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Sample records for silencing transcriptional bias

  1. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-08-19

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  2. Replication and transcription. Silence of the ORCs.

    PubMed

    Kelly, T J; Jallepalli, P V; Clyne, R K

    1994-03-01

    The origin recognition complex, a multi-protein complex known to bind to replication origins, has now been implicated in transcriptional silencing, providing another link between DNA replication and transcription. PMID:7857395

  3. Traffic into silence: endomembranes and post-transcriptional RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Ju; Maizel, Alexis; Chen, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are small RNAs that repress gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in plants and animals. Small RNAs guide Argonaute-containing RNA-induced silencing complexes to target RNAs in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in mRNA deadenylation followed by exonucleolytic decay, mRNA endonucleolytic cleavage, or translational inhibition. Although our knowledge of small RNA biogenesis, turnover, and mechanisms of action has dramatically expanded in the past decade, the subcellular location of small RNA-mediated RNA silencing still needs to be defined. In contrast to the prevalent presumption that RNA silencing occurs in the cytosol, emerging evidence reveals connections between the endomembrane system and small RNA activities in plants and animals. Here, we summarize the work that uncovered this link between small RNAs and endomembrane compartments and present an overview of the involvement of the endomembrane system in various aspects of RNA silencing. We propose that the endomembrane system is an integral component of RNA silencing that has been long overlooked and predict that a marriage between cell biology and RNA biology holds the key to a full understanding of post-transcriptional gene regulation by small RNAs. PMID:24668229

  4. Transcriptional Silencing by Hairpin RNAs Complementary to a Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yongjun; Kalantari, Roya; Dodd, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded RNAs can target gene promoters and inhibit transcription. To date, most research has focused on synthetic RNA duplexes. Transcriptional silencing by hairpin RNAs would facilitate a better understanding of endogenous RNA-mediated regulation of transcription within cells. Here we examine transcriptional silencing of progesterone receptor (PR) expression by hairpin RNAs. We identify the guide strand as the strand complementary to an antisense transcript at the PR promoter and that hairpin RNAs are active transcriptional silencing agents. The sequence of the hairpin loop affects activity, with the highest activity achieved when the loop has the potential for full complementarity to the antisense transcript target. Introduction of centrally mismatched bases relative to the target transcript does not prevent transcriptional silencing unless the mismatches are present on both the guide and passenger strands. These data demonstrate that hairpin RNAs can cause transcriptional silencing and offer insights into the mechanism of gene modulation by RNAs that target gene promoters. PMID:22703280

  5. Post-transcriptional gene silencing, transcriptional gene silencing and human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Catalina; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection is controlled through continuous, life-long use of a combination of drugs targeting different steps of the virus cycle, HIV-1 is never completely eradicated from the body. Despite decades of research there is still no effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection. Therefore, the possibility of an RNA interference (RNAi)-based cure has become an increasingly explored approach. Endogenous gene expression is controlled at both, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels by non-coding RNAs, which act through diverse molecular mechanisms including RNAi. RNAi has the potential to control the turning on/off of specific genes through transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), as well as fine-tuning their expression through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In this review we will describe in detail the canonical RNAi pathways for PTGS and TGS, the relationship of TGS with other silencing mechanisms and will discuss a variety of approaches developed to suppress HIV-1 via manipulation of RNAi. We will briefly compare RNAi strategies against other approaches developed to target the virus, highlighting their potential to overcome the major obstacle to finding a cure, which is the specific targeting of the HIV-1 reservoir within latently infected cells. PMID:26279984

  6. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. PMID:27157137

  7. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  8. Reconstitution of Heterochromatin-Dependent Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron; Li, Geng; Sikorski, Timothy W.; Buratowski, Stephen; Woodcock, Christopher L.; Moazed, Danesh

    2009-01-01

    Summary Heterochromatin assembly in budding yeast requires the SIR complex, which contains the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sir2 and the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins. Sir3 binds to nucleosomes containing deacetylated histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) and, with Sir4, promotes spreading of Sir2 and deacetylation along the chromatin fiber. Combined action of histone modifying and binding activities is a conserved hallmark of heterochromatin, but the relative contribution of each activity to silencing has remained unclear. Here we reconstitute SIR-chromatin complexes using purified components and show that the SIR complex efficiently deacetylates chromatin templates and promotes the assembly of altered structures that silence Gal4-VP16-activated transcription. Silencing requires all three Sir proteins, even with fully deacetylated chromatin, and involves the specific association of Sir3 with deacetylated H4K16. These results define a minimal set of components that mediate heterochromatic gene silencing and demonstrate distinct contributions for histone deacetylation and nucleosome binding in the silencing mechanism. PMID:19782027

  9. RNAi related mechanisms affect both transcriptional and posttranscriptional transgene silencing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal; Birchler, James A

    2002-02-01

    Two types of transgene silencing were found for the Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) transcription unit. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is Polycomb dependent and occurs when Adh is driven by the white eye color gene promoter. Full-length Adh transgenes are silenced posttranscriptionally at high copy number or by a pulsed increase over a threshold. The posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) exhibits molecular hallmarks typical of RNA interference (RNAi), including the production of 21--25 bp length sense and antisense RNAs homologous to the silenced RNA. Mutations in piwi, which belongs to a gene family with members required for RNAi, block PTGS and one aspect of TGS, indicating a connection between the two types of silencing. PMID:11864605

  10. Mutational bias of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus in the context of host anti-viral gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinmin; Pallett, Denise; Jiang, Hui; Hou, Yong; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Plant Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes exhibit a GC-preference during anti-viral post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), delivering an evolutionary selection pressure resulting in plant viruses with GC-poor genomes. However, some viruses, e.g. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV, genus Tymovirus) have GC-rich genomes, raising the question as to whether or not DCL derived selection pressure affects these viruses. In this study we analyzed the virus-derived small interfering RNAs from TYMV-infected leaves of Brassica juncea showed that the TYMV population accumulated a mutational bias with AU replacing GC (GC-AU), demonstrating PTGS pressure. Interestingly, at the highly polymorphic sites the GC-AU bias was no longer observed. This suggests the presence of an unknown mechanism preventing mutational drift of the viral population and maintaining viral genome stability, despite the host PTGS pressure. PMID:26379088

  11. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:27471304

  12. Analysis of trans-silencing interactions using transcriptional silencers of varying strength and targets with and without flanking nuclear matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Robert; Ulker, Bekir; Todd, Joselyn J; Sowinski, Dolores A; Schimeneck, Carolyn R; Allen, George C; Weissinger, Arthur K; Thompson, William F

    2003-06-01

    We investigated the effect of the Rb7 matrix attachment region (MAR) on trans-silencing in tobacco plants, comparing the effects of three transgene silencer loci on ten target loci. Two of the silencer loci, C40 and C190, contain complex and rearranged transgene arrays consisting of 35S:GUS or NOS:NPTII containing plasmids. The third silencer locus, V271, was previously characterized as a complex locus containing rearranged 35S:RiN sequences. Each of these silencers can reduce 35S promoter-driven expression at other loci, albeit with varying efficiencies. The presence of MARs at a target locus does not prevent trans-silencing by the V271 silencer. However, four of seven MAR-containing loci were at least partially resistant to silencing by the C40 and C190 loci. One MAR locus was unaffected by C40, our weakest silencer, and three were silenced only when the silencer locus was maternally inherited. Silencing is progressive in the F1 and F2 generations; two days after germination there is little or no difference between seedlings derived from crosses to silencing or control lines, but seedlings containing silencer loci slowly lose expression during subsequent development. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that a product of the silencer locus must accumulate before unlinked loci can be affected. However, our silencer loci are themselves silenced for GUS transcription, and coding region homology is not required for their effects on target loci. Our results are consistent with a model in which transcriptional silencing is triggered by transcription of sequences during the early stages of embryo or seedling development. PMID:12779119

  13. Trans-Reactivation: A New Epigenetic Phenomenon Underlying Transcriptional Reactivation of Silenced Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Antonia M. R.; Pavesi, Giulio; Corona, Davide F. V.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the role played by cellular RNA pools produced by homologous genomic loci in defining the transcriptional state of a silenced gene, we tested the effect of non-functional alleles of the white gene in the presence of a functional copy of white, silenced by heterochromatin. We found that non-functional alleles of white, unable to produce a coding transcript, could reactivate in trans the expression of a wild type copy of the same gene silenced by heterochromatin. This new epigenetic phenomenon of transcriptional trans-reactivation is heritable, relies on the presence of homologous RNA’s and is affected by mutations in genes involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our data suggest a general new unexpected level of gene expression control mediated by homologous RNA molecules in the context of heterochromatic genes. PMID:26292210

  14. Trans-Reactivation: A New Epigenetic Phenomenon Underlying Transcriptional Reactivation of Silenced Genes.

    PubMed

    Onorati, Maria Cristina; Arancio, Walter; Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Antonia M R; Pavesi, Giulio; Corona, Davide F V

    2015-08-01

    In order to study the role played by cellular RNA pools produced by homologous genomic loci in defining the transcriptional state of a silenced gene, we tested the effect of non-functional alleles of the white gene in the presence of a functional copy of white, silenced by heterochromatin. We found that non-functional alleles of white, unable to produce a coding transcript, could reactivate in trans the expression of a wild type copy of the same gene silenced by heterochromatin. This new epigenetic phenomenon of transcriptional trans-reactivation is heritable, relies on the presence of homologous RNA's and is affected by mutations in genes involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our data suggest a general new unexpected level of gene expression control mediated by homologous RNA molecules in the context of heterochromatic genes. PMID:26292210

  15. Sequence homology requirements for transcriptional silencing of 35S transgenes and post-transcriptional silencing of nitrite reductase (trans)genes by the tobacco 271 locus.

    PubMed

    Thierry, D; Vaucheret, H

    1996-12-01

    The transgene locus of the tobacco plant 271 (271 locus) is located on a telomere and consists of multiple copies of a plasmid carrying an NptII marker gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 19S promoter and the leaf-specific nitrite reductase Nii1 cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Previous analysis of gene expression in leaves has shown that this locus triggers both post-transcriptional silencing of the host leaf-specific Nii genes and transcriptional silencing of transgenes driven by the 19S or 35S promoter irrespective of their coding sequence and of their location in the genome. In this paper we show that silencing of transgenes carrying Nii1 sequences occurs irrespective of the promoter driving their expression and of their location within the genome. This phenomenon occurs in roots as well as in leaves although root Nii genes share only 84% identity with leaf-specific Nii1 sequences carried by the 271 locus. Conversely, transgenes carrying the bean Nii gene (which shares 76% identity with the tobacco Nii1 gene) escape silencing by the 271 locus. We also show that transgenes driven by the figwort mosaic virus 34S promoter (which shares 63% identity with the 35S promoter) also escape silencing by the 271 locus. Taken together, these results indicate that a high degree of sequence similarity is required between the sequences of the silencing locus and of the target (trans)genes for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing. PMID:9002606

  16. Cohesin and Polycomb Proteins Functionally Interact to Control Transcription at Silenced and Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Cheri A.; Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Koenig, Amanda; Gohara, David W.; Watson, Audrey; Dorsett, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Cohesin is crucial for proper chromosome segregation but also regulates gene transcription and organism development by poorly understood mechanisms. Using genome-wide assays in Drosophila developing wings and cultured cells, we find that cohesin functionally interacts with Polycomb group (PcG) silencing proteins at both silenced and active genes. Cohesin unexpectedly facilitates binding of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) to many active genes, but their binding is mutually antagonistic at silenced genes. PRC1 depletion decreases phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and mRNA at many active genes but increases them at silenced genes. Depletion of cohesin reduces long-range interactions between Polycomb Response Elements in the invected-engrailed gene complex where it represses transcription. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized role for PRC1 in facilitating productive gene transcription and provide new insights into how cohesin and PRC1 control development. PMID:23818863

  17. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  18. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  19. Transcriptional silencing of geminiviral promoter-driven transgenes following homologous virus infection.

    PubMed

    Seemanpillai, Mark; Dry, Ian; Randles, John; Rezaian, Ali

    2003-05-01

    Promoters isolated from the Tomato leaf curl virus (TLCV) drive both constitutive and tissue-specific expression in transgenic tobacco. Following systemic TLCV infection of plants stably expressing TLCV promoter:GUS transgenes, transgene expression driven by all six TLCV promoters was silenced. Silencing in the TLCV coat protein promoter:GUS plants (V2:GUSdeltaC) was characterized in more detail. Transgene silencing observed in leaf, stem, and pre-anthesis floral tissue occurred with the continued replication of TLCV in host tissues. Infection of the V2:GUSdeltaC plants with heterologous geminiviruses did not result in transgene silencing, indicating that silencing was specifically associated with TLCV infection. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that silencing was due to the abolition of transcription from the V2:GUSdeltaC transgene. Bisulfite sequencing showed that silencing was associated with cytosine hypermethylation of the TLCV-derived promoter sequences of the V2:GUSdeltaC transgene. Progeny derived from V2:GUSdeltaC plants silenced by TLCV infection were analyzed. Transgene expression was silenced in progeny seedlings but was partially reactivated in the majority of plants by 75 days postgermination. Progeny seedlings treated with the nonmethylatable cytosine analog 5-azacytidine or the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate exhibited partial reactivation of expression. This is the first report of the hypermethylation of a virus-derived transgene associated with a DNA virus infection. PMID:12744514

  20. H19ICR mediated transcriptional silencing does not require target promoter methylation.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Claudia; Rong, Qi; Jeong, Sangkyun; Iben, James; Pfeifer, Karl

    2016-07-29

    Transcription of the reciprocally imprinted genes Insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) and H19 is orchestrated by the 2.4-kb H19 Imprinting Control Region (H19ICR) located upstream of H19. Three known functions are associated with the H19ICR: (1) it is a germline differentially methylated region, (2) it is a transcriptional insulator, and (3) it is a transcriptional silencer. The molecular mechanisms of the DMR and insulator functions have been well characterized but the basis for the ICR's silencer function is less well understood. In order to study the role the H19ICR intrinsically plays in gene silencing, we transferred the 2.4-kb H19ICR to a heterologous non-imprinted location on chromosome 5, upstream of the alpha fetoprotein (Afp) promoter. Independent of its orientation, the 2.4-kb H19ICR silences transcription from the paternal Afp promoter. Thus silencing is a function intrinsic to this DNA element. Further, ICR mediated silencing is a developmental process that, unexpectedly, does not occur through DNA methylation at the target promoter. PMID:27178213

  1. Transcriptional silencing of long noncoding RNA GNG12-AS1 uncouples its transcriptional and product-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Stojic, Lovorka; Niemczyk, Malwina; Orjalo, Arturo; Ito, Yoko; Ruijter, Anna Elisabeth Maria; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Joseph, Nimesh; Weston, Stephen; Menon, Suraj; Odom, Duncan T.; Rinn, John; Gergely, Fanni; Murrell, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression via their RNA product or through transcriptional interference, yet a strategy to differentiate these two processes is lacking. To address this, we used multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to silence GNG12-AS1, a nuclear lncRNA transcribed in an antisense orientation to the tumour-suppressor DIRAS3. Here we show that while most siRNAs silence GNG12-AS1 post-transcriptionally, siRNA complementary to exon 1 of GNG12-AS1 suppresses its transcription by recruiting Argonaute 2 and inhibiting RNA polymerase II binding. Transcriptional, but not post-transcriptional, silencing of GNG12-AS1 causes concomitant upregulation of DIRAS3, indicating a function in transcriptional interference. This change in DIRAS3 expression is sufficient to impair cell cycle progression. In addition, the reduction in GNG12-AS1 transcripts alters MET signalling and cell migration, but these are independent of DIRAS3. Thus, differential siRNA targeting of a lncRNA allows dissection of the functions related to the process and products of its transcription. PMID:26832224

  2. The Xist lncRNA interacts directly with SHARP to silence transcription through HDAC3.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Colleen A; Chen, Chun-Kan; Chow, Amy; Surka, Christine F; Tran, Christina; McDonel, Patrick; Pandya-Jones, Amy; Blanco, Mario; Burghard, Christina; Moradian, Annie; Sweredoski, Michael J; Shishkin, Alexander A; Su, Julia; Lander, Eric S; Hess, Sonja; Plath, Kathrin; Guttman, Mitchell

    2015-05-14

    Many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) affect gene expression, but the mechanisms by which they act are still largely unknown. One of the best-studied lncRNAs is Xist, which is required for transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome during development in female mammals. Despite extensive efforts to define the mechanism of Xist-mediated transcriptional silencing, we still do not know any proteins required for this role. The main challenge is that there are currently no methods to comprehensively define the proteins that directly interact with a lncRNA in the cell. Here we develop a method to purify a lncRNA from cells and identify proteins interacting with it directly using quantitative mass spectrometry. We identify ten proteins that specifically associate with Xist, three of these proteins--SHARP, SAF-A and LBR--are required for Xist-mediated transcriptional silencing. We show that SHARP, which interacts with the SMRT co-repressor that activates HDAC3, is not only essential for silencing, but is also required for the exclusion of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) from the inactive X. Both SMRT and HDAC3 are also required for silencing and Pol II exclusion. In addition to silencing transcription, SHARP and HDAC3 are required for Xist-mediated recruitment of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) across the X chromosome. Our results suggest that Xist silences transcription by directly interacting with SHARP, recruiting SMRT, activating HDAC3, and deacetylating histones to exclude Pol II across the X chromosome. PMID:25915022

  3. The Xist lncRNA directly interacts with SHARP to silence transcription through HDAC3

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Colleen A.; Chen, Chun-Kan; Chow, Amy; Surka, Christine F.; Tran, Christina; McDonel, Patrick; Pandya-Jones, Amy; Blanco, Mario; Burghard, Christina; Moradian, Annie; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Shishkin, Alexander A.; Su, Julia; Lander, Eric S.; Hess, Sonja; Plath, Kathrin; Guttman, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) affect gene expression1, but the mechanisms by which they act are still largely unknown2. One of the best-studied lncRNAs is Xist, which is required for transcriptional silencing of one X-chromosome during development in female mammals3,4. Despite extensive efforts to define the mechanism of Xist-mediated transcriptional silencing, we still do not know any proteins required for this role3. The main challenge is that there are currently no methods to comprehensively define the proteins that directly interact with a lncRNA in the cell5. Here we develop a method to purify a lncRNA and identify its direct interacting proteins using quantitative mass spectrometry. We identify 10 proteins that specifically associate with Xist, three of these proteins – SHARP, SAF-A, and LBR – are required for Xist-mediated transcriptional silencing. We show that SHARP, which interacts with the SMRT co-repressor6 that activates HDAC37, is not only essential for silencing, but is also required for the exclusion of RNA Polymerase II (PolII) from the inactive X. Both SMRT and HDAC3 are also required for silencing and PolII exclusion. In addition to silencing transcription, SHARP and HDAC3 are required for Xist-mediated recruitment of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) across the X-chromosome. Our results suggest that Xist silences transcription by directly interacting with SHARP, recruiting SMRT, activating HDAC3, and deacetylating histones to exclude PolII across the X-chromosome. PMID:25915022

  4. Restriction of Retrotransposon Mobilization in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Transcriptional Silencing and Higher-Order Chromatin Organization

    PubMed Central

    Murton, Heather E.; Grady, Patrick J. R.; Chan, Tsun Ho; Cam, Hugh P.; Whitehall, Simon K.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled propagation of retrotransposons is potentially detrimental to host genome integrity. Therefore, cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms to restrict the mobility of these elements. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the Tf2 LTR retrotransposons are transcriptionally silenced and are also clustered in the nucleus into structures termed Tf bodies. Here we describe the impact of silencing and clustering on the mobility of an endogenous Tf2 element. Deletion of genes such as set1+ (histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase) or abp1+ (CENP-B homolog) that both alleviate silencing and clustering, result in a corresponding increase in mobilization. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active Sre1, a transcriptional activator of Tf2 elements, also alleviates clustering and induces mobilization. In contrast, clustering is not disrupted by loss of the HIRA histone chaperone, despite high levels of expression, and in this background, mobilization frequency is only marginally increased. Thus, mutations that compromise transcriptional silencing but not Tf bodies are insufficient to drive mobilization. Furthermore, analyses of mutant alleles that separate the transcriptional repression and clustering functions of Set1 are consistent with control of Tf2 propagation via a combination of silencing and spatial organization. Our results indicate that host surveillance mechanisms operate at multiple levels to restrict Tf2 retrotransposon mobilization. PMID:27343236

  5. Restriction of Retrotransposon Mobilization in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Transcriptional Silencing and Higher-Order Chromatin Organization.

    PubMed

    Murton, Heather E; Grady, Patrick J R; Chan, Tsun Ho; Cam, Hugh P; Whitehall, Simon K

    2016-08-01

    Uncontrolled propagation of retrotransposons is potentially detrimental to host genome integrity. Therefore, cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms to restrict the mobility of these elements. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the Tf2 LTR retrotransposons are transcriptionally silenced and are also clustered in the nucleus into structures termed Tf bodies. Here we describe the impact of silencing and clustering on the mobility of an endogenous Tf2 element. Deletion of genes such as set1(+) (histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase) or abp1(+) (CENP-B homolog) that both alleviate silencing and clustering, result in a corresponding increase in mobilization. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active Sre1, a transcriptional activator of Tf2 elements, also alleviates clustering and induces mobilization. In contrast, clustering is not disrupted by loss of the HIRA histone chaperone, despite high levels of expression, and in this background, mobilization frequency is only marginally increased. Thus, mutations that compromise transcriptional silencing but not Tf bodies are insufficient to drive mobilization. Furthermore, analyses of mutant alleles that separate the transcriptional repression and clustering functions of Set1 are consistent with control of Tf2 propagation via a combination of silencing and spatial organization. Our results indicate that host surveillance mechanisms operate at multiple levels to restrict Tf2 retrotransposon mobilization. PMID:27343236

  6. Sumoylation of Sir2 differentially regulates transcriptional silencing in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Abdul; Abraham, Neethu Maria; Goyal, Siddharth; Jamir, Imlitoshi; Priyakumar, U. Deva; Mishra, Krishnaveni

    2015-01-01

    Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), the founding member of the conserved sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, regulates several physiological processes including genome stability, gene silencing, metabolism and life span in yeast. Within the nucleus, Sir2 is associated with telomere clusters in the nuclear periphery and rDNA in the nucleolus and regulates gene silencing at these genomic sites. How distribution of Sir2 between telomere and rDNA is regulated is not known. Here we show that Sir2 is sumoylated and this modification modulates the intra-nuclear distribution of Sir2. We identify Siz2 as the key SUMO ligase and show that multiple lysines in Sir2 are subject to this sumoylation activity. Mutating K215 alone counteracts the inhibitory effect of Siz2 on telomeric silencing. SUMO modification of Sir2 impairs interaction with Sir4 but not Net1 and, furthermore, SUMO modified Sir2 shows predominant nucleolar localization. Our findings demonstrate that sumoylation of Sir2 modulates distribution between telomeres and rDNA and this is likely to have implications for Sir2 function in other loci as well. PMID:26319015

  7. Cohesin and Polycomb: Cooperative Checks and Balances in Gene Silencing and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale; Kassis, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex was discovered for its roles in sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, and the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins for their roles in epigenetic gene silencing during development. Cohesin also controls gene transcription via multiple mechanisms. Genetic and molecular evidence from Drosophila argue that cohesin and the PRC1 PcG complex interact to control transcription of many active genes that are critical for development, and that via these interactions cohesin also controls the availability of PRC1 for gene silencing. PMID:24892918

  8. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Good, Paul D.; Miller, Erin L.; McLeod, Ian X.; Yates, John R.; Hopper, Anita K.; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification. PMID:23898186

  9. Epigenetic transcriptional silencing and 5-azacytidine-mediated reactivation of a complex transgene in rice.

    PubMed Central

    Kumpatla, S P; Teng, W; Buchholz, W G; Hall, T C

    1997-01-01

    Despite a growing number of reports indicating non-Mendelian inheritance of transgene expression in monocots, no detailed description of the structure and stability of the transgene exists for transformants generated by direct DNA-transfer techniques, making the cause for these observations difficult to determine. In this paper we describe the complex organization of Btt cryIIIA and bar transgenes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) that displayed aberrant segregation in R1 progeny. Silencing rather than rearrangement of the bar gene was implicated because the herbicide-sensitive R1 plants had a DNA hybridization profile identical to that of the resistant R0 parent and R1 siblings. Genomic DNA analysis revealed substantial methylation of the Ubi1/bar sequences in silenced plants and, to a lesser degree, in herbicide-resistant plants, suggesting that the transgene locus was potentiated for silencing. Nuclease protection and nuclear run-on assays confirmed that silencing was due to transcriptional inactivation. Treatment of R2 progeny of silenced plants with 5-azacytidine resulted in demethylation of the Ubi1 promoter and reactivation of bar gene expression, demonstrating a functional relationship for methylation in gene silencing. These findings indicate that methylation-based silencing may be frequent in cereals transformed by direct DNA protocols that insert multiple, often rearranged sequences. PMID:9342860

  10. Epigenetic Inheritance of Transcriptional Silencing and Switching Competence in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Friis, T.

    1997-01-01

    Epigenetic events allow the inheritance of phenotypic changes that are not caused by an alteration in DNA sequence. Here we characterize an epigenetic phenomenon occuring in the mating-type region of fission yeast. Cells of fission yeast switch between the P and M mating-type by interconverting their expressed mating-type cassette between two allelic forms, mat1-P and mat1-M. The switch results from gene conversions of mat1 by two silent cassettes, mat2-P and mat3-M, which are linked to each other and to mat1. GREWAL and KLAR observed that the ability to both switch mat1 and repress transcription near mat2-P and mat3-M was maintained epigenetically in a strain with an 8-kb deletion between mat2 and mat3. Using a strain very similar to theirs, we determined that interconversions between the switching-and silencing-proficient state and the switching and silencing-deficient state occurred less frequently than once per 1000 cell divisions. Although transcriptional silencing was alleviated by the 8-kb deletion, it was not abolished. We performed a mutant search and obtained a class of trans-acting mutations that displayed a strong cumulative effect with the 8-kb deletion. These mutations allow to assess the extent to which silencing is affected by the deletion and provide new insights on the redundancy of the silencing mechanism. PMID:9055078

  11. A role for DNA polymerase alpha in epigenetic control of transcriptional silencing in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakayama Ji; Allshire, R C; Klar, A J; Grewal, S I

    2001-06-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, transcriptional silencing at the mating-type region, centromeres and telomeres is epigenetically controlled, and results from the assembly of higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin proteins associated with these silenced loci are believed to serve as molecular bookmarks that help promote inheritance of the silenced state during cell division. Specifically, a chromodomain protein Swi6 is believed to be an important determinant of the epigenetic imprint. Here, we show that a mutation in DNA polymerase alpha (pol(alpha)) affects Swi6 localization at the mating-type region and causes a 45-fold increase in spontaneous transition from the silenced epigenetic state to the expressed state. We also demonstrate that pol(alpha) mutant cells are defective in Swi6 localization at centromeres and telomeres. Genetic analysis suggests that Polalpha and Swi6 are part of the same silencing pathway. Interestingly, we found that Swi6 directly binds to Pol(alpha) in vitro. Moreover, silencing-defective mutant Pol(alpha) displays reduced binding to Swi6 protein. This work indicates involvement of a DNA replication protein, Pol(alpha), in heterochromatin assembly and inheritance of epigenetic chromatin structures. PMID:11387218

  12. piRNA-guided slicing of transposon transcripts enforces their transcriptional silencing via specifying the nuclear piRNA repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Senti, Kirsten-André; Jurczak, Daniel; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-01-01

    PIWI clade Argonaute proteins silence transposon expression in animal gonads. Their target specificity is defined by bound ∼23- to 30-nucleotide (nt) PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that are processed from single-stranded precursor transcripts via two distinct pathways. Primary piRNAs are defined by the endonuclease Zucchini, while biogenesis of secondary piRNAs depends on piRNA-guided transcript cleavage and results in piRNA amplification. Here, we analyze the interdependencies between these piRNA biogenesis pathways in developing Drosophila ovaries. We show that secondary piRNA-guided target slicing is the predominant mechanism that specifies transcripts—including those from piRNA clusters—as primary piRNA precursors and defines the spectrum of Piwi-bound piRNAs in germline cells. Post-transcriptional silencing in the cytoplasm therefore enforces nuclear transcriptional target silencing, which ensures the tight suppression of transposons during oogenesis. As target slicing also defines the nuclear piRNA pool during mouse spermatogenesis, our findings uncover an unexpected conceptual similarity between the mouse and fly piRNA pathways. PMID:26302790

  13. piRNA-guided slicing of transposon transcripts enforces their transcriptional silencing via specifying the nuclear piRNA repertoire.

    PubMed

    Senti, Kirsten-André; Jurczak, Daniel; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-08-15

    PIWI clade Argonaute proteins silence transposon expression in animal gonads. Their target specificity is defined by bound ∼23- to 30-nucleotide (nt) PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that are processed from single-stranded precursor transcripts via two distinct pathways. Primary piRNAs are defined by the endonuclease Zucchini, while biogenesis of secondary piRNAs depends on piRNA-guided transcript cleavage and results in piRNA amplification. Here, we analyze the interdependencies between these piRNA biogenesis pathways in developing Drosophila ovaries. We show that secondary piRNA-guided target slicing is the predominant mechanism that specifies transcripts—including those from piRNA clusters—as primary piRNA precursors and defines the spectrum of Piwi-bound piRNAs in germline cells. Post-transcriptional silencing in the cytoplasm therefore enforces nuclear transcriptional target silencing, which ensures the tight suppression of transposons during oogenesis. As target slicing also defines the nuclear piRNA pool during mouse spermatogenesis, our findings uncover an unexpected conceptual similarity between the mouse and fly piRNA pathways. PMID:26302790

  14. Transcriptional gene silencing by Arabidopsis microrchidia homologues involves the formation of heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Moissiard, Guillaume; Bischof, Sylvain; Husmann, Dylan; Pastor, William A.; Hale, Christopher J.; Yen, Linda; Stroud, Hume; Papikian, Ashot; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing is of central importance to maintain genome integrity and is mediated by an elaborate interplay between DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications, and chromatin remodeling complexes. DNA methylation and repressive histone marks usually correlate with transcriptionally silent heterochromatin, however there are exceptions to this relationship. In Arabidopsis, mutation of Morpheus Molecule 1 (MOM1) causes transcriptional derepression of heterochromatin independently of changes in DNA methylation. More recently, two Arabidopsis homologues of mouse microrchidia (MORC) genes have also been implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin condensation without altering genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. In this study, we show that Arabidopsis microrchidia (AtMORC6) physically interacts with AtMORC1 and with its close homologue, AtMORC2, in two mutually exclusive protein complexes. RNA-sequencing analyses of high-order mutants indicate that AtMORC1 and AtMORC2 act redundantly to repress a common set of loci. We also examined genetic interactions between AtMORC6 and MOM1 pathways. Although AtMORC6 and MOM1 control the silencing of a very similar set of genomic loci, we observed synergistic transcriptional regulation in the mom1/atmorc6 double mutant, suggesting that these epigenetic regulators act mainly by different silencing mechanisms. PMID:24799676

  15. Small-RNA loading licenses Argonaute for assembly into a transcriptional silencing complex

    PubMed Central

    Holoch, Daniel; Moazed, Danesh

    2015-01-01

    Argonautes and their small-RNA cofactors form the core effectors of ancient and diverse gene-silencing mechanisms whose roles include regulation of gene expression and defense against foreign genetic elements. Although Argonautes generally act within multisubunit complexes, what governs their assembly into these machineries is not well defined. Here, we show that loading of small RNAs onto Argonaute is a checkpoint for Argonaute’s association with conserved GW-protein components of silencing complexes. We demonstrate that the Argonaute small interfering RNA chaperone (ARC) complex mediates loading of small RNAs onto Ago1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and that deletion of its subunits, or mutations in Ago1 that prevent small-RNA loading, abolish the assembly of the GW protein–containing RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex. Our studies uncover a mechanism that ensures that Argonaute loading precedes RITS assembly and thereby averts the formation of inert and potentially deleterious complexes. PMID:25730778

  16. Attenuation of Histone Methyltransferase KRYPTONITE-mediated transcriptional gene silencing by Geminivirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-Wei; Tee, Chuan-Sia; Ma, Yong-Huan; Wang, Gang; Yao, Xiang-Mei; Ye, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Although histone H3K9 methylation has been intensively studied in animals and a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, little is known about the evolution of the histone methyltransferase and its roles in plant biotic stress response. Here we identified a Nicotiana benthamiana homolog of H3K9 histone methyltransferase KRYPTONITE (NbKYP) and demonstrated its fundamental roles on methylation of plant and virus, beside of leading to the suppression of endogenous gene expression and virus replication. NbKYP and another gene encoding DNA methyltransferase CHROMOMETHYLTRANSFERASE 3 (NbCMT3-1) were further identified as the key components of maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing, a DNA methylation involved anti-virus machinery. All three types of DNA methylations (asymmetric CHH and symmetric CHG/CG) were severely affected in NbKYP-silenced plants, but only severe reduction of CHG methylation found in NbCMT3-1-silenced plants. Attesting to the importance of plant histone H3K9 methylation immunity to virus, the virulence of geminiviruses requires virus-encoded trans-activator AC2 which inhibits the expression of KYP via activation of an EAR-motif-containing transcription repressor RAV2 (RELATED TO ABI3 and VP1). The reduction of KYP was correlated with virulence of various similar geminiviruses. These findings provide a novel mechanism of how virus trans-activates a plant endogenous anti-silencing machinery to gain high virulence. PMID:26602265

  17. The Arabidopsis acetylated histone-binding protein BRAT1 forms a complex with BRP1 and prevents transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Hou, Xiao-Mei; Tan, Lian-Mei; Shao, Chang-Rong; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements and other repetitive DNA sequences are usually subject to DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, anti-silencing mechanisms that promote transcription in these regions are not well understood. Here, we describe an anti-silencing factor, Bromodomain and ATPase domain-containing protein 1 (BRAT1), which we identified by a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana. BRAT1 interacts with an ATPase domain-containing protein, BRP1 (BRAT1 Partner 1), and both prevent transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. Although BRAT1 mediates DNA demethylation at a small set of loci targeted by the 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase ROS1, the involvement of BRAT1 in anti-silencing is largely independent of DNA demethylation. We also demonstrate that the bromodomain of BRAT1 binds to acetylated histone, which may facilitate the prevention of transcriptional silencing. Thus, BRAT1 represents a potential link between histone acetylation and transcriptional anti-silencing at methylated genomic regions, which may be conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:27273316

  18. Transcription of the mitochondrial citrate carrier gene: Identification of a silencer and its binding protein ZNF224

    SciTech Connect

    Iacobazzi, Vito; Infantino, Vittoria; Convertini, Paolo; Vozza, Angelo; Agrimi, Gennaro; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2009-08-14

    In the last few years, we have been functionally characterizing the promoter of the human mitochondrial citrate carrier (CIC). In this study we show that CIC silencer activity extends over 26 bp (-595/-569), which specifically bind a protein present in HepG2 cell nuclear extracts. This transcription factor was purified by DNA affinity and identified as ZNF224. Overexpression of ZNF224 decreases LUC transgene activity in cells transfected with a construct containing the CIC silencer region, whereas ZNF224 silencing activates reporter transcription in cells transfected with the same construct. Moreover, overexpression and silencing of ZNF224 diminishes and enhances, respectively, CIC transcript and protein levels. Finally, ZNF224 is abundantly expressed in fetal tissues contrary to CIC. It is suggested that CIC transcriptional repression by ZNF224 explains, at least in part, the low expression of CIC in fetal tissues in which fatty acid synthesis is low.

  19. Genetic Changes to a Transcriptional Silencer Element Confers Phenotypic Diversity within and between Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    Watada, Masayoshi; Pruitt, Jonathan N.; Williams, Thomas M.; Rebeiz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The modification of transcriptional regulation has become increasingly appreciated as a major contributor to morphological evolution. However, the role of negative-acting control elements (e.g. silencers) in generating morphological diversity has been generally overlooked relative to positive-acting “enhancer” elements. The highly variable body coloration patterns among Drosophilid insects represents a powerful model system in which the molecular alterations that underlie phenotypic diversity can be defined. In a survey of pigment phenotypes among geographically disparate Japanese populations of Drosophila auraria, we discovered a remarkable degree of variation in male-specific abdominal coloration. In testing the expression patterns of the major pigment-producing enzymes, we found that phenotypes uniquely correlated with differences in the expression of ebony, a gene required for yellow-colored cuticle. Assays of ebony’s transcriptional control region indicated that a lightly pigmented strain harbored cis-regulatory mutations that caused correlated changes in its expression. Through a series of chimeric reporter constructs between light and dark strain alleles, we localized function-altering mutations to a conserved silencer that mediates a male-specific pattern of ebony repression. This suggests that the light allele was derived through the loss of this silencer’s activity. Furthermore, examination of the ebony gene of D. serrata, a close relative of D. auraria which secondarily lost male-specific pigmentation revealed the parallel loss of this silencer element. These results demonstrate how loss-of-function mutations in a silencer element resulted in increased gene expression. We propose that the mutational inactivation of silencer elements may represent a favored path to evolve gene expression, impacting morphological traits. PMID:26115430

  20. Functional modulation of the geminivirus AL2 transcription factor and silencing suppressor by self-interaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Baliji, Surendranath; Buchmann, R Cody; Wang, Hui; Lindbo, John A; Sunter, Garry; Bisaro, David M

    2007-11-01

    The DNA genomes of geminiviruses have a limited coding capacity that is compensated for by the production of small multifunctional proteins. The AL2 protein encoded by members of the genus Begomovirus (e.g., Tomato golden mosaic virus) is a transcriptional activator, a silencing suppressor, and a suppressor of a basal defense. The related L2 protein of Beet curly top virus (genus Curtovirus) shares the pathogenicity functions of AL2 but lacks transcriptional activation activity. It is known that AL2 and L2 can suppress local silencing by interacting with adenosine kinase (ADK) and can suppress basal defense by interacting with SNF1 kinase. However, how the activities of these viral proteins are regulated remains an unanswered question. Here, we provide some answers by demonstrating that AL2, but not L2, interacts with itself. The zinc finger-like motif (CCHC) is required but is not sufficient for AL2 self-interaction. Alanine substitutions for the invariant cysteine residues that comprise the motif abolish self-interaction or cause aberrant subnuclear localization but do not abolish interaction with ADK and SNF1. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we show that AL2:AL2 complexes accumulate primarily in the nucleus, whereas AL2:ADK and L2:ADK complexes accumulate mainly in the cytoplasm. Further, the cysteine residue mutations impair the ability of AL2 to activate the coat protein promoter but do not affect local silencing suppression. Thus, AL2 self-interaction correlates with nuclear localization and efficient activation of transcription, whereas AL2 and L2 monomers can suppress local silencing by interacting with ADK in the cytoplasm. PMID:17715241

  1. Novel RNA Duplex Locks HIV-1 in a Latent State via Chromatin-mediated Transcriptional Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Ahlenstiel, Chantelle; Mendez, Catalina; Lim, Steven T H; Marks, Katherine; Turville, Stuart; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of mammalian genes can be induced by short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting promoter regions. We previously reported potent TGS of HIV-1 by siRNA (PromA), which targets tandem NF-κB motifs within the viral 5′LTR. In this study, we screened a siRNA panel with the aim of identifying novel 5′LTR targets, to provide multiplexing potential with enhanced viral silencing and application toward developing alternate therapeutic strategies. Systematic examination identified a novel siRNA target, si143, confirmed to induce TGS as the silencing mechanism. TGS was prolonged with virus suppression >12 days, despite a limited ability to induce post- TGS. Epigenetic changes associated with silencing were suggested by partial reversal by histone deacetylase inhibitors and confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, which showed induction of H3K27me3 and H3K9me3, reduction in H3K9Ac, and recruitment of argonaute-1, all characteristic marks of heterochromatin and TGS. Together, these epigenetic changes mimic those associated with HIV-1 latency. Further, robust resistance to reactivation was observed in the J-Lat 9.2 cell latency model, when transduced with shPromA and/or sh143. These data support si/shRNA-mediated TGS approaches to HIV-1 and provide alternate targets to pursue a functional cure, whereby the viral reservoir is locked in latency following antiretroviral therapy cessation. PMID:26506039

  2. Conserved enhancer and silencer elements responsible for differential Adh transcription in Drosophila cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1990-01-01

    The distal promoter of Adh is differentially expressed in Drosophila tissue culture cell lines. After transfection with an exogenous Adh gene, there was a specific increase in distal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) transcripts in ADH-expressing (ADH+) cells above the levels observed in transfected ADH-nonexpressing (ADH-) cells. We used deletion mutations and a comparative transient-expression assay to identify the cis-acting elements responsible for enhanced Adh distal transcription in ADH+ cells. DNA sequences controlling high levels of distal transcription were localized to a 15-base-pair (bp) region nearly 500 bp upstream of the distal RNA start site. In addition, a 61-bp negative cis-acting element was found upstream from and adjacent to the enhancer. When this silencer element was deleted, distal transcription increased only in the ADH+ cell line. These distant upstream elements must interact with the promoter elements, the Adf-1-binding site and the TATA box, as they only influenced transcription when at least one of these two positive distal promoter elements was present. Internal deletions targeted to the Adf-1-binding site or the TATA box reduced transcription in both cell types but did not affect the transcription initiation site. Distal transcription in transfected ADH- cells appears to be controlled primarily through these promoter elements and does not involve the upstream regulatory elements. Evolutionary conservation in distantly related Drosophila species suggests the importance of these upstream elements in correct developmental and tissue-specific expression of ADH. Images PMID:1694013

  3. SUVH2 and SUVH9 Couple Two Essential Steps for Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuqing; Sun, Han; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Yue; Li, Qi; Liu, Yannan; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2016-08-01

    In Arabidopsis, an RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway (RdDM) is responsible for de novo establishment of DNA methylation and contributes to transcriptional gene silencing. Recently, the microrchidia (MORC)-type ATPases were shown to play essential roles in enforcing transcriptional gene silencing of a subset of genes and transposons by regulating the formation of higher-order chromatin architecture. However, how MORC proteins cooperate with the RdDM pathway components to regulate gene expression remains largely unclear. In this study, SUVH9 and MORC6 were identified from a screening of suppressors of idm1, which is a mutant defective in active DNA demethylation. SUVH9 and MORC6 are required for silencing of two reporter genes and some endogenous genes without enhancing DNA methylation levels. SUVH9, one of SU(VAR)3-9 homologs involved in RdDM, directly interacts with MORC6 and its two close homologs, MORC1 and MORC2. Similar to MORC6, SUVH9 and its homolog SUVH2 are required for heterochromatin condensation and formation of 3D chromatin architecture at SDC and Solo-LTR loci. We propose that SUVH2 and SUVH9 bind to the methylated DNA and facilitate the recruitment of a chromatin-remodeling complex to the target loci in association with MORC proteins. PMID:27216319

  4. Epigenetic Switch from Posttranscriptional to Transcriptional Silencing Is Correlated with Promoter Hypermethylation1

    PubMed Central

    Fojtova, Miloslava; Van Houdt, Helena; Depicker, Anna; Kovarik, Ales

    2003-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of methylcytosine residues along a transgene locus of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in relation to the type of gene silencing were studied in parental plant leaves, calli, and regenerated plants derived thereof. Parental-silenced HeLo1 (hemizygous for locus 1) plants show posttranscriptional silencing of the residing nptII (neomycin phosphotransferase II) transgene and cytosine methylation restricted to the 3′ end and center part of the transcribed region. Here, we report that with an increasing number of cell cycles, DNA methylation changes gradually, and methylation is introduced into the promoter during cell culture and more slowly in vegetatively propagated plants. After 24 months of callus in vitro cultivation, an epigenetic variant, designated locus 1E, was obtained in which cytosine methylation of symmetrical (CG and CNG) sites was almost complete within the 5′ end of the nptII-transcribed region and the 35S promoter. Further, methylation of nonsymmetrical sites appeared de novo in the promoter, whereas this type of methylation was significantly reduced in the 3′ end of the transcribed region when compared with locus 1. The newly established epigenetic patterns were stably transmitted from calli into regenerated plants and their progeny. The protein and steady-state RNA levels remained low in locus 1E, whereas with nuclear run-on assays, no detectable amounts of primary transcripts were found along the nptII gene, indicating that the methylated promoter became inactivated. The results suggest that a switch between posttranscriptional and transcriptional gene silencing could be a mechanism leading to irrevocable shut down of gene expression within a finite number of generations. PMID:14551338

  5. Bottlenecks in Development of Retinal Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jack M.; Yau, Edwin H.; Taggart, R. Thomas; Butler, Mark C.; Kolniak, Tiffany A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents for therapeutic purposes is an immense challenge in modern biology. Established technologies used to knockdown a specific target RNA and its cognate protein: antisense, ribozyme, RNAi, all conditionally depend upon an initial, critical annealing event of the PTGS ligand to a target RNA. In this review we address the nature of the bottlenecks, emphasizing the biocomplexity of target RNA structure, that currently limit PTGS therapeutic development. We briefly review existing and emerging technologies designed to release these constraints to realize the potential of PTGS agents in gene based therapies. PMID:17976683

  6. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression. PMID

  7. DNA Elements Reducing Transcriptional Gene Silencing Revealed by a Novel Screening Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Keiichiro; Ohashi, Yuko; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS)–a phenomenon observed in endogenous genes/transgenes in eukaryotes–is a huge hindrance to transgenic technology and occurs mainly when the genes involved share sequence homology in their promoter regions. TGS depends on chromosomal position, suggesting the existence of genomic elements that suppress TGS. However, no systematic approach to identify such DNA elements has yet been reported. Here, we developed a successful novel screening strategy to identify such elements (anti-silencing regions–ASRs), based on their ability to protect a flanked transgene from TGS. A silenced transgenic tobacco plant in which a subsequently introduced transgene undergoes obligatory promoter-homology dependent TGS in trans allowed the ability of DNA elements to prevent TGS to be used as the screening criterion. We also identified ASRs in a genomic library from a different plant species (Lotus japonicus: a perennial legume); the ASRs include portions of Ty1/copia retrotransposon-like and pararetrovirus-like sequences; the retrotransposon-like sequences also showed interspecies anti-TGS activity in a TGS-induction system in Arabidopsis. Anti-TGS elements could provide effective tools to reduce TGS and ensure proper regulation of transgene expression. Furthermore, the screening strategy described here will also facilitate the efficient identification of new classes of anti-TGS elements. PMID:23382937

  8. SUVR2 is involved in transcriptional gene silencing by associating with SNF2-related chromatin-remodeling proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yong-Feng; Dou, Kun; Ma, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Su-Wei; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; Zhu, Jian-Kang; He, Xin-Jian

    2014-01-01

    The SU(VAR)3-9-like histone methyltransferases usually catalyze repressive histone H3K9 methylation and are involved in transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic organisms. We identified a putative SU(VAR)3-9-like histone methyltransferase SUVR2 by a forward genetic screen and demonstrated that it is involved in transcriptional gene silencing at genomic loci targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). We found that SUVR2 has no histone methyltransferase activity and the conserved catalytic sites of SUVR2 are dispensable for the function of SUVR2 in transcriptional silencing. SUVR2 forms a complex with its close homolog SUVR1 and associate with three previously uncharacterized SNF2-related chromatin-remodeling proteins CHR19, CHR27, and CHR28. SUVR2 was previously thought to be a component in the RdDM pathway. We demonstrated that SUVR2 contributes to transcriptional gene silencing not only at a subset of RdDM target loci but also at many RdDM-independent target loci. Our study suggests that the involvement of SUVR2 in transcriptional gene silencing is related to nucleosome positioning mediated by its associated chromatin-remodeling proteins. PMID:25420628

  9. Identification of Multiple Proteins Coupling Transcriptional Gene Silencing to Genome Stability in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Christopher J.; Potok, Magdalena E.; Lopez, Jennifer; Do, Truman; Liu, Ao; Michaels, Scott D.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by epigenetic marks that act to modulate transcriptional control as well as to regulate DNA replication and repair. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutation of the ATXR5 and ATXR6 histone methyltransferases causes reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 monomethylation, transcriptional upregulation of transposons, and a genome instability defect in which there is an accumulation of excess DNA corresponding to pericentromeric heterochromatin. We designed a forward genetic screen to identify suppressors of the atxr5/6 phenotype that uncovered loss-of-function mutations in two components of the TREX-2 complex (AtTHP1, AtSAC3B), a SUMO-interacting E3 ubiquitin ligase (AtSTUbL2) and a methyl-binding domain protein (AtMBD9). Additionally, using a reverse genetic approach, we show that a mutation in a plant homolog of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 enhances the atxr5/6 phenotype. Through characterization of these mutations, our results suggest models for the production atxr5 atxr6-induced extra DNA involving conflicts between the replicative and transcriptional processes in the cell, and suggest that the atxr5 atxr6 transcriptional defects may be the cause of the genome instability defects in the mutants. These findings highlight the critical intersection of transcriptional silencing and DNA replication in the maintenance of genome stability of heterochromatin. PMID:27253878

  10. Identification of Multiple Proteins Coupling Transcriptional Gene Silencing to Genome Stability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hale, Christopher J; Potok, Magdalena E; Lopez, Jennifer; Do, Truman; Liu, Ao; Gallego-Bartolome, Javier; Michaels, Scott D; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by epigenetic marks that act to modulate transcriptional control as well as to regulate DNA replication and repair. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutation of the ATXR5 and ATXR6 histone methyltransferases causes reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 monomethylation, transcriptional upregulation of transposons, and a genome instability defect in which there is an accumulation of excess DNA corresponding to pericentromeric heterochromatin. We designed a forward genetic screen to identify suppressors of the atxr5/6 phenotype that uncovered loss-of-function mutations in two components of the TREX-2 complex (AtTHP1, AtSAC3B), a SUMO-interacting E3 ubiquitin ligase (AtSTUbL2) and a methyl-binding domain protein (AtMBD9). Additionally, using a reverse genetic approach, we show that a mutation in a plant homolog of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 enhances the atxr5/6 phenotype. Through characterization of these mutations, our results suggest models for the production atxr5 atxr6-induced extra DNA involving conflicts between the replicative and transcriptional processes in the cell, and suggest that the atxr5 atxr6 transcriptional defects may be the cause of the genome instability defects in the mutants. These findings highlight the critical intersection of transcriptional silencing and DNA replication in the maintenance of genome stability of heterochromatin. PMID:27253878

  11. A Role for RE-1-Silencing Transcription Factor in Embryonic Stem Cells Cardiac Lineage Specification.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Irene; Marcy, Guillaume; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Kumar, Vibhor; John-Sanchez, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehran; Buckley, Noel J; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2016-04-01

    During development, lineage specification is controlled by several signaling pathways involving various transcription factors (TFs). Here, we studied the RE-1-silencing transcription factor (REST) and identified an important role of this TF in cardiac differentiation. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to model development, we found that REST knockout cells lost the ability to differentiate into the cardiac lineage. Detailed analysis of specific lineage markers expression showed selective downregulation of endoderm markers in REST-null cells, thus contributing to a loss of cardiogenic signals. REST regulates cardiac differentiation of ESCs by negatively regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and positively regulating the cardiogenic TF Gata4. We propose here a new role for REST in cell fate specification besides its well-known repressive role of neuronal differentiation. PMID:26864965

  12. RNA Pol II subunit Rpb7 promotes centromeric transcription and RNAi-directed chromatin silencing

    PubMed Central

    Djupedal, Ingela; Portoso, Manuela; Spåhr, Henrik; Bonilla, Carolina; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Allshire, Robin C.; Ekwall, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Fission yeast centromeric repeats are transcribed into small interfering RNA (siRNA) precursors (pre-siRNAs), which are processed by Dicer to direct heterochromatin formation. Recently, Rpb1 and Rpb2 subunits of RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) were shown to mediate RNA interference (RNAi)-directed chromatin modification but did not affect pre-siRNA levels. Here we show that another Pol II subunit, Rpb7 has a specific role in pre-siRNA transcription. We define a centromeric pre-siRNA promoter from which initiation is exquisitely sensitive to the rpb7-G150D mutation. In contrast to other Pol II subunits, Rpb7 promotes pre-siRNA transcription required for RNAi-directed chromatin silencing. PMID:16204182

  13. RNA Polymerase I and Fob1 contributions to transcriptional silencing at the yeast rDNA locus.

    PubMed

    Buck, Stephen W; Maqani, Nazif; Matecic, Mirela; Hontz, Robert D; Fine, Ryan D; Li, Mingguang; Smith, Jeffrey S

    2016-07-27

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-transcribed genes embedded within the yeast rDNA locus are repressed through a Sir2-dependent process called 'rDNA silencing'. Sir2 is recruited to the rDNA promoter through interactions with RNA polymerase I (Pol I), and to a pair of DNA replication fork block sites (Ter1 and Ter2) through interaction with Fob1. We utilized a reporter gene (mURA3) integrated adjacent to the leftmost rDNA gene to investigate localized Pol I and Fob1 functions in silencing. Silencing was attenuated by loss of Pol I subunits or insertion of an ectopic Pol I terminator within the adjacent rDNA gene. Silencing left of the rDNA array is naturally attenuated by the presence of only one intact Fob1 binding site (Ter2). Repair of the 2nd Fob1 binding site (Ter1) dramatically strengthens silencing such that it is no longer impacted by local Pol I transcription defects. Global loss of Pol I activity, however, negatively affects Fob1 association with the rDNA. Loss of Ter2 almost completely eliminates localized silencing, but is restored by artificially targeting Fob1 or Sir2 as Gal4 DNA binding domain fusions. We conclude that Fob1 and Pol I make independent contributions to establishment of silencing, though Pol I also reinforces Fob1-dependent silencing. PMID:27060141

  14. Transcriptional silencing induced by Arabidopsis T-DNA mutants is associated with 35S promoter siRNAs and requires genes involved in siRNA-mediated chromatin silencing.

    PubMed

    Mlotshwa, Sizolwenkosi; Pruss, Gail J; Gao, Zhihuan; Mgutshini, Nomathamsanqa L; Li, Junjie; Chen, Xuemei; Bowman, Lewis H; Vance, Vicki

    2010-11-01

    The utility of many T-DNA insertion mutant lines of Arabidopsis is compromised by their propensity to trigger transcriptional silencing of transgenes expressed from the CaMV 35S promoter. To try to circumvent this problem, we characterized the genetic requirements for maintenance of 35S promoter homology-dependent transcriptional gene silencing induced by the dcl3-1 (SALK_005512) T-DNA insertion mutant line. Surprisingly, even though DCL3 and RDR2 are known components of the siRNA-dependent transcriptional gene silencing pathway, transcriptional gene silencing of a 35S promoter-driven GUS hairpin transgene did occur in plants homozygous for the dcl3-1 T-DNA insertion and was unaffected by loss of function of RDR2. However, the transcriptional gene silencing was alleviated in dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutant plants and also by mutations in AGO4, NRPD2, HEN1 and MOM1. Thus, some T-DNA insertion mutant lines induce 35S promoter homology-dependent transcriptional silencing that requires neither DCL3 nor RDR2, but involves other genes known to function in siRNA-dependent transcriptional silencing. Consistent with these results, we detected 35S promoter siRNAs in dcl3-1 SALK line plants, suggesting that the 35S promoter homology-dependent silencing induced by some T-DNA insertion mutant lines is siRNA-mediated. PMID:21070421

  15. Selective repression of gene expression in neuropathic pain by the neuron-restrictive silencing factor/repressor element-1 silencing transcription (NRSF/REST).

    PubMed

    Willis, Dianna E; Wang, Meng; Brown, Elizabeth; Fones, Lilah; Cave, John W

    2016-06-20

    Neuropathic pain often develops following nerve injury as a result of maladaptive changes that occur in the injured nerve and along the nociceptive pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms likely account for these changes; however, the exact nature of these mechanisms remain largely unknown. A growing number of studies suggest that alteration in gene expression is an important step in the progression from acute to chronic pain states and epigenetic regulation has been proposed to drive this change in gene expression. In this review, we discuss recent evidence that the DNA-binding protein neuron-restrictive silencing factor/repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST) is an important component in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain through its role as a transcriptional regulator for a select subset of genes that it normally represses during development. PMID:26679228

  16. Consistent transcriptional silencing of 35S-driven transgenes in gentian.

    PubMed

    Mishiba, Kei-ichiro; Nishihara, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Abe, Yoshiko; Hirano, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Takahide; Kikuchi, Akiko; Yamamura, Saburo

    2005-11-01

    In this study, no transgenic gentian (Gentiana triflora x Gentiana scabra) plants produced via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation exhibited transgene (GtMADS, gentian-derived MADS-box genes or sGFP, green fluorescent protein) expression in their leaf tissues, despite the use of constitutive Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Strikingly, no expression of the selectable marker gene (bar) used for bialaphos selection was observed. To investigate the possible cause of this drastic transgene silencing, methylation-specific sequences were analysed by bisulfite genomic sequencing using tobacco transformants as a control. Highly methylated cytosine residues of CpG and CpWpG (W contains A or T) sites were distinctively detected in the promoter and 5' coding regions of the transgenes 35S-bar and 35S-GtMADS in all gentian lines analysed. These lines also exhibited various degrees of cytosine methylation in asymmetrical sequences. The methylation frequencies in the other transgene, nopaline synthase (NOS) promoter-driven nptII, and the endogenous GtMADS gene coding region, were much lower and were variable compared with those in the 35S promoter regions. Transgene methylation was observed in the bialaphos-selected transgenic calluses expressing the transgenes, and methylation sequences were distributed preferentially around the as-1 element in the 35S promoter. Calluses derived from leaf tissues of silenced transgenic gentian also exhibited transgene suppression, but expression was recovered by treatment with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (aza-dC). These results indicated that cytosine methylation occurs exclusively in the 35S promoter regions of the expressed transgenes during selection of gentian transformants, causing transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:16262705

  17. Mechanical regulation of transcription controls Polycomb-mediated gene silencing during lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Le, Huy Quang; Ghatak, Sushmita; Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Tellkamp, Frederik; Günschmann, Christian; Dieterich, Christoph; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Habermann, Bianca; Pombo, Ana; Niessen, Carien M; Wickström, Sara A

    2016-08-01

    Tissue mechanics drive morphogenesis, but how forces are sensed and transmitted to control stem cell fate and self-organization remains unclear. We show that a mechanosensory complex of emerin (Emd), non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) and actin controls gene silencing and chromatin compaction, thereby regulating lineage commitment. Force-driven enrichment of Emd at the outer nuclear membrane of epidermal stem cells leads to defective heterochromatin anchoring to the nuclear lamina and a switch from H3K9me2,3 to H3K27me3 occupancy at constitutive heterochromatin. Emd enrichment is accompanied by the recruitment of NMIIA to promote local actin polymerization that reduces nuclear actin levels, resulting in attenuation of transcription and subsequent accumulation of H3K27me3 at facultative heterochromatin. Perturbing this mechanosensory pathway by deleting NMIIA in mouse epidermis leads to attenuated H3K27me3-mediated silencing and precocious lineage commitment, abrogating morphogenesis. Our results reveal how mechanics integrate nuclear architecture and chromatin organization to control lineage commitment and tissue morphogenesis. PMID:27398909

  18. Geminivirus Rep protein interferes with the plant DNA methylation machinery and suppresses transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Piedra-Aguilera, Alvaro; Cruzado, Lucia; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Castillo, Araceli G

    2013-07-01

    Cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mark that promotes gene silencing and plays an important role in genome defence against transposons and invading DNA viruses. Previous data showed that the largest family of single-stranded DNA viruses, Geminiviridae, prevents methylation-mediated transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) by interfering with the proper functioning of the plant methylation cycle. Here, we describe a novel counter-defence strategy used by geminiviruses, which reduces the expression of the plant maintenance DNA methyltransferases, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3), in both locally and systemically infected tissues. We demonstrated that the virus-mediated repression of these two maintenance DNA methyltransferases is widespread among geminivirus species. Additionally, we identified Rep (Replication associated protein) as the geminiviral protein responsible for the repression of MET1 and CMT3, and another viral protein, C4, as an ancillary player in MET1 down-regulation. The presence of Rep suppressed TGS of an Arabidopsis thaliana transgene and of host loci whose expression was strongly controlled by CG methylation. Bisulfite sequencing analyses showed that the expression of Rep caused a substantial reduction in the levels of DNA methylation at CG sites. Our findings suggest that Rep, the only viral protein essential for replication, displays TGS suppressor activity through a mechanism distinct from that thus far described for geminiviruses. PMID:23614786

  19. Changes in methylation during progressive transcriptional silencing in transgenic subterranean clover.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nicholas D; Spencer, Donald; Moore, Andrew E; Higgins, Thomas J V

    2003-11-01

    A transgenic line of subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) containing a gene for a sulphur-rich sunflower seed albumin (ssa gene) and a gene conferring tolerance to the herbicide phosphinothricin (bar gene) was previously shown to stably express these genes as far as the T3 generation. In subsequent generations there was a progressive decline in the level of expression of both of these genes such that, by the T7 generation, the plants were almost completely susceptible to the herbicide and the mean level of sunflower seed albumin was reduced to 10-30% of the level in the T2 and T3 generations. The decline in SSA protein correlated closely with a decline in the level of ssa RNA. In vitro transcription experiments with nuclei isolated from plants of the early and late generations showed that the reduced mRNA level was associated with a reduced level of transcription of the ssa transgene. Transcription of the bar transgene was also reduced in the late generations. Bisulphite sequencing analysis showed that the decline in expression of the ssa gene between T3 and subsequent generations correlated closely with increased CpG methylation in the promoter, but not in the coding region. Analysis of the bar gene promoter showed that high levels of CpG methylation preceded the first detectable decline in expression of the bar gene by one generation, suggesting that methylation was not the direct cause of transgene silencing in these plants. PMID:17134405

  20. LSD1 cooperates with CTIP2 to promote HIV-1 transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Le Douce, Valentin; Colin, Laurence; Redel, Laetitia; Cherrier, Thomas; Herbein, Georges; Aunis, Dominique; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine; Schwartz, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Microglial cells are the main HIV-1 targets in the central nervous system (CNS) and constitute an important reservoir of latently infected cells. Establishment and persistence of these reservoirs rely on the chromatin structure of the integrated proviruses. We have previously demonstrated that the cellular cofactor CTIP2 forces heterochromatin formation and HIV-1 gene silencing by recruiting HDAC and HMT activities at the integrated viral promoter. In the present work, we report that the histone demethylase LSD1 represses HIV-1 transcription and viral expression in a synergistic manner with CTIP2. We show that recruitment of LSD1 at the HIV-1 proximal promoter is associated with both H3K4me3 and H3K9me3 epigenetic marks. Finally, our data suggest that LSD1-induced H3K4 trimethylation is linked to hSET1 recruitment at the integrated provirus. PMID:22067449

  1. Transcriptional silencing of heterologous anther promoters in maize: a genetic method to replace detasseling for seed production.

