites and phosphorylation of two different domains. These two elements, DC and JEX, mediate two distinct functional responses. PMID:11042694

  8. Training Signaling Pathway Maps to Biochemical Data with Constrained Fuzzy Logic: Quantitative Analysis of Liver Cell Responses to Inflammatory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Melody K.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Clarke, David C.; Sorger, Peter K.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Predictive understanding of cell signaling network operation based on general prior knowledge but consistent with empirical data in a specific environmental context is a current challenge in computational biology. Recent work has demonstrated that Boolean logic can be used to create context-specific network models by training proteomic pathway maps to dedicated biochemical data; however, the Boolean formalism is restricted to characterizing protein species as either fully active or inactive. To advance beyond this limitation, we propose a novel form of fuzzy logic sufficiently flexible to model quantitative data but also sufficiently simple to efficiently construct models by training pathway maps on dedicated experimental measurements. Our new approach, termed constrained fuzzy logic (cFL), converts a prior knowledge network (obtained from literature or interactome databases) into a computable model that describes graded values of protein activation across multiple pathways. We train a cFL-converted network to experimental data describing hepatocytic protein activation by inflammatory cytokines and demonstrate the application of the resultant trained models for three important purposes: (a) generating experimentally testable biological hypotheses concerning pathway crosstalk, (b) establishing capability for quantitative prediction of protein activity, and (c) prediction and understanding of the cytokine release phenotypic response. Our methodology systematically and quantitatively trains a protein pathway map summarizing curated literature to context-specific biochemical data. This process generates a computable model yielding successful prediction of new test data and offering biological insight into complex datasets that are difficult to fully analyze by intuition alone. PMID:21408212

  9. A Mechanism for Cell Cycle Regulation of MAP Kinase Signaling in a Yeast Differentiation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Shelly C.; Winters, Matthew J.; Ben-Ari, Giora; Lamson, Rachel E.; Tyers, Mike; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Yeast cells arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle upon exposure to mating pheromones. As cells commit to a new cycle, G1 CDK activity (Cln/CDK) inhibits signaling through the mating MAPK cascade. Here, we show that the target of this inhibition is Ste5, the MAPK cascade scaffold protein. Cln/CDK phosphorylates a cluster of sites flanking a small, basic membrane-binding motif in Ste5, thereby disrupting Ste5 membrane localization. Effective inhibition of Ste5 signaling requires multiple phosphorylation sites and a substantial accumulation of negative charge, suggesting that Ste5 acts as a sensor for high G1 CDK activity. Thus, Ste5 is an integration point for both external and internal signals. When Ste5 cannot be phosphorylated, pheromone triggers an aberrant arrest of cells outside G1, either in the presence or absence of the CDK inhibitor protein Far1. These findings define a mechanism and physiological benefit of restricting antiproliferative signaling to G1. PMID:17289571

  10. Enhanced magnetic flux density mapping using coherent steady state equilibrium signal in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Lee, Mun Bae; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the z-component of magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) induced by transversally injected current, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to visualize electrical property (current density and/or conductivity distribution) in a three-dimensional imaging object. For practical implementations of MREIT technique, it is critical to reduce injection of current pulse within safety requirements. With the goal of minimizing the noise level in measured Bz data, we propose a new method to enhance the measure Bz data using steady-state coherent gradient multi-echo (SSC-GME) MR pulse sequence combining with injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method in MREIT, where the ICNE technique injects current during a readout gradient to maximize the signal intensity of phase signal including Bz. The total phase offset in SSC-GME includes additional magnetic flux density due to the injected current, which is different from the phase signal for the conventional spoiled MR pulse sequence. We decompose the magnetization precession phase from the total phase offset including Bz and optimize Bz data using the steady-state equilibrium signal. Results from a real phantom experiment including different kinds of anomalies demonstrated that the proposed method enhanced Bz comparing to a conventional spoiled pulse sequence.

  11. A compressive radar system with chaotic-based FM signals using the Bernoulli map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Hector A.; Teja Enugula, Charan

    2013-05-01

    Matched filters are used in radar systems to identify echo signals embedded in noise. They allow us to extract range and Doppler information about the target from the reflected signal. In high frequency radars, matched filters make the system expensive and complex. For that reason, the radar research community is looking at techniques like compressive sensing or compressive sampling to eliminate the use of matched filters and high frequency analog-to-digital converters. In this work, compressive sensing is proposed as a method to increase the resolution and eliminate the use of matched filters in chaotic radars. Two basic scenarios are considered, one for stationary targets and one for non-stationary targets. For the stationary targets, the radar scene was a one dimensional vector, in which each element from the vector represents a target position. For the non-stationary targets, the radar scene was a two dimensional matrix, in which one direction of the matrix represents the target's range, and the other direction represents the target's velocity. Using optimization techniques, it was possible to recover both radar scenes from an under sampled echo signal. The reconstructed scenes were compared against a traditional matched filter system. In both cases, the matched filter was capable of recovering the radar scene. However, there was a considerable amount of artifacts introduced by the matched filter that made target identification a daunting task. On the other hand, using compressive sensing it was possible to recover both radar scenes perfectly, even when the echo signal was under sampled.

  12. Efficiency of the cross-correlation statistic for gravitational wave stochastic background signals with non-Gaussian noise and heterogeneous detector sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellini, Lionel; Regimbau, Tania

    2015-11-01

    Under standard assumptions including stationary and serially uncorrelated Gaussian gravitational wave stochastic background signal and noise distributions, as well as homogenous detector sensitivities, the standard cross-correlation detection statistic is known to be optimal in the sense of minimizing the probability of a false dismissal at a fixed value of the probability of a false alarm. The focus of this paper is to analyze the comparative efficiency of this statistic, vs a simple alternative statistic obtained by cross-correlating the squared measurements, in situations that deviate from such standard assumptions. We find that differences in detector sensitivities have a large impact on the comparative efficiency of the cross-correlation detection statistic, which is dominated by the alternative statistic when these differences reach 1 order of magnitude. This effect holds even when both the signal and noise distributions are Gaussian. While the presence of non-Gaussian signals has no material impact for reasonable parameter values, the relative inefficiency of the cross-correlation statistic is less prominent for fat-tailed noise distributions, but it is magnified in case noise distributions have skewness parameters of opposite signs. Our results suggest that introducing an alternative detection statistic can lead to noticeable sensitivity gains when noise distributions are possibly non-Gaussian and/or when detector sensitivities exhibit substantial differences, a situation that is expected to hold in joint detections from Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, in particular in the early phases of development of the detectors, or in joint detections from Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope.

  13. Recording Human Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Signals for Neuroscientific Research and Real-time Functional Cortical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hill, N. Jeremy; Gupta, Disha; Brunner, Peter; Gunduz, Aysegul; Adamo, Matthew A.; Ritaccio, Anthony; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    our methods for collecting recording ECoG, and demonstrate how to use these signals for important real-time applications such as clinical mapping and brain-computer interfacing. Our example uses the BCI2000 software platform8,9 and the SIGFRIED10 method, an application for real-time mapping of brain functions. This procedure yields information that clinicians can subsequently use to guide the complex and laborious process of functional mapping by electrical stimulation. Prerequisites and Planning: Patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy may be candidates for resective surgery of an epileptic focus to minimize the frequency of seizures. Prior to resection, the patients undergo monitoring using subdural electrodes for two purposes: first, to localize the epileptic focus, and second, to identify nearby critical brain areas (i.e., eloquent cortex) where resection could result in long-term functional deficits. To implant electrodes, a craniotomy is performed to open the skull. Then, electrode grids and/or strips are placed on the cortex, usually beneath the dura. A typical grid has a set of 8 x 8 platinum-iridium electrodes of 4 mm diameter (2.3 mm exposed surface) embedded in silicon with an inter-electrode distance of 1cm. A strip typically contains 4 or 6 such electrodes in a single line. The locations for these grids/strips are planned by a team of neurologists and neurosurgeons, and are based on previous EEG monitoring, on a structural MRI of the patient's brain, and on relevant factors of the patient's history. Continuous recording over a period of 5-12 days serves to localize epileptic foci, and electrical stimulation via the implanted electrodes allows clinicians to map eloquent cortex. At the end of the monitoring period, explantation of the electrodes and therapeutic resection are performed together in one procedure. In addition to its primary clinical purpose, invasive monitoring also provides a unique opportunity to acquire human ECoG data for

  14. Mutations in MAP3K7 that Alter the Activity of the TAK1 Signaling Complex Cause Frontometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Wade, Emma M; Daniel, Philip B; Jenkins, Zandra A; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Leo, Paul; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie Claude; Adès, Lesley C; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Kim, Chong A; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Irma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Strom, Tim M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Markie, David M; Robertson, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a progressive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia affecting the long bones and skull. The cause of FMD in some individuals is gain-of-function mutations in FLNA, although how these mutations result in a hyperostotic phenotype remains unknown. Approximately one half of individuals with FMD have no identified mutation in FLNA and are phenotypically very similar to individuals with FLNA mutations, except for an increased tendency to form keloid scars. Using whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing in 19 FMD-affected individuals with no identifiable FLNA mutation, we identified mutations in two genes-MAP3K7, encoding transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase (TAK1), and TAB2, encoding TAK1-associated binding protein 2 (TAB2). Four mutations were found in MAP3K7, including one highly recurrent (n = 15) de novo mutation (c.1454C>T [ p.Pro485Leu]) proximal to the coiled-coil domain of TAK1 and three missense mutations affecting the kinase domain (c.208G>C [p.Glu70Gln], c.299T>A [p.Val100Glu], and c.502G>C [p.Gly168Arg]). Notably, the subjects with the latter three mutations had a milder FMD phenotype. An additional de novo mutation was found in TAB2 (c.1705G>A, p.Glu569Lys). The recurrent mutation does not destabilize TAK1, or impair its ability to homodimerize or bind TAB2, but it does increase TAK1 autophosphorylation and alter the activity of more than one signaling pathway regulated by the TAK1 kinase complex. These findings show that dysregulation of the TAK1 complex produces a close phenocopy of FMD caused by FLNA mutations. Furthermore, they suggest that the pathogenesis of some of the filaminopathies caused by FLNA mutations might be mediated by misregulation of signaling coordinated through the TAK1 signaling complex. PMID:27426733

  15. Microglial Signaling in Chronic Pain with a Special Focus on Caspase 6, p38 MAP Kinase, and Sex Dependence.

    PubMed

    Berta, T; Qadri, Y J; Chen, G; Ji, R R

    2016-09-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells in the spinal cord and brain. Mounting evidence suggests that activation of microglia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic pain, including chronic orofacial pain. In particular, microglia contribute to the transition from acute pain to chronic pain, as inhibition of microglial signaling reduces pathologic pain after inflammation, nerve injury, and cancer but not baseline pain. As compared with inflammation, nerve injury induces much more robust morphologic activation of microglia, termed microgliosis, as shown by increased expression of microglial markers, such as CD11b and IBA1. However, microglial signaling inhibitors effectively reduce inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, arguing against the importance of morphologic activation of microglia in chronic pain sensitization. Importantly, microglia enhance pain states via secretion of proinflammatory and pronociceptive mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins 1β and 18, and brain-derived growth factor. Mechanistically, these mediators have been shown to enhance excitatory synaptic transmission and suppress inhibitory synaptic transmission in the pain circuits. While early studies suggested a predominant role of microglia in the induction of chronic pain, further studies have supported a role of microglia in the maintenance of chronic pain. Intriguingly, recent studies show male-dominant microglial signaling in some neuropathic pain and inflammatory pain states, although both sexes show identical morphologic activation of microglia after nerve injury. In this critical review, we provide evidence to show that caspase 6-a secreted protease that is expressed in primary afferent axonal terminals surrounding microglia-is a robust activator of microglia and induces profound release of tumor necrosis factor α from microglia via activation of p38 MAP kinase. The authors also show that microglial caspase 6/p38 signaling is male dominant in some

  16. Arkansas StreamStats: a U.S. Geological Survey web map application for basin characteristics and streamflow statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugh, Aaron L.

    2014-01-01

    Users of streamflow information often require streamflow statistics and basin characteristics at various locations along a stream. The USGS periodically calculates and publishes streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for streamflowgaging stations and partial-record stations, but these data commonly are scattered among many reports that may or may not be readily available to the public. The USGS also provides and periodically updates regional analyses of streamflow statistics that include regression equations and other prediction methods for estimating statistics for ungaged and unregulated streams across the State. Use of these regional predictions for a stream can be complex and often requires the user to determine a number of basin characteristics that may require interpretation. Basin characteristics may include drainage area, classifiers for physical properties, climatic characteristics, and other inputs. Obtaining these input values for gaged and ungaged locations traditionally has been time consuming, subjective, and can lead to inconsistent results.

  17. Mapping the intramolecular contributions to the inelastic electron tunneling signal of a molecular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2016-07-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the intramolecular origin of the inelastic electron tunneling signal of a molecular junction. We use density-functional theory to study a representative conjugated molecule with a low degree of symmetry and calculate, for all modes, the different contributions that give rise to the vibrational spectrum. These local contributions involve products of scattering states with electron-phonon matrix elements and thus encode information on both the vibrational modes and the electronic structure. We separate these intra- and interatomic terms and draw a pattern of addition or cancellation of these partial contributions throughout the inelastic spectrum. This allows for a quantitative relation between the degree of symmetry of each vibrational mode, its inelastic signal, and the locality of selection rules.

  18. Role played by Disabled-2 in albumin induced MAP Kinase signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, Ramaswamy Pearson, Alexander L.; Colville-Nash, Paul; Baines, Deborah L.; Dockrell, Mark E.C.

    2008-02-15

    Albumin has been shown to activate the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in proximal tubular cells (PTECs) of the kidney. Megalin, the putative receptor for albumin has potential signalling properties. However, the mechanisms by which megalin signals are unclear. The adaptor phosphoprotein Disabled-2 (Dab2) is known to interact with the cytoplasmic tail of megalin and may be involved in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling. In this study, we investigated the role of Dab2 in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling and further studied the role of Dab2 in albumin-induced TGF{beta}-1 secretion, a MAPK dependent event. We used RNA interference to knockdown Dab2 protein abundance in HKC-8 cells a model of human PTECs. Albumin activated ERK1,2 and Elk-1 in a MEK-1 dependent manner and resulted in secretion of TGF{beta}-1. In the absence of albumin, knockdown of Dab2 resulted in a trend towards increase in pERK1,2 consistent with its putative role as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However albumin-induced ERK1,2 activation was completely abolished by Dab2 knockdown. Dab2 knockdown did not however result in inhibition of albumin-induced TGF{beta}-1 secretion. These results suggest that Dab2 is a ligand dependent bi-directional regulator of ERK1,2 activity by demonstrating that in addition to its more traditional role as an inhibitor of ERK1,2 it may also activate ERK1,2.

  19. Mapping transverse capillary flow speed using time-varying OCT speckle signals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    We present an optical coherence tomography (OCT) based method for mapping transverse red blood cell (RBC) flow speed at capillary. This OCT velocimetry utilizes a quantitative laser speckle temporal contrast analysis that estimates reliable speckle decorrelation time from the observed speckle contrast, which is related to microcirculatory flow velocity. For capillary speed measurement, we employ a home-built 1.3 µm MHz swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system that can acquire OCT B-frames at a rate of 1.7 kHz. From the multiple B-frames obtained at the same location, intensity profiles with time-varying OCT speckle contrast are extracted at single capillaries using a capillary binary mask and then the transverse flow speed is calculated by adapting the profiles to the speckle contrast analytic model. Finally, a 3D speed map can be achieved for OCT volume imaging. To validate this method, we perform a systematic study using both phantom and in vivo rodent models. Result shows that our method is effective to measure transverse capillary flow speed.

  20. Statistical parametric mapping of stimuli-evoked changes in quantitative blood flow using extended-focus optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Paul J.; Bouwens, Arno; Shamaei, Vincent; Nguyen, David; Extermann, Jerome; Bolmont, Tristan; Lasser, Theo

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging has revolutionised our understanding of brain function through its ability to image human cerebral structures non-invasively over the entire brain. By exploiting the different magnetic properties of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood, functional MRI can indirectly map areas undergoing neural activation. Alongside the development of fMRI, powerful statistical tools have been developed in an effort to shed light on the neural pathways involved in processing of sensory and cognitive information. In spite of the major improvements made in fMRI technology, the obtained spatial resolution of hundreds of microns prevents MRI in resolving and monitoring processes occurring at the cellular level. In this regard, Optical Coherence Microscopy is an ideal instrumentation as it can image at high spatio-temporal resolution. Moreover, by measuring the mean and the width of the Doppler spectra of light scattered by moving particles, OCM allows extracting the axial and lateral velocity components of red blood cells. The ability to assess quantitatively total blood velocity, as opposed to classical axial velocity Doppler OCM, is of paramount importance in brain imaging as a large proportion of cortical vascular is oriented perpendicularly to the optical axis. We combine here quantitative blood flow imaging with extended-focus Optical Coherence Microscopy and Statistical Parametric Mapping tools to generate maps of stimuli-evoked cortical hemodynamics at the capillary level.

  1. Temporal Comparison Between NIRS and EEG Signals During a Mental Arithmetic Task Evaluated with Self-Organizing Maps.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Katsunori; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of brain activity with near-infrared spectroscopy and electroencephalography allows spatiotemporal reconstruction of the hemodynamic response regarding the concentration changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin that are associated with recorded brain activity such as cognitive functions. However, the accuracy of state estimation during mental arithmetic tasks is often different depending on the length of the segment for sampling of NIRS and EEG signals. This study compared the results of a self-organizing map and ANOVA, which were both used to assess the accuracy of state estimation. We conducted an experiment with a mental arithmetic task performed by 10 participants. The lengths of the segment in each time frame for observation of NIRS and EEG signals were compared with the 30-s, 1-min, and 2-min segment lengths. The optimal segment lengths were different for NIRS and EEG signals in the case of classification of feature vectors into the states of performing a mental arithmetic task and being at rest. PMID:27526147

  2. Classifying fractionated electrograms in human atrial fibrillation using monophasic action potentials and activation mapping: Evidence for localized drivers, rate acceleration, and nonlocal signal etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Wright, Matthew; Derval, Nicolas; Jadidi, Amir; Forclaz, Andrei; Nault, Isabelle; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Sacher, Frédéric; Bordachar, Pierre; Clémenty, Jacques; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complex fractionated electrograms (CFAEs) detected during substrate mapping for atrial fibrillation (AF) reflect etiologies that are difficult to separate. Without knowledge of local refractoriness and activation sequence, CFAEs may represent rapid localized activity, disorganized wave collisions, or far-field electrograms. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to separate CFAE types in human AF, using monophasic action potentials (MAPs) to map local refractoriness in AF and multipolar catheters to map activation sequence. METHODS MAP and adjacent activation sequences at 124 biatrial sites were studied in 18 patients prior to AF ablation (age 57 ± 13 years, left atrial diameter 45 ± 8 mm). AF cycle length, bipolar voltage, and spectral dominant frequency were measured to characterize types of CFAE. RESULTS CFAE were observed at 91 sites, most of which showed discrete MAPs and (1) pansystolic local activity (8%); (2) CFAE after AF acceleration, often with MAP alternans (8%); or (3) nonlocal (far-field) signals (67%). A fourth CFAE pattern lacked discrete MAPs (17%), consistent with spatial disorganization. CFAE with discrete MAPs and pansystolic activation (consistent with rapid localized AF sites) had shorter cycle length (P <.05) and lower voltage (P <.05) and trended to have higher dominant frequency than other CFAE sites. Many CFAEs, particularly at the septa and coronary sinus, represented far-field signals. CONCLUSION CFAEs in human AF represent distinct functional types that may be separated using MAPs and activation sequence. In a minority of cases, CFAEs indicate localized rapid AF sites. The majority of CFAEs reflect far-field signals, AF acceleration, or disorganization. These results may help to interpret CFAE during AF substrate mapping. PMID:20955820

  3. Simulated probability of detection maps in case of non-monotonic EC signal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmon, P.; Jenson, F.; Reboud, C.

    2015-03-01

    This study addresses two issues: i) the estimation of simulation-assisted POD, not only versus the size of the defect, but also versus the location of the defect; ii) the non-parametric estimation of simulation-assisted POD when classical Berens hypotheses are not verified. It illustrates on an EC basic case of study the advantages of considering both size and location as characteristic parameters for POD estimation when location has a strong influence. Gaussian kernel smoothing regression has been applied to a simulated data set. Due to the large number of simulations involved, a surrogate model has first been constructed from a signals database generated by CIVA.