    PubMed

    Cigan, A Mark; Haug-Collet, Kristin; Clapp, Joshua

    2014-09-01

    The promoter of the maize male fertility gene ZmMs45, and other anther-specific maize promoters, was previously shown to be transcriptionally silenced by constitutively expressed promoter-inverted repeat RNAs (pIRs). In addition, ZmMS45pIR-mediated male sterility was reversed by co-expression of Ms45 transcribed by promoters not targeted by pIR RNA silencing. In this report, male fertility was restored to ms45 maize by fusing non-maize inflorescence promoters to the ZmMS45 coding region. This complementation assay also established that these rice or Arabidopsis promoters, when expressed as pIRs, functioned to silence sequence identical promoters. These observations were exploited to develop a genetic method to replace maize detasseling during hybrid seed production. In this system, the ZmMS45 coding region was fused to one of two dissimilar non-maize promoters to generate paired sets of ms45 recessive inbred parents which could be self-pollinated and maintained independently. Linked to each unique Ms45 gene was a non-maize pIR which targeted the promoter transcribing the Ms45 copy contained in the paired inbred parent plant. A cross of these pairs brings the dissimilar pIR cassettes together and resulted in silencing both transformed copies of Ms45. The net result uncovers the ms45 allele carried by the inbreds yielding male sterile progeny. The application of heterologous promoters and transcriptional silencing in plants provides an alternative to post-transcriptional gene silencing as a means to restore and silence gene function in plants. PMID:24966130

  2. V2 of tomato yellow leaf curl virus can suppress methylation-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bi; Li, Fangfang; Huang, Changjun; Yang, Xiuling; Qian, Yajuan; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a DNA virus belonging to the genus Begomovirus. TYLCV replicates using double-stranded DNA intermediates that can become the target of plant transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Here, we show that the V2 protein of TYLCV can suppress TGS of a transcriptionally silenced green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene in Nicotiana benthamiana line 16-TGS. Through bisulfite sequencing and chop-PCR, we demonstrated that the TYLCV V2 can reverse GFP transgene silencing by reducing the methylation levels in the 35S promoter sequence. Both AtSN1 and MEA-ISR loci in Arabidopsis thaliana were previously reported to be strongly methylated, and we show that the methylation status of both loci was significantly reduced in TYLCV V2 transgenic Arabidopsis plants. We conclude that TYLCV can efficiently suppress TGS when it infects plants, and its V2 protein is responsible for the TGS suppression activity. PMID:24187017

  3. Post-transcriptional silencing of flavonol synthase mRNA in tobacco leads to fruits with arrested seed set.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Monika; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are synthesized by phenylpropanoid pathway. They are known to participate in large number of physiological and biochemical processes in plants. Parthenocarpy and male sterility has earlier been reported by silencing chalcone synthase (CHS) encoding gene. Silencing of CHS has blocked the synthesis of most of useful flavonoids including flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Also, these studies could not identify whether parthenocarpy/male sterility were due to lack of flavan-3-ols or flavonols or both. Flavonol synthase (FLS) is an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of flavonols. In this article, we propose a novel strategy towards the generation of seedless or less-seeded fruits by downregulation of flavonol biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of FLS encoding mRNA. The FLS silenced lines were observed for 20-80% reduction in FLS encoding gene expression and 25-93% reduction in flavonol (quercetin) content. Interestingly, these FLS silenced tobacco lines also showed reduction in their anthocyanidins content. While the content of flavan-3-ols (catechin, epi-catechin and epi-gallocatechin) was found to be increased in FLS silenced lines. The delayed flowering in FLS silenced lines could be due to decrease in level of indole acetic acid (IAA) at apical region of their shoots. Furthermore, the pollen germination was hampered and pollens were unable to produce functional pollen tube in FLS silenced tobacco lines. Pods of FLS silenced lines contained significantly less number of seeds. The in vitro and in vivo studies where 1 µM quercetin was supplied to germination media, documented the restoration of normal pollen germination and pollen tube growth. This finding identified the role of flavonols particularly quercetin in pollen germination as well as in the regulation of plant fertility. Results also suggest a novel approach towards generation of seedless

  4. Post-Transcriptional Silencing of Flavonol Synthase mRNA in Tobacco Leads to Fruits with Arrested Seed Set

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Monika; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are synthesized by phenylpropanoid pathway. They are known to participate in large number of physiological and biochemical processes in plants. Parthenocarpy and male sterility has earlier been reported by silencing chalcone synthase (CHS) encoding gene. Silencing of CHS has blocked the synthesis of most of useful flavonoids including flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Also, these studies could not identify whether parthenocarpy/male sterility were due to lack of flavan-3-ols or flavonols or both. Flavonol synthase (FLS) is an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of flavonols. In this article, we propose a novel strategy towards the generation of seedless or less-seeded fruits by downregulation of flavonol biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of FLS encoding mRNA. The FLS silenced lines were observed for 20-80% reduction in FLS encoding gene expression and 25–93% reduction in flavonol (quercetin) content. Interestingly, these FLS silenced tobacco lines also showed reduction in their anthocyanidins content. While the content of flavan-3-ols (catechin, epi-catechin and epi-gallocatechin) was found to be increased in FLS silenced lines. The delayed flowering in FLS silenced lines could be due to decrease in level of indole acetic acid (IAA) at apical region of their shoots. Furthermore, the pollen germination was hampered and pollens were unable to produce functional pollen tube in FLS silenced tobacco lines. Pods of FLS silenced lines contained significantly less number of seeds. The in vitro and in vivo studies where 1 µM quercetin was supplied to germination media, documented the restoration of normal pollen germination and pollen tube growth. This finding identified the role of flavonols particularly quercetin in pollen germination as well as in the regulation of plant fertility. Results also suggest a novel approach towards generation of seedless

  5. Slx5 Promotes Transcriptional Silencing and Is Required for Robust Growth in the Absence of Sir2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Russell P.; Garcia, Sandra N.; Koch, Melissa R.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    The broadly conserved Sir2 NAD+-dependent deacetylase is required for chromatin silencing. Here we report the discovery of physical and functional links between Sir2 and Slx5 (Hex3), a RING domain protein and subunit of the Slx5/8 complex column, which is a ubiquitin E3 ligase that targets sumoylated proteins. Slx5 interacted with Sir2 by two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase-binding assays and was found to promote silencing of genes at telomeric or ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci. However, deletion of SLX5 had no detectable effect on the distribution of silent chromatin components and only slightly altered the deacetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 at the telomere. In vivo assays indicated that Sir2-dependent silencing was functionally intact in the absence of Slx5. Although no previous reports suggest that Sir2 contributes to the fitness of yeast populations, we found that Sir2 was required for maximal growth in slx5Δ mutant cells. A similar requirement was observed for mutants of the SUMO isopeptidase Ulp2/Smt4. The contribution of Sir2 to optimal growth was not due to known Sir2 roles in mating-type determination or rDNA maintenance but was connected to a role of sumoylation in transcriptional silencing. These results indicate that Sir2 and Slx5 jointly contribute to transcriptional silencing and robust cellular growth. PMID:18086879

  6. A role for DNA polymerase α in epigenetic control of transcriptional silencing in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Jun-ichi; Allshire, Robin C.; Klar, Amar J.S.; Grewal, Shiv I.S.

    2001-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, transcriptional silencing at the mating-type region, centromeres and telomeres is epigenetically controlled, and results from the assembly of higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin proteins associated with these silenced loci are believed to serve as molecular bookmarks that help promote inheritance of the silenced state during cell division. Specifically, a chromodomain protein Swi6 is believed to be an important determinant of the epigenetic imprint. Here, we show that a mutation in DNA polymerase α (polα) affects Swi6 localization at the mating-type region and causes a 45-fold increase in spontaneous transition from the silenced epigenetic state to the expressed state. We also demonstrate that polα mutant cells are defective in Swi6 localization at centromeres and telomeres. Genetic analysis suggests that Polα and Swi6 are part of the same silencing pathway. Interestingly, we found that Swi6 directly binds to Polα in vitro. Moreover, silencing-defective mutant Polα displays reduced binding to Swi6 protein. This work indicates involvement of a DNA replication protein, Polα, in heterochromatin assembly and inheritance of epigenetic chromatin structures. PMID:11387218

  7. Recruitment of chromatin-modifying enzymes by CTIP2 promotes HIV-1 transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Marban, Céline; Suzanne, Stella; Dequiedt, Franck; de Walque, Stéphane; Redel, Laetitia; Van Lint, Carine; Aunis, Dominique; Rohr, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Following entry and reverse transcription, the HIV-1 genome is integrated into the host genome. In contrast to productively infected cells, latently infected cells frequently harbor HIV-1 genomes integrated in heterochromatic structures, allowing persistence of transcriptionally silent proviruses. Microglial cells are the main HIV-1 target cells in the central nervous system and constitute an important reservoir for viral pathogenesis. In the present work, we show that, in microglial cells, the co-repressor COUP-TF interacting protein 2 (CTIP2) recruits a multienzymatic chromatin-modifying complex and establishes a heterochromatic environment at the HIV-1 promoter. We report that CTIP2 recruits histone deacetylase (HDAC)1 and HDAC2 to promote local histone H3 deacetylation at the HIV-1 promoter region. In addition, DNA-bound CTIP2 also associates with the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1, which increases local histone H3 lysine 9 methylation. This allows concomitant recruitment of HP1 proteins to the viral promoter and formation of local heterochromatin, leading to HIV-1 silencing. Altogether, our findings uncover new therapeutic opportunities for purging latent HIV-1 viruses from their cellular reservoirs. PMID:17245431

  8. Transcription factor Sp3 is silenced through SUMO modification by PIAS1

    PubMed Central

    Sapetschnig, Alexandra; Rischitor, Grigore; Braun, Harald; Doll, Andreas; Schergaut, Marion; Melchior, Frauke; Suske, Guntram

    2002-01-01

    Sp3 is a ubiquitous transcription factor closely related to Sp1. Here we show that Sp3 is a target for SUMO modification in vivo and in vitro. SUMO modification of Sp3 occurs at a single lysine located between the second glutamine-rich activation domain and the DNA-binding domain. Mutational analyses identified the sequence IKXE as essential for SUMO conjugation to Sp3. We identified the protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) as an interaction partner of Sp3 and Ubc9. Moreover, PIAS1 strongly stimulated SUMO conjugation to Sp3, thus acting as an E3 ligase for SUMO conjugation to Sp3. All mutations that prevented SUMO modification in vitro strongly enhanced the transcriptional activity of Sp3, showing that SUMO modification silences Sp3 activity. SUMO-modified Sp3 bound to DNA with similar specificity and affinity as unmodified Sp3. However, DNA-bound Sp3 did not act as a substrate for SUMO modification. PMID:12356736

  9. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Noreen F.; Weaver, Jessica D.; Cram, Erin J.; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:27467510

  10. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  11. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Weaver, Jessica D; Cram, Erin J; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:27467510

  12. Peculiarities of piRNA-mediated post-transcriptional silencing of Stellate repeats in testes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, Roman N; Klenov, Mikhail S; Rozovsky, Yakov M; Olenina, Ludmila V; Kibanov, Mikhail V; Gvozdev, Vladimir A

    2009-06-01

    Silencing of Stellate genes in Drosophila melanogaster testes is caused by antisense piRNAs produced as a result of transcription of homologous Suppressor of Stellate (Su(Ste)) repeats. Mechanism of piRNA-dependent Stellate repression remains poorly understood. Here, we show that deletion of Su(Ste) suppressors causes accumulation of spliced, but not nonspliced Stellate transcripts both in the nucleus and cytoplasm, revealing post-transcriptional degradation of Stellate RNA as the predominant mechanism of silencing. We found a significant amount of Su(Ste) piRNAs and piRNA-interacting protein Aubergine (Aub) in the nuclear fraction. Immunostaining of isolated nuclei revealed co-localization of a portion of cellular Aub with the nuclear lamina. We suggest that the piRNA-Aub complex is potentially able to perform Stellate silencing in the cell nucleus. Also, we revealed that the level of the Stellate protein in Su(Ste)-deficient testes is increased much more dramatically than the Stellate mRNA level. Similarly, Su(Ste) repeats deletion exerts an insignificant effect on mRNA abundance of the Ste-lacZ reporter, but causes a drastic increase of beta-gal activity. In cell culture, exogenous Su(Ste) dsRNA dramatically decreases beta-gal activity of hsp70-Ste-lacZ construct, but not its mRNA level. We suggest that piRNAs, similarly to siRNAs, degrade only unmasked transcripts, which are accessible for translation. PMID:19321499

  13. Peculiarities of piRNA-mediated post-transcriptional silencing of Stellate repeats in testes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kotelnikov, Roman N.; Klenov, Mikhail S.; Rozovsky, Yakov M.; Olenina, Ludmila V.; Kibanov, Mikhail V.; Gvozdev, Vladimir A.

    2009-01-01

    Silencing of Stellate genes in Drosophila melanogaster testes is caused by antisense piRNAs produced as a result of transcription of homologous Suppressor of Stellate (Su(Ste)) repeats. Mechanism of piRNA-dependent Stellate repression remains poorly understood. Here, we show that deletion of Su(Ste) suppressors causes accumulation of spliced, but not nonspliced Stellate transcripts both in the nucleus and cytoplasm, revealing post-transcriptional degradation of Stellate RNA as the predominant mechanism of silencing. We found a significant amount of Su(Ste) piRNAs and piRNA-interacting protein Aubergine (Aub) in the nuclear fraction. Immunostaining of isolated nuclei revealed co-localization of a portion of cellular Aub with the nuclear lamina. We suggest that the piRNA–Aub complex is potentially able to perform Stellate silencing in the cell nucleus. Also, we revealed that the level of the Stellate protein in Su(Ste)-deficient testes is increased much more dramatically than the Stellate mRNA level. Similarly, Su(Ste) repeats deletion exerts an insignificant effect on mRNA abundance of the Ste-lacZ reporter, but causes a drastic increase of β-gal activity. In cell culture, exogenous Su(Ste) dsRNA dramatically decreases β-gal activity of hsp70-Ste-lacZ construct, but not its mRNA level. We suggest that piRNAs, similarly to siRNAs, degrade only unmasked transcripts, which are accessible for translation. PMID:19321499

  14. Post-transcriptional gene silencing triggered by sense transgenes involves uncapped antisense RNA and differs from silencing intentionally triggered by antisense transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Jauvion, Vincent; Bouché, Nicolas; Béclin, Christophe; Hachet, Mélanie; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Although post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been studied for more than a decade, there is still a gap in our understanding of how de novo silencing is initiated against genetic elements that are not supposed to produce double-stranded (ds)RNA. Given the pervasive transcription occurring throughout eukaryote genomes, we tested the hypothesis that unintended transcription could produce antisense (as)RNA molecules that participate to the initiation of PTGS triggered by sense transgenes (S-PTGS). Our results reveal a higher level of asRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana lines that spontaneously trigger S-PTGS than in lines that do not. However, PTGS triggered by antisense transgenes (AS-PTGS) differs from S-PTGS. In particular, a hypomorphic ago1 mutation that suppresses S-PTGS prevents the degradation of asRNA but not sense RNA during AS-PTGS, suggesting a different treatment of coding and non-coding RNA by AGO1, likely because of AGO1 association to polysomes. Moreover, the intended asRNA produced during AS-PTGS is capped whereas the asRNA produced during S-PTGS derives from 3′ maturation of a read-through transcript and is uncapped. Thus, we propose that uncapped asRNA corresponds to the aberrant RNA molecule that is converted to dsRNA by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 in siRNA-bodies to initiate S-PTGS, whereas capped asRNA must anneal with sense RNA to produce dsRNA that initiate AS-PTGS. PMID:26209135

  15. Post-transcriptional gene silencing triggered by sense transgenes involves uncapped antisense RNA and differs from silencing intentionally triggered by antisense transgenes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Jauvion, Vincent; Bouché, Nicolas; Béclin, Christophe; Hachet, Mélanie; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2015-09-30

    Although post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been studied for more than a decade, there is still a gap in our understanding of how de novo silencing is initiated against genetic elements that are not supposed to produce double-stranded (ds)RNA. Given the pervasive transcription occurring throughout eukaryote genomes, we tested the hypothesis that unintended transcription could produce antisense (as)RNA molecules that participate to the initiation of PTGS triggered by sense transgenes (S-PTGS). Our results reveal a higher level of asRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana lines that spontaneously trigger S-PTGS than in lines that do not. However, PTGS triggered by antisense transgenes (AS-PTGS) differs from S-PTGS. In particular, a hypomorphic ago1 mutation that suppresses S-PTGS prevents the degradation of asRNA but not sense RNA during AS-PTGS, suggesting a different treatment of coding and non-coding RNA by AGO1, likely because of AGO1 association to polysomes. Moreover, the intended asRNA produced during AS-PTGS is capped whereas the asRNA produced during S-PTGS derives from 3' maturation of a read-through transcript and is uncapped. Thus, we propose that uncapped asRNA corresponds to the aberrant RNA molecule that is converted to dsRNA by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 in siRNA-bodies to initiate S-PTGS, whereas capped asRNA must anneal with sense RNA to produce dsRNA that initiate AS-PTGS. PMID:26209135

  16. Distinctive profiles of small RNA couple inverted repeat-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing with endogenous RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Matvienko, Marta; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Xu, Huaqin; Martineau, Belinda; Wong, Joan; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The experimental induction of RNA silencing in plants often involves expression of transgenes encoding inverted repeat (IR) sequences to produce abundant dsRNAs that are processed into small RNAs (sRNAs). These sRNAs are key mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and determine its specificity. Despite its application in agriculture and broad utility in plant research, the mechanism of IR-PTGS is incompletely understood. We generated four sets of 60 Arabidopsis plants, each containing IR transgenes expressing different configurations of uidA and CHALCONE SYNTHASE (At-CHS) gene fragments. Levels of PTGS were found to depend on the orientation and position of the fragment in the IR construct. Deep sequencing and mapping of sRNAs to corresponding transgene-derived and endogenous transcripts identified distinctive patterns of differential sRNA accumulation that revealed similarities among sRNAs associated with IR-PTGS and endogenous sRNAs linked to uncapped mRNA decay. Detailed analyses of poly-A cleavage products from At-CHS mRNA confirmed this hypothesis. We also found unexpected associations between sRNA accumulation and the presence of predicted open reading frames in the trigger sequence. In addition, strong IR-PTGS affected the prevalence of endogenous sRNAs, which has implications for the use of PTGS for experimental or applied purposes. PMID:25344399

  17. Distinctive profiles of small RNA couple inverted repeat-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing with endogenous RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Matvienko, Marta; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Xu, Huaqin; Martineau, Belinda; Wong, Joan; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W

    2014-12-01

    The experimental induction of RNA silencing in plants often involves expression of transgenes encoding inverted repeat (IR) sequences to produce abundant dsRNAs that are processed into small RNAs (sRNAs). These sRNAs are key mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and determine its specificity. Despite its application in agriculture and broad utility in plant research, the mechanism of IR-PTGS is incompletely understood. We generated four sets of 60 Arabidopsis plants, each containing IR transgenes expressing different configurations of uidA and CHALCONE Synthase (At-CHS) gene fragments. Levels of PTGS were found to depend on the orientation and position of the fragment in the IR construct. Deep sequencing and mapping of sRNAs to corresponding transgene-derived and endogenous transcripts identified distinctive patterns of differential sRNA accumulation that revealed similarities among sRNAs associated with IR-PTGS and endogenous sRNAs linked to uncapped mRNA decay. Detailed analyses of poly-A cleavage products from At-CHS mRNA confirmed this hypothesis. We also found unexpected associations between sRNA accumulation and the presence of predicted open reading frames in the trigger sequence. In addition, strong IR-PTGS affected the prevalence of endogenous sRNAs, which has implications for the use of PTGS for experimental or applied purposes. PMID:25344399

  18. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis. PMID:23956416

  19. Pomalidomide reverses γ-globin silencing through the transcriptional reprogramming of adult hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Dulmovits, Brian M; Appiah-Kubi, Abena O; Papoin, Julien; Hale, John; He, Mingzhu; Al-Abed, Yousef; Didier, Sebastien; Gould, Michael; Husain-Krautter, Sehba; Singh, Sharon A; Chan, Kyle W H; Vlachos, Adrianna; Allen, Steven L; Taylor, Naomi; Marambaud, Philippe; An, Xiuli; Gallagher, Patrick G; Mohandas, Narla; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Liu, Johnson M; Blanc, Lionel

    2016-03-17

    Current therapeutic strategies for sickle cell anemia are aimed at reactivating fetal hemoglobin. Pomalidomide, a third-generation immunomodulatory drug, was proposed to induce fetal hemoglobin production by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that pomalidomide induced a fetal-like erythroid differentiation program, leading to a reversion of γ-globin silencing in adult human erythroblasts. Pomalidomide acted early by transiently delaying erythropoiesis at the burst-forming unit-erythroid/colony-forming unit-erythroid transition, but without affecting terminal differentiation. Further, the transcription networks involved in γ-globin repression were selectively and differentially affected by pomalidomide including BCL11A, SOX6, IKZF1, KLF1, and LSD1. IKAROS (IKZF1), a known target of pomalidomide, was degraded by the proteasome, but was not the key effector of this program, because genetic ablation of IKZF1 did not phenocopy pomalidomide treatment. Notably, the pomalidomide-induced reprogramming was conserved in hematopoietic progenitors from individuals with sickle cell anemia. Moreover, multiple myeloma patients treated with pomalidomide demonstrated increased in vivo γ-globin levels in their erythrocytes. Together, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms by which pomalidomide reactivates fetal hemoglobin, reinforcing its potential as a treatment for patients with β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26679864

  20. Identification and gene-silencing of a putative odorant receptor transcription factor in Varroa destructor: possible role in olfaction.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Eliash, N; Stein, I; Kamer, Y; Ilia, Z; Rafaeli, A; Soroker, V

    2016-04-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is one of the major threats to apiculture. Using a behavioural choice bioassay, we determined that phoretic mites were more successful in reaching a bee than reproductive mites, suggesting an energy trade-off between reproduction and host selection. We used both chemo-ecological and molecular strategies to identify the regulation of the olfactory machinery of Varroa and its association with reproduction. We focused on transcription regulation. Using primers designed to the conserved DNA binding region of transcription factors, we identified a gene transcript in V. destructor homologous to the pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) gene of Pediculus humanus corporis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed that this PRTF-like gene transcript is expressed in the forelegs at higher levels than in the body devoid of forelegs. Subsequent comparative qPCR analysis showed that transcript expression was significantly higher in the phoretic as compared to the reproductive stage. Electrophysiological and behavioural studies revealed a reduction in the sensitivity of PRTF RNA interference-silenced mites to bee headspace, consistent with a reduction in the mites' ability to reach a host. In addition, vitellogenin expression was stimulated in PRTF-silenced mites to similar levels as found in reproductive mites. These data shed light upon the regulatory mechanism of host chemosensing in V. destructor. PMID:26801167

  1. Sense Transgene-Induced Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Tobacco Compromises the Splicing of Endogenous Counterpart Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Rae; Natsuume, Masaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Imai, Misaki; Iijima, Ken; Oka, Shin-ichiro; Adachi, Eri; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) is thought to be a type of RNA silencing in which ARGONAUTE1 directs the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated cleavage of a target mRNA in the cytoplasm. Here, we report that the altered splicing of endogenous counterpart genes is a main cause for the reduction of their mature mRNA levels. After the S-PTGS of a tobacco endoplasmic reticulum ω-3 fatty acid desaturase (NtFAD3) gene, 3′-truncated, polyadenylated endo-NtFAD3 transcripts and 5′-truncated, intron-containing endo-NtFAD3 transcripts were detected in the total RNA fraction. Although transcription proceeded until the last exon of the endogenous NtFAD3 gene, intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts accumulated in the nucleus of the S-PTGS plants. Several intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts harboring most of the exon sequences were generated when an endogenous silencing suppressor gene, rgs-CaM, was overexpressed in the S-PTGS plants. These intron-containing NtFAD3 splice variants were generated in the presence of NtFAD3 siRNAs that are homologous to the nucleotide sequences of these splice variants. The results of this study indicate that the inhibition of endo-NtFAD3 gene expression is primarily directed via the alteration of splicing and not by cytoplasmic slicer activity. Our results suggest that the transgene and intron-containing endogenous counterpart genes are differentially suppressed in S-PTGS plants. PMID:24586294

  2. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Mediated by a Plastid Inner Envelope Phosphoenolpyruvate/Phosphate Translocator CUE1 in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Ren, Xiaozhi; Cao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Zhizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1) lead to the transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of ProRD29A:LUC (LUCIFERASE) and Pro35S:NPTII (Neomycin Phosphotransferase II) reporter genes. We performed a genetic screen to find suppressors of ros1 that identified two mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN UNDEREXPRESSED1 (CUE1) gene, which encodes a plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator. The cue1 mutations released the TGS of Pro35S:NPTII and the transcriptionally silent endogenous locus TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION in a manner that was independent of DNA methylation but dependent on chromatin modification. The cue1 mutations did not affect the TGS of ProRD29A:LUC in ros1, which was dependent on RNA-directed DNA methylation. It is possible that signals from chloroplasts help to regulate the epigenetic status of a subset of genomic loci in the nucleus. PMID:19515789

  3. Analysis of energetically biased transcripts of viruses and transposable elements

    PubMed Central

    Secolin, Rodrigo; Pascoal, Vinícius D’Ávila Bitencourt; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Pereira, Tiago Campos

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural endogenous process by which double-stranded RNA molecules trigger potent and specific gene silencing in eukaryotic cells and is characterized by target RNA cleavage. In mammals, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the trigger molecules of choice and constitute a new class of RNA-based antiviral agents. In an efficient RNAi response, the antisense strand of siRNAs must enter the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) in a process mediated by thermodynamic features. In this report, we hypothesize that silent mutations capable of inverting thermodynamic properties can promote resistance to siRNAs. Extensive computational analyses were used to assess whether continuous selective pressure that promotes such mutations could lead to the emergence of viral strains completely resistant to RNAi (i.e., prone to transfer only the sense strands to RISC). Based on our findings, we propose that, although synonymous mutations may produce functional resistance, this strategy cannot be systematically adopted by viruses since the longest RNAi-refractory sequence is only 10 nt long. This finding also suggests that all mRNAs display fluctuating thermodynamic landscapes and that, in terms of thermodynamic features, RNAi is a very efficient antiviral system since there will always be sites susceptible to siRNAs. PMID:23271949

  4. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tatsuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation zero plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A) was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification. PMID:25426109

  5. CovR alleviates transcriptional silencing by a nucleoid-associated histone-like protein in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Indranil; Mohapatra, Saswat Sourav

    2012-04-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, the global response regulator CovR plays an important role in biofilm formation, stress tolerance response, and caries production. We have previously demonstrated that CovR activates a large gene cluster, which is a part of a genomic island, TnSmu2. In this article, we have further characterized CovR at the molecular level to understand the gene activation mechanism. Toward this end, we mapped the transcription start site of the operon that lies upstream of the SMU.1348 gene (P(SMU.1348)), the first gene of the cluster. We constructed a transcriptional reporter fusion and showed that CovR induces expression from P(SMU.1348). We also demonstrated that purified CovR protects the sequence surrounding the -10 region of P(SMU.1348). In an in vitro transcription assay, we showed that histone-like protein (HLP), a homologue of Escherichia coli HU protein, represses transcription from P(SMU.1348). In vivo overexpression of HLP in trans also represses transcription from P(SMU.1348). Addition of CovR to the HLP-repressed P(SMU.1348) resulted in increased transcription from the promoter, suggesting a role for CovR in countering HLP silencing. Moreover, addition of SMU.1349, a transcriptional activator of the operon, to the in vitro assay further stimulated the transcription. Based on our in vivo and in vitro results, we propose a model for transcriptional activation of the operon. PMID:22343292

  6. CovR Alleviates Transcriptional Silencing by a Nucleoid-Associated Histone-Like Protein in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Saswat Sourav

    2012-01-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, the global response regulator CovR plays an important role in biofilm formation, stress tolerance response, and caries production. We have previously demonstrated that CovR activates a large gene cluster, which is a part of a genomic island, TnSmu2. In this article, we have further characterized CovR at the molecular level to understand the gene activation mechanism. Toward this end, we mapped the transcription start site of the operon that lies upstream of the SMU.1348 gene (PSMU.1348), the first gene of the cluster. We constructed a transcriptional reporter fusion and showed that CovR induces expression from PSMU.1348. We also demonstrated that purified CovR protects the sequence surrounding the −10 region of PSMU.1348. In an in vitro transcription assay, we showed that histone-like protein (HLP), a homologue of Escherichia coli HU protein, represses transcription from PSMU.1348. In vivo overexpression of HLP in trans also represses transcription from PSMU.1348. Addition of CovR to the HLP-repressed PSMU.1348 resulted in increased transcription from the promoter, suggesting a role for CovR in countering HLP silencing. Moreover, addition of SMU.1349, a transcriptional activator of the operon, to the in vitro assay further stimulated the transcription. Based on our in vivo and in vitro results, we propose a model for transcriptional activation of the operon. PMID:22343292

  7. Enhanced Generation of Myeloid Lineages in Hematopoietic Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells by Silencing Transcriptional Repressor Twist-2

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A.; Huang, Xue F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1+ and F4/80+ cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor. PMID:20025523

  8. RNA silencing of host transcripts by cauliflower mosaic virus requires coordinated action of the four Arabidopsis Dicer-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Moissiard, Guillaume; Voinnet, Olivier

    2006-12-19

    RNA silencing is an ancient mechanism of gene regulation with important antiviral roles in plants and insects. Although induction of RNA silencing by RNA viruses has been well documented in plants, the interactions between DNA viruses and the host silencing machinery remain poorly understood. We investigate this question with cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a dsDNA virus that expresses its genome through the polycistronic 35S RNA, which carries an unusually extensive secondary structure known as translational leader. We show that CaMV-derived siRNAs accumulate in turnip- and Arabidopsis-infected plants and that the leader is a major, albeit not exclusive, source for those molecules. Biogenesis of leader-derived siRNA requires the coordinated and hierarchical action of the four Arabidopsis Dicer-like (DCL) proteins. Our study also uncovers a "facilitating" role exerted by the microRNA biosynthetic enzyme DCL1 on accumulation of DCL2-, DCL3-, and DCL4-dependent siRNAs derived from the 35S leader. This feature of DCL1 defines a small RNA biosynthetic pathway that might have relevance for endogenous gene regulation. Several leader-derived siRNAs were found to bear near-perfect sequence complementarity to Arabidopsis transcripts, and, using a sensor transgene, we provide direct evidence that at least one of those molecules acts as a bona fide siRNA in infected turnip. Extensive bioinformatics searches identified >100 transcripts potentially targeted by CaMV-derived siRNAs, several of which are effectively down-regulated during infection. The implications of virus-directed silencing of host gene expression are discussed. PMID:17164336

  9. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate. PMID:25691247

  10. Media coverage of climate change in Russia: governmental bias and climate silence.

    PubMed

    Poberezhskaya, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores which actors and factors influence media coverage of climate change in Russia. It does this by analysing the coverage of three events by five Russian national newspapers (Komsomol'skaya pravda, Rossiyskaya gazeta, Izvestiya, Kommersant and Sovetskaya Rossiya). The three events are the Kyoto Conference in 1997, the Copenhagen Conference in 2009 and the Russian heat-wave of 2010. This paper concludes that regardless of the ownership structure of the newspapers or their dependence on advertising, there is little difference in quantity and quality of overall coverage on climate change. With most newspapers relying on Russian officials as information sources, almost none criticise or question Russian climate policy. Furthermore, the article concludes that, in Russia, the omission of climate change issues from discussion in national newspapers becomes a greater problem than biased coverage, as the lack of commentary decidedly prevents these issues from entering the public debate. PMID:24510920

  11. Conserved factor Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 triggers premature transcription termination and nucleates heterochromatin to promote gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Chalamcharla, Venkata R.; Folco, H. Diego; Dhakshnamoorthy, Jothy; Grewal, Shiv I. S.

    2015-01-01

    Cotranscriptional RNA processing and surveillance factors mediate heterochromatin formation in diverse eukaryotes. In fission yeast, RNAi machinery and RNA elimination factors including the Mtl1–Red1 core and the exosome are involved in facultative heterochromatin assembly; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that RNA elimination factors cooperate with the conserved exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2, which couples pre-mRNA 3′-end processing to transcription termination, to promote premature termination and facultative heterochromatin formation at meiotic genes. We also find that Dhp1 is critical for RNAi-mediated heterochromatin assembly at retroelements and regulated gene loci and facilitates the formation of constitutive heterochromatin at centromeric and mating-type loci. Remarkably, our results reveal that Dhp1 interacts with the Clr4/Suv39h methyltransferase complex and acts directly to nucleate heterochromatin. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified role for 3′-end processing and transcription termination machinery in gene silencing through premature termination and suggests that noncanonical transcription termination by Dhp1 and RNA elimination factors is linked to heterochromatin assembly. These findings have important implications for understanding silencing mechanisms targeting genes and repeat elements in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26631744

  12. SOX30, a novel epigenetic silenced tumor suppressor, promotes tumor cell apoptosis by transcriptional activating p53 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, F; Liu, W; Jiang, X; Shi, X; Yin, L; Ao, L; Cui, Z; Li, Y; Huang, C; Cao, J; Liu, J

    2015-01-01

    Although members of SOX family have been well documented for their essential roles in embryonic development, cell proliferation and disease, the functional role and molecular mechanism of SOX30 in cancer are largely unexplored. Here, we first identified SRY-box containing gene 30 (SOX30) as a novel preferentially methylated gene using genome-wide methylation screening. SOX30 hypermethylation was detected in 100% of lung cancer cell lines (9/9) and 70.83% (85/120) of primary lung tumor tissues compared with none (0/20) of normal and 8.0% (2/25) of peri-tumoral lung tissues (P<0.01). SOX30 was expressed in normal and peri-tumoral lung tissues in which SOX30 was unmethylated, but was silenced or downregulated in lung cancer cell lines and primary lung tumor tissues harboring a hypermethylated SOX30. De-methylation experiments further confirmed that silence of SOX30 was regulated by its hypermethylation. Ectopic expression of SOX30 induces cancer cell apoptosis with inhibiting proliferation in vitro and represses tumor formation in vivo, whereas knockdown of SOX30 demonstrates a reversed effect both in vitro and in vivo. At the molecular level, the antitumorigenic effect of SOX30 is mediated by directly binding to CACTTTG (+115 to +121) of p53 promoter region and activating p53 transcription, suggesting that SOX30 is a novel transcriptional activating factor of p53. Indeed, blockade of p53 attenuates the tumor inhibition of SOX30. Overall, these findings demonstrate that SOX30 is a novel epigenetic silenced tumor suppressor acting through direct regulation of p53 transcription and expression. This study provides novel insights on the mechanism of tumorigenesis in lung cancer. PMID:25435374

  13. Consolidation of the cancer genome into domains of repressive chromatin by long range epigenetic silencing (LRES) reduces transcriptional plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Coolen, Marcel W.; Stirzaker, Clare; Song, Jenny Z.; Statham, Aaron L.; Kassir, Zena; Moreno, Carlos S.; Young, Andrew N.; Varma, Vijay; Speed, Terence P.; Cowley, Mark; Lacaze, Paul; Kaplan, Warren; Robinson, Mark D.; Clark, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Silencing of individual genes can occur by genetic and epigenetic processes during carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. By creating an integrated prostate cancer epigenome map using tiling arrays, we show that contiguous regions of gene suppression commonly occur due to Long Range Epigenetic Silencing (LRES). We identified 47 novel LRES regions in prostate cancer, typically spanning ~2 Mb and harbouring ~12 genes, with a prevalence of tumour suppressor genes and miRNAs. Our data reveal that LRES is associated with regional histone deacetylation combined with sub-domains of different epigenetic remodelling patterns, that include re-enforcement, gain or exchange of repressive histone and DNA methylation marks. The transcriptional and epigenetic state of genes in normal prostate epithelial and human embryonic stem cells can play a critical role in defining the mode of cancer-associated epigenetic remodelling. We propose that a consolidation or effective reduction of the cancer genome commonly occurs in domains, due to a combination of LRES and LOH or genomic deletion, resulting in reduced transcriptional plasticity within these regions. PMID:20173741

  14. Transcriptional read-through is not sufficient to induce an epigenetic switch in the silencing activity of Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Erokhin, Maksim; Elizar’ev, Pavel; Parshikov, Aleksander; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group proteins are assembled on Polycomb response elements (PREs) to maintain tissue and stage-specific patterns of gene expression. Critical to coordinating gene expression with the process of differentiation, the activity of PREs can be switched “on” and “off.” When on, the PRE imposes a silenced state on the genes in the same domain that is stably inherited through multiple rounds of cell division. When the PRE is switched off, the domain is in a state permissive for gene expression that can be stably inherited. Previous studies have suggested that a burst of transcription through a PRE sequence displaces PcG proteins and provides a universal mechanism for inducing a heritable switch in PRE activity from on to off; however, the evidence favoring this model is indirect. Here, we have directly tested the transcriptional read-through mechanism. Contrary to previous suggestions, we show that transcription through the PRE is not sufficient for inducing an epigenetic switch in PRE activity. In fact, even high levels of continuous transcription through a PRE fails to dislodge the PcG proteins, nor does it remove repressive histone marks. Our results indicate that other mechanisms involving adjacent DNA regulatory elements must be implicated in heritable switch of PRE activity. PMID:26504232

  15. Transcriptional silencing and activation of paternal DNA during P lasmodium berghei zygotic development and transformation to oocyst

    PubMed Central

    Ukegbu, Chiamaka V.; Cho, Jee‐Sun; Christophides, George K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The malaria parasite develops sexually in the mosquito midgut upon entry with the ingested blood meal before it can invade the midgut epithelium and embark on sporogony. Recent data have identified a number of distinct transcriptional programmes operating during this critical phase of the parasite life cycle. We aimed at characterizing the parental contribution to these transcriptional programmes and establish the genetic framework that would guide further studies of P lasmodium zygotic development and ookinete‐to‐oocyst transition. To achieve this we used in vitro and in vivo cross‐fertilization experiments of various parasite lines expressing fluorescent reporters under the control of constitutive and stage‐specific promoters. The results revealed that the zygote/ookinete stage exhibits a maternal phenotype with respect to constitutively expressed reporters, which is derived from either maternal mRNA inheritance or transcription of the maternal allele. The respective paternal alleles are silenced in the zygote/ookinete but reactivated after midgut invasion and transformation to oocyst. Transcripts specifically produced in the zygote/ookinete are synthesized de novo by both parental alleles. These findings highlight a putative role of epigenetic regulation of P lasmodium zygotic development and add substantially to the emerging picture of the molecular mechanisms regulating this important stage of malaria transmission. PMID:25728487

  16. Panspecies Small-Molecule Disruptors of Heterochromatin-Mediated Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Castonguay, Emilie; White, Sharon A.; Kagansky, Alexander; St-Cyr, Daniel J.; Castillo, Araceli G.; Brugger, Christiane; White, Rachel; Bonilla, Carolina; Spitzer, Michaela; Earnshaw, William C.; Schalch, Thomas; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin underpins gene repression, genome integrity, and chromosome segregation. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, conserved protein complexes effect heterochromatin formation via RNA interference-mediated recruitment of a histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase to cognate chromatin regions. To identify small molecules that inhibit heterochromatin formation, we performed an in vivo screen for loss of silencing of a dominant selectable kanMX reporter gene embedded within fission yeast centromeric heterochromatin. Two structurally unrelated compounds, HMS-I1 and HMS-I2, alleviated kanMX silencing and decreased repressive H3K9 methylation levels at the transgene. The decrease in methylation caused by HMS-I1 and HMS-I2 was observed at all loci regulated by histone methylation, including centromeric repeats, telomeric regions, and the mating-type locus, consistent with inhibition of the histone deacetylases (HDACs) Clr3 and/or Sir2. Chemical-genetic epistasis and expression profiles revealed that both compounds affect the activity of the Clr3-containing Snf2/HDAC repressor complex (SHREC). In vitro HDAC assays revealed that HMS-I1 and HMS-I2 inhibit Clr3 HDAC activity. HMS-I1 also alleviated transgene reporter silencing by heterochromatin in Arabidopsis and a mouse cell line, suggesting a conserved mechanism of action. HMS-I1 and HMS-I2 bear no resemblance to known inhibitors of chromatin-based activities and thus represent novel chemical probes for heterochromatin formation and function. PMID:25487573

  17. The Dictyostelium discoideum RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RrpC silences the centromeric retrotransposon DIRS-1 post-transcriptionally and is required for the spreading of RNA silencing signals

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Stephan; Meier, Doreen; Seehafer, Carsten; Malicki, Marek; Hofmann, Patrick; Schmith, Anika; Winckler, Thomas; Földesi, Balint; Boesler, Benjamin; Nellen, Wolfgang; Reimegård, Johan; Käller, Max; Hällman, Jimmie; Emanuelsson, Olof; Avesson, Lotta; Söderbom, Fredrik; Hammann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Dictyostelium intermediate repeat sequence 1 (DIRS-1) is the founding member of a poorly characterized class of retrotransposable elements that contain inverse long terminal repeats and tyrosine recombinase instead of DDE-type integrase enzymes. In Dictyostelium discoideum, DIRS-1 forms clusters that adopt the function of centromeres, rendering tight retrotransposition control critical to maintaining chromosome integrity. We report that in deletion strains of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RrpC, full-length and shorter DIRS-1 messenger RNAs are strongly enriched. Shorter versions of a hitherto unknown long non-coding RNA in DIRS-1 antisense orientation are also enriched in rrpC– strains. Concurrent with the accumulation of long transcripts, the vast majority of small (21 mer) DIRS-1 RNAs vanish in rrpC– strains. RNASeq reveals an asymmetric distribution of the DIRS-1 small RNAs, both along DIRS-1 and with respect to sense and antisense orientation. We show that RrpC is required for post-transcriptional DIRS-1 silencing and also for spreading of RNA silencing signals. Finally, DIRS-1 mis-regulation in the absence of RrpC leads to retrotransposon mobilization. In summary, our data reveal RrpC as a key player in the silencing of centromeric retrotransposon DIRS-1. RrpC acts at the post-transcriptional level and is involved in spreading of RNA silencing signals, both in the 5′ and 3′ directions. PMID:24369430

  18. Silencing clusterin gene transcription on effects of multidrug resistance reversing of human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjie; Sai, Wenli; Yao, Min; Gu, Hongbin; Yao, Yao; Qian, Qi; Yao, Dengfu

    2015-05-01

    Abnormal clusterin (CLU) expression is associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, the CLU expression was analyzed in human hepatoma cells and chemoresistant counterpart HepG2/ADM cells. Compared with L02 cells, the overexpression of cellular CLU was identified in HepG2, HepG2/ADM, SMMC7721, Hep3B ,and PLC cells and relatively lower expression in Bel-7404, SNU-739, and MHCC97H cells. Specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to silence CLU gene transcription were designed, and the most effective sequences were screened. After the HepG2/ADM cells transfected with shRNA-1, the inhibition of CLU expression was 73.68 % at messenger RNA (mRNA) level by real-time quantitative RT-PCR with obvious enhancement in cell chemosensitivity, increasing apoptosis induced by doxorubicin using fluorescence kit, and Rh-123 retention qualified with flow cytometry. Knockdown CLU also significantly decreased the drug efflux pump activity through the depression of MDR1/P-glycoprotein (q = 11.739, P < 0.001). Moreover, silencing CLU led to downregulation of β-catenin (q = 13.544, P = 0.001), suggesting that downregulation of CLU might be a key point to reverse multidrug resistance of HepG2/ADM cells. PMID:25600802

  19. MIDGET Unravels Functions of the Arabidopsis Topoisomerase VI Complex in DNA Endoreduplication, Chromatin Condensation, and Transcriptional Silencing[W

    PubMed Central

    Kirik, Viktor; Schrader, Andrea; Uhrig, Joachim F.; Hulskamp, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The plant homologs of the archaeal DNA topoisomerase VI complex are required for the progression of endoreduplication cycles. Here, we describe the identification of MIDGET (MID) as a novel component of topoisomerase VI. We show that mid mutants show the same phenotype as rhl1, rhl2, and top6B mutants and that MID protein physically interacts with RHL1. The phenotypic analysis revealed new phenotypes, indicating that topoisomerase VI is involved in chromatin organization and transcriptional silencing. In addition, genetic evidence is provided suggesting that the ATR-dependent DNA damage repair checkpoint is activated in mid mutants, and CYCB1;1 is ectopically activated. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of CYCB1;2 can rescue the endoreduplication defects in mid mutants, suggesting that in mid mutants, a specific checkpoint is activated preventing further progression of endoreduplication cycles. PMID:17951446

  20. Targeted silencing of BjMYB28 transcription factor gene directs development of low glucosinolate lines in oilseed Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Rehna; Mukhopadhyay, Arundhati; Bisht, Naveen C

    2013-09-01

    Brassica juncea (Indian mustard), a globally important oilseed crop, contains relatively high amount of seed glucosinolates ranging from 80 to 120 μmol/g dry weight (DW). One of the major breeding objectives in oilseed Brassicas is to improve the seed-meal quality through the development of low-seed-glucosinolate lines (<30 μmol/g DW), as high amounts of certain seed glucosinolates are known to be anti-nutritional and reduce the meal palatability. Here, we report the development of transgenic B. juncea lines having seed glucosinolates as low as 11.26 μmol/g DW, through RNAi-based targeted suppression of BjMYB28, a R2R3-MYB transcription factor family gene involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. Targeted silencing of BjMYB28 homologs provided significant reduction in the anti-nutritional aliphatic glucosinolates fractions, without altering the desirable nonaliphatic glucosinolate pool, both in leaves and seeds of transgenic plants. Molecular characterization of single-copy, low glucosinolate homozygous lines confirmed significant down-regulation of BjMYB28 homologs vis-à-vis enhanced accumulation of BjMYB28-specific siRNA pool. Consequently, these low glucosinolate lines also showed significant suppression of genes involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. The low glucosinolate trait was stable in subsequent generations of the transgenic lines with no visible off-target effects on plant growth and development. Various seed quality parameters including fatty acid composition, oil content, protein content and seed weight of the low glucosinolate lines also remained unaltered, when tested under containment conditions in the field. Our results indicate that targeted silencing of a key glucosinolate transcriptional regulator MYB28 has huge potential for reducing the glucosinolates content and improving the seed-meal quality of oilseed Brassica crops. PMID:23721233

  1. Geminivirus AL2 and L2 proteins suppress transcriptional gene silencing and cause genome-wide reductions in cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, R Cody; Asad, Shaheen; Wolf, Jamie N; Mohannath, Gireesha; Bisaro, David M

    2009-05-01

    Geminiviruses replicate single-stranded DNA genomes through double-stranded intermediates that associate with cellular histone proteins. Unlike RNA viruses, they are subject to RNA-directed methylation pathways that target viral chromatin and likely lead to transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Here we present evidence that the related geminivirus proteins AL2 and L2 are able to suppress this aspect of host defense. AL2 and L2 interact with and inactivate adenosine kinase (ADK), which is required for efficient production of S-adenosyl methionine, an essential methyltransferase cofactor. We demonstrate that the viral proteins can reverse TGS of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene in Nicotiana benthamiana when overexpressed from a Potato virus X vector and that reversal of TGS by geminiviruses requires L2 function. We also show that AL2 and L2 cause ectopic expression of endogenous Arabidopsis thaliana loci silenced by methylation in a manner that correlates with ADK inhibition. However, at one exceptional locus, ADK inhibition was insufficient and TGS reversal required the transcriptional activation domain of AL2. Using restriction-sensitive PCR and bisulfite sequencing, we showed that AL2-mediated TGS suppression is accompanied by reduced cytosine methylation. Finally, using a methylation-sensitive single-nucleotide extension assay, we showed that transgenic expression of AL2 or L2 causes global reduction in cytosine methylation. Our results provide further evidence that viral chromatin methylation is an important host defense and allow us to propose that as a countermeasure, geminivirus proteins reverse TGS by nonspecifically inhibiting cellular transmethylation reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that viral proteins can inhibit TGS. PMID:19279102

  2. Neural transcription factors bias cleavage stage blastomeres to give rise to neural ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Shailly; Mandelbaum, Max; Herold, Mona; Majumdar, Himani Datta; Neilson, Karen M; Maynard, Thomas M; Mood, Kathy; Daar, Ira O; Moody, Sally A

    2016-06-01

    The decision by embryonic ectoderm to give rise to epidermal versus neural derivatives is the result of signaling events during blastula and gastrula stages. However, there also is evidence in Xenopus that cleavage stage blastomeres contain maternally derived molecules that bias them toward a neural fate. We used a blastomere explant culture assay to test whether maternally deposited transcription factors bias 16-cell blastomere precursors of epidermal or neural ectoderm to express early zygotic neural genes in the absence of gastrulation interactions or exogenously supplied signaling factors. We found that Foxd4l1, Zic2, Gmnn, and Sox11 each induced explants made from ventral, epidermis-producing blastomeres to express early neural genes, and that at least some of the Foxd4l1 and Zic2 activities are required at cleavage stages. Similarly, providing extra Foxd4l1 or Zic2 to explants made from dorsal, neural plate-producing blastomeres significantly increased the expression of early neural genes, whereas knocking down either significantly reduced them. These results show that maternally delivered transcription factors bias cleavage stage blastomeres to a neural fate. We demonstrate that mouse and human homologs of Foxd4l1 have similar functional domains compared to the frog protein, as well as conserved transcriptional activities when expressed in Xenopus embryos and blastomere explants. genesis 54:334-349, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27092474

  3. Wheat streak mosaic virus P1, not HC-Pro, facilitates disease synergism and suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potyvirus HC-Pro is a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). One consequence of PTGS suppression is pathogenicity enhancement, resulting in disease synergism upon mixed infection of a potyvirus and an unrelated virus. Tritimoviruses also encode HC-Pro sharing limited sequence i...

  4. Epigenetic silencing of Bim transcription by Spi-1/PU.1 promotes apoptosis resistance in leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ridinger-Saison, M; Evanno, E; Gallais, I; Rimmelé, P; Selimoglu-Buet, D; Sapharikas, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Guillouf, C

    2013-09-01

    Deregulation of transcriptional networks contributes to haematopoietic malignancies. The transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 is a master regulator of haematopoiesis and its alteration leads to leukaemia. Spi-1 overexpression inhibits differentiation and promotes resistance to apoptosis in erythroleukaemia. Here, we show that Spi-1 inhibits mitochondrial apoptosis in vitro and in vivo through the transcriptional repression of Bim, a proapoptotic factor. BIM interacts with MCL-1 that behaves as a major player in the survival of the preleukaemic cells. The repression of BIM expression reduces the amount of BIM-MCL-1 complexes, thus increasing the fraction of potentially active antiapoptotic MCL-1. We then demonstrate that Spi-1 represses Bim transcription by binding to the Bim promoter and by promoting the trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3, a repressive histone mark) on the Bim promoter. The PRC2 repressive complex of Polycomb is directly responsible for the deposit of H3K27me3 mark at the Bim promoter. SUZ12 and the histone methyltransferase EZH2, two PRC2 subunits bind to the Bim promoter at the same location than H3K27me3, distinct of the Spi-1 DNA binding site. As Spi-1 interacts with SUZ12 and EZH2, these results indicate that Spi-1 modulates the activity of PRC2 without directly recruiting the complex to the site of its activity on the chromatin. Our results identify a new mechanism whereby Spi-1 represses transcription and provide mechanistic insights on the antiapoptotic function of a transcription factor mediated by the epigenetic control of gene expression. PMID:23852375

  5. Allele-specific silencing of EEC p63 mutant R304W restores p63 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, F; Lena, A M; Panatta, E; Nasser, W; Shalom-Feuerstein, R; Candi, E; Melino, G

    2016-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactily-ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate) syndrome is a rare genetic disease, autosomal dominant inherited. It is part of the ectodermal dysplasia disorders caused by heterozygous mutations in TP63 gene. EEC patients present limb malformations, orofacial clefting, skin and skin's appendages defects, ocular abnormalities. The transcription factor p63, encoded by TP63, is a master gene for the commitment of ectodermal-derived tissues, being expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge is critical for vertebrate limb formation and, at a later stage, for skin and skin's appendages development. The ΔNp63α isoform is predominantly expressed in epithelial cells and it is indispensable for preserving the self-renewal capacity of adult stem cells and to engage specific epithelial differentiation programs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) offers a potential therapy approach for EEC patients by selectively silencing the mutant allele. Here, using a systemic screening based on a dual-luciferase reported gene assay, we have successfully identified specific siRNAs for repressing the EEC-causing p63 mutant, R304W. Upon siRNA treatment, we were able to restore ΔNp63-WT allele transcriptional function in induced pluripotent stem cells that were derived from EEC patient biopsy. This study demonstrates that siRNAs approach is promising and, may pave the way for curing/delaying major symptoms, such as cornea degeneration and skin erosions in young EEC patients. PMID:27195674

  6. Nucleolin stabilizes G-quadruplex structures folded by the LTR promoter and silences HIV-1 viral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Elena; Frasson, Ilaria; Scalabrin, Matteo; Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Nadai, Matteo; Palù, Giorgio; Fabris, Dan; Richter, Sara N.

    2015-01-01

    Folding of the LTR promoter into dynamic G-quadruplex conformations has been shown to suppress its transcriptional activity in HIV-1. Here we sought to identify the proteins that control the folding of this region of proviral genome by inducing/stabilizing G-quadruplex structures. The implementation of electrophorethic mobility shift assay and pull-down experiments coupled with mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the cellular protein nucleolin is able to specifically recognize G-quadruplex structures present in the LTR promoter. Nucleolin recognized with high affinity and specificity the majority, but not all the possible G-quadruplexes folded by this sequence. In addition, it displayed greater binding preference towards DNA than RNA G-quadruplexes, thus indicating two levels of selectivity based on the sequence and nature of the target. The interaction translated into stabilization of the LTR G-quadruplexes and increased promoter silencing activity; in contrast, disruption of nucleolin binding in cells by both siRNAs and a nucleolin binding aptamer greatly increased LTR promoter activity. These data indicate that nucleolin possesses a specific and regulated activity toward the HIV-1 LTR promoter, which is mediated by G-quadruplexes. These observations provide new essential insights into viral transcription and a possible low mutagenic target for antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26354862

  7. Allele-specific silencing of EEC p63 mutant R304W restores p63 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Novelli, F; Lena, A M; Panatta, E; Nasser, W; Shalom-Feuerstein, R; Candi, E; Melino, G

    2016-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactily-ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate) syndrome is a rare genetic disease, autosomal dominant inherited. It is part of the ectodermal dysplasia disorders caused by heterozygous mutations in TP63 gene. EEC patients present limb malformations, orofacial clefting, skin and skin's appendages defects, ocular abnormalities. The transcription factor p63, encoded by TP63, is a master gene for the commitment of ectodermal-derived tissues, being expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge is critical for vertebrate limb formation and, at a later stage, for skin and skin's appendages development. The ΔNp63α isoform is predominantly expressed in epithelial cells and it is indispensable for preserving the self-renewal capacity of adult stem cells and to engage specific epithelial differentiation programs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) offers a potential therapy approach for EEC patients by selectively silencing the mutant allele. Here, using a systemic screening based on a dual-luciferase reported gene assay, we have successfully identified specific siRNAs for repressing the EEC-causing p63 mutant, R304W. Upon siRNA treatment, we were able to restore ΔNp63-WT allele transcriptional function in induced pluripotent stem cells that were derived from EEC patient biopsy. This study demonstrates that siRNAs approach is promising and, may pave the way for curing/delaying major symptoms, such as cornea degeneration and skin erosions in young EEC patients. PMID:27195674

  8. Cbx7 is epigenetically silenced in glioblastoma and inhibits cell migration by targeting YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Zahid; Patil, Vikas; Arora, Anjali; Hegde, Alangar S; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant form of astrocytomas which are difficult to treat and portend a grave clinical course and poor prognosis. In this study, we identified Chromobox homolog 7 (Cbx7), a member of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), as a downregulated gene in GBM owing to its promoter hypermethylation. Bisulphite sequencing and methylation inhibitor treatment established the hypermethylation of Cbx7 in GBM. Exogenous overexpression of Cbx7 induced cell death, inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration/invasion of the glioma cells. GSEA of Cbx7 regulated genes identified Cbx7 as a repressor of transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ, the inhibitory targets of the Hippo signalling pathway. In good correlation, the exogenous expression of Cbx7 repressed the YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription and downregulated CTGF, a bonafide YAP/TAZ target. We also observed reduced levels of phospho-JNK in Cbx7 expressing cells. Additionally, CTGF silencing and pharmacological inhibition of JNK also inhibited glioma cell migration. Further, Cbx7 failed to inhibit cell migration significantly in the presence of exogenously overexpressed CTGF or constitutively active JNK. Thus, our study identifies Cbx7 as an inhibitor of glioma cell migration through its inhibitory effect on YAP/TAZ-CTGF-JNK signalling axis and underscores the importance of epigenetic inactivation of Cbx7 in gliomagenesis. PMID:27291091

  9. Cbx7 is epigenetically silenced in glioblastoma and inhibits cell migration by targeting YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Zahid; Patil, Vikas; Arora, Anjali; Hegde, Alangar S.; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant form of astrocytomas which are difficult to treat and portend a grave clinical course and poor prognosis. In this study, we identified Chromobox homolog 7 (Cbx7), a member of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), as a downregulated gene in GBM owing to its promoter hypermethylation. Bisulphite sequencing and methylation inhibitor treatment established the hypermethylation of Cbx7 in GBM. Exogenous overexpression of Cbx7 induced cell death, inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration/invasion of the glioma cells. GSEA of Cbx7 regulated genes identified Cbx7 as a repressor of transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ, the inhibitory targets of the Hippo signalling pathway. In good correlation, the exogenous expression of Cbx7 repressed the YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription and downregulated CTGF, a bonafide YAP/TAZ target. We also observed reduced levels of phospho-JNK in Cbx7 expressing cells. Additionally, CTGF silencing and pharmacological inhibition of JNK also inhibited glioma cell migration. Further, Cbx7 failed to inhibit cell migration significantly in the presence of exogenously overexpressed CTGF or constitutively active JNK. Thus, our study identifies Cbx7 as an inhibitor of glioma cell migration through its inhibitory effect on YAP/TAZ-CTGF-JNK signalling axis and underscores the importance of epigenetic inactivation of Cbx7 in gliomagenesis. PMID:27291091

  10. Nucleolin stabilizes G-quadruplex structures folded by the LTR promoter and silences HIV-1 viral transcription.

    PubMed

    Tosoni, Elena; Frasson, Ilaria; Scalabrin, Matteo; Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Nadai, Matteo; Palù, Giorgio; Fabris, Dan; Richter, Sara N

    2015-10-15

    Folding of the LTR promoter into dynamic G-quadruplex conformations has been shown to suppress its transcriptional activity in HIV-1. Here we sought to identify the proteins that control the folding of this region of proviral genome by inducing/stabilizing G-quadruplex structures. The implementation of electrophorethic mobility shift assay and pull-down experiments coupled with mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the cellular protein nucleolin is able to specifically recognize G-quadruplex structures present in the LTR promoter. Nucleolin recognized with high affinity and specificity the majority, but not all the possible G-quadruplexes folded by this sequence. In addition, it displayed greater binding preference towards DNA than RNA G-quadruplexes, thus indicating two levels of selectivity based on the sequence and nature of the target. The interaction translated into stabilization of the LTR G-quadruplexes and increased promoter silencing activity; in contrast, disruption of nucleolin binding in cells by both siRNAs and a nucleolin binding aptamer greatly increased LTR promoter activity. These data indicate that nucleolin possesses a specific and regulated activity toward the HIV-1 LTR promoter, which is mediated by G-quadruplexes. These observations provide new essential insights into viral transcription and a possible low mutagenic target for antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26354862

  11. Silencing of core transcription factors in human EC cells highlights the importance of autocrine FGF signaling for self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Greber, Boris; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite their distinct origins, human embryonic stem (hES) and embryonic carcinoma (hEC) cells share a number of similarities such as surface antigen expression, growth characteristics, the ability to either self-renew or differentiate, and control of the undifferentiated state by the same core transcription factors. To obtain further insights into the regulation of self-renewal, we have silenced hES/hEC cell-specific genes in NCCIT hEC cells and analysed the downstream effects by means of microarrays. Results RNAi-mediated silencing of OCT4 and SOX2 induced differentiation with mesodermal characteristics. Markers of trophoblast induction were only transiently up-regulated in the OCT4 knock-down. Independent knock-downs of NANOG produced a proliferation rather than a differentiation phenotype, which may be due to high NANOG expression levels in the cell line used. Published ChIP-chip data from hES cells were used to identify putative direct targets. RNAi-mediated differentiation was accompanied by direct down-regulation of known hES/hEC cell markers. This included all three core transcription factors in the case of the OCT4 and SOX2 knock-downs, confirming previous findings of reciprocal activation in ES cells. Furthermore, large numbers of histone genes as well as epigenetic regulators were differentially expressed, pointing at chromatin remodeling as an additional regulatory level in the differentiation process. Moreover, loss of self-renewal was accompanied by the down-regulation of genes involved in FGF signaling. FGF receptor inhibition for short and prolonged periods of time revealed that the ERK/MAPK cascade is activated by endogenously expressed fibroblast growth factors and that FGF signaling is cruicial for maintaining the undifferentiated state of hEC cells, like in hES cells. Conclusion Control of self-renewal appears to be very similar in hEC and hES cells. This is supported by large numbers of common transcription factor targets and the

  12. RNAi-directed post transcriptional gene silencing of an Arabidopsis Myb transgene in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AtMyb90 gene encodes the 'production of anthocyanin pigment 2' (PAP2) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana and is able to induce a visible hyper-pigmented phenotype when expressed in tobacco. Based upon this phenotype, we have used the AtMyb90 gene as a reporter gene to examine RNAi-dire...

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid Mediates Activating Transcription Factor 3 Expression Which Is a Target for Post-Transcriptional Silencing by miR-30c-2-3p

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha T.; Jia, Wei; Beedle, Aaron M.; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Murph, Mandi M.