  4. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  5. Opposing actions of TGF{beta} and MAP kinase signaling in undifferentiated hen granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Dori C.; Haugen, Morgan J.; Johnson, A.L. . E-mail: johnson.128@nd.edu

    2005-10-21

    The present studies were conducted to establish interactions between transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family members, TGF{alpha} and betacellulin (BTC), relative to proliferation and differentiation of granulosa cells in hen ovarian follicles. Results presented demonstrate expression of TGF{beta} isoforms, plus TGF{alpha}, BTC, and ErbB receptors in prehierarchal follicles, thus establishing the potential for autocrine/paracrine signaling and cross-talk within granulosa cells at the onset of differentiation. Treatment with TGF{alpha} or BTC increases levels of TGF{beta}1 mRNA in undifferentiated granulosa cells, while the selective inhibitor of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling, U0126, reverses these effects. Moreover, TGF{beta}1 attenuates c-myc mRNA expression and granulosa cell proliferation, while TGF{alpha} blocks both these inhibitory effects. Collectively, these data provide evidence that EGF family ligands regulate both the expression and biological actions of TGF{beta}1 in hen granulosa cells, and indicate that the timely interaction of these opposing factors is an important modulator of both granulosa cell proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Regulation of MAP kinase signaling cascade by microRNAs in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Badmi; Sheikh, Arsheed Hussain; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is one of the most conserved signaling cascade in plants regulating a plethora of cellular processes including normal growth and development, abiotic and biotic stress responses. The perception of external cues triggers the phosphorylation of three tier MAPKKK-MAPKK-MAPK cascade which finally modifies a downstream substrate thereby regulating the cellular processes. Whereas, the transcription regulation by MAPKs, mediated through their substrates is well studied in plants, the transcription and post-transcriptional regulation of the MAPK genes are poorly understood. Previous studies from the animals systems suggested the miRNAs regulate the post-transcriptional regulation of MAPK transcripts. Here we attempt to unravel the post-transcriptional regulation of MAPKs by miRNAs in model crop plant Oryza sativa. Using in silico tools, we predict the miRNAs for 98 out of 99 MAPK transcripts. The predicted miRNAs were validated for the biological relevance of their function. The inverse correlation between relative transcript levels between the MAPKs and their predicted miRNAs validated the in silico prediction. Taken together, this report demonstrates the significance of miRNAs in regulation of the MAPK pathway in plants with a new direction to study the plant signaling molecules. PMID:25482813

  7. Mapping of export signals of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin with alkaline phosphatase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, M S; Lory, S

    1987-01-01

    Pili of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are assembled from monomers of the structural subunit, pilin, after secretion of this protein across the bacterial membrane. These subunits are initally synthesized as precursors (prepilin) with a six-amino-acid leader peptide that is cleaved off during or after membrane traversal, followed by methylation of the amino-terminal phenylalanine residue. This report demonstrates that additional sequences from the N terminus of the mature protein are necessary for membrane translocation. Gene fusions were made between amino-terminal coding sequences of the cloned pilin gene (pilA) and the structural gene for Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (phoA) devoid of a signal sequence. Fusions between at least 45 amino acid residues of the mature pilin and alkaline phosphatase resulted in translocation of the fusion proteins across the cytoplasmic membranes of both P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains carrying recombinant plasmids, as measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and Western blotting. Fusion proteins constructed with the first 10 amino acids of prepilin (including the 6-amino-acid leader peptide) were not secreted, although they were detected in the cytoplasm. Therefore, unlike that of the majority of secreted proteins that are synthesized with transient signal sequences, the membrane traversal of pilin across the bacterial membrane requires the transient six-amino-acid leader peptide as well as sequences contained in the N-terminal region of the mature pilin protein. Images PMID:2885309

  8. An Association Map on the Effect of Flavonoids on the Signaling Pathways in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Sanaz; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Looi, Chung Yeng; Seyedan, Atefehalsadat; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer in the world, causing thousands of deaths annually. Although chemotherapy is known to be an effective treatment to combat colon cancer, it produces severe side effects. Natural products, on the other hand, appear to generate fewer side effects than do chemotherapeutic drugs. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in various fruits and vegetables known to possess antioxidant activities, and the literature shows that several of these flavonoids have anti-CRC propertiesFlavonoids are classified into five main subclasses: flavonols, flavanones, flavones, flavan-3-ols, and flavanonols. Of these subclasses, the flavanonols have a minimum effect against CRC, whereas the flavones play an important role. The main targets for the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on CRC signaling pathways are caspase; nuclear factor kappa B; mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9; p53; β-catenin; cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4; and cyclins A, B, D, and E. In this review article, we summarize the in vitro and in vivo studies that have been performed since 2000 on the anti-CRC properties of flavonoids. We also describe the signaling pathways affected by flavonoids that have been found to be involved in CRC. Some flavonoids have the potential to be an effective alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of colon cancer; well-controlled clinical studies should, however, be conducted to support this proposal. PMID:27226778

  9. Mapping and signaling of neural pathways involved in the regulation of hydromineral homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Antunes-Rodrigues, J.; Ruginsk, S.G.; Mecawi, A.S.; Margatho, L.O.; Cruz, J.C.; Vilhena-Franco, T.; Reis, W.L.; Ventura, R.R.; Reis, L.C.; Vivas, L.M.; Elias, L.L.K.

    2013-01-01

    Several forebrain and brainstem neurochemical circuitries interact with peripheral neural and humoral signals to collaboratively maintain both the volume and osmolality of extracellular fluids. Although much progress has been made over the past decades in the understanding of complex mechanisms underlying neuroendocrine control of hydromineral homeostasis, several issues still remain to be clarified. The use of techniques such as molecular biology, neuronal tracing, electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and microinfusions has significantly improved our ability to identify neuronal phenotypes and their signals, including those related to neuron-glia interactions. Accordingly, neurons have been shown to produce and release a large number of chemical mediators (neurotransmitters, neurohormones and neuromodulators) into the interstitial space, which include not only classic neurotransmitters, such as acetylcholine, amines (noradrenaline, serotonin) and amino acids (glutamate, GABA), but also gaseous (nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide) and lipid-derived (endocannabinoids) mediators. This efferent response, initiated within the neuronal environment, recruits several peripheral effectors, such as hormones (glucocorticoids, angiotensin II, estrogen), which in turn modulate central nervous system responsiveness to systemic challenges. Therefore, in this review, we shall evaluate in an integrated manner the physiological control of body fluid homeostasis from the molecular aspects to the systemic and integrated responses. PMID:23579631

  10. Single-subject statistical mapping of acute brain hypoxia in the rat following middle cerebral artery occlusion: a microPET study.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Masashi; Beech, John S; Fryer, Tim D; Jones, P Simon; Ahmed, Tahir; Smith, Rob; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2011-06-01

    No study so far has attempted to map the 3D topography of brain hypoxia in the individual rat in vivo following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). In a previous microPET study, we reported that (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-MISO) trapping in the brain after MCAo was specific for the hypoxic viable tissue. Here, we used (18)F-MISO microPET to map the 3D topography of brain hypoxia in the acute stage of permanent distal MCAo in individual spontaneously hypertensive rats. Normal rats were also studied. (18)F-MISO was intravenously injected approximately 1 h after clip placement and PET data were acquired for 2 hours. Animals were sacrificed and the brains harvested 48 h later for infarct mapping using standard histopathology. As expected, continuous (18)F-MISO trapping was found over the affected relative to unaffected and control MCA cortex. Using single-subject voxel-based statistical mapping, tracer accumulation 90-120 min after injection was consistently significantly higher in the anterior MCA cortex (proximal relative to clip site) and gradually decreased towards posterior areas, a pattern consistent with the classic penumbra concept. The data also suggested that (i) a portion of the significant (18)F-MISO trapping area may sit outside the contours of the final infarct despite the permanent MCAo, suggesting that (18)F-MISO may be a marker not only of severe (penumbral) but also of milder (oligemic) hypoxia, and (ii) small portions of the final infarct may not exhibit early tracer trapping, suggesting that by the time the tracer was administered this tissue had already progressed to irreversible damage. This study shows the feasibility of single-subject mapping of brain hypoxia following MCAo in the rat, which has potential applications in pathophysiological investigations. PMID:21335004

  11. Statistical analysis of synovial fluid layers phase maps in the diagnostics of development and differentiation of pathological changes severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasniuk, D. I.; Vasyuk, V. L.

    2011-09-01

    A new method for differential diagnosis of pathological changes of the joints on the basis of synovial fluid was founded. Adduced description scheme and the principles of polarization filtering to determine the coordinate distributions of phase shifts.The optical model of polycrystalline networks of knee joint synovial fluid is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts between the orthogonal components of the amplitude in the points of laser images of synovial fluid smears and the change in optical anisotropy of this biological object. The diagnostic criteria of knee joint inflammation processes are determined.

  12. Statistical analysis of synovial fluid layers phase maps in the diagnostics of development and differentiation of pathological changes severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasniuk, D. I.; Vasyuk, V. L.

    2012-01-01

    A new method for differential diagnosis of pathological changes of the joints on the basis of synovial fluid was founded. Adduced description scheme and the principles of polarization filtering to determine the coordinate distributions of phase shifts.The optical model of polycrystalline networks of knee joint synovial fluid is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts between the orthogonal components of the amplitude in the points of laser images of synovial fluid smears and the change in optical anisotropy of this biological object. The diagnostic criteria of knee joint inflammation processes are determined.

  13. Textural analysis by statistical parameters and its application to the mapping of flow-structures in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieczorek, U.

    1977-01-01

    From 1974 to 1977 the application of remote sensing methods in coastal areas and tidal bays and estuaries was investigated on the German coast of the North Sea. Aerial photographs were taken using different films; (1) color, (2) color infrared, and (3) black and white films. Scanner recordings were taken by an 11 channel scanner. Ground truth measurements of radiation and measurements of meteorological elements were carried out. For mapping the morphology in mudflat areas a digital texture analysis was developed, by which measurement of the change of image structures cased by distributing factors, such as changing illumination, is possible.

  14. Cumulative fade statistics and prediction methods associated with the COMSTAR beacon signal at 28.56 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents cumulative fade statistics for the period April 1977 to March 1978 and reviews the rain attenuation predictive efforts using radar and disdrometer data for the summer of 1977. Attention is given to the receiving and radar systems as well as the disdrometer-raingage system. Discussion of the fade statistics covers the yearly, monthly and time of day statistics. Consideration is given to measured and predicted attenuation events, measured and predicted probability distributions as well as an empirical calibration adjustment. It is noted that in spite of many reasons for noncorrelation, the radar results do correlate well. Finally, it is concluded that the results demonstrate the utility of using radar coupled with disdrometer measurements for predicting individual fade events as well as long term fade distributions associated with satellite communications through rain.

  15. Mapping grassland leaf area index with airborne hyperspectral imagery: A comparison study of statistical approaches and inversion of radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Atzberger, Clement; Skidmore, Andrew; Schlerf, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Statistical and physical models have seldom been compared in studying grasslands. In this paper, both modeling approaches are investigated for mapping leaf area index (LAI) in a Mediterranean grassland (Majella National Park, Italy) using HyMap airborne hyperspectral images. We compared inversion of the PROSAIL radiative transfer model with narrow band vegetation indices (NDVI-like and SAVI2-like) and partial least squares regression (PLS). To assess the performance of the investigated models, the normalized RMSE (nRMSE) and R2 between in situ measurements of leaf area index and estimated parameter values are reported. The results of the study demonstrate that LAI can be estimated through PROSAIL inversion with accuracies comparable to those of statistical approaches ( R2 = 0.89, nRMSE = 0.22). The accuracy of the radiative transfer model inversion was further increased by using only a spectral subset of the data ( R2 = 0.91, nRMSE = 0.18). For the feature selection wavebands not well simulated by PROSAIL were sequentially discarded until all bands fulfilled the imposed accuracy requirements.

  16. Geo-Statistics and its Application for Creating Iso-Maps in Hydro-Geology Electric Conductivity contours of Atrak sub basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahdadi, M.; Partani, S.; Ahmadi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Taking discrete sampling from the water resource and measuring the parameters in quantity and quality and using the procedures of turning discrete points to integrated surface can lead the research process to surface variations consideration. There are different procedures for turning broken discrete points to integrated surface like procedure of Geostatistics which conclude Kriging procedure, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Radial Basis Functions (RBF), Local Polynomial Interpolation, Global Polynomial Interpolation and Co-kriging. This research is going to explain any applications of Geostatistics for creating iso-maps such as underground water table contours, Iso-quality (for example EC and pH) contours, and place changes of too many other hydro-geological parameters. In this way, statistic signs such as Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Mean Absolute Relative Error (MARE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), MBE and Coefficient of Correlation, could be employed to select the best Geo-Statistic model in a GIS framework. Eventually, the power in IDW method has been optimized and also best Geo-Statistic method has been introduced for predicting the Electric Conductivity (EC) of underground water in Atrak plain. Finally any conclusions have been extracted. Table No. 1: Comparison of Statistical Indices for Best Estimator Selection G.S Method r RMSE MBE MAE Kriging 0.81 2200 485 1740 RBF 0.79 2263 427 1662 GPI 0.63 2981 347 2031 LPI 0.64 2942 349 2002 Power Optimized IDW 0.459 4816 -183 2845 The use of MAE shows the amount of absolute error, With regard to table No.1 kriging and RBF models have the best estimation which has the least absolute estimation error. As one of results figure No. 2 shows the Iso-Electric Conductivity Map which has been created by Kriging Method in a GIS Framework.; Figure No. 1: Power optimization in IDW method and the minimum of RMSE ; Figure No.2: Iso-Electric Conductivity Map which has been created by Kriging Method in a GIS Framework

  17. Passenger flow statistics across the field of view based on the depth map of the double Xtion sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhang-qin; Gu, Guo-hua; Bai, Xiao-feng; Zhao, Tie-kun; Chen, Hai-xin

    2013-08-01

    It introduces a new method to achieve the passenger flow statistics in stereo vision according to the original depth image output by the monocular Xtion sensor, aiming at the problem of algorithm with large amounts of data and realization of single field with dual camera on the basis of stereo vision. Double Xtion sensors are used to expand the range of view angle because of the monocular Xtion sensor's limitations, whose view range is 45°*58° with small transverse view range and can't meet the passenger flow statistics. Due to the characteristics of constant physical space dimensions, use the improved SIFT (Scale Invariant Features Transform) feature algorithm to realize the auto - stereoscopic splice of binocular original depth images. Firstly, the feature points of the reference image (the image to be matched) and the subsequent image (the image to be matched with the reference image) are obtained by SIFT algorithm, getting the location, scale and direction of the feature points and the feature points are described by means of the 128-dimensional vector .Secondly, complete the match of the feature points of the two images to calculate overlapping area, using the nearest neighbor method. Finally, image stitching is completed based on multi-resolution wavelet transform, which contains three-dimensional spatial information of the human body, thus use a method to analysis comprehensively the depth image for field detection and tracking based on the features such as the head shape, the head area the spatial position relation of the human head and shoulder and so on. The experimental results show that this method not only improve the detection accuracy and efficiency, reduce the amount of operation data, so that the system is simple in structure, but also solve many problems of passenger flow statistics based on video stream in the system, accuracy up to 93%, having high and practical application value.

  18. STEAM - Statistical Template Estimation for Abnormality Mapping: A personalized DTI analysis technique with applications to the screening of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brian G; Miller, Steven P; Brown, Colin J; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Chau, Vann; Grunau, Ruth E; Synnes, Anne R; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2016-01-15

    We introduce the STEAM DTI analysis engine: a whole brain voxel-based analysis technique for the examination of diffusion tensor images (DTIs). Our STEAM analysis technique consists of two parts. First, we introduce a collection of statistical templates that represent the distribution of DTIs for a normative population. These templates include various diffusion measures from the full tensor, to fractional anisotropy, to 12 other tensor features. Second, we propose a voxel-based analysis (VBA) pipeline that is reliable enough to identify areas in individual DTI scans that differ significantly from the normative group represented in the STEAM statistical templates. We identify and justify choices in the VBA pipeline relating to multiple comparison correction, image smoothing, and dealing with non-normally distributed data. Finally, we provide a proof of concept for the utility of STEAM on a cohort of 134 very preterm infants. We generated templates from scans of 55 very preterm infants whose T1 MRI scans show no abnormalities and who have normal neurodevelopmental outcome. The remaining 79 infants were then compared to the templates using our VBA technique. We show: (a) that our statistical templates display the white matter development expected over the modeled time period, and (b) that our VBA results detect abnormalities in the diffusion measurements that relate significantly with both the presence of white matter lesions and with neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18months. Most notably, we show that STEAM produces personalized results while also being able to highlight abnormalities across the whole brain and at the scale of individual voxels. While we show the value of STEAM on DTI scans from a preterm infant cohort, STEAM can be equally applied to other cohorts as well. To facilitate this whole-brain personalized DTI analysis, we made STEAM publicly available at http://www.sfu.ca/bgb2/steam. PMID:26515903

  19. Effects of deformable registration algorithms on the creation of statistical maps for preoperative targeting in deep brain stimulation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; D'Haese, Pierre-Francois; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation, which is used to treat various neurological disorders, involves implanting a permanent electrode into precise targets deep in the brain. Accurate pre-operative localization of the targets on pre-operative MRI sequence is challenging as these are typically located in homogenous regions with poor contrast. Population-based statistical atlases can assist with this process. Such atlases are created by acquiring the location of efficacious regions from numerous subjects and projecting them onto a common reference image volume using some normalization method. In previous work, we presented results concluding that non-rigid registration provided the best result for such normalization. However, this process could be biased by the choice of the reference image and/or registration approach. In this paper, we have qualitatively and quantitatively compared the performance of six recognized deformable registration methods at normalizing such data in poor contrasted regions onto three different reference volumes using a unique set of data from 100 patients. We study various metrics designed to measure the centroid, spread, and shape of the normalized data. This study leads to a total of 1800 deformable registrations and results show that statistical atlases constructed using different deformable registration methods share comparable centroids and spreads with marginal differences in their shape. Among the six methods being studied, Diffeomorphic Demons produces the largest spreads and centroids that are the furthest apart from the others in general. Among the three atlases, one atlas consistently outperforms the other two with smaller spreads for each algorithm. However, none of the differences in the spreads were found to be statistically significant, across different algorithms or across different atlases.

  20. Linking the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern theorem, essential HOPF maps and membrane solitons with exotic spin and statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Tze, Chia-Hsiung . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    By way of the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern theorem, we present a higher dimensional extension of Polyakov's regularization of Wilson loops of point solitons. Spacetime paths of extended objects become hyper-ribbons with self-linking, twisting and writhing numbers. specifically we discuss the exotic spin and statistical phase entanglements of geometric n-membrane solitons of D-dimensional KP{sub 1} {sigma}-models with an added Hopf-Chern-Simons term where (n, D, K) = (0, 3, C), (2, 7, H), (6, 15, {Omega}). They are uniquely linked to the complex and quaternion and octonion division algebras. 22 refs.

  1. X-Ray Map Analyser: A new ArcGIS® based tool for the quantitative statistical data handling of X-ray maps (Geo- and material-science applications)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortolano, Gaetano; Zappalà, Luigi; Mazzoleni, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    A new semi-automated image processing procedure based on multivariate statistical analysis of X-ray maps of petrological and material science interest has been developed to generate high contrast pseudo-coloured images highlighting the element distribution between and within detected mineral phases. This new tool package, developed in Python and integrated with ArcGis®, generates in only a few minutes several graphical outputs useful for classifying chemically homogeneous zones as well as extracting quantitative information through the statistical data handling of X-ray maps. The code, largely based on the use of functions implemented in ArcGis® 9.3 equipped with Spatial Analyst and Data Management licences, has been suitably integrated with original cyclic functions that hugely reduce the time taken to complete lengthy procedures. In particular these tools, after the acquisition of any kind of multispectral images allow fast and powerful data processing for efficient illustration and documentation of key compositional and microtextural relationships in rocks and materials.

  2. Empirical validation of statistical parametric mapping for group imaging of fast neural activity using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Packham, B; Barnes, G; Dos Santos, G Sato; Aristovich, K; Gilad, O; Ghosh, A; Oh, T; Holder, D

    2016-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) allows for the reconstruction of internal conductivity from surface measurements. A change in conductivity occurs as ion channels open during neural activity, making EIT a potential tool for functional brain imaging. EIT images can have  >10 000 voxels, which means statistical analysis of such images presents a substantial multiple testing problem. One way to optimally correct for these issues and still maintain the flexibility of complicated experimental designs is to use random field theory. This parametric method estimates the distribution of peaks one would expect by chance in a smooth random field of a given size. Random field theory has been used in several other neuroimaging techniques but never validated for EIT images of fast neural activity, such validation can be achieved using non-parametric techniques. Both parametric and non-parametric techniques were used to analyze a set of 22 images collected from 8 rats. Significant group activations were detected using both techniques (corrected p  <  0.05). Both parametric and non-parametric analyses yielded similar results, although the latter was less conservative. These results demonstrate the first statistical analysis of such an image set and indicate that such an analysis is an approach for EIT images of neural activity. PMID:27203477

  3. Primitive-path statistics of entangled polymers: mapping multi-chain simulations onto single-chain mean-field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenbakkers, Rudi J. A.; Tzoumanekas, Christos; Li, Ying; Liu, Wing Kam; Kröger, Martin; Schieber, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to map the full equilibrium distribution of the primitive-path (PP) length, obtained from multi-chain simulations of polymer melts, onto a single-chain mean-field ‘target’ model. Most previous works used the Doi-Edwards tube model as a target. However, the average number of monomers per PP segment, obtained from multi-chain PP networks, has consistently shown a discrepancy of a factor of two with respect to tube-model estimates. Part of the problem is that the tube model neglects fluctuations in the lengths of PP segments, the number of entanglements per chain and the distribution of monomers among PP segments, while all these fluctuations are observed in multi-chain simulations. Here we use a recently proposed slip-link model, which includes fluctuations in all these variables as well as in the spatial positions of the entanglements. This turns out to be essential to obtain qualitative and quantitative agreement with the equilibrium PP-length distribution obtained from multi-chain simulations. By fitting this distribution, we are able to determine two of the three parameters of the model, which govern its equilibrium properties. This mapping is executed for four different linear polymers and for different molecular weights. The two parameters are found to depend on chemistry, but not on molecular weight. The model predicts a constant plateau modulus minus a correction inversely proportional to molecular weight. The value for well-entangled chains, with the parameters determined ab initio, lies in the range of experimental data for the materials investigated.

  4. Statistical analysis of the spontaneously emitted photon signals from palm and dorsal sides of both hands in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, Eduard P A; Wijk, Roeland Van; Bajpai, Rajendra P; van der Greef, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Photon signals emitted spontaneously from dorsal and palm sides of both hands were recorded using 6000 time windows of size T=50 ms in 50 healthy human subjects. These photon signals demonstrated universal behaviour by variance and mean. The data sets for larger time windows up to T=50s were obtained by merging the data recorded with T=50 ms. The behaviour of Fano factor regarding different window sizes was investigated. The Fano factor hovered around one in signals up to T=3s and increased slowly with the increase in window size. This indicated super-Poissonian distribution of photo counts. The Fano factor curve F(T) obtained by averaging all subjects and locations had a characteristic shape. Data suggest that the shape is essentially a combination of a smaller sub-population of individuals with sub-Poissonian and a larger sub-population with predominantly super-Poissonian photo count distribution. Averaging the data obtained by randomly shuffling observed data sets was flat and did not show any structure with T. The same applied both to the observed background data sets and the data sets obtained by randomly shuffling background in 50 measurements. The Fano factor was also flat in 50 measurements documented both by a standard LED as well as its shuffled data sets. The structure in the shape F(T) is characteristic of human signals. It may contain valuable information about metabolic processes and may have diagnostic relevance. PMID:20417114

  5. A Bayesian approach to incorporating maximum entropy-derived signal parameter statistics into the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, R. Lee; Sibul, Leon H.; Bradley, David L.; Ballard, Jeffrey A.; Camin, H. John

    2005-09-01

    Our goal is to develop a probabilistic sonar performance prediction methodology that can make use of limited knowledge of random or uncertain environment, target, and sonar system parameters, but does not make unwarranted assumptions. The maximum entropy method (MEM) can be used to construct probability density functions (pdfs) for relevant environmental and source parameters, and an ocean acoustic propagation model can use those pdfs to predict the variability of received signal parameter. At this point, the MEM can be used once again to produce signal parameter pdfs. A Bayesian framework allows these pdfs to be incorporated into the signal processor to produce ROC curves in which, for example, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a random variable for which a pdf has been calculated. One output of such a processor could be a range-dependent probability of detection for fixed probability of false alarm, which would be more useful than the conventional range of the day that is still in use in some areas. [Work supported by ONR Code 321US.