    2015-01-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding entities, they have important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of most of the human genome. These small entities generate fine-tuning adjustments in the expression of mRNA, which can mildly or massively affect the abundance of proteins. Previously, we found that the expression of miR-30c-2-3p is induced by lysophosphatidic acid and has an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. The goal here is to confirm that ATF3 mRNA is a target of miR-30c-2-3p silencing, thereby further establishing the functional role of miR-30c-2-3p. Using a combination of bioinformatics, qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and luciferase assays, we uncovered a regulatory pathway between miR-30c-2-3p and the expression of the transcription factor, ATF3. Lysophosphatidic acids triggers the expression of both miR-30c-2-3p and ATF3, which peak at 1 h and are absent 8 h post stimulation in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 serous ovarian cancer cells. The 3´-untranslated region (3´-UTR) of ATF3 was a predicted, putative target for miR-30c-2-3p, which we confirmed as a bona-fide interaction using a luciferase reporter assay. Specific mutations introduced into the predicted site of interaction between miR-30c-2-3p and the 3´-UTR of ATF3 alleviated the suppression of the luciferase signal. Furthermore, the presence of anti-miR-30c-2-3p enhanced ATF3 mRNA and protein after lysophosphatidic acid stimulation. Thus, the data suggest that after the expression of ATF3 and miR-30c-2-3p are elicited by lysophosphatidic acid, subsequently miR-30c-2-3p negatively regulates the expression of ATF3 through post-transcriptional silencing, which prevents further ATF3-related outcomes as a consequence of lysophosphatidic acid signaling. PMID:26418018

  14. Transcriptional gene silencing of dopamine D3 receptor caused by let-7d mimics in immortalized renal proximal tubule cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Cheng, Caiyu; He, Duofen; Shi, Weibin; Fu, Chunjiang; Wang, Xukai; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-04-15

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) induced by synthetic exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that are fully complementary to gene promoters has been demonstrated in mammalian cells. However, it remains unclear whether microRNAs (miRNAs), which are endogenous small regulatory RNAs, can also silence gene transcription. We investigated the regulation mechanism of let-7d on dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) in immortalized renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells of rats, where let-7d has a predicted homologous target site within DRD3 promoter. We found that let-7d mimics repressed DRD3 expression at the transcription level in RPT cells. Let-7d induced DRD3 inhibition via DNA-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNA-methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) dependent DNA methylation and the inhibition could be abolished by 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dc), a DNA methylation inhibitor. Let-7d induced DRD3 repression was associated with the recruitment of Argonaute 2 (AGO2) protein. Histone 3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) was involved in the let-7d induced DRD3 TGS, indicating the chromatin-level silencing. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that let-7d may induce DRD3 repression in a transcriptional manner by means of DNMTs dependent DNA methylation and histone modification. It is suggested that miRNAs may act as a transcriptional gene regulator via the recognition of the homologous target site within the gene promoter. PMID:26802971

  15. Alterations in the hepatic transcriptional landscape after RNAi mediated ApoB silencing in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M Sabry; Kumar, Chanchal; Chia, Ser Mien; Anandalakshmi, Vidhya; Boo, Nicole; Strapps, Walter; Robinson, Michael; Caguyong, Michelle; Bartz, Steven; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; van Gool, Alain; Shih, Shian-Jiun

    2015-10-01

    The greater genomic conservation between humans and non-human primates (NHP) enables target validation studies for developing of therapeutic strategies for human diseases. Together with predicting activity and potential adverse clinical signs, the inclusion of NHP testing bequeaths to efficacy models for dose titration and pharmacodynamic effects. We have used lipid nanoparticle encapsulated siRNA to silence ApoB in the liver and assessed the phenotypic effects on serum lipids with various levels of hepatic ApoB mRNA knockdown in healthy lean cynomolgus monkeys. ApoB siRNA dosed animals demonstrated significant reductions of hepatic ApoB mRNA and serum APOB protein, with a substantial lowering of plasma lipid levels without obvious signs of toxicity. Microarray based assessment of ApoB siRNA mediated effects revealed a number of differentially expressed genes which mapped onto biological pathways and processes related to lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Furthermore, we identified potential targets and cellular effects that could be studied for therapeutic benchmarking of APOB mediated effects. The network of ApoB regulated genes should be of significance for the understanding and development of novel hypercholesterolemia therapies. PMID:26275376

  16. ATRX contributes to epigenetic asymmetry and silencing of major satellite transcripts in the maternal genome of the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    De La Fuente, Rabindranath; Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M.

    2015-01-01

    A striking proportion of human cleavage-stage embryos exhibit chromosome instability (CIN). Notably, until now, no experimental model has been described to determine the origin and mechanisms of complex chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we examined mouse embryos deficient for the chromatin remodeling protein ATRX to determine the cellular mechanisms activated in response to CIN. We demonstrate that ATRX is required for silencing of major satellite transcripts in the maternal genome, where it confers epigenetic asymmetry to pericentric heterochromatin during the transition to the first mitosis. This stage is also characterized by a striking kinetochore size asymmetry established by differences in CENP-C protein between the parental genomes. Loss of ATRX results in increased centromeric mitotic recombination, a high frequency of sister chromatid exchanges and double strand DNA breaks, indicating the formation of mitotic recombination break points. ATRX-deficient embryos exhibit a twofold increase in transcripts for aurora kinase B, the centromeric cohesin ESCO2, DNMT1, the ubiquitin-ligase (DZIP3) and the histone methyl transferase (EHMT1). Thus, loss of ATRX activates a pathway that integrates epigenetic modifications and DNA repair in response to chromosome breaks. These results reveal the cellular response of the cleavage-stage embryo to CIN and uncover a mechanism by which centromeric fission induces the formation of large-scale chromosomal rearrangements. Our results have important implications to determine the epigenetic origins of CIN that lead to congenital birth defects and early pregnancy loss, as well as the mechanisms involved in the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:25926359

  17. Transient Reversal of Episome Silencing Precedes VP16-Dependent Transcription during Reactivation of Latent HSV-1 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Youn; Mandarino, Angelo; Chao, Moses V.; Mohr, Ian; Wilson, Angus C.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) establishes latency in peripheral neurons, creating a permanent source of recurrent infections. The latent genome is assembled into chromatin and lytic cycle genes are silenced. Processes that orchestrate reentry into productive replication (reactivation) remain poorly understood. We have used latently infected cultures of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) sympathetic neurons to profile viral gene expression following a defined reactivation stimulus. Lytic genes are transcribed in two distinct phases, differing in their reliance on protein synthesis, viral DNA replication and the essential initiator protein VP16. The first phase does not require viral proteins and has the appearance of a transient, widespread de-repression of the previously silent lytic genes. This allows synthesis of viral regulatory proteins including VP16, which accumulate in the cytoplasm of the host neuron. During the second phase, VP16 and its cellular cofactor HCF-1, which is also predominantly cytoplasmic, concentrate in the nucleus where they assemble an activator complex on viral promoters. The transactivation function supplied by VP16 promotes increased viral lytic gene transcription leading to the onset of genome amplification and the production of infectious viral particles. Thus regulated localization of de novo synthesized VP16 is likely to be a critical determinant of HSV-1 reactivation in sympathetic neurons. PMID:22383875

  18. Rational Re-engineering of a Transcriptional Silencing PreQ1 Riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Cheng; Lowe, Phillip T; Robinson, Christopher J; Vincent, Helen A; Dixon, Neil; Leigh, James; Micklefield, Jason

    2015-07-22

    Re-engineered riboswitches that no longer respond to cellular metabolites, but that instead can be controlled by synthetic molecules, are potentially useful gene regulatory tools for use in synthetic biology and biotechnology fields. Previously, extensive genetic selection and screening approaches were employed to re-engineer a natural adenine riboswitch to create orthogonal ON-switches, enabling translational control of target gene expression in response to synthetic ligands. Here, we describe how a rational targeted approach was used to re-engineer the PreQ1 riboswitch from Bacillus subtilis into an orthogonal OFF-switch. In this case, the evaluation of just six synthetic compounds with seven riboswitch mutants led to the identification of an orthogonal riboswitch-ligand pairing that effectively repressed the transcription of selected genes in B. subtilis. The streamlining of the re-engineering approach, and its extension to a second class of riboswitches, provides a methodological platform for the creation of new orthogonal regulatory components for biotechnological applications including gene functional analysis and antimicrobial target validation and screening. PMID:26106809

  19. Loss of epigenetic silencing of the DUX4 transcription factor gene in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jane E

    2015-10-15

    Current genetic and molecular evidence best supports an epigenetic mechanism for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), whereby de-repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array leads to aberrant expression of the DUX4 transcription factor in skeletal muscle. This de-repression is triggered by either array contraction or (more rarely) by mutation of the SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1) gene. Activation of DUX4 targets, including germline genes and several mammalian retrotransposons, then drives pathogenesis. A direct role for DUX4 mRNA in suppression of nonsense-mediated decay pathways has recently been demonstrated and may also contribute to muscle pathology. Loss of D4Z4 repression in FSHD is observed as hypomethylation of the array accompanied by loss of repressive chromatin marks. The molecular mechanisms of D4Z4 repression are poorly understood, but recent data have identified an Argonaute (AGO)-dependent siRNA pathway. Targeting this pathway by exogenous siRNAs could be a therapeutic strategy for FSHD. PMID:26113644

  20. The analysis of novel distal Cebpa enhancers and silencers using a transcriptional model reveals the complex regulatory logic of hematopoietic lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, Eric; Reinitz, John; Manu

    2016-05-01

    C/EBPα plays an instructive role in the macrophage-neutrophil cell-fate decision and its expression is necessary for neutrophil development. How Cebpa itself is regulated in the myeloid lineage is not known. We decoded the cis-regulatory logic of Cebpa, and two other myeloid transcription factors, Egr1 and Egr2, using a combined experimental-computational approach. With a reporter design capable of detecting both distal enhancers and silencers, we analyzed 46 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in cells representing myeloid progenitors, and derived early macrophages or neutrophils. In addition to novel enhancers, this analysis revealed a surprisingly large number of silencers. We determined the regulatory roles of 15 potential transcriptional regulators by testing 32,768 alternative sequence-based transcriptional models against CRM activity data. This comprehensive analysis allowed us to infer the cis-regulatory logic for most of the CRMs. Silencer-mediated repression of Cebpa was found to be effected mainly by TFs expressed in non-myeloid lineages, highlighting a previously unappreciated contribution of long-distance silencing to hematopoietic lineage resolution. The repression of Cebpa by multiple factors expressed in alternative lineages suggests that hematopoietic genes are organized into densely interconnected repressive networks instead of hierarchies of mutually repressive pairs of pivotal TFs. More generally, our results demonstrate that de novo cis-regulatory dissection is feasible on a large scale with the aid of transcriptional modeling. Current address: Department of Biology, University of North Dakota, 10 Cornell Street, Stop 9019, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9019, USA. PMID:26945717

  1. Loss of sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing by sequential introduction of the same transgene sequences in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Sayaka; Takahashi, Kouta; Abiko, Tomomi; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2010-04-01

    RNA silencing is an epigenetic inhibition of gene expression and is guided by small interfering RNAs. Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) occurs in a portion of a transgenic plant population. When a sense transgene encoding a tobacco endoplasmic reticulum omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (NtFAD3) was introduced into tobacco plants, an S-PTGS line, S44, was obtained. Introduction of another copy of the NtFAD3 transgene into S44 plants caused a phenotypic change from S-PTGS to overexpression. Because this change was associated with the methylation of the promoter sequences of the transgene, reduced transcriptional activity may abolish S-PTGS and residual transcription of the sense transgene may account for the overexpression. To clarify whether RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) can repress the transcriptional activity of the S44 transgene locus, we introduced several RdDM constructs targeting the transgene promoter. An RdDM construct harboring a 200-bp-long fragment of promoter sequences efficiently abrogated the generation of NtFAD3 small interfering RNAs in S44 plants. Transcription of the transgene was partially repressed, but the resulting NtFAD3 mRNAs successfully accumulated and an overexpressed phenotype was established. Our results indicate an example in which overexpression of the transgene is established by complex epigenetic interactions among the transgenic loci. PMID:20180844

  2. Identification of a class of human cancer germline genes with transcriptional silencing refractory to the hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Almatrafi, Ahmed; Feichtinger, Julia; Vernon, Ellen G.; Escobar, Natalia Gomez; Wakeman, Jane A.; Larcombe, Lee D.; McFarlane, Ramsay J.

    2014-01-01

    Bona fide germline genes have expression restricted to the germ cells of the gonads. Testis-specific germline development-associated genes can become activated in cancer cells and can potentially drive the oncogenic process and serve as therapeutic/biomarker targets; such germline genes are referred to as cancer/testis genes. Many cancer/testis genes are silenced via hypermethylation of CpG islands in their associated transcriptional control regions and become activated upon treatment with DNA hypomethylating agents; such hypomethylation-induced activation of cancer/testis genes provides a potential combination approach to augment immunotherapeutics. Thus, understanding cancer/testis gene regulation is of increasing clinical importance. Previously studied cancer/testis gene activation has focused on X chromosome encoded cancer/testis genes. Here we find that a sub-set of non-X encoded cancer/testis genes are silenced in non-germline cells via a mechanism that is refractory to epigenetic dysregulation, including treatment with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor tricostatin A. These findings formally indicate that there is a sub-group of the clinically important cancer/testis genes that are unlikely to be activated in clinical therapeutic approaches using hypomethylating agents and it indicates a unique transcriptional silencing mechanism for germline genes in non-germline cells that might provide a target mechanism for new clinical therapies. PMID:25594001

  3. IL-1-induced Post-transcriptional Mechanisms Target Overlapping Translational Silencing and Destabilizing Elements in IκBζ mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Sonam; Doerrie, Anneke; Winzen, Reinhard; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Taghipour, Azadeh; Kuehne, Nancy; Kracht, Michael; Holtmann, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine IL-1 induces profound changes in gene expression. This is contributed in part by activating translation of a distinct set of mRNAs, including IκBζ, as indicated by genome-wide analysis of changes in ribosomal occupancy in IL-1α-treated HeLa cells. Polysome profiling of IκBζ mRNA and reporter mRNAs carrying its 3′ UTR indicated poor translation in unstimulated cells. 3′ UTR-mediated translational silencing was confirmed by suppression of luciferase activity. Translational silencing was unaffected by replacing the poly(A) tail with a histone stem-loop, but lost under conditions of cap-independent internal initiation. IL-1 treatment of the cells caused profound shifts of endogenous and reporter mRNAs to polysome fractions and relieved suppression of luciferase activity. IL-1 also inhibited rapid mRNA degradation. Both translational activation and mRNA stabilization involved IRAK1 and -2 but occurred independently of the p38 MAPK pathway, which is known to target certain other post-transcriptional mechanisms. The translational silencing RNA element contains the destabilizing element but requires additional 5′ sequences and is impaired by mutations that leave destabilization unaffected. These differences in function are associated with differential changes in protein binding in vitro. Thus, rapid degradation occurs independently of the translational silencing effect. The results provide evidence for a novel mode of post-transcriptional control by IL-1, which impinges on the time course and pattern of IL-1-induced gene expression. PMID:20634286

  4. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) is Essential for Chromium Silencing of Gene Induction in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) promotes lung injury and pulmonary diseases through poorly defined mechanisms that may involve the silencing of inducible protective genes. The current study investigated the hypothesis that Cr(VI) actively signals through a signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)–dependent pathway to silence nickel (Ni)–induced expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor A (VEGFA), an important mediator of lung injury and repair. In human bronchial airway epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells, Ni-induced VEGFA transcription by stimulating an extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade that involved Src kinase–activated Sp1 transactivation, as well as increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization and DNA binding. Ni-stimulated ERK, Src, and HIF-1α activities, as well as Ni-induced VEGFA transcript levels were inhibited in Cr(VI)-exposed cells. We previously demonstrated that Cr(VI) stimulates STAT1 to suppress VEGFA expression. In BEAS-2B cells stably expressing STAT1 short hairpin RNA, Cr(VI) increased VEGFA transcript levels and Sp1 transactivation. Moreover, in the absence of STAT1, Cr(VI), and Ni coexposures positively interacted to further increase VEGFA transcripts. This study demonstrates that metal-stimulated signaling cascades interact to regulate transcription and induction of adaptive or repair responses in airway cells. In addition, the data implicate STAT1 as a rate limiting mediator of Cr(VI)-stimulated gene regulation and suggest that cells lacking STAT1, such as many tumor cell lines, have opposite responses to Cr(VI) relative to normal cells. PMID:19403854

  5. Interleukin 3-dependent activation of DREAM is involved in transcriptional silencing of the apoptotic hrk gene in hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Cristina; Mellstrom, Britt; Link, Wolfgang A.; Naranjo, Jose Ramon; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis

    2001-01-01

    The apoptotic protein Hrk is expressed in hematopoietic progenitors after growth factor deprivation. Here we identify a silencer sequence in the 3′ untranslated region of the hrk gene that binds to the transcriptional repressor DREAM in interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells, and abrogates the expression of reporter genes when located downstream of the open reading frame. In addition, the binding of DREAM to the hrk gene is reduced or eliminated when cells are cultured in the absence of IL-3 or treated with a calcium ionophore or a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-specific inhibitor, suggesting that both calcium mobilization and phosphorylation can regulate the transcriptional activity of DREAM. Furthermore, we have shown that DREAM is phosphorylated by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, but Akt-independent pathway. In all cases, loss of the DREAM–DNA binding complex was correlated with increased levels of Hrk and apoptosis. These data suggest that IL-3 may trigger the activation of DREAM through different signaling pathways, which in turn binds to a silencer sequence in the hrk gene and blocks transcription, avoiding inappropriate cell death in hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:11331593

  6. Specification of skeletal muscle differentiation by repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST)-regulated Kv7.4 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Barrese, Vincenzo; Formisano, Luigi; Miceli, Francesco; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the expression of potassium (K(+)) channels is a pivotal event during skeletal muscle differentiation. In mouse C(2)C(12) cells, similarly to human skeletal muscle cells, myotube formation increased the expression of K(v)7.1, K(v)7.3, and K(v)7.4, the last showing the highest degree of regulation. In C(2)C(12) cells, K(v)7.4 silencing by RNA interference reduced the expression levels of differentiation markers (myogenin, myosin heavy chain, troponinT-1, and Pax3) and impaired myotube formation and multinucleation. In K(v)7.4-silenced cells, the differentiation-promoting effect of the K(v)7 activator N-(2-amino-4-(4-fluorobenzylamino)-phenyl)-carbamic acid ethyl ester (retigabine) was abrogated. Expression levels for the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) declined during myotube formation. Transcript levels for K(v)7.4, as well as for myogenin, troponinT-1, and Pax3, were reduced by REST overexpression and enhanced upon REST suppression by RNA interference. Four regions containing potential REST-binding sites in the 5' untranslated region and in the first intron of the K(v)7.4 gene were identified by bioinformatic analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that REST binds to these regions, exhibiting a higher efficiency in myoblasts than in myotubes. These data suggest that K(v)7.4 plays a permissive role in skeletal muscle differentiation and highlight REST as a crucial transcriptional regulator for this K(+) channel subunit. PMID:23242999

  7. The efficiency of silencing expression of the gene coding STAT3 transcriptional factor and susceptibility of bladder cancer cells to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Ilona; Sypniewski, Daniel; Gawlik, Natalia; Goraus, Karol

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Abnormalities in signaling as well as altered gene expression have been identified in numerous diseases, including cancer. The biological functions of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) are very broad. It is thought that STAT3 can also contribute to oncogenesis. RNA interference (RNAi) is one of the most efficient tools for silencing gene expression within cells. The main goal of the study was to verify the effectiveness of STAT3 gene silencing and its influence on cell proliferation and activation of apoptosis in bladder cancer cells. Material and methods The study was conducted on cellular material, which was the stable human bladder cancer cell line T24. The synthesis of shRNA (short hairpin RNA) interfering with the STAT3 gene was based on pSUPER. neo expression vector. The gene expression at the mRNA level was determined by the real-time PCR method. The influence of STAT3 gene silencing on apoptosis induced in cells with modulated STAT3 expression was evaluated using parallel quantification of mono- and oligonucleosomal DNA degradation of genomic DNA. Results In transfected T24 cells, the STAT3 mRNA expression decreased to the level of 68.3% compared to the scrambled (SCR) control. Silencing the STAT3 gene induced changes in the phenotype of T24 cells. Statistically significant differences in cell proliferation (p = 0.0318) and apoptosis induction (p = 0.0376) were observed. Conclusions Application of the designed shRNA for the STAT3 gene contributed to a decrease of expression of the examined gene. It also decreased the proliferation and increased the susceptibility to apoptosis in T24 bladder cancer cells. PMID:23788901

  8. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  9. Silencing of the transcription factor STAT3 sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging drugs, but not to TNFα- and NK cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Dorota W.; Carré, Thibault; Chouaib, Salem; Kaminska, Bozena

    2013-02-15

    Transcription factor STAT3 (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3) is persistently active in human tumors and may contribute to tumor progression. Inhibition of STAT3 expression/activity could be a good strategy to modulate tumor cell survival and responses to cancer chemotherapeutics or immune cytotoxicity. We silenced STAT3 expression in human A549 lung cancer cells to elucidate its role in cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics, TNFα and natural killer (NK)-mediated cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that STAT3 is not essential for basal survival and proliferation of A549 cancer cells. Stable silencing of STAT3 expression sensitized A549 cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics doxorubicin and cisplatin in a p53-independent manner. Sensitization to DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics could be due to down-regulation of the Bcl-xL expression in STAT3 depleted cells. In contrast, knockdown of STAT3 in cancer cells did not modulate responses to TNFα and NK-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that STAT3 depletion increased the NFκB activity likely providing the compensatory, pro-survival signal. The treatment with TNFα, but not doxorubicin, enhanced this effect. We conclude that STAT3 is not crucial for the control of basal cell proliferation and survival of lung carcinoma cells but modulates susceptibility to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics by regulation of intrinsic pro-survival pathways. - Highlights: ► STAT3 silencing is negligent for basal lung cancer cell viability and proliferation. ► STAT3 depletion sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics. ► STAT3 depletion has no effect on susceptibility to extrinsic apoptosis inducers. ► Increased pro-survival NFκB activity may compensate for STAT3 depletion.

  10. The Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Protein MMS19 Regulates Transcriptional Gene Silencing, DNA Repair, and Flowering Time in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Feng; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2015-01-01

    MMS19 is an essential component of the cytoplasmic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster assembly complex in fungi and mammals; the mms19 null mutant alleles are lethal. Our study demonstrates that MMS19/MET18 in Arabidopsis thaliana interacts with the cytoplasmic Fe-S cluster assembly complex but is not an essential component of the complex. We find that MMS19 also interacts with the catalytic subunits of DNA polymerases, which have been demonstrated to be involved in transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), DNA repair, and flowering time regulation. Our results indicate that MMS19 has a similar biological function, suggesting a functional link between MMS19 and DNA polymerases. In the mms19 null mutant, the assembly of Fe-S clusters on the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α is reduced but not blocked, which is consistent with the viability of the mutant. Our study suggests that MMS19 assists the assembly of Fe-S clusters on DNA polymerases in the cytosol, thereby facilitating transcriptional gene silencing, DNA repair, and flowering time control. PMID:26053632

  11. Male-Biased Aganglionic Megacolon in the TashT Mouse Line Due to Perturbation of Silencer Elements in a Large Gene Desert of Chromosome 10

    PubMed Central

    Touré, Aboubacrine M.; Béland, Mélanie; Raiwet, Diana L.; Silversides, David W.; Pilon, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are a transient migratory cell population that generates diverse cell types such as neurons and glia of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Via an insertional mutation screen for loci affecting NCC development in mice, we identified one line—named TashT—that displays a partially penetrant aganglionic megacolon phenotype in a strong male-biased manner. Interestingly, this phenotype is highly reminiscent of human Hirschsprung’s disease, a neurocristopathy with a still unexplained male sex bias. In contrast to the megacolon phenotype, colonic aganglionosis is almost fully penetrant in homozygous TashT animals. The sex bias in megacolon expressivity can be explained by the fact that the male ENS ends, on average, around a “tipping point” of minimal colonic ganglionosis while the female ENS ends, on average, just beyond it. Detailed analysis of embryonic intestines revealed that aganglionosis in homozygous TashT animals is due to slower migration of enteric NCC. The TashT insertional mutation is localized in a gene desert containing multiple highly conserved elements that exhibit repressive activity in reporter assays. RNAseq analyses and 3C assays revealed that the TashT insertion results, at least in part, in NCC-specific relief of repression of the uncharacterized gene Fam162b; an outcome independently confirmed via transient transgenesis. The transcriptional signature of enteric NCC from homozygous TashT embryos is also characterized by the deregulation of genes encoding members of the most important signaling pathways for ENS formation—Gdnf/Ret and Edn3/Ednrb—and, intriguingly, the downregulation of specific subsets of X-linked genes. In conclusion, this study not only allowed the identification of Fam162b coding and regulatory sequences as novel candidate loci for Hirschsprung’s disease but also provides important new insights into its male sex bias. PMID:25786024

  12. "The Silence Itself Is Enough of a Statement": The Day of Silence and LGBTQ Awareness Raising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Susan W.

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study of a high school gay-straight alliance club examines unintended consequences of silence during the Day of Silence, a day of action aimed at addressing anti-LGBTQ bias in schools. While this strategy calls for students to engage in intentional silences to raise awareness of anti-LGBTQ bias, it does not necessarily lead…

  13. The RNA Helicase Rm62 Cooperates with SU(VAR)3-9 to Re-Silence Active Transcription in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, M. Janaki; Vetter, Irene; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal; Imhof, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is highly dynamic and many genes show a wide range in expression over several orders of magnitude. This regulation is often mediated by sequence specific transcription factors. In addition, the tight packaging of DNA into chromatin can provide an additional layer of control resulting in a dynamic range of gene expression covering several orders of magnitude. During transcriptional activation, chromatin barriers have to be eliminated to allow an efficient progression of the RNA polymerase. This repressive chromatin structure has to be re-established quickly after it has been activated in order to tightly regulate gene activity. We show that the DExD/H box containing RNA helicase Rm62 is targeted to a site of rapid induction of transcription where it is responsible for an increased degree of methylation at H3K9 at the heat shock locus after removal of the heat shock stimulus. The RNA helicase interacts with the well-characterized histone methyltransferase SU(VAR)3-9 via its N-terminus, which provides a potential mechanism for the targeting of H3K9 methylation to highly regulated genes. The recruitment of SU(VAR)3-9 through interaction with a RNA helicase to a site of active transcription might be a general mechanism that allows an efficient silencing of highly regulated genes thereby enabling a cell to fine tune its gene activity over a wide range. PMID:21674064

  14. Protective effect of caffeine against high sugar-induced transcription of microRNAs and consequent gene silencing: A study using lenses of galactosemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovtun, Svitlana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have shown that caffeine prevents the formation of cataracts induced by a high-galactose diet and consequent oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate if this protective effect is reflected in the attenuation of the transcription of microRNAs (miRNAs) known to induce apoptosis and cell death by gene silencing. Methods Young CD-1 mice were fed either a normal laboratory diet or a diet containing 25% galactose with or without 1% caffeine. One week later, the animals were euthanized, and the lenses isolated and promptly processed for RNA isolation and subsequent preparation of cDNAs by reverse transcriptase reaction. Mature miRNA (miR)-specific cDNAs were then quantified with PCR in a 96-well microRNA-specific cassette using an ABI7900HT PCR machine. Results As expected from previous studies, the lenses were positive for all 84 miRs corresponding to the miRNA probes present in the cassette wells. However, the levels of at least 19 miRs were significantly elevated in galactosemic lenses compared to those in the normal lenses. The majority are proapoptotic. Such elevation was inhibited by caffeine. This has been demonstrated for the first time. Conclusions Since aberrant elevation of miRNAs silences various genes and consequently deactivates protein translation, and since caffeine downregulates such aberration, the beneficial effect of caffeine could be attributed to its ability to suppress elevation of toxic miRs and consequent gene silencing. PMID:23441122

  15. A Temperature Sensitive Variant of p53 Drives p53-Dependent MicroRNA Expression without Evidence of Widespread Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Miguel A.; Vanzyl, Erin J.; Hamill, Jeff D.; Pan, Elysia; Marcellus, Kristen A.; Tolls, Victoria J.; Alonzi, Rhea C.; Pastic, Alyssa; Rambo, Teeghan M. E.; Sayed, Hadil; McKay, Bruce C.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is a transcription factor that can regulate the expression of numerous genes including many encoding proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs). The predominant outcomes of a typical p53 response are the initiation of apoptotic cascades and the activation of cell cycle checkpoints. HT29-tsp53 cells express a temperature sensitive variant of p53 and in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, these cells preferentially undergo G1 phase cell cycle arrest at the permissive temperature that correlates with increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1. Recent evidence also suggests that a variety of miRNAs can induce G1 arrest by inhibiting the expression of proteins like CDK4 and CDK6. Here we used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify p53-regulated miRNAs that are induced in these cells undergoing G1 arrest. At the permissive temperature, the expression of several miRNAs was increased through a combination of either transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. In particular, miR-34a-5p, miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p were strongly induced and they reached levels comparable to that of reference miRNAs (miR-191 and miR-103). Importantly, miR-34a-5p and miR-145-5p are known to silence the Cdk4 and/or Cdk6 G1 cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Surprisingly, there was no p53-dependent decrease in the expression of either of these G1 cdks. To search for other potential targets of p53-regulated miRNAs, p53-downregulated mRNAs were identified through parallel microarray analysis of mRNA expression. Once again, there was no clear effect of p53 on the repression of mRNAs under these conditions despite a remarkable increase in p53-induced mRNA expression. Therefore, despite a strong p53 transcriptional response, there was no clear evidence that p53-responsive miRNA contributed to gene silencing. Taken together, the changes in cell cycle distribution in this cell line at the permissive temperature is likely attributable to transcriptional

  16. Post-transcriptional silencing of the SGE1 gene induced by a dsRNA hairpin in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense, the causal agent of Panama disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, J S; Angelo, P C S; Cruz, J C; Santos, J M M; Sousa, N R; Silva, G F

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense (Foc), the causal agent of Panama disease, is responsible for economic losses in banana crops worldwide. The identification of genes that effectively act on pathogenicity and/or virulence may contribute to the development of different strategies for disease control and the production of resistant plants. The objective of the current study was to analyze the importance of SGE1 gene expression in Foc virulence through post-transcriptional silencing using a double-stranded RNA hairpin. Thirteen transformants were selected based on different morphological characteristics, and sporulation in these transformants was significantly reduced by approximately 95% (P < 0.05) compared to that of the wild-type strain. The relative SGE1 expression levels in the transformant strains were reduced by 27 to 47% compared to those in the wild-type strain. A pathogenicity analysis revealed that the transformants were able to reach the rhizomes and pseudostems of the inoculated banana plants. However, the transformants induced initial disease symptoms in the banana plants approximately 10 days later than that by the wild-type Foc, and initial disease symptoms persisted even at 45 days after inoculation. These results indicate that the SGE1 gene is directly involved in the virulence of Foc. Therefore, SGE1 may be a potential candidate for host-induced gene silencing in banana plants. PMID:27173186

  17. Delayed translational silencing of ceruloplasmin transcript in gamma interferon-activated U937 monocytic cells: role of the 3' untranslated region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is an acute-phase protein with ferroxidase, amine oxidase, and pro- and antioxidant activities. The primary site of Cp synthesis in human adults is the liver, but it is also synthesized by cells of monocytic origin. We have shown that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the synthesis of Cp mRNA and protein in monocytic cells. We now report that the induced synthesis of Cp is terminated by a mechanism involving transcript-specific translational repression. Cp protein synthesis in U937 cells ceased after 16 h even in the presence of abundant Cp mRNA. RNA isolated from cells treated with IFN-gamma for 24 h exhibited a high in vitro translation rate, suggesting that the transcript was not defective. Ribosomal association of Cp mRNA was examined by sucrose centrifugation. When Cp synthesis was high, i.e., after 8 h of IFN-gamma treatment, Cp mRNA was primarily associated with polyribosomes. However, after 24 h, when Cp synthesis was low, Cp mRNA was primarily in the nonpolyribosomal fraction. Cytosolic extracts from cells treated with IFN-gamma for 24 h, but not for 8 h, contained a factor which blocked in vitro Cp translation. Inhibitor expression was cell type specific and present in extracts of human cells of myeloid origin, but not in several nonmyeloid cells. The inhibitory factor bound to the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Cp mRNA, as shown by restoration of in vitro translation by synthetic 3'-UTR added as a "decoy" and detection of a binding complex by RNA gel shift analysis. Deletion mapping of the Cp 3'-UTR indicated an internal 100-nucleotide region of the Cp 3'-UTR that was required for complex formation as well as for silencing of translation. Although transcript-specific translational control is common during development and differentiation and global translational control occurs during responses to cytokines and stress, to our knowledge, this is the first report of translational silencing of a specific transcript following cytokine

  18. Neuron-restrictive Silencer Factor (NRSF) Represses Cocaine- and Amphetamine-regulated Transcript (CART) Transcription and Antagonizes cAMP-response Element-binding Protein Signaling through a Dual NRSE Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Sihan; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yinxiang; Zhang, Bowen; Liu, Qingbin; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Li, Yanhua; Pei, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against stroke-related brain injury. However, the regulatory mechanism on CART transcription, especially the repression mechanism, is not fully understood. Here, we show that the transcriptional repressor neuron-restrictive silencer elements (NRSF, also known as REST) represses CART expression through direct binding to two NRSF-binding elements (NRSEs) in the CART promoter and intron 1 (named pNRSE and iNRSE, respectively). EMSA show that NRSF binds to pNRSE and iNRSE directly in vitro. ChIP assays show that NRSF recruits differential co-repressor complexes including CoREST and HDAC1 to these NRSEs. The presence of both NRSEs is required for efficient repression of CART transcription as indicated by reporter gene assays. NRSF overexpression antagonizes forskolin-mediated up-regulation of CART mRNA and protein. Ischemia insult triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) enhances NRSF mRNA levels and then NRSF antagonizes the CREB signaling on CART activation, leading to augmented cell death. Depletion of NRSF in combination with forskolin treatment increases neuronal survival after ischemic insult. These findings reveal a novel dual NRSE mechanism by which NRSF represses CART expression and suggest that NRSF may serve as a therapeutic target for stroke treatment. PMID:23086924

  19. Epigenetic silencing in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Rajeevkumar, Sarma; Anunanthini, Pushpanathan; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing is a natural phenomenon in which the expression of genes is regulated through modifications of DNA, RNA, or histone proteins. It is a mechanism for defending host genomes against the effects of transposable elements and viral infection, and acts as a modulator of expression of duplicated gene family members and as a silencer of transgenes. A major breakthrough in understanding the mechanism of epigenetic silencing was the discovery of silencing in transgenic tobacco plants due to the interaction between two homologous promoters. The molecular mechanism of epigenetic mechanism is highly complicated and it is not completely understood yet. Two different molecular routes have been proposed for this, that is, transcriptional gene silencing, which is associated with heavy methylation of promoter regions and blocks the transcription of transgenes, and post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), the basic mechanism is degradation of the cytosolic mRNA of transgenes or endogenous genes. Undesired transgene silencing is of major concern in the transgenic technologies used in crop improvement. A complete understanding of this phenomenon will be very useful for transgenic applications, where silencing of specific genes is required. The current status of epigenetic silencing in transgenic technology is discussed and summarized in this mini-review. PMID:26442010

  20. Host-induced post-transcriptional hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing of vital fungal genes confers efficient resistance against Fusarium wilt in banana.

    PubMed

    Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is among the most destructive diseases of banana (Musa spp.). Because no credible control measures are available, development of resistant cultivars through genetic engineering is the only option. We investigated whether intron hairpin RNA (ihpRNA)-mediated expression of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted against vital fungal genes (velvet and Fusarium transcription factor 1) in transgenic banana could achieve effective resistance against Foc. Partial sequences of these two genes were assembled as ihpRNAs in suitable binary vectors (ihpRNA-VEL and ihpRNA-FTF1) and transformed into embryogenic cell suspensions of banana cv. Rasthali by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Eleven transformed lines derived from ihpRNA-VEL and twelve lines derived from ihpRNA-FTF1 were found to be free of external and internal symptoms of Foc after 6-week-long greenhouse bioassays. The five selected transgenic lines for each construct continued to resist Foc at 8 months postinoculation. Presence of specific siRNAs derived from the two ihpRNAs in transgenic banana plants was confirmed by Northern blotting and Illumina sequencing of small RNAs derived from the transgenic banana plants. The present study represents an important effort in proving that host-induced post-transcriptional ihpRNA-mediated gene silencing of vital fungal genes can confer efficient resistance against debilitating pathogens in crop plants. PMID:24476152

  1. Epigenetic silencing of JMJD5 promotes the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by down-regulating the transcription of CDKN1A

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Zhu; Wu, Chong-Chao; Huang, Li-Yu; Wang, Lan; Han, Ze-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that contain jumonji C (JmjC) domains have recently been identified as major contributors to various malignant human cancers through epigenetic remodeling. However, the roles of these family members in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are obscure. By mining public databases, we found that the HCC patients with lower JmjC domain-containing protein 5 (JMJD5) expression exhibited shorter survival time. We then confirmed that JMJD5 expression was indeed decreased in HCC specimens, which was caused by the altered epigenetic histone modifications, the decreased H3K9ac, H3K27ac and H3K4me2/3 together with the increased trimethylation of H3K27 and H3K9 on the JMJD5 promoter. Functional experiments revealed that JMJD5 knockdown promoted HCC cell proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity by accelerating the G1/S transition of the cell cycle; in contrast, ectopic JMJD5 expression had the opposite effects. At molecular mechanism, we found that, in HCC cell lines including TP53-null Hep3B, JMJD5 knockdown led to the down-regulation of CDKN1A and ectopic expression of JMJD5 not only increased but also rescued CDKN1A transcription. Moreover, CDKN1A knockdown could abrogate the effect of JMJD5 knockdown or overexpression on cell proliferation, suggesting that JMJD5 inhibits HCC cell proliferation mainly by activating CDKN1A expression. We further revealed that JMJD5 directly enhances CDKN1A transcription by binding to CDKN1A's promoter independent of H3K36me2 demethylase activity. In short, we first prove that JMJD5 is a tumor suppressor gene in HCC pathogenesis, and the epigenetic silencing of JMJD5 promotes HCC cell proliferation by directly down-regulating CDKN1A transcription. PMID:26760772

  2. Role of Transglutaminase 2 in Liver Injury via Cross-linking and Silencing of Transcription Factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    TATSUKAWA, HIDEKI; FUKAYA, YAYOI; FRAMPTON, GORDON; MARTINEZ–FUENTES, ANTONIO; SUZUKI, KENJI; KUO, TING–FANG; NAGATSUMA, KEISUKE; SHIMOKADO, KENTARO; OKUNO, MASATAKA; WU, JIAN; IISMAA, SIIRI; MATSUURA, TOMOKAZU; TSUKAMOTO, HIDEKAZU; ZERN, MARK A.; GRAHAM, ROBERT M.; KOJIMA, SOICHI

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Despite high morbidity and mortality of alcoholic liver disease worldwide, the molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced liver cell death are not fully understood. Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a cross-linking enzyme implicated in apoptosis. TG2 levels and activity are increased in association with various types of liver injury. However, how TG2 induces hepatic apoptosis is not known. Methods Human hepatic cells or primary hepatocytes from rats or TG2+/+ and TG2−/− mice were treated with ethanol. Mice were administered anti-Fas antibody or alcohol. Liver sections were prepared from patients with alcoholic steatohepatitis. Changes in TG2 levels, Sp1 cross-linking and its activities, expression of hepatocyte growth factor receptor, c-Met, and hepatic apoptosis were measured. Results Ethanol induced apoptosis in hepatic cells, enhanced activity and nuclear accumulation of TG2 as well as accumulation of cross-linked and inactivated Sp1, and reduced expression of the Sp1-responsive gene, c-Met. These effects were rescued by TG2 knockdown, restoration of functional Sp1, or addition of hepatocyte growth factor, whereas apoptosis was reproduced by Sp1 knockdown or TG2 overexpression. Compared with TG2+/+ mice, TG2−/− mice showed markedly reduced hepatocyte apoptosis and Sp1 cross-linking following ethanol or anti-Fas treatment. Treatment of TG2+/+ mice with the TG2 inhibitors putrescine or cystamine blocked anti-Fas–induced hepatic apoptosis and Sp1 silencing. Moreover, enhanced expression of cross-linked Sp1 and TG2 was evident in hepatocyte nuclei of patients with alcoholic steatohepatitis. Conclusions TG2 induces hepatocyte apoptosis via Sp1 cross-linking and inactivation, with resultant inhibition of the expression of c-Met required for hepatic cell viability. PMID:19208340

  3. Deconstructing Phonetic Transcription: Covert Contrast, Perceptual Bias, and an Extraterrestrial View of "Vox Humana"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Benjamin; Edwards, Jan; Schellinger, Sarah K.; Beckman, Mary E.; Meyer, Marie K.

    2010-01-01

    This article honours Adele Miccio's life work by reflecting on the utility of phonetic transcription. The first section reviews the literature on cases where children whose speech appears to neutralize a contrast in the adult language are found on closer examination to produce a contrast ("covert contrast"). This study presents evidence from a new…

  4. HDAC inhibition by SNDX-275 (Entinostat) restores expression of silenced leukemia-associated transcription factors Nur77 and Nor1 and of key pro-apoptotic proteins in AML.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Ruvolo, V R; McQueen, T; Chen, W; Samudio, I J; Conneely, O; Konopleva, M; Andreeff, M

    2013-06-01

    Nur77 and Nor1 are highly conserved orphan nuclear receptors. We have recently reported that nur77(-/-)nor1(-/-) mice rapidly develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and that Nur77 and Nor1 transcripts were universally downregulated in human AML blasts. These findings indicate that Nur77 and Nor1 function as leukemia suppressors. We further demonstrated silencing of Nur77 and Nor1 in leukemia stem cells (LSCs). We here report that inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) using the specific class I HDAC inhibitor SNDX-275 restored the expression of Nur77/Nor1 and induced expression of activator protein 1 transcription factors c-Jun and JunB, and of death receptor TRAIL, in AML cells and in CD34(+)/38(-) AML LSCs. Importantly, SNDX-275 induced extensive apoptosis in AML cells, which could be suppressed by silencing nur77 and nor1. In addition, pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Noxa were transcriptionally upregulated by SNDX-275 in AML cells and in LSCs. Our present work is the first report of a novel mechanism of HDAC inhibitor-induced apoptosis in AML that involves restoration of the silenced nuclear receptors Nur77 and Nor1, activation of activator protein 1 transcription factors, a death receptor and pro-apoptotic proteins. PMID:23247046

  5. Bortezomib induces DNA hypomethylation and silenced gene transcription by interfering with Sp1/NF-κB–dependent DNA methyltransferase activity in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujun; Liu, Zhongfa; Xie, Zhiliang; Pang, Jiuxia; Yu, Jianhua; Lehmann, Esther; Huynh, Lenguyen; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Takeki, Mitsui; Klisovic, Rebecca B.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Blum, William; Porcu, Pierluigi; Garzon, Ramiro; Byrd, John C.; Perrotti, Danilo; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Chan, Kenneth K.; Wu, Lai-Chu

    2008-01-01

    Bortezomib reversibly inhibits 26S proteasomal degradation, interferes with NF-κB, and exhibits antitumor activity in human malignancies. Zinc finger protein Sp1 transactivates DNMT1 gene in mice and is functionally regulated through protein abundance, posttranslational modifications (ie, ubiquitination), or interaction with other transcription factors (ie, NF-κB). We hypothesize that inhibition of proteasomal degradation and Sp1/NF-κB–mediated transactivation may impair aberrant DNA methyltransferase activity. We show here that, in addition to inducing accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and abolishment of NF-κB activities, bortezomib decreases Sp1 protein levels, disrupts the physical interaction of Sp1/NF-κB, and prevents binding of the Sp1/NF-κB complex to the DNMT1 gene promoter. Abrogation of Sp1/NF-κB complex by bortezomib causes transcriptional repression of DNMT1 gene and down-regulation of DNMT1 protein, which in turn induces global DNA hypomethylation in vitro and in vivo and re-expression of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancer cells. The involvement of Sp1/NF-κB in DNMT1 regulation is further demonstrated by the observation that Sp1 knockdown using mithramycin A or shRNA decreases DNMT1 protein levels, which instead are increased by Sp1 or NF-κB overexpression. Our results unveil the Sp1/NF-κB pathway as a modulator of DNA methyltransferase activity in human cancer and identify bortezomib as a novel epigenetic-targeting drug. PMID:18083845

  6. UV-C-Induced alleviation of transcriptional gene silencing through plant-plant communication: Key roles of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid pathways.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Ting; Xu, Shaoxin; Li, Fanghua; Deng, Chenguang; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Bian, Po

    2016-08-01

    Plant stress responses at the epigenetic level are expected to allow more permanent changes of gene expression and potentially long-term adaptation. While it has been reported that plants subjected to adverse environments initiate various stress responses in their neighboring plants, little is known regarding epigenetic responses to external stresses mediated by plant-plant communication. In this study, we show that DNA repetitive elements of Arabidopsis thaliana, whose expression is inhibited epigenetically by transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) mechanism, are activated by UV-C irradiation through airborne plant-plant and plant-plant-plant communications, accompanied by DNA demethylation at CHH sites. Moreover, the TGS is alleviated by direct treatments with exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and methyl salicylate (MeSA). Further, the plant-plant and plant-plant-plant communications are blocked by mutations in the biosynthesis or signaling of jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA), indicating that JA and SA pathways are involved in the interplant communication for epigenetic responses. For the plant-plant-plant communication, stress cues are relayed to the last set of receiver plants by promoting the production of JA and SA signals in relaying plants, which exhibit upregulated expression of genes for JA and SA biosynthesis and enhanced emanation of MeJA and MeSA. PMID:27131397

  7. The long noncoding RNA HOXA transcript at the distal tip promotes colorectal cancer growth partially via silencing of p21 expression.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yifan; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Zhihong; Shi, Yongguo; Zhu, Ya; Li, Juan; Peng, Peng; Wang, Jirong; Fan, Yingrui; De, Wei; Wang, Keming

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysregulation of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is associated with human carcinogenesis. The lncRNA HOXA transcript at the distal tip (HOTTIP) is involved in the development of several cancers. However, the biological role of HOTTIP in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not yet been discussed. Here, we report that HOTTIP acts as a functional oncogene in the pathogenesis of CRC. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to detect the expression of HOTTIP in 48 pairs of colorectal cancer samples. We found that overexpression of HOTTIP is correlated with an advanced pathological stage and a larger tumor size. Moreover, functional analyses revealed that the knockdown of HOTTIP expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) could inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis. More importantly, we observed that HOTTIP knockdown induced a marked increase in the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduction in the number of cells in the S phase in both DLD-1 cells and SW480 cells. An in vivo experiment also revealed that the knockdown of HOTTIP inhibited tumor growth. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses indicated that HOTTIP potentially contributed to CRC cell growth partially through the silencing of p21 expression. Collectively, our results suggest that HOTTIP is involved in the progression of CRC and may provide evidence for HOTTIP being a target for therapy of this disease. PMID:26678886

  8. Distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in cellular models and C9orf72 mutation cases suggests link to transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Schludi, Martin H; May, Stephanie; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rentzsch, Kristin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Arzberger, Thomas; Edbauer, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    A massive expansion of a GGGGCC repeat upstream of the C9orf72 coding region is the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Despite its intronic localization and lack of a canonical start codon, both strands are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins: poly-GA, poly-GP, poly-GR, poly-PR and poly-PA. To address conflicting findings on the predominant toxicity of the different DPR species in model systems, we compared the expression pattern of the DPR proteins in rat primary neurons and postmortem brain and spinal cord of C9orf72 mutation patients. Only poly-GA overexpression closely mimicked the p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions commonly observed for all DPR proteins in patients. In contrast, overexpressed poly-GR and poly-PR formed nucleolar p62-negative inclusions. In patients, most of the less common neuronal intranuclear DPR inclusions were para-nucleolar and p62 positive. Neuronal nucleoli in C9orf72 cases showed normal size and morphology regardless of the presence of poly-GR and poly-PR inclusions arguing against widespread nucleolar stress, reported in cellular models. Colocalization of para-nucleolar DPR inclusions with heterochromatin and a marker of transcriptional repression (H3K9me2) indicates a link to gene transcription. In contrast, we detected numerous intranuclear DPR inclusions not associated with nucleolar structures in ependymal and subependymal cells. In patients, neuronal inclusions of poly-GR, poly-GP and the poly-GA interacting protein Unc119 were less abundant than poly-GA inclusions, but showed similar regional and subcellular distribution. Regardless of neurodegeneration, all inclusions were most abundant in neocortex, hippocampus and thalamus, with few inclusions in brain stem and spinal cord. In the granular cell layer of the cerebellum, poly-GA and Unc119 inclusions were significantly more abundant in cases with FTLD than in cases with MND and FTLD/MND. Poly

  9. Deconstructing phonetic transcription: covert contrast, perceptual bias, and an extraterrestrial view of Vox Humana.

    PubMed

    Munson, Benjamin; Edwards, Jan; Schellinger, Sarah K; Beckman, Mary E; Meyer, Marie K

    2010-01-01

    This article honours Adele Miccio's life work by reflecting on the utility of phonetic transcription. The first section reviews the literature on cases where children whose speech appears to neutralize a contrast in the adult language are found on closer examination to produce a contrast (covert contrast). This study presents evidence from a new series of perception studies that covert contrast may be far more prevalent in children's speech than existing studies would suggest. The second section presents the results of a new study designed to examine whether naïve listeners' perception of children's /s/ and /theta/ productions can be changed experimentally when they are led to believe that the children who produced the sounds were older or younger. Here, it is shown that, under the right circumstances, adults report more tokens of /theta/ to be accurate productions of /s/ when they believe a talker to be an older child than when they believe the talker to be younger. This finding suggests that auditory information alone cannot be the sole basis for judging the accuracy of a sound. The final section presents recommendations for supplementing phonetic transcription with other measures, to gain a fuller picture of children's production abilities. PMID:20345255

  10. Deconstructing Phonetic Transcription: Covert Contrast, Perceptual Bias, and an Extraterrestrial View of Vox Humana

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Benjamin; Edwards, Jan; Schellinger, Sarah; Beckman, Mary E.; Meyer, Marie K.

    2010-01-01

    This article honours Adele Miccio's life work by reflecting on the utility of phonetic transcription. The first section reviews the literature on cases where children whose speech appears to neutralize a contrast in the adult language are found on closer examination to produce a contrast (covert contrast). We present evidence from a new series of perception studies that covert contrast may be far more prevalent in children's speech than existing studies would suggest. The second section presents the results of a new study designed to examine whether naïve listeners' perception of children's /s/ and /θ/ productions can be changed experimentally when they are led to believe that the children who produced the sounds were older or younger. Here, it is shown that, under the right circumstances, adults report more tokens of /θ/ to be accurate productions of /s/ when they believe a talker to be an older child than when they believe the talker to be younger. This finding suggests that auditory information alone cannot be the sole basis for judging the accuracy of a sound. The final section presents recommendations for supplementing phonetic transcription with other measures, to gain a fuller picture of children's production abilities. PMID:20345255

  11. Suppression of methylation-mediated transcriptional gene silencing by βC1-SAHH protein interaction during geminivirus-betasatellite infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuling; Xie, Yan; Raja, Priya; Li, Sizhun; Wolf, Jamie N; Shen, Qingtang; Bisaro, David M; Zhou, Xueping

    2011-10-01

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression and represses endogenous transposons and invading DNA viruses. As a counter-defense, the geminiviruses encode proteins that inhibit methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Some geminiviruses have acquired a betasatellite called DNA β. This study presents evidence that suppression of methylation-mediated TGS by the sole betasatellite-encoded protein, βC1, is crucial to the association of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) with its betasatellite (TYLCCNB). We show that TYLCCNB complements Beet curly top virus (BCTV) L2⁻ mutants deficient for methylation inhibition and TGS suppression, and that cytosine methylation levels in BCTV and TYLCCNV genomes, as well as the host genome, are substantially reduced by TYLCCNB or βC1 expression. We also demonstrate that while TYLCCNB or βC1 expression can reverse TGS, TYLCCNV by itself is ineffective. Thus its AC2/AL2 protein, known to have suppression activity in other geminiviruses, is likely a natural mutant in this respect. A yeast two-hybrid screen of candidate proteins, followed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, revealed that βC1 interacts with S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), a methyl cycle enzyme required for TGS. We further demonstrate that βC1 protein inhibits SAHH activity in vitro. That βC1 and other geminivirus proteins target the methyl cycle suggests that limiting its product, S-adenosyl methionine, may be a common viral strategy for methylation interference. We propose that inhibition of methylation and TGS by βC1 stabilizes geminivirus/betasatellite complexes. PMID:22028660

  12. Suppression of Methylation-Mediated Transcriptional Gene Silencing by βC1-SAHH Protein Interaction during Geminivirus-Betasatellite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Li, Sizhun; Wolf, Jamie N.; Shen, Qingtang; Bisaro, David M.; Zhou, Xueping

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression and represses endogenous transposons and invading DNA viruses. As a counter-defense, the geminiviruses encode proteins that inhibit methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Some geminiviruses have acquired a betasatellite called DNA β. This study presents evidence that suppression of methylation-mediated TGS by the sole betasatellite-encoded protein, βC1, is crucial to the association of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) with its betasatellite (TYLCCNB). We show that TYLCCNB complements Beet curly top virus (BCTV) L2- mutants deficient for methylation inhibition and TGS suppression, and that cytosine methylation levels in BCTV and TYLCCNV genomes, as well as the host genome, are substantially reduced by TYLCCNB or βC1 expression. We also demonstrate that while TYLCCNB or βC1 expression can reverse TGS, TYLCCNV by itself is ineffective. Thus its AC2/AL2 protein, known to have suppression activity in other geminiviruses, is likely a natural mutant in this respect. A yeast two-hybrid screen of candidate proteins, followed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, revealed that βC1 interacts with S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), a methyl cycle enzyme required for TGS. We further demonstrate that βC1 protein inhibits SAHH activity in vitro. That βC1 and other geminivirus proteins target the methyl cycle suggests that limiting its product, S-adenosyl methionine, may be a common viral strategy for methylation interference. We propose that inhibition of methylation and TGS by βC1 stabilizes geminivirus/betasatellite complexes. PMID:22028660

  13. Size and positional effects of promoter RNA segments on virus-induced RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Otagaki, Shungo; Kawai, Miou; Masuta, Chikara; Kanazawa, Akira

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation at a gene promoter can be triggered by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway and induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Although genes involved in the RdDM pathway have been identified, whether dsRNAs of different promoter regions have different extent of effects on RdDM and/or TGS is unknown. Here, we addressed this question by targeting the CaMV 35S promoter in the plant genome using a recombinant Cucumber mosaic virus that contained various portions of the promoter. The efficiency of the induction of TGS depended on the length of the promoter segment triggering the RdDM; the lower size limit for TGS induction was 81-91 nt. TGS was induced when 70-nt fragments were connected in tandem, none of which solely induced TGS. TGS induction did not simply depend on the production of small interfering RNAs corresponding to the promoter. Along with the induction of RdDM, spreading of DNA methylation from the originally targeted site toward the adjacent regions was detected. The maintenance of TGS in the progeny that lacks an RNA trigger depended on the promoter segments triggering the RdDM in the former generation and was correlated with the number of cytosines at symmetrical sites in the targeted region. These results indicate that both the length of dsRNA above the threshold and the frequency of cytosines at symmetric sites in the region targeted by dsRNA are the major factors that allow induction of heritable TGS via RdDM. PMID:21610318

  14. Transient Co-Expression of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Suppressors for Increased in Planta Expression of a Recombinant Anthrax Receptor Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arzola, Lucas; Chen, Junxing; Rattanaporn, Kittipong; Maclean, James M.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Potential epidemics of infectious diseases and the constant threat of bioterrorism demand rapid, scalable, and cost-efficient manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Molecular farming of tobacco plants provides an alternative for the recombinant production of therapeutics. We have developed a transient production platform that uses Agrobacterium infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants to express a novel anthrax receptor decoy protein (immunoadhesin), CMG2-Fc. This chimeric fusion protein, designed to protect against the deadly anthrax toxins, is composed of the von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of human capillary morphogenesis 2 (CMG2), an effective anthrax toxin receptor, and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). We evaluated, in N. benthamiana intact plants and detached leaves, the expression of CMG2-Fc under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter, and the co-expression of CMG2-Fc with nine different viral suppressors of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS): p1, p10, p19, p21, p24, p25, p38, 2b, and HCPro. Overall, transient CMG2-Fc expression was higher on intact plants than detached leaves. Maximum expression was observed with p1 co-expression at 3.5 days post-infiltration (DPI), with a level of 0.56 g CMG2-Fc per kg of leaf fresh weight and 1.5% of the total soluble protein, a ten-fold increase in expression when compared to absence of suppression. Co-expression with the p25 PTGS suppressor also significantly increased the CMG2-Fc expression level after just 3.5 DPI. PMID:21954339

  15. Cell-Specific mRNA Profiling of the Caenorhabditis elegans Somatic Gonadal Precursor Cells Identifies Suites of Sex-Biased and Gonad-Enriched Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kroetz, Mary B; Zarkower, David

    2015-12-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad differs greatly between the two sexes in its pattern of cell divisions, migration, and differentiation. Despite decades of study, the genetic pathways directing early gonadal development and establishing sexual dimorphism in the gonad remain largely unknown. To help define the genetic networks that regulate gonadal development, we employed cell-specific RNA-seq. We identified transcripts present in the somatic gonadal precursor cells and their daughter cells of each sex at the onset of sexual differentiation. We identified several hundred gonad-enriched transcripts, including the majority of known regulators of early gonadal development, and transgenic reporter analysis confirmed the effectiveness of this approach. Before the division of the somatic gonad precursors, few sex-biased gonadal transcripts were detectable; less than 6 hr later, after their division, we identified more than 250 sex-biased transcripts, of which about a third were enriched in the somatic gonad compared to the whole animal. This indicates that a robust sex-biased developmental program, some of it gonad-specific, initiates in the somatic gonadal precursor cells around the time of their first division. About 10% of male-biased transcripts had orthologs with male-biased expression in the early mouse gonad, suggesting possible conservation of gonad sex differentiation. Cell-specific analysis also identified approximately 70 previously unannotated mRNA isoforms that are enriched in the somatic gonad. Our data illustrate the power of cell-specific transcriptome analysis and suggest that early sex differentiation in the gonad is controlled by a relatively small suite of differentially expressed genes, even after dimorphism has become apparent. PMID:26497144

  16. Cell-Specific mRNA Profiling of the Caenorhabditis elegans Somatic Gonadal Precursor Cells Identifies Suites of Sex-Biased and Gonad-Enriched Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Mary B.; Zarkower, David

    2015-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad differs greatly between the two sexes in its pattern of cell divisions, migration, and differentiation. Despite decades of study, the genetic pathways directing early gonadal development and establishing sexual dimorphism in the gonad remain largely unknown. To help define the genetic networks that regulate gonadal development, we employed cell-specific RNA-seq. We identified transcripts present in the somatic gonadal precursor cells and their daughter cells of each sex at the onset of sexual differentiation. We identified several hundred gonad-enriched transcripts, including the majority of known regulators of early gonadal development, and transgenic reporter analysis confirmed the effectiveness of this approach. Before the division of the somatic gonad precursors, few sex-biased gonadal transcripts were detectable; less than 6 hr later, after their division, we identified more than 250 sex-biased transcripts, of which about a third were enriched in the somatic gonad compared to the whole animal. This indicates that a robust sex-biased developmental program, some of it gonad-specific, initiates in the somatic gonadal precursor cells around the time of their first division. About 10% of male-biased transcripts had orthologs with male-biased expression in the early mouse gonad, suggesting possible conservation of gonad sex differentiation. Cell-specific analysis also identified approximately 70 previously unannotated mRNA isoforms that are enriched in the somatic gonad. Our data illustrate the power of cell-specific transcriptome analysis and suggest that early sex differentiation in the gonad is controlled by a relatively small suite of differentially expressed genes, even after dimorphism has become apparent. PMID:26497144

  17. In vitro transcription activities of Pol IV, Pol V and RDR2 reveal coupling of Pol IV and RDR2 for dsRNA synthesis in plant RNA silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Ream, Thomas S.; Marasco, Michelle; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-12-14

    In Arabidopsis, RNA-dependent DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing involves three nuclear RNA polymerases that are biochemically undefined: the presumptive DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Pol IV and Pol V and the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2. Here, we demonstrate their RNA polymerase activities in vitro. Unlike Pol II, Pols IV and V require an RNA primer, are insensitive to alpha-amanitin and differ in their ability to displace non-template DNA during transcription. Biogenesis of 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires both Pol IV and RDR2, which physically associate in vivo. Pol IV does not require RDR2 for activity, but RDR2 is nonfunctional in the absence of associated Pol IV, suggesting that their coupling explains the channeling of Pol IV transcripts into double-stranded RNAs that are then diced into 24 nt siRNAs.

  18. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code "NT"); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code "HB12"); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code "TT8"). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also affected

  19. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code “NT”); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code “HB12”); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code “TT8”). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also

  20. RNA Amplification Protocol Leads to Biased Polymerase Chain Reaction Results Especially for Low-Copy Transcripts of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coenen, Carolin; Liedtke, Stefanie; Kogler, Gesine

    2015-01-01

    The amplification of RNA is becoming increasingly important, as often only limited amounts of cells are available for gene expression analysis. In this study, the gene expression profile of the 39 human homeobox (HOX) genes was analyzed in bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (BM-MSCs) by reverse transcription (RT-) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). For further unlimited gene expression analysis, Whole Transcriptome Amplification (WTA) was used to amplify RNA from human BM-MSCs. However, WTA led to biased RT- and qPCR results, and even non-detectability of HOX transcripts compared to non-amplified BM-MSC samples which instead revealed transcription. It is important to note that the same RNA of the respective human BM-MSC line was used for normal cDNA synthesis by standard reverse transcription (non-amplified RT samples) and for cDNA synthesis by WTA (amplified WTA samples). On this account, the different RT- and qPCR results were unexpected applying WTA. The significantly reduced detection of HOX transcripts after WTA has been demonstrated for numerous BM-MSC lines (n = 26) by RT-PCR analysis. Furthermore, undetectable HOX transcripts meaning HOX transcripts of human BM-MSCs that were detected after normal cDNA synthesis, but were no longer detectable after WTA, were consistently observed by qPCR analysis. Finally, qPCR experiments revealed a possible explanation for the differences between amplified and non-amplified BM-MSC samples: an inverse correlation between the biased qPCR results and the low expression level of the respective HOX gene. The PCR analysis of high-copy transcripts like GAPDH or RPL13A revealed unchanged qPCR results after WTA compared to corresponding non-amplified BM-MSC samples. In contrast, WTA led to biased qPCR results for medium-copy HOX transcripts, and even non-detectability of low-copy HOX transcripts of human BM-MSCs resulting in false negative RT- and qPCR data applying WTA. PMID:26485654

  1. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  2. Arabidopsis HIT4, a regulator involved in heat-triggered reorganization of chromatin and release of transcriptional gene silencing, relocates from chromocenters to the nucleolus in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Chin; Wu, Jia-Rong; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Wu, Shaw-Jye

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis HIT4 is known to mediate heat-induced decondensation of chromocenters and release from transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) with no change in the level of DNA methylation. It is unclear whether HIT4 and MOM1, a well-known DNA methylation-independent transcriptional silencer, have overlapping regulatory functions. A hit4-1/mom1 double mutant strain was generated. Its nuclear morphology and TGS state were compared with those of wild-type, hit4-1, and mom1 plants. Fluorescent protein tagging was employed to track the fates of HIT4, hit4-1 and MOM1 in vivo under heat stress. HIT4- and MOM1-mediated TGS were distinguishable. Both HIT4 and MOM1 were localized normally to chromocenters. Under heat stress, HIT4 relocated to the nucleolus, whereas MOM1 dispersed with the chromocenters. hit4-1 was able to relocate to the nucleolus under heat stress, but its relocation was insufficient to trigger the decompaction of chromocenters. The hypersensitivity to heat associated with the impaired reactivation of TGS in hit4-1 was not alleviated by mom1-induced release from TGS. HIT4 delineates a novel and MOM1-independent TGS regulation pathway. The involvement of a currently unidentified component that links HIT4 relocation and the large-scale reorganization of chromatin, and which is essential for heat tolerance in plants is hypothesized. PMID:25329561

  3. Metalloregulator CueR biases RNA polymerase's kinetic sampling of dead-end or open complex to repress or activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Martell, Danya J; Joshi, Chandra P; Gaballa, Ahmed; Santiago, Ace George; Chen, Tai-Yen; Jung, Won; Helmann, John D; Chen, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Metalloregulators respond to metal ions to regulate transcription of metal homeostasis genes. MerR-family metalloregulators act on σ(70)-dependent suboptimal promoters and operate via a unique DNA distortion mechanism in which both the apo and holo forms of the regulators bind tightly to their operator sequence, distorting DNA structure and leading to transcription repression or activation, respectively. It remains unclear how these metalloregulator-DNA interactions are coupled dynamically to RNA polymerase (RNAP) interactions with DNA for transcription regulation. Using single-molecule FRET, we study how the copper efflux regulator (CueR)--a Cu(+)-responsive MerR-family metalloregulator--modulates RNAP interactions with CueR's cognate suboptimal promoter PcopA, and how RNAP affects CueR-PcopA interactions. We find that RNAP can form two noninterconverting complexes at PcopA in the absence of nucleotides: a dead-end complex and an open complex, constituting a branched interaction pathway that is distinct from the linear pathway prevalent for transcription initiation at optimal promoters. Capitalizing on this branched pathway, CueR operates via a "biased sampling" instead of "dynamic equilibrium shifting" mechanism in regulating transcription initiation; it modulates RNAP's binding-unbinding kinetics, without allowing interconversions between the dead-end and open complexes. Instead, the apo-repressor form reinforces the dominance of the dead-end complex to repress transcription, and the holo-activator form shifts the interactions toward the open complex to activate transcription. RNAP, in turn, locks CueR binding at PcopA into its specific binding mode, likely helping amplify the differences between apo- and holo-CueR in imposing DNA structural changes. Therefore, RNAP and CueR work synergistically in regulating transcription. PMID:26483469

  4. Genetic Differentiation of Hypothalamus Parentally Biased Transcripts in Populations of the House Mouse Implicate the Prader–Willi Syndrome Imprinted Region as a Possible Source of Behavioral Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Anna; Linnenbrink, Miriam; Montero, Inka; Schilhabel, Markus B.; Tautz, Diethard

    2014-01-01

    Parentally biased expression of transcripts (genomic imprinting) in adult tissues, including the brain, can influence and possibly drive the evolution of behavioral traits. We have previously found that paternally determined cues are involved in population-specific mate choice decisions between two populations of the Western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). Here, we ask whether this could be mediated by genomically imprinted transcripts that are subject to fast differentiation between these populations. We focus on three organs that are of special relevance for mate choice and behavior: The vomeronasal organ (VNO), the hypothalamus, and the liver. To first identify candidate transcripts at a genome-wide scale, we used reciprocal crosses between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus inbred strains and RNA sequencing of the respective tissues. Using a false discovery cutoff derived from mock reciprocal cross comparisons, we find a total of 66 imprinted transcripts, 13 of which have previously not been described as imprinted. The largest number of imprinted transcripts were found in the hypothalamus; fewer were found in the VNO, and the least were found in the liver. To assess molecular differentiation and imprinting in the wild-derived M. m. domesticus populations, we sequenced the RNA of the hypothalamus from individuals of these populations. This confirmed the presence of the above identified transcripts also in wild populations and allowed us to search for those that show a high genetic differentiation between these populations. Our results identify the Ube3a–Snrpn imprinted region on chromosome 7 as a region that encompasses the largest number of previously not described transcripts with paternal expression bias, several of which are at the same time highly differentiated. For four of these, we confirmed their imprinting status via single nucleotide polymorphism-specific pyrosequencing assays with RNA from reciprocal crosses. In addition, we find the

  5. Genetic differentiation of hypothalamus parentally biased transcripts in populations of the house mouse implicate the Prader-Willi syndrome imprinted region as a possible source of behavioral divergence.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Anna; Linnenbrink, Miriam; Montero, Inka; Schilhabel, Markus B; Tautz, Diethard

    2014-12-01

    Parentally biased expression of transcripts (genomic imprinting) in adult tissues, including the brain, can influence and possibly drive the evolution of behavioral traits. We have previously found that paternally determined cues are involved in population-specific mate choice decisions between two populations of the Western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). Here, we ask whether this could be mediated by genomically imprinted transcripts that are subject to fast differentiation between these populations. We focus on three organs that are of special relevance for mate choice and behavior: The vomeronasal organ (VNO), the hypothalamus, and the liver. To first identify candidate transcripts at a genome-wide scale, we used reciprocal crosses between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus inbred strains and RNA sequencing of the respective tissues. Using a false discovery cutoff derived from mock reciprocal cross comparisons, we find a total of 66 imprinted transcripts, 13 of which have previously not been described as imprinted. The largest number of imprinted transcripts were found in the hypothalamus; fewer were found in the VNO, and the least were found in the liver. To assess molecular differentiation and imprinting in the wild-derived M. m. domesticus populations, we sequenced the RNA of the hypothalamus from individuals of these populations. This confirmed the presence of the above identified transcripts also in wild populations and allowed us to search for those that show a high genetic differentiation between these populations. Our results identify the Ube3a-Snrpn imprinted region on chromosome 7 as a region that encompasses the largest number of previously not described transcripts with paternal expression bias, several of which are at the same time highly differentiated. For four of these, we confirmed their imprinting status via single nucleotide polymorphism-specific pyrosequencing assays with RNA from reciprocal crosses. In addition, we find the

  6. Repression of platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene transcription by an upstream silencer element. Participation by sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Maul, R S; Kaetzel, D M

    1996-10-18

    Platelet-derived growth factor A-chain is a potent mitogen expressed in a restricted number of normal and transformed cells. Transient transfection and deletion analysis in BSC-1 (African green monkey, renal epithelial) cells revealed that the -1680 to -1374 region of the A-chain gene repressed homologous and heterologous promoter activities by 60-80%. An S1 nuclease-hypersensitive region (5'SHS) was identified within this region (-1418 to -1388) that exhibited transcriptional silencer activity in BSC-1 and a variety of human tumor cell lines (U87, HepG2, and HeLa). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays conducted with 5'SHS oligodeoxynucleotide probes revealed several binding protein complexes that displayed unique preferences for binding to sense, antisense, and double-stranded forms of the element. Southwestern blot analysis revealed that the antisense strand of 5'SHS binds to nuclear proteins of molecular mass 97, 87, 44, and 17 kDa, whereas the double-stranded form of 5'SHS is recognized by a 70-kDa factor. Mutations within 5'SHS element indicated the necessity of a central 5'-GGGGAGGGGG-3' motif for protein binding and silencer function, while nucleotides flanking both sides of the motif were also critical for repression. These results support a model in which silencer function of 5'SHS is mediated by antisense strand binding proteins, possibly by stabilizing single-stranded DNA conformations required for interaction with enhancer sequences in the proximal promoter region of the A-chain gene. PMID:8824279

  7. Transcriptional changes in epigenetic modifiers associated with gene silencing in the intestine of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka), during aestivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianming; Yang, Hongsheng; Zhao, Huan; Chen, Muyan; Wang, Bing

    2011-11-01

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, undergoes aestivation to improve survival during periods of high-temperature. During aestivation, the metabolic rate is depressed to reduce the consumption of reserved energy. We evaluated the role of epigenetic modification on global gene silencing during metabolic rate depression in the sea cucumber. We compared the expression of epigenetic modifiers in active and aestivating sea cucumbers. The expression of three genes involved in DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling (DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1, Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2), and Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 5) was significantly higher during aestivation (Days 20 and 40). Similarly, we observed an increase in the expression of genes involved in histone acetylation (Histone deacetylase 3) and Histone-binding protein RBBP4) during the early (Days 5 and 10) and late phases (Days 20 and 40) of aestivation. There was no change in the expression of KAT2B, a histone acetyltransferase. However, the expression of histone methylation associated modifiers (Histone-arginine methyltransferase CARMER and Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase MLL5) was significantly higher after 5 d in the aestivating group. The results suggest that the expression of epigenetic modifiers involved in DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone methylation is upregulated during aestivation. We hypothesize that these changes regulate global gene silencing during aestivation in A. japonicus.

  8. miRNA-Mediated KHSRP Silencing Rewires Distinct Post-transcriptional Programs during TGF-β-Induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Margherita; Bucci, Gabriele; Rossi, Martina; Giovarelli, Matteo; Bordo, Domenico; Moshiri, Arfa; Gorlero, Franco; Gherzi, Roberto; Briata, Paola

    2016-07-26

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers several traits to cancer cells that are required for malignant progression. Here, we report that miR-27b-3p-mediated silencing of the single-strand RNA binding protein KHSRP is required for transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced EMT in mammary gland cells. Sustained KHSRP expression limits TGF-β-dependent induction of EMT factors and cell migration, whereas its knockdown in untreated cells mimics TGF-β-induced EMT. Genome-wide sequencing analyses revealed that KHSRP controls (1) levels of mature miR-192-5p, a microRNA that targets a group of EMT factors, and (2) alternative splicing of a cohort of pre-mRNAs related to cell adhesion and motility including Cd44 and Fgfr2. KHSRP belongs to a ribonucleoprotein complex that includes hnRNPA1, and the two proteins cooperate in promoting epithelial-type exon usage of select pre-mRNAs. Thus, TGF-β-induced KHSRP silencing is central in a pathway leading to gene-expression changes that contribute to the cellular changes linked to EMT. PMID:27396342

  9. Practising Silence in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The concept "silence" has diametrically opposed meanings; it connotes peace and contemplation as well as death and oblivion. Silence can also be considered a practice. There is keeping the rule of silence to still the mind and find inner truth, as well as forcibly silencing in the sense of subjugating another to one's own purposes.…

  10. HRAS is silenced by two neighboring G-quadruplexes and activated by MAZ, a zinc-finger transcription factor with DNA unfolding property

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, Susanna; Shchekotikhin, Andrey E.; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2014-01-01

    The HRAS promoter contains immediately upstream of the transcription start site two neighboring G-elements, each capable of folding into a G-quadruplex structure. We have previously found that these G-quadruplexes bind to the zinc-finger transcription factors MAZ and Sp1. In the present study we have examined the interaction between the HRAS promoter and MAZ, demonstrating for the first time that the protein unfolds the G-quadruplex structures. We also demonstrate that MAZ-GST, in the presence of the complementary strands, promotes a rapid transformation of the two HRAS quadruplexes into duplexes. By a mutational analysis of the HRAS G-elements, we dissected the MAZ-binding sites from the quadruplex-forming motifs, finding that the two neighboring G-quadruplexes bring about a dramatic repression of transcription, in a synergistic manner. We also discovered that the two G-quadruplexes are strong targets for small anticancer molecules. We found that a cell-penetrating anthratiophenedione (ATPD-1), which binds tightly to the G-quadruplexes (ΔT > 15°C), promotes the total extinction of HRAS transcription. In contrast, when one of the two G-quadruplexes was abrogated by point mutations, ATPD-1 repressed transcription by only 50%. Our study provides relevant information for the rationale design of targeted therapy drugs specific for the HRAS oncogene. PMID:25013182

  11. Mammalian meiotic silencing exhibits sexually dimorphic features.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, J M; Mahadevaiah, S K; ElInati, E; Tóth, A; Turner, James

    2016-06-01

    During mammalian meiotic prophase I, surveillance mechanisms exist to ensure that germ cells with defective synapsis or recombination are eliminated, thereby preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes and embryos. Meiosis in females is more error-prone than in males, and this is in part because the prophase I surveillance mechanisms are less efficient in females. A mechanistic understanding of this sexual dimorphism is currently lacking. In both sexes, asynapsed chromosomes are transcriptionally inactivated by ATR-dependent phosphorylation of histone H2AFX. This process, termed meiotic silencing, has been proposed to perform an important prophase I surveillance role. While the transcriptional effects of meiotic silencing at individual genes are well described in the male germ line, analogous studies in the female germ line have not been performed. Here we apply single- and multigene RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA FISH) to oocytes from chromosomally abnormal mouse models to uncover potential sex differences in the silencing response. Notably, we find that meiotic silencing in females is less efficient than in males. Within individual oocytes, genes located on the same asynapsed chromosome are silenced to differing extents, thereby generating mosaicism in gene expression profiles across oocyte populations. Analysis of sex-reversed XY female mice reveals that the sexual dimorphism in silencing is determined by gonadal sex rather than sex chromosome constitution. We propose that sex differences in meiotic silencing impact on the sexually dimorphic prophase I response to asynapsis. PMID:26712235

  12. Yeast linker histone Hho1p is required for efficient RNA polymerase I processivity and transcriptional silencing at the ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Anat; Eyal, Miri; Hershkovits, Gitit; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Klutstein, Michael; Katcoff, Don Jay

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome core particles in eukaryotes are linked by a stretch of DNA that is usually associated with a linker histone. Here, we show in yeast, that the presence of yeast linker histone Hho1p represses expression of a pol II transcribed gene (MET15) embedded in the rDNA. In vivo deletions of Hho1p sequences showed that the second globular domain is sufficient for that repression, whereas the presence of the N terminus is required for its derepression. In contrast, a run-on assay confirmed by a ChIP experiment showed that Hho1p is required for maximal pol I processivity during rDNA transcription. Psoralen accessibility experiments indicated that Hho1p is necessary for normal rDNA compaction. DNA array expression analysis comparing RNA transcripts in wild-type and hho1 strains before and after a heat-shock showed that Hho1p is necessary to achieve wild-type mRNA levels of transcripts that encode ribosomal components. Taken together, our results suggest that Hho1p is involved in rDNA compaction, and like core histones, is required for efficient rDNA transcription by pol I. PMID:18687885

  13. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L.) subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH) has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected) and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES) and post-elongation stem (PES) internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV) regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs), the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes suggested co

  14. New Construct Approaches for Efficient Gene Silencing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hua; Chretien, Robert; Ye, Jingsong; Rommens, Caius M.

    2006-01-01

    An important component of conventional sense, antisense, and double-strand RNA-based gene silencing constructs is the transcriptional terminator. Here, we show that this regulatory element becomes obsolete when gene fragments are positioned between two oppositely oriented and functionally active promoters. The resulting convergent transcription triggers gene silencing that is at least as effective as unidirectional promoter-to-terminator transcription. In addition to short, variably sized, and nonpolyadenylated RNAs, terminator-free cassette produced rare, longer transcripts that reach into the flanking promoter. These read-through products did not influence the efficacy and expression levels of the neighboring hygromycin phosphotransferase gene. Replacement of gene fragments by promoter-derived sequences further increased the extent of gene silencing. This finding indicates that genomic DNA may be a more efficient target for gene silencing than gene transcripts. PMID:16766670

  15. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  16. Isolation and Identification of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing-Related Micro-RNAs by Functionalized Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-I; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Li, Keng-Hui; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Su, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Wei; Tseng, Kun-Chang; Lin, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chii-Dong; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2015-01-01

    Many transcribed RNAs are non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNAs to regulate the translation efficacy. Therefore, identifying the miRNAs expressed in cells/organisms aids in understanding genetic control in cells/organisms. In this report, we determined the binding of oligonucleotides to a receptor-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) by monitoring the changes in conductance of the SiNW-FET. We first modified a SiNW-FET with a DNA probe to directly and selectively detect the complementary miRNA in cell lysates. This SiNW-FET device has 7-fold higher sensitivity than reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in detecting the corresponding miRNA. Next, we anchored viral p19 proteins, which bind the double-strand small RNAs (ds-sRNAs), on the SiNW-FET. By perfusing the device with synthesized ds-sRNAs of different pairing statuses, the dissociation constants revealed that the nucleotides at the 3'-overhangs and pairings at the terminus are important for the interactions. After perfusing the total RNA mixture extracted from Nicotiana benthamiana across the device, this device could enrich the ds-sRNAs for sequence analysis. Finally, this bionanoelectronic SiNW-FET, which is able to isolate and identify the interacting protein-RNA, adds an additional tool in genomic technology for the future study of direct biomolecular interactions. PMID:26616332

  17. Isolation and Identification of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing-Related Micro-RNAs by Functionalized Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-I.; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Li, Keng-Hui; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Su, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Wei; Tseng, Kun-Chang; Lin, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chii-Dong; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Many transcribed RNAs are non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNAs to regulate the translation efficacy. Therefore, identifying the miRNAs expressed in cells/organisms aids in understanding genetic control in cells/organisms. In this report, we determined the binding of oligonucleotides to a receptor-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) by monitoring the changes in conductance of the SiNW-FET. We first modified a SiNW-FET with a DNA probe to directly and selectively detect the complementary miRNA in cell lysates. This SiNW-FET device has 7-fold higher sensitivity than reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in detecting the corresponding miRNA. Next, we anchored viral p19 proteins, which bind the double-strand small RNAs (ds-sRNAs), on the SiNW-FET. By perfusing the device with synthesized ds-sRNAs of different pairing statuses, the dissociation constants revealed that the nucleotides at the 3‧-overhangs and pairings at the terminus are important for the interactions. After perfusing the total RNA mixture extracted from Nicotiana benthamiana across the device, this device could enrich the ds-sRNAs for sequence analysis. Finally, this bionanoelectronic SiNW-FET, which is able to isolate and identify the interacting protein-RNA, adds an additional tool in genomic technology for the future study of direct biomolecular interactions.

  18. Isolation and Identification of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing-Related Micro-RNAs by Functionalized Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-I; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Li, Keng-Hui; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Su, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Wei; Tseng, Kun-Chang; Lin, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chii-Dong; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2015-01-01

    Many transcribed RNAs are non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNAs to regulate the translation efficacy. Therefore, identifying the miRNAs expressed in cells/organisms aids in understanding genetic control in cells/organisms. In this report, we determined the binding of oligonucleotides to a receptor-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) by monitoring the changes in conductance of the SiNW-FET. We first modified a SiNW-FET with a DNA probe to directly and selectively detect the complementary miRNA in cell lysates. This SiNW-FET device has 7-fold higher sensitivity than reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in detecting the corresponding miRNA. Next, we anchored viral p19 proteins, which bind the double-strand small RNAs (ds-sRNAs), on the SiNW-FET. By perfusing the device with synthesized ds-sRNAs of different pairing statuses, the dissociation constants revealed that the nucleotides at the 3′-overhangs and pairings at the terminus are important for the interactions. After perfusing the total RNA mixture extracted from Nicotiana benthamiana across the device, this device could enrich the ds-sRNAs for sequence analysis. Finally, this bionanoelectronic SiNW-FET, which is able to isolate and identify the interacting protein-RNA, adds an additional tool in genomic technology for the future study of direct biomolecular interactions. PMID:26616332

  19. Silencing the Menkes Copper-Transporting ATPase (Atp7a) Gene in Rat Intestinal Epithelial (IEC-6) Cells Increases Iron Flux via Transcriptional Induction of Ferroportin 1 (Fpn1)123

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The Menkes copper-transporting ATPase (Atp7a) gene is induced in rat duodenum during iron deficiency, consistent with copper accumulation in the intestinal mucosa and liver. To test the hypothesis that ATP7A influences intestinal iron metabolism, the Atp7a gene was silenced in rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology. Perturbations in intracellular copper homeostasis were noted in knockdown cells, consistent with the dual roles of ATP7A in pumping copper into the trans-Golgi (for cuproenzyme synthesis) and exporting copper from cells. Intracellular iron concentrations were unaffected by Atp7a knockdown. Unexpectedly, however, vectorial iron (59Fe) transport increased (∼33%) in knockdown cells grown in bicameral inserts and increased further (∼70%) by iron deprivation (compared with negative control shRNA-transfected cells). Additional experiments were designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of increased transepithelial iron flux. Enhanced iron uptake by knockdown cells was associated with increased expression of a ferrireductase (duodenal cytochrome b) and activity of a cell-surface ferrireductase. Increased iron efflux from knockdown cells was likely mediated via transcriptional activation of the ferroportin 1 gene (by an unknown mechanism). Moreover, Atp7a knockdown significantly attenuated expression of an iron oxidase [hephaestin (HEPH); by ∼80%] and membrane ferroxidase activity (by ∼50%). Cytosolic ferroxidase activity, however, was retained in knockdown cells (75% of control cells), perhaps compensating for diminished HEPH activity. This investigation has thus documented alterations in iron homeostasis associated with Atp7a knockdown in enterocyte-like cells. Alterations in copper transport, trafficking, or distribution may underlie the increase in transepithelial iron flux noted when ATP7A activity is diminished. PMID:24174620

  20. The molecular topography of silenced chromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Thurtle, Deborah M.; Rine, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin imparts regional, promoter-independent repression of genes and is epigenetically heritable. Understanding how silencing achieves this regional repression is a fundamental problem in genetics and development. Current models of yeast silencing posit that Sir proteins, recruited by transcription factors bound to the silencers, spread throughout the silenced region. To test this model directly at high resolution, we probed the silenced chromatin architecture by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) of Sir proteins, histones, and a key histone modification, H4K16-acetyl. These analyses revealed that Sir proteins are strikingly concentrated at and immediately adjacent to the silencers, with lower levels of enrichment over the promoters at HML and HMR, the critical targets for transcriptional repression. The telomeres also showed discrete peaks of Sir enrichment yet a continuous domain of hypoacetylated histone H4K16. Surprisingly, ChIP-seq of cross-linked chromatin revealed a distribution of nucleosomes at silenced loci that was similar to Sir proteins, whereas native nucleosome maps showed a regular distribution throughout silenced loci, indicating that cross-linking captured a specialized chromatin organization imposed by Sir proteins. This specialized chromatin architecture observed in yeast informs the importance of a steric contribution to regional repression in other organisms. PMID:24493645

  1. How Can Plant DNA Viruses Evade siRNA-Directed DNA Methylation and Silencing?

    PubMed Central

    Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2013-01-01

    Plants infected with DNA viruses produce massive quantities of virus-derived, 24-nucleotide short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can potentially direct viral DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, growing evidence indicates that the circular double-stranded DNA accumulating in the nucleus for Pol II-mediated transcription of viral genes is not methylated. Hence, DNA viruses most likely evade or suppress RNA-directed DNA methylation. This review describes the specialized mechanisms of replication and silencing evasion evolved by geminiviruses and pararetoviruses, which rescue viral DNA from repressive methylation and interfere with transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing of viral genes. PMID:23887650

  2. RNA silencing: an antiviral mechanism.

    PubMed

    Csorba, T; Pantaleo, V; Burgyán, J

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific gene-inactivation system that also functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To overcome antiviral RNA silencing, viruses express silencing-suppressor proteins which can counteract the host silencing-based antiviral process. After the discovery of virus-encoded silencing suppressors, it was shown that these viral proteins can target one or more key points in the silencing machinery. Here we review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism and function of antiviral RNA silencing in plants, and on the virus's counterattack by expression of silencing-suppressor proteins. We also discuss emerging evidence that RNA silencing and expression of viral silencing-suppressor proteins are tools forged as a consequence of virus-host coevolution for fine-tuning host-pathogen coexistence. PMID:20109663

  3. Rate of amino acid substitution is influenced by the degree and conservation of male-biased transcription over 50 myr of Drosophila evolution.

    PubMed

    Grath, Sonja; Parsch, John

    2012-01-01

    Sex-biased gene expression (i.e., the differential expression of genes between males and females) is common among sexually reproducing species. However, genes often differ in their sex-bias classification or degree of sex bias between species. There is also an unequal distribution of sex-biased genes (especially male-biased genes) between the X chromosome and the autosomes. We used whole-genome expression data and evolutionary rate estimates for two different Drosophilid lineages, melanogaster and obscura, spanning an evolutionary time scale of around 50 Myr to investigate the influence of sex-biased gene expression and chromosomal location on the rate of molecular evolution. In both lineages, the rate of protein evolution correlated positively with the male/female expression ratio. Genes with highly male-biased expression, genes expressed specifically in male reproductive tissues, and genes with conserved male-biased expression over long evolutionary time scales showed the fastest rates of evolution. An analysis of sex-biased gene evolution in both lineages revealed evidence for a "fast-X" effect in which the rate of evolution was greater for X-linked than for autosomal genes. This pattern was particularly pronounced for male-biased genes. Genes located on the obscura "neo-X" chromosome, which originated from a recent X-autosome fusion, showed rates of evolution that were intermediate between genes located on the ancestral X-chromosome and the autosomes. This suggests that the shift to X-linkage led to an increase in the rate of molecular evolution. PMID:22321769

  4. Rate of Amino Acid Substitution Is Influenced by the Degree and Conservation of Male-Biased Transcription Over 50 Myr of Drosophila Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Grath, Sonja; Parsch, John

    2012-01-01

    Sex-biased gene expression (i.e., the differential expression of genes between males and females) is common among sexually reproducing species. However, genes often differ in their sex-bias classification or degree of sex bias between species. There is also an unequal distribution of sex-biased genes (especially male-biased genes) between the X chromosome and the autosomes. We used whole-genome expression data and evolutionary rate estimates for two different Drosophilid lineages, melanogaster and obscura, spanning an evolutionary time scale of around 50 Myr to investigate the influence of sex-biased gene expression and chromosomal location on the rate of molecular evolution. In both lineages, the rate of protein evolution correlated positively with the male/female expression ratio. Genes with highly male-biased expression, genes expressed specifically in male reproductive tissues, and genes with conserved male-biased expression over long evolutionary time scales showed the fastest rates of evolution. An analysis of sex-biased gene evolution in both lineages revealed evidence for a “fast-X” effect in which the rate of evolution was greater for X-linked than for autosomal genes. This pattern was particularly pronounced for male-biased genes. Genes located on the obscura “neo-X” chromosome, which originated from a recent X-autosome fusion, showed rates of evolution that were intermediate between genes located on the ancestral X-chromosome and the autosomes. This suggests that the shift to X-linkage led to an increase in the rate of molecular evolution. PMID:22321769

  5. Multitasking of the piRNA Silencing Machinery: Targeting Transposable Elements and Foreign Genes in the Bdelloid Rotifer Adineta vaga.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Fernando; Arkhipova, Irina R

    2016-05-01

    RNA-mediated silencing processes play a key role in silencing of transposable elements, especially in the germ line, where piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for suppressing transposon mobility and maintaining genome integrity. We previously reported that the genome of Adineta vaga, the first sequenced representative of the phylum Rotifera (class Bdelloidea), is characterized by massive levels of horizontal gene transfer, by unusually low transposon content, and by highly diversified RNA-mediated silencing machinery. Here, we investigate genome-wide distribution of pi-like small RNAs, which in A. vaga are 25-31 nucleotides in length and have a strong 5'-uridine bias, while lacking ping-pong amplification signatures. In agreement with expectations, 71% of mapped reads corresponded to annotated transposons, with 93% of these reads being in the antisense orientation. Unexpectedly, a significant fraction of piRNAs originate from predicted coding regions corresponding to genes of putatively foreign origin. The distribution of piRNAs across foreign genes is not biased toward 3'-UTRs, instead resembling transposons in uniform distribution pattern throughout the gene body, and in predominantly antisense orientation. We also find that genes with small RNA coverage, including a number of genes of metazoan origin, are characterized by higher occurrence of telomeric repeats in the surrounding genomic regions, and by higher density of transposons in the vicinity, which have the potential to promote antisense transcription. Our findings highlight the complex interplay between RNA-based silencing processes and acquisition of genes at the genome periphery, which can result either in their loss or eventual domestication and integration into the host genome. PMID:27017627

  6. Mariner Transposons Contain a Silencer: Possible Role of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Beauclair, Linda; Moiré, Nathalie; Arensbuger, Peter; Bigot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are driving forces for establishing genetic innovations such as transcriptional regulatory networks in eukaryotic genomes. Here, we describe a silencer situated in the last 300 bp of the Mos1 transposase open reading frame (ORF) which functions in vertebrate and arthropod cells. Functional silencers are also found at similar locations within three other animal mariner elements, i.e. IS630-Tc1-mariner (ITm) DD34D elements, Himar1, Hsmar1 and Mcmar1. These silencers are able to impact eukaryotic promoters monitoring strong, moderate or low expression as well as those of mariner elements located upstream of the transposase ORF. We report that the silencing involves at least two transcription factors (TFs) that are conserved within animal species, NFAT-5 and Alx1. These cooperatively act with YY1 to trigger the silencing activity. Four other housekeeping transcription factors (TFs), neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF), GAGA factor (GAF) and GTGT factor (GTF), were also found to have binding sites within mariner silencers but their impact in modulating the silencer activity remains to be further specified. Interestingly, an NRSF binding site was found to overlap a 30 bp motif coding a highly conserved PHxxYSPDLAPxD peptide in mariner transposases. We also present experimental evidence that silencing is mainly achieved by co-opting the host Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 pathway. However, we observe that when PRC2 is impaired another host silencing pathway potentially takes over to maintain weak silencer activity. Mariner silencers harbour features of Polycomb Response Elements, which are probably a way for mariner elements to self-repress their transcription and mobility in somatic and germinal cells when the required TFs are expressed. At the evolutionary scale, mariner elements, through their exaptation, might have been a source of silencers playing a role in the chromatin configuration in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:26939020

  7. Sea urchin mtDBP is a two-faced transcription termination factor with a biased polarity depending on the RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Roberti, Marina; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Montoya, Julio; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2001-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial displacement (D)-loop binding protein mtDBP has been previously identified and cloned. The polypeptide (348 amino acids) displays a significant homology with the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF. This similarity, and the observation that the 3′ ends of mitochondrial RNAs coded by opposite strands mapped in correspondence of mtDBP-binding sites, suggested that mtDBP could function as transcription termination factor in sea urchin mitochondria. To investigate such a role we tested the capability of mtDBP bound to its target sequence in the main non-coding region to affect RNA elongation by mitochondrial and bacteriophage T3 and T7 RNA polymerases. We show that mtDBP was able to terminate transcription bidirectionally when initiated by human mitochondrial RNA polymerase but only unidirectionally when initiated by T3 or T7 RNA polymerases. Time-course experiments indicated that mtDBP promotes true transcription termination rather than transcription pausing. These results indicate that mtDBP is able to function as a bipolar transcription termination factor in sea urchin mitochondria. The functional significance of such an activity could be linked to the previously proposed dual role of the protein in modulating mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. PMID:11713324

  8. Nuclear gene silencing directs reception of long-distance mRNA silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, C A; Mitter, N; Christie, M; Smith, N A; Waterhouse, P M; Carroll, B J

    2007-09-11

    In plants, silencing of mRNA can be transmitted from cell to cell and also over longer distances from roots to shoots. To investigate the long-distance mechanism, WT and mutant shoots were grafted onto roots silenced for an mRNA. We show that three genes involved in a chromatin silencing pathway, NRPD1a encoding RNA polymerase IVa, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2), and DICER-like 3 (DCL3), are required for reception of long-distance mRNA silencing in the shoot. A mutant representing a fourth gene in the pathway, argonaute4 (ago4), was also partially compromised in the reception of silencing. This pathway produces 24-nt siRNAs and resulted in decapped RNA, a known substrate for amplification of dsRNA by RDR6. Activation of silencing in grafted shoots depended on RDR6, but no 24-nt siRNAs were detected in mutant rdr6 shoots, indicating that RDR6 also plays a role in initial signal perception. After amplification of decapped transcripts, DCL4 and DCL2 act hierarchically as they do in antiviral resistance to produce 21- and 22-nt siRNAs, respectively, and these guide mRNA degradation. Several dcl genotypes were also tested for their capacity to transmit the mobile silencing signal from the rootstock. dcl1-8 and a dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutant are compromised in micro-RNA and siRNA biogenesis, respectively, but were unaffected in signal transmission. PMID:17785412

  9. Genetic diversity and silencing suppression effects of Rice yellow mottle virus and the P1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Siré, Christelle; Bangratz-Reyser, Martine; Fargette, Denis; Brugidou, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Background PTGS (post-transcriptional gene silencing) is used to counter pathogenic invasions, particularly viruses. In return, many plant viruses produce proteins which suppress silencing directed against their RNA. The diversity of silencing suppression at the species level in natural hosts is unknown. Results We investigated the functional diversity of silencing suppression among isolates of the African RYMV (Rice yellow mottle virus) in rice. The RYMV-P1 protein is responsible for cell-to-cell movement and is a silencing suppressor. Transgenic gus-silencing rice lines were used to investigate intra-specific and serogroup silencing suppression diversity at two different levels: that of the virion and the P1 silencing suppressor protein. Our data provide evidence that silencing suppression is a universal phenomenon for RYMV species. However, we found considerable diversity in their ability to suppress silencing which was not linked to RYMV phylogeny, or pathogenicity. At the level of the silencing suppressor P1 alone, we found similar results to those previously found at the virion level. In addition, we showed that cell-to-cell movement of P1 was crucial for the efficiency of silencing suppression. Mutagenesis of P1 demonstrated a strong link between some amino acids and silencing suppression features with, one on the hand, the conserved amino acids C95 and C64 involved in cell-to-cell movement and the strength of suppression, respectively, and on the other hand, the non conserved F88 was involved in the strength of silencing suppression. Conclusion We demonstrated that intra-species diversity of silencing suppression is highly variable and by mutagenesis of P1 we established the first link between silencing suppression and genetic diversity. These results are potentially important for understanding virus-host interactions. PMID:18447922

  10. The Fruit of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    This presentation explores how contemplative practices, especially those anchored in an active listening to silence, are integrated into creative writing courses. It pays particular attention to a course taught at the United States Military Academy at West Point and to a course on the poetry of war and peace taught at the University of…

  11. The Gift of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    Slowing down, quieting the mind and body, and experiencing silence nourishes the spirit. Montessori educators are mandated to cultivate not just the intellect but the whole child. They recognize that nurturing the spirit of the child is part of what makes this form of education work so well. This article discusses the benefits of stillness and…

  12. Multiple roles for Piwi in silencing Drosophila transposons

    PubMed Central

    Rozhkov, Nikolay V.; Hammell, Molly; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Silencing of transposons in the Drosophila ovary relies on three Piwi family proteins—Piwi, Aubergine (Aub), and Ago3—acting in concert with their small RNA guides, the Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Aub and Ago3 are found in the germ cell cytoplasm, where they function in the ping-pong cycle to consume transposon mRNAs. The nuclear Piwi protein is required for transposon silencing in both germ and somatic follicle cells, yet the precise mechanisms by which Piwi acts remain largely unclear. We investigated the role of Piwi by combining cell type-specific knockdowns with measurements of steady-state transposon mRNA levels, nascent RNA synthesis, chromatin state, and small RNA abundance. In somatic cells, Piwi loss led to concerted effects on nascent transcripts and transposon mRNAs, indicating that Piwi acts through transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). In germ cells, Piwi loss showed disproportionate impacts on steady-state RNA levels, indicating that it also exerts an effect on post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Piwi knockdown affected levels of germ cell piRNAs presumably bound to Aub and Ago3, perhaps explaining its post-transcriptional impacts. Overall, our results indicate that Piwi plays multiple roles in the piRNA pathway, in part enforcing transposon repression through effects on local chromatin states and transcription but also participating in germ cell piRNA biogenesis. PMID:23392609

  13. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Czosnek, Henryk; Eybishtz, Assaf; Sade, Dagan; Gorovits, Rena; Sobol, Iris; Bejarano, Eduardo; Rosas-Díaz, Tábata; Lozano-Durán, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS) to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R), the other susceptible (S) to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the molecular

  14. Transcript Profiling of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Using the GeneChip Soybean Genome Array: Optimizing Analysis by Masking Biased Probes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and soybean (Glycine max) both belong to the Phaseoleae tribe and share significant coding sequence homology. To evaluate the utility of the soybean GeneChip for transcript profiling of common bean, we hybridized cRNAs purified from nodule, leaf, and root of common b...

  15. The Conspiracy Of Silence

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Saul

    1980-01-01

    The issue of the impaired physician is compounded by not only mass denial of the problem, but also a 'conspiracy of silence' among many groups associated with the physician. The conspirators—including the physician himself, his family, community, professional colleagues and nurses as well as hospital boards and administration—are unable to reconcile deteriorating performance due to alcohol or drugs with an otherwise gifted professional who should know the dangers of substance abuse. They may also fear the effects of labels such as 'alcoholism', 'drug abuse' and 'psychiatric illness', and they may not know how to handle the problem. A Saskatchewan Medical Association committee was formed in 1976 to penetrate the shroud of silence by identifying and rehabilitating impaired physicians. However, the committee's experience since that time has been largely frustrating because its function has been viewed as more punitive than therapeutic. Imagesp849-a PMID:21293652

  16. DICER-LIKE2 plays a primary role in transitive silencing of transgenes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mlotshwa, Sizolwenkosi; Pruss, Gail J; Peragine, Angela; Endres, Matthew W; Li, Junjie; Chen, Xuemei; Poethig, R Scott; Bowman, Lewis H; Vance, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes play a pivotal role in RNA silencing in plants, processing the long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that triggers silencing into the primary short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that mediate it. The siRNA population can be augmented and silencing amplified via transitivity, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR)-dependent pathway that uses the target RNA as substrate to generate secondary siRNAs. Here we report that Arabidopsis DCL2-but not DCL4-is required for transitivity in cell-autonomous, post-transcriptional silencing of transgenes. An insertion mutation in DCL2 blocked sense transgene-induced silencing and eliminated accumulation of the associated RDR-dependent siRNAs. In hairpin transgene-induced silencing, the dcl2 mutation likewise eliminated accumulation of secondary siRNAs and blocked transitive silencing, but did not block silencing mediated by primary siRNAs. Strikingly, in all cases, the dcl2 mutation eliminated accumulation of all secondary siRNAs, including those generated by other DCL enzymes. In contrast, mutations in DCL4 promoted a dramatic shift to transitive silencing in the case of the hairpin transgene and enhanced silencing induced by the sense transgene. Suppression of hairpin and sense transgene silencing by the P1/HC-Pro and P38 viral suppressors was associated with elimination of secondary siRNA accumulation, but the suppressors did not block processing of the stem of the hairpin transcript into primary siRNAs. Thus, these viral suppressors resemble the dcl2 mutation in their effects on siRNA biogenesis. We conclude that DCL2 plays an essential, as opposed to redundant, role in transitive silencing of transgenes and may play a more important role in silencing of viruses than currently thought. PMID:18335032

  17. Silencing of an arabidopsis Myb regulatory transgene in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been exploring the use of genetically engineered anthocyanin over-production as a visual indicator of gene activation and silencing in plants. Previous work demonstrated that constitutive over-expression of genes encoding specific Arabidopsis transcription factors from the myb family can pr...

  18. Intergroup bias.

    PubMed

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility. PMID:11752497

  19. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process. PMID:27323202

  20. Rethinking the Day of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Back in 2006, 7th and 8th graders at Green Acres, the K-8 independent school where the author taught in suburban Maryland, participated in the Day of Silence. The Day of Silence is a national event: Students across the country take a one-day pledge of silence to show that they want to make schools safe for all students, regardless of their sexual…

  1. GENE SILENCING. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Tchasovnikarova, Iva A; Timms, Richard T; Matheson, Nicholas J; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A; Lehner, Paul J

    2015-06-26

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A nonlethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the HUSH (human silencing hub) complex, comprising three poorly characterized proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin; this complex is absent from Drosophila but is conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH components resulted in decreased H3K9me3 both at endogenous genomic loci and at retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing. PMID:26022416

  2. Edwin Hubble's Silence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, D.

    2013-04-01

    In late 1928 Edwin Hubble was right in the middle of using V. M. Slipher's redshift data to prove that the universe is expanding, when Hubble's boss, George Hale, directed him to drop everything and rush to the Grand Canyon and test it as a possible site for Hale's planned 200-inch telescope. On his way, Hubble stopped at Lowell Observatory and met with V. M. Slipher. The letters both men wrote about this visit suggest that Hubble never said a word about his being in the middle of using Slipher's research to transform the universe. At the least, this silence is symbolic of the silence with which astronomical history has often treated Slipher's work. A survey of the historical literature suggests several reasons for this. Theorists and observers in astronomy (and other sciences) have long had different perspectives about how science works, and those who place more importance on theory have tended to credit the idea of the expanding universe to the theorists. Also, many sources indicate that Edwin Hubble was not a modest man or generous about sharing credit.

  3. Analysis of Geminivirus AL2 and L2 Proteins Reveals a Novel AL2 Silencing Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jackel, Jamie N.; Buchmann, R. Cody; Singhal, Udit

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Both posttranscriptional and transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS and TGS, respectively) participate in defense against the DNA-containing geminiviruses. As a countermeasure, members of the genus Begomovirus (e.g., Cabbage leaf curl virus) encode an AL2 protein that is both a transcriptional activator and a silencing suppressor. The related L2 protein of Beet curly top virus (genus Curtovirus) lacks transcription activation activity. Previous studies showed that both AL2 and L2 suppress silencing by a mechanism that correlates with adenosine kinase (ADK) inhibition, while AL2 in addition activates transcription of cellular genes that negatively regulate silencing pathways. The goal of this study was to clarify the general means by which these viral proteins inhibit various aspects of silencing. We confirmed that AL2 inhibits systemic silencing spread by a mechanism that requires transcription activation activity. Surprisingly, we also found that reversal of PTGS and TGS by ADK inactivation depended on whether experiments were conducted in vegetative or reproductive Nicotiana benthamiana plants (i.e., before or after the vegetative-to-reproductive transition). While AL2 was able to reverse silencing in both vegetative and reproductive plants, L2 and ADK inhibition were effective only in vegetative plants. This suggests that silencing maintenance mechanisms can change during development or in response to stress. Remarkably, we also observed that AL2 lacking its transcription activation domain could reverse TGS in reproductive plants, revealing a third, previously unsuspected AL2 suppression mechanism that depends on neither ADK inactivation nor transcription activation. IMPORTANCE RNA silencing in plants is a multivalent antiviral defense, and viruses respond by elaborating multiple and sometimes multifunctional proteins that inhibit various aspects of silencing. The studies described here add an additional layer of complexity to this interplay. By examining

  4. The Search for Strategic Silence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Richard

    Media content analysts seldom observe the principle that editorial omissions are as telling as what is published or broadcast; hence, the purpose of this paper is to explore, and thus stimulate debate about, editorial omissions or "strategic silence." It is observed that as a concept, strategic silence embraces both tact and strategy--the former…

  5. Sympathetic bias.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Peart, Sandra J

    2008-06-01

    We wish to deal with investigator bias in a statistical context. We sketch how a textbook solution to the problem of "outliers" which avoids one sort of investigator bias, creates the temptation for another sort. We write down a model of the approbation seeking statistician who is tempted by sympathy for client to violate the disciplinary standards. We give a simple account of one context in which we might expect investigator bias to flourish. Finally, we offer tentative suggestions to deal with the problem of investigator bias which follow from our account. As we have given a very sparse and stylized account of investigator bias, we ask what might be done to overcome this limitation. PMID:17925315

  6. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  7. The eerie silence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Whether or not we are alone in the universe is one of the great outstanding questions of existence. For thousands of years it was restricted to the realm of philosophy and theology, but 50 years ago it became part of science. In April 1960 a young US astronomer, Frank Drake, began using a radio telescope to investigate whether signals from an extraterrestrial community might be coming our way. Known as the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, or SETI, it has grown into a major international enterprise, involving scientific institutions in several countries. Apart from a few oddities, however, all that the radio astronomers have encountered is an eerie silence. So is humankind the only technological civilization in the universe after all? Or might we be looking for the wrong thing in the wrong place at the wrong time?

  8. The rest is silence.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, E; Denli, A M; Hannon, G J

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several years, RNAi and its related phenomena have emerged not only as a powerful experimental tool but also as a new mode of gene regulation. Through a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches we have learned much about the mechanisms underlying dsRNA responses. However, many of the most intriguing aspects of dsRNA-induced gene silencing have yet to be illuminated. What has become abundantly clear is that the complex and highly conserved biology underlying RNA interference is critical both for genome maintenance and for the development of complex organisms. However, it seems probable that we have only begun to reveal the diversity of biological roles played by RNAi-related processes. PMID:11720281

  9. Silence Amenity Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hajime

    Engineering civilization brought convenient and comfortable life to us. However, some environmental problems such as various pollutions have also been developed with it. Acoustical noise is one of the major problems in modern life. Noise is generated from a noise source and propagates through transmitting medium such as the air and eventually reaches a receiver, usually a human being. The noise problem can be avoided, therefore, if one of those three elements in the noise problem is removed completely. In actual case, engineers are looking for most efficient way combining the controls for these three elements. In this article, basic characteristics of noise is reviewed briefly at first, then sound field analysis to predict sound transmission is discussed Aerodynamic noise is one of the major problems in silence amenity engineering today. Basic concept of the aerodynamic noise generation mechanism is discussed in detail with applications to turbo-machinery and high speed train noise control technology.

  10. A synthetic silencer mediates SIR-dependent functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    McNally, F J; Rine, J

    1991-01-01

    Copies of the mating-type genes are present at three loci on chromosome III of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genes at the MAT locus are transcribed, whereas the identical genes at the silent loci, HML and HMR, are not transcribed. Several genes, including the four SIR genes, and two sites, HMR-E and HMR-I, are required for repression of transcription at the HMR locus. Three elements have been implicated in the function of the HMR-E silencer: a binding site for the RAP1 protein, a binding site for the ABF1 protein, and an 11-bp consensus sequence common to nearly all autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) elements (putative origins of DNA replication). RAP1 and ABF1 binding sites of different sequence than those found at HMR-E were joined with an 11-bp ARS consensus sequence to form a synthetic silencer. The synthetic silencer was able to repress transcription of the HMRa1 gene, confirming that binding sites for RAP1 and ABF1 and the 11-bp ARS consensus sequence were the functional components of the silencer in vivo. Mutations in the ABF1 binding site or in the ARS consensus sequence of the synthetic silencer caused nearly complete derepression of transcription at HMR. The ARS consensus sequence mutation also eliminated the ARS activity of the synthetic silencer. These data suggested that replication initiation at the HMR-E silencer was required for establishment of the repressed state at the HMR locus. Images PMID:1922068

  11. Gene Silencing in Crustaceans: From Basic Research to Biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Amir; Manor, Rivka; Ventura, Tomer

    2013-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) is gaining momentum for crustaceans, both in basic research and for commercial development. RNAi has proven instrumental in a growing number of crustacean species, revealing the functionality of novel crustacean genes essential among others to development, growth, metabolism and reproduction. Extensive studies have also been done on silencing of viral transcripts in crustaceans, contributing to the understanding of the defense mechanisms of crustaceans and strategies employed by viruses to overcome these. The first practical use of gene silencing in aquaculture industry has been recently achieved, through manipulation of a crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone. This review summarizes the advancements in the use of RNAi in crustaceans, and assesses the advantages of this method, as well as the current hurdles that hinder its large-scale practice. PMID:24705266

  12. RNA silencing and antiviral defense in plants.

    PubMed

    Agius, Claire; Eamens, Andrew L; Millar, Anthony A; Watson, John M; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Given the widespread impact of RNA silencing on the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, it is indeed remarkable that this means of gene regulation went undiscovered for so long. Since the publication of landmark papers in 1998 (Fire et al., Nature 391:806-811, 1998; Waterhouse et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:13959-13964, 1998), intense research efforts have resulted in much progress from the speculation of Mello and colleagues that "the mechanisms underlying RNA interference probably exist for a biological purpose" (Fire et al., Nature 391:806-811, 1998). Across the eukaryotic kingdom, with the notable exception of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Moazed, Science 326:544-550, 2009), the importance of small RNA-driven gene regulation has been recognized and implicated in central developmental processes as well as in aberrant and diseased states. Plants have by far the most complex RNA-based control of gene expression (Wang et al., Floriculture, ornamental and plant biotechnology, vol. III, 2006). Four distinct RNA silencing pathways have been recognized in plants, albeit with considerable conservation of the molecular components. These pathways are directed by various small RNA species, including microRNAs (miRNAs), trans-acting small interfering RNAs (siRNA) (ta-siRNAs), repeat-associated siRNAs (ra-siRNAs), and natural antisense transcript siRNAs (nat-siRNAs). The effective functionality of each of these pathways appear to be fundamental to the integrity of A. thaliana. Furthermore, in response to viral invasion, plants synthesize viral sRNAs as a means of defense. This process may in fact reflect the ancient origins of RNA silencing: plants may have evolved RNA silencing pathways as a defense mechanism against foreign nucleic acid species in the absence of an immune system (Wang and Metzlaff, Curr Opin Plant Biol 8:216-222, 2005). The generation of viral siRNAs is a particularly interesting illustration of RNA silencing as it provides a context to explore the potential to

  13. Epigenetic silencers are enriched in dormant desert frog muscle.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Nicholas J; Lonhienne, T G A; Franklin, Craig E; Harper, Gregory S; Lehnert, S A

    2008-08-01

    Green-striped burrowing frogs, Cyclorana alboguttata, survive droughts by entering a metabolic depression called aestivation, characterised by a reduction in resting oxygen consumption by 80%. Aestivation in C. alboguttata is manifest by transcriptional silencing of skeletal muscle bioenergetic genes, such as NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase 1, ATP synthase and superoxide dismutase 2. In this study, we hypothesised that aestivation is associated with epigenetic change in frog muscle. We assessed mRNA transcript abundance of seven genes that code for proteins with established roles in epigenetically-mediated gene silencing [transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A, DNA (cytosine-5-) methyltransferase 1, methyl CpG binding protein 2, chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 4, histone binding protein rbbp4, histone deacetylase 1 and nuclear receptor co-repressor 2] using qRT-PCR. These seven genes showed a modest (1.1-3.5-fold) but coordinated upregulation in 6-month aestivating muscle. This reached significance for SIN3A and DNA cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1 in standard pair-wise comparisons (p < 0.05), and the candidates as a whole when analysed by Fisher's combined probability test (p < 0.01). These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the transcriptional silencing and metabolic depression that occurs during seasonal dormancy are associated with chromatin remodelling, and present a novel example of an environmentally induced epigenetic modification in an adult vertebrate. PMID:18369641

  14. Induction of stable epigenetic gene silencing in plants using a virus vector.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Akira; Kasai, Megumi

    2015-01-01

    Gene silencing through transcriptional repression can be induced by double-stranded RNA targeted to a gene promoter, a process known as RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). This phenomenon is associated with epigenetic changes involving cytosine methylation of the promoter. Plant virus vectors have been used to induce RNA-mediated TGS. Here, we describe methods relevant to the induction of epigenetic changes and RNA-mediated TGS in plants using a virus vector, which include inoculation of recombinant virus, detection of short interfering RNAs, bisulfite sequencing analysis, and nuclear run-on transcription assay. PMID:25740361

  15. Hindsight Bias.

    PubMed

    Roese, Neal J; Vohs, Kathleen D

    2012-09-01

    Hindsight bias occurs when people feel that they "knew it all along," that is, when they believe that an event is more predictable after it becomes known than it was before it became known. Hindsight bias embodies any combination of three aspects: memory distortion, beliefs about events' objective likelihoods, or subjective beliefs about one's own prediction abilities. Hindsight bias stems from (a) cognitive inputs (people selectively recall information consistent with what they now know to be true and engage in sensemaking to impose meaning on their own knowledge), (b) metacognitive inputs (the ease with which a past outcome is understood may be misattributed to its assumed prior likelihood), and (c) motivational inputs (people have a need to see the world as orderly and predictable and to avoid being blamed for problems). Consequences of hindsight bias include myopic attention to a single causal understanding of the past (to the neglect of other reasonable explanations) as well as general overconfidence in the certainty of one's judgments. New technologies for visualizing and understanding data sets may have the unintended consequence of heightening hindsight bias, but an intervention that encourages people to consider alternative causal explanations for a given outcome can reduce hindsight bias. PMID:26168501

  16. A 22-nt artificial microRNA mediates widespread RNA silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Marcus; Eamens, Andrew L; Finnegan, E Jean; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    It is known that 22-nucleotide (nt) microRNAs (miRNAs) derived from asymmetric duplexes trigger phased small-interfering RNA (phasiRNA) production from complementary targets. Here we investigate the efficacy of 22-nt artificial miRNA (amiRNA)-mediated RNA silencing relative to conventional hairpin RNA (hpRNA) and 21-nt amiRNA-mediated RNA silencing. CHALCONE SYNTHASE (CHS) was selected as a target in Arabidopsis thaliana due to the obvious and non-lethal loss of anthocyanin accumulation upon widespread RNA silencing. Over-expression of CHS in the pap1-D background facilitated visual detection of both local and systemic RNA silencing. RNA silencing was initiated in leaf tissues from hpRNA and amiRNA plant expression vectors under the control of an Arabidopsis RuBisCo small subunit 1A promoter (SSU). In this system, hpRNA expression triggered CHS silencing in most leaf tissues but not in roots or seed coats. Similarly, 21-nt amiRNA expression from symmetric miRNA/miRNA* duplexes triggered CHS silencing in all leaf tissues but not in roots or seed coats. However, 22-nt amiRNA expression from an asymmetric duplex triggered CHS silencing in all tissues, including roots and seed coats, in the majority of plant lines. This widespread CHS silencing required RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6-mediated accumulation of phasiRNAs from the endogenous CHS transcript. These results demonstrate the efficacy of asymmetric 22-nt amiRNA-directed RNA silencing and associated phasiRNA production and activity, in mediating widespread RNA silencing of an endogenous target gene. Asymmetric 22-nt amiRNA-directed RNA silencing requires little modification of existing amiRNA technology and is expected to be effective in suppressing other genes and/or members of gene families. PMID:23937661

  17. Technical advances in trigger-induced RNA interference gene silencing in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Foda, Bardees M; Suresh, Susmitha; Singh, Upinder

    2016-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has a robust endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. There are abundant 27 nucleotide (nt) anti-sense small RNAs (AS sRNAs) that target genes for silencing and the genome encodes many genes involved in the RNAi pathway such as Argonaute proteins. Importantly, an E. histolytica gene with numerous AS sRNAs can function as a "trigger" to induce silencing of a gene that is fused to the trigger. Thus, the amebic RNAi pathway regulates gene expression relevant to amebic biology and has additionally been harnessed as a tool for genetic manipulation. In this study we have further improved the trigger-induced gene silencing method. We demonstrate that rather than using the full-length gene, a short portion of the coding region fused to a trigger is sufficient to induce silencing; the first 537 bp of the E. histolytica rhomboid gene (EhROM1) fused in-frame to the trigger was sufficient to silence EhROM1. We also demonstrated that the trigger method could silence two amebic genes concomitantly; fusion of the coding regions of EhROM1 and transcription factor, EhMyb, in-frame to a trigger gene resulted in both genes being silenced. Alternatively, two genes can be silenced sequentially: EhROM1-silenced parasites with no drug selection plasmid were transfected with trigger-EhMyb, resulting in parasites with both EhROM1 and EhMyb silenced. With all approaches tested, the trigger-mediated silencing was substantive and silencing was maintained despite loss of the G418 selectable marker. All gene silencing was associated with generation of AS sRNAs to the silenced gene. We tested the reversibility of the trigger system using inhibitors of histone modifications but found that the silencing was highly stable. This work represents a technical advance in the trigger gene silencing method in E. histolytica. Approaches that readily silence multiple genes add significantly to the genetic toolkit available to the ameba research community. PMID:26747561

  18. Silence and the Notion of the Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ursula

    1994-01-01

    Stresses the value of silence, the right to have silence, and how technology has manipulated the sound environment and therefore taken silence out of common availability. Discusses noise pollution and the manipulative use of sound for private gain. Suggests taking action to restore the right to silence. (LP)

  19. RNA silencing movement in plants.

    PubMed

    Mermigka, Glykeria; Verret, Frédéric; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular organisms, like higher plants, need to coordinate their growth and development and to cope with environmental cues. To achieve this, various signal molecules are transported between neighboring cells and distant organs to control the fate of the recipient cells and organs. RNA silencing produces cell non-autonomous signal molecules that can move over short or long distances leading to the sequence specific silencing of a target gene in a well defined area of cells or throughout the entire plant, respectively. The nature of these signal molecules, the route of silencing spread, and the genes involved in their production, movement and reception are discussed in this review. Additionally, a short section on features of silencing spread in animal models is presented at the end of this review. PMID:26297506

  20. The capacity of target silencing by Drosophila PIWI and piRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Post, Christina; Clark, Josef P.; Sytnikova, Yuliya A.; Chirn, Gung-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Although Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) genetically repress transposable elements (TEs), it is unclear how the highly diverse piRNA populations direct Piwi proteins to silence TE targets without silencing the entire transcriptome. To determine the capacity of piRNA-mediated silencing, we introduced reporter genes into Drosophila OSS cells, which express microRNAs (miRNAs) and piRNAs, and compared the Piwi pathway to the Argonaute pathway in gene regulation. Reporter constructs containing several target sites that were robustly silenced by miRNAs were not silenced to the same degrees by piRNAs. However, another set of reporters we designed to enable a large number of both TE-directed and genic piRNAs to bind were robustly silenced by the PIWI/piRNA complex in OSS cells. These reporters show that a bulk of piRNAs are required to pair to the reporter's transcripts and not the reporter's DNA sequence to engage PIWI-mediated silencing. Following our genome-wide study of PIWI-regulated targets in OSS cells, we assessed candidate gene elements with our reporter platform. These results suggest TE sequences are the most direct of PIWI regulatory targets while coding genes are less directly affected by PIWI targeting. Finally, our study suggests that the PIWI transcriptional silencing mechanism triggers robust chromatin changes on targets with sufficient piRNA binding, and preferentially regulates TE transcripts because protein-coding transcripts lack a threshold of targeting by piRNA populations. This reporter platform will facilitate future dissections of the PIWI-targeting mechanism. PMID:25336588

  1. Characterization of Arabidopsis Genes Involved in Gene Silencing. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S. R.

    1999-02-05

    Enhancer of gene silencing 1 (egs1) is an Arabidopsis mutant that enhances post-transcriptional gene silencing of the rolB gene introduced by genetic engineering (transgene). The goal of our proposal was cloning EGS1 based on its map position. Although we screened more than 2000 chromosomes for recombination, we were unable to get closer than 2 cM to the gene. We experienced an unexpected tendency of the post-transcriptionally silenced transgene to switch to a more stable silenced state. This made it impossible to select egs1 homozygotes for map based cloning. This forced us to reconsider our cloning strategy. One possibility would have been to use a different transgene as the target of gene silencing. We tested two other transgenes. Both encoded proteins unrelated to the first but they were all expressed from the same type of promoter and they all had a similar tendency to become post-transcriptionally silenced. After screening over 80 F2 segregants from each cross between our egs1 mutant and Arabidopsis of the same ecotype homozygous for the new transgene, we were disappointed to find that the egs1 mutation did not enhance post-transcription silencing of the two new genes. In 80 plants we expected to have between 4 and 6 plants that were homozygous for the transgene and for the mutant egs1 allele. If egs1 mutations could enhance gene silencing of the new transgene, these plants would not express it. However all the double homozygotes still expressed the transgene. Therefore, we could not change the target transgene for mapping. This was the state of the cloning at the time for renewal of the grant in 1999. Because the selection of new meaningful recombinant plants had become extremely inefficient using the original rolB transgene, we abandoned the attempt at map based cloning and did not apply for further funding.