  6. Relationship between aberrant brain connectivity and clinical features in Angelman Syndrome: a new method using tract based spatial statistics of DTI color-coded orientation maps

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vijay N.; Jeong, Jeong-won; Wilson, Benjamin J.; Behen, Michael E; Chugani, Harry T.; Sundaram, Senthil K.

    2013-01-01

    Aim In order to relate brain structural abnormalities to clinical features of Angelman Syndrome (AS), we determined the locations of abnormal regional white matter architecture in AS children using a sensitive and objective whole brain approach to analyze diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) color-coded orientation maps. Methods Using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) of DTI color-coded orientation maps, the fraction of fibers oriented in the anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML) and superioinferior (SI) directions were determined in whole brain white matter of 7 children with AS (mean age: 70 ± 25.78 months, 5 males) and 7 children with typical development (TD, mean age: 79.8 ± 17.25 months, 4 males). TBSS of FA map was also performed for comparison. Results Children with AS had a significantly lower AP component than the TD group in 9 clusters (3 bilateral and 3 unilateral). Bilateral clusters were located in inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation and arcuate fasciculus regions. Unilateral clusters involved left brainstem, left cingulum and right uncinate regions. Similarly, children with AS had significantly lower ML component than the TD group in 4 clusters (2 in corpus callosum and 2 unilateral clusters). Unilateral clusters were located in the left cingulum and left anterior thalamic radiation regions. SI component was lower in children with AS in two clusters compared to TD (corticospinal tract and corpus callosum). FA map clusters mostly corresponded with component clusters. Interpretation Children with AS have a global impairment of white matter integrity including AP, ML and SI components in whole brain suggesting a potential underlying error with axon guidance mechanisms during brain development possibly due to loss of UBE3A gene expression. Some of this aberrant connectivity can be related to the clinical features of AS. PMID:21827860

  7. Identification and fine mapping of nuclear and nucleolar localization signals within the human ribosomal protein S17.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S17 (RPS17) is mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a bone marrow disorder that fails to produce sufficient red blood cells leading to anemia. Recently, an RPS17 protein sequence was also found to be naturally inserted in the genome of hepatitis E virus (HEV) from patients chronically-infected by HEV. The role of RPS17 in HEV replication and pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of knowledge about how RPS17 functions at a molecular level. Understanding the biological function of RPS17 is critical for elucidating its role in virus infection and DBA disease processes. In this study we probed the subcellular distribution of normal and mutant RPS17 proteins in a human liver cell line (Huh7). RPS17 was primarily detected within the nucleus, and more specifically within the nucleoli. Using a transient expression system in which RPS17 or truncations were expressed as fusions with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP), we were able to identify and map, for the first time, two separate nuclear localization signals (NLSs), one to the first 13 amino acids of the amino-terminus of RPS17 and the other within amino acids 30-60. Additionally, we mapped amino acid sequences required for nucleolar accumulation of RPS17 to amino acids 60-70. Amino acids 60-70 possess a di-RG motif that may be necessary for nucleolar retention of RPS17. The results from this study enhance our knowledge of RSP17 and will facilitate future mechanistic studies about the roles of RSP17 in hepatitis E and DBA disease processes. PMID:25853866

  8. Statistical mapping of ULF Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath as a function of solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a statistical study of Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath. There exists a notable dawn-dusk asymmetry, such that velocity fluctuations generally exhibit enhanced spectral power in the magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The fluctuations in the central magnetosheath and close to bow shock tend to dampen with increasing tail-ward distance while the opposite trend is observed close to the magnetopause. This strongly suggests that velocity shear driven processes such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drive Pc3 flow variations close to the magnetopause as the velocity shear increases with increasing tail-ward distance. We also show strong evidence that Pc3 velocity fluctuations are significantly enhanced during intervals of faster solar wind speeds. We see negligible differences between data collected during northward and southward IMF orientations, but in general, a dawn-favoured asymmetry persists.

  9. miR-625-3p regulates oxaliplatin resistance by targeting MAP2K6-p38 signalling in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Lyskjær, Iben; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hansen, Flemming; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Pfeiffer, Per; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers (CRC) is a major medical problem, and predictive markers are urgently needed. Recently, miR-625-3p was reported as a promising predictive marker. Herein, we show that miR-625-3p functionally induces oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells, and identify the signalling networks affected by miR-625-3p. We show that the p38 MAPK activator MAP2K6 is a direct target of miR-625-3p, and, accordingly, is downregulated in non-responder patients of oxaliplatin therapy. miR-625-3p-mediated resistance is reversed by anti-miR-625-3p treatment and ectopic expression of a miR-625-3p insensitive MAP2K6 variant. In addition, reduction of p38 signalling by using siRNAs, chemical inhibitors or expression of a dominant-negative MAP2K6 protein induces resistance to oxaliplatin. Transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome profiles confirm inactivation of MAP2K6-p38 signalling as one likely mechanism of oxaliplatin resistance. Our study shows that miR-625-3p induces oxaliplatin resistance by abrogating MAP2K6-p38-regulated apoptosis and cell cycle control networks, and corroborates the predictive power of miR-625-3p. PMID:27526785

  10. VOXEL-LEVEL MAPPING OF TRACER KINETICS IN PET STUDIES: A STATISTICAL APPROACH EMPHASIZING TISSUE LIFE TABLES1

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Finbarr; Muzi, Mark; Mankoff, David A.; Eary, Janet F.; Spence, Alexander M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Most radiotracers used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scanning act in a linear time-invariant fashion so that the measured time-course data are a convolution between the time course of the tracer in the arterial supply and the local tissue impulse response, known as the tissue residue function. In statistical terms the residue is a life table for the transit time of injected radiotracer atoms. The residue provides a description of the tracer kinetic information measurable by a dynamic PET scan. Decomposition of the residue function allows separation of rapid vascular kinetics from slower blood-tissue exchanges and tissue retention. For voxel-level analysis, we propose that residues be modeled by mixtures of nonparametrically derived basis residues obtained by segmentation of the full data volume. Spatial and temporal aspects of diagnostics associated with voxel-level model fitting are emphasized. Illustrative examples, some involving cancer imaging studies, are presented. Data from cerebral PET scanning with 18F fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) and 15O water (H2O) in normal subjects is used to evaluate the approach. Cross-validation is used to make regional comparisons between residues estimated using adaptive mixture models with more conventional compartmental modeling techniques. Simulations studies are used to theoretically examine mean square error performance and to explore the benefit of voxel-level analysis when the primary interest is a statistical summary of regional kinetics. The work highlights the contribution that multivariate analysis tools and life-table concepts can make in the recovery of local metabolic information from dynamic PET studies, particularly ones in which the assumptions of compartmental-like models, with residues that are sums of exponentials, might not be certain. PMID:25392718

  11. Mapping the Dark Matter From UV Light at High Redshift: An Empirical Approach to Understand Galaxy Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Giavalisco, Mauro; Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H; Ferguson, Henry C.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Urry, Claudia M.; /Yale Ctr. Astron. Astrophys.

    2009-08-03

    We present a simple formalism to interpret the observations of two galaxy statistics, the UV luminosity function (LF) and two-point correlation functions for star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 4, 5 and 6 in the context of {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Both statistics are the result of how star formation takes place in dark matter halos, and thus are used to constrain how UV light depends on halo properties, in particular halo mass. The two physical quantities we explore are the star formation duty cycle, and the range of UV luminosity that a halo of mass M can have (mean and variance). The former directly addresses the typical duration of star formation activity in halos while the latter addresses the averaged star formation history and regularity of gas inflow into these systems. In the context of this formalism, we explore various physical models consistent with all the available observational data, and find the following: (1) the typical duration of star formation observed in the data is {approx}< 0.4 Gyr (1{sigma}), (2) the inferred scaling law between the observed L{sub UV} and halo mass M from the observed faint-end slope of the luminosity functions is roughly linear out to M {approx} 10{sup 11.5} - 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} at all redshifts probed in this work, and (3) the observed L{sub UV} for a fixed halo mass M decreases with time, implying that the star formation efficiency (after dust extinction) is higher at earlier times. We explore several different physical scenarios relating star formation to halo mass, but find that these scenarios are indistinguishable due to the limited range of halo mass probed by our data. In order to discriminate between different scenarios, we discuss the possibility of using the bright-faint galaxy cross-correlation functions and more robust determination of luminosity-dependent galaxy bias for future surveys.

  12. Mapping the Dark Matter from UV Light at High Redshift: An Empirical Approach to Understand Galaxy Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Giavalisco, Mauro; Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Urry, Claudia M.

    2009-04-01

    We present a simple formalism to interpret the observations of two galaxy statistics, the UV luminosity function (LF) and two-point correlation functions for star-forming galaxies at z~4, 5, and 6 in the context of Λ cold dark matter cosmology. Both statistics are the result of how star formation takes place in dark matter halos, and thus are used to constrain how UV light depends on halo properties, in particular halo mass. The two physical quantities we explore are the star formation duty cycle, and the range of UV luminosity that a halo of mass M can have (mean and variance). The former directly addresses the typical duration of star formation activity in halos, while the latter addresses the averaged star formation history and regularity of gas inflow into these systems. In the context of this formalism, we explore various physical models consistent with all the available observational data, and find the following: (1) the typical duration of star formation observed in the data is lsim0.4 Gyr (1σ) (2) the inferred scaling law between the observed L UV and halo mass M from the observed faint-end slope of the LFs is roughly linear out to M ≈ 1011.5-1012 h -1 M sun at all redshifts probed in this work; and (3) the observed L UV for a fixed halo mass M decreases with time, implying that the star formation efficiency (after dust extinction) is higher at earlier times. We explore several different physical scenarios relating star formation to halo mass, but find that these scenarios are indistinguishable due to the limited range of halo mass probed by our data. In order to discriminate between different scenarios, we discuss the possibility of using the bright-faint galaxy cross-correlation functions and more robust determination of luminosity-dependent galaxy bias for future surveys.

  13. Recording human electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals for neuroscientific research and real-time functional cortical mapping.

    PubMed

    Hill, N Jeremy; Gupta, Disha; Brunner, Peter; Gunduz, Aysegul; Adamo, Matthew A; Ritaccio, Anthony; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    methods for collecting recording ECoG, and demonstrate how to use these signals for important real-time applications such as clinical mapping and brain-computer interfacing. Our example uses the BCI2000 software platform and the SIGFRIED method, an application for real-time mapping of brain functions. This procedure yields information that clinicians can subsequently use to guide the complex and laborious process of functional mapping by electrical stimulation. PREREQUISITES AND PLANNING: Patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy may be candidates for resective surgery of an epileptic focus to minimize the frequency of seizures. Prior to resection, the patients undergo monitoring using subdural electrodes for two purposes: first, to localize the epileptic focus, and second, to identify nearby critical brain areas (i.e., eloquent cortex) where resection could result in long-term functional deficits. To implant electrodes, a craniotomy is performed to open the skull. Then, electrode grids and/or strips are placed on the cortex, usually beneath the dura. A typical grid has a set of 8 x 8 platinum-iridium electrodes of 4 mm diameter (2.3 mm exposed surface) embedded in silicon with an inter-electrode distance of 1cm. A strip typically contains 4 or 6 such electrodes in a single line. The locations for these grids/strips are planned by a team of neurologists and neurosurgeons, and are based on previous EEG monitoring, on a structural MRI of the patient's brain, and on relevant factors of the patient's history. Continuous recording over a period of 5-12 days serves to localize epileptic foci, and electrical stimulation via the implanted electrodes allows clinicians to map eloquent cortex. At the end of the monitoring period, explantation of the electrodes and therapeutic resection are performed together in one procedure. In addition to its primary clinical purpose, invasive monitoring also provides a unique opportunity to acquire human ECoG data for neuroscientific research

  14. MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOAL VEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS. 1P Zhang, UP Kodavanti. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, 1School of Vet Med, NCSU, Raleigh, NC
    Exposure to PM ma...

  15. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  16. Contour Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Ohio State University Center for Mapping, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), developed a system for mobile mapping called the GPSVan. While driving, the users can map an area from the sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. George J. Igel and Company and the Ohio State University Center for Mapping advanced the technology for use in determining the contours of a construction site. The new system reduces the time required for mapping and staking, and can monitor the amount of soil moved.

  17. Experimental designs and statistical methods for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying triploid endosperm traits without maternal genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongxian; Wu, Weiren

    2008-01-01

    Many endosperm traits are related to grain quality in cereal crops. Endosperm traits are mainly controlled by the endosperm genome but may be affected by the maternal genome. Studies have shown that maternal genotypic variation could greatly influence the estimation of the direct effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying endosperm traits. In this paper, we propose methods of interval mapping of endosperm QTLs using seeds of F2 or BC1 (an equal mixture of F1 x P1 and F1 x P2 with F1 as the female parent) derived from a cross between 2 pure lines (P1 x P2). The most significant advantage of our experimental designs is that the maternal effects do not contribute to the genetic variation of endosperm traits and therefore the direct effects of endosperm QTLs can be estimated without the influence of maternal effects. In addition, the experimental designs can greatly reduce environmental variation because a few F1 plants grown in a small block of field will produce sufficient F2 or BC1 seeds for endosperm QTL analysis. Simulation studies show that the methods can efficiently detect endosperm QTLs and unbiasedly estimate their positions and effects. The BC1 design is better than the F2 design. PMID:18544551

  18. Regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by cytokines is mediated through differential activation of MAP kinase signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2009-09-10

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a pivotal role in coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, and cancer, but its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). In this study we examined the mechanisms involved in the regulation of EPCR shedding in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), but not interferon-{gamma} and interleukin-6, suppressed EPCR mRNA transcription and cell-associated EPCR expression in HUVEC. The release of sEPCR induced by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} correlated with activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). EPCR shedding was also induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, ionomycin, anisomycin, thiol oxidants or alkylators, thrombin, and disruptors of lipid rafts. Both basal and induced shedding of EPCR was blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitors, TAPI-0 and GM6001, and by the reduced non-protein thiols, glutathione, dihydrolipoic acid, dithiothreitol, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Because other antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to block the cleavage of EPCR, a direct suppression of metalloproteinase activity seems responsible for the observed effects of reduced thiols. In summary, the shedding of EPCR in HUVEC is effectively regulated by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}, and downstream by MAP kinase signaling pathways and metalloproteinases.

  19. Using ALSM to map sinkholes in the urbanized covered karst of Pinellas County, Florida—2. Accuracy statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, H. L.; Seale, Larry D.; Florea, Lee J.; Brinkmann, Robert

    2008-05-01

    We apply the logic of clinical epidemiological studies to quantify the accuracy of mapping sinkholes by ALSM in the 750 km2 Pinellas County. By such studies, a new diagnostic procedure is tested by comparing the diagnoses in a clinical trial to diagnoses on the same patients from a more reliable, but more elaborate and expensive procedure (“gold standard” in epidemiological context). A relatively undeveloped, 65 km2 focus area where we have aerial photographs that are effectively contemporaneous with the ALSM flights serves as the “clinical trial”. The xy-locations in the focus area are the “patients” in the trial. The “diagnostic test” for having “sinkhole disease” is inclusion in a database of sinkhole polygons delimited by ALSM contours (“ALSM-alone”), as detailed in Part 1. The standard of comparison (“gold standard” would be an overstatement in the absence of geophysical testing) is inclusion in a database of sinkhole outlines derived by best judgment of conjunctive interpretation of ALSM and aerial photography. GIS intersections that indicate the sensitivity and specificity of the test (ALSM-alone) are 43 and 98.3%, respectively, and, in the focus area where the prevalence of “sinkhole disease” is 4.7%, the positive and negative predictive values are 55.5 and 97.2%, respectively. Over much of the rest of the county, where only the test can be applied, the prevalence of sinkholes is sufficiently small that it cannot be determined to be any different from zero given the paucity of interpreted sinkholes (positive diagnoses) and the low specificity of the test method. The conclusion, therefore, is that contemporaneous aerial photography is essential to compile an ALSM-derived database that aims to state that the given xy-points lay inside or outside of topographic depressions in the covered karst of west-central Florida.

  20. Exceeding chance level by chance: The caveat of theoretical chance levels in brain signal classification and statistical assessment of decoding accuracy.

    PubMed

    Combrisson, Etienne; Jerbi, Karim

    2015-07-30

    Machine learning techniques are increasingly used in neuroscience to classify brain signals. Decoding performance is reflected by how much the classification results depart from the rate achieved by purely random classification. In a 2-class or 4-class classification problem, the chance levels are thus 50% or 25% respectively. However, such thresholds hold for an infinite number of data samples but not for small data sets. While this limitation is widely recognized in the machine learning field, it is unfortunately sometimes still overlooked or ignored in the emerging field of brain signal classification. Incidentally, this field is often faced with the difficulty of low sample size. In this study we demonstrate how applying signal classification to Gaussian random signals can yield decoding accuracies of up to 70% or higher in two-class decoding with small sample sets. Most importantly, we provide a thorough quantification of the severity and the parameters affecting this limitation using simulations in which we manipulate sample size, class number, cross-validation parameters (k-fold, leave-one-out and repetition number) and classifier type (Linear-Discriminant Analysis, Naïve Bayesian and Support Vector Machine). In addition to raising a red flag of caution, we illustrate the use of analytical and empirical solutions (binomial formula and permutation tests) that tackle the problem by providing statistical significance levels (p-values) for the decoding accuracy, taking sample size into account. Finally, we illustrate the relevance of our simulations and statistical tests on real brain data by assessing noise-level classifications in Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and intracranial EEG (iEEG) baseline recordings. PMID:25596422

  1. Method for estimating potential wetland extent by utilizing streamflow statistics and flood-inundation mapping techniques: Pilot study for land along the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Moon H.; Ritz, Christian T.; Arvin, Donald V.

    2012-01-01

    Potential wetland extents were estimated for a 14-mile reach of the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana. This pilot study was completed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The study showed that potential wetland extents can be estimated by analyzing streamflow statistics with the available streamgage data, calculating the approximate water-surface elevation along the river, and generating maps by use of flood-inundation mapping techniques. Planning successful restorations for Wetland Reserve Program (WRP) easements requires a determination of areas that show evidence of being in a zone prone to sustained or frequent flooding. Zone determinations of this type are used by WRP planners to define the actively inundated area and make decisions on restoration-practice installation. According to WRP planning guidelines, a site needs to show evidence of being in an "inundation zone" that is prone to sustained or frequent flooding for a period of 7 consecutive days at least once every 2 years on average in order to meet the planning criteria for determining a wetland for a restoration in agricultural land. By calculating the annual highest 7-consecutive-day mean discharge with a 2-year recurrence interval (7MQ2) at a streamgage on the basis of available streamflow data, one can determine the water-surface elevation corresponding to the calculated flow that defines the estimated inundation zone along the river. By using the estimated water-surface elevation ("inundation elevation") along the river, an approximate extent of potential wetland for a restoration in agricultural land can be mapped. As part of the pilot study, a set of maps representing the estimated potential wetland extents was generated in a geographic information system (GIS) application by combining (1) a digital water-surface plane representing the surface of inundation elevation that sloped in the downstream

  2. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-01-01

    Maps were created by importing site coordinates, summary water-level statistics, and completeness of record statistics into a geographic information system, and by interpolating between water levels at monitoring sites in the canals and water levels along the coastline. Raster surfaces were created from these data by using the triangular irregular network interpolation method. The raster surfaces were contoured by using geographic information system software. These contours were imprecise in some areas because the software could not fully evaluate the hydrology given available information; therefore, contours were manually modified where necessary. The ability to evaluate differences in water levels between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 is limited in some areas because most of the monitoring sites did not have 80 percent complete records for one or both of these periods. The quality of the analyses was limited by (1) deficiencies in spatial coverage; (2) the combination of pre- and post-construction water levels in areas where canals, levees, retention basins, detention basins, or water-control structures were installed or removed; (3) an inability to address the potential effects of the vertical hydraulic head gradient on water levels in wells of different depths; and (4) an inability to correct for the differences between daily water-level statistics. Contours are dashed in areas where the locations of contours have been approximated because of the uncertainty caused by these limitations. Although the ability of the maps to depict differences in water levels between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 was limited by missing data, results indicate that near the coast water levels were generally higher in May during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999; and that inland water levels were generally lower during 2000–2009 than during 1990–1999. Generally, the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of water levels from all months were also higher near the coast and lower inland

  3. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  4. Quantitative estimation of Tropical Rainfall Mapping Mission precipitation radar signals from ground-based polarimetric radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolen, Steven M.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2003-06-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Mapping Mission (TRMM) is the first mission dedicated to measuring rainfall from space using radar. The precipitation radar (PR) is one of several instruments aboard the TRMM satellite that is operating in a nearly circular orbit with nominal altitude of 350 km, inclination of 35°, and period of 91.5 min. The PR is a single-frequency Ku-band instrument that is designed to yield information about the vertical storm structure so as to gain insight into the intensity and distribution of rainfall. Attenuation effects on PR measurements, however, can be significant and as high as 10-15 dB. This can seriously impair the accuracy of rain rate retrieval algorithms derived from PR signal returns. Quantitative estimation of PR attenuation is made along the PR beam via ground-based polarimetric observations to validate attenuation correction procedures used by the PR. The reflectivity (Zh) at horizontal polarization and specific differential phase (Kdp) are found along the beam from S-band ground radar measurements, and theoretical modeling is used to determine the expected specific attenuation (k) along the space-Earth path at Ku-band frequency from these measurements. A theoretical k-Kdp relationship is determined for rain when Kdp ≥ 0.5°/km, and a power law relationship, k = a Zhb, is determined for light rain and other types of hydrometers encountered along the path. After alignment and resolution volume matching is made between ground and PR measurements, the two-way path-integrated attenuation (PIA) is calculated along the PR propagation path by integrating the specific attenuation along the path. The PR reflectivity derived after removing the PIA is also compared against ground radar observations.