  2. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    PubMed

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. PMID:27085853

  3. Organizational Silence and Hidden Threats to Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Kerm; Dayton, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Organizational silence refers to a collective-level phenomenon of saying or doing very little in response to significant problems that face an organization. The paper focuses on some of the less obvious factors contributing to organizational silence that can serve as threats to patient safety. Converging areas of research from the cognitive, social, and organizational sciences and the study of sociotechnical systems help to identify some of the underlying factors that serve to shape and sustain organizational silence. These factors have been organized under three levels of analysis: (1) individual factors, including the availability heuristic, self-serving bias, and the status quo trap; (2) social factors, including conformity, diffusion of responsibility, and microclimates of distrust; and (3) organizational factors, including unchallenged beliefs, the good provider fallacy, and neglect of the interdependencies. Finally, a new role for health care leaders and managers is envisioned. It is one that places high value on understanding system complexity and does not take comfort in organizational silence. PMID:16898978

  4. Epigenetic silencing of EYA2 in pancreatic adenocarcinomas promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Hong, Seung-Mo; Hu, Chaoxin; Omura, Noriyuki; Young, Angela; Kim, Haeryoung; Yu, Jun; Knight, Spencer; Ayars, Michael; Griffith, Margaret; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To identify potentially important genes dysregulated in pancreatic cancer, we analyzed genome-wide transcriptional analysis of pancreatic cancers and normal pancreatic duct samples and identified the transcriptional coactivator, EYA2 (Drosophila Eyes Absent Homologue-2) as silenced in the majority of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the role of epigenetic mechanisms of EYA2 gene silencing in pancreatic cancers, performed in vitro and in vivo proliferation and migration assays to assess the effect of EYA2 silencing on tumor cell growth and metastasis formation, and expression analysis to identify genes transcriptionally regulated by EYA2. We found loss of tumoral Eya2 expression in 63% of pancreatic cancers (120/189 cases). Silencing of EYA2 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines correlated with promoter methylation and histone deacetylation and was reversible with DNA methyltransferase and HDAC inhibitors. EYA2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation. Compared to parental pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic cancers stably-expressing EYA2 grew more slowly and had fewer metastases in orthotopic models. The transcriptional changes after stable expression of EYA2 in pancreatic cancer cells included induction of genes in the TGFbeta pathway. Epigenetic silencing of EYA2 is a common event in pancreatic cancers and stable expression EYA2 limits the growth and metastases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:24810906

  5. Adenosine kinase inhibition and suppression of RNA silencing by geminivirus AL2 and L2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Buckley, Kenneth J; Yang, Xiaojuan; Buchmann, R Cody; Bisaro, David M

    2005-06-01

    Most plant viruses are initiators and targets of RNA silencing and encode proteins that suppress this adaptive host defense. The DNA-containing geminiviruses are no exception, and the AL2 protein (also known as AC2, C2, and transcriptional activator protein) encoded by members of the genus Begomovirus has been shown to act as a silencing suppressor. Here, a three-component, Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay is used to further examine the silencing suppression activity of AL2 from Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV, a begomovirus) and to determine if the related L2 protein of Beet curly top virus (BCTV, genus Curtovirus) also has suppression activity. We show that TGMV AL2, AL2(1-100) (lacking the transcriptional activation domain), and BCTV L2 can all suppress RNA silencing directed against a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene when silencing is induced by a construct expressing an inverted repeat GFP RNA (dsGFP). We previously found that these viral proteins interact with and inactivate adenosine kinase (ADK), a cellular enzyme important for adenosine salvage and methyl cycle maintenance. Using the GFP-dsGFP system, we demonstrate here that codelivery of a construct expressing an inverted repeat ADK RNA (dsADK), or addition of an ADK inhibitor (the adenosine analogue A-134974), suppresses GFP-directed silencing in a manner similar to the geminivirus proteins. In addition, AL2/L2 suppression phenotypes and nucleic acid binding properties are shown to be different from those of the RNA virus suppressors HC-Pro and p19. These findings provide strong evidence that ADK activity is required to support RNA silencing, and indicate that the geminivirus proteins suppress silencing by a novel mechanism that involves ADK inhibition. Further, since AL2(1-100) is as effective a suppressor as the full-length AL2 protein, activation and silencing suppression appear to be independent activities. PMID:15919897

  6. Construct design for efficient, effective and high-throughput gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Wesley, S V; Helliwell, C A; Smith, N A; Wang, M B; Rouse, D T; Liu, Q; Gooding, P S; Singh, S P; Abbott, D; Stoutjesdijk, P A; Robinson, S P; Gleave, A P; Green, A G; Waterhouse, P M

    2001-09-01

    Post-transcriptional silencing of plant genes using anti-sense or co-suppression constructs usually results in only a modest proportion of silenced individuals. Recent work has demonstrated the potential for constructs encoding self-complementary 'hairpin' RNA (hpRNA) to efficiently silence genes. In this study we examine design rules for efficient gene silencing, in terms of both the proportion of independent transgenic plants showing silencing, and the degree of silencing. Using hpRNA constructs containing sense/anti-sense arms ranging from 98 to 853 nt gave efficient silencing in a wide range of plant species, and inclusion of an intron in these constructs had a consistently enhancing effect. Intron-containing constructs (ihpRNA) generally gave 90-100% of independent transgenic plants showing silencing. The degree of silencing with these constructs was much greater than that obtained using either co-suppression or anti-sense constructs. We have made a generic vector, pHANNIBAL, that allows a simple, single PCR product from a gene of interest to be easily converted into a highly effective ihpRNA silencing construct. We have also created a high-throughput vector, pHELLSGATE, that should facilitate the cloning of gene libraries or large numbers of defined genes, such as those in EST collections, using an in vitro recombinase system. This system may facilitate the large-scale determination and discovery of plant gene functions in the same way as RNAi is being used to examine gene function in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:11576441

  7. Two Components of the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation Pathway Associate with MORC6 and Silence Loci Targeted by MORC6 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhang-Wei; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Shao, Chang-Rong; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The SU(VAR)3-9 homolog SUVH9 and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein IDN2 were thought to be components of an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway in Arabidopsis. We previously found that SUVH9 interacts with MORC6 but how the interaction contributes to transcriptional silencing remains elusive. Here, our genetic analysis indicates that SUVH2 and SUVH9 can either act in the same pathway as MORC6 or act synergistically with MORC6 to mediate transcriptional silencing. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDN2 interacts with MORC6 and mediates the silencing of a subset of MORC6 target loci. Like SUVH2, SUVH9, and IDN2, other RdDM components including Pol IV, Pol V, RDR2, and DRM2 are also required for transcriptional silencing at a subset of MORC6 target loci. MORC6 was previously shown to mediate transcriptional silencing through heterochromatin condensation. We demonstrate that the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex components SWI3B, SWI3C, and SWI3D interact with MORC6 as well as with SUVH9 and then mediate transcriptional silencing. These results suggest that the RdDM components are involved not only in DNA methylation but also in MORC6-mediated heterochromatin condensation. This study illustrates how DNA methylation is linked to heterochromatin condensation and thereby enhances transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. PMID:27171427

  8. Two Components of the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation Pathway Associate with MORC6 and Silence Loci Targeted by MORC6 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang-Wei; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Shao, Chang-Rong; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2016-05-01

    The SU(VAR)3-9 homolog SUVH9 and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein IDN2 were thought to be components of an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway in Arabidopsis. We previously found that SUVH9 interacts with MORC6 but how the interaction contributes to transcriptional silencing remains elusive. Here, our genetic analysis indicates that SUVH2 and SUVH9 can either act in the same pathway as MORC6 or act synergistically with MORC6 to mediate transcriptional silencing. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDN2 interacts with MORC6 and mediates the silencing of a subset of MORC6 target loci. Like SUVH2, SUVH9, and IDN2, other RdDM components including Pol IV, Pol V, RDR2, and DRM2 are also required for transcriptional silencing at a subset of MORC6 target loci. MORC6 was previously shown to mediate transcriptional silencing through heterochromatin condensation. We demonstrate that the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex components SWI3B, SWI3C, and SWI3D interact with MORC6 as well as with SUVH9 and then mediate transcriptional silencing. These results suggest that the RdDM components are involved not only in DNA methylation but also in MORC6-mediated heterochromatin condensation. This study illustrates how DNA methylation is linked to heterochromatin condensation and thereby enhances transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. PMID:27171427

  9. Communicative Silences: Forms and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, Thomas J.

    1973-01-01

    The nature of silence is discussed as an imposition of mind, as an interdependent signification ground for speech signs, as a relationship to mental time (as opposed to artificial time), and as it relates to sensation, perception and metaphorical movement. (Author)

  10. Sim4: a novel fission yeast kinetochore protein required for centromeric silencing and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Pidoux, Alison L; Richardson, William; Allshire, Robin C

    2003-04-28

    Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two domains: the central core and the outer repeats. Although both regions are required for full centromere function, the central core has a distinct chromatin structure and is likely to underlie the kinetochore itself, as it is associated with centromere-specific proteins. Genes placed within either region are transcriptionally silenced, reflecting the formation of a functional kinetochore complex and flanking centromeric heterochromatin. Here, transcriptional silencing was exploited to identify components involved in central core silencing and kinetochore assembly or structure. The resulting sim (silencing in the middle of the centromere) mutants display severe chromosome segregation defects. sim2+ encodes a known kinetochore protein, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant Cnp1CENP-A. sim4+ encodes a novel essential coiled-coil protein, which is specifically associated with the central core region and is required for the unusual chromatin structure of this region. Sim4 coimmunoprecipitates with the central core component Mis6 and, like Mis6, affects Cnp1CENP-A association with the central domain. Functional Mis6 is required for Sim4 localization at the kinetochore. Our analyses illustrate the fundamental link between silencing, chromatin structure, and kinetochore function, and establish defective silencing as a powerful approach for identifying proteins required to build a functional kinetochore. PMID:12719471

  11. Silence as the Foundation of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    Past and present discussions on education all too frequently neglect the role that silence plays in learning. In this article I set out to demonstrate that silence is the very foundation of learning. My claim is that we must find ways of freeing silence in our pedagogical practices so that our discourse does not denigrate into mere empty words,…

  12. Teaching Note: Gaining Voice through Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Peter

    2008-01-01

    For educators striving to create an egalitarian classroom based on open, reflexive, and honest dialogue, silence can be the ultimate obstacle. Not only does silence stifle individual expression; more importantly, silence also prevents the collective production of knowledge, understanding, compassion, and empathy. When learners and teachers feel…

  13. Is silence killing your company?

    PubMed

    Perlow, Leslie; Williams, Stephanie

    2003-05-01

    Many times, often with the best of intentions, people at work decide it's more productive to remain silent about their differences than to air them. There's no time, they think, or no point in going against what the boss says. But as new research by the authors shows, silencing doesn't smooth things over or make people more productive. It merely pushes differences beneath the surface and can set in motion powerfully destructive forces. When people stay silent about important disagreements, they can begin to fill with anxiety, anger, and resentment. As long as the conflict is unresolved, their repressed feelings remain potent, making them increasingly distrustful, self-protective, and all the more fearful that if they speak up they will be embarrassed or rejected. Their sense of insecurity grows, leading to further acts of silence, more defensiveness, and more distrust, thereby setting into motion a destructive "spiral of silence." Sooner or later, they mentally opt out--sometimes merely doing what they're told but contributing nothing of their own, sometimes spreading discontent and frustration throughout the workplace that can lead them, and others, to leave without thinking it through. These vicious spirals of silence can be replaced with virtuous spirals of communication, but that requires individuals to find the courage to act differently and executives to create the conditions in which people will value the expression of differences. All too often, behind failed products, broken processes, and mistaken career decisions are people who chose to hold their tongues. Breaking the silence can bring an outpouring of fresh ideas from all levels of an organization--ideas that might just raise the organization's performance to a whole new level. PMID:12747162

  14. The Tnt1 Retrotransposon Escapes Silencing in Tobacco, Its Natural Host

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Cifuentes, Marta; Hénaff, Elizabeth; Santiago, Néstor; Espinás, M. Lluïsa; Casacuberta, Josep M.

    2012-01-01

    Retrotransposons' high capacity for mutagenesis is a threat that genomes need to control tightly. Transcriptional gene silencing is a general and highly effective control of retrotransposon expression. Yet, some retrotransposons manage to transpose and proliferate in plant genomes, suggesting that, as shown for plant viruses, retrotransposons can escape silencing. However no evidence of retrotransposon silencing escape has been reported. Here we analyze the silencing control of the tobacco Tnt1 retrotransposon and report that even though constructs driven by the Tnt1 promoter become silenced when stably integrated in tobacco, the endogenous Tnt1 elements remain active. Silencing of Tnt1-containing transgenes correlates with high DNA methylation and the inability to incorporate H2A.Z into their promoters, whereas the endogenous Tnt1 elements remain partially methylated at asymmetrical positions and incorporate H2A.Z upon induction. Our results show that the promoter of Tnt1 is a target of silencing in tobacco, but also that endogenous Tnt1 elements can escape this control and be expressed in their natural host. PMID:22479451

  15. Adult-specific electrical silencing of pacemaker neurons uncouples the molecular oscillator from circadian outputs

    PubMed Central

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Berni, Jimena; Aranovich, Ezequiel J.; Muraro, Nara I.; Beckwith, Esteban J.; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Circadian rhythms regulate physiology and behavior through transcriptional feedback loops of clock genes running within specific pacemaker cells. In Drosophila, molecular oscillations in the small ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNvs) command rhythmic behavior under free-running conditions releasing the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) in a circadian fashion. Electrical activity in the sLNvs is also required for behavioral rhythmicity. Yet, how temporal information is transduced into behavior remains unclear. Results Here we developed a new tool for temporal control of gene expression to obtain adult-restricted electrical silencing of the PDF circuit, which led to reversible behavioral arrhythmicity. Remarkably, PER oscillations during the silenced phase remained unaltered, indicating that arrhythmicity is a direct consequence of the silenced activity. Accordingly, circadian axonal remodeling and PDF accumulation were severely affected during the silenced phase. Conclusions Although electrical activity of the sLNvs is not a clock component it coordinates circuit outputs leading to rhythmic behavior. PMID:22018542

  16. Trans-specific gene silencing between host and parasitic plants.

    PubMed

    Tomilov, Alexey A; Tomilova, Natalia B; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard; Yoder, John I

    2008-11-01

    Species of Orobanchaceae parasitize the roots of nearby host plants to rob them of water and other nutrients. Parasitism can be debilitating to the host plant, and some of the world's most pernicious agricultural pests are parasitic weeds. We demonstrate here that interfering hairpin constructs transformed into host plants can silence expression of the targeted genes in the parasite. Transgenic roots of the hemi-parasitic plant Triphysaria versicolor expressing the GUS reporter gene were allowed to parasitize transgenic lettuce roots expressing a hairpin RNA containing a fragment of the GUS gene (hpGUS). When stained for GUS activity, Triphysaria roots attached to non-transgenic lettuce showed full GUS activity, but those parasitizing transgenic hpGUS lettuce lacked activity in root tissues distal to the haustorium. Transcript quantification indicated a reduction in the steady-state level of GUS mRNA in Triphysaria when they were attached to hpGUS lettuce. These results demonstrate that the GUS silencing signal generated by the host roots was translocated across the haustorium interface and was functional in the parasite. Movement across the haustorium was bi-directional, as demonstrated in double-junction experiments in which non-transgenic Triphysaria concomitantly parasitized two hosts, one transgenic for hpGUS and the other transgenic for a functional GUS gene. Observation of GUS silencing in the second host demonstrated that the silencing trigger could be moved from one host to another using the parasite as a physiological bridge. Silencing of parasite genes by generating siRNAs in the host provides a novel strategy for controlling parasitic weeds. PMID:18643992

  17. Reversal of epigenetic promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia by a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Lam, Christina C.; Costello, Whitney N.; Anderson, Michael P.; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, the most prevalent inherited ataxia, is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene. Repressive chromatin spreads from the expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence to cause epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter via altered nucleosomal positioning and reduced chromatin accessibility. Indeed, deficient transcriptional initiation is the predominant cause of transcriptional deficiency in Friedreich ataxia. Treatment with 109, a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, resulted in increased level of FXN transcript both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence, without any change in transcript stability, suggesting that it acts via improvement of transcriptional initiation. Quantitative analysis of transcriptional initiation via metabolic labeling of nascent transcripts in patient-derived cells revealed a >3-fold increase (P < 0.05) in FXN promoter function. A concomitant 3-fold improvement (P < 0.001) in FXN promoter structure and chromatin accessibility was observed via Nucleosome Occupancy and Methylome Sequencing, a high-resolution in vivo footprint assay for detecting nucleosome occupancy in individual chromatin fibers. No such improvement in FXN promoter function or structure was observed upon treatment with a chemically-related inactive compound (966). Thus epigenetic promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is reversible, and the results implicate class I HDACs in repeat-mediated promoter silencing. PMID:26896803

  18. Biased Allostery.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Stuart J; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large group of integral membrane proteins that transduce extracellular signals from a wide range of agonists into targeted intracellular responses. Although the responses can vary depending on the category of G-proteins activated by a particular receptor, responses were also found to be triggered by interactions of the receptor with β-arrestins. It was subsequently discovered that for the same receptor molecule (e.g., the β-adrenergic receptor), some agonists have a propensity to specifically favor responses by G-proteins, others by β-arrestins, as has now been extensively studied. This feature of the GPCR system is known as biased agonism and is subject to various interpretations, including agonist-induced conformational change versus selective stabilization of preexisting active conformations. Here, we explore a complete allosteric framework for biased agonism based on alternative preexisting conformations that bind more strongly, but nonexclusively, either G-proteins or β-arrestins. The framework incorporates reciprocal effects among all interacting molecules. As a result, G-proteins and β-arrestins are in steric competition for binding to the cytoplasmic surface of either the G-protein-favoring or β-arrestin-favoring GPCR conformation. Moreover, through linkage relations, the strength of the interactions of G-proteins or β-arrestins with the corresponding active conformation potentiates the apparent affinity for the agonist, effectively equating these two proteins to allosteric modulators. The balance between response alternatives can also be influenced by the physiological concentrations of either G-proteins or β-arrestins, as well as by phosphorylation or interactions with positive or negative allosteric modulators. The nature of the interactions in the simulations presented suggests novel experimental tests to distinguish more fully among alternative mechanisms. PMID:27602718

  19. Different patterns of gene silencing in position-effect variegation.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Vett K; Dyment, David; Sinclair, Donald A R; Grigliatti, Thomas A

    2003-12-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) results when a fully functional gene is moved from its normal position to a position near to a broken heterochromatic-euchromatic boundary. In this new position, the gene, while remaining unaltered at the DNA level, is transcriptionally silenced in some cells but active in others, producing a diagnostic mosaic phenotype. Many variegating stocks show phenotypic instability, in that the level of variegation is dramatically different in different isolates or when out crossed. To test if this phenotypic instability was due to segregation of spontaneously accumulated mutations that suppress variegation, four different and well-characterized strains showing PEV for the white+ gene (wm4, wmMc, wm51b, and wmJ) and representing both large and small spot variegators were repeatedly out crossed to a strain free of modifiers, and the phenotypes of these variegators were monitored for 30 generations. Once free of modifiers, these variegating strains were then allowed to reaccumulate modifiers. The spontaneous suppressors of variegation were found to include both dominant and recessive, autosomal and X-linked alleles selected to reduce the detrimental effects of silencing white+ and adjacent genes. The time of peak sensitivity to temperature during development was also determined for these four variegators. Although large and small spot variegators have previously been attributed to early and late silencing events, respectively, the variegators we examined all shared a common early period of peak sensitivity to temperature. Once free of their variegation suppressors, the different variegating strains showed considerable differences in the frequency of inactivation at a cellular level (the number of cells showing silencing of a given gene) and the extent of variegation within the cell (the number of silenced genes). These results suggest that large and small spot variegation may be a superficial consequence of spontaneous variegation suppressors

  20. A Gli silencer is required for robust repression of gremlin in the vertebrate limb bud.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Lewandowski, Jordan P; Powell, Marian B; Norrie, Jacqueline L; Cho, Seung Hee; Vokes, Steven A

    2014-05-01

    The transcriptional response to the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is mediated by Gli proteins, which function as context-dependent transcriptional activators or repressors. However, the mechanism by which Gli proteins regulate their target genes is poorly understood. Here, we have performed the first genetic characterization of a Gli-dependent cis-regulatory module (CRM), focusing on its regulation of Grem1 in the mouse limb bud. The CRM, termed GRE1 (Gli responsive element 1), can act as both an enhancer and a silencer. The enhancer activity requires sustained Hh signaling. As a Gli-dependent silencer, GRE1 prevents ectopic transcription of Grem1 driven through additional CRMs. In doing so, GRE1 works with additional GREs to robustly regulate Grem1. We suggest that multiple Gli CRMs may be a general mechanism for mediating a robust transcriptional response to the Hh pathway. PMID:24700818

  1. SHREC Silences Heterochromatin via Distinct Remodeling and Deacetylation Modules.

    PubMed

    Job, Godwin; Brugger, Christiane; Xu, Tao; Lowe, Brandon R; Pfister, Yvan; Qu, Chunxu; Shanker, Sreenath; Baños Sanz, José I; Partridge, Janet F; Schalch, Thomas

    2016-04-21

    Nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complexes are co-transcriptional regulators implicated in differentiation, development, and diseases. Methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins play an essential role in recruitment of NuRD complexes to their target sites in chromatin. The related SHREC complex in fission yeast drives transcriptional gene silencing in heterochromatin through cooperation with HP1 proteins. How remodeler and histone deacetylase (HDAC) cooperate within NuRD complexes remains unresolved. We determined that in SHREC the two modules occupy distant sites on the scaffold protein Clr1 and that repressive activity of SHREC can be modulated by the expression level of the HDAC-associated Clr1 domain alone. Moreover, the crystal structure of Clr2 reveals an MBD-like domain mediating recruitment of the HDAC module to heterochromatin. Thus, SHREC bi-functionality is organized in two separate modules with separate recruitment mechanisms, which work together to elicit transcriptional silencing at heterochromatic loci. PMID:27105116

  2. Epigeneitc silencing of ribosomal RNA genes by Mybbp1a

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcription of the ribosomal RNA gene repeats by Pol I occurs in the nucleolus and is a fundamental step in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. Due to tight coordination between ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation, transcription of rRNA and stable maintenance of rDNA clusters are thought to be under intricate control by intercalated mechanisms, particularly at the epigenetic level. Methods and Results Here we identify the nucleolar protein Myb-binding protein 1a (Mybbp1a) as a novel negative regulator of rRNA expression. Suppression of rDNA transcription by Mybbp1a was linked to promoter regulation as illustrated by its binding to the chromatin around the hypermethylated, inactive rDNA gene promoters. Our data further showed that downregulation of Mybbp1a abrogated the local DNA methylation levels and histone marks associated with gene silencing, and altered the promoter occupancy of various factors such UBF and HDACs, consequently leading to elevated rRNA expression. Mechanistically, we propose that Mybbp1a maintains rDNA repeats in a silenced state while in association with the negative epigenetic modifiers HDAC1/2. Conclusions Results from our present work reveal a previously unrecognized co-repressor role of Mybbp1a in rRNA expression. They are further consistent with the scenario that Mybbp1a is an integral constituent of the rDNA epigenetic regulation that underlies the balanced state of rDNA clusters. PMID:22686419

  3. Chalcone synthase as a reporter in virus-induced gene silencing studies of flower senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Chih; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Gookin, Timothy E; Hunter, Donald A; Clark, David G; Reid, Michael S

    2004-07-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated infection of petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants with tobacco rattle virus (TRV) bearing fragments of Petunia genes resulted in systemic infection and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the homologous host genes. Infection with TRV containing a phytoene desaturase (PDS) fragment resulted in reduced abundance of PDS transcripts and typical photobleaching of photosynthetic tissues. Infection with TRV containing a chalcone synthase (CHS) fragment resulted in silencing of anthocyanin production in infected flowers. The silencing phenotype ranged from scattered white spots on the normal purple background to entirely white flowers. Symptoms in the V26 cultivar were a diffuse mosaic, but infection of some purple-flowered commercial cultivars resulted in large white sectors and even entirely white flowers. Abundance of CHS transcripts in the white flowers was less than 4% of that in purple flowers on the same plant. Infection with TRV containing a tandem construct of PDS and CHS resulted in leaf photobleaching and white patterns on the flowers. Transcripts of CHS and PDS were reduced both in leaves and in flowers confirming simultaneous silencing of both genes by the tandem construct. We tested the effects of infection with TRV containing CHS and a fragment of a petunia gene encoding for 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO4) Abundance of transcripts encoding ACO4 and ACO1 were reduced (by 5% and 20%, respectively) in infected flowers. Whether the flowers were treated with ACC or pollinated, the white (silenced) flowers or flower sectors produced less ethylene and senesced later than purple (non-silenced) tissues. These results indicate the value of VIGS with tandem constructs containing CHS as reporter and a target gene as a tool for examining the function of floral-associated genes. PMID:15604697

  4. Tritimovirus P1 functions as a suppressor of RNA silencing and an enhancer of disease symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an eriophyid mite-transmitted virus of the genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae. Complete deletion of HC-Pro has no effect on WSMV virulence or disease synergism, suggesting that a different viral protein suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). PT...

  5. Artificial micro RNA (amiRNA) induced gene silencing in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene silencing is a powerful technique that allows the study of the function of specific genes by selectively reducing their transcription. Several different approaches can be used; however, they all have in common the artificial generation of single-stranded small RNAs that are utilized by the endo...

  6. Mechanism of the piRNA-mediated silencing of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Olovnikov, Ivan; Sergeeva, Anna; Lavrov, Sergey; Abramov, Yuri; Savitsky, Mikhail; Kalmykova, Alla

    2011-01-01

    In the Drosophila germline, retrotransposons are silenced by the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway. Telomeric retroelements HeT-A, TART and TAHRE, which are involved in telomere maintenance in Drosophila, are also the targets of piRNA-mediated silencing. We have demonstrated that expression of reporter genes driven by the HeT-A promoter is under the control of the piRNA silencing pathway independent of the transgene location. In order to test directly whether piRNAs affect the transcriptional state of retrotransposons we performed a nuclear run-on (NRO) assay and revealed increased density of the active RNA polymerase complexes at the sequences of endogenous HeT-A and TART telomeric retroelements as well as HeT-A-containing constructs in the ovaries of spn-E mutants and in flies with piwi knockdown. This strongly correlates with enrichment of two histone H3 modifications (dimethylation of lysine 79 and dimethylation of lysine 4), which mark transcriptionally active chromatin, on the same sequences in the piRNA pathway mutants. spn-E mutation and piwi knockdown results in transcriptional activation of some other non-telomeric retrotransposons in the ovaries, such as I-element and HMS Beagle. Therefore piRNA-mediated transcriptional mode of silencing is involved in the control of retrotransposon expression in the Drosophila germline. PMID:21764773

  7. Silencing mechansim of C5 transgenic plums is stable under challenge inoculation with heterologous viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic C5 'HoneySweet' is a clone of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP). This transgenic plum displays post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) which makes it highly resistant to PPV infection. To test the effect of heterologous viruses on the ...

  8. Identification of RNA silencing components in soybean and sorghum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA silencing is a process triggered by 21–24 small RNAs to repress gene expression. Many organisms including plants use RNA silencing to regulate development and physiology, and to maintain genome stability. Plants possess two classes of small RNAs: microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The frameworks of miRNA and siRNA pathways have been established in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). Results Here we report the identification of putative genes that are required for the generation and function of miRNAs and siRNAs in soybean and sorghum, based on knowledge obtained from Arabidopsis. The gene families, including DCL, HEN1, SE, HYL1, HST, RDR, NRPD1, NRPD2/NRPE2, NRPE1, and AGO, were analyzed for gene structures, phylogenetic relationships, and protein motifs. The gene expression was validated using RNA-seq, expressed sequence tags (EST), and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Conclusions The identification of these components could provide not only insight into RNA silencing mechanism in soybean and sorghum but also basis for further investigation. All data are available at http://sysbio.unl.edu/. PMID:24387046

  9. Distribution of a limited Sir2 protein pool regulates the strength of yeast rDNA silencing and is modulated by Sir4p.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J S; Brachmann, C B; Pillus, L; Boeke, J D

    1998-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs at the silent mating-type loci HML and HMR, at telomeres, and at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus RDN1. Silencing in the rDNA occurs by a novel mechanism that depends on a single Silent Information Regulator (SIR) gene, SIR2. SIR4, essential for other silenced loci, paradoxically inhibits rDNA silencing. In this study, we elucidate a regulatory mechanism for rDNA silencing based on the finding that rDNA silencing strength directly correlates with cellular Sir2 protein levels. The endogenous level of Sir2p was shown to be limiting for rDNA silencing. Furthermore, small changes in Sir2p levels altered rDNA silencing strength. In rDNA silencing phenotypes, sir2 mutations were shown to be epistatic to sir4 mutations, indicating that SIR4 inhibition of rDNA silencing is mediated through SIR2. Furthermore, rDNA silencing is insensitive to SIR3 overexpression, but is severely reduced by overexpression of full-length Sir4p or a fragment of Sir4p that interacts with Sir2p. This negative effect of SIR4 overexpression was overridden by co-overexpression of SIR2, suggesting that SIR4 directly inhibits the rDNA silencing function of SIR2. Finally, genetic manipulations of SIR4 previously shown to promote extended life span also resulted in enhanced rDNA silencing. We propose a simple model in which telomeres act as regulators of rDNA silencing by competing for limiting amounts of Sir2 protein. PMID:9649515

  10. Non-Coding RNAs in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Chia Ariel; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing guided by small RNAs is a process conserved from protozoa to mammals. Small RNAs loaded into Argonaute family proteins direct repressive histone modifications or DNA cytosine methylation to homologous regions of the genome. Small RNA-mediated transcriptional silencing is required for many biological processes, including repression of transposable elements, maintaining the genome stability/integrity, and epigenetic inheritance of gene expression. Here we will summarize the current knowledge about small RNA biogenesis and mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in plants, Drosophila, C. elegans and mice. Furthermore, a rapidly growing number long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated as important players in transcription regulation. We will discuss current models for long non-coding RNA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:26120554

  11. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate posttranscriptional gene silencing of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome profiles. The tug of war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways. PMID:27045817

  12. [A gun silencer of a special kind].

    PubMed

    Schyma, C; Schyma, P; Milbradt, H

    2000-01-01

    The authors report about a small bore pistol with silencer. In addition, the silencer can be sealed up by a rubber plate. This leads to a false estimation of the shooting distance. Also at close range shots the shot with the silencer and the rubber seal leaves hardly gunshot residues. The bullet wipe persists but microradiography shows his changed morphological composition. The use of the rubber seal leads predominantly to atypical bullet holes. PMID:10829239

  13. SERRATE is required for intron suppression of RNA silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Michael; Carroll, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    Transposons and viruses are generally devoid of introns and are prime targets for small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and RNA silencing. Conversely, endogenous genes often contain introns and are not usually subjected to post-transcriptional gene silencing by siRNAs. In a recent study, we reported that efficient intron splicing directly suppresses siRNA biogenesis and RNA silencing of a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) transgene. Splicing-mediated suppression of GFP silencing was dependent on ABH1, the Arabidopsis ortholog of human mRNA cap-binding protein 80. Furthermore, genome-wide analyses of Arabidopsis small RNA libraries showed that exons from intron-containing genes accumulate less small RNAs than exons from intronless genes. Our in silico analysis therefore suggested that intron splicing has a fundamental role in protecting endogenous genes from becoming templates for siRNA biogenesis and RNA silencing. Here, we show that SERRATE (SE) is also required for splicing-mediated suppression of RNA silencing in Arabidopsis. SE encodes a zinc finger protein that, like ABH1, functions in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis and intron splicing. The implications of our findings are also discussed in a broader context. PMID:22112452

  14. Control of heterochromatin localization and silencing by the nuclear membrane protein Lem2

    PubMed Central

    Barrales, Ramón Ramos; Forn, Marta; Georgescu, Paula Raluca; Sarkadi, Zsuzsa; Braun, Sigurd

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent chromatin localizes to the nuclear periphery, which provides a special microenvironment for gene repression. A variety of nuclear membrane proteins interact with repressed chromatin, yet the functional role of these interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear membrane protein Lem2 associates with chromatin and mediates silencing and heterochromatin localization. Unexpectedly, we found that these functions can be separated and assigned to different structural domains within Lem2, excluding a simple tethering mechanism. Chromatin association and tethering of centromeres to the periphery are mediated by the N-terminal LEM (LAP2–Emerin–MAN1) domain of Lem2, whereas telomere anchoring and heterochromatin silencing require exclusively its conserved C-terminal MSC (MAN1–Src1 C-terminal) domain. Particularly, silencing by Lem2 is epistatic with the Snf2/HDAC (histone deacetylase) repressor complex SHREC at telomeres, while its necessity can be bypassed by deleting Epe1, a JmjC protein with anti-silencing activity. Furthermore, we found that loss of Lem2 reduces heterochromatin association of SHREC, which is accompanied by increased binding of Epe1. This reveals a critical function of Lem2 in coordinating these antagonistic factors at heterochromatin. The distinct silencing and localization functions mediated by Lem2 suggest that these conserved LEM-containing proteins go beyond simple tethering to play active roles in perinuclear silencing. PMID:26744419

  15. [E. M. Jellinek's silenced and silencing transgenerational story].

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Gábor; Márk, Mónika

    2013-01-01

    Jellinek is a kind of archetypal character for future generations in the field of addiction studies. His implosion in the arena of alcoholism around the age of 50 was an unexpected challenge to medical science. We know very little about his own role models giving an intellectual and moral compass to his pragmatic creativity. More than 30 years has passed since Jellinek's death when an American sociologist Ron Roizen started unearthing his silent story. Roizen discerned that there are a lot of unsaid and muted issues in his personal Hungarian past. Our paper, based on the authors' research in Hungarian archives and other sources reveals that not just Jellinek's personal but his transgenerational narrative has been not-yet-said. This silenced and silencing history appears an unfinished business of acculturation of the family, which started prior to four generations. Authors have been concluding that the issue of religious conversion is a critical point in the process of acculturation. They examine the counter move of loyalty to family values and driving force of assimilation making their story unspeakable. PMID:24443572

  16. Silence Is Consent, or Curse Ye Meroz!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Examines assumptions of "oppositional" literary criticism, namely the assumption that older-style "objective" literary criticism must, in its political silence, be supportive of dominant ideologies. (TB)

  17. Chromosomal Redistribution of Male-Biased Genes in Mammalian Evolution with Two Bursts of Gene Gain on the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong E.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A. B.; Long, Manyuan

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution. PMID:20957185

  18. A single Argonaute gene is required for induction of RNA silencing antiviral defense and promotes viral RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qihong; Choi, Gil H; Nuss, Donald L

    2009-10-20

    Dicer gene dcl2, required for the RNA silencing antiviral defense response in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, is inducible upon mycovirus infection and promotes viral RNA recombination. We now report that the antiviral defense response requires only one of the four C. parasitica Argonaute-like protein genes, agl2. The agl2 gene is required for the virus-induced increase in dcl2 transcript accumulation. Agl2 and dcl2 transcripts accumulated to much higher levels in response to hairpin RNA production or infection by a mutant CHV1-EP713 hypovirus lacking the suppressor of RNA silencing p29 than to wild-type CHV1-EP713. Similar results were obtained for an agl2-promoter/EGFP-reporter construct, indicating that p29-mediated repression of agl2 transcript accumulation is promoter-dependent. Significantly, the agl2 deletion mutant exhibited stable maintenance of non-viral sequences in recombinant hypovirus RNA virus vectors and the absence of hypovirus-defective interfering (DI) RNA production. These results establish a key role for an Argonaute gene in the induction of an RNA silencing antiviral defense response and the promotion of viral RNA recombination. They also provide evidence for a mechanism by which a virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor represses the transcriptional induction of an RNA silencing component. PMID:19822766

  19. Systemic silencing signal(s).

    PubMed

    Fagard, M; Vaucheret, H

    2000-06-01

    Grafting experiments have revealed that transgenic plants that undergo co-suppression of homologous transgenes and endogenous genes or PTGS of exogenous transgenes produce a sequence-specific systemic silencing signal that is able to propagate from cell to cell and at long distance. Similarly, infection of transgenic plants by viruses that carry (part of) a transgene sequence results in global silencing (VIGS) of the integrated transgenes although viral infection is localized. Systemic PTGS and VIGS strongly resemble recovery from virus infection in non-transgenic plants, leading to protection against secondary infection in newly emerging leaves and PTGS of transiently expressed homologous transgenes. The sequence-specific PTGS signal is probably a transgene product (for example, aberrant RNA) or a secondary product (for example, RNA molecules produced by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with transgene RNA as a matrix) that mimics the type of viral RNA that is targeted for degradation by cellular defence. Whether some particular cases of transgene TGS could also rely on the production of such a mobile molecule is discussed. PMID:10999411

  20. Epigenetic silencing of AKAP12 in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Lipka, Daniel B; Witte, Tania; Wierzbinska, Justyna A; Fluhr, Silvia; Helf, Monika; Mücke, Oliver; Claus, Rainer; Konermann, Carolin; Nöllke, Peter; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Flotho, Christian; Plass, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    A-kinase anchor protein 12 (AKAP12) is a regulator of protein kinase A and protein kinase C signaling, acting downstream of RAS. Epigenetic silencing of AKAP12 has been demonstrated in different cancer entities and this has been linked to the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we used quantitative high-resolution DNA methylation measurement by MassARRAY to investigate epigenetic regulation of all three AKAP12 promoters (i.e., α, β, and γ) within a large cohort of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) patient samples. The AKAP12α promoter shows DNA hypermethylation in JMML samples, which is associated with decreased AKAP12α expression. Promoter methylation of AKAP12α correlates with older age at diagnosis, elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin and poor prognosis. In silico screening for transcription factor binding motifs around the sites of most pronounced methylation changes in the AKAP12α promoter revealed highly significant scores for GATA-2/-1 sequence motifs. Both transcription factors are known to be involved in the haematopoietic differentiation process. Methylation of a reporter construct containing this region resulted in strong suppression of AKAP12 promoter activity, suggesting that DNA methylation might be involved in the aberrant silencing of the AKAP12 promoter in JMML. Exposure to DNMT- and HDAC-inhibitors reactivates AKAP12α expression in vitro, which could potentially be a mechanism underlying clinical treatment responses upon demethylating therapy. Together, these data provide evidence for epigenetic silencing of AKAP12α in JMML and further emphasize the importance of dysregulated RAS signaling in JMML pathogenesis. PMID:26891149

  1. A petunia ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, plays an important role in antiviral RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daoyang; Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Zhang, Yanlong; Reid, Michael S; Niu, Lixin; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Virus-induced RNA silencing is involved in plant antiviral defense and requires key enzyme components, including RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), Dicer-like RNase III enzymes (DCLs), and Argonaute proteins (AGOs). However, the transcriptional regulation of these critical components is largely unknown. In petunia (Petunia hybrida), an ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, is induced by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) infection. Inclusion of a PhERF2 fragment in a TRV silencing construct containing reporter fragments of phytoene desaturase (PDS) or chalcone synthase (CHS) substantially impaired silencing efficiency of both the PDS and CHS reporters. Silencing was also impaired in PhERF2- RNAi lines, where TRV-PhPDS infection did not show the expected silencing phenotype (photobleaching). In contrast, photobleaching in response to infiltration with the TRV-PhPDS construct was enhanced in plants overexpressing PhERF2 Transcript abundance of the RNA silencing-related genes RDR2, RDR6, DCL2, and AGO2 was lower in PhERF2-silenced plants but higher in PhERF2-overexpressing plants. Moreover, PhERF2-silenced lines showed higher susceptibility to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) than wild-type (WT) plants, while plants overexpressing PhERF2 exhibited increased resistance. Interestingly, growth and development of PhERF2-RNAi lines were substantially slower, whereas the overexpressing lines were more vigorous than the controls. Taken together, our results indicate that PhERF2 functions as a positive regulator in antiviral RNA silencing. PMID:27099376

  2. A petunia ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, plays an important role in antiviral RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Daoyang; Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Zhang, Yanlong; Reid, Michael S.; Niu, Lixin; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced RNA silencing is involved in plant antiviral defense and requires key enzyme components, including RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), Dicer-like RNase III enzymes (DCLs), and Argonaute proteins (AGOs). However, the transcriptional regulation of these critical components is largely unknown. In petunia (Petunia hybrida), an ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, is induced by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) infection. Inclusion of a PhERF2 fragment in a TRV silencing construct containing reporter fragments of phytoene desaturase (PDS) or chalcone synthase (CHS) substantially impaired silencing efficiency of both the PDS and CHS reporters. Silencing was also impaired in PhERF2- RNAi lines, where TRV-PhPDS infection did not show the expected silencing phenotype (photobleaching). In contrast, photobleaching in response to infiltration with the TRV-PhPDS construct was enhanced in plants overexpressing PhERF2. Transcript abundance of the RNA silencing-related genes RDR2, RDR6, DCL2, and AGO2 was lower in PhERF2-silenced plants but higher in PhERF2-overexpressing plants. Moreover, PhERF2-silenced lines showed higher susceptibility to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) than wild-type (WT) plants, while plants overexpressing PhERF2 exhibited increased resistance. Interestingly, growth and development of PhERF2-RNAi lines were substantially slower, whereas the overexpressing lines were more vigorous than the controls. Taken together, our results indicate that PhERF2 functions as a positive regulator in antiviral RNA silencing. PMID:27099376

  3. Classroom Silence: Voices from Japanese EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harumi, Seiko

    2011-01-01

    This article explores Japanese EFL learners' classroom silence in a Japanese EFL context. The existence of silence in second language learning contexts can be a source of conflict between students and teachers and even among students themselves. It can also be an obstacle to acquiring the target language. In order to tackle this problem and to…

  4. Venturis as silencers in a BOF stack

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsall, T.; Gerritsen, T.; Landon, T.

    1995-06-01

    Installation of a venture in a BOF stack reduced the sound level in a local community by 10 to 15 db. This application resulted in the development of a new type of fan silencer, called the modal silencer, having the inherent advantages of low pressure drop and less maintenance compared with conventional types.

  5. SILENCING POLYGALACTURONASE EXPRESSION INHIBITS TOMATO PETIOLE ABSCISSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) as a tool for functional analysis of cell-wall associated genes that have been suggested to be involved in leaf abscission. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) is an effective vector for VIGS in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Silencing was more efficient when ...

  6. A Novel Epigenetic Silencing Pathway Involving the Highly Conserved 5’-3’ Exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, James Franklin; Ohle, Corina; Schermann, Géza; Bendrin, Katja; Zhang, Wei; Fischer, Tamás; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing plays a critical role in regulating gene expression and contributes to organismal development and cell fate acquisition in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, heterochromatin-associated gene silencing is known to be mediated by RNA processing pathways including RNA interference (RNAi) and a 3’-5’ exoribonuclease complex, the exosome. Here, we report a new RNA-processing pathway that contributes to epigenetic gene silencing and assembly of heterochromatin mediated by 5’-3’ exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2. Dhp1 mutation causes defective gene silencing both at peri-centromeric regions and at the silent mating type locus. Intriguingly, mutation in either of the two well-characterized Dhp1-interacting proteins, the Din1 pyrophosphohydrolase or the Rhn1 transcription termination factor, does not result in silencing defects at the main heterochromatic regions. We demonstrate that Dhp1 interacts with heterochromatic factors and is essential in the sequential steps of establishing silencing in a manner independent of both RNAi and the exosome. Genomic and genetic analyses suggest that Dhp1 is involved in post-transcriptional silencing of repetitive regions through its RNA processing activity. The results describe the unexpected role of Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 in chromatin-based silencing and elucidate how various RNA-processing pathways, acting together or independently, contribute to epigenetic regulation of the eukaryotic genome. PMID:26889830

  7. A Novel Epigenetic Silencing Pathway Involving the Highly Conserved 5'-3' Exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James Franklin; Ohle, Corina; Schermann, Géza; Bendrin, Katja; Zhang, Wei; Fischer, Tamás; Zhang, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing plays a critical role in regulating gene expression and contributes to organismal development and cell fate acquisition in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, heterochromatin-associated gene silencing is known to be mediated by RNA processing pathways including RNA interference (RNAi) and a 3'-5' exoribonuclease complex, the exosome. Here, we report a new RNA-processing pathway that contributes to epigenetic gene silencing and assembly of heterochromatin mediated by 5'-3' exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2. Dhp1 mutation causes defective gene silencing both at peri-centromeric regions and at the silent mating type locus. Intriguingly, mutation in either of the two well-characterized Dhp1-interacting proteins, the Din1 pyrophosphohydrolase or the Rhn1 transcription termination factor, does not result in silencing defects at the main heterochromatic regions. We demonstrate that Dhp1 interacts with heterochromatic factors and is essential in the sequential steps of establishing silencing in a manner independent of both RNAi and the exosome. Genomic and genetic analyses suggest that Dhp1 is involved in post-transcriptional silencing of repetitive regions through its RNA processing activity. The results describe the unexpected role of Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 in chromatin-based silencing and elucidate how various RNA-processing pathways, acting together or independently, contribute to epigenetic regulation of the eukaryotic genome. PMID:26889830

  8. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella

    PubMed Central

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Kanost, Michael R.; Baker, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi) provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database under NCBI Accession # AY427951. Abbreviation RNAi RNA interference PCR polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR reverse transcription-PCR PMID:15861231

  9. Neuronal activity biases axon selection for myelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Jacob H.; Ravanelli, Andrew M.; Schwindt, Rani; Scott, Ethan K.; Appel, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    An essential feature of vertebrate neural development is ensheathment of axons with myelin, an insulating membrane formed by oligodendrocytes. Not all axons are myelinated, but mechanisms directing myelination of specific axons are unknown. Using zebrafish we show that activity-dependent secretion stabilizes myelin sheath formation on select axons. When VAMP2-dependent exocytosis is silenced in single axons, oligodendrocytes preferentially ensheath neighboring axons. Nascent sheaths formed on silenced axons are shorter in length, but when activity of neighboring axons is also suppressed, inhibition of sheath growth is relieved. Using in vivo time-lapse microscopy, we show that only 25% of oligodendrocyte processes that initiate axon wrapping are stabilized during normal development, and that initiation does not require activity. Instead, oligodendrocyte processes wrapping silenced axons are retracted more frequently. We propose that axon selection for myelination results from excessive and indiscriminate initiation of wrapping followed by refinement that is biased by activity-dependent secretion from axons. PMID:25849987

  10. Splicing factor Spf30 assists exosome-mediated gene silencing in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Pascal; Drogat, Julie; Dheur, Sonia; Genier, Sylvie; Javerzat, Jean-Paul

    2010-03-01

    Heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast relies on the processing of cognate noncoding RNAs by both the RNA interference and the exosome degradation pathways. Recent evidence indicates that splicing factors facilitate the cotranscriptional processing of centromeric transcripts into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). In contrast, how the exosome contributes to heterochromatin assembly and whether it also relies upon splicing factors were unknown. We provide here evidence that fission yeast Spf30 is a splicing factor involved in the exosome pathway of heterochromatin silencing. Spf30 and Dis3, the main exosome RNase, colocalize at centromeric heterochromatin and euchromatic genes. At the centromeres, Dis3 helps recruiting Spf30, whose deficiency phenocopies the dis3-54 mutant: heterochromatin is impaired, as evidenced by reduced silencing and the accumulation of polyadenylated centromeric transcripts, but the production of siRNAs appears to be unaffected. Consistent with a direct role, Spf30 binds centromeric transcripts and locates at the centromeres in an RNA-dependent manner. We propose that Spf30, bound to nascent centromeric transcripts, perhaps with other splicing factors, assists their processing by the exosome. Splicing factor intercession may thus be a common feature of gene silencing pathways. PMID:20028739

  11. Hypoxia Reduces Arylsulfatase B Activity and Silencing Arylsulfatase B Replicates and Mediates the Effects of Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents evidence of 1) a role for arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase) in mediating intracellular oxygen signaling; 2) replication between the effects of ARSB silencing and hypoxia on sulfated glycosaminoglycan content, cellular redox status, and expression of hypoxia-associated genes; and 3) a mechanism whereby changes in chondroitin-4-sulfation that follow either hypoxia or ARSB silencing can induce transcriptional changes through galectin-3. ARSB removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of chondroitin-4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and is required for their degradation. For activity, ARSB requires modification of a critical cysteine residue by the formylglycine generating enzyme and by molecular oxygen. When primary human bronchial and human colonic epithelial cells were exposed to 10% O2×1 h, ARSB activity declined by ∼41% and ∼30% from baseline, as nuclear hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α increased by ∼53% and ∼37%. When ARSB was silenced, nuclear HIF-1α increased by ∼81% and ∼61% from baseline, and mRNA expression increased to 3.73 (±0.34) times baseline. Inversely, ARSB overexpression reduced nuclear HIF-1α by ∼37% and ∼54% from baseline in the epithelial cells. Hypoxia, like ARSB silencing, significantly increased the total cellular sulfated glycosaminoglycans and chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) content. Both hypoxia and ARSB silencing had similar effects on the cellular redox status and on mRNA expression of hypoxia-associated genes. Transcriptional effects of both ARSB silencing and hypoxia may be mediated by reduction in galectin-3 binding to more highly sulfated C4S, since the galectin-3 that co-immunoprecipitated with C4S declined and the nuclear galectin-3 increased following ARSB knockdown and hypoxia. PMID:22428001

  12. Exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA silences genes linked to severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Siegel, T Nicolai; Martins, Rafael M; Wang, Fei; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi; Cheng, Xiu; Jiang, Lubin; Hon, Chung-Chau; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Turner, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Claes, Aurelie; Guizetti, Julien; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Scherf, Artur

    2014-09-18

    Antigenic variation of the Plasmodium falciparum multicopy var gene family enables parasite evasion of immune destruction by host antibodies. Expression of a particular var subgroup, termed upsA, is linked to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain and to the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria. The mechanism determining upsA activation remains unknown. Here we show that an entirely new type of gene silencing mechanism involving an exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA controls the silencing of genes linked to severe malaria. We identify a novel chromatin-associated exoribonuclease, termed PfRNase II, that controls the silencing of upsA var genes by marking their transcription start site and intron-promoter regions leading to short-lived cryptic RNA. Parasites carrying a deficient PfRNase II gene produce full-length upsA var transcripts and intron-derived antisense long non-coding RNA. The presence of stable upsA var transcripts overcomes monoallelic expression, resulting in the simultaneous expression of both upsA and upsC type PfEMP1 proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. In addition, we observe an inverse relationship between transcript levels of PfRNase II and upsA-type var genes in parasites from severe malaria patients, implying a crucial role of PfRNase II in severe malaria. Our results uncover a previously unknown type of post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism in malaria parasites with repercussions for other organisms. Additionally, the identification of RNase II as a parasite protein controlling the expression of virulence genes involved in pathogenesis in patients with severe malaria may provide new strategies for reducing malaria mortality. PMID:25043062

  13. Flexible tools for gene expression and silencing in tomato.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ana I; Viron, Nicolas; Alhagdow, Moftah; Karimi, Mansour; Jones, Matthew; Amsellem, Ziva; Sicard, Adrien; Czerednik, Anna; Angenent, Gerco; Grierson, Donald; May, Sean; Seymour, Graham; Eshed, Yuval; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine; Rothan, Christophe; Hilson, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    As a genetic platform, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) benefits from rich germplasm collections and ease of cultivation and transformation that enable the analysis of biological processes impossible to investigate in other model species. To facilitate the assembly of an open genetic toolbox designed to study Solanaceae, we initiated a joint collection of publicly available gene manipulation tools. We focused on the characterization of promoters expressed at defined time windows during fruit development, for the regulated expression or silencing of genes of interest. Five promoter sequences were captured as entry clones compatible with the versatile MultiSite Gateway format: PPC2, PG, TPRP, and IMA from tomato and CRC from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Corresponding transcriptional fusions were made with the GUS gene, a nuclear-localized GUS-GFP reporter, and the chimeric LhG4 transcription factor. The activity of the promoters during fruit development and in fruit tissues was confirmed in transgenic tomato lines. Novel Gateway destination vectors were generated for the transcription of artificial microRNA (amiRNA) precursors and hairpin RNAs under the control of these promoters, with schemes only involving Gateway BP and LR Clonase reactions. Efficient silencing of the endogenous phytoene desaturase gene was demonstrated in transgenic tomato lines producing a matching amiRNA under the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S or PPC2 promoter. Lastly, taking advantage of the pOP/LhG4 two-component system, we found that well-characterized flower-specific Arabidopsis promoters drive the expression of reporters in patterns generally compatible with heterologous expression. Tomato lines and plasmids will be distributed through a new Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre service unit dedicated to Solanaceae resources. PMID:19812183

  14. Development of a gene silencing DNA vector derived from a broad host range geminivirus

    PubMed Central

    Golenberg, Edward M; Sather, D Noah; Hancock, Leandria C; Buckley, Kenneth J; Villafranco, Natalie M; Bisaro, David M

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene silencing is proving to be a powerful tool for genetic, developmental, and physiological analyses. The use of viral induced gene silencing (VIGS) offers advantages to transgenic approaches as it can be potentially applied to non-model systems for which transgenic techniques are not readily available. However, many VIGS vectors are derived from Gemini viruses that have limited host ranges. We present a new, unipartite vector that is derived from a curtovirus that has a broad host range and will be amenable to use in many non-model systems. Results The construction of a gene silencing vector derived from the geminivirus Beet curly top virus (BCTV), named pWSRi, is reported. Two versions of the vector have been developed to allow application by biolistic techniques or by agro-infiltration. We demonstrate its ability to silence nuclear genes including ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS), transketolase, the sulfur allele of magnesium chelatase (ChlI), and two homeotic transcription factors in spinach or tomato by generating gene-specific knock-down phenotypes. Onset of phenotypes occurred 3 to 12 weeks post-inoculation, depending on the target gene, in organs that developed after the application. The vector lacks movement genes and we found no evidence for significant spread from the site of inoculation. However, viral amplification in inoculated tissue was detected and is necessary for systemic silencing, suggesting that signals generated from active viral replicons are efficiently transported within the plant. Conclusion The unique properties of the pWSRi vector, the ability to silence genes in meristem tissue, the separation of virus and silencing phenotypes, and the broad natural host range of BCTV, suggest that it will have wide utility. PMID:19573239

  15. The gifts of silence and solitude.

    PubMed

    Schmidt Bunkers, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    In this column the author describes the importance of finding silence and solitude amid the noise and technology present today in the teaching-learning academy. Three gifts of silence and solitude are identified: the gift of comforting aloneness, the gift of vision for new horizons, and the gift of a sense of freedom. A humanbecoming perspective is used to explore the implications of these gifts. This column introduces a column by Diana Vander Woude describing her teaching-learning experience in leadership focusing on silence and solitude. PMID:18096981

  16. Identification of high-copy disruptors of telomeric silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M S; Kahana, A; Wolf, A J; Meisinger, L L; Peterson, S E; Goggin, C; Mahowald, M; Gottschling, D E

    1998-01-01

    The ends of chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae initiate a repressive chromatin structure that spreads internally and inhibits the transcription of nearby genes, a phenomenon termed telomeric silencing. To investigate the molecular basis of this process, we carried out a genetic screen to identify genes whose overexpression disrupts telomeric silencing. We thus isolated 10 DOT genes (disruptor of telomeric silencing). Among these were genes encoding chromatin component Sir4p, DNA helicase Dna2p, ribosomal protein L32, and two proteins of unknown function, Asf1p and Ifh1p. The collection also included genes that had not previously been identified: DOT1, DOT4, DOT5, DOT6, and TLC1, which encodes the RNA template component of telomerase. With the exception of TLC1, all these genes, particularly DOT1 and DOT4, also reduced silencing at other repressed loci (HM loci and rDNA) when overexpressed. Moreover, deletion of the latter two genes weakened silencing as well, suggesting that DOT1 and DOT4 normally play important roles in gene repression. DOT1 deletion also affected telomere tract length. The function of Dot1p is not known. The sequence of Dot4p suggests that it is a ubiquitin-processing protease. Taken together, the DOT genes include both components and regulators of silent chromatin. PMID:9755194

  17. Polycomb PRC2 complex mediates epigenetic silencing of a critical osteogenic master regulator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Rodrigo; Bustos, Fernando J; Saez, Mauricio; Rojas, Adriana; Allende, Miguel L; van Wijnen, Andre J; van Zundert, Brigitte; Montecino, Martin

    2016-08-01

    During hippocampal neuron differentiation, the expression of critical inducers of non-neuronal cell lineages must be efficiently silenced. Runx2 transcription factor is the master regulator of mesenchymal cells responsible for intramembranous osteoblast differentiation and formation of the craniofacial bone tissue that surrounds and protects the central nervous system (CNS) in mammalian embryos. The molecular mechanisms that mediate silencing of the Runx2 gene and its downstream target osteogenic-related genes in neuronal cells have not been explored. Here, we assess the epigenetic mechanisms that mediate silencing of osteoblast-specific genes in CNS neurons. In particular, we address the contribution of histone epigenetic marks and histone modifiers on the silencing of the Runx2/p57 bone-related isoform in rat hippocampal tissues at embryonic to adult stages. Our results indicate enrichment of repressive chromatin histone marks and of the Polycomb PRC2 complex at the Runx2/p57 promoter region. Knockdown of PRC2 H3K27-methyltransferases Ezh2 and Ezh1, or forced expression of the Trithorax/COMPASS subunit Wdr5 activates Runx2/p57 mRNA expression in both immature and mature hippocampal cells. Together these results indicate that complementary epigenetic mechanisms progressively and efficiently silence critical osteoblastic genes during hippocampal neuron differentiation. PMID:27216774

  18. Applications and advantages of virus-induced gene silencing for gene function studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Burch-Smith, Tessa M; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Martin, Gregory B; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2004-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed gene transcript suppression technique for characterizing the function of plant genes. The approach involves cloning a short sequence of a targeted plant gene into a viral delivery vector. The vector is used to infect a young plant, and in a few weeks natural defense mechanisms of the plant directed at suppressing virus replication also result in specific degradation of mRNAs from the endogenous plant gene that is targeted for silencing. VIGS is rapid (3-4 weeks from infection to silencing), does not require development of stable transformants, allows characterization of phenotypes that might be lethal in stable lines, and offers the potential to silence either individual or multiple members of a gene family. Here we briefly review the discoveries that led to the development of VIGS and what is known about the experimental requirements for effective silencing. We describe the methodology of VIGS and how it can be optimized and used for both forward and reverse genetics studies. Advantages and disadvantages of VIGS compared with other loss-of-function approaches available for plants are discussed, along with how the limitations of VIGS might be overcome. Examples are reviewed where VIGS has been used to provide important new insights into the roles of specific genes in plant development and plant defense responses. Finally, we examine the future prospects for VIGS as a powerful tool for assessing and characterizing the function of plant genes. PMID:15315635

  19. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Costello, Whitney N.; Lam, Christina C.; Parikh, Aniruddha C.; Hughes, Tamara T.; Michalopulos, Michael G.; Pook, Mark A.; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues. Methodology / Principal Findings The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR), which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R). We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse. Conclusions / Significance Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues. PMID:26393353

  20. Analysis and application of viroid-specific small RNAs generated by viroid-inducing RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Zhang, Zhixiang; Li, Shifang; Sano, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Viroids are noncoding RNA pathogens inducing severe to mild disease symptoms on agriculturally important crop plants. Viroid replication is entirely dependent on host transcription machinery, and their replication/accumulation in the infected cells can activate RNA silencing-a host defense mechanism that targets the viroid itself. RNA silencing produces in the cell large amounts of viroid-specific small RNAs of 21-24-nucleotides by cleaving (or "dicing") entire molecules of viroid RNA. However, viroid replication is resistant to the effects of RNA silencing and disrupts the normal regulation of host gene expression, finally resulting in the development of disease symptoms on infected plant. The molecular mechanisms of biological processes involving RNA silencing and underlying various aspects of viroid-host interaction, such as symptom expression, are of special interests to both basic and applied areas of viroid research. Here we present a method to create infectious viroid cDNA clones and RNA transcripts, the starting material for such analyses, using Hop stunt viroid as an example. Next we describe methods for the preparation and analysis of viroid-specific small RNAs by deep sequencing using tomato plants infected with Potato spindle tuber viroid as an example. Finally we introduce bioinformatics tools and methods necessary to process, analyze, and characterize these viroid-specific small RNAs. These bioinformatic methods provide a powerful new tool for the detection and discovery of both known and new viroid species. PMID:25287502

  1. Lsh is required for meiotic chromosome synapsis and retrotransposon silencing in female germ cells.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, Rabindranath; Baumann, Claudia; Fan, Tao; Schmidtmann, Anja; Dobrinski, Ina; Muegge, Kathrin

    2006-12-01

    Lymphoid specific helicase (Lsh) is a major epigenetic regulator that is essential for DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing of parasitic elements in the mammalian genome. However, whether Lsh is involved in the regulation of chromatin-mediated processes during meiosis is not known. Here, we show that Lsh is essential for the completion of meiosis and transcriptional repression of repetitive elements in the female gonad. Oocytes from Lsh knockout mice exhibit demethylation of transposable elements and tandem repeats at pericentric heterochromatin, as well as incomplete chromosome synapsis associated with persistent RAD51 foci and gammaH2AX phosphorylation. Failure to load crossover-associated foci results in the generation of non-exchange chromosomes. The severe oocyte loss observed and lack of ovarian follicle formation, together with the patterns of Lsh nuclear compartmentalization in the germ line, demonstrate that Lsh has a critical and previously unidentified role in epigenetic gene silencing and maintenance of genomic stability during female meiosis. PMID:17115026

  2. Design of steam silencers for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazalde-Crabtree, H.

    1985-01-01

    Steam silencers are a means of reducing the loud noise caused by venting steam into the atmosphere as a consequence of load-reductions in a geothermal power plant. For new plants, or for those in which noise measurements cannot be made, an analytical method is given to determine the unsilenced noise levels. Designs fo two types of steam silencers, based on experimental work and theoretical considerations, are presented.

  3. Common themes in mechanisms of gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D

    2001-09-01

    The assembly of DNA into regions of inaccessible chromatin, called silent chromatin, is involved in the regulation of gene expression and maintenance of chromosome stability in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Sir2-containing silencing complexes in budding yeast and HP1- and Swi6-containing silencing complexes in metazoans and fission yeast suggest a common mechanism for the assembly of these domains, which involves the physical coupling of histone modifying enzymes to histone binding proteins. PMID:11583612

  4. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  5. Noise suppression by flexible fan silencers

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, J.; Kelly, T.R.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results on noise testing of a fan only, as well as the results of a steel silencer and of flexible silencers that were connected directly to a fan. On-site facilities and free-field method set by the British Standards Institution were used to measure and then compare the fan only and different practical silencer configuration setups. In order to determine the fan-silencer combination that would give the maximum noise attenuation, total noise intensity, noise contributed to by the fan motor only, as well as aerodynamical noise created through air interacting with the fan parts were considered to obtain decibel readings for the octave bands. Subsequently, the optimal configuration found was the setup with flexible silencers on the fan inlet and the fan outlet. If only one silencer is used, it should be installed on the fan inlet. The aerodynamic noise affects the low frequencies. The flow noise is then overtaken at 1 kHz by the mechanical noise.

  6. Epigenetic gene silencing in cancer: the DNA hypermethylome.

    PubMed

    Esteller, Manel

    2007-04-15

    Epigenetic gene inactivation in transformed cells involves many 'belts of silencing'. One of the best-known lesions of the malignant cell is the transcriptional repression of tumor-suppressor genes by promoter CpG island hypermethylation. We are in the process of completing the molecular dissection of the entire epigenetic machinery involved in methylation-associated silencing, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases, histone demethylases and Polycomb proteins. The first indications are also starting to emerge about how the combination of cellular selection and targeted pathways leads to abnormal DNA methylation. One thing is certain already, promoter CpG island hypermethylation of tumor-suppressor genes is a common hallmark of all human cancers. It affects all cellular pathways with a tumor-type specific profile, and in addition to classical tumor-suppressor and DNA repair genes, it includes genes involved in premature aging and microRNAs with growth inhibitory functions. The importance of hypermethylation events is already in evidence at the bedside of cancer patients in the form of cancer detection markers and chemotherapy predictors, and in the approval of epigenetic drugs for the treatment of hematological malignancies. In the very near future, the synergy of candidate gene approaches and large-scale epigenomic technologies, such as methyl-DIP, will yield the complete DNA hypermethylome of cancer cells. PMID:17613547

  7. Bias in Mental Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Lloyd

    1981-01-01

    While some forms of test bias (for example, bias in selection and prediction) appear amenable to definitional consensus, a definition of cultural bias will remain problematic so long as it is confused with the nature/nurture issue. (Author/BW)

  8. Demonstrating the Correspondence Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Shepperd, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Among the best-known and most robust biases in person perception is the correspondence bias--the tendency for people to make dispositional, rather than situational, attributions for an actor's behavior. The correspondence bias appears in virtually every social psychology textbook and in many introductory psychology textbooks, yet the authors'…

  9. Bias in Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malouff, John

    2008-01-01

    Bias in grading can be conscious or unconscious. The author describes different types of bias, such as those based on student attractiveness or performance in prior courses, and a variety of methods of reducing bias, including keeping students anonymous during grading and using detailed criteria for subjective grading.

  10. Recalibrating Academic Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancey, George

    2012-01-01

    Whether political and/or religious academic bias exists is a question with important ramifications for the educational institutions. Those arguing for the presence of such bias contend that political conservatives and the highly religious in academia are marginalized and face discrimination. The question of academic bias tends to be cast in a…

  11. Arabidopsis HDA6 Regulates Locus-Directed Heterochromatin Silencing in Cooperation with MET1

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Akihiro; Kurihara, Yukio; Morosawa, Taeko; Ishida, Junko; Tanaka, Maho; Endo, Takaho; Kakutani, Tetsuji; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Seki, Motoaki

    2011-01-01

    Heterochromatin silencing is pivotal for genome stability in eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, a plant-specific mechanism called RNA–directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is involved in heterochromatin silencing. Histone deacetylase HDA6 has been identified as a component of such machineries; however, its endogenous targets and the silencing mechanisms have not been analyzed globally. In this study, we investigated the silencing mechanism mediated by HDA6. Genome-wide transcript profiling revealed that the loci silenced by HDA6 carried sequences corresponding to the RDR2-dependent 24-nt siRNAs, however their transcript levels were mostly unaffected in the rdr2 mutant. Strikingly, we observed significant overlap of genes silenced by HDA6 to those by the CG DNA methyltransferase MET1. Furthermore, regardless of dependence on RdDM pathway, HDA6 deficiency resulted in loss of heterochromatic epigenetic marks and aberrant enrichment for euchromatic marks at HDA6 direct targets, along with ectopic expression of these loci. Acetylation levels increased significantly in the hda6 mutant at all of the lysine residues in the H3 and H4 N-tails, except H4K16. Interestingly, we observed two different CG methylation statuses in the hda6 mutant. CG methylation was sustained in the hda6 mutant at some HDA6 target loci that were surrounded by flanking DNA–methylated regions. In contrast, complete loss of CG methylation occurred in the hda6 mutant at the HDA6 target loci that were isolated from flanking DNA methylation. Regardless of CG methylation status, CHG and CHH methylation were lost and transcriptional derepression occurred in the hda6 mutant. Furthermore, we show that HDA6 binds only to its target loci, not the flanking methylated DNA, indicating the profound target specificity of HDA6. We propose that HDA6 regulates locus-directed heterochromatin silencing in cooperation with MET1, possibly recruiting MET1 to specific loci, thus forming the foundation of silent chromatin structure

  12. Multiple Factors Drive Replicating Strand Composition Bias in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-Long; Xia, Zhong-Kui; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Composition bias from Chargaff’s second parity rule (PR2) has long been found in sequenced genomes, and is believed to relate strongly with the replication process in microbial genomes. However, some disagreement on the underlying reason for strand composition bias remains. We performed an integrative analysis of various genomic features that might influence composition bias using a large-scale dataset of 1111 genomes. Our results indicate (1) the bias was stronger in obligate intracellular bacteria than in other free-living species (p-value = 0.0305); (2) Fusobacteria and Firmicutes had the highest average bias among the 24 microbial phyla analyzed; (3) the strength of selected codon usage bias and generation times were not observably related to strand composition bias (p-value = 0.3247); (4) significant negative relationships were found between GC content, genome size, rearrangement frequency, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional subcategories A, C, I, Q, and composition bias (p-values < 1.0 × 10−8); (5) gene density and COG functional subcategories D, F, J, L, and V were positively related with composition bias (p-value < 2.2 × 10−16); and (6) gene density made the most important contribution to composition bias, indicating transcriptional bias was associated strongly with strand composition bias. Therefore, strand composition bias was found to be influenced by multiple factors with varying weights. PMID:26404268

  13. Global role for polyadenylation-assisted nuclear RNA degradation in posttranscriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Win; Stevenson, Abigail L; Kearsey, Stephen E; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg

    2008-01-01

    Fission yeast Cid14, a component of the TRAMP (Cid14/Trf4-Air1-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex, polyadenylates nuclear RNA and stimulates degradation by the exosome for RNA quality control. Here, we analyze patterns of global gene expression in cells lacking the Cid14 or the Dis3/Rpr44 subunit of the nuclear exosome. We found that transcripts from many genes induced during meiosis, including key regulators, accumulated in the absence of Cid14 or Dis3. Moreover, our data suggest that additional substrates include transcripts involved in heterochromatin assembly. Mutant cells lacking Cid14 and/or Dis3 accumulate transcripts corresponding to naturally silenced repeat elements within heterochromatic domains, reflecting defects in centromeric gene silencing and derepression of subtelomeric gene expression. We also uncover roles for Cid14 and Dis3 in maintaining the genomic integrity of ribosomal DNA. Our data indicate that polyadenylation-assisted nuclear RNA turnover functions in eliminating a variety of RNA targets to control diverse processes, such as heterochromatic gene silencing, meiotic differentiation, and maintenance of genomic integrity. PMID:18025105

  14. Global effects on gene expression in fission yeast by silencing and RNA interference machineries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Klavs R; Burns, Gavin; Mata, Juan; Volpe, Thomas A; Martienssen, Robert A; Bähler, Jürg; Thon, Geneviève

    2005-01-01

    Histone modifications influence gene expression in complex ways. The RNA interference (RNAi) machinery can repress transcription by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to chromatin, although it is not clear whether this is a general mechanism for gene silencing or whether it requires repeated sequences such as long terminal repeats (LTRs). We analyzed the global effects of the Clr3 and Clr6 histone deacetylases, the Clr4 methyltransferase, the zinc finger protein Clr1, and the RNAi proteins Dicer, RdRP, and Argonaute on the transcriptome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The clr mutants derepressed similar subsets of genes, many of which also became transcriptionally activated in cells that were exposed to environmental stresses such as nitrogen starvation. Many genes that were repressed by the Clr proteins clustered in extended regions close to the telomeres. Surprisingly few genes were repressed by both the silencing and RNAi machineries, with transcripts from centromeric repeats and Tf2 retrotransposons being notable exceptions. We found no correlation between repression by RNAi and proximity to LTRs, and the wtf family of repeated sequences seems to be repressed by histone deacetylation independent of RNAi. Our data indicate that the RNAi and Clr proteins show only a limited functional overlap and that the Clr proteins play more global roles in gene silencing. PMID:15632061

  15. Heat-Induced Release of Epigenetic Silencing Reveals the Concealed Role of an Imprinted Plant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego H.; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms suppress the transcription of transposons and DNA repeats; however, this suppression can be transiently released under prolonged heat stress. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana imprinted gene SDC, which is silent during vegetative growth due to DNA methylation, is activated by heat and contributes to recovery from stress. SDC activation seems to involve epigenetic mechanisms but not canonical heat-shock perception and signaling. The heat-mediated transcriptional induction of SDC occurs particularly in young developing leaves and is proportional to the level of stress. However, this occurs only above a certain window of absolute temperatures and, thus, resembles a thermal-sensing mechanism. In addition, the re-silencing kinetics during recovery can be entrained by repeated heat stress cycles, suggesting that epigenetic regulation in plants may conserve memory of stress experience. We further demonstrate that SDC contributes to the recovery of plant biomass after stress. We propose that transcriptional gene silencing, known to be involved in gene imprinting, is also co-opted in the specific tuning of SDC expression upon heat stress and subsequent recovery. It is therefore possible that dynamic properties of the epigenetic landscape associated with silenced or imprinted genes may contribute to regulation of their expression in response to environmental challenges. PMID:25411840

  16. SOCS3 Silencing Attenuates Eosinophil Functions in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, Mª Paz; Cañas, Jose A.; Mazzeo, Carla; Gámez, Cristina; Sanz, Veronica; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Quirce, Santiago; Barranco, Pilar; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the key inflammatory cells in asthma. Eosinophils can exert a wide variety of actions through expression and secretion of multiple molecules. Previously, we have demonstrated that eosinophils purified from peripheral blood from asthma patients express high levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). In this article, SOCS3 gene silencing in eosinophils from asthmatics has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the suppressor function in eosinophils. SOCS3 siRNA treatment drastically reduced SOCS3 expression in eosinophils, leading to an inhibition of the regulatory transcription factors GATA-3 and FoxP3, also interleukin (IL)-10; in turn, an increased STAT3 phosphorilation was observed. Moreover, SOCS3 abrogation in eosinophils produced impaired migration, adhesion and degranulation. Therefore, SOCS3 might be regarded as an important regulator implicated in eosinophil mobilization from the bone marrow to the lungs during the asthmatic process. PMID:25764157

  17. SOCS3 silencing attenuates eosinophil functions in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Ma Paz; Cañas, Jose A; Mazzeo, Carla; Gámez, Cristina; Sanz, Veronica; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Quirce, Santiago; Barranco, Pilar; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the key inflammatory cells in asthma. Eosinophils can exert a wide variety of actions through expression and secretion of multiple molecules. Previously, we have demonstrated that eosinophils purified from peripheral blood from asthma patients express high levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). In this article, SOCS3 gene silencing in eosinophils from asthmatics has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the suppressor function in eosinophils. SOCS3 siRNA treatment drastically reduced SOCS3 expression in eosinophils, leading to an inhibition of the regulatory transcription factors GATA-3 and FoxP3, also interleukin (IL)-10; in turn, an increased STAT3 phosphorilation was observed. Moreover, SOCS3 abrogation in eosinophils produced impaired migration, adhesion and degranulation. Therefore, SOCS3 might be regarded as an important regulator implicated in eosinophil mobilization from the bone marrow to the lungs during the asthmatic process. PMID:25764157

  18. Editor meets silencer: crosstalk between RNA editing and RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    The most prevalent type of RNA editing is mediated by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, which convert adenosines to inosines (a process known as A→I RNA editing) in double-stranded (ds)RNA substrates. A→I RNA editing was long thought to affect only selected transcripts by altering the proteins they encode. However, genome-wide screening has revealed numerous editing sites within inverted Alu repeats in introns and untranslated regions. Also, recent evidence indicates that A→I RNA editing crosstalks with RNA-interference pathways, which, like A→I RNA editing, involve dsRNAs. A→I RNA editing therefore seems to have additional functions, including the regulation of retrotransposons and gene silencing, which adds a new urgency to the challenges of fully understanding ADAR functions. PMID:17139332

  19. Queries for Bias Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Diana F.

    1992-01-01

    Selecting a good bias prior to concept learning can be difficult. Therefore, dynamic bias adjustment is becoming increasingly popular. Current dynamic bias adjustment systems, however, are limited in their ability to identify erroneous assumptions about the relationship between the bias and the target concept. Without proper diagnosis, it is difficult to identify and then remedy faulty assumptions. We have developed an approach that makes these assumptions explicit, actively tests them with queries to an oracle, and adjusts the bias based on the test results.

  20. Renormalized halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of renormalization in models of halo biasing. Building on work of McDonald, we show that Eulerian biasing is only consistent with renormalization if non-local terms and higher-derivative contributions are included in the biasing model. We explicitly determine the complete list of required bias parameters for Gaussian initial conditions, up to quartic order in the dark matter density contrast and at leading order in derivatives. At quadratic order, this means including the gravitational tidal tensor, while at cubic order the velocity potential appears as an independent degree of freedom. Our study naturally leads to an effective theory of biasing in which the halo density is written as a double expansion in fluctuations and spatial derivatives. We show that the bias expansion can be organized in terms of Galileon operators which aren't renormalized at leading order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss how the renormalized bias parameters impact the statistics of halos.

  1. Silencing of E2F3 suppresses tumor growth of Her2+ breast cancer cells by restricting mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miyoung; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Saavedra, Harold I.

    2015-01-01

    The E2F transcriptional activators E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3a regulate many important cellular processes, including DNA replication, apoptosis and centrosome duplication. Previously, we demonstrated that silencing E2F1 or E2F3 suppresses centrosome amplification (CA) and chromosome instability (CIN) in Her2+ breast cancer cells without markedly altering proliferation. However, it is unknown whether and how silencing a single E2F activator, E2F3, affects malignancy of human breast cancer cells. Thus, we injected HCC1954 Her2+ breast cancer cells silenced for E2F3 into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient mice and demonstrated that loss of E2F3 retards tumor growth. Surprisingly, silencing of E2F3 led to significant reductions in mitotic indices relative to vector controls, while the percentage of cells undergoing S phase were not affected. Nek2 is a mitotic kinase commonly upregulated in breast cancers and a critical regulator of Cdk4- or E2F- mediated CA. In this report, we found that Nek2 overexpression rescued back the CA caused by silencing of shE2F3. However, the effects of Nek2 overexpression in affecting tumor growth rates of shE2F3 and shE2F3; GFP cells were inconclusive. Taken together, our results indicate that E2F3 silencing decreases mammary tumor growth by reducing percentage of cells undergoing mitosis. PMID:26512919

  2. From silencing the self to action: experiences of women living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, R F; Miller, K H; Patsdaughter, C A; Chisholm, M; Grindel, C G

    1998-01-01

    Feminist literature has demonstrated that women often maintain behaviors that support silencing of their voices. The critical issue is whether the silencing experience is (a) a destructive process of burying feelings and needs, (b) a protective strategy to preserve personal and professional relationships which they value, (c) a coping mechanism to divorce themselves from an androcentric/ethnocentric health care culture, or all of these. The transition from silence to action may be a process of reacting to a threat to self (i.e., HIV/AIDS diagnosis) where gender normative behaviors become irrelevant and self-advocacy becomes paramount for survival. Alternatively, the transition may be a conscious process of gaining insight into past behaviors that have been learned and culturally supported and making purposeful changes. Data for this study were extracted for secondary analysis from data from a larger study on experiences and needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS. Data were obtained from transcripts from three focus groups (N = 14 women) and six individual interviews. Women ranged in age from 21 to 55; 9 were European American, 7 were African American, and 4 were Latina American. Data were content analyzed and organized using four categories proposed by Jack (1991): (a) externalized self-perception, (b) care as self-sacrifice, (c) silencing the self, and (d) the divided self. Data supported that women with HIV/AIDS reported all four categories of silencing behaviors, particularly early in the HIV trajectory. For some women, an HIV/AIDS diagnosis ignited them to speak for themselves and to shape their own lives based on feelings and needs. For others, peer or professional support or both was the catalyst for the transition from silence to action. Findings suggest interventions that would assist women in judging themselves by internal versus external standards, putting their own needs before the perceived needs of others, expressing themselves toward action rather than

  3. Epigenetic chromatin silencing: bistability and front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Mohammad; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2007-12-01

    The role of post-translational modification of histones in eukaryotic gene regulation is well recognized. Epigenetic silencing of genes via heritable chromatin modifications plays a major role in cell fate specification in higher organisms. We formulate a coarse-grained model of chromatin silencing in yeast and study the conditions under which the system becomes bistable, allowing for different epigenetic states. We also study the dynamics of the boundary between the two locally stable states of chromatin: silenced and unsilenced. The model could be of use in guiding the discussion on chromatin silencing in general. In the context of silencing in budding yeast, it helps us understand the phenotype of various mutants, some of which may be non-trivial to see without the help of a mathematical model. One such example is a mutation that reduces the rate of background acetylation of particular histone side chains that competes with the deacetylation by Sir2p. The resulting negative feedback due to a Sir protein depletion effect gives rise to interesting counter-intuitive consequences. Our mathematical analysis brings forth the different dynamical behaviors possible within the same molecular model and guides the formulation of more refined hypotheses that could be addressed experimentally.

  4. "Stop the noise!" From voice to silence.

    PubMed

    Newton, Lorelei; Storch, Janet L; Makaroff, Kara Schick; Pauly, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Nurses are frequently portrayed in the literature as being silent about ethical concerns that arise in their practice. This silence is often represented as a lack of voice. However, in our study, we found that nurses who responded to questions about moral distress were not so much silent as silenced. These nurses were enacting their moral agency by engaging in diverse, multiple and time-consuming actions in response to situations identified as morally distressing with families, colleagues, physicians, educators or managers. In many situations, they took action by contacting other healthcare team members, making referrals and coordinating care with other departments such as home care and hospice, as well as initiating contact with groups such as professional regulatory bodies or unions. Examining the relationship between ethical climate, moral distress and voice offers insights into both the meaning and impact of being silenced in the workplace. PMID:22469764

  5. Lagrangian bias in the local bias model

    SciTech Connect

    Frusciante, Noemi; Sheth, Ravi K. E-mail: sheth@ictp.it

    2012-11-01

    It is often assumed that the halo-patch fluctuation field can be written as a Taylor series in the initial Lagrangian dark matter density fluctuation field. We show that if this Lagrangian bias is local, and the initial conditions are Gaussian, then the two-point cross-correlation between halos and mass should be linearly proportional to the mass-mass auto-correlation function. This statement is exact and valid on all scales; there are no higher order contributions, e.g., from terms proportional to products or convolutions of two-point functions, which one might have thought would appear upon truncating the Taylor series of the halo bias function. In addition, the auto-correlation function of locally biased tracers can be written as a Taylor series in the auto-correlation function of the mass; there are no terms involving, e.g., derivatives or convolutions. Moreover, although the leading order coefficient, the linear bias factor of the auto-correlation function is just the square of that for the cross-correlation, it is the same as that obtained from expanding the mean number of halos as a function of the local density only in the large-scale limit. In principle, these relations allow simple tests of whether or not halo bias is indeed local in Lagrangian space. We discuss why things are more complicated in practice. We also discuss our results in light of recent work on the renormalizability of halo bias, demonstrating that it is better to renormalize than not. We use the Lognormal model to illustrate many of our findings.

  6. Dimethylated H3K27 Is a Repressive Epigenetic Histone Mark in the Protist Entamoeba histolytica and Is Significantly Enriched in Genes Silenced via the RNAi Pathway.

    PubMed

    Foda, Bardees M; Singh, Upinder

    2015-08-21

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a fundamental biological process that plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression in many organisms. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is one of the important nuclear roles of RNAi. Our previous data show that Entamoeba histolytica has a robust RNAi pathway that links to TGS via Argonaute 2-2 (Ago2-2) associated 27-nucleotide small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini. Here, we report the first repressive histone mark to be identified in E. histolytica, dimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27Me2), and demonstrate that it is enriched at genes that are silenced by RNAi-mediated TGS. An RNAi-silencing trigger can induce H3K27Me2 deposits at both episomal and chromosomal loci, mediating gene silencing. Our data support two phases of RNAi-mediated TGS: an active silencing phase where the RNAi trigger is present and both H3K27Me2 and Ago2-2 concurrently enrich at chromosomal loci; and an established silencing phase in which the RNAi trigger is removed, but gene silencing with H3K27Me2 enrichment persist independently of Ago2-2 deposition. Importantly, some genes display resistance to chromosomal silencing despite induction of functional small RNAs. In those situations, the RNAi-triggering plasmid that is maintained episomally gets partially silenced and has H3K27Me2 enrichment, but the chromosomal copy displays no repressive histone enrichment. Our data are consistent with a model in which H3K27Me2 is a repressive histone modification, which is strongly associated with transcriptional repression. This is the first example of an epigenetic histone modification that functions to mediate RNAi-mediated TGS in the deep-branching eukaryote E. histolytica. PMID:26149683

  7. Repression of chimeric transcripts emanating from endogenous retrotransposons by a sequence-specific transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retroviral elements are pervasively transcribed and dynamically regulated during development. While multiple histone- and DNA-modifying enzymes have broadly been associated with their global silencing, little is known about how the many diverse retroviral families are each selectively recognized. Results Here we show that the zinc finger protein Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3) specifically silences transcription from the ORR1A0 long terminal repeat in murine fetal and adult erythroid cells. In the absence of KLF3, we detect widespread transcription from ORR1A0 elements driven by the master erythroid regulator KLF1. In several instances these aberrant transcripts are spliced to downstream genic exons. One such chimeric transcript produces a novel, dominant negative isoform of PU.1 that can induce erythroid differentiation. Conclusions We propose that KLF3 ensures the integrity of the murine erythroid transcriptome through the selective repression of a particular retroelement and is likely one of multiple sequence-specific factors that cooperate to achieve global silencing. PMID:24946810

  8. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting “hot spots”. The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model. PMID:26061033

  9. Chromatin insulation by a transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Nathan B.; Scalzo, David; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I. K.

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, transcriptionally active regions are interspersed with silent chromatin that may repress genes in its vicinity. Chromatin insulators are elements that can shield a locus from repressive effects of flanking chromatin. Few such elements have been characterized in higher eukaryotes, but transcriptional activating elements are an invariant feature of active loci and have been shown to suppress transgene silencing. Hence, we have assessed the ability of a transcriptional activator to cause chromatin insulation, i.e., to relieve position effects at transgene integration sites in cultured cells. The transgene contained a series of binding sites for the metal-inducible transcriptional activator MTF, linked to a GFP reporter. Clones carrying single integrated transgenes were derived without selection for expression, and in most clones the transgene was silent. Induction of MTF resulted in transition of the transgene from the silent to the active state, prolongation of the active state, and a marked narrowing of the range of expression levels at different genomic sites. At one genomic site, prolonged induction of MTF resulted in suppression of transgene silencing that persisted after withdrawal of the induction stimulus. These results are consistent with MTF acting as a chromatin insulator and imply that transcriptional activating elements can insulate active loci against chromatin repression. PMID:12547916

  10. Embracing Silence and the Emptiness between Unspoken Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the use of silence as a constructive teaching tool in the classroom rather than as a punitive measure. The author offers suggestions for the inclusion of silence to benefit students specifically in a literature high school classroom.

  11. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A

    2016-07-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1 We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  12. Disruption of Rpp1-mediated soybean rust immunity by virus-induced gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; McMahon, Michael B; Luster, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungus that causes rust disease on soybean, has potential to impart significant yield loss and disrupt food security and animal feed production. Rpp1 is a soybean gene that confers immunity to soybean rust, and it is important to understand how it regulates the soybean defense system and to use this knowledge to protect commercial crops. It was previously discovered that some soybean proteins resembling transcription factors accumulate in the nucleus of Rpp1 soybeans. To determine if they contribute to immunity, Bean pod mottle virus was used to attenuate or silence the expression of their genes. Rpp1 plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing exhibited reduced amounts of RNA for 5 of the tested genes, and the plants developed rust-like symptoms after subsequent inoculation with fungal spores. Symptoms were associated with the accumulation of rust fungal RNA and protein. Silenced plants also had reduced amounts of RNA for the soybean Myb84 transcription factor and soybean isoflavone O-methyltransferase, both of which are important to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and lignin formation, crucial components of rust resistance. These results help resolve some of the genes that contribute to Rpp1-mediated immunity and improve upon the knowledge of the soybean defense system. It is possible that these genes could be manipulated to enhance rust resistance in otherwise susceptible soybean cultivars. PMID:24401541

  13. RASSF10 is epigenetically silenced and functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Ziran; Chen, Xia; Chen, Ji; Wang, Weimin; Xu, Xudong; Cai, Qingping

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► Epigenetic silencing of RASSF10 gene expression in GC cells. ► RASSF10 overexpression inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. ► RASSF10 induces apoptosis in GC cells. ► RASSF10 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ras association domain family (RASSF) proteins are encoded by several tumor suppressor genes that are frequently silenced in human cancers. In this study, we investigated RASSF10 as a target of epigenetic inactivation and examined its functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. RASSF10 was silenced in six out of eight gastric cancer cell lines. Loss or downregulation of RASSF10 expression was associated with promoter hypermethylation, and could be restored by a demethylating agent. Overexpression of RASSF10 in gastric cancer cell lines (JRST, BGC823) suppressed cell growth and colony formation, and induced apoptosis, whereas RASSF10 depletion promoted cell growth. In xenograft animal experiments, RASSF10 overexpression effectively repressed tumor growth. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RASSF10 inhibited tumor growth by blocking activation of β-catenin and its downstream targets including c-Myc, cyclinD1, cyclinE1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ, transcription factor 4, transcription factor 1 and CD44. In conclusion, the results of this study provide insight into the role of RASSF10 as a novel functional tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  14. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1. We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  15. Site-specific silencing of regulatory elements as a mechanism of X inactivation.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, J Mauro; Sun, Wei; Song, Lingyun; Mugford, Joshua W; Williams, Lucy; Yee, Della; Starmer, Joshua; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Crawford, Gregory E; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-11-21

    The inactive X chromosome's (Xi) physical territory is microscopically devoid of transcriptional hallmarks and enriched in silencing-associated modifications. How these microscopic signatures relate to specific Xi sequences is unknown. Therefore, we profiled Xi gene expression and chromatin states at high resolution via allele-specific sequencing in mouse trophoblast stem cells. Most notably, X-inactivated transcription start sites harbored distinct epigenetic signatures relative to surrounding Xi DNA. These sites displayed H3-lysine27-trimethylation enrichment and DNaseI hypersensitivity, similar to autosomal Polycomb targets, yet excluded Pol II and other transcriptional hallmarks, similar to nontranscribed genes. CTCF bound X-inactivated and escaping genes, irrespective of measured chromatin boundaries. Escape from X inactivation occurred within, and X inactivation was maintained exterior to, the area encompassed by Xist in cells subject to imprinted and random X inactivation. The data support a model whereby inactivation of specific regulatory elements, rather than a simple chromosome-wide separation from transcription machinery, governs gene silencing over the Xi. PMID:23178118

  16. Site-specific silencing of regulatory elements as a mechanism of X-inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J. Mauro; Sun, Wei; Song, Lingyun; Mugford, Joshua W.; Williams, Lucy; Yee, Della; Starmer, Joshua; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Crawford, Gregory E.; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The inactive X chromosome’s (Xi) physical territory is microscopically devoid of transcriptional hallmarks and enriched in silencing-associated modifications. How these microscopic signatures relate to specific Xi sequence is unknown. Therefore, we profiled Xi gene expression and chromatin states at high resolution via allele-specific sequencing in mouse trophoblast stem cells. Most notably, X-inactivated transcription start sites harbored distinct epigenetic signatures relative to surrounding Xi DNA. These sites displayed H3-lysine27-trimethylation enrichment and DNaseI hypersensitivity, similar to autosomal Polycomb targets, yet excluded Pol II and other transcriptional hallmarks, similar to non-transcribed genes. CTCF bound X-inactivated and escaping genes, irrespective of measured chromatin boundaries. Escape from X-inactivation occurred within, and X-inactivation was maintained exterior to, the area encompassed by Xist in cells subject to imprinted and random X-inactivation. The data support a model whereby inactivation of specific regulatory elements, rather than a simple chromosome-wide separation from transcription machinery, governs gene silencing over the Xi. PMID:23178118

  17. Behold: Silence and Attention in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, David

    2014-01-01

    Educators continually ask about the best means to engage students and how best to capture attention. These concerns often make the problematic assumption that students can directly govern their own attention. In order to address the role and limits of attention in education, some theorists have sought to recover the significance of silence or…

  18. Mainstream Television, Adolescent Homosexuality, and Significant Silence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kielwasser, Alfred P.; Wolf, Michelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Argues that the symbolic annihilation of gay and lesbian youth exhibited by network television contributes to a dysfunctional isolation supported by the mutually reinforcing invisibility of homosexual adolescents on television and in the real world. Suggests that the spiral of silence also partially accounts for the inefficacy of oppositional…

  19. Effect of flow on the drumlike silencer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Y. S.; Huang, Lixi

    2005-11-01

    This study examines the effects of a mean flow and turbulent flow excitation on the performance of the recently conceived device which was tested under the no-flow condition [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2014-2035 (2002)]. The silencer consists of two cavity-backed membranes lining part of the duct walls. When a certain optimal tension is applied, the silencer gives a broad stopband in the low-frequency regime. Similar performance is predicted for the condition with a mean flow, and tests conducted for flow speeds from 5 to 15 m/s validated these predictions. The spectrum of transmission loss without flow features three resonance peaks, and the mean flow is found to smooth out all peaks and shift two of them through cross-modal coupling. The silencer was tested in a wind tunnel, and no flow induced flexural instability was found on the membrane in the range of flow speeds tested. Insertion loss measurement was also conducted in a natural ventilation condition where a turbulence intensity of 3% was recorded, and the results were close to those without flow. It is concluded that no noticeable extra sound is produced by the turbulent excitation of the membrane under the optimal tension required by the silencer.

  20. Applying gene silencing technology to contraception.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-12-01

    Population control of feral animals is often difficult, as it can be dangerous for the animals, labour intensive and expensive. Therefore, a useful tool for control of animal populations would be a non-surgical method to induce sterility. Our laboratories utilize methods aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A useful framework for design of a new approach will be the combination of these methods with the intended goal to produce a technique that can be used to non-invasively sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: the target gene must be essential for fertility; the method must include a mechanism to effectively and specifically silence the gene of interest; the method of delivering the silencing agent must be minimally invasive, and finally, the silencing effect must be sustained for the lifespan of the target species, so that expansion of the population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss our work to develop gene silencing technology to induce sterility; we will use examples of our previous studies demonstrating that this approach is viable. These studies include (i) the use of viral vectors able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to the regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) experiments with viral vectors that are able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:23279544

  1. Silence in the Context of "Child Voice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Recent decades have seen growing enthusiasm internationally for the concept and practice of "child voice". This was encapsulated in, and stimulated, by Article 12 of the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This article presents the case for incorporating the equally important concept of "child silence" in both research and…

  2. Parenting a Precocious Preschooler: Breaking the Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Leigh Ann

    2016-01-01

    Precocity in the very young should be a valid topic of discussion in parental and educational circles, yet too frequently those conversations are slow to occur or are absent altogether. Many parents and educators remain silent about raising and nurturing precocious preschoolers, and author Leigh Ann Fish believe that the silence is due to a lack…

  3. Muted Colors: Gender and Classroom Silence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericksen, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    Highlights some causes for silence in schoolgirls and other marginalized students. Suggests ways teachers can help these students participate more fully as speakers and writers in language arts classes. Shows how language arts instruction can change students' attitudes about themselves as gendered subjects, agents, and communicators. (SR)

  4. Mutuality, Self-Silencing, and Disordered Eating in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Lisa S.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Stabb, Sally D.; Marshall, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined patterns of association among mutuality, self-silencing, and disordered eating in an ethnically diverse sample of college women (N = 149). Partner mutuality and overall self-silencing were negatively correlated and together were associated with six disordered eating indices. All four self-silencing subscales were…

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Siphophage Silence

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Jonathan A.; Farmer, Nicholas G.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Silence is a newly isolated siphophage that infects Bacillus megaterium, a soil bacterium that is used readily in research and commercial applications. A study of B. megaterium phage Silence will enhance our knowledge of the diversity of Bacillus phages. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence and annotated features of Silence. PMID:26450722

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Siphophage Silence.

    PubMed

    Solis, Jonathan A; Farmer, Nicholas G; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Silence is a newly isolated siphophage that infects Bacillus megaterium, a soil bacterium that is used readily in research and commercial applications. A study of B. megaterium phage Silence will enhance our knowledge of the diversity of Bacillus phages. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence and annotated features of Silence. PMID:26450722

  7. The Sound of Silence: The Case of Virtual Team Organising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panteli, N.; Fineman, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the role of silence within a virtual organising context. The paper raises issues related to the construction of silence in the virtual team context and the implications it has on team interactions. By drawing upon existing studies on virtual teams, we argue that members' silence may not always have negative effects on team…

  8. After the Blackbird Whistles: Listening to Silence in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: Students spend a large part of their time in schools in silence. However, teachers tend to spend most of their time attending to student talk. Anthropological and linguistic research has contributed to an understanding of silence in particular communities, offering explanations for students' silence in school. This research…

  9. Silenced Voices and Extraordinary Conversations... Re-Imagining Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Michelle; Weis, Lois

    This collection of papers examines the crisis in public education, focusing on poor and minority children. There are seven chapters in two parts. After "Introduction: Silenced Voices and Extraordinary Conversations" (Michelle Fine and Lois Weis), Part 1, "Scenes of Silencing," includes: (1) "Silencing and Nurturing Voice in an Improbable Context:…

  10. Histone H3K36 trimethylation is essential for multiple silencing mechanisms in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shota; Kato, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Yutaka; Chikashige, Yuji; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Takahata, Shinya; Murakami, Yota

    2016-05-19

    In budding yeast, Set2 catalyzes di- and trimethylation of H3K36 (H3K36me2 and H3K36me3) via an interaction between its Set2-Rpb1 interaction (SRI) domain and C-terminal repeats of RNA polymerase II (Pol2) phosphorylated at Ser2 and Ser5 (CTD-S2,5-P). H3K36me2 is sufficient for recruitment of the Rpd3S histone deacetylase complex to repress cryptic transcription from transcribed regions. In fission yeast, Set2 is also responsible for H3K36 methylation, which represses a subset of RNAs including heterochromatic and subtelomeric RNAs, at least in part via recruitment of Clr6 complex II, a homolog of Rpd3S. Here, we show that CTD-S2P-dependent interaction of fission yeast Set2 with Pol2 via the SRI domain is required for formation of H3K36me3, but not H3K36me2. H3K36me3 silenced heterochromatic and subtelomeric transcripts mainly through post-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms, respectively, whereas H3K36me2 was not enough for silencing. Clr6 complex II appeared not to be responsible for heterochromatic silencing by H3K36me3. Our results demonstrate that H3K36 methylation has multiple outputs in fission yeast; these findings provide insights into the distinct roles of H3K36 methylation in metazoans, which have different enzymes for synthesis of H3K36me1/2 and H3K36me3. PMID:26792892

  11. STAT3-silenced human dendritic cells have an enhanced ability to prime IFNγ production by both αβ and γδ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanseverino, Isabella; Purificato, Cristina; Varano, Barbara; Conti, Lucia; Gessani, Sandra; Gauzzi, M Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are an attractive target for therapeutic manipulation of the immune system to enhance insufficient immune responses, such those occurring in cancer, or to dampen dangerous responses in allergic and autoimmune diseases. Main goal of this study was to manipulate human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) function by silencing STAT3, since this transcription factor plays a key role as a negative regulator of immune surveillance, and is strongly involved in inflammation. STAT3 silencing did not affect the immunophenotype of both immature and toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand-matured DC. However, an altered cytokine secretion profile, characterized by lower IL10 and higher IL12 and TNFα levels, was observed in silenced DC with respect to control cells upon TLR triggering. Accordingly, STAT3 silenced MDDC promoted a higher IFNγ production by CD4(+) naïve T cells. Furthermore, STAT3 silencing in MDDC favored the activation of γδ T lymphocytes, an immune cell population with important antitumor effector activities. This effect was at least in part mediated by the increased IL12 production by silenced cells. STAT3 silencing also increased the levels of CCL4, a CCR5-binding chemokine known to be involved in T helper 1 (Th1) cell recruitment. Altogether these results strengthen the role of STAT3 as a critical check point of the suppression of Th1 responses, unraveling its potential to dampen DC capability to both induce and recruit different IFNγ producing T lymphocyte subsets. PMID:24674241

  12. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells*

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Nicholas J.; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A non-lethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the Human Silencing Hub (HUSH), a complex of three poorly-characterised proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin, which is absent from Drosophila but conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH subunits resulted in decreased H3K9me3 at both endogenous genomic loci and retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing. PMID:26022416

  13. The nucleoporin Nup153 regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency through gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Jacinto, Filipe V.; Benner, Chris; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoporins (Nups) are a family of proteins best known as the constituent building blocks of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), membrane-embedded channels that mediate nuclear transport across the nuclear envelope. Recent evidence suggests that several Nups have additional roles in controlling the activation and silencing of developmental genes; however, the mechanistic details of these functions remain poorly understood. Here, we show that depletion of Nup153 in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) causes the derepression of developmental genes and induction of early differentiation. This loss of stem cell identity is not associated with defects in the nuclear import of key pluripotency factors. Rather, Nup153 binds around the transcriptional start site (TSS) of developmental genes and mediates the recruitment of the polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) to a subset of its target loci. Our results demonstrate a chromatin-associated role of Nup153 in maintaining stem cell pluripotency by functioning in mammalian epigenetic gene silencing. PMID:26080816

  14. Position-Effect Variegation, Heterochromatin Formation, and Gene Silencing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Reuter, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) results when a gene normally in euchromatin is juxtaposed with heterochromatin by rearrangement or transposition. When heterochromatin packaging spreads across the heterochromatin/euchromatin border, it causes transcriptional silencing in a stochastic pattern. PEV is intensely studied in Drosophila using the white gene. Screens for dominant mutations that suppress or enhance white variegation have identified many conserved epigenetic factors, including the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase SU(VAR)3-9. Heterochromatin protein HP1a binds H3K9me2/3 and interacts with SU(VAR)3-9, creating a core memory system. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical analysis of PEV in Drosophila has contributed many key findings concerning establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin with concomitant gene silencing. PMID:23906716

  15. Silencing of YY1 downregulates RIZ1 promoter in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, Ciro; de Nigris, Filomena; De Rosa, Caterina; Rossiello, Raffaele; Puca, Giovanni Alfredo; Napoli, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    RIZ1 isoform, but not RIZ2, is commonly silenced in many types of tumors. In osteosarcoma cells, RIZ1 protein is very abundant. The silencing of YY1 protein, a recent target gene in osteosarcoma cells, reduced the expression of RIZ1 protein. Here we show that RIZ1 overexpression is a transcriptional event documented by Western blot, RT-PCR, and promoter assays. YY1 protein binds and cooperates to positive regulation of the RIZ1 promoter and its presence reduced the dimethyl lysine 9 histone 3 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These results indicate that overexpression of YY1 in osteosarcoma cells plays a key role in positive regulation of RIZ1. The coexpression of RIZ1/YY1 proteins suggests a tandem regulatory mechanism in human osteosarcoma cells and tissues. PMID:18488713

  16. Silencing of protein kinase D2 induces glioma cell senescence via p53-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Heffeter, Petra; Wintersperger, Andrea; Asslaber, Martin; Frank, Saša; Hammer, Astrid; Strohmaier, Heimo; DeVaney, Trevor; Mrfka, Manuel; Eder, Hans; Windpassinger, Christian; Ireson, Christopher R.; Mischel, Paul S.; Berger, Walter; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumor of the central nervous system with a dismal prognosis for affected patients. Aberrant protein kinase C (PKC) signaling has been implicated in gliomagenesis, and a member of the PKC-activated protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was identified as mediator of GBM growth in vitro and in vivo. Methods The outcome of PRKD2 silencing and pharmacological inhibition on glioma cell proliferation was established with different glioma cell lines. Western blotting, senescence assays, co-immunoprecipitation, fluorescence activated cell sorting, quantitative PCR, and immunofluorescence microscopy were utilized to analyze downstream signaling. Results RNA-interference (21-mer siRNA) and pharmacological inhibition (CRT0066101) of PRKD2 profoundly inhibited proliferation of p53wt (U87MG, A172, and primary GBM2), and p53mut (GM133, T98G, U251, and primary Gli25) glioma cells. In a xenograft experiment, PRKD2 silencing significantly delayed tumor growth of U87MG cells. PRKD2 silencing in p53wt and p53mut cells was associated with typical hallmarks of senescence and cell cycle arrest in G1. Attenuated AKT/PKB phosphorylation in response to PRKD2 silencing was a common observation made in p53wt and p53mut GBM cells. PRKD2 knockdown in p53wt cells induced upregulation of p53, p21, and p27 expression, decreased phosphorylation of CDK2 and/or CDK4, hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb), and reduced transcription of E2F1. In p53mut GM133 and primary Gli25 cells, PRKD2 silencing increased p27 and p15 and reduced E2F1 transcription but did not affect pRb phosphorylation. Conclusions PRKD2 silencing induces glioma cell senescence via p53-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:24463355

  17. GATA Transcription Factors and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost a quarter century since it was first appreciated that a class of oncogenes contained in rapidly transforming avian retroviruses encoded DNA-binding transcription factors. As with other oncogenes, genetic recombination with the viral genome led to their overexpression or functional alteration. In the years that followed, alterations of numerous transcription factors were shown to be causatively involved in various cancers in human patients and model organisms. Depending on their normal cellular functions, these factors were subsequently categorized as proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the role of GATA transcription factors in carcinogenesis. GATA factors are zinc finger DNA binding proteins that control the development of diverse tissues by activating or repressing transcription. GATA factors thus coordinate cellular maturation with proliferation arrest and cell survival. Therefore, a role of this family of genes in human cancers is not surprising. Prominent examples include structural mutations in GATA1 that are found in almost all megakaryoblastic leukemias in patients with Down syndrome; loss of GATA3 expression in aggressive, dedifferentiated breast cancers; and silencing of GATA4 and GATA5 expression in colorectal and lung cancers. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis vis-à-vis the normal functions of GATA factors as they pertain to human patients and mouse models of cancer. PMID:21779441

  18. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) in XPC gene silencing and bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies and causes hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year. Bladder cancer is strongly associated with exposure to environmental carcinogens. It is believed that DNA damage generated by environmental carcinogens and their metabolites causes development of bladder cancer. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the major DNA repair pathway for repairing bulk DNA damage generated by most environmental carcinogens, and XPC is a DNA damage recognition protein required for initiation of the NER process. Recent studies demonstrate reduced levels of XPC protein in tumors for a majority of bladder cancer patients. In this work we investigated the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in XPC gene silencing and bladder cancer development. The results of our HDAC inhibition study revealed that the treatment of HTB4 and HTB9 bladder cancer cells with the HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) caused an increase in transcription of the XPC gene in these cells. The results of our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies indicated that the VPA treatment caused increased binding of both CREB1 and Sp1 transcription factors at the promoter region of the XPC gene for both HTB4 and HTB9 cells. The results of our immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining studies further revealed a strong correlation between the over-expression of HDAC4 and increased bladder cancer occurrence (p < 0.001) as well as a marginal significance of increasing incidence of HDAC4 positivity seen with an increase in severity of bladder cancer (p = 0.08). In addition, the results of our caspase 3 activation studies demonstrated that prior treatment with VPA increased the anticancer drug cisplatin-induced activation of caspase 3 in both HTB4 and HTB9 cells. All of these results suggest that the HDACs negatively regulate transcription of the XPC gene in bladder cancer cells and contribute to the severity of bladder tumors. PMID:21507255

  19. Elaboration, diversification and regulation of the Sir1 family of silencing proteins in Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jennifer E G; Babiarz, Joshua E; Teytelman, Leonid; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Rine, Jasper

    2009-04-01

    Heterochromatin renders domains of chromosomes transcriptionally silent and, due to clonal variation in its formation, can generate heritably distinct populations of genetically identical cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae's Sir1 functions primarily in the establishment, but not the maintenance, of heterochromatic silencing at the HMR and HML loci. In several Saccharomyces species, we discovered multiple paralogs of Sir1, called Kos1-Kos4 (Kin of Sir1). The Kos and Sir1 proteins contributed partially overlapping functions to silencing of both cryptic mating loci in S. bayanus. Mutants of these paralogs reduced silencing at HML more than at HMR. Most genes of the SIR1 family were located near telomeres, and at least one paralog was regulated by telomere position effect. In S. cerevisiae, Sir1 is recruited to the silencers at HML and HMR via its ORC interacting region (OIR), which binds the bromo adjacent homology (BAH) domain of Orc1. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which diverged from Saccharomyces after the appearance of the silent mating cassettes, but before the whole-genome duplication, contained an ortholog of Kos3 that was apparently the archetypal member of the family, with only one OIR. In contrast, a duplication of this domain was present in all orthologs of Sir1, Kos1, Kos2, and Kos4. We propose that the functional specialization of Sir3, itself a paralog of Orc1, as a silencing protein was facilitated by the tandem duplication of the OIR domain in the Sir1 family, allowing distinct Sir1-Sir3 and Sir1-Orc1 interactions through OIR-BAH domain interactions. PMID:19171939

  20. Diverse gene-silencing mechanisms with distinct requirements for RNA polymerase subunits in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Amy E; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-11-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes--mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1--suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. PMID:25164883

  1. Diagnosing and prioritizing uncertainties according to their relevance for policy: the case of transgene silencing.

    PubMed

    Krayer von Krauss, Martin Paul; Kaiser, Matthias; Almaas, Vibeke; van der Sluijs, Jeroen; Kloprogge, Penny

    2008-02-01

    Uncertainty often becomes problematic when science is used to support decision making in the policy process. Scientists can contribute to a more constructive approach to uncertainty by making their uncertainties transparent. In this article, an approach to systematic uncertainty diagnosis is demonstrated on the case study of transgene silencing and GMO risk assessment. Detailed interviews were conducted with five experts on transgene silencing to obtain quantitative and qualitative information on their perceptions of the uncertainty characterising our knowledge of the phenomena. The results indicate that there are competing interpretations of the cause-effect relationships leading to gene silencing (model structure uncertainty). In particular, the roles of post-transcriptional gene silencing, position effects, DNA-DNA interactions, direct-repeat DNA structures, recognition factors and dsRNA and aberrant zRNA are debated. The study highlights several sources of uncertainty beyond the statistical uncertainty commonly reported in risk assessment. The results also reveal a discrepancy between the way in which uncertainties would be prioritized on the basis of the uncertainty analysis conducted, and the way in which they would be prioritized on the basis of expert willingness to pay to eliminate uncertainty. The results also reveal a diversity of expert opinions on the uncertainty characterizing transgene silencing. Because the methodology used to diagnose uncertainties was successful in revealing a broad spectrum of uncertainties as well as a diversity of expert opinion, it is concluded that the methodology used could contribute to increasing transparency and fostering a critical discussion on uncertainty in the decision making process. PMID:17988720

  2. Effect of PLCε gene silencing on inhibiting the cancerous transformation of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, KUN; YAN, JING; PENG, LAN; ZOU, YU-PEI; HE, FU-QIAN; GAN, HUA-TIAN; HUANG, XIAO-LI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cε (PLCε) gene silencing on the inhibition of cancer development in ulcerative colitis (UC) and to explore the pathogenesis and carcinogenic mechanism of UC, in order to facilitate the establishment of novel strategies for the treatment of UC, prevent the cancerous transformation of UC and discern the association between inflammation and cancer. A pGenesil-PLCε RNA interference vector was constructed and transfected into HEK293 cells (pGenesil-PLCε group). HEK293 cells transfected with pGenesil empty plasmid were set as the negative control (pGenesil-NC group). The expression of PLCε was observed, and molecules associated with the PLC signaling pathway were detected using a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. ELISA was used to determine the expression of serum interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) of mice in which the PLCε gene had been silenced. Compared with the pGenesil-NC group, the mRNA and protein levels of PLCε were significantly decreased in the pGenesil-PLCε group. In addition, the mRNA levels of K-ras, NF-κB, Fas and Bcl-2 were markedly reduced, while P53 mRNA level was notably enhanced, in the pGenesil-PLCε group, and these changes were accompanied by similar changes in the corresponding protein levels. The serum IL-1 and TNF-α expression in the PLCε gene-silenced mice was significantly reduced compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, PLCε RNA silencing can effectively inhibit the cancerous transformation of UC by regulating the colorectal cancer-related cell proliferation and cell cycle in vivo. In addition, PLCε RNA silencing can suppress the expression of inflammatory factors in vitro. PMID:27347072

  3. Modification of Seed Oil Composition in Arabidopsis by Artificial microRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James Robertson; Shrestha, Pushkar; Singh, Surinder Pal

    2012-01-01

    Various post transcriptional gene silencing strategies have been developed and exploited to study gene function or engineer disease resistance. The recently developed artificial microRNA strategy is an alternative method of effectively silencing target genes. The Δ12-desaturase (FAD2), Fatty acid elongase (FAE1), and Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB) were targeted with amiR159b-based constructs in Arabidopsis thaliana to evaluate changes in oil composition when expressed with the seed-specific Brassica napus truncated napin (FP1) promoter. Fatty acid profiles from transgenic homozygous seeds reveal that the targeted genes were silenced. The down-regulation of the AtFAD-2 gene substantially increased oleic acid from the normal levels of ∼15% to as high as 63.3 and reduced total PUFA content (18:2Δ9,12 + 18:3Δ9,12,15 + 20:2Δ11,14 + 20:3Δ11,14,17) from 46.8 to 4.8%. Δ12-desaturase activity was reduced to levels as low as those in the null fad-2-1 and fad-2-2 mutants. Silencing of the FAE1 gene resulted in the reduction of eicosenoic acid (20:1Δ11) to 1.9 from 15.4% and silencing of FATB resulted in the reduction of palmitic acid (16:0) to 4.4% from 8.0%. Reduction in FATB activity is comparable with a FATB knock-out mutant. These results demonstrate for the first time amiR159b constructs targeted against three endogenous seed-expressed genes are clearly able to down-regulate and generate genotypic changes that are inherited stably over three generations. PMID:22866055

  4. Separation of stem cell maintenance and transposon silencing functions of Piwi protein

    PubMed Central

    Klenov, Mikhail S.; Sokolova, Olesya A.; Yakushev, Evgeny Y.; Stolyarenko, Anastasia D.; Mikhaleva, Elena A.; Lavrov, Sergey A.; Gvozdev, Vladimir A.

    2011-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and Piwi proteins have the evolutionarily conserved function of silencing of repetitive genetic elements in germ lines. The founder of the Piwi subfamily, Drosophila nuclear Piwi protein, was also shown to be required for the maintenance of germ-line stem cells (GSCs). Hence, null mutant piwi females exhibit two types of abnormalities, overexpression of transposons and severely underdeveloped ovaries. It remained unknown whether the failure of GSC maintenance is related to transposon derepression or if GSC self-renewal and piRNA silencing are two distinct functions of the Piwi protein. We have revealed a mutation, piwiNt, removing the nuclear localization signal of the Piwi protein. piwiNt females retain the ability of GSC self-renewal and a near-normal number of egg chambers in the ovarioles but display a drastic transposable element derepression and nuclear accumulation of their transcripts in the germ line. piwiNt mutants are sterile most likely because of the disturbance of piRNA-mediated transposon silencing. Analysis of chromatin modifications in the piwiNt ovaries indicated that Piwi causes chromatin silencing only of certain types of transposons, whereas others are repressed in the nuclei without their chromatin modification. Thus, Piwi nuclear localization that is required for its silencing function is not essential for the maintenance of GSCs. We suggest that the Piwi function in GSC self-renewal is independent of transposon repression and is normally realized in the cytoplasm of GSC niche cells. PMID:22065765

  5. Separation of stem cell maintenance and transposon silencing functions of Piwi protein.

    PubMed

    Klenov, Mikhail S; Sokolova, Olesya A; Yakushev, Evgeny Y; Stolyarenko, Anastasia D; Mikhaleva, Elena A; Lavrov, Sergey A; Gvozdev, Vladimir A

    2011-11-15

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and Piwi proteins have the evolutionarily conserved function of silencing of repetitive genetic elements in germ lines. The founder of the Piwi subfamily, Drosophila nuclear Piwi protein, was also shown to be required for the maintenance of germ-line stem cells (GSCs). Hence, null mutant piwi females exhibit two types of abnormalities, overexpression of transposons and severely underdeveloped ovaries. It remained unknown whether the failure of GSC maintenance is related to transposon derepression or if GSC self-renewal and piRNA silencing are two distinct functions of the Piwi protein. We have revealed a mutation, piwi(Nt), removing the nuclear localization signal of the Piwi protein. piwi(Nt) females retain the ability of GSC self-renewal and a near-normal number of egg chambers in the ovarioles but display a drastic transposable element derepression and nuclear accumulation of their transcripts in the germ line. piwi(Nt) mutants are sterile most likely because of the disturbance of piRNA-mediated transposon silencing. Analysis of chromatin modifications in the piwi(Nt) ovaries indicated that Piwi causes chromatin silencing only of certain types of transposons, whereas others are repressed in the nuclei without their chromatin modification. Thus, Piwi nuclear localization that is required for its silencing function is not essential for the maintenance of GSCs. We suggest that the Piwi function in GSC self-renewal is independent of transposon repression and is normally realized in the cytoplasm of GSC niche cells. PMID:22065765

  6. Epigenetic silencing of a foreign gene in nuclear transformants of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, H; Johnson, A M; Gillham, N W; Boynton, J E

    1997-01-01

    The unstable expression of introduced genes poses a serious problem for the application of transgenic technology in plants. In transformants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, expression of a eubacterial aadA gene, conferring spectinomycin resistance, is transcriptionally suppressed by a reversible epigenetic mechanism(s). Variations in the size and frequency of colonies surviving on different concentrations of spectinomycin as well as the levels of transcriptional activity of the introduced transgene(s) suggest the existence of intermediate expression states in genetically identical cells. Gene silencing does not correlate with methylation of the integrated DNA and does not involve large alterations in its chromatin structure, as revealed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and DNase I. Transgene repression is enhanced by lower temperatures, similar to position effect variegation in Drosophila. By analogy to epigenetic phenomena in several eukaryotes, our results suggest a possible role for (hetero)chromatic chromosomal domains in transcriptional inactivation. PMID:9212467

  7. Biased predecision processing.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories. PMID:12848220

  8. Sde2: A novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Sde2 is essential for telomere silencing. {yields} Sde2 is involved in the maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} Sde2 promotes the recruitment of SHREC, a histone deacetylase complex, to telomeres. -- Abstract: Telomeres, specialized domains assembled at the ends of linear chromosomes, are essential for genomic stability in eukaryotes. The formation and maintenance of telomeres are governed by numerous factors such as telomeric repeats, telomere-binding proteins, heterochromatin proteins, and telomerase. Here, we report Sde2, a novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A deficiency in sde2 results in the derepression of the ura4{sup +} gene inserted near telomeric repeats, and the noncoding transcripts from telomeric regions accumulate in sde2{Delta} cells. The loss of Sde2 function compromises transcriptional silencing at telomeres, and this silencing defect is accompanied by increased levels of acetylated histone H3K14 and RNA polymerase II occupancy at telomeres as well as reduced recruitment of the SNF2 ATPase/histone deacetylase-containing complex SHREC to telomeres. Deletion of sde2 also leads to a higher frequency of mitotic minichromosome loss, and sde2{Delta} cells often form asci that contain spores in abnormal numbers, shapes, or both. In addition, sde2{Delta} cells are highly sensitive to several stresses, including high/low temperatures, bleomycin, which induces DNA damage, and thiabendazole, a microtubule-destabilizing agent. Furthermore, Sde2 genetically interacts with the telomere regulators Taz1, Pof3, and Ccq1. These findings demonstrate that Sde2 cooperates with other telomere regulators to maintain functional telomeres, thereby preventing genomic instability.

  9. The RNA surveillance complex Pelo-Hbs1 is required for transposon silencing in the Drosophila germline

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu; Zhao, Rui; Fang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Huanwei; Xuan, Yang; Ma, Yanting; Chen, Hongyan; Cai, Tao; Qi, Yijun; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-01-01

    Silencing of transposable elements (TEs) in the metazoan germline is critical for genome integrity and is primarily dependent on Piwi proteins and associated RNAs, which exert their function through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Here, we report that the evolutionarily conserved Pelo (Dom34)-Hbs1 mRNA surveillance complex is required for transposon silencing in the Drosophila germline. In pelo mutant gonads, mRNAs and proteins of some selective TEs are up-regulated. Pelo is not required for piRNA biogenesis, and our studies suggest that Pelo may function at the translational level to silence TEs: This function requires interaction with Hbs1, and overexpression of RpS30a partially reverts TE-silencing defects in pelo mutants. Interestingly, TE silencing and spermatogenesis defects in pelo mutants can also effectively be rescued by expressing the mammalian ortholog of Pelo. We propose that the Pelo-Hbs1 surveillance complex provides another level of defense against the expression of TEs in the germline of Drosophila and possibly all metazoa. PMID:26124316

  10. Re-expression of CXCL14, a common target for epigenetic silencing in lung cancer, induces tumor necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Klinge, Donna M.; Yingling, Christin M.; Do, Kieu; Van Neste, Leander; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are important regulators of directional cell migration and tumor metastasis. A genome-wide transcriptome array designed to uncover novel genes silenced by methylation in lung cancer identified the CXC-subfamily of chemokines. Expression of eleven of the sixteen known human CXC-chemokines was increased in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines after treatment with 5-aza-2deoxycytidine (DAC). Tumor-specific methylation leading to silencing of CXCL5, 12 and 14 was found in over 75% of primary lung adenocarcinomas and DAC treatment restored expression of each silenced gene. Forced expression of CXCL14 in H23 cells where this gene is silenced by methylation increased cell death in vitro and dramatically reduced in vivo growth of lung tumor xenografts through necrosis of up to 90% of the tumor mass. CXCL14 re-expression had a profound effect on the genome altering the transcription of over 1,000 genes, including increased expression of 30 cell cycle inhibitor and pro-apoptosis genes. In addition, CXCL14 methylation in sputum from asymptomatic early stage lung cancer cases was associated with a 2.9-fold elevated risk for this disease compared to controls, substantiating its potential as a biomarker for early detection of lung cancer. Together these findings identify CXCL14 as an important tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced during lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20562917

  11. Inheritance of a Nuclear PIWI from Pluripotent Stem Cells by Somatic Descendants Ensures Differentiation by Silencing Transposons in Planarian.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Norito; Kashima, Makoto; Ishiko, Taisuke; Nishimura, Osamu; Rouhana, Labib; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Saito, Kuniaki; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-05-01

    Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) requires transposon silencing throughout the process. PIWIs, best known as key factors in germline transposon silencing, are also known to act in somatic differentiation of planarian PSCs (neoblasts). However, how PIWIs control the latter process remains elusive. Here, using Dugesia japonica, we show that a nuclear PIWI, DjPiwiB, was bound to PIWI-interacting RNAs (generally key mediators of PIWI-dependent transposon silencing), and was detected in not only neoblasts but also their descendant somatic cells, which do not express piwi. In contrast, cytoplasmic DjPiwiA and DjPiwiC were detected only in neoblasts, in accord with their transcription there. DjPiwiB was indispensable for regeneration, but dispensable for transposon silencing in neoblasts. However, transposons were derepressed at the onset of differentiation in DjPiwiB-knockdown planarians. Thus, DjPiwiB appears to be inherited by descendant somatic cells of neoblasts to ensure transposon silencing in those cells, which are unable to produce PIWI proteins. PMID:27165555

  12. An RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Histone Modifiers and RNA Silencing Genes in Soybean during Floral Initiation Process

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Lim Chee; Singh, Mohan B.; Bhalla, Prem L.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics has been recognised to play vital roles in many plant developmental processes, including floral initiation through the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The histone modifying proteins that mediate these modifications involve the SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases, JmjC domain-containing demethylase, acetylases and deacetylases. In addition, RNA interference (RNAi)-associated genes are also involved in epigenetic regulation via RNA-directed DNA methylation and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Soybean, a major crop legume, requires a short day to induce flowering. How histone modifications regulate the plant response to external cues that initiate flowering is still largely unknown. Here, we used RNA-seq to address the dynamics of transcripts that are potentially involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi mediated gene silencing during the floral initiation of soybean. Soybean is a paleopolyploid that has been subjected to at least two rounds of whole genome duplication events. We report that the expanded genomic repertoire of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean includes 14 histone acetyltransferases, 24 histone deacetylases, 47 histone methyltransferases, 15 protein arginine methyltransferases, 24 JmjC domain-containing demethylases and 47 RNAi-associated genes. To investigate the role of these histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes during floral initiation, we compared the transcriptional dynamics of the leaf and shoot apical meristem at different time points after a short-day treatment. Our data reveal that the extensive activation of genes that are usually involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi gene silencing in the soybean shoot apical meristem are reprogrammed for floral development following an exposure to inductive conditions. PMID:24147010

  13. Harassment, Bias, and Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welliver, Paul W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a new principle which has been added to the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics regarding discrimination, harassment, and bias. An example is presented which illustrates a violation of a professional colleague's rights. (LRW)

  14. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  15. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  16. Political bias is tenacious.

    PubMed

    Ditto, Peter H; Wojcik, Sean P; Chen, Eric Evan; Grady, Rebecca Hofstein; Ringel, Megan M

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al. are right to worry about political bias in social psychology but they underestimate the ease of correcting it. Both liberals and conservatives show partisan bias that often worsens with cognitive sophistication. More non-liberals in social psychology is unlikely to speed our convergence upon the truth, although it may broaden the questions we ask and the data we collect. PMID:26786070

  17. Organ-specific alterations in tobacco transcriptome caused by the PVX-derived P25 silencing suppressor transgene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RNA silencing affects a broad range of regulatory processes in all eukaryotes ranging from chromatin structure maintenance to transcriptional and translational regulation and longevity of the mRNAs. Particularly in plants, it functions as the major defense mechanism against viruses. To counter-act this defense, plant viruses produce suppressors of RNA silencing (Viral suppressors of RNA silencing, VSRSs), which are essential for viruses to invade their specific host plants. Interactions of these VSRSs with the hosts’ silencing pathways, and their direct and indirect interference with different cellular regulatory networks constitute one of the main lines of the molecular virus-host interactions. Here we have used a microarray approach to study the effects of the Potato virus X Potexvirus (PVX)-specific P25 VSRS protein on the transcript profile of tobacco plants, when expressed as a transgene in these plants. Results The expression of the PVX-specific P25 silencing suppressor in transgenic tobacco plants caused significant up-regulation of 1350 transcripts, but down-regulation of only five transcripts in the leaves, and up- and down-regulation of 51 and 13 transcripts, respectively, in the flowers of these plants, as compared to the wild type control plants. Most of the changes occurred in the transcripts related to biotic and abiotic stresses, transcription regulation, signaling, metabolic pathways and cell wall modifications, and many of them appeared to be induced through up-regulation of the signaling pathways regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. Correlations of these alterations with the protein profile and related biological functions were analyzed. Surprisingly, they did not cause significant alterations in the protein profile, and caused only very mild alteration in the phenotype of the P25-expressing transgenic plants. Conclusion Expression of the PVX-specific P25 VSRS protein causes major alterations in the transcriptome

  18. Short interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing in Globodera pallida and Meloidogyne incognita infective stage juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Johnathan J; McMaster, Steven; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of gene function through RNA interference (RNAi)-based reverse genetics in plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) remains inexplicably reliant on the use of long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silencing triggers; a practice inherently disadvantageous due to the introduction of superfluous dsRNA sequence, increasing chances of aberrant or off-target gene silencing through interactions between nascent short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and non-cognate mRNA targets. Recently, we have shown that non-nematode, long dsRNAs have a propensity to elicit profound impacts on the phenotype and migrational abilities of both root knot and cyst nematodes. This study presents, to our knowledge for the first time, gene-specific knockdown of FMRFamide-like peptide (flp) transcripts, using discrete 21bp siRNAs in potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida, and root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita infective (J2) stage juveniles. Both knockdown at the transcript level through quantitative (q)PCR analysis and functional data derived from migration assay, indicate that siRNAs targeting certain areas of the FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) transcripts are potent and specific in the silencing of gene function. In addition, we present a method of manipulating siRNA activity through the management of strand thermodynamics. Initial evaluation of strand thermodynamics as a determinant of RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) strand selection (inferred from knockdown efficacy) in the siRNAs presented here suggested that the purported influence of 5' stand stability on guide incorporation may be somewhat promiscuous. However, we have found that on strategically incorporating base mismatches in the sense strand of a G. pallida-specific siRNA, we could specifically increase or decrease the knockdown of its target (specific to the antisense strand), presumably through creating more favourable thermodynamic profiles for incorporation of either the sense (non-target-specific) or antisense (target

  19. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  20. Silencing Nociceptor Neurons Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Burkett, Patrick R; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J F; Pascal, Maud A; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L; Tran, Johnathan V; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Bean, Bruce P; Levy, Bruce D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-07-15

    Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation, we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8(+) sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large-pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin- or house-dust-mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4(+) and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  1. The Marijuana Phenomenon: Contradictions and Silence.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joanne M; Shattell, Mona M; McConnell, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The United States is trending toward more permissiveness regarding recreational and medicinal marijuana (MJ). Many conditions for which MJ is recommended, prescribed, or self-prescribed are symptoms that advanced practice nurses address daily. Yet, the silence of nursing scientists on ethics, practices, and policies regarding such clinical decisions is deafening. This is but one of many contradictions about MJ use that we discuss in this article. We do not propose to resolve these contradictions; that is left to the community of nurse scientists in interprofessional discourse. Collectively, we must explore these contradictions and, through evidence-based policy recommendations, overcome the silence about how providers view MJ, how it might be helpful, its risks, and cultural shifts that have accompanied a changed political/legal environment. Long term, we must close the gaps in the nursing knowledge base regarding MJ as it affects users and how it is used interventionally. PMID:26950836

  2. Silencing FAT10 inhibits metastasis of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chengbin; Zhang, Zhiyu; Cui, Yan; Yuan, Hongmou; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the main challenge of osteosarcoma treatment. Herein, we first reveal the oncogenic role of FAT10 in metastasis of osteosarcoma. FAT10 was upregulated in osteosarcoma, especially in metastatic osteosarcoma. High level of FAT10 was associated with poorer prognosis of osteosarcoma patients. Moreover, Transwell and Matrigel assays revealed that silencing FAT10 significantly inhibited the invasive and migratory abilities of osteosarcoma cells. Metastasis assay in vivo showed that silencing FAT10 decreased the number of mice with distant metastasis. We also found that FAT10 may act its oncogenic functions through regulating HOXB9. Collectively, the results suggested that FAT10 may be a novel therapeutic target for osteosarcoma patients. PMID:27279480

  3. RNA Interference of Soybean Isoflavone Synthase Genes Leads to Silencing in Tissues Distal to the Transformation Site and to Enhanced Susceptibility to Phytophthora sojae1

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Senthil; Graham, Madge Y.; Yu, Oliver; Graham, Terrence L.