  5. The different varieties of the Suyama-Yamaguchi consistency relation and its violation as a signal of statistical inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Yeinzon; Beltrán Almeida, Juan P.; Valenzuela-Toledo, César A.

    2013-04-01

    We present the different consistency relations that can be seen as variations of the well known Suyama-Yamaguchi (SY) consistency relation τNL>=((6/5)fNL)2, the latter involving the levels of non-gaussianity fNL and τNL in the primordial curvature perturbation ζ. It has been (implicitly) claimed that the following variation: τNL(k1,k3)>=((6/5))2fNL(k1)fNL(k3), which we call ``the fourth variety'', in the collapsed (for τNL) and squeezed (for fNL) limits is always satisfied independently of any physics; however, the proof depends sensitively on the assumption of scale-invariance (expressing this way the fourth variety of the SY consistency relation as τNL>=((6/5)fNL)2) which only applies for cosmological models involving Lorentz-invariant scalar fields (at least at tree level), leaving room for a strong violation of this variety of the consistency relation when non-trivial degrees of freedom, for instance vector fields, are in charge of the generation of the primordial curvature perturbation. With this in mind as a motivation, we explicitly state, in the first part of this work, under which conditions the SY consistency relation has been claimed to hold in its different varieties (implicitly) presented in the literature since its inception back in 2008; as a result, we show for the first time that the variety τNL(k1,k1)>=((6/5)fNL(k1))2, which we call ``the fifth variety'', is always satisfied even when there is strong scale-dependence and high levels of statistical anisotropy as long as statistical homogeneity holds: thus, an observed violation of this specific variety would prevent the comparison between theory and observation, shaking this way the foundations of cosmology as a science. In the second part, we concern about the existence of non-trivial degrees of freedom, concretely vector fields for which the levels of non-gaussianity have been calculated for very few models; among them, and by making use of the δN formalism at tree level, we study a class

  6. The different varieties of the Suyama-Yamaguchi consistency relation and its violation as a signal of statistical inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Yeinzon; Almeida, Juan P. Beltrán; Valenzuela-Toledo, César A. E-mail: juanpbeltran@uan.edu.co

    2013-04-01

    We present the different consistency relations that can be seen as variations of the well known Suyama-Yamaguchi (SY) consistency relation τ{sub NL}≥((6/5)f{sub NL}){sup 2}, the latter involving the levels of non-gaussianity f{sub NL} and τ{sub NL} in the primordial curvature perturbation ζ. It has been (implicitly) claimed that the following variation: τ{sub NL}(k{sub 1},k{sub 3})≥((6/5)){sup 2}f{sub NL}(k{sub 1})f{sub NL}(k{sub 3}), which we call ''the fourth variety'', in the collapsed (for τ{sub NL}) and squeezed (for f{sub NL}) limits is always satisfied independently of any physics; however, the proof depends sensitively on the assumption of scale-invariance (expressing this way the fourth variety of the SY consistency relation as τ{sub NL}≥((6/5)f{sub NL}){sup 2}) which only applies for cosmological models involving Lorentz-invariant scalar fields (at least at tree level), leaving room for a strong violation of this variety of the consistency relation when non-trivial degrees of freedom, for instance vector fields, are in charge of the generation of the primordial curvature perturbation. With this in mind as a motivation, we explicitly state, in the first part of this work, under which conditions the SY consistency relation has been claimed to hold in its different varieties (implicitly) presented in the literature since its inception back in 2008; as a result, we show for the first time that the variety τ{sub NL}(k{sub 1},k{sub 1})≥((6/5)f{sub NL}(k{sub 1})){sup 2}, which we call ''the fifth variety'', is always satisfied even when there is strong scale-dependence and high levels of statistical anisotropy as long as statistical homogeneity holds: thus, an observed violation of this specific variety would prevent the comparison between theory and observation, shaking this way the foundations of cosmology as a science. In the second part, we concern about the existence of non-trivial degrees of freedom, concretely vector fields for which the

  7. MAP3K19 Is a Novel Regulator of TGF-β Signaling That Impacts Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Franz-Bacon, Karin; DiTirro, Danielle N.; Ly, Tai Wei; Bacon, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, debilitating disease for which two medications, pirfenidone and nintedanib, have only recently been approved for treatment. The cytokine TGF-β has been shown to be a central mediator in the disease process. We investigated the role of a novel kinase, MAP3K19, upregulated in IPF tissue, in TGF-β-induced signal transduction and in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. MAP3K19 has a very limited tissue expression, restricted primarily to the lungs and trachea. In pulmonary tissue, expression was predominantly localized to alveolar and interstitial macrophages, bronchial epithelial cells and type II pneumocytes of the epithelium. MAP3K19 was also found to be overexpressed in bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages from IPF patients compared to normal patients. Treatment of A549 or THP-1 cells with either MAP3K19 siRNA or a highly potent and specific inhibitor reduced phospho-Smad2 & 3 nuclear translocation following TGF-β stimulation. TGF-β-induced gene transcription was also strongly inhibited by both the MAP3K19 inhibitor and nintedanib, whereas pirfenidone had a much less pronounced effect. In combination, the MAP3K19 inhibitor appeared to act synergistically with either pirfenidone or nintedanib, at the level of target gene transcription or protein production. Finally, in an animal model of IPF, inhibition of MAP3K19 strongly attenuated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis when administered either prophylactically ortherapeutically. In summary, these results strongly suggest that inhibition of MAP3K19 may have a beneficial therapeutic effect in the treatment of IPF and represents a novel strategy to target this disease. PMID:27144281

  8. Proper Use of Allele-Specific Expression Improves Statistical Power for cis-eQTL Mapping with RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    HU, Yi-Juan; SUN, Wei; TZENG, Jung-Ying; PEROU, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of loci that were found to be associated with complex diseases and the mechanisms can be classified into cis- and trans-acting regulation. At present, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is rapidly replacing expression microarrays to assess gene expression abundance. Unlike microarrays that only measure the total expression of each gene, RNA-seq also provides information on allele-specific expression (ASE), which can be used to distinguish cis-eQTLs from trans-eQTLs and, more importantly, enhance cis-eQTL mapping. However, assessing the cis-effect of a candidate eQTL on a gene requires knowledge of the haplotypes connecting the candidate eQTL and the gene, which cannot be inferred with certainty. The existing two-stage approach that first phases the candidate eQTL against the gene and then treats the inferred phase as observed in the association analysis tends to attenuate the estimated cis-effect and reduce the power for detecting a cis-eQTL. In this article, we provide a maximum-likelihood framework for cis-eQTL mapping with RNA-seq data. Our approach integrates the inference of haplotypes and the association analysis into a single stage, and is thus unbiased and statistically powerful. We also develop a pipeline for performing a comprehensive scan of all local eQTLs for all genes in the genome by controlling for false discovery rate, and implement the methods in a computationally efficient software program. The advantages of the proposed methods over the existing ones are demonstrated through realistic simulation studies and an application to empirical breast cancer data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project. PMID:26568645

  9. Mapping of the Signal Peptide-Binding Domain of Escherichia coli SecA Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer†

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Sarah M.; Moses, Julia P.; Musial-Siwek, Monika; Kendall, Debra A.; Oliver, Donald B.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the signal peptide-binding domain within SecA ATPase is an important goal for understanding the molecular basis of SecA preprotein recognition as well as elucidating the chemo-mechanical cycle of this nanomotor during protein translocation. In this study, Förster resonance energy transfer methodology was employed to map the location of the SecA signal peptide-binding domain using a collection of functional monocysteine SecA mutants and alkaline phosphatase signal peptides labeled with appropriate donor–acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements yielded an equilibrium binding constant of 1.4 or 10.7 μM for the alkaline phosphatase signal peptide labeled at residue 22 or 2, respectively, with SecA, and a binding stoichiometry of one signal peptide bound per SecA monomer. Binding affinity measurements performed with a monomer-biased mutant indicate that the signal peptide binds equally well to SecA monomer or dimer. Distance measurements determined for 13 SecA mutants show that the SecA signal peptide-binding domain encompasses a portion of the preprotein cross-linking domain but also includes regions of nucleotide-binding domain 1 and particularly the helical scaffold domain. The identified region lies at a multidomain interface within the heart of SecA, surrounded by and potentially responsive to domains important for binding nucleotide, mature portions of the preprotein, and the SecYEG channel. Our FRET-mapped binding domain, in contrast to the domain identified by NMR spectroscopy, includes the two-helix finger that has been shown to interact with the preprotein during translocation and lies at the entrance to the protein-conducting channel in the recently determined SecA–SecYEG structure. PMID:20025247

  10. Statistical radii associated with amino acids to determine the contact map: fixing the structure of a type I cohesin domain in the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Poma Bernaola, Adolfo; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We propose to improve and simplify protein refinement procedures through consideration of which pairs of amino acid residues should form native contacts. We first consider 11 330 proteins from the CATH database to determine statistical distributions of contacts associated with a given type of amino acid. The distributions are set across the distances between the α-C atoms that are in contact. Based on this data, we determine typical radii of effective spheres that can be placed on the α-C atoms in order to reconstruct the distribution of the contact lengths. This is done by checking for overlaps with enlarged van der Waals spheres associated with heavy atoms on other amino acids. The resulting contacts can be used to identify non-native contacts that may arise during the time evolution of structure-based models. Here, the radii are used to guide reconstruction of nine missing side chains in a type I cohesin domain with the Protein Data Bank code 1AOH. We first identify the likely missing contacts and then sculpt the corresponding side chains by standard refinement tools to achieve consistency with the expected contact map. One ambiguity in refinement is resolved by determining all-atom conformational energies.

  11. Statistical radii associated with amino acids to determine the contact map: fixing the structure of a type I cohesin domain in the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome.

    PubMed

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Bernaola, Adolfo Poma; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We propose to improve and simplify protein refinement procedures through consideration of which pairs of amino acid residues should form native contacts. We first consider 11 330 proteins from the CATH database to determine statistical distributions of contacts associated with a given type of amino acid. The distributions are set across the distances between the α-C atoms that are in contact. Based on this data, we determine typical radii of effective spheres that can be placed on the α-C atoms in order to reconstruct the distribution of the contact lengths. This is done by checking for overlaps with enlarged van der Waals spheres associated with heavy atoms on other amino acids.The resulting contacts can be used to identify non-native contacts that may arise during the time evolution of structure-based models. Here, the radii are used to guide reconstruction of nine missing side chains in a type I cohesin domain with the Protein Data Bank code 1AOH. We first identify the likely missing contacts and then sculpt the corresponding side chains by standard refinement tools to achieve consistency with the expected contact map. One ambiguity in refinement is resolved by determining all-atom conformational energies. PMID:26015431

  12. Development and aging of superficial white matter myelin from young adulthood to old age: Mapping by vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS).

    PubMed

    Wu, Minjie; Kumar, Anand; Yang, Shaolin

    2016-05-01

    Superficial white matter (SWM) lies immediately beneath cortical gray matter and consists primarily of short association fibers. The characteristics of SWM and its development and aging were seldom examined in the literature and warrant further investigation. Magnetization transfer imaging is sensitive to myelin changes in the white matter. Using an innovative multimodal imaging analysis approach, vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS), the current study vertexwise mapped age-related changes of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in SWM from young adulthood to old age (30-85 years, N = 66). Results demonstrated regionally selective and temporally heterochronologic changes of SWM MTR with age, including (1) inverted U-shaped trajectories of SWM MTR in the rostral middle frontal, medial temporal, and temporoparietal regions, suggesting continuing myelination and protracted maturation till age 40-50 years and accelerating demyelination at age 60 and beyond, (2) linear decline of SWM MTR in the middle and superior temporal, and pericalcarine areas, indicating early maturation and less acceleration in age-related degeneration, and (3) no significant changes of SWM MTR in the primary motor, somatosensory and auditory regions, suggesting resistance to age-related deterioration. We did not observe similar patterns of changes in cortical thickness in our sample, suggesting the observed SWM MTR changes are not due to cortical atrophy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1759-1769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26955787

  13. BcIqg1, a fungal IQGAP homolog, interacts with NADPH oxidase, MAP kinase and calcium signaling proteins and regulates virulence and development in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Robert; Tudzynski, Paul

    2016-07-01

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in multicellular eukaryotic organisms. They trigger defense reactions ('oxidative burst') - in phagocytes and plant cells -, and are involved in a broad range of differentiation processes. Fungal Nox-complexes play a central role in vegetative, sexual and pathogenic processes. In contrast to mammalian systems, knowledge is limited about composition, localisation and connection to major signaling cascades in fungi. Here, we characterize a fungal homolog of the RasGAP scaffold protein IQGAP, which links several major signaling processes, including Nox in mammalian cell lines. We show that BcIqg1 interacts directly with a cytosolic, regulatory component (BcRac) and a membrane-associated subunit (BcNoxD) of a Nox-complex in the pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Thus, this protein may be a scaffold that mediates interaction of the catalytic subunits with the regulator BcNoxR. The protein interacts with modules of the MAP kinase- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways. Functional analysis of BcIqg1 substantiated its involvement in different signaling pathways. It mediates the Ca(2+) -triggered nuclear translocation of - BcCRZ1 and the MAP kinase BcBmp1. BcIqg1 is involved in resistance against oxidative and membrane stress and is required for several developmental processes including formation of sclerotia, conidial anastomosis tubes and infection cushions as well as for virulence. PMID:27062300

  14. Signal level statistics and case studies for an over-the-horizon mid-Atlantic coastal link operating at C-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Musiani, Bert H.

    1999-03-01

    We examine the results of 1 year of near-continuous measurements for a 128-km over-the-horizon C-band coastal propagation link. The link extends between Dam Neck, Virginia (16 km south of Virginia Beach), and Wallops Island, Virginia (approximately 150 km southeast of Washington, D. C.). The objectives of this effort are to explore the different mechanisms of propagation through an analysis of several case studies and to assess the statistical connectivity over the 1-year period. Case studies involving the linking of environmental information and measured signal levels are analyzed. Propagation factor levels due to evaporation ducts, surface ducts, and scattering from irregularities of the refractive index in the common volume are determined. Cumulative distributions of the measured propagation factor for the annual, fall-winter, and spring-summer periods are presented. Conditional and absolute distributions of propagation factor time durations are also presented and analyzed. It is demonstrated that during the spring-summer period, received signal levels were consistent with ducting and not with troposcatter. The fall-winter levels may be due to troposcatter from irregularities of the refractive index. The months giving the smallest and largest propagation factors were January and June, respectively.

  15. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Kissick, David J; Muir, Ryan D; Sullivan, Shane Z; Oglesbee, Robert A; Simpson, Garth J

    2013-02-14

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges. PMID:24817799

  16. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissick, David J.; Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges.

  17. Piezoelectric sensing and non-parametric statistical signal processing for health monitoring of hysteretic dampers used in seismic-resistant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Benavent-Climent, A.; Romo-Melo, L.

    2015-08-01

    The paper proposes a new application of non-parametric statistical processing of signals recorded from vibration tests for damage detection and evaluation on I-section steel segments. The steel segments investigated constitute the energy dissipating part of a new type of hysteretic damper that is used for passive control of buildings and civil engineering structures subjected to earthquake-type dynamic loadings. Two I-section steel segments with different levels of damage were instrumented with piezoceramic sensors and subjected to controlled white noise random vibrations. The signals recorded during the tests were processed using two non-parametric methods (the power spectral density method and the frequency response function method) that had never previously been applied to hysteretic dampers. The appropriateness of these methods for quantifying the level of damage on the I-shape steel segments is validated experimentally. Based on the results of the random vibrations, the paper proposes a new index that predicts the level of damage and the proximity of failure of the hysteretic damper.

  18. PAU/GNSS-R: Implementation, Performance and First Results of a Real-Time Delay-Doppler Map Reflectometer Using Global Navigation Satellite System Signals

    PubMed Central

    Marchan-Hernandez, Juan Fernando; Camps, Adriano; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Valencia, Enric

    2008-01-01

    Signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) were originally conceived for position and speed determination, but they can be used as signals of opportunity as well. The reflection process over a given surface modifies the properties of the scattered signal, and therefore, by processing the reflected signal, relevant geophysical data regarding the surface under study (land, sea, ice…) can be retrieved. In essence, a GNSS-R receiver is a multi-channel GNSS receiver that computes the received power from a given satellite at a number of different delay and Doppler bins of the incoming signal. The first approaches to build such a receiver consisted of sampling and storing the scattered signal for later post-processing. However, a real-time approach to the problem is desirable to obtain immediately useful geophysical variables and reduce the amount of data. The use of FPGA technology makes this possible, while at the same time the system can be easily reconfigured. The signal tracking and processing constraints made necessary to fully design several new blocks. The uniqueness of the implemented system described in this work is the capability to compute in real-time Delay-Doppler maps (DDMs) either for four simultaneous satellites or just one, but with a larger number of bins. The first tests have been conducted from a cliff over the sea and demonstrate the successful performance of the instrument to compute DDMs in real-time from the measured reflected GNSS/R signals. The processing of these measurements shall yield quantitative relationships between the sea state (mainly driven by the surface wind and the swell) and the overall DDM shape. The ultimate goal is to use the DDM shape to correct the sea state influence on the L-band brightness temperature to improve the retrieval of the sea surface salinity (SSS).

  19. Statistical Analysis of Physiological Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, María G.; Pérez, Leticia

    2003-07-01

    In spite of two hundred years of clinical practice, Homeopathy still lacks of scientific basis. Its fundamental laws, similia principle and the activity of the denominated ultra-high dilutions are controversial issues that do not fit into the mainstream medicine or current physical-chemistry field as well. Aside its clinical efficacy, the identification of physical - chemistry parameters, as markers of the homeopathic effect, would allow to construct mathematic models [1], which in turn, could provide clues regarding the involved mechanism.

  20. Functional brain mapping by blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast magnetic resonance imaging. A comparison of signal characteristics with a biophysical model.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, S; Menon, R S; Tank, D W; Kim, S G; Merkle, H; Ellermann, J M; Ugurbil, K

    1993-01-01

    It recently has been demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging can be used to map changes in brain hemodynamics produced by human mental operations. One method under development relies on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast: a change in the signal strength of brain water protons produced by the paramagnetic effects of venous blood deoxyhemoglobin. Here we discuss the basic quantitative features of the observed BOLD-based signal changes, including the signal amplitude and its magnetic field dependence and dynamic effects such as a pronounced oscillatory pattern that is induced in the signal from primary visual cortex during photic stimulation experiments. The observed features are compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations of water proton intravoxel phase dispersion produced by local field gradients generated by paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in nearby venous blood vessels. The simulations suggest that the effect of water molecule diffusion is strong for the case of blood capillaries, but, for larger venous blood vessels, water diffusion is not an important determinant of deoxyhemoglobin-induced signal dephasing. We provide an expression for the apparent in-plane relaxation rate constant (R2*) in terms of the main magnetic field strength, the degree of the oxygenation of the venous blood, the venous blood volume fraction in the tissue, and the size of the blood vessel. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8386018

  1. Nighttime activity of moving objects, their mapping and statistic making, on the example of applying thermal imaging and advanced image processing to the research of nocturnal mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregowski, Piotr; Owadowska, Edyta; Pietrzak, Jan; Zwolenik, Slawomir

    2005-09-01

    The paper presents method of acquiring a new form of statistical information about the changes at scenery, overseen by thermal imaging camera in static configuration. This type of imagers reach uniquely high efficiency during nighttime surveillance and targeting. The technical issue we have solved, resulted from the problem: how to verify the hypothesis that small, nocturnal rodents, like bank voles, use common paths inside their range and that they form a common, rather stable system? Such research has been especially difficult because the mentioned mammals are secretive, move with various speed and due to low contrast to their natural surroundings - as leaves or grass - nearly impossible for other kind of observations from a few meters distance. The main advantage of the elaborated method showed to be both adequately filtered long thermal movies for manual analyses, as well as auto-creation of the synthetic images which present maps of invisible paths and activity of their usage. Additional file with logs describing objects and their dislocations as the ".txt" files allows various, more detailed studies of animal behavior. The obtained results proved that this original method delivers a new, non-invasive, powerful and dynamic concept of solving various ecological problems. Creation of networks consisted of uncooled thermal imagers - of significantly increased availability - with data transmissions to digital centers allows to investigate of moving - particularly heat generated - objects in complete darkness, much wider and much more efficiently than up today. Thus, although our system was elaborated for ecological studies, a similar one can be considered as a tool for chosen tasks in the optical security areas.