    2005-01-01

    Isoflavones are thought to play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are also potentially important to human nutrition and medicine. Isoflavone synthase (IFS) is a key enzyme for the formation of the isoflavones. Here, we examined the consequences of RNAi silencing of genes for this enzyme in soybean (Glycine max). Soybean cotyledon tissues were transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying an RNAi silencing construct designed to silence expression of both copies of IFS genes. Approximately 50% of emerging roots were transformed with the RNAi construct, and most transformed roots exhibited >95% silencing of isoflavone accumulation. Silencing of IFS was also demonstrated throughout the entire cotyledon (in tissues distal to the transformation site) both by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of isoflavones and by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. This distal silencing led to a nearly complete suppression of mRNA accumulation for both the IFS1 and IFS2 genes and of isoflavone accumulations induced by wounding or treatment with the cell wall glucan elicitor from Phytophthora sojae. Preformed isoflavone conjugates were not reduced in distal tissues, suggesting little turnover of these stored isoflavone pools. Distal silencing was established within just 5 d of transformation and was highly efficient for a 3- to 4-d period, after which it was no longer apparent in most experiments. Silencing of IFS was effective in at least two genotypes and led to enhanced susceptibility to P. sojae, disrupting both R gene-mediated resistance in roots and nonrace-specific resistance in cotyledon tissues. The soybean cotyledon system, already a model system for defense signal-response and cell-to-cell signaling, may provide a convenient and effective system for functional analysis of plant genes through gene silencing. PMID:15778457

  4. Silencing the Singer. Antibioethics in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schöne-Seifert, B; Rippe, K P

    1991-01-01

    "Die Gedanken sind frei," in the words of the old song. But in Germany, thoughts are no longer free. Peter Singer, the "death ethicist," has become a special target for activists attempting to silence bioethical debate in Germany. In the context of the trauma inflicted by National Socialism, a profound unease over issues at the end of life is accompanied by an insistence that these issues are not to be discussed. PMID:1837289

  5. Silencing of TaBTF3 gene impairs tolerance to freezing and drought stresses in wheat.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guozhang; Ma, Hongzhen; Liu, Guoqin; Han, Qiaoxia; Li, Chengwei; Guo, Tiancai

    2013-11-01

    Basic transcription factor 3 (BTF3), the β-subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex, is responsible for the transcriptional initiation of RNA polymerase II and is also involved in cell apoptosis, translation initiation regulation, growth, development, and other functions. Here, we report the impact of BTF3 on abiotic tolerance in higher plants. The transcription levels of the TaBTF3 gene, first isolated from wheat seedlings in our lab, were differentially regulated by diverse abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, including PEG-induced stress (20 % polyethylene glycol 6000), cold (4 °C), salt (100 mM NaCl), abscisic acid (100 μM), methyl jasmonate (50 μM), and salicylic acid (50 μM). Southern blot analysis indicated that, in the wheat genome, TaBTF3 is a multi-copy gene. Compared to BSMV-GFP-infected wheat plants (control), under freezing (-8 °C for 48 h) or drought stress (withholding water for 15 days) conditions, TaBTF3-silenced wheat plants showed lower survival rates, free proline content, and relative water content and higher relative electrical conductivity and water loss rate. These results suggest that silencing of the TaBTF3 gene may impair tolerance to freezing and drought stresses in wheat and that it may be involved in the response to abiotic stresses in higher plants. PMID:23942841

  6. Analysis and design of pod silencers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, M. L.

    2003-05-01

    Parallel baffle mufflers or split silencers are used extensively in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems for increased attenuation of noise within a short or given length. Acoustic analysis of rectangular parallel baffle mufflers runs on the same lines as that of a rectangular duct lined on two sides. This simplification would not hold for circular configurations. Often, a cylindrical pod is inserted into a circular lined duct to increase its attenuation (or transmission loss), thereby making the flow passage annular and providing an additional absorptive layer on the inner side of this annular passage. This configuration, called a pod silencer, is analyzed here for the four-pole parameters as well as transmission loss, making use of the bulk reaction model. The effect of thin protective film or a highly perforated metallic plate is duly incorporated by means of a grazing-flow impedance. Use of appropriate boundary conditions leads to a set of linear homogeneous equations which in turn lead to a transcendental frequency equation in the unknown complex axial wave number. This is solved by means of the Newton-Raphson method, and the axial wave number is then used in the expressions for transmission loss as well as the transfer matrix parameters. Finally, results of a parametric study are reported to help the designer in optimization of a pod silencer configuration within a given overall size for minimal cost.

  7. Targeted gene silencing to induce permanent sterility.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-08-01

    A non-surgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: it needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: (i) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  8. Prediction Bias and Selection Bias: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel; Gamliel, Eyal

    2001-01-01

    Proposed a definition of selection bias and studied the empirical relation between prediction bias and selection bias with respect to prominent social groups. Results show that, although the two biases are related, the relation is not isomorphic. It is mediated by the selection ratio, and for most selection ratios, it is only moderate. (SLD)

  9. Cohabitation of insulators and silencing elements in yeast subtelomeric regions.

    PubMed Central

    Fourel, G; Revardel, E; Koering, C E; Gilson, E

    1999-01-01

    In budding yeast, the telomeric DNA is flanked by a combination of two subtelomeric repetitive sequences, the X and Y' elements. We have investigated the influence of these sequences on telomeric silencing. The telomere-proximal portion of either X or Y' dampened silencing when located between the telomere and the reporter gene. These elements were named STARs, for subtelomeric anti-silencing regions. STARs can also counteract silencer-driven repression at the mating-type HML locus. When two STARs bracket a reporter gene, its expression is no longer influenced by surrounding silencing elements, although these are still active on a second reporter gene. In addition, an intervening STAR uncouples the silencing of neighboring genes. STARs thus display the hallmarks of insulators. Protection from silencing is recapitulated by multimerized oligonucleotides representing Tbf1p- and Reb1p-binding sites, as found in STARs. In contrast, sequences located more centromere proximal in X and Y' elements reinforce silencing. They can promote silencing downstream of an insulated expressed domain. Overall, our results suggest that the silencing emanating from telomeres can be propagated in a discontinuous manner via a series of subtelomeric relay elements. PMID:10228166

  10. Characterization of transcriptional regulatory domains of ankyrin repeat cofactor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Aihua; Li, Chia-Wei; Chen, J. Don . E-mail: chenjd@umdnj.edu

    2007-07-13

    The ankyrin repeats cofactor-1 (ANCO-1) was recently identified as a p160 coactivator-interacting protein that may inhibit transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. Here, we have characterized the transcriptional regulatory domains of ANCO-1. Two intrinsic repression domains (RD) were identified: an N-terminal RD1 at residues 318-611 and a C-terminal RD2 at 2369-2663. ANCO-1 also contains an activation domain (AD) capable of stimulating transcription in both mammalian and yeast cells. The minimal AD was delimited to a 70-amino acid region at residues 2076-2145. Overall, full-length ANCO-1 exhibited transcriptional repressor activity, suggesting that RD domains may suppress the AD activity. We further demonstrated that ANCO-1 silencing by siRNA enhanced progesterone receptor-mediated transcription. Together, these results indicate that the transcriptional potential of ANCO-1 may be modulated by a combination of repression and activation signals.

  11. Transcription and RNAi in the formation of heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Shiv S.; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2010-01-01

    Preface Our title appears to be an oxymoron – surely “silenced” chromatin should not be transcribed! But there have been frequent reports of low level transcription in heterochromatic domains, and in Drosophila several hundred genes are found within heterochromatic regions1. Most striking, recent investigations implicate RNAi (in the broadest sense) in targeting and maintaining heterochromatin, and RNAi-based mechanisms are inherently dependent on transcription. While this might involve trans-acting sources of the critical small RNAs, in some cases transcription of the domain to be silenced appears to be required at least initially, a seeming contradiction. PMID:17522672

  12. The horizontally-acquired response regulator SsrB drives a Salmonella lifestyle switch by relieving biofilm silencing

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Stuti K; Winardhi, Ricksen S; Periasamy, Saravanan; Dykas, Michal M; Jie, Yan; Kenney, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy by which bacterial pathogens reside in humans is by shifting from a virulent lifestyle, (systemic infection), to a dormant carrier state. Two major serovars of Salmonella enterica, Typhi and Typhimurium, have evolved a two-component regulatory system to exist inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles in the macrophage, as well as to persist as asymptomatic biofilms in the gallbladder. Here we present evidence that SsrB, a transcriptional regulator encoded on the SPI-2 pathogenicity-island, determines the switch between these two lifestyles by controlling ancestral and horizontally-acquired genes. In the acidic macrophage vacuole, the kinase SsrA phosphorylates SsrB, and SsrB~P relieves silencing of virulence genes and activates their transcription. In the absence of SsrA, unphosphorylated SsrB directs transcription of factors required for biofilm formation specifically by activating csgD (agfD), the master biofilm regulator by disrupting the silenced, H-NS-bound promoter. Anti-silencing mechanisms thus control the switch between opposing lifestyles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10747.001 PMID:26880544

  13. The horizontally-acquired response regulator SsrB drives a Salmonella lifestyle switch by relieving biofilm silencing.

    PubMed

    Desai, Stuti K; Winardhi, Ricksen S; Periasamy, Saravanan; Dykas, Michal M; Jie, Yan; Kenney, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy by which bacterial pathogens reside in humans is by shifting from a virulent lifestyle, (systemic infection), to a dormant carrier state. Two major serovars of Salmonella enterica, Typhi and Typhimurium, have evolved a two-component regulatory system to exist inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles in the macrophage, as well as to persist as asymptomatic biofilms in the gallbladder. Here we present evidence that SsrB, a transcriptional regulator encoded on the SPI-2 pathogenicity-island, determines the switch between these two lifestyles by controlling ancestral and horizontally-acquired genes. In the acidic macrophage vacuole, the kinase SsrA phosphorylates SsrB, and SsrB~P relieves silencing of virulence genes and activates their transcription. In the absence of SsrA, unphosphorylated SsrB directs transcription of factors required for biofilm formation specifically by activating csgD (agfD), the master biofilm regulator by disrupting the silenced, H-NS-bound promoter. Anti-silencing mechanisms thus control the switch between opposing lifestyles. PMID:26880544

  14. Bias in Psychological Assessment: Heterosexism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernin, Jeffrey; Holden, Janice Miner; Chandler, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Explores heterosexist bias in seven widely used assessment instruments. Focuses on bias that is observable in the instruments themselves and in the ancillary materials. Describes three types of bias, how these biases manifest in various instruments, and makes recommendations for mental health practitioners and for professionals who develop…

  15. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  16. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  17. Epigenetic silencing of ARRDC3 expression in basal-like breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soung, Young Hwa; Pruitt, Kevin; Chung, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Arrestin domain-containing 3 (ARRDC3) is a tumor suppressor whose expression is either lost or suppressed in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). However, the mechanism by which BLBC suppresses ARRDC3 expression is not established. Here, we show that expression of ARRDC3 in BLBC cells is suppressed at the transcriptional level. Suppression of ARRDC3 expression in BLBC cells involves epigenetic silencing as inhibitors of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) significantly restores ARRDC3 levels in BLBC cells. SIRT2, among class III HDACs, plays a major role in epigenetic silencing of ARRDC3 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Acetylation levels of the ARRDC3 promoter in BLBC cells is significantly lower than that of other sub-types of BC cells. Chromatin immunopreciptitation analysis established SIRT2 binding at ARRDC3 promoter in BLBC cells. Our studies indicate that SIRT2 dependent epigenetic silencing of ARRDC3 is one of the important events that may contribute to the aggressive nature of BLBC cells.

  18. Efficiency of gene silencing in Arabidopsis: direct inverted repeats vs. transitive RNAi vectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei A; DiFazio, Steven P; Brunner, Amy M; Davis, John M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Kalluri, Udaya C; Arias, Renee S; Etherington, Elizabeth; Tuskan, Gerald A; Strauss, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis using transitive and homologous inverted repeat (hIR) vectors. hIR constructs carry self-complementary intron-spliced fragments of the target gene whereas transitive vectors have the target sequence fragment adjacent to an intron-spliced, inverted repeat of heterologous origin. Both transitive and hIR constructs facilitated specific and heritable silencing in the three genes studied (AP1, ETTIN and TTG1). Both types of vectors produced a phenotypic series that phenocopied reduction of function mutants for the respective target gene. The hIR yielded up to fourfold higher proportions of events with strongly manifested reduction of function phenotypes compared to transitive RNAi. We further investigated the efficiency and potential off-target effects of AP1 silencing by both types of vectors using genome-scale microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. The depletion of AP1 transcripts coincided with reduction of function phenotypic changes among both hIR and transitive lines and also showed similar expression patterns among differentially regulated genes. We did not detect significant silencing directed against homologous potential off-target genes when constructs were designed with minimal sequence similarity. Both hIR and transitive methods are useful tools in plant biotechnology and genomics. The choice of vector will depend on specific objectives such as cloning throughput, number of events and degree of suppression required.

  19. Host-induced silencing of Fusarium culmorum genes protects wheat from infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanxin; Kastner, Christine; Nowara, Daniela; Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Rutten, Twan; Zhao, Yusheng; Deising, Holger B; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Plants producing antisense or double-stranded RNA molecules that target specific genes of eukaryotic pests or pathogens can become protected from their attack. This beneficial effect was also reported for plant-fungus interactions and is believed to reflect uptake of the RNAs by the fungus via an as yet unknown mechanism, followed by target gene silencing. Here we report that wheat plants pre-infected with Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) strains containing antisense sequences against target genes of the Fusarium head blight (FHB) fungus F. culmorum caused a reduction of corresponding transcript levels in the pathogen and reduced disease symptoms. Stable transgenic wheat plants carrying an RNAi hairpin construct against the β-1, 3-glucan synthase gene FcGls1 of F. culmorum or a triple combination of FcGls1 with two additional, pre-tested target genes also showed enhanced FHB resistance in leaf and spike inoculation assays under greenhouse and near-field conditions, respectively. Microscopic evaluation of F. culmorum development in plants transiently or stably expressing FcGls1 silencing constructs revealed aberrant, swollen fungal hyphae, indicating severe hyphal cell wall defects. The results lead us to propose host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) as a plant protection approach that may also be applicable to highly FHB-susceptible wheat genotypes. PMID:27540093

  20. Host-induced silencing of Fusarium culmorum genes protects wheat from infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanxin; Kastner, Christine; Nowara, Daniela; Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Rutten, Twan; Zhao, Yusheng; Deising, Holger B.; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Plants producing antisense or double-stranded RNA molecules that target specific genes of eukaryotic pests or pathogens can become protected from their attack. This beneficial effect was also reported for plant–fungus interactions and is believed to reflect uptake of the RNAs by the fungus via an as yet unknown mechanism, followed by target gene silencing. Here we report that wheat plants pre-infected with Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) strains containing antisense sequences against target genes of the Fusarium head blight (FHB) fungus F. culmorum caused a reduction of corresponding transcript levels in the pathogen and reduced disease symptoms. Stable transgenic wheat plants carrying an RNAi hairpin construct against the β-1, 3-glucan synthase gene FcGls1 of F. culmorum or a triple combination of FcGls1 with two additional, pre-tested target genes also showed enhanced FHB resistance in leaf and spike inoculation assays under greenhouse and near-field conditions, respectively. Microscopic evaluation of F. culmorum development in plants transiently or stably expressing FcGls1 silencing constructs revealed aberrant, swollen fungal hyphae, indicating severe hyphal cell wall defects. The results lead us to propose host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) as a plant protection approach that may also be applicable to highly FHB-susceptible wheat genotypes. PMID:27540093

  1. An siRNA-based method for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Isidor, Marie S; Winther, Sally; Basse, Astrid L; Petersen, M Christine H; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; Hansen, Jacob B

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a promising therapeutic target for opposing obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The ability to modulate gene expression in mature brown adipocytes is important to understand brown adipocyte function and delineate novel regulatory mechanisms of non-shivering thermogenesis. The aim of this study was to optimize a lipofection-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection protocol for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes. We determined that a critical parameter was to deliver the siRNA to mature adipocytes by reverse transfection, i.e. transfection of non-adherent cells. Using this protocol, we effectively knocked down both high- and low-abundance transcripts in a model of mature brown adipocytes (WT-1) as well as in primary mature mouse brown adipocytes. A functional consequence of the knockdown was confirmed by an attenuated increase in uncoupled respiration (thermogenesis) in response to β-adrenergic stimulation of mature WT-1 brown adipocytes transfected with uncoupling protein 1 siRNA. Efficient gene silencing was also obtained in various mouse and human white adipocyte models (3T3-L1, primary mouse white adipocytes, hMADS) with the ability to undergo "browning." In summary, we report an easy and versatile reverse siRNA transfection protocol to achieve specific silencing of gene expression in various models of mature brown and browning-competent white adipocytes, including primary cells. PMID:27386153

  2. A common telomeric gene silencing assay is affected by nucleotide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Marlies P.; Luo, Weijun; Tsaponina, Olga; Chabes, Andrei; Stillman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Telomere-associated position effect variegation (TPEV) in budding yeast has been used as a model for understanding epigenetic inheritance and gene silencing. A widely used assay to identify mutants with improper TPEV employs the URA3 gene at the telomere of chromosome VII-L that can be counter-selected with 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA). 5-FOA resistance has been inferred to represent lack of transcription of URA3 and therefore to represent heterochromatin-induced gene silencing. For two genes implicated in telomere silencing, POL30 and DOT1, we show that the URA3 telomere reporter assay does not reflect their role in heterochromatin formation. Rather, an imbalance in ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), which is induced by 5-FOA, and the specific promoter of URA3 fused to ADH4 at telomere VII-L are jointly responsible for the variegated phenotype. We conclude that metabolic changes caused by the drug employed and certain mutants being studied are incompatible with the use of certain prototrophic markers for TPEV. PMID:21474074

  3. Putative methyltransferase LaeA and transcription factor CreA are necessary for proper asexual development and controlling secondary metabolic gene cluster expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhu, Yingying; Bao, Longfei; Gao, Liwei; Yao, Guangshan; Li, Yanan; Yang, Zhifeng; Li, Zhonghai; Zhong, Yaohua; Li, Fuli; Yin, Heng; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-09-01

    The morphological development of fungi is a complex process and is often coupled with secondary metabolite production. In this study, we assessed the function of putative methyltransferase LaeA and transcription factor CreA in controlling asexual development and secondary metabolic gene cluster expression in Penicillium oxalicum. The deletion of laeA (ΔlaeA) impaired the conidiation in P. oxalicum, with a downregulated expression of brlA. Overexpression of P. oxalicum brlA in ΔlaeA could upregulate brlA and abaA remarkably, but could not rescue the conidiation defect; therefore, brlA and abaA expression were necessary but not sufficient for conidiation. Deletion of creA in ΔlaeA background (ΔlaeAΔcreA) blocked conidiation with a white fluffy phenotype. Nutrient-rich medium could not rescue developmental defects in ΔlaeAΔcreA mutant but could rescue defects in ΔlaeA. Expression of 10 genes, namely, albA/wA, abrB/yA, arpA, aygA, arpA-like, arpB, arpB-like, rodA, rodA-like, and rodB, for pigmentation and spore wall protein genes was silenced in ΔlaeAΔcreA, whereas only six of them were downregulated in ΔlaeA. Among the 28 secondary metabolism gene clusters in P. oxalicum, four secondary metabolism gene clusters were silenced in ΔlaeA and two were also silenced in ΔbrlA mutant. A total of 10 physically linked and coregulated genes were distributed over five chromosomes in ΔlaeA. Six of these genes were located in subtelomeric regions, thus demonstrating a positional bias for LaeA-regulated clusters toward subtelomeric regions. All of silenced clusters located in subtelomeric regions were derepressed in ΔlaeAΔcreA, hence showing that lack of CreA could remediate the repression of gene clusters in ΔlaeA background. Results show that both putative methyltransferase LaeA and transcription factor CreA are necessary for proper asexual development and controlling secondary metabolic gene cluster expression. PMID:27387217

  4. Development of an Efficient Virus Induced Gene Silencing Strategy in the Non-Model Wild Ginger-Zingiber zerumbet and Investigation of Associated Proteome Changes

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Chidambareswaren; Jaleel, Abdul; Deb, Lokesh; Thomas, George; Sakuntala, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Zingiber zerumbet (Zingiberaceae) is a wild, tropical medicinal herb that shows a high degree of resistance to diseases affecting cultivated ginger. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) silencing vectors containing an endogenous phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene fragment were agroinfiltrated into young leaves of Z. zerumbet under controlled growth conditions to effect virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Infiltrated leaves as well as newly emerged leaves and tillers showed visual signs of PDS silencing after 30 days. Replication and systemic movement of the viral vectors in silenced plants were confirmed by RT-PCR. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis verified significant down-regulation of PDS transcripts in the silenced tissues. Label-free proteomic analysis was conducted in leaves with established PDS transcript down regulation and buffer-infiltrated (mock) leaves. A total of 474 proteins were obtained, which were up-regulated, down-regulated or modulated de novo during VIGS. Most of these proteins were localized to the chloroplast, as revealed by UniprotKB analysis, and among the up-regulated proteins there were abiotic stress responsive, photosynthetic, metabolic and membrane proteins. Moreover, the demonstration of viral proteins together with host proteins proved successful viral infection. We report for the first time the establishment of a high-throughput gene functional analysis platform using BSMV-mediated VIGS in Z. zerumbet, as well as proteomic changes associated with VIGS. PMID:25918840

  5. Early origin and adaptive evolution of the GW182 protein family, the key component of RNA silencing in animals.

    PubMed

    Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2015-01-01

    The GW182 proteins are a key component of the miRNA-dependent post-transcriptional silencing pathway in animals. They function as scaffold proteins to mediate the interaction of Argonaute (AGO)-containing complexes with cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP) and PAN2-PAN3 and CCR4-NOT deadenylases. The AGO-GW182 complexes mediate silencing of the target mRNA through induction of translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. Although the GW182 proteins are a subject of extensive experimental research in the recent years, very little is known about their origin and evolution. Here, based on complex functional annotation and phylogenetic analyses, we reveal 448 members of the GW182 protein family from the earliest animals to humans. Our results indicate that a single-copy GW182/TNRC6C progenitor gene arose with the emergence of multicellularity and it multiplied in the last common ancestor of vertebrates in 2 rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) resulting in 3 genes. Before the divergence of vertebrates, both the AGO- and CCR4-NOT-binding regions of GW182s showed significant acceleration in the accumulation of amino acid changes, suggesting functional adaptation toward higher specificity to the molecules of the silencing complex. We conclude that the silencing ability of the GW182 proteins improves with higher position in the taxonomic classification and increasing complexity of the organism. The first reconstruction of the molecular journey of GW182 proteins from the ancestral metazoan protein to the current mammalian configuration provides new insight into development of the miRNA-dependent post-transcriptional silencing pathway in animals. PMID:26106978

  6. Oocyte heterogeneity with respect to the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed X chromosomes in the XY female mouse.

    PubMed

    Taketo, Teruko; Naumova, Anna K

    2013-10-01

    In the XY pachytene spermatocyte, the sex chromosomes do not synapse except for the pseudoautosomal region and become transcriptionally silenced. It has been suggested that the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC) also occurs in oocytes. In the XY sex-reversed female mouse, the sex chromosomes fail to pair in the majority of oocytes and a greater number of oocytes are eliminated during the meiotic prophase compared to the XX female. Yet, many XY oocytes survive to reach the second meiotic metaphase. The goal of our current study was to determine whether the single X chromosome shows the characteristics of asynapsis and meiotic silencing in a proportion of XY oocytes, which can explain the survival of the remaining oocytes. We first examined the accumulation of markers associated with asynapsis or transcriptional silencing, i.e., BRCA1, γH2AX, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3, at the single X chromosome in the XY oocyte. We found that γH2AX and BRCA1 were enriched on the single X chromosome whereas H3K9me3 was not, and H3K27me3 was enriched at all chromosomes in the majority of XY oocytes. We next examined the meiotic silencing of the single X chromosome using enrichment of the X-encoded ATRX protein. On average, ATRX enrichment was lower in XY oocytes than in XX oocytes as expected from its half gene dosage. However, the intensity of ATRX staining in XY oocytes harboring γH2AX domains showed a remarkable heterogeneity. We conclude that MSUC occurs with varying consequences, resulting in a heterogeneous population of oocytes with respect to protein enrichment in the XY female mouse. PMID:23760560

  7. Early origin and adaptive evolution of the GW182 protein family, the key component of RNA silencing in animals

    PubMed Central

    Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2015-01-01

    The GW182 proteins are a key component of the miRNA-dependent post-transcriptional silencing pathway in animals. They function as scaffold proteins to mediate the interaction of Argonaute (AGO)-containing complexes with cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP) and PAN2-PAN3 and CCR4-NOT deadenylases. The AGO-GW182 complexes mediate silencing of the target mRNA through induction of translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. Although the GW182 proteins are a subject of extensive experimental research in the recent years, very little is known about their origin and evolution. Here, based on complex functional annotation and phylogenetic analyses, we reveal 448 members of the GW182 protein family from the earliest animals to humans. Our results indicate that a single-copy GW182/TNRC6C progenitor gene arose with the emergence of multicellularity and it multiplied in the last common ancestor of vertebrates in 2 rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) resulting in 3 genes. Before the divergence of vertebrates, both the AGO- and CCR4-NOT-binding regions of GW182s showed significant acceleration in the accumulation of amino acid changes, suggesting functional adaptation toward higher specificity to the molecules of the silencing complex. We conclude that the silencing ability of the GW182 proteins improves with higher position in the taxonomic classification and increasing complexity of the organism. The first reconstruction of the molecular journey of GW182 proteins from the ancestral metazoan protein to the current mammalian configuration provides new insight into development of the miRNA-dependent post-transcriptional silencing pathway in animals. PMID:26106978

  8. Factors affecting susceptibility to RNA interference in Haemonchus contortus and in vivo silencing of an H11 aminopeptidase gene.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Buddhini; Knox, David P; Britton, Collette

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been applied very successfully to Caenorhabditis elegans to study gene function but has proven less effective in parasitic nematodes. In the sheep gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus, previous studies demonstrated reproducible silencing of β-tubulin but not of other genes targeted. Here we aimed to examine whether the level of target transcript or site of gene expression influence susceptibility to RNAi by soaking. Target genes represented by a high number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the H. contortus L3 stage were not reproducibly silenced. In contrast, four out of six genes putatively expressed in the intestine, excretory cell or amphids were consistently silenced by RNAi. This suggests that genes expressed in sites accessible to the environment are more likely to be susceptible to RNAi by soaking. Silenced genes included those encoding the highly protective gut aminopeptidase H11, secretory protein Hc-ASP-1, β-tubulin and homologues of aquaporin and RNA helicase. To determine whether RNAi silencing of H11 could mimic H11 vaccination in reducing worm and egg counts, we examined the in vivo effects of H11 RNAi. This is the first, to our knowledge, in vivo study of RNAi in an animal parasitic nematode. RNAi of the H11 gene in infective larvae prior to infection resulted in a 57% reduction in faecal egg count (FEC), 40% reduction in worm burden and 64% decrease in aminopeptidase activity compared with pre-soaking in control dsRNA. Thus, in this study we have established that RNAi is a valid and feasible approach to identify essential gene function. However, using current methods, this may be limited to genes expressed in accessible sites. PMID:20699100

  9. Electrical silencing of PDF neurons advances the phase of non-PDF clock neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Cao, Guan; Nitabach, Michael N

    2008-04-01

    Drosophila clock neurons exhibit self-sustaining cellular oscillations that rely in part on rhythmic transcriptional feedback loops. We have previously determined that electrical silencing of the pigment dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing lateral-ventral (LN(V)) pacemaker subset of fly clock neurons via expression of an inward-rectifier K(+) channel (Kir2.1) severely disrupts free-running rhythms of locomotor activity-most flies are arrhythmic and those that are not exhibit weak short-period rhythms-and abolishes LN(V) molecular oscillation in constant darkness. PDF is known to be an important LN(V) output signal. Here we examine the effects of electrical silencing of the LN(V) pacemakers on molecular rhythms in other, nonsilenced, subsets of clock neurons. In contrast to previously described cell-autonomous abolition of free-running molecular rhythms, we find that electrical silencing of the LN(V) pacemakers via Kir2.1 expression does not impair molecular rhythms in LN(D), DN1, and DN2 subsets of clock neurons. However, free-running molecular rhythms in these non-LN(V) clock neurons occur with advanced phase. Electrical silencing of LN(V)s phenocopies PDF null mutation (pdf (01) ) at both behavioral and molecular levels except for the complete abolition of free-running cellular oscillation in the LN(V)s themselves. LN(V) electrically silenced or pdf 01 flies exhibit weak free-running behavioral rhythms with short period, and the molecular oscillation in non-LN(V) neurons phase advances in constant darkness. That LN( V) electrical silencing leads to the same behavioral and non-LN( V) molecular phenotypes as pdf 01 suggests that persistence of LN(V) molecular oscillation in pdf 01 flies has no functional effect, either on behavioral rhythms or on non-LN(V) molecular rhythms. We thus conclude that functionally relevant signals from LN(V)s to non-LN(V) clock neurons and other downstream targets rely both on PDF signaling and LN(V) electrical activity, and that LN( V

  10. Gender Differences in Self-Silencing and Psychological Distress in Informal Cancer Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ussher, Jane M.; Perz, Janette

    2010-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in self-silencing, the relationship between self-silencing and psychological distress, and reasons for self-silencing in informal cancer carers (329 women, 155 men), using a mixed-method design. Men reported greater self-silencing than women on the Silencing the Self Scale; however, women reported higher…

  11. The Enamovirus P0 protein is a silencing suppressor which inhibits local and systemic RNA silencing through AGO1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Adriana F; Correa, Regis L; Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jackson, Craig; Kawchuk, Lawrence; Vaslin, Maite F S; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2012-05-10

    The P0 protein of poleroviruses and P1 protein of sobemoviruses suppress the plant's RNA silencing machinery. Here we identified a silencing suppressor protein (SSP), P0(PE), in the Enamovirus Pea enation mosaic virus-1 (PEMV-1) and showed that it and the P0s of poleroviruses Potato leaf roll virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus have strong local and systemic SSP activity, while the P1 of Sobemovirus Southern bean mosaic virus supresses systemic silencing. The nuclear localized P0(PE) has no discernable sequence conservation with known SSPs, but proved to be a strong suppressor of local silencing and a moderate suppressor of systemic silencing. Like the P0s from poleroviruses, P0(PE) destabilizes AGO1 and this action is mediated by an F-box-like domain. Therefore, despite the lack of any sequence similarity, the poleroviral and enamoviral SSPs have a conserved mode of action upon the RNA silencing machinery. PMID:22361475

  12. The Enamovirus P0 protein is a silencing suppressor which inhibits local and systemic RNA silencing through AGO1 degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Fusaro, Adriana F.; Correa, Regis L.; Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jackson, Craig; Kawchuk, Lawrence; Vaslin, Maite F.S.; Waterhouse, Peter M.

    2012-05-10

    The P0 protein of poleroviruses and P1 protein of sobemoviruses suppress the plant's RNA silencing machinery. Here we identified a silencing suppressor protein (SSP), P0{sup PE}, in the Enamovirus Pea enation mosaic virus-1 (PEMV-1) and showed that it and the P0s of poleroviruses Potato leaf roll virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus have strong local and systemic SSP activity, while the P1 of Sobemovirus Southern bean mosaic virus supresses systemic silencing. The nuclear localized P0{sup PE} has no discernable sequence conservation with known SSPs, but proved to be a strong suppressor of local silencing and a moderate suppressor of systemic silencing. Like the P0s from poleroviruses, P0{sup PE} destabilizes AGO1 and this action is mediated by an F-box-like domain. Therefore, despite the lack of any sequence similarity, the poleroviral and enamoviral SSPs have a conserved mode of action upon the RNA silencing machinery.

  13. Biased to Learn Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebastian-Galles, Nuria

    2007-01-01

    Some recent publications that explore the foundations of early language development are reviewed in this article. The review adopts the pivotal idea that infants' advancements are helped by the existence of different types of biases. The infant's discovery of the phonological properties of the language of the environment, as well as their learning…

  14. Optically biased laser gyro

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.Z.; Chow, W.W.; Scully, M.O.; Sanders, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    We describe a four-mode ring laser that exhibits none of the mode-locking characteristics that plague laser gyros. This laser is characterized by a bias that changes sign with a change in the direction of rotation and prevents the counterpropagating modes from locking. A theoretical analysis explaining the experimental results is outlined.

  15. Suppressing RNA silencing with small molecules and the viral suppressor of RNA silencing protein p19.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Dana C; Filip, Roxana; Powdrill, Megan H; O'Hara, Shifawn; Pezacki, John P

    2015-08-01

    RNA silencing is a gene regulatory and host defense mechanism whereby small RNA molecules are engaged by Argonaute (AGO) proteins, which facilitate gene knockdown of complementary mRNA targets. Small molecule inhibitors of AGO represent a convenient method for reversing this effect and have applications in human therapy and biotechnology. Viral suppressors of RNA silencing, such as p19, can also be used to suppress the pathway. Here we assess the compatibility of these two approaches, by examining whether synthetic inhibitors of AGO would inhibit p19-siRNA interactions. We observe that aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) is a potent inhibitor of p19's ability to bind siRNA (IC50 = 0.43 μM), oxidopamine does not inhibit p19:siRNA interactions, and suramin is a mild inhibitor of p19:siRNA interactions (IC50 = 430 μM). We observe that p19 and suramin are compatible inhibitors of RNA silencing in human hepatoma cells. Our data suggests that at least some inhibitors of AGO may be used in combination with p19 to inhibit RNA silencing at different points in the pathway. PMID:26079891

  16. A Modular Plasmid Assembly Kit for Multigene Expression, Gene Silencing and Silencing Rescue in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Andreas; Lambert, Jayne; Morbitzer, Robert; Popp, Claudia; Ott, Thomas; Lahaye, Thomas; Parniske, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Golden Gate (GG) modular assembly approach offers a standardized, inexpensive and reliable way to ligate multiple DNA fragments in a pre-defined order in a single-tube reaction. We developed a GG based toolkit for the flexible construction of binary plasmids for transgene expression in plants. Starting from a common set of modules, such as promoters, protein tags and transcribed regions of interest, synthetic genes are assembled, which can be further combined to multigene constructs. As an example, we created T-DNA constructs encoding multiple fluorescent proteins targeted to distinct cellular compartments (nucleus, cytosol, plastids) and demonstrated simultaneous expression of all genes in Nicotiana benthamiana, Lotus japonicus and Arabidopsis thaliana. We assembled an RNA interference (RNAi) module for the construction of intron-spliced hairpin RNA constructs and demonstrated silencing of GFP in N. benthamiana. By combination of the silencing construct together with a codon adapted rescue construct into one vector, our system facilitates genetic complementation and thus confirmation of the causative gene responsible for a given RNAi phenotype. As proof of principle, we silenced a destabilized GFP gene (dGFP) and restored GFP fluorescence by expression of a recoded version of dGFP, which was not targeted by the silencing construct. PMID:24551083

  17. Co-silencing the mirabilis antiviral protein permits virus-induced gene silencing in Mirabilis jalapa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an attractive and rapid technique for loss of function assay that can reveal the phenotype of embryo-lethal sequences and avoids the need for time consuming transformation and regeneration processes. Among various VIGS vectors that have been explored, the tobac...

  18. An efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector for maize functional genomics research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Yang, Xinxin; Wang, Nian; Liu, Xuedong; Nelson, Richard S; Li, Weimin; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Maize is a major crop whose rich genetic diversity provides an advanced resource for genetic research. However, a tool for rapid transient gene function analysis in maize that may be utilized in most maize cultivars has been lacking, resulting in reliance on time-consuming stable transformation and mutation studies to obtain answers. We developed an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for maize based on a naturally maize-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain, ZMBJ-CMV. An infectious clone of ZMBJ-CMV was constructed, and a vascular puncture inoculation method utilizing Agrobacterium was optimized to improve its utility for CMV infection of maize. ZMBJ-CMV was then modified to function as a VIGS vector. The ZMBJ-CMV vector induced mild to moderate symptoms in many maize lines, making it useful for gene function studies in critically important maize cultivars, such as the sequenced reference inbred line B73. Using this CMV VIGS system, expression of two endogenous genes, ZmPDS and ZmIspH, was found to be decreased by 75% and 78%, respectively, compared with non-silenced tissue. Inserts with lengths of 100-300 bp produced the most complete transcriptional and visual silencing phenotypes. Moreover, genes related to autophagy, ZmATG3 and ZmATG8a, were also silenced, and it was found that they function in leaf starch degradation. These results indicate that our ZMBJ-CMV VIGS vector provides a tool for rapid and efficient gene function studies in maize. PMID:26921244

  19. Silencing of mitochondrial Lon protease deeply impairs mitochondrial proteome and function in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Boraldi, Federica; Giorgio, Valentina; Bernardi, Paolo; Bartolomeo, Regina; Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Missiroli, Sonia; Carnevale, Gianluca; Losi, Lorena; Tesei, Anna; Pinton, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Lon is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial protease that assists protein folding, degrades oxidized/damaged proteins, and participates in maintaining mtDNA levels. Here we show that Lon is up-regulated in several human cancers and that its silencing in RKO colon cancer cells causes profound alterations of mitochondrial proteome and function, and cell death. We silenced Lon in RKO cells by constitutive or inducible expression of Lon shRNA. Lon-silenced cells displayed altered levels of 39 mitochondrial proteins (26% related to stress response, 14.8% to ribosome assembly, 12.7% to oxidative phosphorylation, 8.5% to Krebs cycle, 6.3% to β-oxidation, and 14.7% to crista integrity, ketone body catabolism, and mtDNA maintenance), low levels of mtDNA transcripts, and reduced levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes (with >90% reduction of complex I). Oxygen consumption rate decreased 7.5-fold in basal conditions, and ATP synthesis dropped from 0.25 ± 0.04 to 0.03 ± 0.001 nmol/mg proteins, in the presence of 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Hydrogen peroxide and mitochondrial superoxide anion levels increased by 3- and 1.3-fold, respectively. Mitochondria appeared fragmented, heterogeneous in size and shape, with dilated cristae, vacuoles, and electrondense inclusions. The triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9,-dien-28-oic acid, a Lon inhibitor, partially mimics Lon silencing. In summary, Lon is essential for maintaining mitochondrial shape and function, and for survival of RKO cells. PMID:25154874

  20. Epigenetic silencing of GDF1 disrupts SMAD signaling to reinforce gastric cancer development.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Mok, M T S; Li, M S M; Kang, W; Wang, H; Chan, A W; Chou, J-L; Chen, J; Ng, E K W; To, K-F; Yu, J; Chan, M W Y; Chan, F K L; Sung, J J Y; Cheng, A S L

    2016-04-21

    Accumulating evidence reveals the effectiveness of epigenetic therapy in gastric cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms and targets underlying such therapeutic responses remain elusive. Herein, we report an aberrant yet therapeutically rectifiable epigenetic signaling in gastric carcinogenesis. Administration of DNA-demethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) reduced gastric cancer incidence by ~74% (P<0.05) in N-nitroso-N-methylurea-treated mice. Through genome-wide methylation scanning, novel promoter hypermethylation-silenced and drug-targeted genes were identified in the resected murine stomach tumors and tissues. We uncovered that growth/differentiation factor 1 (Gdf1), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, was silenced by promoter hypermethylation in control tumor-bearing mice, but became reactivated in 5-aza-dC-treated mice (P<0.05). In parallel, the downregulated SMAD2/3 phosphorylation in gastric cancer was revived by 5-aza-dC in vivo. Such hypermethylation-dependent silencing and 5-aza-dC-mediated reactivation of GDF1-SMAD2/3 activity was conserved in human gastric cancer cells (P<0.05). Subsequent functional characterization further revealed the antiproliferative activity of GDF1, which was exerted through activation of SMAD2/3/4-mediated signaling, transcriptional controls on p15, p21 and c-Myc cell-cycle regulators and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Clinically, hypermethylation and loss of GDF1 was significantly associated with reduced phosphorylated-SMAD2/3 and poor survival in stomach cancer patients (P<0.05). Taken together, we demonstrated a causal relationship between DNA methylation and a tumor-suppressive pathway in gastric cancer. Epigenetic silencing of GDF1 abrogates the growth-inhibitory SMAD signaling and renders proliferation advantage to gastric epithelial cells during carcinogenesis. This study lends support to epigenetic therapy for gastric cancer chemoprevention and identifies a potential

  1. Characterization of RNA silencing components in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Gao, Qixun; Huang, Mengmeng; Liu, Ye; Liu, Zunyong; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) plays a critical role in gene regulation in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. However, the role of RNAi remains largely unclear in plant pathogenic fungi. In this study, we explored the roles of core components of the RNAi pathway in Fusarium graminearum, the major causal agent of wheat head blight. Our results demonstrated that the hairpin RNA (hpRNA) can efficiently silence the expression level of target gene, and the argonaute protein FgAgo1 and dicer protein FgDicer2 are important in this silencing process. RNAi machinery was not involved in growth, abiotic stress and pathogenesis in F. graminearum under tested conditions. We firstly applied high-throughput sequencing technology to elucidate small RNA (17–40 nucleotides) (sRNA) transcriptome in F. graminearum, and found that a total of forty-nine micro-like-RNA (milRNA) candidates were identified in the wild-type and ∆FgDICER2, and twenty-four of them were FgDicer2-dependent. Fg-milRNA-4 negatively regulated expression of its target gene. Taken together, our results indicated that the hpRNA-induced gene silencing was a valuable genetic tool for exploring gene function in F. graminearum. FgAgo1 and FgDicer2 proteins played a critical role in the hpRNA mediated gene silencing process. In addition, FgDicer2 was involved in sRNA transcription and milRNA generation in this fungus. PMID:26212591

  2. Characterization of RNA silencing components in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Gao, Qixun; Huang, Mengmeng; Liu, Ye; Liu, Zunyong; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) plays a critical role in gene regulation in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. However, the role of RNAi remains largely unclear in plant pathogenic fungi. In this study, we explored the roles of core components of the RNAi pathway in Fusarium graminearum, the major causal agent of wheat head blight. Our results demonstrated that the hairpin RNA (hpRNA) can efficiently silence the expression level of target gene, and the argonaute protein FgAgo1 and dicer protein FgDicer2 are important in this silencing process. RNAi machinery was not involved in growth, abiotic stress and pathogenesis in F. graminearum under tested conditions. We firstly applied high-throughput sequencing technology to elucidate small RNA (17-40 nucleotides) (sRNA) transcriptome in F. graminearum, and found that a total of forty-nine micro-like-RNA (milRNA) candidates were identified in the wild-type and ∆FgDICER2, and twenty-four of them were FgDicer2-dependent. Fg-milRNA-4 negatively regulated expression of its target gene. Taken together, our results indicated that the hpRNA-induced gene silencing was a valuable genetic tool for exploring gene function in F. graminearum. FgAgo1 and FgDicer2 proteins played a critical role in the hpRNA mediated gene silencing process. In addition, FgDicer2 was involved in sRNA transcription and milRNA generation in this fungus. PMID:26212591

  3. A CTCF-binding silencer regulates the imprinted genes AWT1 and WT1-AS and exhibits sequential epigenetic defects during Wilms' tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Anne L; Brown, Keith W; Moorwood, Kim; Moon, Hanlim; Holmgren, Claes; Mardikar, Sudhanshu H; Dallosso, Anthony R; Klenova, Elena; Loukinov, Dmitri; Ohlsson, Rolf; Lobanenkov, Victor V; Malik, Karim

    2007-02-01

    We have shown previously that AWT1 and WT1-AS are functionally imprinted in human kidney. In the adult kidney, expression of both transcripts is restricted to the paternal allele, with the silent maternal allele retaining methylation at the WT1 antisense regulatory region (WT1 ARR). Here, we report characterization of the WT1 ARR differentially methylated region and show that it contains a transcriptional silencer element acting on both the AWT1 and WT1-AS promoters. DNA methylation of the silencer results in increased transcriptional repression, and the silencer is also shown to be an in vitro and in vivo target site for the imprinting regulator protein CTCF. Binding of CTCF is methylation-sensitive and limited to the unmethylated silencer. Potentiation of the silencer activity is demonstrated after CTCF protein is knocked down, suggesting a novel silencer-blocking activity for CTCF. We also report assessment of WT1 ARR methylation in developmental and tumour tissues, including the first analysis of Wilms' tumour precursor lesions, nephrogenic rests. Nephrogenic rests show increases in methylation levels relative to foetal kidney and reductions relative to the adult kidney, together with biallelic expression of AWT1 and WT1-AS. Notably, the methylation status of CpG residues within the CTCF target site appears to distinguish monoallelic and biallelic expression states. Our data suggest that failure of methylation spreading at the WT1 ARR early in renal development, followed by imprint erasure, occurs during Wilms' tumourigenesis. We propose a model wherein imprinting defects at chromosome 11p13 may contribute to Wilms' tumourigenesis. PMID:17210670

  4. An Essential Viral Transcription Activator Modulates Chromatin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gibeault, Rebecca L.; Bildersheim, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Although ICP4 is the only essential transcription activator of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), its mechanisms of action are still only partially understood. We and others propose a model in which HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized as a cellular defense to inhibit HSV-1 transcription. To counteract silencing, HSV-1 would have evolved proteins that prevent or destabilize chromatinization to activate transcription. These proteins should act as HSV-1 transcription activators. We have shown that HSV-1 genomes are organized in highly dynamic nucleosomes and that histone dynamics increase in cells infected with wild type HSV-1. We now show that whereas HSV-1 mutants encoding no functional ICP0 or VP16 partially enhanced histone dynamics, mutants encoding no functional ICP4 did so only minimally. Transient expression of ICP4 was sufficient to enhance histone dynamics in the absence of other HSV-1 proteins or HSV-1 DNA. The dynamics of H3.1 were increased in cells expressing ICP4 to a greater extent than those of H3.3. The dynamics of H2B were increased in cells expressing ICP4, whereas those of canonical H2A were not. ICP4 preferentially targets silencing H3.1 and may also target the silencing H2A variants. In infected cells, histone dynamics were increased in the viral replication compartments, where ICP4 localizes. These results suggest a mechanism whereby ICP4 activates transcription by disrupting, or preventing the formation of, stable silencing nucleosomes on HSV-1 genomes. PMID:27575707

  5. Silencing defense pathways in Arabidopsis by heterologous gene sequences from Brassica oleracea enhances the performance of a specialist and a generalist herbivorous insect.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Si-Jun; Zhang, Peng-Jun; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2011-08-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway and defensive secondary metabolites such as glucosinolates are generally considered to play central roles in the defense of brassicaceous plants against herbivorous insects. To determine the function of specific plant genes in plant-insect interactions, signaling or biosynthetic mutants are needed. However, mutants are not yet available for brassicaceous plants other than Arabidopsis thaliana, e.g., cabbage (Brassica oleracea). We employed virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) by using tobacco rattle virus (TRV) to knock down the endogenous expression of lipoxygenase (LOX), an upstream enzyme of the JA pathway and thioglucoside glucohydrolase: myrosinase (TGG1/TGG2), a hydrolytic enzyme that catalyzes the release of defensive volatile products originating from glucosinolates, in Arabidopsis thaliana. This was done by using the heterologous gene sequences from B. oleracea. Silencing these genes in A. thaliana plants is efficient and specific. Only 18 nucleotides with 100% identity between the trigger (BoMYR) and the target (AtTGG1/2) sequence are sufficient to achieve gene silencing. LOX-silenced plants showed significantly reduced AtLOX2 transcript accumulation after Pieris rapae larval feeding. TGG-silenced plants exhibited significantly lower TGG1/TGG2 transcript levels only after shorter larval feeding. The inhibition of TGG1/TGG2 transcript accumulation via gene silencing may be overruled by longer larval feeding. Specialist P. rapae larvae developed significantly better on both types of silenced plants than on empty vector (EV) control plants, while generalist Mamestra brassicae larvae developed significantly better on the TGG1/TGG2 silenced plants than on EV control plants. This shows that not only the generalist herbivore but also the Brassicaceae-specialist P. rapae is negatively affected by the ability of brassicaceous plants to produce their specific secondary metabolites, i.e., glucosinolates. Our results

  6. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4−CD8− thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4−CD8− cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  7. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4(-)CD8(-) thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4(-)CD8(-) cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  8. Variations in hypovirus interactions with the fungal-host RNA-silencing antiviral-defense response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemin; Shi, Diane; Nuss, Donald L

    2012-12-01

    Hypoviruses Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV-1)/EP713, CHV-1/Euro7, and CHV-1/EP721, which infect the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, differ in their degrees of virulence attenuation (hypovirulence), symptom expression, and viral RNA accumulation, even though they share between 90% and 99% amino acid sequence identity. In this report we examine whether this variability is influenced by interactions with the C. parasitica Dicer gene dcl2-dependent RNA-silencing antiviral defense response. The mild symptoms exhibited by strains infected with CHV-1/Euro7 and CHV-1/EP721 relative to those with severe hypovirus CHV-1/EP713 did not correlate with a higher induction of the RNA-silencing pathway. Rather, dcl2 transcripts accumulated to a higher level (∼8-fold) following infection by CHV-1/EP713 than following infection by CHV-1/Euro7 (1.2-fold) or CHV-1/EP721 (1.4-fold). The differences in dcl2 transcript accumulation in response to CHV-1/EP713 and CHV-1/EP721 were unrelated to the suppressor of RNA silencing, p29, encoded by the two viruses. Moreover, the coding strand viral RNA levels increased by 33-, 32-, and 16-fold for CHV-1/EP713, CHV-1/Euro7, and CHV-1/EP721, respectively, in Δdcl2 mutant strains. This indicates that a very robust antiviral RNA-silencing response was induced against all three viruses, even though significant differences in the levels of dcl2 transcript accumulation were observed. Unexpectedly, the severe debilitation previously reported for CHV-1/EP713-infected Δdcl2 mutant strains, and observed here for the CHV-1/Euro7-infected Δdcl2 mutant strains, was not observed with infection by CHV-1/EP721. By constructing chimeric viruses containing portions of CHV-1/EP713 and CHV-1/EP721, it was possible to map the region that is associated with the severe debilitation of the Δdcl2 mutant hosts to a 4.1-kb coding domain located in the central part of the CHV-1/EP713 genome. PMID:22993160

  9. DsRNA-mediated silencing of Nudix hydrolase in Trichinella spiralis inhibits the larval invasion and survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai Bing; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhong Quan; Long, Shao Rong; Liu, Ruo Dan; Zhang, Xi; Yang, Wei; Ren, Hui Jun; Cui, Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) during the larval invasion of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), development and survival in host by RNAi. The TsNd-specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was designed to silence the expression of TsNd in T. spiralis larvae. DsRNA were delivered to the larvae by soaking incubation or electroporation. Silencing effect of TsNd transcription and expression was determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The infectivity of larvae treated with dsRNA was investigated by the in vitro larval invasion of IECs and experimental infection in mice. After being soaked with 40 ng/μl of dsRNA-TsNd, the transcription and expression level of TsNd gene was inhibited 65.8% and 56.4%, respectively. After being electroporated with 40 ng/μl of dsRNA-TsNd, the transcription and expression level of TsNd gene was inhibited 74.2% and 58.2%, respectively. Silencing TsNd expression by both soaking and electroporation inhibited significantly the larval invasion of IECs in a dose-dependent manner (r1 = -0.96798, r2 = -0.98707). Compared with the mice inoculated with untreated larvae, mice inoculated with larvae soaked with TsNd dsRNA displayed a 49.9% reduction in adult worms and 39.9% reduction in muscle larvae, while mice inoculated with larvae electroporated with TsNd dsRNA displayed a 83.4% reduction in adult worms and 69.5% reduction in muscle larvae, indicating that electroporation has a higher efficiency than soaking in inhibiting the larval development and survival in mice. Our results showed that silencing TsNd expression in T. spiralis inhibited significantly the larval invasion and survival in host. PMID:26778819

  10. S1 domain-containing STF modulates plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Soon Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    • In this study, we examined the biochemical and physiological functions of Nicotiana benthamiana S1 domain-containing Transcription-Stimulating Factor (STF) using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), cosuppression, and overexpression strategies. • STF : green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein colocalized with sulfite reductase (SiR), a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein also present in the stroma. Full-length STF and its S1 domain preferentially bound to RNA, probably in a sequence-nonspecific manner. • STF silencing by VIGS or cosuppression resulted in severe leaf yellowing caused by disrupted chloroplast development. STF deficiency significantly perturbed plastid-encoded multimeric RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcript accumulation. Chloroplast transcription run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of PEP-dependent plastid genes was reduced in the STF-silenced leaves. Conversely, the exogenously added recombinant STF protein increased the transcription rate, suggesting a direct role of STF in plastid transcription. Etiolated seedlings of STF cosuppression lines showed defects in the light-triggered transition from etioplasts to chloroplasts, accompanied by reduced light-induced expression of plastid-encoded genes. • These results suggest that STF plays a critical role as an auxiliary factor of the PEP transcription complex in the regulation of plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in higher plants. PMID:22050604

  11. Analysis of Tospovirus NSs Proteins in Suppression of Systemic Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Hedil, Marcio; Sterken, Mark G.; de Ronde, Dryas; Lohuis, Dick; Kormelink, Richard

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing is a sequence-specific gene regulation mechanism that in plants also acts antiviral. In order to counteract antiviral RNA silencing, viruses have evolved RNA silencing suppressors (RSS). In the case of tospoviruses, the non-structural NSs protein has been identified as the RSS. Although the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) tospovirus NSs protein has been shown to exhibit affinity to long and small dsRNA molecules, its ability to suppress the non-cell autonomous part of RNA silencing has only been studied to a limited extent. Here, the NSs proteins of TSWV, groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV), representatives for three distinct tospovirus species, have been studied on their ability and strength to suppress local and systemic silencing. A system has been developed to quantify suppression of GFP silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana 16C lines, to allow a comparison of relative RNA silencing suppressor strength. It is shown that NSs of all three tospoviruses are suppressors of local and systemic silencing. Unexpectedly, suppression of systemic RNA silencing by NSsTYRV was just as strong as those by NSsTSWV and NSsGRSV, even though NSsTYRV was expressed in lower amounts. Using the system established, a set of selected NSsTSWV gene constructs mutated in predicted RNA binding domains, as well as NSs from TSWV isolates 160 and 171 (resistance breakers of the Tsw resistance gene), were analyzed for their ability to suppress systemic GFP silencing. The results indicate another mode of RNA silencing suppression by NSs that acts further downstream the biogenesis of siRNAs and their sequestration. The findings are discussed in light of the affinity of NSs for small and long dsRNA, and recent mutant screen of NSsTSWV to map domains required for RSS activity and triggering of Tsw-governed resistance. PMID:26275304

  12. Increasing the amylose content of durum wheat through silencing of the SBEIIa genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High amylose starch has attracted particular interest because of its correlation with the amount of Resistant Starch (RS) in food. RS plays a role similar to fibre with beneficial effects for human health, providing protection from several diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Amylose content can be modified by a targeted manipulation of the starch biosynthetic pathway. In particular, the inactivation of the enzymes involved in amylopectin synthesis can lead to the increase of amylose content. In this work, genes encoding starch branching enzymes of class II (SBEIIa) were silenced using the RNA interference (RNAi) technique in two cultivars of durum wheat, using two different methods of transformation (biolistic and Agrobacterium). Expression of RNAi transcripts was targeted to the seed endosperm using a tissue-specific promoter. Results Amylose content was markedly increased in the durum wheat transgenic lines exhibiting SBEIIa gene silencing. Moreover the starch granules in these lines were deformed, possessing an irregular and deflated shape and being smaller than those present in the untransformed controls. Two novel granule bound proteins, identified by SDS-PAGE in SBEIIa RNAi lines, were investigated by mass spectrometry and shown to have strong homologies to the waxy proteins. RVA analysis showed new pasting properties associated with high amylose lines in comparison with untransformed controls. Finally, pleiotropic effects on other starch genes were found by semi-quantitative and Real-Time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Conclusion We have found that the silencing of SBEIIa genes in durum wheat causes obvious alterations in granule morphology and starch composition, leading to high amylose wheat. Results obtained with two different methods of transformation and in two durum wheat cultivars were comparable. PMID:20626919

  13. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Falcicchia, Chiara; Trempat, Pascal; Binaschi, Anna; Perrier-Biollay, Coline; Roncon, Paolo; Soukupova, Marie; Berthommé, Hervé; Simonato, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies. PMID:26954758

  14. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    PubMed Central

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A.; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5′-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  15. Epigenetic silencing of the XAF1 gene is mediated by the loss of CTCF binding

    PubMed Central

    Victoria-Acosta, Georgina; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Jimenez-Hernandez, Luis; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Maldonado, Vilma; Martinez-Ruiz, Gustavo Ulises; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    XAF1 is a tumour suppressor gene that compromises cell viability by modulating different cellular events such as mitosis, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In cancer, the XAF1 gene is commonly silenced by CpG-dinucleotide hypermethylation of its promoter. DNA demethylating agents induce transcriptional reactivation of XAF1, sensitizing cancer cells to therapy. The molecular mechanisms that mediate promoter CpG methylation have not been previously studied. Here, we demonstrate that CTCF interacts with the XAF1 promoter in vivo in a methylation-sensitive manner. By transgene assays, we demonstrate that CTCF mediates the open-chromatin configuration of the XAF1 promoter, inhibiting both CpG-dinucleotide methylation and repressive histone posttranslational modifications. In addition, the absence of CTCF in the XAF1 promoter inhibits transcriptional activation induced by well-known apoptosis activators. We report for the first time that epigenetic silencing of the XAF1 gene is a consequence of the loss of CTCF binding. PMID:26443201

  16. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-05-22

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5'-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  17. Nuclear positional control of HIV transcription in 4D

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Somdutta; Dieudonné, Mariacarolina

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses integrate their genome into the chromatin of the host cell and are subject to the same control mechanisms governing transcription in the nucleus. There is increasing evidence that the spatial position of a gene within the nucleus in time affects its activity. Therefore it becomes important to study the chromatin environment in space and time of the HIV-1 provirus, particularly in cells where a tight transcriptional control allows the virus to hide away from antiviral treatment and immune response. We recently showed that the HIV-1 provirus is found at the nuclear periphery of latently infected lymphocytes associated in trans with centromeric heterochromatin. After induction of transcription, this association was lost, although the location of the transcribing provirus remained peripheral. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of transcriptional silencing involved in HIV-1 post-transcriptional latency and open wider perspectives for the general organization of chromatin in the nucleus. PMID:21327098

  18. Silencing cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) identifies CYR61 as a tumor suppressor gene in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dobroff, Andrey S; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-09-18

    Metastatic progression of melanoma is associated with overexpression and activity of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). However, the mechanism by which CREB contributes to tumor progression and metastasis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that stably silencing CREB expression in two human metastatic melanoma cell lines, A375SM and C8161-c9, suppresses tumor growth and experimental metastasis. Analysis of cDNA microarrays revealed that CREB silencing leads to increased expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/CYR61) known to mediate adhesion, chemostasis, survival, and angiogenesis. Promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that CREB acts as a negative regulator of CCN1/CYR61 transcription by directly binding to its promoter. Re-expression of CREB in CREB-silenced cells rescued the low CCN1/CYR61 expression phenotype. CCN1/CYR61 overexpression resulted in reduced tumor growth and metastasis and inhibited the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Furthermore, its overexpression decreased melanoma cell motility and invasion through Matrigel, which was abrogated by silencing CCN1/CYR61 in low metastatic melanoma cells. Moreover, a significant decrease in angiogenesis as well as an increase in apoptosis was seen in tumors overexpressing CCN1/CYR61. Our results demonstrate that CREB promotes melanoma growth and metastasis by down-regulating CCN1/CYR61 expression, which acts as a suppressor of melanoma cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:19632997

  19. Silencing cAMP-response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Identifies CYR61 as a Tumor Suppressor Gene in Melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic progression of melanoma is associated with overexpression and activity of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). However, the mechanism by which CREB contributes to tumor progression and metastasis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that stably silencing CREB expression in two human metastatic melanoma cell lines, A375SM and C8161-c9, suppresses tumor growth and experimental metastasis. Analysis of cDNA microarrays revealed that CREB silencing leads to increased expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/CYR61) known to mediate adhesion, chemostasis, survival, and angiogenesis. Promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that CREB acts as a negative regulator of CCN1/CYR61 transcription by directly binding to its promoter. Re-expression of CREB in CREB-silenced cells rescued the low CCN1/CYR61 expression phenotype. CCN1/CYR61 overexpression resulted in reduced tumor growth and metastasis and inhibited the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Furthermore, its overexpression decreased melanoma cell motility and invasion through Matrigel, which was abrogated by silencing CCN1/CYR61 in low metastatic melanoma cells. Moreover, a significant decrease in angiogenesis as well as an increase in apoptosis was seen in tumors overexpressing CCN1/CYR61. Our results demonstrate that CREB promotes melanoma growth and metastasis by down-regulating CCN1/CYR61 expression, which acts as a suppressor of melanoma cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:19632997

  20. Silencing of vacuolar invertase and asparagine synthetase genes and its impact on acrylamide formation of fried potato products.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobiao; Gong, Huiling; He, Qunyan; Zeng, Zixian; Busse, James S; Jin, Weiwei; Bethke, Paul C; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Acrylamide is produced in a wide variety of carbohydrate-rich foods during high-temperature cooking. Dietary acrylamide is a suspected human carcinogen, and health concerns related to dietary acrylamide have been raised worldwide. French fries and potato chips contribute a significant proportion to the average daily intake of acrylamide, especially in developed countries. One way to mitigate health concerns related to acrylamide is to develop potato cultivars that have reduced contents of the acrylamide precursors asparagine, glucose and fructose in tubers. We generated a large number of silencing lines of potato cultivar Russet Burbank by targeting the vacuolar invertase gene VInv and the asparagine synthetase genes StAS1 and StAS2 with a single RNA interference construct. The transcription levels of these three genes were correlated with reducing sugar (glucose and fructose) and asparagine content in tubers. Fried potato products from the best VInv/StAS1/StAS2-triple silencing lines contained only one-fifteenth of the acrylamide content of the controls. Interestingly, the extent of acrylamide reduction of the best triple silencing lines was similar to that of the best VInv-single silencing lines developed previously from the same potato cultivar Russet Burbank. These results show that an acrylamide mitigation strategy focused on developing potato cultivars with low reducing sugars is likely to be an effective and sufficient approach for minimizing the acrylamide-forming potential of French fry processing potatoes. PMID:26079224

  1. Selective silencing of gene target expression by siRNA expression plasmids in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; De-la-O-Gómez, Faustino; Deas, Jessica; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Fierros-Zárate, Geny Del Socorro; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is a natural mechanism to silence post-transcriptional gene expression in eukaryotic cells in which microRNAs act to cleave or halt the translation of target mRNAs at specific target sequences. Mature microRNAs, 19-25 nucleotides in length, mediate their effect at the mRNA level by inhibiting translation, or inducing cleavage of the mRNA target. This process is directed by the degree of complementary nucleotides between the microRNAs and the target mRNA; perfect complementary base pairing induces cleavage of mRNA, whereas several mismatches lead to translational arrest. Biological effects of microRNAs can be manipulated through the use of small interference RNAs (siRNAs) generated by chemical synthesis, or by cloning in molecular vectors. The cloning of a DNA insert in a molecular vector that will be transcribed into the corresponding siRNAs is an approach that has been developed using siRNA expression plasmids. These vectors contain DNA inserts designed with software to generate highly efficient siRNAs which will assemble into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC), and silence the target mRNA. In addition, the DNA inserts may be contained in cloning cassettes, and introduced in other molecular vectors. In this chapter we describe an attractive technology platform to silence cellular gene expression using specific siRNA expression plasmids, and evaluate its biological effect on target gene expression in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25348304

  2. Construction of effective inverted repeat silencing constructs using sodium bisulfite treatment coupled with strand-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sarah H; Harmse, Johan; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Van Den Berg, Fiona; Weinberg, Marco S; Rey, Marie E C

    2012-04-01

    RNA silencing has been exploited to produce transgenic plants with resistance to viral pathogens via posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In some cases, this technology is difficult to apply due to the instability of inverted repeat (IR) constructs during cloning and plant transformation. Although such constructs have been shown to be stabilized with introns and efficiently induce RNA silencing, we found that the Pdk intron did not stabilize South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV) silencing constructs. Therefore, we developed a method for producing long SACMV IR constructs through bisulfite-induced base pair mismatches on the sense arm prior to IR assembly. Expression of SACMV BC1 mismatched IR constructs in the model test plant Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in a reduction in viral BC1 transcript levels, hence viral replication, upon SACMV infection. Mismatched SACMV AC1 IR constructs induced PTGS more efficiently in a N. benthamiana callus system than nonmismatched IR constructs. Our novel method for IR construct generation should be applicable to many sequences where the generation of these constructs has proven difficult in the past. PMID:22482441

  3. Temperature trend biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  4. Echoes of Silence: Empathy and Making Connections through Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    On April 25, 2008, students on college and public school campuses collectively committed to a vow of silence commemorating an event known as the National Day of Silence. This student-generated, nationwide action theatrically "speaks out" in solidarity with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people who for one reason or another fear…

  5. A Time for Silence: Booker T. Washington in Atlanta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the rhetoric of silence as an alternative to participation in a discussion of social issues, particularly when participation confirms the efforts of those who seek social control. Concludes that Booker T. Washington should have employed the strategy of silence when invited to address an exposition in Atlanta in 1895. (JMF)

  6. Hearing the Silence: Acknowledging the Voice of My Latina Sisters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Vogt, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Latina community college students experience a number of challenges during their transition to college. Findings from a larger study indicated that Latina community college students experienced racism and stereotyping on campus responding with silence. Silence occurred in two ways: (1) Latinas were forced to be silent, and/or (2) Latinas chose to…

  7. Discourses that Silence: Teachers and Anti-Lesbian Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferfolja, Tania

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the way lesbian identities are silenced in schools particularly through anti-lesbian harassment. Based on research with 30 self-identified lesbian teachers working across high schools in New South Wales, Australia, the discussion illustrates how various responses to anti-lesbian harassment silence the recognition of such…

  8. Silence in the Second Language Classrooms of Japanese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Japanese language learners' proclivity for silence has been alluded to by various writers (e.g. Anderson 1993; Korst 1997; Greer 2000) and is supported by plenty of anecdotal evidence, but large-scale, empirical studies aimed at measuring the extent of macro-level silence within Japanese university L2 classrooms are notably lacking. This article…

  9. Deriving Silence through Dependent Reference: Focus on Pronouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livitz, Inna G.

    2014-01-01

    The starting point of this dissertation is the observation that pronouns that are obligatorily dependent on a sufficiently local antecedent are persistently silent. The classical hypothesis has been that silence is a lexical property of such elements. The central claim of this dissertation is that silence is instead a product of syntax--of the way…

  10. Self-Silencing and Rejection Sensitivity in Adolescent Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Melinda S.; Dickson, Joseph W.; Welsh, Deborah P.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the link between rejection sensitivity, self-silencing behaviors, and depressive symptomatology among adolescent dating couples. Self-silencing was hypothesized to be the process mediating the association between rejection sensitivity and depressive symptoms. Our sample included 211 couples between 14 and 21 who were dating at…

  11. The Question of Silence: Techniques to Ensure Full Class Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Stephanie M.

    1988-01-01

    Law school professors have a responsibility to monitor student participation and silence in the classroom, to consider why some students are silent, and to examine their role in contributing to that silence. A variety of techniques are available to encourage participation. (MSE)

  12. Silenced by Sex: Hard Truths & Taboos in Teaching Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Shelby A.; Maniotes, Leslie K.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the silencing of young voices, both on and off the page, because of sexual trauma and even sexual curiosity. Considers the novel, "Speak," in which the protagonist's silence stems from the fact that she was raped. Explores two other literary texts that center on sexual issues for young teens. (SG)

  13. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Ornametal Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  14. Reflections on the Silencing the Self Scale and Its Origins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Dana Crowley

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the Silencing the Self Scale (STSS) and blends her personal and professional thoughts about self-silencing, gender, and depression. For her, the despair of depression deeply involves questions of value and meaning, culture and freedom. The STSS grew from listening to depressed women's voices. From them, the…

  15. Virus-Induced gene silencing in ornamental plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  16. An electronically tunable duct silencer using dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenbo; Godaba, Hareesh; Cui, Yongdong; Foo, Choon Chiang; Debiasi, Marco; Zhu, Jian

    2015-09-01

    A duct silencer with tunable acoustic characteristics is presented in this paper. Dielectric elastomer, a smart material with lightweight, high elastic energy density and large deformation under high direct current/alternating current voltages, was used to fabricate this duct silencer. The acoustic performances and tunable mechanisms of this duct silencer were experimentally investigated. It was found that all the resonance peaks of this duct silencer could be adjusted using external control signals without any additional mechanical part. The physics of the tunable mechanism is further discussed based on the electro-mechanical interactions using finite element analysis. The present promising results also provide insight into the appropriateness of the duct silencer for possible use as next generation acoustic treatment device to replace the traditional acoustic treatment. PMID:26428819

  17. Silencing suppressors: viral weapons for countering host cell defenses.

    PubMed

    Song, Liping; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Yanjun; Zhou, Ling; Huang, Wenlin

    2011-04-01

    RNA silencing is a conserved eukaryotic pathway involved in the suppression of gene expression via sequence-specific interactions that are mediated by 21-23 nt RNA molecules. During infection, RNAi can act as an innate immune system to defend against viruses. As a counter-defensive strategy, silencing suppressors are encoded by viruses to inhibit various stages of the silencing process. These suppressors are diverse in sequence and structure and act via different mechanisms. In this review, we discuss whether RNAi is a defensive strategy in mammalian host cells and whether silencing suppressors can be encoded by mammalian viruses. We also review the modes of action proposed for some silencing suppressors. PMID:21528352

  18. A Stem Cell-Like Chromatin Pattern May Predispose Tumor Suppressor Genes to DNA Hypermethylation and Silencing in Adult Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ohm, Joyce E.; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Yu, Xiaobing; Cheng, Linzhao; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Cope, Leslie; Mohammad, Helai P.; Chen, Wei; Daniel, Vincent C.; Yu, Wayne; Berman, David M.; Jenuwein, Thomas; Pruitt, Kevin; Sharkis, Saul J.; Watkins, D. Neil; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Adult cancers may derive from stem or early progenitor cells1,2. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression is essential for normal function of these early cells, but is highly abnormal in cancers, which often exhibit aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes and pro-differentiation factors3-5. We find that, for such genes, both normal and malignant embryonic cells generally lack the gene DNA hypermethylation found in adult cancers. In embryonic stem (ES) cells, these genes are held in a “transcription ready” state mediated by a “bivalent” promoter chromatin pattern consisting of the repressive polycomb group (PcG) H3K27me mark plus the active mark, H3K4me. However, embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells add two key repressive marks, H3K9me2 and H3K9me3, both associated with DNA hypermethylated genes in adult cancers6-8. We hypothesize that cell chromatin patterns and transient silencing of these important growth regulatory genes in stem or progenitor cells of origin for cancer may leave these genes vulnerable to aberrant DNA hypermethylation and heritable gene silencing in adult tumors. PMID:17211412

  19. Transient down-regulation of the RNA silencing machinery increases efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bilichak, Andriy; Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2014-06-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that is widely used in plant transformation. As the process of transgenesis includes the delivery of single-stranded T-DNA molecule, we hypothesized that transformation rate may negatively correlate with the efficiency of the RNA-silencing machinery. Using mutants compromised in either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene-silencing pathways, two inhibitors of stable transformation were revealed-AGO2 and NRPD1a. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation experiment has shown that NRPD1, a subunit of Pol IV, directly interacts with Agrobacterium T-DNA in planta. Using the Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)--based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique, we demonstrated that the transient down-regulation of the expression of either AGO2 or NRPD1a genes in reproductive organs of Arabidopsis, leads to an increase in transformation rate. We observed a 6.0- and 3.5-fold increase in transformation rate upon transient downregulation of either AGO2 or NRPD1a genes, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the increase in the plant transformation rate via VIGS-mediated transient down-regulation of the components of epigenetic machinery in reproductive tissue. PMID:24472037

  20. Functional Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Kokhran Virus/Cotton Leaf Curl Multan Betasatellite RNA Silencing Suppressors.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Briddon, Rob W; Dalakouras, Athanasios; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In South Asia, Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is caused by a complex of phylogenetically-related begomovirus species and a specific betasatellite, Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB). The post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) suppression activities of the transcriptional activator protein (TrAP), C4, V2 and βC1 proteins encoded by Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV)/CLCuMuB were assessed in Nicotiana benthamiana. A variable degree of local silencing suppression was observed for each viral protein tested, with V2 protein exhibiting the strongest suppression activity and only the C4 protein preventing the spread of systemic silencing. The CLCuKoV-encoded TrAP, C4, V2 and CLCuMuB-encoded βC1 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. TrAP was shown to bind various small and long nucleic acids including single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) RNA and DNA molecules. C4, V2, and βC1 bound ssDNA and dsDNA with varying affinities. Transgenic expression of C4 under the constitutive 35S Cauliflower mosaic virus promoter and βC1 under a dexamethasone inducible promoter induced severe developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana. The results indicate that homologous proteins from even quite closely related begomoviruses may differ in their suppressor activity and mechanism of action. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:26512705

  1. Functional Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Kokhran Virus/Cotton Leaf Curl Multan Betasatellite RNA Silencing Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Muhammad; Briddon, Rob W.; Dalakouras, Athanasios; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In South Asia, Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is caused by a complex of phylogenetically-related begomovirus species and a specific betasatellite, Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB). The post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) suppression activities of the transcriptional activator protein (TrAP), C4, V2 and βC1 proteins encoded by Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV)/CLCuMuB were assessed in Nicotiana benthamiana. A variable degree of local silencing suppression was observed for each viral protein tested, with V2 protein exhibiting the strongest suppression activity and only the C4 protein preventing the spread of systemic silencing. The CLCuKoV-encoded TrAP, C4, V2 and CLCuMuB-encoded βC1 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. TrAP was shown to bind various small and long nucleic acids including single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) RNA and DNA molecules. C4, V2, and βC1 bound ssDNA and dsDNA with varying affinities. Transgenic expression of C4 under the constitutive 35S Cauliflower mosaic virus promoter and βC1 under a dexamethasone inducible promoter induced severe developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana. The results indicate that homologous proteins from even quite closely related begomoviruses may differ in their suppressor activity and mechanism of action. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:26512705

  2. HDA6 Directly Interacts with DNA Methyltransferase MET1 and Maintains Transposable Element Silencing in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuncheng; Yu, Chun-Wei; Duan, Jun; Luo, Ming; Wang, Koching; Tian, Gang; Cui, Yuhai; Wu, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of how the histone deacetylase HDA6 participates in maintaining transposable element (TE) silencing in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is not yet defined. In this study, we show that a subset of TEs was transcriptionally reactivated and that TE reactivation was associated with elevated histone H3 and H4 acetylation as well as increased H3K4Me3 and H3K4Me2 in hda6 mutants. Decreased DNA methylation of the TEs was also detected in hda6 mutants, suggesting that HDA6 silences the TEs by regulating histone acetylation and methylation as well as the DNA methylation status of the TEs. Similarly, transcripts of some of these TEs were also increased in the methyltransferase1 (met1) mutant, with decreased DNA methylation. Furthermore, H4 acetylation, H3K4Me3, H3K4Me2, and H3K36Me2 were enriched at the coregulated TEs in the met1 and hda6 met1 mutants. Protein-protein interaction analysis indicated that HDA6 physically interacts with MET1 in vitro and in vivo, and further deletion analysis demonstrated that the carboxyl-terminal region of HDA6 and the bromo-adjacent homology domain of MET1 were responsible for the interaction. These results suggested that HDA6 and MET1 interact directly and act together to silence TEs by modulating DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and histone methylation status. PMID:21994348

  3. Evaluating the ability of the barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing system to simultaneously silence two wheat genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  4. Evaluating the Ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing System to Simultaneously Silence Two Wheat Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  5. Negativity bias and basic values.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Shalom H

    2014-06-01

    Basic values explain more variance in political attitudes and preferences than other personality and sociodemographic variables. The values most relevant to the political domain are those likely to reflect the degree of negativity bias. Value conflicts that represent negativity bias clarify differences between what worries conservatives and liberals and suggest that relations between ideology and negativity bias are linear. PMID:24970450

  6. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  7. Test Bias and the Elimination of Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of test bias are discussed: content bias, atmosphere bias, and use bias. Use bias is considered the most important. Tests reflect the bias in society, and eliminating test bias means eliminating racism and sexism in society. A six-stage model to eliminate racism and sexism is presented. (Author)

  8. Antisense Gene Silencing: Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Troels T.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how the technique is exploited in a pre-clinical and clinical perspective in relation to neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24705213

  9. Altered Nucleosome Positioning at the Transcription Start Site and Deficient Transcriptional Initiation in Friedreich Ataxia*

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Costello, Whitney N.; Lam, Christina; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2014-01-01

    Most individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) are homozygous for an expanded GAA triplet repeat (GAA-TR) mutation in intron 1 of the FXN gene, which results in deficiency of FXN transcript. Consistent with the expanded GAA-TR sequence as a cause of variegated gene silencing, evidence for heterochromatin has been detected in intron 1 in the immediate vicinity of the expanded GAA-TR mutation in FRDA. Transcriptional deficiency in FRDA is thought to result from deficient elongation through the expanded GAA-TR sequence because of repeat-proximal heterochromatin and abnormal DNA structures adopted by the expanded repeat. There is also evidence for deficient transcriptional initiation in FRDA, but its relationship to the expanded GAA-TR mutation remains unclear. We show that repressive chromatin extends from the expanded GAA-TR in intron 1 to the upstream regions of the FXN gene, involving the FXN transcriptional start site. Using a chromatin accessibility assay and a high-resolution nucleosome occupancy assay, we found that the major FXN transcriptional start site, which is normally in a nucleosome-depleted region, is rendered inaccessible by altered nucleosome positioning in FRDA. Consistent with the altered epigenetic landscape the FXN gene promoter, a typical CpG island promoter, was found to be in a transcriptionally non-permissive state in FRDA. Both metabolic labeling of nascent transcripts and an unbiased whole transcriptome analysis revealed a severe deficiency of transcriptional initiation in FRDA. Deficient transcriptional initiation, and not elongation, is the major cause of FXN transcriptional deficiency in FRDA, and it is related to the spread of repressive chromatin from the expanded GAA-TR mutation. PMID:24737321

  10. Reversible epigenetic fingerprint-mediated glutathione-S-transferase P1 gene silencing in human leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Karius, Tommy; Schnekenburger, Michael; Ghelfi, Jenny; Walter, Jörn; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2011-06-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) gene is commonly silenced by CpG island promoter hypermethylation in prostate, breast, and liver cancers. However, mechanisms leading to GSTP1 repression by promoter hypermethylation in leukemia and its relationship with pathological alterations of the chromatin structure remain poorly understood. A panel of leukemia cell lines was analyzed for their GSTP1 expression, revealing cell lines with high, moderate or no detectable GSTP1 expression. Bisulfite sequencing, methylation-specific PCR and combined bisulfite restriction analysis revealed that GSTP1 promoter was completely methylated in transcriptionally inactive RAJI and MEG-01 cell lines. In contrast, cell lines expressing GSTP1 exhibited an unmethylated and transcriptionally active promoter. Furthermore, histone marks and effector proteins associated with transcriptional activity were detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation in the GSTP1 expressing hypomethylated K-562 cell line. However, repressive chromatin marks and the recruitment of silencing protein complexes were found in the non-expressing hypermethylated RAJI and MEG-01 cell lines. Finally, we provide evidence that treatment of RAJI and MEG-01 cells with the DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, resulted in GSTP1 promoter demethylation, drastic changes of histone modifications and promoter associated proteins and GSTP1 gene activation. In contrast, treatments with HDAC inhibitors failed to demethylate and reactivate the GSTP1 gene. Our study extends the knowledge on leukemia-specific epigenetic alterations of GSTP1 gene. Furthermore, we are showing the correlation of DNA methylation and histone modifications with the positive/negative GSTP1 transcriptional expression state. Finally, these data support the concept of the dominance of DNA methylation over HDAC inhibitor-sensitive histone deacetylation in gene silencing. PMID:21453686

  11. Slug silencing inhibited perineural invasion through regulation of EMMPRIN expression in human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baolei; Wei, Jianhua; Hu, Zhiqiang; Shan, Chun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Chenping; Yang, Xi; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin

    2016-02-01

    Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is the most frequent salivary gland malignancy with a unique characteristic that has been named perineural invasion (PNI). EMMPRIN is a transmembrane glycoprotein that has been demonstrated to promote PNI in SACC. Slug, one of the most effective promoters of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), has been found to be associated with PNI in SACC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles and relationships of Slug, EMMPRIN, and E-cadherin in the PNI process of SACC. The expression levels of Slug, EMMPRIN, and E-cadherin in 115 primary SACC cases were statistically analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Simultaneously, the SACC cell line SACC-83 was transfected with recombinant plasmids of silencing Slug (si-Slug) and/or silencing EMMPRIN (si-EMMPRIN). The functions of Slug and EMMPRIN in the EMT and PNI process were assessed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), western blotting, morphological observation, scratch test, migration assay, and in vitro perineural invasion assay. The immunohistochemical statistics revealed that the high expression of Slug and EMMPRIN and the low expression of E-cadherin were significantly associated with the PNI of SACC (P < 0.05). Slug expression was significantly associated with EMMPRIN expression (P < 0.05), and Slug expression and EMMPRIN expression were both significantly negatively associated with E-cadherin expression (P < 0.05). Slug and EMMPRIN silencing both significantly inhibited EMMPRIN expression but promoted E-cadherin expression in SACC-83 cells (P < 0.01). The series of in vitro assays revealed that silencing of Slug, EMMPRIN, or both induced cell morphology changes and inhibited tumor cell motility and PNI ability in SACC-83 cells (P < 0.01). These results suggested that Slug silencing could inhibit the EMT process by downregulating EMMPRIN and then upregulating E-cadherin in the PNI process of SACC. The present study indicated that Slug

  12. Occupying chromatin: Polycomb mechanisms for getting to genomic targets, stopping transcriptional traffic, and staying put

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jeffrey A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Polycomb repressive complexes are conserved chromatin regulators with key roles in multicellular development, stem cell biology, and cancer. New findings advance molecular understanding of how they target to sites of action, interact with and alter local chromatin to silence genes, and maintain silencing in successive generations of proliferating cells. Chromatin modification by Polycomb proteins provides an essential strategy for gene silencing in higher eukaryotes. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) silence many key developmental regulators and are centrally integrated in the transcriptional circuitry of embryonic and adult stem cells. PRC2 trimethylates histone H3 on lysine-27 (H3-K27me3) and PRC1-type complexes ubiquitylate histone H2A and compact polynucleosomes. How PRCs and these signature activities are deployed to select and silence genomic targets is the subject of intense current investigation. We review recent advances on targeting, modulation, and functions of PRC1 and PRC2, and we consider progress on defining transcriptional steps impacted in Polycomb silencing. Key recent findings demonstrate PRC1 targeting independent of H3-K27me3 and emphasize nonenzymatic PRC1-mediated compaction. We also evaluate expanding connections between Polycomb machinery and non-coding RNAs. Exciting new studies supply the first systematic analyses of what happens to Polycomb complexes, and associated histone modifications, during the wholesale chromatin reorganizations that accompany DNA replication and mitosis. The stage is now set to reveal fundamental epigenetic mechanisms that determine how Polycomb target genes are silenced and how Polycomb silence is preserved through cell cycle progression. PMID:23473600

  13. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  14. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  15. Highly activated RNA silencing via strong induction of dicer by one virus can interfere with the replication of an unrelated virus

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Sotaro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Viruses often coinfect single host organisms in nature. Depending on the combination of viruses in such coinfections, the interplay between them may be synergistic, apparently neutral with no effect on each other, or antagonistic. RNA silencing is responsible for many cases of interference or cross-protection between viruses, but such antagonistic interactions are usually restricted to closely related strains of the same viral species. In this study, we present an unprecedented example of RNA silencing-mediated one-way interference between unrelated viruses in a filamentous model fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica. The replication of Rosellinia necatrix victorivirus 1 (RnVV1; Totiviridae) was strongly impaired by coinfection with the prototypic member of the genus Mycoreovirus (MyRV1) or a mutant of the prototype hypovirus (Cryphonectria hypovirus 1, CHV1) lacking the RNA silencing suppressor (CHV1-Δp69). This interference was associated with marked transcriptional induction of key genes in antiviral RNA silencing, dicer-like 2 (dcl2) and argonaute-like 2 (agl2), following MyRV1 or CHV1-Δp69 infection. Interestingly, the inhibition of RnVV1 replication was reproduced when the levels of dcl2 and agl2 transcripts were elevated by transgenic expression of a hairpin construct of an endogenous C. parasitica gene. Disruption of dcl2 completely abolished the interference, whereas that of agl2 did not always lead to its abolishment, suggesting more crucial roles of dcl2 in antiviral defense. Taken altogether, these results demonstrated the susceptible nature of RnVV1 to the antiviral silencing in C. parasitica activated by distinct viruses or transgene-derived double-stranded RNAs and provide insight into the potential for broad-spectrum virus control mediated by RNA silencing. PMID:26283371

  16. Highly activated RNA silencing via strong induction of dicer by one virus can interfere with the replication of an unrelated virus.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Sotaro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Viruses often coinfect single host organisms in nature. Depending on the combination of viruses in such coinfections, the interplay between them may be synergistic, apparently neutral with no effect on each other, or antagonistic. RNA silencing is responsible for many cases of interference or cross-protection between viruses, but such antagonistic interactions are usually restricted to closely related strains of the same viral species. In this study, we present an unprecedented example of RNA silencing-mediated one-way interference between unrelated viruses in a filamentous model fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica. The replication of Rosellinia necatrix victorivirus 1 (RnVV1; Totiviridae) was strongly impaired by coinfection with the prototypic member of the genus Mycoreovirus (MyRV1) or a mutant of the prototype hypovirus (Cryphonectria hypovirus 1, CHV1) lacking the RNA silencing suppressor (CHV1-Δp69). This interference was associated with marked transcriptional induction of key genes in antiviral RNA silencing, dicer-like 2 (dcl2) and argonaute-like 2 (agl2), following MyRV1 or CHV1-Δp69 infection. Interestingly, the inhibition of RnVV1 replication was reproduced when the levels of dcl2 and agl2 transcripts were elevated by transgenic expression of a hairpin construct of an endogenous C. parasitica gene. Disruption of dcl2 completely abolished the interference, whereas that of agl2 did not always lead to its abolishment, suggesting more crucial roles of dcl2 in antiviral defense. Taken altogether, these results demonstrated the susceptible nature of RnVV1 to the antiviral silencing in C. parasitica activated by distinct viruses or transgene-derived double-stranded RNAs and provide insight into the potential for broad-spectrum virus control mediated by RNA silencing. PMID:26283371

  17. Evaluating solutions to sponsorship bias.

    PubMed

    Doucet, M; Sismondo, S

    2008-08-01

    More than 40 primary studies, and three recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, have shown a clear association between pharmaceutical industry funding of clinical trials and pro-industry results. Industry sponsorship biases published scientific research in favour of the sponsors, a result of the strong interest commercial sponsors have in obtaining favourable results. Three proposed remedies to this problem are widely agreed upon among those concerned with the level of sponsorship bias: financial disclosure, reporting standards and trial registries. This paper argues that all of these remedies either fail to address the mechanisms by which pharmaceutical companies' sponsorship leads to biased results-design bias, multiple trials with predictable outcomes, fraud, rhetorical effects and publication bias-or else only inadequately address those mechanisms. As a result, the policies normally proposed for dealing with sponsorship bias are unable to eliminate it. Only completely separating public clinical research from pharmaceutical industry funding can eliminate sponsorship bias. PMID:18667655

  18. Bioinformatics tools for achieving better gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoz; Dai, Xinbin; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is one of the most popular and effective molecular technologies for knocking down the expression of an individual gene of interest in living organisms. Yet the technology still faces the major issue of nonspecific gene silencing, which can compromise gene functional characterization and the interpretation of phenotypes associated with individual gene knockdown. Designing an effective and target-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) for induction of RNAi is therefore the major challenge in RNAi-based gene silencing. A 'good' siRNA molecule must possess three key features: (a) the ability to specifically silence an individual gene of interest, (b) little or no effect on the expressions of unintended siRNA gene targets (off-target genes), and (c) no cell toxicity. Although several siRNA design and analysis algorithms have been developed, only a few of them are specifically focused on gene silencing in plants. Furthermore, current algorithms lack a comprehensive consideration of siRNA specificity, efficacy, and nontoxicity in siRNA design, mainly due to lack of integration of all known rules that govern different steps in the RNAi pathway. In this review, we first describe popular RNAi methods that have been used for gene silencing in plants and their serious limitations regarding gene-silencing potency and specificity. We then present novel, rationale-based strategies in combination with computational and experimental approaches to induce potent, specific, and nontoxic gene silencing in plants. PMID:25740355

  19. The effect of eccentricity and spatiotemporal energy on motion silencing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Lark Kwon; Bovik, Alan C; Cormack, Lawrence K

    2016-03-01

    The now well-known motion-silencing illusion has shown that salient changes among a group of objects' luminances, colors, shapes, or sizes may appear to cease when objects move rapidly (Suchow & Alvarez, 2011). It has been proposed that silencing derives from dot spacing that causes crowding, coherent changes in object color or size, and flicker frequencies combined with dot spacing (Choi, Bovik, & Cormack, 2014; Peirce, 2013; Turi & Burr, 2013). Motion silencing is a peripheral effect that does not occur near the point of fixation. To better understand the effect of eccentricity on motion silencing, we measured the amount of motion silencing as a function of eccentricity in human observers using traditional psychophysics. Fifteen observers reported whether dots in any of four concentric rings changed in luminance over a series of rotational velocities. The results in the human experiments showed that the threshold velocity for motion silencing almost linearly decreases as a function of log eccentricity. Further, we modeled the response of a population of simulated V1 neurons to our stimuli. We found strong matches between the threshold velocities on motion silencing observed in the human experiment and those seen in the energy model of Adelson and Bergen (1985). We suggest the plausible explanation that as eccentricity increases, the combined motion-flicker signal falls outside the narrow spatiotemporal frequency response regions of the modeled receptive fields, thereby reducing flicker visibility. PMID:27019052

  20. Silencing of a Germin-Like Gene in Nicotiana attenuata Improves Performance of Native Herbivores1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yonggen; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2006-01-01

    Germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are known to function in pathogen resistance, but their involvement in defense against insect herbivores is poorly understood. In the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, attack from the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta or elicitation by adding larval oral secretions (OS) to wounds up-regulates transcripts of a GLP. To understand the function of this gene, which occurs as a single copy, we cloned the full-length NaGLP and silenced its expression in N. attenuata by expressing a 250-bp fragment in an antisense orientation with an Agrobacterium-based transformation system and by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Homozygous lines harboring a single insert and VIGS plants had significantly reduced constitutive (measured in roots) and elicited NaGLP transcript levels (in leaves). Silencing NaGLP improved M. sexta larval performance and Tupiocoris notatus preference, two native herbivores of N. attenuata. Silencing NaGLP also attenuated the OS-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), diterpene glycosides, and trypsin proteinase inhibitor responses, which may explain the observed susceptibility of antisense or VIGS plants to herbivore attack and increased nicotine contents, but did not influence the OS-elicited jasmonate and salicylate bursts, or the release of the volatile organic compounds (limonene, cis-α-bergamotene, and germacrene-A) that function as an indirect defense. This suggests that NaGLP is involved in H2O2 production and might also be related to ethylene production and/or perception, which in turn influences the defense responses of N. attenuata via H2O2 and ethylene-signaling pathways. PMID:16461381

  1. The siRNA-mediated silencing of Trichinella spiralis nudix hydrolase results in reduction of larval infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Quan; Zhang, Shuai Bing; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Ruo Dan; Long, Shao Rong; Zhang, Xi; Ren, Hui Jun; Cui, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) bound to intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), and vaccination of mice with rTsNd or TsNd DNA produced a partial protective immunity against T. spiralis infection. In this study, three TsNd specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) were designed to silence the expression of TsNd in T. spiralis larvae. SiRNAs were delivered to the larvae by electroporation. Silencing effect of TsNd transcription and expression was determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The infectivity of the larvae treated with siRNA was investigated by the in vitro larval invasion of IECs and experimental infection in mice. The results showed that siRNAs were efficiently delivered into T. spiralis larvae through electroporation. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that transcription and expression level of TsNd gene was inhibited 73.3 and 76.7 %, respectively, after being electroporated with 2 μM of siRNA-275 for 1 day. Silencing TsNd expression inhibited significantly the larval invasion of IECs (P < 0.01) and was in a dose-dependent manner (r = -0.97941). The mice with infected larvae treated with TsNd siRNA displayed a 63.6 % reduction in intestinal adult worms and 68.8 % reduction in muscle larval burden compared with mice infected with control siRNA-treated larvae. Our results showed that silencing TsNd expression in T. spiralis significantly reduced the larval infectivity and survival in host. PMID:26231837

  2. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  3. RNA binding proteins implicated in Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

    PubMed

    Moindrot, Benoit; Brockdorff, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome silencing by Xist RNA occurs in two steps; localisation in cis within the nuclear matrix to form a domain that corresponds to the territory of the inactive X chromosome elect, and transduction of silencing signals from Xist RNA to the underlying chromatin. Key factors that mediate these processes have been identified in a series of recent studies that harnessed comprehensive proteomic or genetic screening strategies. In this review we discuss these findings in light of prior knowledge both of Xist-mediated silencing and known functions/properties of the novel factors. PMID:26816113

  4. A mitotic transcriptional switch in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verdeguer, Francisco; Corre, Stephanie Le; Fischer, Evelyne; Callens, Celine; Garbay, Serge; Doyen, Antonia; Igarashi, Peter; Terzi, Fabiola; Pontoglio, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β(HNF-1β) is a transcription factor required for the expression of several renal cystic genes and whose prenatal deletion leads to polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1. We show here that inactivation of Hnf1b from postnatal day 10 onward does not elicit cystic dilations in tubules after their proliferative morphogenetic elongation is over. Cystogenic resistance is intrinsically linked to the quiescent state of cells. In fact, when Hnf1b deficient quiescent cells are forced to proliferate by an ischemiareperfusion injury, they give rise to cysts, owing to loss of oriented cell division. Remarkably, in quiescent cells, the transcription of crucial cystogenic target genes is maintained even in the absence of HNF-1β. However, their expression is lost as soon as cells proliferate and the chromatin of target genes acquires heterochromatin marks. These results unveil a previously undescribed aspect of gene regulation. It is well established that transcription is shut off during the mitotic condensation of chromatin2,3. We propose that transcription factors such as HNF-1β might be involved in reprogramming gene expression after transcriptional silencing is induced by mitotic chromatin condensation. Notably, HNF-1β remains associated with the mitotically condensed chromosomal barrels. This association suggests that HNF-1β is a bookmarking factor that is necessary for reopening the chromatin of target genes after mitotic silencing. PMID:19966811

  5. Highly Efficient Virus-induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) in California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica): An Evaluation of VIGS as a Strategy to Obtain Functional Data from Non-model Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Stefanie; Scholz, Andrea; Gleissberg, Stefan; Becker, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Eschscholzia californica (California poppy) is an emerging model plant for ‘evo–devo’ studies from the basal eudicot clade of Papaveraceae. California poppy has a relatively small genome, a short life cycle and, most importantly, it is amenable for transformation. However, since this transformation protocol is time consuming, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was evaluated as a fast method to obtain functional data for California poppy genes. Methods Commercially available California poppy plants were infiltrated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the tobacco rattle virus plasmids pTRV1 and pTRV2. pTRV2 contained part of the eschscholzia Phytoene Desaturase (EcPDS) gene whose loss of function results in photobleaching of the green parts of the plant and in a lack of floral coloration. The degree and duration of these symptoms was evaluated for vegetative rosettes and plants in flower. Key Results It is shown that VIGS is able to effectively down-regulate the EcPDS gene in eschscholzia. Various degrees of silencing were observed starting <2 weeks after infiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens in 92 % of the plants. Tissue with silencing symptoms also showed complete or strong reduction of EcPDS transcripts. Strong silencing resulted in almost completely white petals, fruits, shoots and leaves. Plants with a strong degree of silencing will eventually die off; however, others are able to produce EcPDS gene product even after a strong initial silencing and will recover. Silencing was found to be not always systemic, but was often restricted to certain organs or parts of organs. Conclusions VIGS is an effective, fast and transient method to down-regulate gene expression in eschscholzia. It serves well to detect prominent phenotypes which may become obvious even if some target gene transcript remains in the plant tissue. However, subtle phenotypes will be more difficult to detect, as extremely strong silencing effects occur in <10 % of

  6. The Silenced Language of Abandoned Brazilian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Edelyn Schweidson

    1995-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out with homeless children in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, which sought to engage the fantasies of these children by telling them fairy tales that reflected their ordeal and by asking them to make up stories to tell puppets in distressing situations. The article contains a lengthy appendix with transcripts of…

  7. The Effects of Vocational High School Teachers' Perceived Trust on Organizational Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Aycan Çiçek

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to reveal the effects of vocational school teachers' perceived organizational trust on organizational silence. For this purpose, at first teachers' perception on sub-dimensions of organizational silence and organizational trust, which are respectively "acquiescent silence," "defensive silence,"…

  8. Temperature-Responsive Gene Silencing by a Smart Polymer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-03-16

    Intracellular siRNA release is a crucial step in efficient gene silencing mediated by cationic polymers. Here, we show an example of temperature change-induced intracellular siRNA release and silencing using a temperature-responsive polymer consisting of dendrimer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and phenylboronic acid. The smart polymer can trigger the release of loaded siRNA in a controlled manner upon cooling the surrounding solution below its lower critical solution temperature. Gene silencing efficacy of the polymer was significantly increased by cool treatment after its cellular uptake. The polymer and the cool treatment cause minimal toxicity to the transfected cells. The results provide a facile and promising strategy to design stimuli-responsive polymers for efficient gene silencing. PMID:26783999

  9. Mutations in Ran system affected telomere silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Naoyuki Kobayashi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Murakami, Seishi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    2007-11-23

    The Ran GTPase system regulates the direction and timing of several cellular events, such as nuclear-cytosolic transport, centrosome formation, and nuclear envelope assembly in telophase. To gain insight into the Ran system's involvement in chromatin formation, we investigated gene silencing at the telomere in several mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had defects in genes involved in the Ran system. A mutation of the RanGAP gene, rna1-1, caused reduced silencing at the telomere, and partial disruption of the nuclear Ran binding factor, yrb2-{delta}2, increased this silencing. The reduced telomere silencing in rna1-1 cells was suppressed by a high dosage of the SIR3 gene or the SIT4 gene. Furthermore, hyperphosphorylated Sir3 protein accumulated in the rna1-1 mutant. These results suggest that RanGAP is required for the heterochromatin structure at the telomere in budding yeast.

  10. Silencing of meiosis-critical genes for engineering male sterility in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiping; Singer, Stacy D; Liu, Zongrang

    2012-04-01

    The potential for pollen-mediated transgene flow into wild or closely related species has provoked unease in terms of transgenic modification of agricultural plant species. One approach to remedy this situation in species whose seeds and fruits are not of particular value is to engineer male sterility into the transgenic lines. In this study, three meiosis-critical genes, namely AHP2, AtRAD51C and SWITCH1 (SWI), were chosen as silencing targets to test the feasibility of incorporating sterility into plants using an RNAi-based approach. Our results indicated that the silencing of each of these genes via hairpin RNA (termed AHPi, RAD51Ci and SWIi lines) in Arabidopsis thaliana yielded a proportion of transgenic plants exhibiting a similar 'partially sterile' phenotype in which less than 50% of pollen was viable. In addition, a 'sterile' phenotype was also evident in a minority of RAD51Ci and SWIi, but not AHPi, lines in which plants yielded no seeds and either produced inviable pollen (RAD51Ci lines) or displayed a complete absence of pollen (SWIi lines). This suggests that AtRAD51C and SWI may function at distinct stages of meiosis. Further analyses of SWIi lines demonstrated that the 'sterile' phenotype was associated with a substantial reduction in the level of targeted gene transcript in floral tissues and resulted from sterility of the male, but not female gametes. This work demonstrates that generating male sterility through the silencing of key genes involved in the regulation of meiosis is feasible, and its advantages and potential applications for transgene containment are discussed. PMID:22120011

  11. Ericifolin: a novel antitumor compound from allspice that silences androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lokeshwar, Bal L.

    2013-01-01

    Silencing of androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a specific and effective mechanism to cure cancer of the prostate (CaP). In this study, the isolation and characterization of a compound from the aromatic berries of Pimenta dioica (allspice) that silences AR is presented. Potential antitumor activities of an aqueous allspice extract (AAE) and a compound purified from the extract were tested on CaP cells. AAE inhibited tumor cell proliferation and colony formation (50% growth inhibition ∼40–85 µg/ml) but not the viability of quiescent normal fibroblasts or non-tumorigenic prostate cells. In tumor cells, AAE inhibited cell cycle progression at G1/S, induced apoptosis or autophagy. Apoptosis was by caspase-dependent poly (ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage. A caspase-independent, apoptosis-inducing factor-mediated mechanism of apoptosis caused cell death in castration-resistant AR-positive or AR-negative CaP cells, such as CWR22RV1, PC-3 or DU145 cells. Treatment with AAE decreased the levels of AR messenger RNA (mRNA), protein and silenced AR activity in AR-positive cells. AR depletion was due to inhibition of AR promoter activity and mRNA stability. Delayed tumor growth (~55%) without measurable systemic toxicity was observed in LNCaP tumor-bearing mice treated with AAE by oral or intraperitoneal routes. LNCaP tumor tissues from AAE-treated mice revealed increased apoptosis as a potential mechanism of antitumor activity of AAE. The chemical identity of bioactive compound in AAE was established through multistep high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, mass and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopies. The compound, eugenol 5-O-β-(6′-galloylglucopyranoside) or ericifolin (EF), showed antiproliferative, pro-apoptosis and anti-AR transcription activities. These results demonstrate a potential use of AAE and EF against prostate cancer. PMID:23568956

  12. miR-196b Is Epigenetically Silenced during the Premalignant Stage of Lung Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Carmen S; Juri, Daniel E; Do, Kieu; Picchi, Maria A; Wang, Teresa; Liu, Gang; Spira, Avrum; Belinsky, Steven A

    2016-08-15

    miRNA silencing by promoter hypermethylation may represent a mechanism by which lung cancer develops and progresses, but the miRNAs involved during malignant transformation are unknown. We previously established a model of premalignant lung cancer wherein we treated human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) with low doses of tobacco carcinogens. Here, we demonstrate that next-generation sequencing of carcinogen-transformed HBECs treated with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine revealed miR-196b and miR-34c-5p to be epigenetic targets. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed dense promoter hypermethylation indicative of silencing in multiple malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies further demonstrated an enrichment in repressive histone marks on the miR-196b promoter during HBEC transformation. Restoration of miR-196b expression by transfecting transformed HBECs with specific mimics led to cell-cycle arrest mediated in part through transcriptional regulation of the FOS oncogene, and miR-196b reexpression also significantly reduced the growth of tumor xenografts. Luciferase assays demonstrated that forced expression of miR-196b inhibited the FOS promoter and AP-1 reporter activity. Finally, a case-control study revealed that methylation of miR-196b in sputum was strongly associated with lung cancer (OR = 4.7, P < 0.001). Collectively, these studies highlight miR-196b as a tumor suppressor whose silencing early in lung carcinogenesis may provide a selective growth advantage to premalignant cells. Targeted delivery of miR-196b could therefore serve as a preventive or therapeutic strategy for the management of lung cancer. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4741-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302168

  13. Integrated Analysis of Dysregulated miRNA-gene Expression in HMGA2-silenced Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Nalini; Deepa, PR; Vasudevan, Madavan; Khetan, Vikas; Reddy, Ashwin M; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a primary childhood eye cancer. HMGA2 shows promise as a molecule for targeted therapy. The involvement of miRNAs in genome-level molecular dys-regulation in HMGA2-silenced RB cells is poorly understood. Through miRNA expression microarray profiling, and an integrated array analysis of the HMGA2-silenced RB cells, the dysregulated miRNAs and the miRNA-target relationships were modelled. Loop network analysis revealed a regulatory association between the transcription factor (SOX5) and the deregulated miRNAs (miR-29a, miR-9*, miR-9-3). Silencing of HMGA2 deregulated the vital oncomirs (miR-7, miR-331, miR-26a, miR-221, miR-17~92 and miR-106b∼25) in RB cells. From this list, the role of the miR-106b∼25 cluster was examined further for its expression in primary RB tumor tissues (n = 20). The regulatory targets of miR-106b∼25 cluster namely p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor) and BIM (pro-apoptotic gene) were elevated, and apoptotic cell death was observed, in RB tumor cells treated with the specific antagomirs of the miR-106b∼25 cluster. Thus, suppression of miR-106b∼25 cluster controls RB tumor growth. Taken together, HMGA2 mediated anti-tumor effect present in RB is, in part, mediated through the miR-106b∼25 cluster. PMID:25232279

  14. PKC Activation Counteracts ADAM10 Deficit in HuD-Silenced Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Nicoletta; Amadio, Marialaura; Colombrita, Claudia; Govoni, Stefano; Ratti, Antonia; Pascale, Alessia

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal ELAV/Hu (nELAV) are RNA-binding proteins that mainly regulate gene expression by increasing the stability and/or translation rate of target mRNAs bearing ARE (adenine and uracil-rich elements) sequences. Among nELAV target transcripts there is ADAM10, an α-secretase involved in the non-amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) which leads to the production of the neuroprotective sAβPPα peptide. The aim of this study was to evaluate if nELAV depletion affects ADAM10 expression in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We also studied the effects of Bryostatin-1, a molecule able to activate nELAV protein cascade. The specific HuD/nELAV gene silencing decreased both nELAV and ADAM10 protein contents; similar results were obtained by Aβ40 treatment in wild-type SH-SY5Y cells. In HuD-silenced cells, the exposure to Bryostatin-1 counteracted both nELAV and ADAM10 proteins downregulation, by restoring nELAV/ADAM10 basal levels. We also found that sAβPPα release, which seemed not to be compromised by Aβ40 challenge or HuD-silencing, was favored by Bryostatin-1. Overall, these findings strongly suggest that a deficiency in nELAV content negatively affects ADAM10 expression and may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases, which may benefit by molecules activating ELAV cascade. PMID:27472877

  15. Improved design of PPRHs for gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Villalobos, Xenia; Solé, Anna; Lliberós, Carolina; Ciudad, Carlos J; Noé, Véronique

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, the modulation of gene expression by nucleic acids has become a routine tool in biomedical research for target validation and it is also used to develop new therapeutic approaches. Recently, we developed the so-called polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs) that show high stability and a low immunogenic profile and we demonstrated their efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we explored different characteristics of PPRHs to improve their usage as a tool for gene silencing. We studied the role of PPRH length in the range from 20 to 30 nucleotides. We also proved their higher affinity of binding and efficacy on cell viability compared to nonmodified TFOs. To overcome possible off-target effects, we tested wild-type PPRHs, which proved to be capable of binding to their target sequence with more affinity, displaying a higher stability of binding and a higher effect in terms of cell viability. Moreover, we developed a brand new molecule called Wedge-PPRH with the ability to lock the ds-DNA into the displaced structure and proved its efficacy in prostate and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:25615267

  16. The Chp1–Tas3 core is a multifunctional platform critical for gene silencing by RITS

    SciTech Connect

    Schalch, Thomas; Job, Godwin; Shanker, Sreenath; Partridge, Janet F.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2011-11-13

    RNA interference (RNAi) is critical for the assembly of heterochromatin at Schizosaccharomyces pombe centromeres. Central to this process is the RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing (RITS) complex, which physically anchors small noncoding RNAs to chromatin. RITS includes Ago1, the chromodomain protein Chp1, and Tas3, which forms a bridge between Chp1 and Ago1. Chp1 is a large protein with no recognizable domains, apart from its chromodomain. Here we describe how the structured C-terminal half of Chp1 binds the Tas3 N-terminal domain, revealing the tight association of Chp1 and Tas3. The structure also shows a PIN domain at the C-terminal tip of Chp1 that controls subtelomeric transcripts through a post-transcriptional mechanism. We suggest that the Chp1–Tas3 complex provides a solid and versatile platform to recruit both RNAi-dependent and RNAi-independent gene-silencing pathways for locus-specific regulation of heterochromatin.

  17. HoxB domain induction silences DNA replication origins in the locus and specifies a single origin at its boundary.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Damien; Brodolin, Konstantin; Méchali, Marcel

    2006-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, changes in the DNA replication programme could act to integrate differentiation with cell division in various developmental and transcriptional contexts. Here, we have addressed the use of DNA replication origins during differentiation in the HoxB domain-a cluster of nine genes developmentally regulated in a collinear manner. In undifferentiated mouse P19 cells, we detected several DNA replication origins in the 100 kb HoxB locus, indicating a relaxed origin use when the locus is transcriptionally silent. By contrast, in retinoic-acid-induced differentiated cells, when HoxB transcription is activated, a general silencing of DNA replication origins occurs in the locus except one located downstream of Hoxb1, at the 3' boundary of the HoxB domain. Silencing of the replication origins is associated with histone hyperacetylation, whereas the active Hoxb1 origin persists as a hypoacetylated island. These findings provide direct evidence for the differentiated use of origins in HoxB genes, and we suggest that this regulation might contribute to the regulated expression of HoxB genes during development. PMID:16845368

  18. A is for aphorism - the power of silence.

    PubMed

    Kreijkamp-Kaspers, Sanne; Glasziou, Paul

    2012-11-01

    'All you have to do is listen' is the title of Rob Kapilow's delightful book on classical music; but he could equally have been talking about general practice consultations. Listening requires several skills including attention, echoing and body language, but begins with silence. Well timed silences, used judiciously, can allow the patient adequate space to express symptoms and concerns, while allowing the general practitioner more time for attention, comprehension and synthesis. PMID:23145428

  19. RNA Silencing Is Resistant to Low-Temperature in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Romon, Marjorie; Soustre-Gacougnolle, Isabelle; Schmitt, Carine; Perrin, Mireille; Burdloff, Yannick; Chevalier, Elodie; Mutterer, Jérome; Himber, Christophe; Zervudacki, Jérôme; Montavon, Thomas; Zimmermann, Aude; Elmayan, Taline; Vaucheret, Hervé; Dunoyer, Patrice; Masson, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    RNA silencing is a natural defence mechanism against viruses in plants, and transgenes expressing viral RNA-derived sequences were previously shown to confer silencing-based enhanced resistance against the cognate virus in several species. However, RNA silencing was shown to dysfunction at low temperatures in several species, questioning the relevance of this strategy in perennial plants such as grapevines, which are often exposed to low temperatures during the winter season. Here, we show that inverted-repeat (IR) constructs trigger a highly efficient silencing reaction in all somatic tissues in grapevines. Similarly to other plant species, IR-derived siRNAs trigger production of secondary transitive siRNAs. However, and in sharp contrast to other species tested to date where RNA silencing is hindered at low temperature, this process remained active in grapevine cultivated at 4°C. Consistently, siRNA levels remained steady in grapevines cultivated between 26°C and 4°C, whereas they are severely decreased in Arabidopsis grown at 15°C and almost undetectable at 4°C. Altogether, these results demonstrate that RNA silencing operates in grapevine in a conserved manner but is resistant to far lower temperatures than ever described in other species. PMID:24376561

  20. Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B silencing induces DNA damage response via STAT3 pathway in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Fu, L; Kong, X; Xu, J; Wang, Z; Ma, X; Akiyama, Y; Chen, Y; Fang, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B (JMJD2B), directly targeted by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, maintains the histone methylation balance important for the transcriptional activation of many oncogenes. Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B has been implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression; however, the mechanism remains unclear. Methods: Immunofluorescence and western blotting detected phosphorylated histone H2AX, characteristic of double-strand breaks, and comet assay was used to investigate DNA damage, in CRC cells after JMJD2B small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. We assessed the resulting in vitro responses, that is, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and senescence coupled with JMJD2B silencing-induced DNA damage, studying the regulatory role of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). The JMJD2B silencing anti-cancer effect was determined using an in vivo CRC xenograft model. Results: Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B knockdown induced DNA damage via ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related pathway activation, resulting in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence in both normoxia and hypoxia. Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 suppression by JMJD2B silencing enhanced DNA damage. Intratumoural injection of JMJD2B siRNA suppressed tumour growth in vivo and activated the DNA damage response (DDR). Conclusions: Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B has an essential role in cancer cell survival and tumour growth via DDR mediation, which STAT3 partially regulates, suggesting that JMJD2B is a potential anti-cancer target. PMID:24473398

  1. Silencing of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II by Kruppel-like factor 14 underscores the importance of a negative feedback mechanism in TGFbeta signaling.

    PubMed

    Truty, Mark J; Lomberk, Gwen; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Urrutia, Raul

    2009-03-01

    The role of non-Smad proteins in the regulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling is an emerging line of active investigation. Here, we characterize the role of KLF14, as a TGFbeta-inducible, non-Smad protein that silences the TGFbeta receptor II (TGFbetaRII) promoter. Together with endocytosis, transcriptional silencing is a critical mechanism for down-regulating TGFbeta receptors at the cell surface. However, the mechanisms underlying transcriptional repression of these receptors remain poorly understood. KLF14 has been chosen from a comprehensive screen of 24 members of the Sp/KLF family due to its TGFbeta inducibility, its ability to regulate the TGFbetaRII promoter, and the fact that this protein had yet to be functionally characterized. We find that KLF14 represses the TGFbetaRII, a function that is augmented by TGFbeta treatment. Mapping of the TGFbetaRII promoter, in combination with site-directed mutagenesis, electromobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, have identified distinct GC-rich sequences used by KLF14 to regulate this promoter. Mechanistically, KLF14 represses the TGFbetaRII promoter via a co-repressor complex containing mSin3A and HDAC2. Furthermore, the TGFbeta pathway activation leads to recruitment of a KLF14-mSin3A-HDAC2 repressor complex to the TGFbetaRII promoter, as well as the remodeling of chromatin to increase histone marks that associate with transcriptional silencing. Thus, these results describe a novel negative-feedback mechanism by which TGFbetaRII activation at the cell surface induces the expression of KLF14 to ultimately silence the TGFbetaRII and further expand the network of non-Smad transcription factors that participate in the TGFbeta pathway. PMID:19088080

  2. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  3. Simultaneous Silencing of Two Arginine Decarboxylase Genes Alters Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rangel, Diana; Chávez-Martínez, Ana I.; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Maruri-López, Israel; Urano, Kaoru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are small aliphatic polycations that are found ubiquitously in all organisms. In plants, PAs are involved in diverse biological processes such as growth, development, and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the arginine decarboxylase enzymes (ADC1 and 2) catalyze the first step of PA biosynthesis. For a better understanding of PA biological functions, mutants in PA biosynthesis have been generated; however, the double adc1/adc2 mutant is not viable in A. thaliana. In this study, we generated non-lethal A. thaliana lines through an artificial microRNA that simultaneously silenced the two ADC genes (amiR:ADC). The generated transgenic lines (amiR:ADC-L1 and -L2) showed reduced AtADC1 and AtADC2 transcript levels. For further analyses the amiR:ADC-L2 line was selected. We found that the amiR:ADC-L2 line showed a significant decrease of their PA levels. The co-silencing revealed a stunted growth in A. thaliana seedlings, plantlets and delay in its flowering rate; these phenotypes were reverted with PA treatment. In addition, amiR:ADC-L2 plants displayed two seed phenotypes, such as yellow and brownish seeds. The yellow mutant seeds were smaller than adc1, adc2 mutants and wild type seeds; however, the brownish were the smallest seeds with arrested embryos at the torpedo stage. These data reinforce the importance of PA homeostasis in the plant development processes. PMID:27014322

  4. Simultaneous Silencing of Two Arginine Decarboxylase Genes Alters Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rangel, Diana; Chávez-Martínez, Ana I; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A; Maruri-López, Israel; Urano, Kaoru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are small aliphatic polycations that are found ubiquitously in all organisms. In plants, PAs are involved in diverse biological processes such as growth, development, and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the arginine decarboxylase enzymes (ADC1 and 2) catalyze the first step of PA biosynthesis. For a better understanding of PA biological functions, mutants in PA biosynthesis have been generated; however, the double adc1/adc2 mutant is not viable in A. thaliana. In this study, we generated non-lethal A. thaliana lines through an artificial microRNA that simultaneously silenced the two ADC genes (amiR:ADC). The generated transgenic lines (amiR:ADC-L1 and -L2) showed reduced AtADC1 and AtADC2 transcript levels. For further analyses the amiR:ADC-L2 line was selected. We found that the amiR:ADC-L2 line showed a significant decrease of their PA levels. The co-silencing revealed a stunted growth in A. thaliana seedlings, plantlets and delay in its flowering rate; these phenotypes were reverted with PA treatment. In addition, amiR:ADC-L2 plants displayed two seed phenotypes, such as yellow and brownish seeds. The yellow mutant seeds were smaller than adc1, adc2 mutants and wild type seeds; however, the brownish were the smallest seeds with arrested embryos at the torpedo stage. These data reinforce the importance of PA homeostasis in the plant development processes. PMID:27014322

  5. Silencing leaf sorbitol synthesis alters long-distance partitioning and apple fruit quality

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Gianni; Suzuki, Yasuo; Uratsu, Sandie L.; Lampinen, Bruce; Ormonde, Nichole; Hu, William K.; DeJong, Ted M.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorbitol and sucrose are major products of photosynthesis distributed in apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. “Greensleeves”) that affect quality in fruit. Transgenic apple plants were silenced or up-regulated for sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by using the CaMV35S promoter to define the role of sorbitol distribution in fruit development. Transgenic plants with suppressed sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compensated by accumulating sucrose and starch in leaves, and morning and midday net carbon assimilation rates were significantly lower. The sorbitol to sucrose ratio in leaves was reduced by ≈90% and in phloem exudates by ≈75%. The fruit accumulated more glucose and less fructose, starch, and malic acid, with no overall differences in weight and firmness. Sorbitol dehydrogenase activity was reduced in silenced fruit, but activities of neutral invertase, vacuolar invertase, cell wall-bound invertase, fructose kinase, and hexokinase were unaffected. Analyses of transcript levels and activity of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism throughout fruit development revealed significant differences in pathways related to sorbitol transport and breakdown. Together, these results suggest that sorbitol distribution plays a key role in fruit carbon metabolism and affects quality attributes such as sugar–acid balance and starch accumulation. PMID:17132742

  6. Nrf2 silencing to inhibit proteolytic defense induced by hyperthermia in HT22 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Nrf2 pathway has been known to be protective against cancer progression however recent studies have revealed that the antioxidant activity of Nrf2 contributes to chemotherapy resistance. For many years, hyperthermia has been used as an additional therapy to increase the efficiency of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Besides the positive effects of hyperthermia during treatment procedure, thermotolerance has been found to develop against heat treatment. Although the involved molecular mechanisms have not been fully clarified, heat shock proteins (HSP) and proteasome activity are known to be involved in the acquisition of thermotolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential beneficial effects of combining hyperthermia with Nrf2 silencing to inhibit molecular mechanisms leading to induction of defense mechanisms in transcription level. Following heat treatment of HT22 cells, HSP70 and the proteasome levels and as well as proteasome activity were found to be elevated in the nucleus. Our results demonstrated that Nrf2 silencing reduced defense mechanisms against heat treatment both in antioxidant and proteolytic manner and Nrf2 may be a potential target for therapeutic approach in order to improve the beneficial effects of hyperthermia in cancer therapy. PMID:26966891

  7. E protein silencing by the leukemogenic AML1-ETO fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinsong; Kalkum, Markus; Yamamura, Soichiro; Chait, Brian T; Roeder, Robert G

    2004-08-27

    The AML1-ETO fusion protein, generated by the t(8;21) chromosomal translocation, is causally involved in nearly 15% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. This study shows that AML1-ETO, as well as ETO, inhibits transcriptional activation by E proteins through stable interactions that preclude recruitment of p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP) coactivators. These interactions are mediated by a conserved ETO TAF4 homology domain and a 17-amino acid p300/CBP and ETO target motif within AD1 activation domains of E proteins. In t(8;21) leukemic cells, very stable interactions between AML1-ETO and E proteins underlie a t(8;21) translocation-specific silencing of E protein function through an aberrant cofactor exchange mechanism. These studies identify E proteins as AML1-ETO targets whose dysregulation may be important for t(8;21) leukemogenesis, as well as an E protein silencing mechanism that is distinct from that associated with differentiation-inhibitory proteins. PMID:15333839

  8. Galacturonosyltransferase 4 silencing alters pectin composition and carbon partitioning in tomato

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Fabiana; Bermúdez, Luisa; Lira, Bruno Silvestre; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Elbl, Paula; Demarco, Diego; Alseekh, Saleh; Insani, Marina; Buckeridge, Marcos; Almeida, Juliana; Grigioni, Gabriela; Fernie, Alisdair Robert; Carrari, Fernando; Rossi, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Pectin is a main component of the plant cell wall and is the most complex family of polysaccharides in nature. Its composition is essential for the normal growth and morphology pattern, as demonstrated by pectin-defective mutant phenotypes. Besides this basic role in plant physiology, in tomato, pectin structure contributes to very important quality traits such as fruit firmness. Sixty-seven different enzymatic activities have been suggested to be required for pectin biosynthesis, but only a few genes have been identified and studied so far. This study characterized the tomato galacturonosyltransferase (GAUT) family and performed a detailed functional study of the GAUT4 gene. The tomato genome harbours all genes orthologous to those described previously in Arabidopsis thaliana, and a transcriptional profile revealed that the GAUT4 gene was expressed at higher levels in developing organs. GAUT4-silenced tomato plants exhibited an increment in vegetative biomass associated with palisade parenchyma enlargement. Silenced fruits showed an altered pectin composition and accumulated less starch along with a reduced amount of pectin, which coincided with an increase in firmness. Moreover, the harvest index was dramatically reduced as a consequence of the reduction in the fruit weight and number. Altogether, these results suggest that, beyond its role in pectin biosynthesis, GAUT4 interferes with carbon metabolism, partitioning, and allocation. Hence, this cell-wall-related gene seems to be key in determining plant growth and fruit production in tomato. PMID:23599271

  9. Histone chaperone Chz1p regulates H2B ubiquitination and subtelomeric anti-silencing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yakun; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Lin, Chan-Hsien; Arens, Christina E.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Aitchison, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Chz1p is a histone chaperone that interacts physically and functionally with the histone variant Htz1p, which has been implicated in establishing and maintaining boundaries between transcriptionally inactive heterochromatin and active euchromatin. To investigate the role of Chz1p in chromatin organization, we performed genome-wide expression arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitations of SIR complex components and modified histones in a CHZ1 deletion strain. Deletion of CHZ1 led to reduced ubiquitination of subtelomere-associated H2B, reduced subtelomeric H3K79 di-methylation, and increased binding of Sir3p, and Sir4p at telomere-distal euchromatin regions, correlating with decreased gene expression in subtelomeric regions. This anti-silencing defect appears to be mediated by enhanced association of de-ubiquitinase Ubp10p with subtelomeric DNA, as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In support of this, we show that deletion of UBP10 can antagonize the subtelomeric silencing phenotype of Δchz1. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel role for Chz1p in epigenetic regulation, through H2B de-ubiquitination by Ubp10p. PMID:20008511