  2. Mapping key regions of the RXFP2 low-density lipoprotein class-A module that are involved in signal activation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Roy C K; Bathgate, Ross A D; Bruell, Shoni; Wade, John D; Gooley, Paul R; Petrie, Emma J

    2014-07-22

    The peptide hormone INSL3 and its receptor, RXFP2, have co-evolved alongside relaxin and its receptor, RXFP1. Both RXFP1 and RXFP2 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) containing the hallmark seven transmembrane helices in addition to a distinct ectodomain of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a single low-density lipoprotein class-A (LDLa) module at the N-terminus. RXFP1 and RXFP2 are the only mammalian GPCRs known to contain an LDLa, and its removal does not perturb primary ligand binding to the LRRs; however, signaling is abolished. This presents a general mechanism whereby ligand binding induces a conformational change in the receptor to position the LDLa to elicit a signal response. Although the LDLa interaction site has not been identified, the residues important to the action have been mapped within the RXFP1 LDLa module. In this study, we comprehensively study the RXFP2 LDLa module. We determine its structure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and concurrently investigate the signaling of an RXFP2 with the LDLa removed (RXFP2-short), confirming that the LDLa is essential to signaling. We then replaced the LDLa with the second ligand binding module from the LDL receptor, LB2, creating the RXFP2-LB2 chimera. Unlike that in the equivalent RXFP1-LB2 chimera, signaling is rescued albeit modestly. Guided by the NMR structure, we dissected regions of the RXFP2 LDLa to identify specific residues that are important to signal activation. We determine that although the module is important to the activation of RXFP2, unlike the RXFP1 receptor, specific residues in the N-terminus of the domain are not involved in signal activation. PMID:24983702

  3. Analysis of signal transduction pathways during anoxia exposure in a marine snail: a role for p38 MAP kinase and downstream signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Larade, Kevin; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-01-01

    The responses of members of the three main MAPK families (ERK, JNK/SAPK, p38 MAPK), as well as selected peripheral pathways, were examined in hepatopancreas of the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea, to determine if anoxia exposure influenced the total protein content or the phosphorylation status of any key components. The content of active phospho-p38 MAPK was 2-fold higher in hepatopancreas from anoxic snails relative to controls. A 1.7-fold increase in the amount of phospho-Hsp27 and a 1.3-fold increase in phospho-CREB correlated well with the changes in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Activation of these factors via p38 MAPK may be vital to the reorganization of metabolic responses to anoxia in hepatopancreas. No changes in components of the JNK/SAPK and ERK pathways occurred and transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism did not appear to be affected by anoxia. The present analysis of a variety of signaling pathways has implicated the p38 MAPK pathway as a key anoxia-responsive signal transduction pathway in L. littorea. PMID:16326124

  4. Sargaquinoic acid promotes neurite outgrowth via protein kinase A and MAP kinases-mediated signaling pathways in PC12D cells.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yuto; Tsang, Chi Kwan

    2003-08-01

    We previously isolated a nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent neurite outgrowth promoting substance MC14 (sargaquinoic acid) from a marine brown alga, Sargassum macrocarpum. In the present study, the NGF-potentiating activity of MC14 to neural differentiation of PC12D cells was investigated in detail. The treatment of cells with 3 microg/ml MC14 in the presence of 1.25-100 ng/ml NGF markedly enhanced the proportion of neurite-bearing cells compared with the NGF-only controls. In addition, MC14 significantly elevated the NGF-induced specific acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in PC12D cells, suggesting that MC14 could morphologically and biochemically promote the differentiation of PC12D cells. The mechanism of action of MC14 was further investigated by pharmacological inhibition of several intracellular signaling molecules. Results indicated that the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of MC14 was almost completely blocked by 10 microM PD98059, suggesting that a TrkA-dependent MAP kinases-mediated signaling pathway may play a crucial role in modulating the effect of MC14. Besides, the MC14-enhanced neurite outgrowth was substantially suppressed by the pretreatment with 10 ng/ml protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, demonstrating that the adenylate cyclase-PKA signaling cascade was also involved in the action of MC14. In contrast, a PKC inhibitor chelerythrine chloride did not inhibit the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of MC14. Altogether, these results demonstrate that MC14 enhances the neurite outgrowth by cooperating at least two separated signaling pathways, a TrkA-MAP kinases pathway and an adenylate cyclase-PKA pathway, in PC12D cells. PMID:12850058

  5. Mapping Van

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) - developed system for satellite mapping has been commercialized for the first time. Global Visions, Inc. maps an area while driving along a road in a sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. Data is fed into a computerized geographic information system (GIS). The resulting amps can be used for tax assessment purposes, emergency dispatch vehicles and fleet delivery companies as well as other applications.

  6. Endocytosis separates EGF receptors from endogenous fluorescently labeled HRas and diminishes receptor signaling to MAP kinases in endosomes.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Macua, Itziar; Watkins, Simon C; Sorkin, Alexander

    2016-02-23

    Signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular-stimuli-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is proposed to be transduced not only from the cell surface but also from endosomes, although the role of endocytosis in this signaling pathway is controversial. Ras is the only membrane-anchored component in the EGFR-ERK signaling axis, and therefore, its location determines intracellular sites of downstream signaling. Hence, we labeled endogenous H-Ras (HRas) with mVenus fluorescent protein using gene editing in HeLa cells. mVenus-HRas was primarily located at the plasma membrane, and in small amounts in tubular recycling endosomes and associated vesicles. EGF stimulation resulted in fast but transient activation of mVenus-HRas. Although EGF:EGFR complexes were rapidly accumulated in endosomes together with the Grb2 adaptor, very little, if any, mVenus-HRas was detected in these endosomes. Interestingly, the activities of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 remained high beyond the point of the physical separation of HRas from EGF:EGFR complexes and down-regulation of Ras activity. Paradoxically, this sustained MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation was dependent on the active EGFR kinase. Cell surface biotinylation and selective inactivation of surface EGFRs suggested that a small fraction of active EGFRs remaining in the plasma membrane is responsible for continuous signaling to MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. We propose that, under physiological conditions of cell stimulation, EGFR endocytosis serves to spatially separate EGFR-Grb2 complexes and Ras, thus terminating Ras-mediated signaling. However, sustained minimal activation of Ras by a small pool of active EGFRs in the plasma membrane is sufficient for extending MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activities. PMID:26858456

  7. Nitric Oxide Affects ERK Signaling through Down-Regulation of MAP Kinase Phosphatase Levels during Larval Development of the Ascidian Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In the ascidian Ciona intestinalis larval development and metamorphosis require a complex interplay of events, including nitric oxide (NO) production, MAP kinases (ERK, JNK) and caspase-3 activation. We have previously shown that NO levels affect the rate of metamorphosis, regulate caspase activity and promote an oxidative stress pathway, resulting in protein nitration. Here, we report that NO down-regulates MAP kinase phosphatases (mkps) expression affecting positively ERK signaling. By pharmacological approach, we observed that the reduction of endogenous NO levels caused a decrease of ERK phosphorylation, whereas increasing levels of NO induced ERK activation. We have also identified the ERK gene network affected by NO, including mpk1, mpk3 and some key developmental genes by quantitative gene expression analysis. We demonstrate that NO induces an ERK-independent down-regulation of mkp1 and mkp3, responsible for maintaining the ERK phosphorylation levels necessary for transcription of key metamorphic genes, such as the hormone receptor rev-erb and the van willebrand protein vwa1c. These results add new insights into the role played by NO during larval development and metamorphosis in Ciona, highlighting the cross-talk between different signaling pathways. PMID:25058405

  8. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sophie J.; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J.; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A.; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR–biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery. PMID:27071102

  9. Mapping of the SecA signal peptide binding site and dimeric interface by using the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Bhanu, Meera K; Zhao, Ping; Kendall, Debra A

    2013-10-01

    SecA is an ATPase nanomotor critical for bacterial secretory protein translocation. Secretory proteins carry an amino-terminal signal peptide that is recognized and bound by SecA followed by its transfer across the SecYEG translocon. While this process is crucial for the onset of translocation, exactly where the signal peptide interacts with SecA is unclear. SecA protomers also interact among themselves to form dimers in solution, yet the oligomeric interface and the residues involved in dimerization are unknown. To address these issues, we utilized the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM); we generated a library of 23 monocysteine SecA mutants and probed for the accessibility of each mutant cysteine to maleimide-(polyethylene glycol)2-biotin (MPB), a sulfhydryl-labeling reagent, both in the presence and absence of a signal peptide. Dramatic differences in MPB labeling were observed, with a select few mutants located at the preprotein cross-linking domain (PPXD), the helical wing domain (HWD), and the helical scaffold domain (HSD), indicating that the signal peptide binds at the groove formed between these three domains. The exposure of this binding site is varied under different conditions and could therefore provide an ideal mechanism for preprotein transfer into the translocon. We also identified residues G793, A795, K797, and D798 located at the two-helix finger of the HSD to be involved in dimerization. Adenosine-5'-(γ-thio)-triphosphate (ATPγS) alone and, more extensively, in conjunction with lipids and signal peptides strongly favored dimer dissociation, while ADP supports dimerization. This study provides key insight into the structure-function relationships of SecA preprotein binding and dimer dissociation. PMID:23935053

  10. N-cadherin mediated distribution of beta-catenin alters MAP kinase and BMP-2 signaling on chondrogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Rozbeh; Lafond, Toulouse; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Danielson, Keith G; Tuan, Rocky S; Seghatoleslami, M Reza

    2005-05-01

    We have examined the effect of calcium-dependent adhesion, mediated by N-cadherin, on cell signaling during chondrogenesis of multipotential embryonic mouse C3H10T1/2 cells. The activity of chondrogenic genes, type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 were examined in monolayer (non-chondrogenic), and micromass (chondrogenic) cultures of parental C3H10T1/2 cells and altered C3H10T1/2 cell lines that express a dominant negative form of N-cadherin (delta390-T1/2) or overexpress normal N-cadherin (MNCD2-T1/2). Our findings show that missexpression or inhibition of N-cadherin in C3H10T1/2 cells results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II. We have also analyzed activity of the serum response factor (SRF), a nuclear target of MAP kinase signaling implicated in chondrogenesis. In semi-confluent monolayer cultures (minimum cell-cell contact) of C3H10T1/2, MNCD2-T1/2, or delta390-T1/2 cells, there was no significant change in the pattern of MAP kinase or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulation of SRF. However, in micromass cultures, the effect of MAP kinase and BMP-2 on SRF activity was proportional to the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a Wnt stabilized cytoplasmic factor that can associate with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF) to serve as a transcription factor. Our findings suggest that the extent of adherens junction formation mediated by N-cadherin can modulate the potential Wnt-induced nuclear activity of beta-catenin. PMID:15723280

  11. Comparative genomics of MAP kinase and calcium-calcineurin signalling components in plant and human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Rispail, Nicolas; Soanes, Darren M; Ant, Cemile; Czajkowski, Robert; Grünler, Anke; Huguet, Romain; Perez-Nadales, Elena; Poli, Anna; Sartorel, Elodie; Valiante, Vito; Yang, Meng; Beffa, Roland; Brakhage, Axel A; Gow, Neil A R; Kahmann, Regine; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lenasi, Helena; Perez-Martin, José; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wendland, Jürgen; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway control fundamental aspects of fungal growth, development and reproduction. Core elements of these signalling pathways are required for virulence in a wide array of fungal pathogens of plants and mammals. In this review, we have used the available genome databases to explore the structural conservation of three MAPK cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway in ten different fungal species, including model organisms, plant pathogens and human pathogens. While most known pathway components from the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae appear to be widely conserved among taxonomically and biologically diverse fungi, some of them were found to be restricted to the Saccharomycotina. The presence of multiple paralogues in certain species such as the zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae and the incorporation of new functional domains that are lacking in S. cerevisiae signalling proteins, most likely reflect functional diversification or adaptation as filamentous fungi have evolved to occupy distinct ecological niches. PMID:19570501

  12. Aloe-Emodin Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation of ATDC5 Cells via MAP Kinases and BMP-2 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Li, Liang; Heo, Seok-Mo; Soh, Yunjo

    2016-07-01

    Endochondral bone formation is the process by which mesenchymal cells condense into chondrocytes, which are ultimately responsible for new bone formation. The processes of chondrogenic differentiation and hypertrophy are critical for bone formation and are therefore highly regulated. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of aloe-emodin on chondrogenic differentiation in clonal mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells. Aloe-emodin treatment stimulated the accumulation of cartilage nodules in a dose-dependent manner. ATDC5 cells were treated with aloe-emodin and stained with alcian blue. Compared with the control cells, the ATDC5 cells showed more intense alcian blue staining. This finding suggested that aloe-emodin induced the synthesis of matrix proteoglycans and increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase. Aloe-emodin also enhanced the expressions of chondrogenic marker genes such as collagen II, collagen X, BSP and RunX2 in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, examination of the MAPK signaling pathway showed that aloe-emodin increased the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but had no effect on p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Aloe-emodin also enhanced the protein expression of BMP-2 in a time-dependent manner. Thus, these results showed that aloe-emodin exhibited chodromodulating effects via the BMP-2 or ERK signaling pathway. Aloe-emodin may have potential future applications for the treatment of growth disorders. PMID:27350340

  13. Aloe-Emodin Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation of ATDC5 Cells via MAP Kinases and BMP-2 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Li, Liang; Heo, Seok-Mo; Soh, Yunjo

    2016-01-01

    Endochondral bone formation is the process by which mesenchymal cells condense into chondrocytes, which are ultimately responsible for new bone formation. The processes of chondrogenic differentiation and hypertrophy are critical for bone formation and are therefore highly regulated. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of aloe-emodin on chondrogenic differentiation in clonal mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells. Aloe-emodin treatment stimulated the accumulation of cartilage nodules in a dose-dependent manner. ATDC5 cells were treated with aloe-emodin and stained with alcian blue. Compared with the control cells, the ATDC5 cells showed more intense alcian blue staining. This finding suggested that aloe-emodin induced the synthesis of matrix proteoglycans and increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase. Aloe-emodin also enhanced the expressions of chondrogenic marker genes such as collagen II, collagen X, BSP and RunX2 in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, examination of the MAPK signaling pathway showed that aloe-emodin increased the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but had no effect on p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Aloe-emodin also enhanced the protein expression of BMP-2 in a time-dependent manner. Thus, these results showed that aloe-emodin exhibited chodromodulating effects via the BMP-2 or ERK signaling pathway. Aloe-emodin may have potential future applications for the treatment of growth disorders. PMID:27350340

  14. Protopanaxatriol Ginsenoside Rh1 Upregulates Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes: Involvement of MAP Kinases and Nrf2/ARE Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Sun; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress activates several intracellular signaling cascades that may have deleterious effects on neuronal cell survival. Thus, controlling oxidative stress has been suggested as an important strategy for prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we found that ginsenoside Rh1 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent cell death in rat primary astrocytes. Rh1 increased the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, superoxide dismutase-2, and catalase, that are under the control of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Further mechanistic studies showed that Rh1 increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE), and increased the ARE-mediated transcription activities in rat primary astrocytes. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that MAP kinases are important in HO-1 expression, and act by modulating ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Therefore, the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes by Rh1 may provide preventive therapeutic potential for various neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with oxidative stress. PMID:26759699

  15. Combined inhibition of MAP kinase and KIT signaling synergistically destabilizes ETV1 and suppresses GIST tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Leili; Sirota, Inna; Cao, Zhen; Murphy, Devan; Chen, Yuedan; Shukla, Shipra; Xie, Yuanyuan; Kaufmann, Michael C.; Gao, Dong; Zhu, Sinan; Rossi, Ferdinando; Wongvipat, John; Taguchi, Takahiro; Tap, William D.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Chen, Yu; Chi, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), originating from the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), is characterized by frequent activating mutations of the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase. Despite the clinical success of imatinib that targets KIT, most advanced GIST patients develop resistance and eventually die of the disease. The ETS family transcription factor, ETV1, is a master regulator of the ICC lineage. Using mouse models of Kit activation and Etv1 ablation, we demonstrate that Etv1 is required for GIST initiation and proliferation in vivo, validating it as a therapeutic target. We further uncover a positive feedback circuit where MAP kinase activation downstream of KIT stabilizes the ETV1 protein and ETV1 positively regulates KIT expression. Combined targeting of ETV1 stability by imatinib and MEK162 resulted in increased growth suppression in vitro and complete tumour regression in vivo. The combination strategy to target ETV1 may provide an effective therapeutic strategy in GIST clinical management. PMID:25572173

  16. Stable Pseudohyphal Growth in Budding Yeast Induced by Synergism between Septin Defects and Altered MAP-kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junwon; Rose, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Upon nutrient limitation, budding yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be induced to adopt alternate filament-like growth patterns called diploid pseudohyphal or invasive haploid growth. Here, we report a novel constitutive pseudohyphal growth state, sharing some characteristics with classic forms of filamentous growth, but differing in crucial aspects of morphology, growth conditions and genetic regulation. The constitutive pseudohyphal state is observed in fus3 mutants containing various septin assembly defects, which we refer to as sadF growth (septin assembly defect induced filamentation) to distinguish it from classic filamentation pathways. Similar to other filamentous states, sadF cultures comprise aggregated chains of highly elongated cells. Unlike the classic pathways, sadF growth occurs in liquid rich media, requiring neither starvation nor the key pseudohyphal proteins, Flo8p and Flo11p. Moreover sadF growth occurs in haploid strains of S288C genetic background, which normally cannot undergo pseudohyphal growth. The sadF cells undergo highly polarized bud growth during prolonged G2 delays dependent on Swe1p. They contain septin structures distinct from classical pseudo-hyphae and FM4-64 labeling at actively growing tips similar to the Spitzenkörper observed in true hyphal growth. The sadF growth state is induced by synergism between Kss1p-dependent signaling and septin assembly defects; mild disruption of mitotic septins activates Kss1p-dependent gene expression, which exacerbates the septin defects, leading to hyper-activation of Kss1p. Unlike classical pseudo-hyphal growth, sadF signaling requires Ste5, Ste4 and Ste18, the scaffold protein and G-protein β and γ subunits from the pheromone response pathway, respectively. A swe1 mutation largely abolished signaling, breaking the positive feedback that leads to amplification of sadF signaling. Taken together, our findings show that budding yeast can access a stable constitutive pseudohyphal growth

  17. Stable Pseudohyphal Growth in Budding Yeast Induced by Synergism between Septin Defects and Altered MAP-kinase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junwon; Rose, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    Upon nutrient limitation, budding yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be induced to adopt alternate filament-like growth patterns called diploid pseudohyphal or invasive haploid growth. Here, we report a novel constitutive pseudohyphal growth state, sharing some characteristics with classic forms of filamentous growth, but differing in crucial aspects of morphology, growth conditions and genetic regulation. The constitutive pseudohyphal state is observed in fus3 mutants containing various septin assembly defects, which we refer to as sadF growth (septin assembly defect induced filamentation) to distinguish it from classic filamentation pathways. Similar to other filamentous states, sadF cultures comprise aggregated chains of highly elongated cells. Unlike the classic pathways, sadF growth occurs in liquid rich media, requiring neither starvation nor the key pseudohyphal proteins, Flo8p and Flo11p. Moreover sadF growth occurs in haploid strains of S288C genetic background, which normally cannot undergo pseudohyphal growth. The sadF cells undergo highly polarized bud growth during prolonged G2 delays dependent on Swe1p. They contain septin structures distinct from classical pseudo-hyphae and FM4-64 labeling at actively growing tips similar to the Spitzenkörper observed in true hyphal growth. The sadF growth state is induced by synergism between Kss1p-dependent signaling and septin assembly defects; mild disruption of mitotic septins activates Kss1p-dependent gene expression, which exacerbates the septin defects, leading to hyper-activation of Kss1p. Unlike classical pseudo-hyphal growth, sadF signaling requires Ste5, Ste4 and Ste18, the scaffold protein and G-protein β and γ subunits from the pheromone response pathway, respectively. A swe1 mutation largely abolished signaling, breaking the positive feedback that leads to amplification of sadF signaling. Taken together, our findings show that budding yeast can access a stable constitutive pseudohyphal growth

  18. Signaling by the pathogenicity-related MAP kinase of Cochliobolus heterostrophus correlates with its local accumulation rather than phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lev, Sophie; Tal, Hila; Rose, Mark S; Horwitz, Benjamin A

    2009-09-01

    Phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) transmit signals by activation of their targets. The extent of signal transduction could depend on MAPK phosphorylation level, concentration, and subcellular localization. The pathogenicity MAPK Chk1 of the fungal corn pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus is required for central developmental functions, including appressoria formation, conidiation, melanization, virulence, and female fertility. We followed CHK1 transcript level, protein localization, quantity, phosphorylation, and expression of downstream genes during conidial germination on a surface inductive for appressoria formation and in suspension. The Chk1-GFP protein representing a translational fusion of Chk1 and GFP (green fluorescent protein) was very abundant in ungerminated conidia, accumulated in maturating appressoria and appressorial nuclei, but was uniformly distributed in suspension-grown hyphae. Expression of Chk1-dependent genes was upregulated in appressoria-forming hyphae but not in suspension. Despite Chk1 activation, there was no change in its phosphorylation and total protein quantity. Of all conditions tested, a temperature shift caused a decrease whereas hyperosmotic stress caused an increase in Chk1 phosphorylation. Activation of Chk1 during appressoria formation is apparently manifested by its local accumulation but not by significant changes in phosphorylation. PMID:19656044

  19. Mapping hypoxia-induced bioenergetic rearrangements and metabolic signaling by 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Dzeja, Petras P; Bast, Peter; Gumina, Richard J; Drahl, Carmen; Lim, Lynette; Juranic, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Terzic, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Brief hypoxia or ischemia perturbs energy metabolism inducing paradoxically a stress-tolerant state, yet metabolic signals that trigger cytoprotection remain poorly understood. To evaluate bioenergetic rearrangements, control and hypoxic hearts were analyzed with 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The 18O-induced isotope shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of CrP, betaADP and betaATP was used to quantify phosphotransfer fluxes through creatine kinase and adenylate kinase. This analysis was supplemented with determination of energetically relevant metabolites in the phosphomonoester (PME) region of 31P NMR spectra, and in both aromatic and aliphatic regions of 1H NMR spectra. In control conditions, creatine kinase was the major phosphotransfer pathway processing high-energy phosphoryls between sites of ATP consumption and ATP production. In hypoxia, creatine kinase flux was dramatically reduced with a compensatory increase in adenylate kinase flux, which supported heart energetics by regenerating and transferring beta- and gamma-phosphoryls of ATP. Activation of adenylate kinase led to a build-up of AMP, IMP and adenosine, molecules involved in cardioprotective signaling. 31P and 1H NMR spectral analysis further revealed NADH and H+ scavenging by alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alphaGPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase contributing to maintained glycolysis under hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced accumulation of alpha-glycerophosphate and nucleoside 5'-monophosphates, through alphaGPDH and adenylate kinase reactions, respectively, was mapped within the increased PME signal in the 31P NMR spectrum. Thus, 18O-assisted 31P NMR combined with 1H NMR provide a powerful approach in capturing rearrangements in cardiac bioenergetics, and associated metabolic signaling that underlie the cardiac adaptive response to stress. PMID:14977188

  20. Ploidy status and copy number aberrations in primary glioblastomas defined by integrated analysis of allelic ratios, signal ratios and loss of heterozygosity using 500K SNP Mapping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gardina, Paul J; Lo, Ken C; Lee, Walter; Cowell, John K; Turpaz, Yaron

    2008-01-01

    Background Genomic hybridization platforms, including BAC-CGH and genotyping arrays, have been used to estimate chromosome copy number (CN) in tumor samples by detecting the relative strength of genomic signal. The methods rely on the assumption that the predominant chromosomal background of the samples is diploid, an assumption that is frequently incorrect for tumor samples. In addition to generally greater resolution, an advantage of genotyping arrays over CGH arrays is the ability to detect signals from individual alleles, allowing estimation of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) and allelic ratios to enhance the interpretation of copy number alterations. Copy number events associated with LOH potentially have the same genetic consequences as deletions. Results We have utilized allelic ratios to detect patterns that are indicative of higher ploidy levels. An integrated analysis using allelic ratios, total signal and LOH indicates that many or most of the chromosomes from 24 glioblastoma tumors are in fact aneuploid. Some putative whole-chromosome losses actually represent trisomy, and many apparent sub-chromosomal losses are in fact relative losses against a triploid or tetraploid background. Conclusion These results suggest a re-interpretation of previous findings based only on total signal ratios. One interesting observation is that many single or multiple-copy deletions occur at common putative tumor suppressor sites subsequent to chromosomal duplication; these losses do not necessarily result in LOH, but nonetheless occur in conspicuous patterns. The 500 K Mapping array was also capable of detecting many sub-mega base losses and gains that were overlooked by CGH-BAC arrays, and was superior to CGH-BAC arrays in resolving regions of complex CN variation. PMID:18928532

  1. Self-consistent signal-to-noise analysis of the statistical behavior of analog neural networks and enhancement of the storage capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiino, Masatoshi; Fukai, Tomoki

    1993-08-01

    Based on the self-consistent signal-to-noise analysis (SCSNA) capable of dealing with analog neural networks with a wide class of transfer functions, enhancement of the storage capacity of associative memory and the related statistical properties of neural networks are studied for random memory patterns. Two types of transfer functions with the threshold parameter θ are considered, which are derived from the sigmoidal one to represent the output of three-state neurons. Neural networks having a monotonically increasing transfer function FM, FM(u)=sgnu (||u||>θ), FM(u)=0 (||u||<=θ), are shown to make it impossible for the spin-glass state to coexist with retrieval states in a certain parameter region of θ and α (loading rate of memory patterns), implying the reduction of the number of spurious states. The behavior of the storage capacity with changing θ is qualitatively the same as that of the Ising spin neural networks with varying temperature. On the other hand, the nonmonotonic transfer function FNM, FNM(u)=sgnu (||u||<θ), FNM(u)=0 (||u||>=θ) gives rise to remarkable features in several respects. First, it yields a large enhancement of the storage capacity compared with the Amit-Gutfreund-Sompolinsky (AGS) value: with decreasing θ from θ=∞, the storage capacity αc of such a network is increased from the AGS value (~=0.14) to attain its maximum value of ~=0.42 at θ~=0.7 and afterwards is decreased to vanish at θ=0. Whereas for θ>~1 the storage capacity αc coincides with the value αc~ determined by the SCSNA as the upper bound of α ensuring the existence of retrieval solutions, for θ<~1 the αc is shown to differ from the αc~ with the result that the retrieval solutions claimed by the SCSNA are unstable for αc<α<αc~. Second, in the case of θ<1 the network can exhibit a new type of phase which appears as a result of a phase transition with respect to the non-Gaussian distribution of the local fields of neurons: the standard type of retrieval

  2. Archaeological applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: an example from the Coso Volcanic Field, California, using advanced statistical signal processing analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remus, Jeremiah J.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Harmon, Russell S.; Draucker, Anne; Baron, Dirk; Yohe, Robert

    2010-05-01

    of the classifier setup considered in this study include the training/testing routine (a 27-fold leave-one-sample-out setup versus a simple split of the data into separate sets for training and evaluation), the number of latent variables used in the regression model, and whether PLSDA operating on the entire broadband LIBS spectrum is superior to that using only a selected subset of LIBS emission lines. The results point to the robustness of the PLSDA technique and suggest that LIBS analysis combined with the appropriate statistical signal processing has the potential to be a useful tool for chemical analysis of archaeological artifacts and geological specimens.

  3. Statistical Analysis of the Heavy Neutral Atoms Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard; Galli, André; Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O&Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O&Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  4. Density Equalizing Map Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Close, E. R.; Merrill, D. W.; Holmes, H. H.

    1995-07-01

    A geographic map is mathematically transformed so that the subareas of the map are proportional to a given quantity such as population. In other words, population density is equalized over the entire map. The transformed map can be used as a display tool, or it can be statistically analyzed. For example, cases of disease plotted on the transformed map should be uniformly distributed at random, if disease rates are everywhere equal. Geographic clusters of disease can be readily identified, and their statistical significance determined, on a density equalized map.

  5. Density Equalizing Map Projections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-01

    A geographic map is mathematically transformed so that the subareas of the map are proportional to a given quantity such as population. In other words, population density is equalized over the entire map. The transformed map can be used as a display tool, or it can be statistically analyzed. For example, cases of disease plotted on the transformed map should be uniformly distributed at random, if disease rates are everywhere equal. Geographic clusters of diseasemore » can be readily identified, and their statistical significance determined, on a density equalized map.« less

  6. DLK-1/p38 MAP Kinase Signaling Controls Cilium Length by Regulating RAB-5 Mediated Endocytosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Aniek; Rademakers, Suzanne; Jansen, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles present on almost all vertebrate cells. Cilium length is constant, but varies between cell types, indicating that cilium length is regulated. How this is achieved is unclear, but protein transport in cilia (intraflagellar transport, IFT) plays an important role. Several studies indicate that cilium length and function can be modulated by environmental cues. As a model, we study a C. elegans mutant that carries a dominant active G protein α subunit (gpa-3QL), resulting in altered IFT and short cilia. In a screen for suppressors of the gpa-3QL short cilium phenotype, we identified uev-3, which encodes an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant that acts in a MAP kinase pathway. Mutation of two other components of this pathway, dual leucine zipper-bearing MAPKKK DLK-1 and p38 MAPK PMK-3, also suppress the gpa-3QL short cilium phenotype. However, this suppression seems not to be caused by changes in IFT. The DLK-1/p38 pathway regulates several processes, including microtubule stability and endocytosis. We found that reducing endocytosis by mutating rabx-5 or rme-6, RAB-5 GEFs, or the clathrin heavy chain, suppresses gpa-3QL. In addition, gpa-3QL animals showed reduced levels of two GFP-tagged proteins involved in endocytosis, RAB-5 and DPY-23, whereas pmk-3 mutant animals showed accumulation of GFP-tagged RAB-5. Together our results reveal a new role for the DLK-1/p38 MAPK pathway in control of cilium length by regulating RAB-5 mediated endocytosis. PMID:26657059

  7. Cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by regulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 hairless mice skin

    SciTech Connect

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Joseph, Binoy; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Yin, Yuanqin; Roy, Ram Vinod; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; and others

    2014-10-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation induces inflammation and photocarcinogenesis in mammalian skin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a member of the anthocyanin family, is present in various vegetables and fruits especially in edible berries, and displays potent antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study, we have assessed the in vivo effects of C3G on UVB irradiation induced chronic inflammatory responses in SKH-1 hairless mice, a well-established model for UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. Here, we show that C3G inhibited UVB-induced skin damage and inflammation in SKH-1 hairless mice. Our results indicate that C3G inhibited glutathione depletion, lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidation in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. C3G significantly decreased the production of UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-α, associated with cutaneous inflammation. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by C3G as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, C3G also decreased UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), PGE{sub 2} and iNOS levels, which are well-known key mediators of inflammation and cancer. Treatment with C3G inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mice skin. Immunofluorescence assay revealed that topical application of C3G inhibited the expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and cyclin D1 in chronic UVB exposed mouse skin. Collectively, these data indicates that C3G can provide substantial protection against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating UVB-induced MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. - Highlights: • C3G inhibited UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation. • C3G inhibited UVB-induced COX-2, iNOS and PGE{sub 2} production. • C3G

  8. Nuclear Localization Signal and p53 Binding Site in MAP/ERK Kinase Kinase 1 (MEKK1).

    PubMed

    Chipps, Elizabeth; Protzman, April; Muhi, M Zubayed; Ando, Shoko; Calvet, James P; Islam, M Rafiq

    2015-12-01

    Previously, we showed that Mekk1 translocates to the nucleus, interacts with tumor suppressor protein p53, and co-represses PKD1 transcription via an atypical p53 binding site on the minimal PKD1 promoter (JBC 285:38,818-38,831, 2010). In this study, we report the mechanisms of Mekk1 nuclear transport and p53 binding. Using GFP-linked constitutively active-Mekk1 (CA-Mekk1) and a deletion strategy, we identified a nuclear localization signal (HRDVK) located at amino acid (aa) residues 1,349-1,353 in the C-terminal Mekk1 catalytic domain. Deletion of this sequence in CA-Mekk1 and full-length Mekk1 significantly reduced their nuclear translocation in both HEK293T and COS-1 cells. Using co-immunoprecipitation, we identified an adjacent sequence (GANLID, aa 1,354-1,360) in Mekk1 responsible for p53 binding. Deletion of this sequence markedly reduced the interaction of Mekk1 with p53. Mekk1 does not appear to affect phosphorylation of Ser15, located in the Mdm2 interaction site, or other Ser residues in p53. However, Mekk1 mediates p53 protein stability in the presence of Mdm2 and reduces p53 ubiquitination, suggesting an interference with Mdm2-mediated degradation of p53 by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:26018553

  9. Sevoflurane Stimulates MAP Kinase Signal transduction through the Activation of PKC α and βII in Fetal Rat Cerebral Cortex Cultured Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme that participates in various neuronal functions. PKC has also been identified as a target molecule for general anesthetic actions. Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) have been thought to be target effectors of PKC. In the present study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of sevoflurane on PKC/MAPK cascade signaling in cultured fetal rat cerebral ­cortex neurons, prepared from embryonic day 18 fetuses. The effects of sevoflurane on the translocation of 7 PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, γ, δ, ɛ and ζ) were observed by immunoblotting using isoform-selective antibodies to PKCs. The treatment of neurons with sevoflurane induced the translocation of PKC α and PKC βII species from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, which indicated the activation of these PKC isoforms. In contrast, there was no clear change in the distribution of other PKC isoforms. We next examined whether the specific activation of PKC α and βII by sevoflurane could stimulate the MAP kinase signaling pathway in cultured neurons. Raf phosphorylation was increased by the administration of 0.25 mM sevoflurane. The phosphorylation of Raf proteins reached a maximum at 5–10 min. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of MEK proteins was increased at 10–15 min after sevoflurane treatments. That of ERK proteins was induced at 15–60 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK induced by sevoflurane was significantly decreased by the treatment of PKC inhibitor (staurosporine) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059). On the other hand, the contents of total Raf, MEK and ERK proteins were relatively constant at all times examined. To examine the ­localization of phosphorylated-ERK protein, immunohistochemical staining of sevoflurane-treated cultured neurons was performed. The phosphorylated-ERK proteins were markedly accumulated in both the cytosol of the cell body and the neurites in the neuronal cells with time after 0

  10. Mapping Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s): Critical Molecular Determinant and Signaling Profile of GAT100, a Novel, Potent, and Irreversibly Binding Probe.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Hurst, Dow P; Lynch, Diane; Reggio, Patricia H; Janero, David R; Pertwee, Roger G; Stevenson, Lesley A; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Thakur, Ganesh A

    2016-06-15

    One of the most abundant G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in brain, the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), is a tractable therapeutic target for treating diverse psychobehavioral and somatic disorders. Adverse on-target effects associated with small-molecule CB1R orthosteric agonists and inverse agonists/antagonists have plagued their translational potential. Allosteric CB1R modulators offer a potentially safer modality through which CB1R signaling may be directed for therapeutic benefit. Rational design of candidate, druglike CB1R allosteric modulators requires greater understanding of the architecture of the CB1R allosteric endodomain(s) and the capacity of CB1R allosteric ligands to tune the receptor's information output. We have recently reported the synthesis of a focused library of rationally designed, covalent analogues of Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1, two prototypic CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs). Among the novel, pharmacologically active CB1R NAMs reported, the isothiocyanate GAT100 emerged as the lead by virtue of its exceptional potency in the [(35)S]GTPγS and β-arrestin signaling assays and its ability to label CB1R as a covalent allosteric probe with significantly reduced inverse agonism in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay as compared to Org27569. We report here a comprehensive functional profiling of GAT100 across an array of important downstream cell-signaling pathways and analysis of its potential orthosteric probe-dependence and signaling bias. The results demonstrate that GAT100 is a NAM of the orthosteric CB1R agonist CP55,940 and the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide for β-arrestin1 recruitment, PLCβ3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, cAMP accumulation, and CB1R internalization in HEK293A cells overexpressing CB1R and in Neuro2a and STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells endogenously expressing CB1R. Distinctively, GAT100 was a more potent and efficacious CB1R NAM than Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1 in all signaling assays and did not exhibit the inverse

  11. Cicletanine stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via Akt and MAP kinase/Erk signaling in sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songling; Rockey, Don C

    2013-07-15

    The function of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and production of nitric oxide (NO) is altered in a number of disease states. Pharmacological approaches to enhancing NO synthesis and thus perhaps endothelial function could have substantial benefits in patients. We analyzed the effect of cicletanine, a synthetic pyridine with potent vasodilatory characteristics, on eNOS function and NO production in normal (liver) and injured rat sinusoidal endothelial cells, and we studied the effect of cicletanine-induced NO on stellate cell contraction and portal pressure in an in vivo model of liver injury. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were isolated from normal and injured rat livers. After exposure to cicletanine, eNOS phosphorylation, NO synthesis, and the signaling pathway regulating eNOS activation were measured. Cicletanine led to an increase in eNOS (Ser¹¹⁷⁷) phosphorylation, cytochrome c reductase activity, L-arginine conversion to L-citrulline, as well as NO production. The mechanism of the effect of cicletanine appeared to be via the protein kinase B (Akt) and MAP kinase/Erk signaling pathways. Additionally, cicletanine improved NO synthesis in injured sinusoidal endothelial cells. NO production induced by cicletanine in sinusoidal endothelial cells increased protein kinase G (PKG) activity as well as relaxation of stellate cells. Finally, administration of cicletanine to mice with portal hypertension induced by bile duct ligation led to reduction of portal pressure. The data indicate that cicletanine might improve eNOS activity in injured sinusoidal endothelial cells and likely activates hepatic stellate cell NO/PKG signaling. It raises the possibility that cicletanine could improve intrahepatic vascular function in portal hypertensive patients. PMID:23639812

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8 (MAP3K8) Mediates the Signaling Pathway of Estradiol Stimulating Progesterone Production Through G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) in Mouse Corpus Luteum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Yueqin; Zhang, Di; Liu, Jiali; Gou, Kemian; Cui, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine gland developed from the ovulated follicles, and the most important function is to synthesize and secrete progesterone (P(4)), a key hormone to maintain normal pregnancy and estrous cycle in most mammals. It is known that estrogen has a vital role in stimulating P(4) synthesis in CL, but it still remains unclear about the mechanism of estradiol (E(2)) regulating P(4) production in CL. Our results here first show that all of the CL cells express MAPK 8 (MAP3K8), and the MAP3K8 level is much higher at the midstage than at the early and late stages during CL development. The further functional studies show that the forced inhibition of endogenous MAP3K8 by using MAP3K8 small interfering RNA and MAP3K8 signaling inhibitor (MAP3K8i) in the luteal cells significantly block the P(4) synthesis and neutralize the enhancing effect of E(2) on P(4) production in the CL. In addition, our results here demonstrate that the stimulating effect of E(2) on P(4) synthesis relies on the estrogen no-classical protein-coupled receptor 30, and MAP3K8 is involved in mediating the protein-coupled receptor 30signaling of E(2) affecting P(4) synthesis via stimulating ERK phosphorylation. These novel findings are critical for our understanding the ovary physiology and pathological mechanism. PMID:25763610

  13. Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation through MAP kinases and NF-κB signalling pathways in SKH-1 mice skin

    PubMed Central

    Son, Young-Ok; Roy, Ram Vinod; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Asha, Padmaja; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Extensive exposure of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation to skin induces oxidative stress and inflammation that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. In this study, we investigated whether blackberry extract (BBE) reduces chronic inflammatory responses induced by UVB irradiation in SKH-1 hairless mice skin. Mice were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm2) on alternate days for 10 weeks, and BBE (10% and 20%) was applied topically a day before UVB exposure. Our results show that BBE suppressed UVB-induced hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the SKH-1 hairless mice skin. BBE treatment reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. BBE significantly decreased the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in UVB-exposed skin. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by BBE as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, BBE also reduced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels in UVB-exposed skin. Treatment with BBE inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mouse skin. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that topical application of BBE inhibited the expression of 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and cyclin D1 in UVB-exposed skin. Collectively, these data indicates that BBE protects from UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by modulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25680589

  14. Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation through MAP kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 mice skin.

    PubMed

    Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Wang, Xin; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Roy, Ram Vinod; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Asha, Padmaja; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-04-01

    Extensive exposure of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation to skin induces oxidative stress and inflammation that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. In this study, we investigated whether blackberry extract (BBE) reduces chronic inflammatory responses induced by UVB irradiation in SKH-1 hairless mice skin. Mice were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm(2)) on alternate days for 10 weeks, and BBE (10% and 20%) was applied topically a day before UVB exposure. Our results show that BBE suppressed UVB-induced hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the SKH-1 hairless mice skin. BBE treatment reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. BBE significantly decreased the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in UVB-exposed skin. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by BBE as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, BBE also reduced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels in UVB-exposed skin. Treatment with BBE inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mouse skin. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that topical application of BBE inhibited the expression of 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and cyclin D1 in UVB-exposed skin. Collectively, these data indicate that BBE protects from UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by modulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25680589

  15. A retention signal necessary and sufficient for Golgi localization maps to the cytoplasmic tail of a Bunyaviridae (Uukuniemi virus) membrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Andersson, A M; Melin, L; Bean, A; Pettersson, R F

    1997-06-01

    Members of the Bunyaviridae family mature by a budding process in the Golgi complex. The site of maturation is thought to be largely determined by the accumulation of the two spike glycoproteins, G1 and G2, in this organelle. Here we show that the signal for localizing the Uukuniemi virus (a phlebovirus) spike protein complex to the Golgi complex resides in the cytoplasmic tail of G1. We constructed chimeric proteins in which the ectodomain, transmembrane domain (TMD), and cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Uukuniemi virus G1 were exchanged with the corresponding domains of either vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV G), chicken lysozyme, or CD4, all proteins readily transported to the plasma membrane. The chimeras were expressed in HeLa or BHK-21 cells by using either the T7 RNA polymerase-driven vaccinia virus system or the Semliki Forest virus system. The fate of the chimeric proteins was monitored by indirect immunofluorescence, and their localizations were compared by double labeling with markers specific for the Golgi complex. The results showed that the ectodomain and TMD (including the 10 flanking residues on either side of the membrane) of G1 played no apparent role in targeting chimeric proteins to the Golgi complex. Instead, all chimeras containing the CT of G1 were efficiently targeted to the Golgi complex and colocalized with mannosidase II, a Golgi-specific enzyme. Conversely, replacing the CT of G1 with that from VSV G resulted in the efficient transport of the chimeric protein to the cell surface. Progressive deletions of the G1 tail suggested that the Golgi retention signal maps to a region encompassing approximately residues 10 to 50, counting from the proposed border between the TMD and the tail. Both G1 and G2 were found to be acylated, as shown by incorporation of [3H]palmitate into the viral proteins. By mutational analyses of CD4-G1 chimeras, the sites for palmitylation were mapped to two closely spaced cysteine residues in the G1 tail. Changing

  16. Cosmic statistics of statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, István; Colombi, Stéphane; Bernardeau, Francis

    1999-12-01

    The errors on statistics measured in finite galaxy catalogues are exhaustively investigated. The theory of errors on factorial moments by Szapudi & Colombi is applied to cumulants via a series expansion method. All results are subsequently extended to the weakly non-linear regime. Together with previous investigations this yields an analytic theory of the errors for moments and connected moments of counts in cells from highly non-linear to weakly non-linear scales. For non-linear functions of unbiased estimators, such as the cumulants, the phenomenon of cosmic bias is identified and computed. Since it is subdued by the cosmic errors in the range of applicability of the theory, correction for it is inconsequential. In addition, the method of Colombi, Szapudi & Szalay concerning sampling effects is generalized, adapting the theory for inhomogeneous galaxy catalogues. While previous work focused on the variance only, the present article calculates the cross-correlations between moments and connected moments as well for a statistically complete description. The final analytic formulae representing the full theory are explicit but somewhat complicated. Therefore we have made available a fortran program capable of calculating the described quantities numerically (for further details e-mail SC at colombi@iap.fr). An important special case is the evaluation of the errors on the two-point correlation function, for which this should be more accurate than any method put forward previously. This tool will be immensely useful in the future for assessing the precision of measurements from existing catalogues, as well as aiding the design of new galaxy surveys. To illustrate the applicability of the results and to explore the numerical aspects of the theory qualitatively and quantitatively, the errors and cross-correlations are predicted under a wide range of assumptions for the future Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The principal results concerning the cumulants ξ, Q3 and Q4 is that

  17. Signal-to-noise ratio requirements for detection of multiple pulses subject to partially correlated fading with chi-squared statistics of various degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, Albert H.; Eby, Edward S.

    1986-06-01

    The transmitted signal in a fading medium is composed of several pulses separated in time so as to achieve diversity and thereby combat deep fades and loss of signal. Receiver processing consists of matched filtering of each of the pulses, followed by summation of the squared envelopes of all the filter outputs. In addition to additive Gaussian background noise, the signal is subject to slow medium fading which has a chi-squared first-order distribution and which may be correlated from pulse to pulse to an arbitrary degree. The false alarm and detection probabilities of this system are derived in various series expansions which are amenable to efficient computer evaluation. Programs are presented and exercised for various combinations of signal-to-noise ratio, number of pulses, degree of correlated fading, and (noninteger) number of degrees of freedom of the chi-squared fading. Required input signal-to-noise ratios for several false alarm and detection probabilities are computed and plotted for cases of the fading normalized correlation coefficient ranging from 0 to 1; results for a nonfading medium are superposed for easy comparison. Special cases are dependent and independent Rayleigh amplitude fading.

  18. Representation of pheromones, interspecific signals, and plant odors in higher olfactory centers; mapping physiologically identified antennal-lobe projection neurons in the male heliothine moth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Kvello, Pål; Løfaldli, Bjarte B.; Lillevoll, Siri C.; Mustaparta, Hanna; Berg, Bente G.

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of anatomically separated systems for information about general and pheromone odorants is well documented at the initial levels of the olfactory pathway both in vertebrates and insects. In the primary olfactory center of the moth brain, for example, a few enlarged glomeruli situated dorsally, at the entrance of the antennal nerve, are devoted to information about female-produced substances whereas a set of more numerous ordinary glomeruli (OG) receives input about general odorants. Heliothine moths are particularly suitable for studying central chemosensory mechanisms not only because of their anatomically separated systems for plant odors and pheromones but also due to their use of female-produced substances in communication across the species. Thus, the male-specific system of heliothine moths includes two sub-arrangements, one ensuring attraction and mating behavior by carrying information about pheromones released by conspecifics, and the other inhibition of attraction via signal information emitted from heterospecifics. Based on previous tracing experiments, a general chemotopic organization of the male-specific glomeruli has been demonstrated in a number of heliothine species. As compared to the well explored organization of the moth antennal lobe (AL), demonstrating a non-overlapping representation of the biologically relevant stimuli, less is known about the neural arrangement residing at the following synaptic level, i.e., the mushroom body calyces and the lateral horn. In the study presented here, we have labeled physiologically characterized antennal-lobe projection neurons in males of the two heliothine species, Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa assulta, for the purpose of mapping their target regions in the protocerebrum. In order to compare the representation of plant odors, pheromones, and interspecific signals in the higher brain regions of each species, we have created standard brain atlases and registered three-dimensional models

  19. Mapping changes in agricultural cropping frequency across Zimbabwe using cross-scale time-series remote sensing data and a novel signal decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, A.; Van Den Hoek, J.; Sedano, F.; Kumar, V.; Tucker, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    A central challenge in agricultural remote sensing is the detection of changes in intra-annual cropping frequency, often necessary in monitoring crop productivity, agricultural management practices, or policy implementation. Though remote sensing imagery offers synoptic and systematic measurements relevant to monitoring crop phenology across spatial scales, broad-scale (i.e., country-wide) changes in cropping frequency have seldom been quantified due to spatio-temporal heterogeneity in phenological and climatic cycles, signal noise, and missing data resulting from cloud cover. For example, in Zimbabwe, once the breadbasket of southern Africa, large-scale changes to agricultural production followed land distribution policies introduced in the early 2000s. The diverse impacts of land reform on the agricultural economy continue to be debated yet the underlying changes in cropping frequency and pattern have never been systematically assessed. Using Zimbabwean agriculture as a case study and MODIS 16-day composite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and complementary Landsat imagery collected since 2000 across Zimbabwe, this presentation introduces a novel time-series signal decomposition and spatiotemporal clustering approach to map intra-annual cropping frequency and changes therein. MODIS-derived results indicate a massive decline in double-cropped acreage since 2000, a complete overhaul of cropping pattern with the disaggregation of large-scale commercial farms into multiple smallholder plots, and a spatial contraction of double-cropped fields to peri-urban lands, while Landsat trends capture the recent emergence of small-scale double-cropping systems unseen in MODIS data. These findings provide an independent and objective assessment of field-level changes in agricultural productivity, spatiotemporally explicit land reform effects on large-scale as well as smallholder agriculture and potential for food production, and have importance for regional water

  20. Effects of Non-Local Diffusion on Structural MRI Preprocessing and Default Network Mapping: Statistical Comparisons with Isotropic/Anisotropic Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xi-Nian; Xing, Xiu-Xia

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging community usually employs spatial smoothing to denoise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, e.g., Gaussian smoothing kernels. Such an isotropic diffusion (ISD) based smoothing is widely adopted for denoising purpose due to its easy implementation and efficient computation. Beyond these advantages, Gaussian smoothing kernels tend to blur the edges, curvature and texture of images. Researchers have proposed anisotropic diffusion (ASD) and non-local diffusion (NLD) kernels. We recently demonstrated the effect of these new filtering paradigms on preprocessing real degraded MRI images from three individual subjects. Here, to further systematically investigate the effects at a group level, we collected both structural and functional MRI data from 23 participants. We first evaluated the three smoothing strategies' impact on brain extraction, segmentation and registration. Finally, we investigated how they affect subsequent mapping of default network based on resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) data. Our findings suggest that NLD-based spatial smoothing maybe more effective and reliable at improving the quality of both MRI data preprocessing and default network mapping. We thus recommend NLD may become a promising method of smoothing structural MRI images of R-fMRI pipeline. PMID:22066005

  1. Moving toward a Biomass Map of Boreal Eurasia based on ICESat GLAS, ASTER GDEM, and field measurements: Amount, Spatial distribution, and Statistical Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neigh, C. S.; Nelson, R. F.; Sun, G.; Ranson, J.; Montesano, P. M.; Margolis, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Eurasian boreal forest is the largest continuous forest in the world and contains a vast quantity of carbon stock that is currently vulnerable to loss from climate change. We develop and present an approach to map the spatial distribution of above ground biomass throughout this region. Our method combines satellite measurements from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) that is carried on the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite ( ICESat), with the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM), and biomass field measurements collected from surveys from a number of different biomes throughout Boreal Eurasia. A slope model derived from the GDEM with quality control flags, and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) water mask was implemented to exclude poor quality GLAS shots and stratify measurements by MODIS International Geosphere Biosphere (IGBP) and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) ecozones. We derive equations from regional field measurements to estimate the spatial distribution of above ground biomass by land cover type within biome and present a map with uncertainties and limitations of this approach which can be used as a baseline for future studies.

  2. An Investigation of Statistical Thinking in Two Different Contexts: Detecting a Signal in a Noisy Process and Determining a Typical Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Randall E.

    2005-01-01

    The study describes students' patterns of thinking for statistical problems set in two different contexts. Fifteen students representing a wide range of experiences with high school mathematics participated in problem-solving clinical interview sessions. At one point during the interviews, each solved a problem that involved determining the…

  3. Proteomic mapping of stimulus-specific signaling pathways involved in THP-1 cells exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis or its purified components.

    PubMed

    Saba, Julian A; McComb, Mark E; Potts, Donna L; Costello, Catherine E; Amar, Salomon

    2007-06-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease initiated by host-parasite interactions which contributes to connective tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), a black-pigmented Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, is a major pathogen in the development and progression of periodontitis. To characterize the role that P. gingivalis and its cell surface components play in disease processes, we investigated the differential expression of proteins induced by live P.g., P.g. LPS, and P.g. FimA, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry. We have tested whether, at the level of protein expression, unique signaling pathways are differentially induced by the bacterial components P.g. LPS and P.g. FimA, as compared to live P.g. We found that P.g. LPS stimulation of THP-1 up-regulated the expression of a set of proteins compared to control: deoxyribonuclease, actin, carbonic anhydrase 2, alpha enolase, adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP1), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), glucose regulated protein (grp78), and 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), whereas FimA treatment did not result in statistically significant changes to protein levels versus the control. Live P.g. stimulation resulted in 12 differentially expressed proteins: CAP1, tubulin beta-2 chain, ATP synthase beta chain, tubulin alpha-6 chain, PDI, vimentin, 60-kDa heat shock protein, and nucleolin were found to be up-regulated, while carbonic anhydrase II, beta-actin, and HSP70 were down-regulated relative to control. These differential changes by the bacteria and its components are interpreted as preferential signal pathway activation in host immune/inflammatory responses to P.g. infection. PMID:17477557

  4. Image based cardiac acceleration map using statistical shape and 3D+t myocardial tracking models; in-vitro study on heart phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashaei, Ali; Piella, Gemma; Planes, Xavier; Duchateau, Nicolas; de Caralt, Teresa M.; Sitges, Marta; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the acceleration signal has potential to monitor heart function and adaptively optimize Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) systems. In this paper, we propose a non-invasive method for computing myocardial acceleration from 3D echocardiographic sequences. Displacement of the myocardium was estimated using a two-step approach: (1) 3D automatic segmentation of the myocardium at end-diastole using 3D Active Shape Models (ASM); (2) propagation of this segmentation along the sequence using non-rigid 3D+t image registration (temporal di eomorphic free-form-deformation, TDFFD). Acceleration was obtained locally at each point of the myocardium from local displacement. The framework has been tested on images from a realistic physical heart phantom (DHP-01, Shelley Medical Imaging Technologies, London, ON, CA) in which the displacement of some control regions was known. Good correlation has been demonstrated between the estimated displacement function from the algorithms and the phantom setup. Due to the limited temporal resolution, the acceleration signals are sparse and highly noisy. The study suggests a non-invasive technique to measure the cardiac acceleration that may be used to improve the monitoring of cardiac mechanics and optimization of CRT.

  5. An overview of data acquisition, signal coding and data analysis techniques for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the data acquisition, signal processing, and data analysis techniques that are currently in use with high power MST/ST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere/stratosphere troposphere) radars. This review supplements the works of Rastogi (1983) and Farley (1984) presented at previous MAP workshops. A general description is given of data acquisition and signal processing operations and they are characterized on the basis of their disparate time scales. Then signal coding, a brief description of frequently used codes, and their limitations are discussed, and finally, several aspects of statistical data processing such as signal statistics, power spectrum and autocovariance analysis, outlier removal techniques are discussed.

  6. An automated normative-based fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography image-analysis procedure to aid Alzheimer disease diagnosis using statistical parametric mapping and interactive image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kewei; Ge, Xiaolin; Yao, Li; Bandy, Dan; Alexander, Gene E.; Prouty, Anita; Burns, Christine; Zhao, Xiaojie; Wen, Xiaotong; Korn, Ronald; Lawson, Michael; Reiman, Eric M.

    2006-03-01

    Having approved fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in some patients, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services suggested the need to develop and test analysis techniques to optimize diagnostic accuracy. We developed an automated computer package comparing an individual's FDG PET image to those of a group of normal volunteers. The normal control group includes FDG-PET images from 82 cognitively normal subjects, 61.89+/-5.67 years of age, who were characterized demographically, clinically, neuropsychologically, and by their apolipoprotein E genotype (known to be associated with a differential risk for AD). In addition, AD-affected brain regions functionally defined as based on a previous study (Alexander, et al, Am J Psychiatr, 2002) were also incorporated. Our computer package permits the user to optionally select control subjects, matching the individual patient for gender, age, and educational level. It is fully streamlined to require minimal user intervention. With one mouse click, the program runs automatically, normalizing the individual patient image, setting up a design matrix for comparing the single subject to a group of normal controls, performing the statistics, calculating the glucose reduction overlap index of the patient with the AD-affected brain regions, and displaying the findings in reference to the AD regions. In conclusion, the package automatically contrasts a single patient to a normal subject database using sound statistical procedures. With further validation, this computer package could be a valuable tool to assist physicians in decision making and communicating findings with patients and patient families.

  7. Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohonen, Teuvo

    The Self-Organizing Map (SOM), with its variants, is the most popular artificial neural network algorithm in the unsupervised learning category. Many fields of science have adopted the SOM as a standard analytical tool: in statistics,signal processing, control theory, financial analyses, experimental physics, chemistry and medicine. A new area is organization of very large document collections. The SOM is also one of the most realistic models of the biological brain functions.This new edition includes a survey of over 2000 contemporary studies to cover the newest results; the case examples were provided with detailed formulae, illustrations and tables; a new chapter on software tools for SOM was written, other chapters were extended or reorganized.

  8. Laboratory for Engineering Man/Machine Systems (LEMS): System identification, model reduction and deconvolution filtering using Fourier based modulating signals and high order statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Jianqiang

    1992-01-01

    Several important problems in the fields of signal processing and model identification, such as system structure identification, frequency response determination, high order model reduction, high resolution frequency analysis, deconvolution filtering, and etc. Each of these topics involves a wide range of applications and has received considerable attention. Using the Fourier based sinusoidal modulating signals, it is shown that a discrete autoregressive model can be constructed for the least squares identification of continuous systems. Some identification algorithms are presented for both SISO and MIMO systems frequency response determination using only transient data. Also, several new schemes for model reduction were developed. Based upon the complex sinusoidal modulating signals, a parametric least squares algorithm for high resolution frequency estimation is proposed. Numerical examples show that the proposed algorithm gives better performance than the usual. Also, the problem was studied of deconvolution and parameter identification of a general noncausal nonminimum phase ARMA system driven by non-Gaussian stationary random processes. Algorithms are introduced for inverse cumulant estimation, both in the frequency domain via the FFT algorithms and in the domain via the least squares algorithm.

  9. Optimizing and Interpreting Insular Functional Connectivity Maps Obtained During Acute Experimental Pain: The Effects of Global Signal and Task Paradigm Regression.

    PubMed

    Ibinson, James W; Vogt, Keith M; Taylor, Kevin B; Dua, Shiv B; Becker, Christopher J; Loggia, Marco; Wasan, Ajay D

    2015-12-01

    The insula is uniquely located between the temporal and parietal cortices, making it anatomically well-positioned to act as an integrating center between the sensory and affective domains for the processing of painful stimulation. This can be studied through resting-state functional connectivity (fcMRI) imaging; however, the lack of a clear methodology for the analysis of fcMRI complicates the interpretation of these data during acute pain. Detected connectivity changes may reflect actual alterations in low-frequency synchronous neuronal activity related to pain, may be due to changes in global cerebral blood flow or the superimposed task-induced neuronal activity. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of global signal regression (GSR) and task paradigm regression (TPR) on the changes in functional connectivity of the left (contralateral) insula in healthy subjects at rest and during acute painful electric nerve stimulation of the right hand. The use of GSR reduced the size and statistical significance of connectivity clusters and created negative correlation coefficients for some connectivity clusters. TPR with cyclic stimulation gave task versus rest connectivity differences similar to those with a constant task, suggesting that analysis which includes TPR is more accurately reflective of low-frequency neuronal activity. Both GSR and TPR have been inconsistently applied to fcMRI analysis. Based on these results, investigators need to consider the impact GSR and TPR have on connectivity during task performance when attempting to synthesize the literature. PMID:26061382

  10. Statistical downscaling for daily precipitation in Korea using combined PRISM, RCM, and quantile mapping: Part 1, methodology and evaluation in historical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Kim, Seonae; Kim, Jinuk; Heo, Jin; Park, Jeong-Soo; Kwon, Won-Tae; Suh, Myoung-Seok

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we present the Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM)-based Dynamic downscaling Error correction (PRIDE) model, which is suitable for complex topographies, such as the Korean peninsula. The PRIDE model is constructed by combining the PRISM module, the Regional Climate Model (RCM) anomaly, and quantile mapping (QM) to produce high-resolution (1 km) grid data at a daily time scale. The results show that the systematic bias of the RCM was significantly reduced by simply substituting the climatological observational seasonal cycle at a daily timescale for each grid point obtained from the PRISM. QM was then applied to correct additional systematic bias by constructing the transfer functions under the cumulative density function framework between the model and observation using six types of transfer functions. K-fold cross-validation of the PRIDE model shows that the number of modeled precipitation days is approximately 90~121% of the number of observed precipitation days for the five daily precipitation classes, indicating that the PRIDE model reasonably estimates the observational frequency of daily precipitation under a quantile framework. The relative Mean Absolute Error (MAE) is also discussed in the framework of the intensity of daily precipitation.

  11. Identification of environmental parameters and risk mapping of visceral leishmaniasis in Ethiopia by using geographical information systems and a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Tsegaw, Teshome; Gadisa, Endalamaw; Seid, Ahmed; Abera, Adugna; Teshome, Aklilu; Mulugeta, Abate; Herrero, Merce; Argaw, Daniel; Jorge, Alvar; Aseffa, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a vector-borne disease strongly influenced by environmental factors, has (re)-emerged in Ethiopia during the last two decades and is currently of increasing public health concern. Based on VL incidence in each locality (kebele) documented from federal or regional health bureaus and/or hospital records in the country, geographical information systems (GIS), coupled with binary and multivariate logistic regression methods, were employed to develop a risk map for Ethiopia with respect to VL based on soil type, altitude, rainfall, slope and temperature. The risk model was subsequently validated in selected sites. This environmental VL risk model provided an overall prediction accuracy of 86% with mean land surface temperature and soil type found to be the best predictors of VL. The total population at risk was estimated at 3.2 million according to the national population census in 2007. The approach presented here should facilitate the identification of priority areas for intervention and the monitoring of trends as well as providing input for further epidemiological and applied research with regard to this disease in Ethiopia. PMID:23733292

  12. Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation through MAP kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 mice skin

    SciTech Connect

    Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Wang, Xin; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Roy, Ram Vinod; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Asha, Padmaja; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-04-01

    Extensive exposure of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation to skin induces oxidative stress and inflammation that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. In this study, we investigated whether blackberry extract (BBE) reduces chronic inflammatory responses induced by UVB irradiation in SKH-1 hairless mice skin. Mice were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm{sup 2}) on alternate days for 10 weeks, and BBE (10% and 20%) was applied topically a day before UVB exposure. Our results show that BBE suppressed UVB-induced hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the SKH-1 hairless mice skin. BBE treatment reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. BBE significantly decreased the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in UVB-exposed skin. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by BBE as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, BBE also reduced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels in UVB-exposed skin. Treatment with BBE inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mouse skin. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that topical application of BBE inhibited the expression of 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and cyclin D1 in UVB-exposed skin. Collectively, these data indicate that BBE protects from UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by modulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced glutathione depletion.

  13. Descriptive statistics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; McLarty, Jerry W

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we introduced basic concepts of statistics, type of distributions, and descriptive statistics. A few examples were also provided. The basic concepts presented herein are only a fraction of the concepts related to descriptive statistics. Also, there are many commonly used distributions not presented herein, such as Poisson distributions for rare events and exponential distributions, F distributions, and logistic distributions. More information can be found in many statistics books and publications. PMID:19891281

  14. Space Weather Effects on Mid-Latitude Railways: a Statistical Study of Anomalies observed in the Operation of Signaling and Train Control Equipment on the East-Siberian Railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinskii, V. V.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Lyahov, N. N.; Dorman, L. I.; Villoresi, G.; Iucci, N.

    The end result of a long chain of space weather events beginning on the Sun is the induction of currents in ground-based long conductors as power lines pipelines and railways Intense geomagnetically induced currents GIC can hamper rail traffic by disturbing signaling and train control systems In few cases induced voltages were believed to have affected signaling equipment in Sweden Jansen et al 2000 and in the North of Russia Belov et al 2005 GIC threats have been a concern for technological systems at high-latitude locations due to disturbances driven by electrojet intensifications However other geomagnetic storm processes such as SSC and ring current enhancement can also cause GIC concerns for the technological systems Objective of this report is to continue our research Ptitsyna et al 2005 on possible influence of geomagnetic storms on mid-latitude railways and to perform a statistical research in addition to case studies This will help in providing a basis for railway companies to evaluate the risk of disruption to signaling and train control equipment and devise engineering solutions In the present report we analyzed anomalies in operation of automatic signaling and train control equipment occurred in 2004-2005 on the East-Siberian Railway located at mid-latitudes latitudes 51N-56N longitudes 96E-114E The anomalies consist mainly in unstable functioning and false operations in traffic automatic control systems rail chain switches locomotive control devices etc often resulting in false engagement of railway

  15. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    As a branch of knowledge, Statistics is ubiquitous and its applications can be found in (almost) every field of human endeavour. In this article, the authors track down the possible source of the link between the "Siren song" and applications of Statistics. Answers to their previous five questions and five new questions on Statistics are presented.

  16. Statistical Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callamaras, Peter

    1983-01-01

    This buyer's guide to seven major types of statistics software packages for microcomputers reviews Edu-Ware Statistics 3.0; Financial Planning; Speed Stat; Statistics with DAISY; Human Systems Dynamics package of Stats Plus, ANOVA II, and REGRESS II; Maxistat; and Moore-Barnes' MBC Test Construction and MBC Correlation. (MBR)

  17. Bayesian Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Donald L.

    Bayesian statistical methodology and its possible uses in the behavioral sciences are discussed in relation to the solution of problems in both the use and teaching of fundamental statistical methods, including confidence intervals, significance tests, and sampling. The Bayesian model explains these statistical methods and offers a consistent…

  18. Three-dimensional mapping of soil chemical characteristics at micrometric scale: Statistical prediction by combining 2D SEM-EDX data and 3D X-ray computed micro-tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapca, Simona

    2015-04-01

    Many soil properties and functions emerge from interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes at microscopic scales, which can be understood only by integrating techniques that traditionally are developed within separate disciplines. While recent advances in imaging techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), offer the possibility to reconstruct the 3D physical structure at fine resolutions, for the distribution of chemicals in soil, existing methods, based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray detection (EDX), allow for characterization of the chemical composition only on 2D surfaces. At present, direct 3D measurement techniques are still lacking, sequential sectioning of soils, followed by 2D mapping of chemical elements and interpolation to 3D, being an alternative which is explored in this study. Specifically, we develop an integrated experimental and theoretical framework which combines 3D X-ray CT imaging technique with 2D SEM-EDX and use spatial statistics methods to map the chemical composition of soil in 3D. The procedure involves three stages 1) scanning a resin impregnated soil cube by X-ray CT, followed by precision cutting to produce parallel thin slices, the surfaces of which are scanned by SEM-EDX, 2) alignment of the 2D chemical maps within the internal 3D structure of the soil cube, and 3) development, of spatial statistics methods to predict the chemical composition of 3D soil based on the observed 2D chemical and 3D physical data. Specifically, three statistical models consisting of a regression tree, a regression tree kriging and cokriging model were used to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron and oxygen in soil, these chemical elements showing a good spatial agreement between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the corresponding 2D SEM-EDX data. Due to the spatial correlation between the physical and chemical data, the regression-tree model showed a great potential

  19. Statistical Downscaling: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D.; Hall, A. D.; Sun, F.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we examine ways to improve statistical downscaling of general circulation model (GCM) output. Why do we downscale GCM output? GCMs have low resolution, so they cannot represent local dynamics and topographic effects that cause spatial heterogeneity in the regional climate change signal. Statistical downscaling recovers fine-scale information by utilizing relationships between the large-scale and fine-scale signals to bridge this gap. In theory, the downscaled climate change signal is more credible and accurate than its GCM counterpart, but in practice, there may be little improvement. Here, we tackle the practical problems that arise in statistical downscaling, using temperature change over the Los Angeles region as a test case. This region is an ideal place to apply downscaling since its complex topography and shoreline are poorly simulated by GCMs. By comparing two popular statistical downscaling methods and one dynamical downscaling method, we identify issues with statistically downscaled climate change signals and develop ways to fix them. We focus on scale mismatch, domain of influence, and other problems - many of which users may be unaware of - and discuss practical solutions.

  20. High-resolution habitat mapping on mud fields: new approach to quantitative mapping of Ocean quahog.

    PubMed

    Isachenko, Artem; Gubanova, Yana; Tzetlin, Alexander; Mokievsky, Vadim

    2014-12-01

    During 2009-2012 stocks of the bivalve Arctica islandica (Linnaeus, 1767) (Ocean quahog) in Kandalaksha Bay (the White Sea) has been assessed using a side-scan sonar, grab sampling and underwater photo imaging. Structurally uniform localities were highlighted on the basis of side-scan signal. Each type of a signal reflects combination of sediment type, microtopography and structural characteristics of benthic community. The distribution of A. islandica was the predominant factor in determining community structure. Seabed attributes considered most significant were defined for each type of substrate type. Relations of sonar signal and sediment type were used for landscape mapping based on sonar data. Community characteristics at known localities were reliably interpolated to the area of survey using statistical processing of geophysical data. A method of integrated sonar and sampling data interpretation for high-resolution mapping of A. islandica by biomass groups, benthic faunal groups and associated habitats was developed. PMID:24954748

  1. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Goldman, Robin I.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R.

    2013-01-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain. PMID:23220430

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced activation of Erk5 MAP-kinase is dependent on Mekk2, Mek1/2, PKC and PI3-kinase, and affects BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsioumpekou, Maria; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Burovic, Fatima; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) binds to its tyrosine kinase receptors (PDGFRs) and stimulates mitogenicity and survival of cells of mesenchymal origin. Activation of PDGFRs initiates a number of downstream signaling pathways, including phosphatidyl 3'-inositol kinase (PI3-kinase), phospholipase Cγ and MAP kinase pathways. In this report, we show that Erk5 MAP kinase is activated in response to PDGF-BB in the smooth muscle cell line MOVAS in a manner dependent on Mekk2, Mek1/2, Mek5, PI3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). The co-operation of Mek1/2 and Mekk2 in the activation of Erk5, suggests a close co-regulation between the Erk1/2 and Erk5 MAP kinase pathways. Furthermore, we found that classical PKCs are important for Erk5 activation. In addition, we found that PKCζ interacts with Erk5 and may exert a negative feed-back effect. We observed no nuclear accumulation of Erk5 in response to PDGF-BB stimulation, however, we identified a mechanism by which cytoplasmic Erk5 influences gene expression; Erk5 was essential for PDGF-BB-mediated Smad1/5/8 signaling by stimulating release and/or activation of bone morphogenetic protein(s) (BMPs). Thus, PDGF-BB-induced Erk5 activation involves parallel stimulatory and inhibitory pathways and promotes Smad1/5/8 signaling. PMID:27339033

  3. Statistical databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kogalovskii, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a review of problems related to statistical database systems, which are wide-spread in various fields of activity. Statistical databases (SDB) are referred to as databases that consist of data and are used for statistical analysis. Topics under consideration are: SDB peculiarities, properties of data models adequate for SDB requirements, metadata functions, null-value problems, SDB compromise protection problems, stored data compression techniques, and statistical data representation means. Also examined is whether the present Database Management Systems (DBMS) satisfy the SDB requirements. Some actual research directions in SDB systems are considered.

  4. Morbidity statistics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alwyn

    1969-01-01

    This paper is based on an analysis of questionnaires sent to the health ministries of Member States of WHO asking for information about the extent, nature, and scope of morbidity statistical information. It is clear that most countries collect some statistics of morbidity and many countries collect extensive data. However, few countries relate their collection to the needs of health administrators for information, and many countries collect statistics principally for publication in annual volumes which may appear anything up to 3 years after the year to which they refer. The desiderata of morbidity statistics may be summarized as reliability, representativeness, and relevance to current health problems. PMID:5306722

  5. Comparing and combining the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Devlin, Mark J.; Herbig, Thomas; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman

    2001-05-15

    We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE-DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signals at the 21{sigma} and 40{sigma} levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka and Q bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available on the web together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE-DMR, showing good agreement.

  6. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors focus on hypothesis testing--that peculiarly statistical way of deciding things. Statistical methods for testing hypotheses were developed in the 1920s and 1930s by some of the most famous statisticians, in particular Ronald Fisher, Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson, who laid the foundations of almost all modern methods of…

  7. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-04-11

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

  8. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities.

  9. S. aureus haemolysin A-induced IL-8 and IL-6 release from human airway epithelial cells is mediated by activation of p38- and Erk-MAP kinases and additional, cell type-specific signalling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Räth, Susann; Ziesemer, Sabine; Witte, Amelie; Konkel, Anne; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Petra; Völker, Uwe; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2013-07-01

    Soluble virulence-associated factors of Staphylococcus aureus like haemolysin A (Hla) induce secretion of chemo/cytokines from airway epithelial cells. To elucidate the potential roles of specific signalling pathways in this response, we treated 16HBE14o-, S9 or A549 cells with recombinant Hla (rHla). In a dose-dependent manner, rHla induced secretion of IL-8 in all three cell types, but IL-6 release only in 16HBE14o- and S9 cells. rHla-mediated secretion of IL-8 and IL-6 was suppressed by pre-incubation of cells with inhibitors of Erk type or p38 MAP kinases, indicating that activation of these signalling pathways is essential for IL-8 release in all three cell types and for IL-6 release in 16HBE14o- and S9 cells. The rHla-mediated phosphorylation and activation of p38 MAP kinase seem to depend on elevations in [Ca(2+)]i, an early response in rHla-treated cells. Inhibitors of calmodulin or calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II attenuated rHla-mediated release of IL-8 in 16HBE14o- and A549 cells and of IL-6 in 16HBE14o- cells. This indicates that rHla may mediate simultaneous activation of calmodulin-dependent processes as additional prerequisites for chemo/cytokine secretion.However, the inhibitors of calmodulin-dependent signalling did not affect rHla-induced p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation, indicating that this pathway works in parallel with p38 MAP kinase. PMID:23347173

  10. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae. PMID:27193947

  11. Statistics Clinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Foy, Millennia; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fiedler, James

    2014-01-01

    Do you have elevated p-values? Is the data analysis process getting you down? Do you experience anxiety when you need to respond to criticism of statistical methods in your manuscript? You may be suffering from Insufficient Statistical Support Syndrome (ISSS). For symptomatic relief of ISSS, come for a free consultation with JSC biostatisticians at our help desk during the poster sessions at the HRP Investigators Workshop. Get answers to common questions about sample size, missing data, multiple testing, when to trust the results of your analyses and more. Side effects may include sudden loss of statistics anxiety, improved interpretation of your data, and increased confidence in your results.

  12. SEER Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  13. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  14. Statistical properties of an iterated arithmetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, M.R.; Rouet, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We study the (3x = 1)/2 problem from a probabilistic viewpoint and show a forgetting mechanism for the last k binary digits of the seed after k iterations. The problem is subsequently generalized to a trifurcation process, the (lx + m)/3 problem. Finally the sequence of a set of seeds is empirically shown to be equivalent to a random walk of the variable log{sub 2}x (or log{sub 3} x) though computer simulations.

  15. Statistical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Claudine

    Statistical Physics bridges the properties of a macroscopic system and the microscopic behavior of its constituting particles, otherwise impossible due to the giant magnitude of Avogadro's number. Numerous systems of today's key technologies - such as semiconductors or lasers - are macroscopic quantum objects; only statistical physics allows for understanding their fundamentals. Therefore, this graduate text also focuses on particular applications such as the properties of electrons in solids with applications, and radiation thermodynamics and the greenhouse effect.

  16. A statistical model for the selection of ground observations of solar radiation: an application in producing a five-year dataset of radiation maps on Italian territory through correction of MSG-derived data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Lorenzo; Castelli, Fabio

    2011-11-01

    The incident solar radiation is one of the component of the land surface energy budget and constitutes an essential input for several applications. An accurate estimation of this variable on large areas requires a dense network of ground sensors and continuous knowledge of the cloud cover, that are rarely available. A valid alternative in this respect is constituted by the remote sensing. In this work a simple algorithm is used in order to integrate the LSA-SAF (Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility) products of shortwave incident radiation obtained from MSG-SEVIRI imagery with ground radiometers observations. A statistical approach is followed in order to define a criterion for accept or reject the ground sensors observations, by modelling the mean daily error between the observations and a theoretical radiation time series and the cloud cover observations with probability distribution functions. Such distributions is used for the ground sensors selection criterion. The analysis is used to produce a dataset of corrected solar radiation maps on the whole Italian territory for a period of 5 years (2005-2009).

  17. A statistical study of GPS loss of lock caused by ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugawa, T.; Nishioka, M.; Otsuka, Y.; Saito, A.; Kato, H.; Kubota, M.; Nagatsuma, T.; Murata, K. T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional total electron content (TEC) maps have been derived from ground-based GPS receiver networks and applied to studies of various ionospheric disturbances since mid-1990s. For the purpose of monitoring and researching ionospheric disturbances which can degrade GNSS navigations and cause loss-of-lock on GNSS signals, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Japan has developed TEC maps over Japan using the dense GPS network, GEONET, which consists of more than 1,200 GPS receivers and is operated by Geophysical Survey Institute, Japan. Currently, we are providing two-dimensional maps of absolute TEC, detrended TEC with 60, 30, 15-minute window, rate of TEC change index (ROTI), and loss-of-lock (LOL) on GPS signal over Japan. These data and quick-look maps since 1997 are archived and available in the website of NICT (http://wdc.nict.go.jp/IONO/). Recently developed GPS receiver networks in North America and Europe make it possible to obtain regional TEC maps with higher spatial and temporal resolution than the global weighted mean TEC maps in the IONEX format provided by several institutes such as International GNSS Service (IGS) and another global TEC map provided by MIT Haystack observatory. Recently, we have also developed the regional TEC maps over North America and Europe. These data and quick-look maps are also available in the NICT website. In this presentation, we will show some severe ionospheric events such as high latitude storm-time plasma bubbles and storm enhanced density events observed over Japan using the GPS-TEC database. These events cause loss-of-lock of GPS signals and large GPS positioning errors. We also discuss about the statistical characteristics of LOL on the GPS signal caused by ionospheric disturbances.

  18. Statistical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. W.

    This book is based on the thesis that some training in the area of statistical optics should be included as a standard part of any advanced optics curriculum. Random variables are discussed, taking into account definitions of probability and random variables, distribution functions and density functions, an extension to two or more random variables, statistical averages, transformations of random variables, sums of real random variables, Gaussian random variables, complex-valued random variables, and random phasor sums. Other subjects examined are related to random processes, some first-order properties of light waves, the coherence of optical waves, some problems involving high-order coherence, effects of partial coherence on imaging systems, imaging in the presence of randomly inhomogeneous media, and fundamental limits in photoelectric detection of light. Attention is given to deterministic versus statistical phenomena and models, the Fourier transform, and the fourth-order moment of the spectrum of a detected speckle image.

  19. Digital noise generators using one-dimensional chaotic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Ñonthe, J. A; Palacios-Luengas, L.; Cruz-Irisson, M.; Vazquez Medina, R.; Díaz Méndez, J. A.

    2014-05-15

    This work shows how to improve the statistical distribution of signals produced by digital noise generators designed with one-dimensional (1-D) chaotic maps. It also shows that in a digital electronic design the piecewise linear chaotic maps (PWLCM) should be considered because they do not have stability islands in its chaotic behavior region, as it occurs in the case of the logistic map, which is commonly used to build noise generators. The design and implementation problems of the digital noise generators are analyzed and a solution is proposed. This solution relates the output of PWLCM, usually defined in the real numbers' domain, with a codebook of S elements, previously defined. The proposed solution scheme produces digital noise signals with a statistical distribution close to a uniform distribution. Finally, this work shows that it is possible to have control over the statistical distribution of the noise signal by selecting the control parameter of the PWLCM and using, as a design criterion, the bifurcation diagram.

  20. Dietary influence on MAPK-signaling pathways and risk of colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Associations between genes in the DUSP, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK-signaling pathways and dietary factors associated with growth factors, inflammation, and oxidative stress and risk of colon and rectal cancer were evaluated. Data include colon cases (n=1555) and controls (n=1956) and rectal cases (n=754) and controls (n=959). Statistically significant interactions were observed for the MAPK-signaling pathways after adjustment for multiple comparisons. DUSP genes interacted with carbohydrates, mutagen index, calories, calcium, vitamin D, lycopene, dietary fats, folic acid, and selenium. MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK1 and RAF1 within the ERK1/2 MAPK-signaling pathway interacted with dietary fats and cruciferous vegetables. Within the JNK MAPK-signaling pathway, interactions between MAP3K7 and protein, vitamin C, iron, folic acid, carbohydrates, and cruciferous vegetables; MAP3K10 and folic acid; MAP3K9 and lutein/zeaxanthin; MAPK8 and calcium; MAP3K3 and calcium and lutein; MAP3K1 and cruciferous vegetables. Interaction within the p38-signaling pathway included: MAPK14 with calories, carbohydrates saturated fat, selenium, vitamin C; MAP3K2 and carbohydrates, and folic acid. These data suggest that dietary factors involved in inflammation and oxidative stress interact with MAPK-signaling genes to alter risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23859041

  1. Bodily maps of emotions

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  2. Digital Forensics Using Local Signal Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Xunyu

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid growth of the Internet and the popularity of digital imaging devices, digital imagery has become our major information source. Meanwhile, the development of digital manipulation techniques employed by most image editing software brings new challenges to the credibility of photographic images as the definite records of events. We…

  3. An Automated System of Knickpoint Definition and Extraction from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM): Implications for Efficient Large-Scale Mapping and Statistical Analyses of Knickpoint Distributions in Fluvial Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, A. B.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Knickpoints, or convexities in a stream's longitudinal profile, often delineate boundaries in stream networks that separate reaches eroding at different rates resulting from sharp temporal or spatial changes in uplift rate, contributing drainage area, precipitation, or bedrock lithology. We explicitly defined the geometry of a knickpoint in a manner that can be identified using an algorithm which operates in accordance with the stream power incision model, using a chi-plot analysis approach. This method allows for comparison between the real stream profile extracted from a DEM, and a linear best-fit line profile in chi-elevation space, representing a steady state theoretical stream functioning in accordance to uniform temporal and spatial conditions listed above. Assessing where the stream of interest is "under-steepened" and "over-steepened" with respect to a theoretical linear profile reveals knickpoints as certain points of slope inflection, extractable by our algorithm. We tested our algorithm on a 1m resolution LiDAR DEM of Santa Cruz Island (SCI), a tectonically active island 25km south of Santa Barbara, CA with an estimated uplift rate between 0.5 and 1.2mm/yr calculated from uplifted paleoshorelines. We have identified 1025 knickpoints using our algorithm and compared the position of these knickpoints to a similarly-sized dataset of knickpoints manually selected from distance-elevation longitudinal stream profiles for the same region. Our algorithm reduced mapping time by 99.3% and agreed with knickpoint positions from the manually selected knickpoint map for 85% of the 1025 knickpoints. Discrepancies can arise from inconsistencies in manual knickpoint selection that are not present in an automated computation. Additionally, the algorithm measures useful characteristics for each knickpoint allowing for quick statistical analyses. Histograms of knickpoint elevation and chi coordinate have a 3 peaked distribution, possibly expressing 3 levels of uplifted

  4. Statistics Revelations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicot, Katie; Holmes, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    The use, and misuse, of statistics is commonplace, yet in the printed format data representations can be either over simplified, supposedly for impact, or so complex as to lead to boredom, supposedly for completeness and accuracy. In this article the link to the video clip shows how dynamic visual representations can enliven and enhance the…

  5. Statistical Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catley, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Following the announcement last year that there will be no more math coursework assessment at General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), teachers will in the future be able to devote more time to preparing learners for formal examinations. One of the key things that the author has learned when teaching statistics is that it makes for far…

  6. Statistical characterization of real-world illumination.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ron O; Willsky, Alan S; Adelson, Edward H

    2004-09-28

    Although studies of vision and graphics often assume simple illumination models, real-world illumination is highly complex, with reflected light incident on a surface from almost every direction. One can capture the illumination from every direction at one point photographically using a spherical illumination map. This work illustrates, through analysis of photographically acquired, high dynamic range illumination maps, that real-world illumination possesses a high degree of statistical regularity. The marginal and joint wavelet coefficient distributions and harmonic spectra of illumination maps resemble those documented in the natural image statistics literature. However, illumination maps differ from typical photographs in that illumination maps are statistically nonstationary and may contain localized light sources that dominate their power spectra. Our work provides a foundation for statistical models of real-world illumination, thereby facilitating the understanding of human material perception, the design of robust computer vision systems, and the rendering of realistic computer graphics imagery. PMID:15493972

  7. The effects of cardamonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory protein production and MAP kinase and NFκB signalling pathways in monocytes/macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hatziieremia, S; Gray, A I; Ferro, V A; Paul, A; Plevin, R

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study we examined the effect of the natural product cardamonin, upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory gene expression in order to attempt to pinpoint the mechanism of action. Experimental approaches: Cardamonin was isolated from the Greek plant A. absinthium L. Its effects were assessed on LPS-induced nitrite release and iNOS and COX-2 protein expression in two macrophage cell lines. Western blotting was used to investigate its effects on phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases, ERK, JNK and p38 MAP kinase, and activation of the NFκB pathway, at the level of IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of NFκB. Also its effects on NFκB and GAS/GAF-DNA binding were assessed by EMSA. Key results: Cardamonin concentration-dependently inhibited both NO release and iNOS expression but had no effect on COX-2 expression. It did not affect phosphorylation of the MAP kinases, degradation of IκBα or phosphorylation of NFκB. However, it inhibited NFκB DNA-binding in both LPS-stimulated cells and nuclear extracts of the cells (in vitro). It also inhibited IFNγ-stimulated iNOS induction and GAS/GAF-DNA binding. Conclusions and Implications: These results show that the inhibitory effect of cardamonin on LPS-induced iNOS induction is not mediated via effects on the initial activation of the NFκB or MAP kinase pathways but is due to a direct effect on transcription factor binding to DNA. However, although some selectivity in cardamonin's action is implicated by its inability to affect COX-2 expression, its exact mechanism(s) of action has yet to be identified. PMID:16894344

  8. Statistical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Joseph W.

    2000-07-01

    The Wiley Classics Library consists of selected books that have become recognized classics in their respective fields. With these new unabridged and inexpensive editions, Wiley hopes to extend the life of these important works by making them available to future generations of mathematicians and scientists. Currently available in the Series: T. W. Anderson The Statistical Analysis of Time Series T. S. Arthanari & Yadolah Dodge Mathematical Programming in Statistics Emil Artin Geometric Algebra Norman T. J. Bailey The Elements of Stochastic Processes with Applications to the Natural Sciences Robert G. Bartle The Elements of Integration and Lebesgue Measure George E. P. Box & Norman R. Draper Evolutionary Operation: A Statistical Method for Process Improvement George E. P. Box & George C. Tiao Bayesian Inference in Statistical Analysis R. W. Carter Finite Groups of Lie Type: Conjugacy Classes and Complex Characters R. W. Carter Simple Groups of Lie Type William G. Cochran & Gertrude M. Cox Experimental Designs, Second Edition Richard Courant Differential and Integral Calculus, Volume I RIchard Courant Differential and Integral Calculus, Volume II Richard Courant & D. Hilbert Methods of Mathematical Physics, Volume I Richard Courant & D. Hilbert Methods of Mathematical Physics, Volume II D. R. Cox Planning of Experiments Harold S. M. Coxeter Introduction to Geometry, Second Edition Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Representation Theory of Finite Groups and Associative Algebras Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Methods of Representation Theory with Applications to Finite Groups and Orders, Volume I Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Methods of Representation Theory with Applications to Finite Groups and Orders, Volume II Cuthbert Daniel Fitting Equations to Data: Computer Analysis of Multifactor Data, Second Edition Bruno de Finetti Theory of Probability, Volume I Bruno de Finetti Theory of Probability, Volume 2 W. Edwards Deming Sample Design in Business Research

  9. The NO-cGMP-PKG Signaling Pathway Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Fear Memory Consolidation in the Lateral Amygdala via Activation of ERK/MAP Kinase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ota, Kristie T.; Pierre, Vicki J.; Ploski, Jonathan E.; Queen, Kaila; Schafe, Glenn E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a crucial role in memory consolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning and in synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA). In the present experiments, we examined the role of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), a downstream effector of NO, in fear memory consolidation and…

  10. Biochemical and pharmacological assessment of MAP-kinase signaling along pain pathways in experimental rodent models: a potential tool for the discovery of novel antinociceptive therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Brederson, Jill-Desiree; Jarvis, Michael F; Bitner, Robert S

    2014-02-01

    Injury to the peripheral or central nervous system can induce changes within the nervous tissues that promote a state of sensitization that may underlie conditions of pathological chronic pain. A key biochemical event in the initiation and maintenance of peripheral and central neuronal sensitization associated with chronic pain is the phosphorylation and subsequent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and immediate early gene transcription factors, in particular cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). In this commentary we review the preclinical data that describe anatomical and mechanistic aspects of nociceptive-induced signaling along nociceptive pathways including peripheral cutaneous axons, the dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord dorsal horn and cerebral cortex. In addition to the regional manifestation of nociceptive signaling, investigations have attempted to elucidate the cellular origin of biochemical nociceptive processing in which communication, i.e. cross-talk between neurons and glia is viewed as an essential component of pathogenic pain development. Here, we outline a research strategy by which nociceptive-induced cellular signaling in experimental pain models, specifically MAPK and CREB phosphorylation can be utilized to provide mechanistic insight into drug-target interaction along the nociceptive pathways. We describe a series of studies using nociceptive inflammatory and neuropathic pain models to investigate the effects of known pain therapeutics on nociceptive-induced biochemical signaling and present this as a complementary research strategy for assessing antinociceptive activity useful in the preclinical development of novel pain therapeutics. PMID:24300134

  11. Fermions from classical statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-12-15

    We describe fermions in terms of a classical statistical ensemble. The states {tau} of this ensemble are characterized by a sequence of values one or zero or a corresponding set of two-level observables. Every classical probability distribution can be associated to a quantum state for fermions. If the time evolution of the classical probabilities p{sub {tau}} amounts to a rotation of the wave function q{sub {tau}}(t)={+-}{radical}(p{sub {tau}}(t)), we infer the unitary time evolution of a quantum system of fermions according to a Schroedinger equation. We establish how such classical statistical ensembles can be mapped to Grassmann functional integrals. Quantum field theories for fermions arise for a suitable time evolution of classical probabilities for generalized Ising models.

  12. [Statistical materials].

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    Official population data for the USSR are presented for 1985 and 1986. Part 1 (pp. 65-72) contains data on capitals of union republics and cities with over one million inhabitants, including population estimates for 1986 and vital statistics for 1985. Part 2 (p. 72) presents population estimates by sex and union republic, 1986. Part 3 (pp. 73-6) presents data on population growth, including birth, death, and natural increase rates, 1984-1985; seasonal distribution of births and deaths; birth order; age-specific birth rates in urban and rural areas and by union republic; marriages; age at marriage; and divorces. PMID:12178831

  13. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs