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Sample records for silicon photon detectors

  1. Advantages of gated silicon single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legré, Matthieu; Lunghi, Tommaso; Stucki, Damien; Zbinden, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    We present gated silicon single photon detectors based on two commercially available avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one customised APD from ID Quantique SA. This customised APD is used in a commercially available device called id110. A brief comparison of the two commercial APDs is presented. Then, the charge persistence effect of all of those detectors that occurs just after a strong illumination is shown and discussed.

  2. Low-resistivity photon-transparent window attached to photo-sensitive silicon detector

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2000-02-15

    The invention comprises a combination of a low resistivity, or electrically conducting, silicon layer that is transparent to long or short wavelength photons and is attached to the backside of a photon-sensitive layer of silicon, such as a silicon wafer or chip. The window is applied to photon sensitive silicon devices such as photodiodes, charge-coupled devices, active pixel sensors, low-energy x-ray sensors and other radiation detectors. The silicon window is applied to the back side of a photosensitive silicon wafer or chip so that photons can illuminate the device from the backside without interference from the circuit printed on the frontside. A voltage sufficient to fully deplete the high-resistivity photosensitive silicon volume of charge carriers is applied between the low-resistivity back window and the front, patterned, side of the device. This allows photon-induced charge created at the backside to reach the front side of the device and to be processed by any circuitry attached to the front side. Using the inventive combination, the photon sensitive silicon layer does not need to be thinned beyond standard fabrication methods in order to achieve full charge-depletion in the silicon volume. In one embodiment, the inventive backside window is applied to high resistivity silicon to allow backside illumination while maintaining charge isolation in CCD pixels.

  3. Silicon microchannel plates: initial results for photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Winn, D. R.

    2000-12-01

    The emergence of Silicon based microchannel plates (MCP's) has been awaited for a number of years, with many proposed advantages over standard glass MCPs for space-based detectors. Si should have a very low inherent background (< 0.01 events sec-1 cm-2), as well as being a low Z element with low stopping power for x, gamma and cosmic rays. The surface is oxidized and can be baked to very high temperatures (> 800 degrees Celsius), and will not react with photocathodes deposited on the surface. This could potentially allow opaque photocathodes, with their higher resolution and efficiency, to be used in the near UV/optical bands. Since the microchannel positions are determined photolithographically, the pattern will be uniform and coherent, resulting in more uniform flat fields and less differential non-linearity in the spatial response. Microchannel spacing could decrease to the micron regime, while size formats could increase. The potential advantages of Si MCPs encompass increased gain, stability, longevity, event rate, and QE. However, glass MCPs have a strong and successful heritage in space-based detector systems and the advantages of Si MCP's must be demonstrated in the laboratory before being considered for flight applications. We have tested some newly developed silicon (Si) MCP's provided by Nanosciences Corp. Although these are still in the developmental stage we have achieved a number of significant results. The gain, pulse height, response and gain uniformity, and quantum detection efficiency are very similar to glass MCP's. However the Si MCP background is approximately 0.02 events sec-1 cm-2 without shielding, a significant improvement over even low noise MCP's. The small samples we have tested are 25 mm format with 8 micrometer pore spacing, but they are taken from a 75 mm substrate, which offers the possibility of large MCP's in the near future. More testing and process development are underway to probe other operational parameters and optimize the

  4. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  5. Spectral perturbations from silicon diode detector encapsulation and shielding in photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Silicon diodes are widely used as detectors for relative dose measurements in radiotherapy. The common manufacturing practice is to encapsulate the diodes in plastic for protection and to facilitate mounting in scanning devices. Diodes intended for use in photon fields commonly also have a shield of a high atomic number material (usually tungsten) integrated into the encapsulation to selectively absorb low-energy photons to which silicon diodes would otherwise over-response. However, new response models based on cavity theories and spectra calculations have been proposed for direct correction of the readout from unshielded (e.g., ''electron'') diodes used in photon fields. This raises the question whether it is correct to assume that the spectrum in a water phantom at the location of the detector cavity is not perturbed by the detector encapsulation materials. The aim of this work is to investigate the spectral effects of typical encapsulations, including shielding, used for clinical diodes. Methods: The effects of detector encapsulation of an unshielded and a shielded commercial diode on the spectra at the detector cavity location are studied through Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE-2005. Variance reduction based on correlated sampling is applied to reduce the CPU time needed for the simulations. Results: The use of correlated sampling is found to be efficient and to not introduce any significant bias to the results. Compared to reference spectra calculated in water, the encapsulation for an unshielded diode is demonstrated to not perturb the spectrum, while a tungsten shielded diode caused not only the desired decrease in low-energy scattered photons but also a large increase of the primary electron fluence. Measurements with a shielded diode in a 6 MV photon beam proved that the shielding does not completely remove the field-size dependence of the detector response caused by the over-response from low-energy photons. Response factors of a properly

  6. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray CT scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose, and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes claimed to be unsuitable for use in computed tomography because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that high-quality energy-resolved CT images can nonetheless be acquired with clinically realistic exposure parameters using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. We use basis material decomposition to obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  7. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  8. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  9. Count rate performance of a silicon-strip detector for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Grönberg, F.; Sjölin, M.; Karlsson, S.; Danielsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    A silicon-strip detector is developed for spectral computed tomography. The detector operates in photon-counting mode and allows pulse-height discrimination with 8 adjustable energy bins. In this work, we evaluate the count-rate performance of the detector in a clinical CT environment. The output counts of the detector are measured for x-ray tube currents up to 500 mA at 120 kV tube voltage, which produces a maximum photon flux of 485 Mphotons/s/mm2 for the unattenuated beam. The corresponding maximum count-rate loss of the detector is around 30% and there are no saturation effects. A near linear relationship between the input and output count rates can be observed up to 90 Mcps/mm2, at which point only 3% of the input counts are lost. This means that the loss in the diagnostically relevant count-rate region is negligible. A semi-nonparalyzable dead-time model is used to describe the count-rate performance of the detector, which shows a good agreement with the measured data. The nonparalyzable dead time τn for 150 evaluated detector elements is estimated to be 20.2±5.2 ns.

  10. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  11. Fast digitization and discrimination of prompt neutron and photon signals using a novel silicon carbide detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon W. Blackburn; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; David L. Chichester; James L. Jones; Frank H. Ruddy; John G. Seidel; Robert W. Flammang

    2007-04-01

    Current requirements of some Homeland Security active interrogation projects for the detection of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) necessitate the development of faster inspection and acquisition capabilities. In order to do so, fast detectors which can operate during and shortly after intense interrogation radiation flashes are being developed. Novel silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor Schottky diodes have been utilized as robust neutron and photon detectors in both pulsed photon and pulsed neutron fields and are being integrated into active inspection environments to allow exploitation of both prompt and delayed emissions. These detectors have demonstrated the capability of detecting both photon and neutron events during intense photon flashes typical of an active inspection environment. Beyond the inherent insensitivity of SiC to gamma radiation, fast digitization and processing has demonstrated that pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in combination with amplitude discrimination can further suppress unwanted gamma signals and extract fast neutron signatures. Usable neutron signals have been extracted from mixed radiation fields where the background has exceeded the signals of interest by >1000:1.

  12. A silicon photonic wavelength division multiplex system for high-speed data transmission in detector instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwierawski, P.; Schneider, M.; Karnick, D.; Eisenblätter, L.; Weber, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new silicon photonics-based optical transmission system utilizing wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) . This technology has the possibility of reading out all raw data from a detector even without massive local data reduction. The transmitter in the detector volume consists of multiple integrated Mach-Zehnder modulators monolithically integrated with wavelength (de-)multiplexers. The first demonstrator currently under development aims for a data rate of 160 Gbit/s per fiber, scalable to 5 Tbit/s and beyond. We report on our recently developed Echelle grating WDM multiplexers with up to 45 channels on an area of 0.5 mm2 and electro-optic modulators providing a bandwidth of 18 GHz.

  13. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  14. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  15. Integrated GHz silicon photonic interconnect with micrometer-scale modulators and detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Preston, Kyle; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Lipson, Michal

    2009-08-01

    We report an optical link on silicon using micrometer-scale ring-resonator enhanced silicon modulators and waveguide-integrated germanium photodetectors. We show 3 Gbps operation of the link with 0.5 V modulator voltage swing and 1.0 V detector bias. The total energy consumption for such a link is estimated to be ~120 fJ/bit. Such compact and low power monolithic link is an essential step towards large-scale on-chip optical interconnects for future microprocessors.

  16. The Vacuum Silicon Photomultiplier Tube (VSiPMT): A new version of a hybrid photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Stefano; Barbarino, Giancarlo; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Rosa, Gianfranca

    2010-11-01

    The future astroparticle experiments will study both energetic phenomena and extremely rare events from astrophysical sources. Since most of these families of experiments are carried out by using scintillation phenomena, Cherenkov or fluorescence radiation, the development of photosensitive detectors seems to be the right way to increase the experimental sensitivity. Therefore we propose an innovative design for a modern, high gain, silicon-based Vacuum Silicon Photomultiplier Tube (VSiPMT), which combines three fully established and well-understood technologies: the manufacture of hemispherical vacuum tubes with the possibility of very large active areas, the photocathode glass deposition and the novel Geiger-mode avalanche silicon photodiode (G-APD) for which a mass production is today available. This new design, based on G-APD as the electron multiplier, allows overcoming the limits of a classical PMT dynode chain.

  17. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  18. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O’Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  19. Further characterization of IRAS doped silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Measurements made on several doped-silicon detectors are reported. Topics discussed include: Si:Sb detector, the effects of detector bias on dielectric relaxation; characterization of spontaneous noise and gamma-induced spikes and their circumvention; and the time response of two detectors to step changes in the background photon flux density. Several potential system programs are indicated.

  20. Label-free silicon photonic biosensor system with integrated detector array

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rongjin; Mestas, Santano P.; Yuan, Guangwei; Safaisini, Rashid; Dandy, David S.

    2010-01-01

    An integrated, inexpensive, label-free photonic waveguide biosensor system with multi-analyte capability has been implemented on a silicon photonics integrated circuit from a commercial CMOS line and tested with nanofilms. The local evanescent array coupled (LEAC) biosensor is based on a new physical phenomenon that is fundamentally different from the mechanisms of other evanescent field sensors. Increased local refractive index at the waveguide’s upper surface due to the formation of a biological nanofilm causes local modulation of the evanescent field coupled into an array of photodetectors buried under the waveguide. The planar optical waveguide biosensor system exhibits sensitivity of 20%/nm photocurrent modulation in response to adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) layers less than 3 nm thick. In addition to response to BSA, an experiment with patterned photoresist as well as beam propagation method simulations support the evanescent field shift principle. The sensing mechanism enables the integration of all optical and electronic components for a multi-analyte biosensor system on a chip. PMID:19606292

  1. Spectral CT of the extremities with a silicon strip photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Taguchi, K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are an important emerging technology for spectral imaging and material differentiation with numerous potential applications in diagnostic imaging. We report development of a Si-strip PCXD system originally developed for mammography with potential application to spectral CT of musculoskeletal extremities, including challenges associated with sparse sampling, spectral calibration, and optimization for higher energy x-ray beams. Methods: A bench-top CT system was developed incorporating a Si-strip PCXD, fixed anode x-ray source, and rotational and translational motions to execute complex acquisition trajectories. Trajectories involving rotation and translation combined with iterative reconstruction were investigated, including single and multiple axial scans and longitudinal helical scans. The system was calibrated to provide accurate spectral separation in dual-energy three-material decomposition of soft-tissue, bone, and iodine. Image quality and decomposition accuracy were assessed in experiments using a phantom with pairs of bone and iodine inserts (3, 5, 15 and 20 mm) and an anthropomorphic wrist. Results: The designed trajectories improved the sampling distribution from 56% minimum sampling of voxels to 75%. Use of iterative reconstruction (viz., penalized likelihood with edge preserving regularization) in combination with such trajectories resulted in a very low level of artifacts in images of the wrist. For large bone or iodine inserts (>5 mm diameter), the error in the estimated material concentration was <16% for (50 mg/mL) bone and <8% for (5 mg/mL) iodine with strong regularization. For smaller inserts, errors of 20-40% were observed and motivate improved methods for spectral calibration and optimization of the edge-preserving regularizer. Conclusion: Use of PCXDs for three-material decomposition in joint imaging proved feasible through a combination of rotation-translation acquisition trajectories and

  2. Silicon applications in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  3. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  4. Characterization of an Indirect-Detection Amorphous Silicon Detector for Dosimetric Measurement of Intensity Modulated Photon Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Daniel Wayne

    Indirect-detection amorphous silicon electronic imagers show much promise for measurement of radiation dose, particularly for pre-treatment verification of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy plans. These instruments, commonly known as Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs), have high data density, large detecting area, convenient electronic read-out, excellent positional reproducibility, and are quickly becoming standard equipment on today's medical megavoltage linear accelerators. However, because these devices were originally intended to be digital radiograph imagers and not dosimeters, the modeling, calibration, and prediction of their response to dose carries a number of challenges. For instance, EPID dose images exhibit off-axis dose errors of up to 18% with increasing distance from the central axis of the imager (as compared to dose predictions calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system). Furthermore, these off-axis errors are asymmetric, with higher errors in the in-plane direction than in the cross-plane direction. In this work, methods are proposed to account for EPID off-axis effects by precisely calculating off-axis output factors from experimental measurements to increase the accuracy of EPID absolute dose measurement. Using these methods, dose readings acquired over the entire surface of the detector agree to within 2% accuracy as compared to respective EPID dose predictions. Similarly, the percentage of measured dose points that agree with respective calculated dose points (using 3%, 3 mm criteria) improves by as much as 60% for off-axis intensity modulated photon fields. Furthermore, a number of clinical applications of EPID dosimetry are investigated, including pixel response constancy, the effect of data density on a common metric for quantitatively comparing measured vs. calculated dose, and the implementation of an electronic portal dosimetry program for radiotherapy quality assurance.

  5. Micromechanical uncooled photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datskos, Panos G.

    2000-04-01

    Recent advances in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of uncooled IR detectors operate as micromechanical thermal detectors or micromechanical quantum detectors. We report on a new method for photon detection using electronic stresses in semiconductor microstructures. Photo-induced stress in semiconductor microstructures, is caused by changes in the charge carrier density in the conduction band and photon detection results from the measurement of the photon-induced bending of semiconductor microstructures. Small changes in position of microstructures are routinely measured in atomic force microscopy where atomic imaging of surfaces relies on the measurement of small changes in the bending of microcantilevers. Changes in the conduction band charge carrier density can result either from direct photo- generation of free charge carriers or from photoelectrons emitted from thin metal film surface in contact with a semiconductor microstructure which forms a Schottky barrier. In our studies we investigated three systems: (i) Si microstructures, (ii) InSb microstructures and (iii) Si microstructures coated with a thin excess electron-hole- pairs while for InSb photo-induced stress causes the crystal lattice to expand. We will present our results and discuss our findings.

  6. Photon-number-resolving superconducting nanowire detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Francesco; Zhou, Zili; Gaggero, Alessandro; Gaudio, Rosalinda; Jahanmirinejad, Saeedeh; Sahin, Döndü; Marsili, Francesco; Leoni, Roberto; Fiore, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, photon-number-resolving (PNR) detectors have attracted great interest, mainly because they can play a key role in diverse application fields. A PNR detector with a large dynamic range would represent an ideal photon detector, bringing the linear response of conventional analogue detectors down to the single-photon level. Several technologies, such as InGaAs single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs), arrays of silicon photomultipliers, InGaAs SPADs with self-differencing circuits and transition edge sensors have shown photon number resolving capability. Superconducting nanowires provide free-running single-photon sensitivity from visible to mid-infrared frequencies, low dark counts, excellent timing resolution (<60 ps) and short dead time (˜10 ns), at an easily accessible temperature (2-3 K), but they do not inherently resolve the photon number. In this framework, PNR detectors based on arrays of superconducting nanowires have been proposed. In this article we describe a number of methods and device configurations that have been pursued to obtain PNR capability using superconducting nanowire detectors.

  7. SU-F-18C-05: Characterization of a Silicon Strip Photon-Counting Detector in the Presence of Compton Scatter: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Ding, H; Cho, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Compton scatter on detection efficiency and charge-sharing for a Si strip photon-counting detector as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and total pixel length. Methods: A CT imaging system employing a silicon photon-counting detector was implemented using the GATE Monte Carlo package. A focal spot size of 300 µm, magnification of 1.33, and pixel pitches of 0.1 and 0.5mm were initially investigated. A 60 kVp spectrum with 3 mm Al filter was used and energy spectral degradation based on a prototype detector was simulated. To study charge-sharing, a single pixel was illuminated, and the detector response in neighboring pixels was investigated. A longitudinally semiinfinite detector was simulated to optimize the quantum detection efficiency of the imaging system as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and depth of interaction. A 2.5 mm thick tungsten plate with a 0.01 mm by 1.5 mm slit was implemented to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF) from projection-based images. A threshold of 15 keV was implemented in the detector simulation. The preliminary charge sharing investigation results considered only scattering effects and the detector electronics related factors were neglected. Results: Using a 15 keV threshold, 1% of the pixel charge migrated into neighboring pixels with a pixel size of 0.1×0.1 mm{sup 2}. The quantum detection efficiency was 77%, 84%, 87% and 89% for 15 mm, 22.5 mm, 30 mm, and 45 mm length silicon detector pixels, respectively. For a pixel pitch of 0.1 mm, the spatial frequency at 10% of the maximum MTF was found to be 5.2 lp/mm. This agreed with an experimental MTF measurement of 5.3 lp/mm with a similar detector configuration. Conclusion: Using optimized design parameters, Si strip photon-counting detectors can offer high detection efficiency and spatial resolution even in the presence of Compton scatter.

  8. Photon detectors with gaseous amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-08-01

    Gaseous photon detectors, including very large 4{pi}-devices such as those incorporated in SLD and DELPHI, are finally delivering physics after many years of hard work. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photoelectrons. Among detector builders, there is hardly anybody who did not make mistakes in this area, and who does not have a healthy respect for the problems involved. This point is stressed in this paper, and it is suggested that only a very small operating phase space is available for running gaseous photon detectors in a very large system with good efficiency and few problems. In this paper the authors discuss what was done correctly or incorrectly in first generation photon detectors, and what would be their recommendations for second generation detectors. 56 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  10. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  11. Electron-Photon Coincidence Calibration Of Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute and relative detector efficiencies measured. Apparatus uses coincidence-counting techniques to measure efficiency of ultraviolet or vacuum ultraviolet detector at very low radiation intensity. Crossed electron and atomic beams generate photons used to calibrate photon detector. Pulses from electron counter and photon detector(s) processed by standard coincidence-counting techniques. Used to calibrate other detectors or make absolute measurements of incident photon fluxes.

  12. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  13. Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    F. H. Ruddy; J.G. Seidel; R.W. Flammang

    2007-03-01

    The need to address increasingly challenging inspection requirements (such as large volume objects, very fast inspection throughputs, potentially significant shielding, etc.) for such items as nuclear materials and explosives will require the use of active interrogation technologies. While these active technologies can successfully address these challenges by inducing unique, temporal signatures, the inspection environment will also induce overall “background signals” that can be orders of magnitude larger than the induced signatures. Detectors that can successfully operate in these types of customized, inspection environments (pulsed and continuous) and successfully extract induced signature data are clearly needed and will effectively define the limitations of any active inspection system. A novel silicon carbide detector is now being investigated to successfully address both neutron- and photon/bremsstrahlung-type inspection applications. While this paper describes this detector and highlights efforts related to neutron inspection, it will focus on its neutron and gamma-ray/photon detection performance in neutron- and bremssstrahlung-type inspection applications.

  14. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Lange, S.; Smoljanin, S.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.; Epple, M.; Zuvic, M.; Lampert, M.-O.; Fritzsch, T.; Rothermund, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Medipix3 photon-counting detector chip has a number of novel features that are attractive for synchrotron experiments, such as a high frame rate with zero dead time and high spatial resolution. DESY are developing a large-area Medipix3-based detector array (LAMBDA). A single LAMBDA module consists of 2 by 6 Medipix3 chips on a ceramic carrier board, bonded to either a single large silicon sensor or two smaller high-Z sensors. The readout system fits behind the carrier board to allow module tiling, and uses a large on-board RAM and multiple 10 Gigabit Ethernet links to permit high-speed readout. Currently, the first large silicon modules have been constructed and read out at low speed, and the firmware for highspeed readout is being developed. In addition to these silicon sensors, we are developing a germanium hybrid pixel detector in collaboration with Canberra for higher-energy beamlines. Canberra have produced a set of 256-by-256-pixel planar germanium sensors with 55μm pitch, and these are currently being bonded to Medipix3 readout chips by Fraunhofer IZM (Berlin).

  15. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.

    1993-09-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the detector in the radiation environment are discussed. The device has been taking colliding beams data since May of 1992, performing at its best design specifications and enhancing the physics program of CDF.

  16. Argon-39 Background in DUNE Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Gleb; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a 40-kt liquid argon detector that will be constructed 5000 ft underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in order to study neutrino and proton decay physics. Instrumenting liquid argon with photon detectors to record scintillation in addition to the ionization signal can significantly improve time and energy resolution of the experiment. Argon produces light with wavelength of 128 nm. The reference design for the photon detectors includes acrylic bars covered in wavelength shifter, where the scintillation light can be captured and reemitted with longer wavelengths, then detected using silicon photomultipliers. Radiological backgrounds may noticeably deteriorate the photon detection system performance, especially for low-energy interactions. A particularly important background comes from argon-39 decays, because argon-39 is present in natural argon that will be used in DUNE and the background rate increases with the size of the experiment. The effect of the argon-39 background has been studied and is presented in this talk.

  17. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  18. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips.

  19. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Schuck, C; Guo, X; Fan, L; Ma, X; Poot, M; Tang, H X

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  20. Schematic driven silicon photonics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flückiger, Jonas; Pond, James; Klein, Jackson; Wang, Xu; Li, Sarah; Tai, Wei; Hsu, En Yao; Kim, Chan; Ferguson, John; Cone, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is very common for the design to begin at the physical component level. In order to build large integrated photonic systems, it is crucial to design using a schematic-driven approach. This includes simulations based on schematics, schematic-driven layout, layout versus schematic verification, and post-layout simulations. This paper describes such a design framework implemented using Mentor Graphics and Lumerical Solutions design tools. In addition, we describe challenges in silicon photonics related to manufacturing, and how these can be taken into account in simulations and how these impact circuit performance.

  1. Silicon nitride microwave photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René G; van Dijk, Paulus W L; Oldenbeuving, Ruud M; Marpaung, David A I; Burla, Maurizio; Boller, Klaus-J

    2013-09-23

    We present an overview of several microwave photonic processing functionalities based on combinations of Mach-Zehnder and ring resonator filters using the high index contrast silicon nitride (TriPleX™) waveguide technology. All functionalities are built using the same basic building blocks, namely straight waveguides, phase tuning elements and directional couplers. We recall previously shown measurements on high spurious free dynamic range microwave photonic (MWP) link, ultra-wideband pulse generation, instantaneous frequency measurements, Hilbert transformers, microwave polarization networks and demonstrate new measurements and functionalities on a 16 channel optical beamforming network and modulation format transformer as well as an outlook on future microwave photonic platform integration, which will lead to a significantly reduced footprint and thereby enables the path to commercially viable MWP systems. PMID:24104179

  2. VSiPMT a new photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, F.; Barbarino, G.; Barbato, F. C. T.; Campajola, L.; de Asmundis, R.; De Rosa, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Mollo, C. M.; Vivolo, D.

    2016-04-01

    Photon detection is a key factor to study many physical processes in several areas of fundamental physics research. Focusing the attention on photodetectors for particle astrophysics, the future experiments aimed at the study of very high-energy or extremely rare phenomena (e.g. dark matter, proton decay, neutrinos from astrophysical sources) will require additional improvements in linearity, gain, quantum efficiency and single photon counting capability. To meet the requirements of these class of experiments, we propose a new design for a modern hybrid photodetector: the VSiPMT (Vacuum Silicon PhotoMultiplier Tube). The idea is to replace the classical dynode chain of a PMT with a SiPM, which therefore acts as an electron detector and amplifier. The aim is to match the large sensitive area of a photocathode with the performances of the SiPM technology.

  3. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  4. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-02-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  5. Silicon diode detectors used in radiological physics measurements. Part II: Measurement of dosimetry data for high-energy photons.

    PubMed

    Wright, A E; Gager, L D

    1977-01-01

    Initial calibration of a linear accelerator requires physics instruments to measure accurately central axis depth-dose and off-axis data, both in and out of the beam. These data for an 8- MeV unit were first measured using film, a Farmer 0.6-cm3 ion chamber, a 0.3-cm3 ion chamber, and a 0.1-cm3 silicon diode. Both small probes and film gave a high response compared to the Farmer probe, which has a uniform energy response. Measurements with the diode interfaced to an X-Y recorder required only a fraction of the time required with the chambers, minimizing error due to change in machine output, and permitted resolution of isodose lines in the penumbra. However, corrections required at points in depth due to nonuniform energy response of the unshielded diode were laborious. Construction of a partially shielded diode which duplicates the response of the Farmer probe eliminated the necessity for corrections, permitting rapid accumulation of a wide range of depth-dose and off-axis data. PMID:927387

  6. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  7. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglieri, M.; Boyarinov, S.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Cooper, W.; Cuevas, C.; Dashyan, N.; DeVita, R.; Desnault, C.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Essig, R.; Fadeyev, V.; Field, C.; Freyberger, A.; Gershtein, Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Girod, F.-X.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Griffioen, K.; Grillo, A.; Guidal, M.; Haller, G.; Hansson Adrian, P.; Herbst, R.; Holtrop, M.; Jaros, J.; Kaneta, S.; Khandaker, M.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, J.; Moffeit, K.; Moreno, O.; Neal, H.; Nelson, T.; Niccolai, S.; Odian, A.; Oriunno, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Partridge, R.; Phillips, S. K.; Rauly, E.; Raydo, B.; Reichert, J.; Rindel, E.; Rosier, P.; Salgado, C.; Schuster, P.; Sharabian, Y.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Toro, N.; Uemura, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Walz, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-03-01

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e+e- invariant mass spectrum above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e+e- pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10 cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  8. Applications of passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Richard; Park, Chan Ho

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the study of the applications of passivated silicon detectors, this paper shows following procedures in two categories. Painting on little pieces of silicon (Polyimid and Boxcar Red) :Took clean paint brush and painted on Polyimid and Boxcar red samples onto little pieces of sample silicon and dried for a certain number of hours in different conditions. Cooling test : usually done in 7 cycles, cool until usually -35 degrees or -40 degrees Celsius with thermoelectric cooler, dry out, evapate the moisture in the fume hood, take pictures with the microscope and check for irregularities every 1, 4 and 7 times. The results show us how the passivated silicon will act in the real experiment--the vacuum chamber and x-rays (from the radioactive source), and different atmospheric pressures simulate what it will be like in space.

  9. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Shukla, R A; Dugad, S R; Garde, C S; Gopal, A V; Gupta, S K; Prabhu, S S

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 - σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper. PMID:24593348

  10. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R. Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.; Garde, C. S.

    2014-02-15

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  11. Design methodologies for silicon photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Flueckiger, Jonas; Lin, Charlie; Hochberg, Michael; Pond, James; Klein, Jackson; Ferguson, John; Cone, Chris

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes design methodologies developed for silicon photonics integrated circuits. The approach presented is inspired by methods employed in the Electronics Design Automation (EDA) community. This is complemented by well established photonic component design tools, compact model synthesis, and optical circuit modelling. A generic silicon photonics design kit, as described here, is available for download at http://www.siepic.ubc.ca/GSiP.

  12. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f50 (spatial-frequency at

  13. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f{sub 50} (spatial

  14. Portable triple silicon detector telescope spectrometer for skin dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Larsen, H. E.; Christensen, P.

    1999-12-01

    The features of a newly developed portable beta telescope spectrometer are described. The detector probe uses three silicon detectors with the thickness: 50μm/150μm/7000μm covered by a 2μm thick titanium window. Rejection of photon contributions from mixed beta/photon exposures is achieved by coincidence requirements between the detector signals. The silicon detectors, together with cooling aggregate, bias supplies, preamplifiers and charge generation for calibration are contained in a handy detector probe. Through a 3- or 10-m cable the detector unit is connected to a compact, portable processing unit including a laptop computer executing control, monitor, histogram and display tasks. The use of digital signal processing at an early stage of the signal chain has facilitated the achievement of a compact, low-weight device. 256 channels are available for each of the three detectors. The LabVIEWTM software distributed by National Instruments was used for all program developments for the spectrometer, comprising also the capability of evaluating the absorbed dose rates from the measured beta spectra. The report describes the capability of the telescope spectrometer to measure beta and photon spectra as well as beta dose rates in mixed beta/photon radiation fields. It also describes the main features of the digital signal-processing electronics.

  15. A complete design flow for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James; Cone, Chris; Chrostowski, Lukas; Klein, Jackson; Flueckiger, Jonas; Liu, Amy; McGuire, Dylan; Wang, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Broad adoption of silicon photonics technology for photonic integrated circuits requires standardized design flows that are similar to what is available for analog and mixed signal electrical circuit design. We have developed a design flow that combines mature electronic design automation (EDA) software with optical simulation software. An essential component of any design flow, whether electrical or photonic, is the ability to accurately simulate largescale circuits. This is particularly important when the behavior of the circuit is not trivially related to the individual component performance. While this is clearly the case for electronic circuits consisting of hundreds to billions of transistors, it is already becoming important in photonic circuits such as WDM transmitters, where signal cross talk needs to be considered, as well as optical cross-connect switches. In addition, optical routing to connect different components requires the introduction of additional waveguide sections, waveguide bends, and waveguide crossings, which affect the overall circuit performance. Manufacturing variability can also have dramatic circuit-level consequences that need to be simulated. Circuit simulations must rely on compact models that can accurately represent the behavior of each component, and the compact model parameters must be extracted from physical level simulation and experimental results. We show how large scale circuits can be simulated in both the time and frequency domains, including the effects of bidirectional and, where appropriate, multimode and multichannel photonic waveguides. We also show how active, passive and nonlinear individual components such as grating couplers, waveguides, splitters, filters, electro-optical modulators and detectors can be simulated using a combination of electrical and optical algorithms, and good agreement with experimental results can be obtained. We then show how parameters, with inclusion of fabrication process variations, can

  16. Operating quantum waveguide circuits with superconducting single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, C. M.; Peruzzo, A.; Miki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Wang, Z.; Baek, B.; Nam, S.; Hadfield, R. H.; O'Brien, J. L.

    2010-05-01

    Advanced quantum information science and technology (QIST) applications place exacting demands on optical components. Quantum waveguide circuits offer a route to scalable QIST on a chip. Superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) provide infrared single-photon sensitivity combined with low dark counts and picosecond timing resolution. In this study, we bring these two technologies together. Using SSPDs we observe a two-photon interference visibility of 92.3±1.0% in a silica-on-silicon waveguide directional coupler at λ =804 nm—higher than that measured with silicon detectors (89.9±0.3%). We further operated controlled-NOT gate and quantum metrology circuits with SSPDs. These demonstrations present a clear path to telecom-wavelength quantum waveguide circuits.

  17. High resistivity silicon radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Julie Diane

    This work addresses the use of silicon detectors both for charged particles in a high energy physics application, and for electromagnetic radiation, specifically x-ray and γ-ray detectors. The second generation of a PIN diode array pixel detector integrated with full twin well CMOS was developed for high energy particle physics. A new vertical high voltage diode termination structure was developed and compared to other diode termination structures through simulations. The new structure reduced the process complexity and improved the yield and robustness to mechanical damage to the backside, allowing us to build a much larger detector with denser frontside patterning, implementing a new sparse-field read-out design. Radiation measurements from this pixel detector are presented, which represent the first integrated sparse-field read-out results ever reported. A prototype 1mm thick PIN diode array x-ray detector with a depletion voltage of 800V was simulated, designed and fabricated for protein crystallography. Using 2D simulations, an optimized 5 floating ring high voltage structure was designed and implemented. Preliminary measurements indicate that the detector can be operated successfully up to 1000V. A new cylindrical drift detector was developed for x-ray absorbtion spectroscopy. To minimize the drift time, an analytic expression for drift field and 2D simulations were used to optimize the applied surface potential for a uniform drift field. Three novel integrated transistors for first stage amplification were designed and fabricated, which show promise of working with fairly straightforward optimization. A new technique for controlling dark current due to surface generation was introduced and implemented successfully. Instead of collecting the surface current at a guard anode, surface generation is suppressed by putting n+ diffusion rings between the p+ rings, dramatically reducing the depleted oxide interface area which is the site for surface generation

  18. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  19. Electromagnetic Shower Reconstruction for theSilicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, N.

    2005-12-08

    This report presents a two-pass reconstruction algorithm for electromagnetic showers, based on studies with simulated photons in the highly segmented Silicon Tungsten calorimeter of the Silicon Detector concept for the International Linear Collider. It is shown that the initial reconstruction and identification of the dense shower cores allows shower separation down to 3 cm distance between two photons on the calorimeter surface. First results are shown for the subsequent collection of unassociated hits around the shower cores necessary to reconstruct complete energy deposits by individual particles.

  20. Comparison at the sub-100 fW optical power level of calibrating a single-photon detector using a high-sensitive, low-noise silicon photodiode and the double attenuator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrovecchio, G.; Šmid, M.; López, M.; Hofer, H.; Rodiek, B.; Kück, S.

    2016-08-01

    A comparison down to sub-100-fW optical power level was carried out between a low-noise Silicon photodiode and a low optical flux measurement facility based on a double attenuator technique. The comparison was carried out via a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (Si-SPAD), which acted as transfer standard. The measurements were performed at a wavelength of 770 nm using an attenuated laser as a radiation source at optical power levels between approximately 86 fW and approximately 1325 fW, corresponding to approximately 330 000 photons s‑1 and approximately 5.2  ×  106 photons s‑1, respectively. The mean relative deviation of the detection efficiencies of the Si-SPAD, determined by the Si-photodiode and the low optical flux measurement facility, i.e. between two completely independent traceability routes, was  <  0.2%, thus well within the combined standard uncertainty of the two measurements. To our knowledge, this is the first comparison for the detection efficiency of a single photon detector using a direct optical flux measurement by a conventional Si-photodiode at such low power levels.

  1. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S. ); Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T. ); Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  2. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  3. Emerging heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-05-01

    Silicon photonics has been established as a mature and promising technology for optoelectronic integrated circuits, mostly based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide platform. However, not all optical functionalities can be satisfactorily achieved merely based on silicon, in general, and on the SOI platform, in particular. Long-known shortcomings of silicon-based integrated photonics are optical absorption (in the telecommunication wavelengths) and feasibility of electrically-injected lasers (at least at room temperature). More recently, high two-photon and free-carrier absorptions required at high optical intensities for third-order optical nonlinear effects, inherent lack of second-order optical nonlinearity, low extinction ratio of modulators based on the free-carrier plasma effect, and the loss of the buried oxide layer of the SOI waveguides at mid-infrared wavelengths have been recognized as other shortcomings. Accordingly, several novel waveguide platforms have been developing to address these shortcomings of the SOI platform. Most of these emerging platforms are based on heterogeneous integration of other material systems on silicon substrates, and in some cases silicon is integrated on other substrates. Germanium and its binary alloys with silicon, III-V compound semiconductors, silicon nitride, tantalum pentoxide and other high-index dielectric or glass materials, as well as lithium niobate are some of the materials heterogeneously integrated on silicon substrates. The materials are typically integrated by a variety of epitaxial growth, bonding, ion implantation and slicing, etch back, spin-on-glass or other techniques. These wide range of efforts are reviewed here holistically to stress that there is no pure silicon or even group IV photonics per se. Rather, the future of the field of integrated photonics appears to be one of heterogenization, where a variety of different materials and waveguide platforms will be used for different purposes with

  4. Silicon photonics at the University of Surrey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Mashanovich, G.; Gardes, F. Y.; Gwilliam, R. M.; Wright, N. M.; Thomson, D. J.; Timotijevic, B. D.; Litvinenko, K. L.; Headley, W. R.; Smith, A. J.; Knights, A. P.; Jessop, P. E.; Tarr, N. G.; Deane, J. H. B.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon Photonics is a field that has seen rapid growth and dramatic changes in the past 5 years. According to the MIT Communications Technology Roadmap [1], which aims to establish a common architecture platform across market sectors with a potential $20B in annual revenue, silicon photonics is among the top ten emerging technologies. This has in part been a consequence of the recent involvement of large semiconductor companies around the world, particularly in the USA. Significant investment in the technology has also followed in Japan, Korea, and in the European Union. Low cost is a key driver, so it is imperative to pursue technologies that are mass-producible. Therefore, Silicon Photonics continues to progress at a rapid rate. This paper will describe some of the work of the Silicon Photonics Group at the University of Surrey in the UK. The work is concerned with the sequential development of a series of components for silicon photonic optical circuits, and some of the components are discussed here. In particular the paper will present work on optical waveguides, optical filters, modulators, and lifetime modification of carriers generated by two photon absorption, to improve the performance of Raman amplifiers in silicon.

  5. Analog optical computing primitives in silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunshan; DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    Optical computing accelerators may help alleviate bandwidth and power consumption bottlenecks in electronics. We show an approach to implementing logarithmic-type analog co-processors in silicon photonics and use it to perform the exponentiation operation. The function is realized by exploiting nonlinear-absorption-enhanced Raman amplification saturation in a silicon waveguide.

  6. Novel photon-counting detectors for free-space communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 μm to 25 μm doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  7. Deposited silicon photonics: Optical interconnect devices in polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Kyle Jonathan

    Silicon photonics has tremendous potential to provide high-bandwidth and low-power data communication for applications such as computing and telecommunication, over length scales ranging from 100 kilometers over fiber to centimeter-length on-chip waveguides. Many silicon photonic building blocks have been demonstrated to date, but critical work remains to determine the best approaches for integrating together silicon photonics with microelectronics. In this thesis, I explore a novel method for integration of silicon photonics on the CMOS platform by using a deposited material: polycrystalline silicon. I will show the first demonstrations of electrically-active optical filters, modulators, and photodetectors in this material. In principle, this material platform would allow for the integration of silicon photonic devices and systems on top of any substrate, including complex CMOS and memory chips or even glass and plastic substrates. In Chapter 1, I introduce the state-of-the-art in silicon photonics, describe several integration schemes under development, and introduce the idea of using deposited materials. In Chapter 2, I demonstrate the use of polysilicon to make integrated microring resonators, and show the integration of different silicon materials together. Chapter 3 discusses the use of polysilicon as both an optical waveguiding layer and an electrode material in slot waveguides for the application of light emitters. Chapter 4 demonstrates the use of a pump-probe experiment to measure the free carrier lifetime in the material and demonstrate all-optical modulation. In Chapter 5, I demonstrate the first high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator in polysilicon, a necessary device for optical transmitters. In Chapter 6, I show how defects inside the same material enable integrated photodetectors at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths. Chapter 7 shows initial results in adapting the material processing for lower temperatures, necessary for integration

  8. Compound FDTD method for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaee, Abbas; Hamadani, Farzad T.

    2011-09-01

    Attempt to manufacture photonics devices on silicon requires theoretical and numerical prediction. This essay presents Compound FDTD (C-FDTD) method for comprehensive simulation of silicon photonics devices. Although this method is comprehensive, it maintains conventional Yee algorithm. The method involves variation of refractive index due to nonlinear effects. With the help of this simulator, refractive index change due to free-carriers created through two photon absorption and Kerr effect in silicon waveguide is considered. Results indicate how to choose pump pulse shape to optimum operation of active photonics devices. Also conductivity variation of Si waveguide due to change in free-carrier density is studied. By considering variations in conductivity profile, we are able to design better schemes for sweep free carriers away with reverse bias or nonlinear photovoltaic effect for fast devices and Raman amplifiers.

  9. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  10. Thermoelectric nanowire single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, Astghik A.; Kuzanyan, Armen S.

    2013-05-01

    We have collected and analyzed the values of thermoelectric parameters of thermoelectric materials and on this basis calculated the energy resolution and photon count rate of the Thermoelectric Nanowire Single-Photon Detector (TNSPD). It is concluded that the TNSPD can achieve higher specifications as compared with the best single-photon detectors. The lanthanum-cerium hexaboride sensors of TNSPD are expected to reach more than gigahertz count rates and will have a sensitivity of 0.1 eV. It means that the device is sensitive enough to register and spectrally characterize not only X-ray and UV, but also optical and infrared photons, as its major competitors, the superconducting and semiconducting single-photon detectors.

  11. SIS Detectors for Terahertz Photon Counting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Hajime; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ukibe, Masahiro; Fujii, Go; Shiki, Shigetomo

    2016-07-01

    An Intensity interferometer with photon counting detector is a candidate to realize a THz interferometer for astronomical observations. We have demonstrated that synthesis imaging is possible even with intensity interferometers. An SIS junction (or STJ) with low leakage current of 1 pA is a suitable device for photon counting detectors. Readout circuit utilizing FETs with low gate leakage, low gate capacitance, and fast response is discussed.

  12. Utilization of thermal effects for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Daoxin; Yu, Longhai; Chen, Sitao; Wu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Thermal effect plays a key role and has been utilized for various photonic devices. For silicon photonics, the thermal effect is usually important because of the large thermo-optical coefficient of silicon material. This paper gives a review for the utilization of thermal effects for silicon photonics. First, the thermal effect is very beneficial to realize energy-efficient silicon photonic devices with tunability/switchability (including switches, variable optical attenuators, etc). Traditionally metal micro-heater sitting on a buried silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire is used to introduce a phase shift for thermal tunability by injecting a electrical current. An effective way to improve the energy-efficiency of thermal tuning is reducing the volume of the optical waveguide as well as the micro-heater. Our recent work on silicon nanophotonic waveguides with novel nano-heaters based on metal wires as well as graphene ribbons will be summarized. Second, the thermal resistance effect of the metal strip on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide structure can be utilized to realize an ultra-small on-chip photodetector available for an ultra-broad band of wavelength, which will also be discussed.

  13. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  14. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  15. Status and perspectives of gaseous photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    This article aims at reviewing the state of the art of gaseous photon detectors for RICH applications. Emphasis will be put on THGEM based devices which represent the most advanced development among the various micro-pattern gaseous photon sensors proposed for Cherenkov imaging in very high rate environments.

  16. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinthorne, Neal; Brzezinski, Karol; Chesi, Enrico; Cochran, Eric; Grkovski, Milan; Grošičar, Borut; Honscheid, Klaus; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Linhart, Vladimir; Mikuž, Marko; Smith, D. Shane; Stankova, Vera; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ˜5 mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ˜1 mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET "magnifying glass" configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration.

  17. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  18. Charging effects in passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, D. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Morley, K. B.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Komisarcik, K.; Rader, A. J.; Viola, V. E.

    1995-02-01

    Ion-implanted passivated silicon detectors undergo a gradual, then rapid increase in leakage current when exposed to ionizing radiation in the presence of gas between 5-200 Torr. Conditions for generating this effect are discussed and a mechanism is proposed to explain this behavior. Methods for preventing this effect and for recovering detectors damaged in this way are presented.

  19. Analog optical computing primitives in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunshan; DeVore, Peter T S; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Optical computing accelerators help alleviate bandwidth and power consumption bottlenecks in electronics. We show an approach to implementing logarithmic-type analog co-processors in silicon photonics and use it to perform the exponentiation operation and the recovery of a signal in the presence of multiplicative distortion. The function is realized by exploiting nonlinear-absorption-enhanced Raman amplification saturation in a silicon waveguide. PMID:26977687

  20. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  1. EDITORIAL: Special issue on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Graham; Paniccia, Mario; Wada, Kazumi; Mashanovich, Goran

    2008-06-01

    The technology now known as silicon photonics can be traced back to the pioneering work of Soref in the mid-1980s (see, for example, Soref R A and Lorenzo J P 1985 Electron. Lett. 21 953). However, the nature of the research conducted today, whilst it builds upon that early work, is unrecognizable in terms of technology metrics such as device efficiency, device data rate and device dimensions, and even in targeted applications areas. Today silicon photonics is still evolving, and is enjoying a period of unprecedented attention in terms of research focus. This has resulted in orders-of-magnitude improvement in device performance over the last few years to levels many thought were impossible. However, despite the existence of the research field for more than two decades, silicon is still regarded as a 'new' optical material, one that is being manipulated and modified to satisfy the requirements of a range of applications. This is somewhat ironic since silicon is one of the best known and most thoroughly studied materials, thanks to the electronics industry that has made silicon its material of choice. The principal reasons for the lack of study of this 'late developer' are that (i) silicon is an indirect bandgap material and (ii) it does not exhibit a linear electro-optic (Pockels) effect. The former condition means that it is difficult to make a laser in silicon based on the intrinsic performance of the material, and consequently, in recent years, researchers have attempted to modify the material to artificially engineer the conditions for lasing to be viable (see, for example, the review text, Jalali B et al 2008 Silicon Lasers in Silicon Photonics: The State of the Art ed G T Reed (New York: Wiley)). The latter condition means that optical modulators are intrinsically less efficient in silicon than in some other materials, particularly when targeting the popular telecommunications wavelengths around 1.55 μm. Therefore researchers have sought alternative

  2. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  3. Monolithic pixel detectors in silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, Dario

    2013-05-01

    Silicon On Insulator (SOI) is becoming an attractive technology to fabricate monolithic pixel detectors. The possibility of using the depleted resistive substrate as a drift collection volume and to connect it by means of vias through the buried oxide to the pixel electronic makes this kind of approach interesting both for particle and photon detection. In this paper I report the results obtained in the development of monolithic pixel detectors in an SOI technology by a collaboration between groups from the University and INFN of Padova (Italy) and the LBNL and the SCIPP at UCSC (USA).

  4. Silicon radiation detectors: materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    Silicon nuclear radiation detectors are available today in a large variety of sizes and types. This profusion has been made possible by the ever increasing quality and diameter silicon single crystals, new processing technologies and techniques, and innovative detector design. The salient characteristics of the four basic detector groups, diffused junction, ion implanted, surface barrier, and lithium drift are reviewed along with the silicon crystal requirements. Results of crystal imperfections detected by lithium ion compensation are presented. Processing technologies and techniques are described. Two recent novel position-sensitive detector designs are discussed - one in high-energy particle track reconstruction and the other in x-ray angiography. The unique experimental results obtained with these devices are presented.

  5. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 micrometers to 25 micrometers doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  6. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  7. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  8. High speed analog-to-digital conversion with silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, C. W.; Amatya, R.; Araghchini, M.; Birge, J.; Byun, H.; Chen, J.; Dahlem, M.; DiLello, N. A.; Gan, F.; Hoyt, J. L.; Ippen, E. P.; Kärtner, F. X.; Khilo, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Motamedi, A.; Orcutt, J. S.; Park, M.; Perrott, M.; Popovic, M. A.; Ram, R. J.; Smith, H. I.; Zhou, G. R.; Spector, S. J.; Lyszczarz, T. M.; Geis, M. W.; Lennon, D. M.; Yoon, J. U.; Grein, M. E.; Schulein, R. T.; Frolov, S.; Hanjani, A.; Shmulovich, J.

    2009-02-01

    Sampling rates of high-performance electronic analog-to-digital converters (ADC) are fundamentally limited by the timing jitter of the electronic clock. This limit is overcome in photonic ADC's by taking advantage of the ultra-low timing jitter of femtosecond lasers. We have developed designs and strategies for a photonic ADC that is capable of 40 GSa/s at a resolution of 8 bits. This system requires a femtosecond laser with a repetition rate of 2 GHz and timing jitter less than 20 fs. In addition to a femtosecond laser this system calls for the integration of a number of photonic components including: a broadband modulator, optical filter banks, and photodetectors. Using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the platform we have fabricated these individual components. The silicon optical modulator is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer architecture and achieves a VπL of 2 Vcm. The filter banks comprise 40 second-order microring-resonator filters with a channel spacing of 80 GHz. For the photodetectors we are exploring ion-bombarded silicon waveguide detectors and germanium films epitaxially grown on silicon utilizing a process that minimizes the defect density.

  9. High quantum-efficiency photon-number-resolving detector for photonic on-chip information processing.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Brice; Mennea, Paolo L; Lita, Adriana E; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Mirin, Richard P; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-09-23

    The integrated optical circuit is a promising architecture for the realization of complex quantum optical states and information networks. One element that is required for many of these applications is a high-efficiency photon detector capable of photon-number discrimination. We present an integrated photonic system in the telecom band at 1550 nm based on UV-written silica-on-silicon waveguides and modified transition-edge sensors capable of number resolution and over 40 % efficiency. Exploiting the mode transmission failure of these devices, we multiplex three detectors in series to demonstrate a combined 79 % ± 2 % detection efficiency with a single pass, and 88 % ± 3 % at the operating wavelength of an on-chip terminal reflection grating. Furthermore, our optical measurements clearly demonstrate no significant unexplained loss in this system due to scattering or reflections. This waveguide and detector design therefore allows the placement of number-resolving single-photon detectors of predictable efficiency at arbitrary locations within a photonic circuit - a capability that offers great potential for many quantum optical applications. PMID:24104153

  10. Deep UV photon-counting detectors and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Gary A.; Siegel, Andrew M.; Model, Joshua; Geboff, Adam; Soloviev, Stanislav; Vert, Alexey; Sandvik, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Photon counting detectors are used in many diverse applications and are well-suited to situations in which a weak signal is present in a relatively benign background. Examples of successful system applications of photon-counting detectors include ladar, bio-aerosol detection, communication, and low-light imaging. A variety of practical photon-counting detectors have been developed employing materials and technologies that cover the waveband from deep ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared. However, until recently, photoemissive detectors (photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and their variants) were the only viable technology for photon-counting in the deep UV region of the spectrum. While PMTs exhibit extremely low dark count rates and large active area, they have other characteristics which make them unsuitable for certain applications. The characteristics and performance limitations of PMTs that prevent their use in some applications include bandwidth limitations, high bias voltages, sensitivity to magnetic fields, low quantum efficiency, large volume and high cost. Recently, DARPA has initiated a program called Deep UV Avalanche Photodiode (DUVAP) to develop semiconductor alternatives to PMTs for use in the deep UV. The higher quantum efficiency of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD) detectors and the ability to fabricate arrays of individually-addressable detectors will open up new applications in the deep UV. In this paper, we discuss the system design trades that must be considered in order to successfully replace low-dark count, large-area PMTs with high-dark count, small-area GM-APD detectors. We also discuss applications that will be enabled by the successful development of deep UV GM-APD arrays, and we present preliminary performance data for recently fabricated silicon carbide GM-APD arrays.

  11. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  12. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  13. Dual concentric crystal low energy photon detector

    DOEpatents

    Guilmette, R.A.

    A photon detector for biological samples includes a block of NaI(T1) having a hole containing a thin walled cylinder of CsI(T1). At least three photo multiplier tubes are evenly spaced around the parameter of the block. Biological samples are placed within the hole, and emissions which are sensed by at least two of the photo multipliers from only the NaI(T1) detector are counted.

  14. Phase coherence length in silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisu; Ma, Yangjin; Guan, Hang; Liu, Yang; Danziger, Steven; Ocheltree, Stewart; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-06-29

    We report for the first time two typical phase coherence lengths in highly confined silicon waveguides fabricated in a standard CMOS foundry's multi-project-wafer shuttle run in the 220nm silicon-on-insulator wafer with 248nm lithography. By measuring the random phase fluctuations of 800 on-chip silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometers across the wafer, we extracted, with statistical significance, the coherence lengths to be 4.17 ± 0.42 mm and 1.61 ± 0.12 mm for single mode strip waveguide and rib waveguide, respectively. We present a new experimental method to quantify the phase coherence length. The theory model is verified by both our and others' experiments. Coherence length is expected to become one key parameter of the fabrication non-uniformity to guide the design of silicon photonics. PMID:26191700

  15. Upgrade of the Belle Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Belle SVD Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) was inaugurated in 1999 and has delivered excellent physics results since then, which were, for example, recognized in the Nobel Prize award 2008 to Kobayashi and Masukawa. An overall luminosity of 895 fb -1 has been recorded as of December 2008, and the present system will be running until 1 ab -1 is achieved. After that, a major upgrade is foreseen for both the KEK-B machine and the Belle detector. Already in 2004, the Letter of Intent for KEK Super B Factory was published. Intermediate steps of upgrade were considered for the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which performs very well but already got close to its limit regarding the occupancy in the innermost layer and dead time. Eventually it was decided to keep the existing SVD2 system until 1 ab -1 and completely replace the silicon detector as well as its readout system for Super-Belle. The future SVD will be composed of double-sided silicon sensors as the present detector, but equipped with faster readout electronics, namely the APV25 chips originally made for CMS at CERN. Moreover, it will be enlarged by two additional layers and equipped with a double layer of DEPFET pixel detectors surrounding the beam pipe. The silicon sensors will be fabricated from 6 in. wafers (compared to the current 4 in. types) and the readout chain will be completely replaced, including front-end, repeaters and the back-end electronics in the counting house.

  16. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lončar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310 nm and 632 nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300 pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  17. Detectors for dark photon search with MESA

    SciTech Connect

    Molitor, Matthias

    2013-11-07

    The predictions of the standard model for the anomalous magnetic momentum of the muon, deviates from the direct measurements by 3,6 σ. A gauge boson of a new U(1)-Interaction, the so called dark photon, is predicted in many expansions of the standard model and could explain those deviations. In order to search for such a dark photon, a dedicated experiment is scheduled at the planned low energy accelerator MESA in Mainz. In order to detect dark photons this experiment needs a high resolution detector with a suitable acceptance.

  18. Status of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, Sebastian; /Harvard U.

    2006-05-01

    The CDF Run II silicon micro-strip detector is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the experiment. Since the commissioning period ended in 2002, about 85% of the 730 k readout channels have been consistently provided good data. A summary of the recent improvements in the DAQ system as well as experience of maintaining and operating such a large, complex detector are presented.

  19. Performance of single-photon-counting PILATUS detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, P.; Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Johnson, I.; Mozzanica, A.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Willmott, P. R.; Schmitt, B.

    2009-01-01

    PILATUS is a silicon hybrid pixel detector system, operating in single-photon-counting mode, that has been developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut for the needs of macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A calibrated PILATUS module has been characterized with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The influence of charge sharing on the count rate and the overall energy resolution of the detector were investigated. The dead-time of the system was determined using the attenuated direct synchrotron beam. A single module detector was also tested in surface diffraction experiments at the SLS, whereby its performance regarding fluorescence suppression and saturation tolerance were evaluated, and have shown to greatly improve the sensitivity, reliability and speed of surface diffraction data acquisition. PMID:19395800

  20. Hybrid laser integration for silicon photonics platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuyu

    Silicon photonics has attracted extensive attention in both academia and industry in recent years, as an enabling technology to address the exponentially increasing demands for communication bandwidth. It brings state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing technology to the field of photonic integration. The high yield and uniformity of silicon devices make it possible to build complex photonic systems-on-chip in large production volumes. Cutting-edge device performance has been demonstrated on this platform, including high-speed modulators, photodetectors, and passive devices such as the Y-junction, waveguide crossing, and arrayed waveguide gratings. As the device library quickly matures, an integrated laser source for a transmitter remains missing from the design kit. I demonstrated hybrid external cavity lasers by integrating reflective optical semiconductor amplifiers and silicon photonics chips. The gain chip and silicon chip can be designed and optimized independently, which is a significant advantage compared to bonding an III-V film on top of the silicon chip. Advanced optoelectronics packaging processes can be leveraged for chip alignment. Tunable C-Band (near 1550 nm) lasers with 10 mW on-chip power and less than 220 kHz bandwidth are demonstrated. O-Band lasers (operating near 1310 nm) as well as successful data transmission at 10 Gb/s and 40 Gb/s using the hybrid laser as the light source are also demonstrated. I designed a single cavity, multi wavelength laser by utilizing a quantum dot SOA, Sagnac loop and micro-ring based silicon photonics half cavity. Four lasing peaks with less than 3 dB power non-uniformity were measured, as well as 4 x 10 Gb/s error free data transmission. In addition to my main focus on RSOA/Silicon external cavity lasers, I propose and demonstrate a novel germanium-assisted grating coupler with low loss on-and-off chip fiber coupling. A coupling efficiency of 76% at 1.55 microm and 40 nm 1 d

  1. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  2. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  3. Optical Ranicon detectors for photon counting imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark; Crocker, Jim; Paresce, Francesco; Rafal, Marc

    1988-08-01

    The design and development of two detectors, known as Ranicon and advanced Ranicon, for optical photon counting imaging on ground-based telescopes are discussed. The proximity focusing, microchannel-plate stack, resistive anode, and signal processing characteristics are described. The theory behind the overall resolution of the Ranicon system is reviewed. Resolution measurements for the instruments are reported and discussed.

  4. Performance characteristics and radiation damage results from the Fermilab E706 silicon microstrip detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, E.; Mani, S.; Orris, D.; Shepard, P. F.; Weerasundara, P. D.; Choudhary, B. C.; Joshi, U.; Kapoor, V.; Shivpuri, R.; Baker, W.; Berg, D.; Carey, D.; Johnstone, C.; Nelson, C.; Bromberg, C.; Brown, D.; Huston, J.; Miller, R.; Nguyen, A.; Benson, R.; Lukens, P.; Ruddick, K.; Alverson, G.; Faissler, W.; Garelick, D.; Glaubman, M.; Kourbanis, I.; Lirakis, C.; Pothier, E.; Sinanidis, A.; Wu, G.-H.; Yasuda, T.; Yosef, C.; Easo, S.; Hartman, K.; Oh, B. Y.; Toothacker, W.; Whitmore, J.; Ballocchi, G.; Debarbaro, L.; Desoi, W.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ginther, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Pedeville, G.; Prebys, E.; Skow, D.; Slattery, P.; Varelas, N.; Zielinski, M.

    1989-07-01

    A charged particle spectrometer containing a 7120-channel silicon microstrip detector system, one component of Fermilab experiment E706 to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions, was utilized in a run in which 6 million events were recorded. We describe the silicon system, provide early results of track and vertex reconstruction, and present data on the radiation damage to the silicon wafers resulting from the narrow high intensity beam.

  5. Silicon Photonic Devices and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying

    Silicon photonics is the study and application of photonic systems, which use silicon as an optical medium. Data is transferred in the systems by optical rays. This technology is seen as the substitutions of electric computer chips in the future and the means to keep tack on the Moore's law. Cavity optomechanics is a rising field of silicon photonics. It focuses on the interaction between light and mechanical objects. Although it is currently at its early stage of growth, this field has attracted rising attention. Here, we present highly sensitive optical detection of acceleration using an optomechanical accelerometer. The core part of this accelerometer is a slot-type photonic crystal cavity with strong optomechanical interactions. We first discuss theoretically the optomechanical coupling in the air-slot mode-gap photonic crystal cavity. The dispersive coupling gom is numerically calculated. Dynamical parametric oscillations for both cooling and amplification, in the resolved and unresolved sideband limit, are examined numerically, along with the displacement spectral density and cooling rates for the various operating parameters. Experimental results also demonstrated that the cavity has a large optomechanical coupling rate. The optically induced spring effect, damping and amplification of the mechanical modes are observed with measurements both in air and in vacuum. Then, we propose and demonstrate our optomechanical accelerometer. It can operate with a resolution of 730 ng/Hz1/2 (or equivalently 40.1 aN/Hz1/2) and with a transduction bandwidth of ≈ 85 kHz. We also demonstrate an integrated photonics device, an on-chip spectroscopy, in the last part of this thesis. This new type of on-chip microspectrometer is based on the Vernier effect of two cascaded micro-ring cavities. It can measure optical spectrum with a bandwidth of 74nm and a resolution of 0.22 nm in a small footprint of 1.5 mm2.

  6. Multifunctional optomechanical dynamics in integrated silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan

    Light can generate forces on matter. The nature of these forces is electromagnetic force, or Lorentz force. The emergence and rapid progress of nanotechnology provided an unprecedented platform where the very feeble optical forces began to play significant roles. The interactions between light and matter in nanoscale has been the focus of almost a decade of active theoretical and experimental investigations, which are still ongoing and constitute a whole new burgeoning branch of nanotechnology, nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS). In such context, the general goal of my research is to generate, enhance and control optical forces on silicon photonics platforms, with a focus on developing new functionalities and demonstrating novel effects, which will potentially lead to a new class of silicon photonic devices for a broad spectrum of applications. In this dissertation, the concept of optical force and the general background of the NOMS research area are first introduced. The general goal of the silicon photonics research area and the research presented in this dissertation is then described. Subsequently, the fundamental theory for optical force is summarized. The different methods to calculate optical forces are enumerated and briefly reviewed. Integrated hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPWG) devices have been successfully fabricated and the enhanced optical forces experimentally measured for the first time. All-optical amplification of RF signals has been successfully demonstrated. The optical force generated by one laser is used to mechanically change the optical path and hence the output power of another laser. In addition, completely optically tunable mechanical nonlinear behavior has been demonstrated for the first time and systematically studied. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities has been demonstrated with a "photon see-saw" device. This photon see-saw is a novel multicavity optomechanical device which consists of two photonic crystal

  7. International Workshop on New Photon-detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The third edition of the « International Workshop on New Photon-Detectors (PhotoDet 2012) » will be held at the Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), Orsay, France, from 13th to 15th of June, 2012. The workshop is devoted to recent developments in photo-sensors and their applications in different fields like high energy physics,nuclear physics, cosmic-ray physics, astronomy, cosmology and medical sciences. The Geiger-mode multi-pixel photon detectors and their related front-end and read-out electronics represent the main targets of the workshop. Topics related to Hybrid-PMT, APD, MCP-PMT and other new photon sensors are also covered.

  8. Picosecond response of a photon drag detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmitt, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    The primary use of photon drag detectors has been with CO{sub 2} lasers at 10{mu}m. Cornmercially-available devices are limited to response times of < 0.5-1ns and voltage responsivities of <0.5{mu}V W{sup -1}. This poster paper will describe the first photon drag detector specifically designed for very fast response. Using the free-election laser FELIX at the FOM Institute in the Netherlands, a rise time of <50ps has been demonstrated, using a 5mm{sup 2} area detector with a responsivity of >1{mu}V W{sup -1} over the wavelength range 10-25{mu}m. The figure shows the clear resolution of the micropulse structure of the laser. The actual width of each pulse is a few picosecoods, with a micropulse spacing of Ins. The advantages or photon drag detectors are room-temperature operation, linear response to intensifies greater than 10{sup 6}MW cm{sup -2} and very high damage threshold. These detectors are cheap to manufacture and, using different semiconductors, can be designed for any wavelength from 1 {mu}m-5mm.

  9. Experimental studies of radiation damage of silicon detectors. Internal report

    SciTech Connect

    Angelescu, T.; Ghete, V.M.; Ghiordanescu, N.; Lazanu, I.; Mihul, A.; Golutvin, I.; Lazanu, S.; Savin, I.; Vasilescu, A.; Biggeri, U.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M. |; Li, Z.; Kraner, H.W.

    1994-02-01

    New particle physics experiments are correlated with high luminosity and/or high energy. The new generation of colliding beam machines which will be constructed will make an extrapolation of a factor of 100 in the center of mass energy and of 1000 in luminosity beyond present accelerators. The scientific community hopes that very exciting physics results could be achieved this way, from the solution to the problem of electroweak symmetry breaking to the possible discovery of new, unpredicted phenomena. The particles which compose the radiation field are: electrons, pions, neutrons, protons and photons. It has become evident that the problem of the radiation resistance of detectors in this severe environment is a crucial one. This situation is complicated more by the fact that detectors must work all the run time of the machine, and better all the time of the experiment, without replacement (part or whole). So, studies related to the investigation of the radiation hardness of all detector parts, are developing. The studies are in part material and device characterization after irradiation, and in part technological developments, made in order to find harder, cheaper technologies, for larger surfaces. Semiconductor detectors have proven to be a good choice for vertex and calorimeter. Both fixed target machines and colliders had utilized in the past silicon junction detectors as the whole or part of the detection system. Precision beam hodoscopes and sophisticated trigger devices with silicon are equally used. The associated electronics in located near the detectors, and is subjected to the same radiation fields. Studies of material and device radiation hardness are developing in parallel. Here the authors present results on the radiation hardness of silicon, both as a bulk material and as detectors, to neutron irradiation at high fluences.

  10. Silicon Photonic Devices for Optical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ciyuan

    The requirement for high performance computer will be significantly increased by the fast development of the internet. However, traditional CMOS computer will meet its bottleneck due to the miniaturization problem. Optical computer comes to be the leading candidate to solve this issue. Silicon photonic technology has tremendous developments and thus it becomes an ideal platform to implement optical computing system. In Chapter 1, I will first show the development of the optical computing and silicon photonic technology. I will also discuss some key nonlinear optical effects of silicon photonic devices. Based on the current silicon photonic technology, I will then make a brief introduction on the optical direct logic for the 2D optical computing and spatial light modulator for the 3D optical computing, both of which will be discussed in detail in the followed chapters. In Chapter 2, I will discuss micro-ring resonator which is the key element of optical directed logic circuit discussed in Chapter 3. I will give the analytical model based on photonic circuit to explain the performance of the micro-ring resonator. The group delay and the loss of the micro-ring resonator will be analyzed. And I will also show the active tuning of the transmission spectrum by using the nonlinear effect of silicon. In Chapter 3, I will show a revised optical direct-logic (DL) circuit for 2D optical computer that is well suited for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible silicon photonics. It can significantly reduce the latency compared with traditional CMOS computers. For proof of concept, I demonstrated a scalable and reconfigurable optical directed-logic architecture consisting of a regular array of micro-ring resonator based optical on-off switches. The switches are controlled by electrical input logic signals through embedded p-i-n junctions. The circuit can be reconfigured to perform any 2x2 combinational logic operations by thermally tuning the operation modes of

  11. Dow Corning photonics: the silicon advantage in automotive photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Terry V.; Paquet, Rene; Norris, Ann; Pettersen, Babette

    2005-02-01

    The Automotive Market offers several opportunities for Dow Corning to leverage the power of silicon-based materials. Dow Corning Photonics Solutions has a number of developments that may be attractive for the emergent photonics needs in automobiles, building on 40 years of experience as a leading Automotive supplier with a strong foundation of expertise and an extensive product offering- from encapsulents and highly reliable resins, adhesives, insulating materials and other products, ensuring that the advantage of silicones are already well-embedded in Automotive systems, modules and components. The recent development of LED encapsulants of exceptional clarity and stability has extended the potential for Dow Corning"s strength in Photonics to be deployed "in-car". Demonstration of board-level and back-plane solutions utilising siloxane waveguide technology offers new opportunities for systems designers to integrate optical components at low cost on diverse substrates. Coupled with work on simple waveguide technology for sensors and data communications applications this suite of materials and technology offerings is very potent in this sector. The harsh environment under hood and the very extreme thermal range that materials must sustain in vehicles due to both their engine and the climate is an applications specification that defines the siloxane advantage. For these passive optics applications the siloxanes very high clarity at the data-communications wavelengths coupled with extraordinary stability offers significant design advantage. The future development of Head-Up-Displays for instrumentation and data display will offer yet more opportunities to the siloxanes in Automotive Photonics.

  12. Practical photon number detection with electric field-modulated silicon avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, O; Yuan, Z L; Shields, A J

    2012-01-01

    Low-noise single-photon detection is a prerequisite for quantum information processing using photonic qubits. In particular, detectors that are able to accurately resolve the number of photons in an incident light pulse will find application in functions such as quantum teleportation and linear optics quantum computing. More generally, such a detector will allow the advantages of quantum light detection to be extended to stronger optical signals, permitting optical measurements limited only by fluctuations in the photon number of the source. Here we demonstrate a practical high-speed device, which allows the signals arising from multiple photon-induced avalanches to be precisely discriminated. We use a type of silicon avalanche photodiode in which the lateral electric field profile is strongly modulated in order to realize a spatially multiplexed detector. Clearly discerned multiphoton signals are obtained by applying sub-nanosecond voltage gates in order to restrict the detector current. PMID:22273682

  13. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  14. Silicon Detector Letter of Intent

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

    2010-05-26

    This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

  15. Development of Ultra-High Sensivity Silicon Carbide Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Xin, Xiao-Bin; Alexandrov, Petre; Stahle, Carl M.; Guan, Bing; Zhao, Jian H.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of silicon carbide (SiC) detectors have been developed to study the sensitivity of SiC ultraviolet (UV) detectors, including Schottky photodiodes, p-i-n photodiodes, avalanche photodiodes (APDs), and single photon-counting APDs. Due to the very wide bandgap and thus extremely low leakage current, Sic photo-detectors showed excellent sensitivity. The specific detectivity, D*, of SiC photodiodes are orders of magnitude higher than that of their competitors, such as Si photodiodes, and comparable to the D* of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). To pursue the ultimate detection sensitivity, SiC APDs and single photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) have also been fabricated. By operating the SiC APDs at a linear mode gain over 10(exp 6), SPADs in UV have been demonstrated. SiC UV detectors have great potential for use in solar blind UV detection and biosensing. Moreover, SiC detectors have excellent radiation hardness and high temperature tolerance which makes them ideal for extreme environment applications such as in space or on the surface of the Moon or Mars.

  16. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  17. Detector for high-energy photon backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Erker, Joseph W.; Duncan, Michael Z.; Hartford, Thomas J.; Sivers, E. A.; Hopkinson, James F.

    1993-12-01

    High energy photon backscatter uses pair production to probe deep beneath surfaces with single side accessibility or to image thick, radiographically opaque objects. At the higher photon energies needed to penetrate thick and/or highly attenuating objects, Compton backscatter becomes strongly forward peaked with relatively little backscatter flux. Furthermore, the downward energy shift of the backscattered photon makes it more susceptible to attenuation on its outbound path. Above 1.022 MeV, pair production is possible; at about 10 MeV, pari production crosses over Compton scatter as the dominant x-ray interaction mechanism. The backscattered photons can be hard x rays from the bremsstrahlung of the electrons and positrons or 0.511 MeV photons from the annihilation of the positron. Monte Carlo computer simulations of such a backscatter system were done to characterize the output signals and to optimize a high energy detector design. This paper touches on the physics of high energy backscatter imaging and describes at some length the detector design for tomographic and radiographic imaging.

  18. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  19. Silicon technologies for arrays of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulinatti, Angelo; Ceccarelli, Francesco; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    In order to fulfill the requirements of many applications, we recently developed a new technology aimed at combining the advantages of traditional thin and thick silicon Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD). In particular we demonstrated single-pixel detectors with a remarkable improvement in the Photon Detection Efficiency in the red/nearinfrared spectrum (e.g. 40% at 800nm) while maintaining a timing jitter better than 100ps. In this paper we discuss the limitations of such Red-Enhanced (RE) technology from the point of view of the fabrication of small arrays of SPAD and we propose modifications to the structure aimed at overcoming these issues. We also report the first preliminary experimental results attained on devices fabricated adopting the improved structure.

  20. A beta-ray spectrometer based on a two-or three silicon detector coincidence telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Weizman, Y.; Hirning, C. R.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the operation of a beta-ray energy spectrometer based on a silicon detector telescope using two or three elements. The front detector is a planar, totally-depleted, silicon surface barrier detector that is 97 μm thick, the back detector is a room-temperature, lithium compensated, silicon detector that is 5000 μm thick, and the intermediate detector is similar to the front detector but 72 μm thick and intended to be used only in intense photon fields. The three detectors are mounted in a light-tight aluminum housing. The capability of the spectrometer to reject photons is based upon the fact that the incident photon will have a small probability of simultaneously losing detectable energy in two detectors, and an even smaller probability of losing detectable energy in all three detectors. Electrons will, however, almost always record measurable events in either the front two or all three detectors. A coincidence requirement between the detectors thus rejects photon induced events. With a 97 μm thick detector the lower energy coincidence threshold is approximately 110 keV. With an ultra-thin 40 μm thick front detector, and operated at 15°C, the spectrometer is capable of detecting even 60-70 keV electrons with a coincidence efficiency of 60%. The spectrometer has been used to measure beta radiation fields in CANDU reactor working environments, and the spectral information is intended to support dose algorithms for the LiF TLD chips used in the Ontario Hydro dosimetry program.

  1. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×10 6 X-rays/s/pixel.

  2. Investigation of Self Triggered Cosmic Ray Detectors using Silicon Photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Adrian; Niduaza, Rommel; Hernandez, Victor; Ruiz, Daniel; Ramos, Daniel; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura; Ritt, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a highly sensitive light detector capable of measuring single photons. It costs a fraction of the photomultiplier tube and operates slightly above the breakdown voltage. At this conference we describe our investigation of SiPM, the multipixel photon counters (MPPC) from Hamamatsu as readout detectors for plastic scintillators working for detecting cosmic ray particles. Our setup consists of scintillator sheets embedded with blue to green wavelength shifting fibers optically coupled to MPPCs to detect scintillating light. Four detector assemblies would be constructed and arranged to work in self triggered mode. Using custom matching tee boxes, the amplified MPPC signals are fed to discriminators with threshold set to give a reasonable coincidence count rate. Moreover, the detector waveforms are digitized using a 5 Giga Samples per second waveform digitizer, the DRS4, and triggered with the coincidence logic to capture the MPPC waveforms. Offline analysis of the digitized waveforms is accomplished using the CERN package PAW and results of our experiments and the data analysis would also be discussed. US Department of Education Title V Grant Number PO31S090007.

  3. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  4. Overview of Silicon Detectors in STAR: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Kabana, Sonia; Collaboration: The SVT, SSD and HFT detector groups of the STAR experiment at RHIC

    2011-12-13

    The STAR experiment at RHIC aims to study the QCD phase transition and the origin of the spin of the proton. Its main detector for charged particle track reconstruction is a Time Projection Chamber, which has been supplemented with a silicon detector involving two different technologies, in particular double-sided silicon strip and silicon drift technology. STAR is preparing now for a new Silicon Vertex Detector, using double-sided silicon strip, single-sided silicon strip-pads, and CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors technology, planned to take data in 2014. We give an overview of the design, calibration and performances of the silicon detectors used by the STAR experiment in the past and the expected performances of the future silicon detector upgrade.

  5. A silicon strip detector dose magnifying glass for IMRT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Petasecca, M.; Khanna, S.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows the delivery of escalated radiation dose to tumor while sparing adjacent critical organs. In doing so, IMRT plans tend to incorporate steep dose gradients at interfaces between the target and the organs at risk. Current quality assurance (QA) verification tools such as 2D diode arrays, are limited by their spatial resolution and conventional films are nonreal time. In this article, the authors describe a novel silicon strip detector (CMRP DMG) of high spatial resolution (200 {mu}m) suitable for measuring the high dose gradients in an IMRT delivery. Methods: A full characterization of the detector was performed, including dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with Farmer ion chamber measurements, stem effect, dose linearity, uniformity, energy response, angular response, and penumbra measurements. They also present the application of the CMRP DMG in the dosimetric verification of a clinical IMRT plan. Results: The detector response changed by 23% for a 390-fold change in the dose per pulse. A correction function is derived to correct for this effect. The strip detector depth dose curve agrees with the Farmer ion chamber within 0.8%. The stem effect was negligible (0.2%). The dose linearity was excellent for the dose range of 3-300 cGy. A uniformity correction method is described to correct for variations in the individual detector pixel responses. The detector showed an over-response relative to tissue dose at lower photon energies with the maximum dose response at 75 kVp nominal photon energy. Penumbra studies using a Varian Clinac 21EX at 1.5 and 10.0 cm depths were measured to be 2.77 and 3.94 mm for the secondary collimators, 3.52 and 5.60 mm for the multileaf collimator rounded leaf ends, respectively. Point doses measured with the strip detector were compared to doses measured with EBT film and doses predicted by the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The differences were 1

  6. Commissioning and operation of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. D'Auria

    2002-01-18

    The CDF-II silicon detector has been partially commissioned and used for taking preliminary physics data. This paper is a report on commissioning and initial operations of the 5.8m{sup 2} silicon detector. This experience can be useful to the large silicon systems that are presently under construction.

  7. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  8. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  9. Microstructured silicon neutron detectors for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, S.; Fleta, C.; Guardiola, C.; Jumilla, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Lozano, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present the design and performance of a perforated thermal neutron silicon detector with a 6LiF neutron converter. This device was manufactured within the REWARD project workplace whose aim is to develop and enhance technologies for the detection of nuclear and radiological materials. The sensor perforated structure results in a higher efficiency than that obtained with an equivalent planar sensor. The detectors were tested in a thermal neutron beam at the nuclear reactor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon and the intrinsic detection efficiency for thermal neutrons and the gamma sensitivity were obtained. The Geant4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the experimental conditions, i.e. thermal neutron beam and the whole detector geometry. An intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency of 8.6%±0.4% with a discrimination setting of 450 keV was measured.

  10. The performance of photon counting imaging with a Geiger mode silicon avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hui-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ji, Zhong-Jie; Chen, Qian

    2013-10-01

    In principle, photon counting imaging can detect a photon. With the development of low-level-light image intensifier techniques and low-level-light detection devices, photon counting imaging can now detect photon images under extremely low illumination. Based on a Geiger mode silicon avalanche photodiode single photon counter, an experimental system for photon counting imaging was built through two-dimensional scanning of a SPAD (single photon avalanche diode) detector. The feasibility of the imaging platform was validated experimentally. Two images with different characteristics, namely, the USAF 1951 resolution test panel and the image of Lena, were chosen to evaluate the imaging performance of the experimental system. The results were compared and analysed. The imaging properties under various illumination and scanning steps were studied. The lowest illumination limit of the SPAD photon counting imaging was determined.

  11. Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Marsili, Francesco; Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Painter, Oskar J.; Shaw, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated WSi-based superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors coupled to SiNx waveguides with integrated ring resonators. This photonics platform enables the implementation of robust and efficient photon-counting detectors with fine spectral resolution near 1550 nm.

  12. Silicon Photonics: The System on Chip Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, Alberto

    This chapter describes possible applications of silicon photonics to the System on Chip (SoC) domain. Systems on Chip (SoCs) are complex systems containing billions of transistors integrated in a unique silicon-chip, implementing even complex functionalities by means of a variety of modules communicating with the system memories and/or between them through a proper communication system. The higher and higher integration density is becoming such that many issues arise when a SoC has to be integrated, and electrical limits of interconnect wires are a limiting factor for performance. According to this scenario, a new technology is required for the on-chip interconnect, in order to overcome current physical and performance issues; one possible solution is the optical interconnect, exploiting the many benefits of light to transport information across the chip. From an industrial point of view it is fundamental that such a new technology be fully CMOS compatible, in order to be able to continue to use current SoC design methodologies as well as present manufacturing equipment for the whole electronic part of the chip. Many semiconductor industries are today investigating such a novel field and a number of projects are currently running in order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a revolutionary on-chip communication system relying on both CMOS technology and photonics.

  13. Silicon Detectors-Tools for Discovery in Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Krammer, Manfred

    2009-07-07

    Since the first application of Silicon strip detectors in high energy physics in the early 1980ies these detectors have enabled the experiments to perform new challenging measurements. With these devices it became possible to determine the decay lengths of heavy quarks, for example in the fixed target experiment NA11 at CERN. In this experiment Silicon tracking detectors were used for the identification of particles containing a c-quark. Later on, the experiments at the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN used already larger and sophisticated assemblies of Silicon detectors to identify and study particles containing the b-quark. A very important contribution to the discovery of the last of the six quarks, the top quark, has been made by even larger Silicon vertex detectors inside the experiments CDF and D0 at Fermilab. Nowadays a mature detector technology, the use of Silicon detectors is no longer restricted to the vertex regions of collider experiments. The two multipurpose experiments ATLAS and CMS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN contain large tracking detectors made of Silicon. The largest is the CMS Inner Tracker consisting of 200 m{sup 2} of Silicon sensor area. These detectors will be very important for a possible discovery of the Higgs boson or of Super Symmetric particles. This paper explains the first applications of Silicon sensors in particle physics and describes the continuous development of this technology up to the construction of the state of the art Silicon detector of CMS.

  14. Development of a cylindrical tracking detector with multichannel scintillation fibers and pixelated photon detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Y.; Miwa, K.; Honda, R.; Shiozaki, T.; Chiga, N.

    2015-07-01

    We are developing a cylindrical tracking detector for a Σp scattering experiment in J-PARC with scintillation fibers and the Pixelated Photon Detector (PPD) readout, which is called as cylindrical fiber tracker (CFT), in order to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles emitted inside CFT. CFT works not only as a tracking detector but also a particle identification detector from energy deposits. A prototype CFT consisting of two straight layers and one spiral layer was constructed. About 1100 scintillation fibers with a diameter of 0.75 mm (Kuraray SCSF-78 M) were used. Each fiber signal was read by Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC, HPK S10362-11-050P, 1×1 mm2, 400 pixels) fiber by fiber. MPPCs were handled with Extended Analogue Silicon Photomultipliers Integrated ReadOut Chip (EASIROC) boards, which were developed for the readout of a large number of MPPCs. The energy resolution of one layer was 28% for a 70 MeV proton where the energy deposit in fibers was 0.7 MeV.

  15. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362–33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15°C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  16. Spectroscopy-on-chip applications of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baets, Roel; Subramanian, Ananth Z.; Dhakal, Ashim; Selvaraja, Shankar K.; Komorowska, Katarzyna; Peyskens, Frédéric; Ryckeboer, Eva; Yebo, Nebiyu; Roelkens, Gunther; Le Thomas, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    In recent years silicon photonics has become a mature technology enabling the integration of a variety of optical and optoelectronic functions by means of advanced CMOS technology. While most efforts in this field have gone to telecom and datacom/interconnect applications, there is a rapidly growing interest in using the same technology for sensing applications, ranging from refractive index sensing to spectroscopic sensing. In this paper the prospect of silicon photonics for absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy on-a-chip will be discussed. To allow spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared the silicon photonics platform is extended with silicon nitride waveguides.

  17. Stacked Metal Silicide/Silicon Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Selective doping of silicon in proposed metal silicide/silicon Schottky-barrier infrared photodetector increases maximum detectable wavelength. Stacking layers to form multiple Schottky barriers increases quantum efficiency of detector. Detectors of new type enhance capabilities of far-infrared imaging arrays. Grows by molecular-beam epitaxy on silicon waferscontaining very-large-scale integrated circuits. Imaging arrays of detectors made in monolithic units with image-preprocessing circuitry.

  18. An integrated Micromegas UV-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melai, Joost; Lyashenko, Alexey; Breskin, Amos; van der Graaf, Harry; Timmermans, Jan; Visschers, Jan; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-05-01

    Preliminary results of a photon detector combining a Micromegas-like multiplier coated with a UV-sensitive CsI photocathode are described. The multiplier is made in a CMOS compatible InGrid technology, which allows to postprocess it directly on the surface of an imaging IC. This method is aimed at building light-sensitive imaging detectors where all elements are monolithically integrated. We show that the CsI photocathode deposited in the InGrid mesh does not alter the device performance. Maximum gains of ˜6000 were reached in a single-grid element operated in Ar/CH4, with a 2% ion backflow fraction returning to the photocathode.

  19. Neutron spectrometer for ITER using silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Sean W.; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson-Sunden, Erik; Ericsson, Goran; Gatu-Johnson, Maria; Hellesen, Carl; Ronchi, Emanuel; Sjostrand, Henrik

    2008-10-15

    High resolution neutron spectrometers provide information about plasma parameters at existing fusion experiments. Such a system may also be employed at ITER. Proton recoil telescopes have classically been used to detect neutrons with good energy resolution but poor efficiency. Using annular silicon detectors, it is possible to greatly increase the solid angle coverage and hence improve efficiency. Based on a simulation (MCNPX) study, the scaling of energy resolution, efficiency, and time to determine an ion temperature to 10% accuracy on foil thickness and detector location is shown. The latter quantity is used to determine the optimum foil thickness and detector geometry for specific plasma temperatures. For a 20 keV deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma, 5.3% resolution with efficiency of 2.9x10{sup -4} n cm{sup 2} is attainable using the available detectors. This gives a temperature measurement with 10% accuracy in 1.1 ms for a neutron flux of 2x10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2}. Multiple detectors can be used to further increase the efficiency if needed. A system of this kind could be tested in a future DT campaign at, for example, JET.

  20. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  1. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  2. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aoki; N. Bacchetta; S. Behari et al.

    2004-02-25

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology. Single sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  3. Operational experience with the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mondragon, Miguel N.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CDF Run II Silicon Detector is the largest operating silicon detector in High Energy Physics. Its 722,000 channels spread over 7 m{sup 2} of silicon micro-strip sensors allow precision tracking and vertexing. The CDF silicon detector played a critical role in the discovery of B{sub s} mixing and is used extensively for the current Higgs Boson searches. Over the last 7 years, the detector efficiency has remained stable at 95% after the Run II commissioning period. The infrastructure (cooling, power supplies) problems dealt with are discussed.

  4. Memory effect in silicon time-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dalla Mora, A.; Contini, D. Di Sieno, L.; Tosi, A.; Boso, G.; Villa, F.; Pifferi, A.

    2015-03-21

    We present a comprehensive characterization of the memory effect arising in thin-junction silicon Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) when exposed to strong illumination. This partially unknown afterpulsing-like noise represents the main limiting factor when time-gated acquisitions are exploited to increase the measurement dynamic range of very fast (picosecond scale) and faint (single-photon) optical signals following a strong stray one. We report the dependences of this unwelcome signal-related noise on photon wavelength, detector temperature, and biasing conditions. Our results suggest that this so-called “memory effect” is generated in the deep regions of the detector, well below the depleted region, and its contribution on detector response is visible only when time-gated SPADs are exploited to reject a strong burst of photons.

  5. Cadmium zinc telluride detector for low photon energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kyung-Wook; Wang, Kai; Reznic, Alla; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a polycrystalline radiation detector that has been investigated over the years for a variety of applications including Constellation X-ray space mission [1] and direct-conversion medical imaging such as digital mammography [2]. Due to its high conversion gain and low electron-hole pair creation energy (~4.43 eV) [3], it has found use in high end, photon counting medical imaging applications including positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, its potential in low photon energy applications has not been fully explored. In this work, we explore the capacity of the CZT material to count low photon energies (6 keV - 20 keV). These energies are of direct relevance to applications in gamma ray breast brachytheraphy and mammography, X-ray protein crystallography, X-ray mammography and mammography tomosynthesis. We also present a design that integrates the CZT direct conversion detector with an inhouse fabricated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) array. A CZT photoconductor (2 cm x 2 cm size, 5-mm-thick) prepared by the traveling heat method (THM) from RedlenTM is characterized. The current-voltage characteristics reveal a resistivity of 3.3 x 1011 Ω•cm and a steady state dark current in the range of nA. Photocurrent transients under different biases and illumination pulses are studied to investigate photogeneration and the charge trapping process. It is found that charge trapping plays a more significant role in transient behavior at low biases and low frequency.

  6. Development of the ORRUBA Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Johnson, M. S.; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest due to the proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new high solid-angular coverage array, composed of two rings of silicon detectors, optimized for measuring (d,p) reactions. A partial implementation has been used to measure (d,p) reactions on nuclei around the N = 82 shell closure.

  7. Beta ray spectroscopy based on a plastic scintillation detector/silicon surface barrier detector coincidence telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Hirning, C. R.; Yuen, P.; Aikens, M.

    1994-01-01

    Beta radiation is now recognized as a significant radiation safety problem and several international conferences have recently been devoted to the problems of mixed field beta/photon dosimetry. Conventional dosimetry applies algorithms to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) multi-element badges which attempt to extract dose information based on the comparison of TL signals from ``thick/thin'' and/or ``bare/filtered'' elements. These may be grossly innacurate due to inadequate or non-existant knowledge of the energy spectrum of both the beta radiation and the accompanying photon field, as well as other factors. In this paper, we discuss the operation of a beta-ray energy spectrometer based on a two element, E × dE detector telescope intended to support dose algorithms with beta spectral information. Beta energies are measured via a 5 cm diameter × 2 cm thick BC-404 plastic scintillator preceded by a single, 100 μm thick, totally depleted, silicon dE detector. Photon events in the E detector are rejected by requiring a coincidence between the E and dE detectors. Photon rejection ratios vary from 225:1 at 1.25 MeV (60Co) to 360:1 at 0.36 MeV (133Ba). The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from a lower energy coincidence threshold of approximately 125 keV to an upper limit of 3.5 MeV. This energy range spans the great majority of beta-emitting radionuclides in nuclear facilities.

  8. Characterization of Silicon Detector Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    2015-07-22

    Configuration and calibration of the front-end electronics typical of many silicon detector configurations were investigated in a lab activity based on a pair of strip sensors interfaced with FSSR2 read-out chips and an FPGA. This simple hardware configuration, originally developed for a telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, was used to measure thresholds and noise on individual readout channels and to study the influence that different configurations of the front-end electronics had on the observed levels of noise in the system. An understanding of the calibration and operation of this small detector system provided an opportunity to explore the architecture of larger systems such as those currently in use at LHC experiments.

  9. Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2006-10-01

    The CDF silicon detector is one of the largest silicon detectors in operation. It has a total of 722,432 electronic channels, and it covers a sensor surface area of 6 m{sup 2}. The detector has been operating reliably for five years, and it has recorded 1.5 fb{sup -1} of data. This article discusses experiences of operating such a large, complex system as well as the longevity of the detector.

  10. Preliminary studies using silicon strip detectors in digital autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghera, B.; Ott, R.J. . Inst. of Cancer Research)

    1993-08-01

    A prototype 1-D silicon strip detector system for applications in autoradiography is described. The commercially available detector allows 2-D imaging to be achieved by acquiring projection data at multiple angles as the source is rotated above the detector. Standard image reconstruction techniques are employed to produce the final 2-D image. The first test performed is presented showing that tomography is possible with 1-D silicon strip detectors.

  11. Glucose sensing by means of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaele, Ronny; Ryckeboer, Eva; Hattasan, Nannicha; De Koninck, Yannick; Muneeb, Muhammad; Verstuyft, Steven; Delbeke, Danaë; Bogaerts, Wim; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a fast growing metabolic disease, where the patients suffer from disordered glucose blood levels. Monitoring the blood glucose values in combination with extra insulin injection is currently the only therapy to keep the glucose concentration in diabetic patients under control, minimizing the long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations and improving quality of life of the diabetic patients. Implantable sensors allow continuous glucose monitoring, offering the most reliable data to control the glucose levels. Infrared absorption spectrometers offer a non-chemical measurement method to determine the small glucose concentrations in blood serum. In this work, a spectrometer platform based on silicon photonics is presented, allowing the realization of very small glucose sensors suitable for building implantable sensors. A proof-of-concept of a spectrometer with integrated evanescent sample interface is presented, and the route towards a fully implantable spectrometer is discussed.

  12. Silicon-chip source of bright photon pairs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei C; Lu, Xiyuan; Zhang, Jidong; Painter, Oskar; Lin, Qiang

    2015-08-10

    Integrated quantum photonics relies critically on the purity, scalability, integrability, and flexibility of a photon source to support diverse quantum functionalities on a single chip. Here we report a chip-scale photon-pair source on the silicon-on-insulator platform that utilizes dramatic cavity-enhanced four-wave mixing in a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator. The device is able to produce high-quality photon pairs at different wavelengths with a high spectral brightness of 6.24×10(7) pairs/s/mW(2)/GHz and photon-pair correlation with a coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 1386 ± 278 while pumped with a continuous-wave laser. The superior performance, together with the structural compactness and CMOS compatibility, opens up a great avenue towards quantum silicon photonics with capability of multi-channel parallel information processing for both integrated quantum computing and long-haul quantum communication. PMID:26367942

  13. Integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zanyun; Huang, Beiju; Zhang, Zan; Cheng, Chuantong; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hongda

    2016-05-01

    An integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface is demonstrated by connecting a bidirectional grating based E-O modulator and a germanium waveguide photodetector. To investigate this photonic interconnect, both static and dynamic performance of the discrete devices are characterized respectively. Based on the characterization work, data transmission experiment is carried out for the photonic interconnect. Eye diagram results indicate the photonic interconnect can operate up to 7 Gb/s.

  14. Lithium-drifted silicon detector with segmented contacts

    DOEpatents

    Tindall, Craig S.; Luke, Paul N.

    2006-06-13

    A method and apparatus for creating both segmented and unsegmented radiation detectors which can operate at room temperature. The devices include a metal contact layer, and an n-type blocking contact formed from a thin layer of amorphous semiconductor. In one embodiment the material beneath the n-type contact is n-type material, such as lithium compensated silicon that forms the active region of the device. The active layer has been compensated to a degree at which the device may be fully depleted at low bias voltages. A p-type blocking contact layer, or a p-type donor material can be formed beneath a second metal contact layer to complete the device structure. When the contacts to the device are segmented, the device is capable of position sensitive detection and spectroscopy of ionizing radiation, such as photons, electrons, and ions.

  15. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  16. New Generation of Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsman, G. N.

    2015-09-01

    We present an overview of recent results for new generation of infrared and optical superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) that has already demonstrated a performance that makes them devices-of-choice for many applications. SNSPDs provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, SNSPDs are also compatible with an integrated optical platform as a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. By embedding SNSPDs in nanophotonic circuits we realize waveguide integrated single photon detectors which unite all desirable detector properties in a single device.

  17. Graphene Josephson Junction Single Photon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    Single photon detectors (SPDs) have found use across a wide array of applications depending on the wavelength to which they are sensitive. Graphene, because of its linear, gapless dispersion near the Dirac point, has a flat, wide bandwidth absorption that can be enhanced to near 100 % through the use of resonant structures making it a promising candidate for broadband SPDs. Upon absorbing a photon in the optical to mid-infrared range, a small (~10 μm2) sheet of graphene at cryogenic temperatures can experience a significant increase in electronic temperature due to its extremely low heat capacity. At 1550 nm, for example, calculations show that the temperature could rise by as much as 500 %. This temperature increase could be detected with near perfect quantum efficiency by making the graphene the weak link in a Josephson junction (JJ). We present a theoretical model demonstrating that such a graphene JJ SPD could operate at the readily achievable temperature of 3 K with near zero dark count, sub-50 ps timing jitter, and sub-5 ns dead time and report on the progress toward experimentally realizing the device.

  18. Wavelenght specific photon detector for the VUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, C. G.

    1980-05-01

    The high photon fluxes necessary for modulation experiments place troublesome requirements on detectors. The necessity of retaining good linearity at high effective count rates eliminates channeltrons. Use of a photomultiplier plus sodium salicylate is inattractive, both because of poor efficiency and because the combination cannot discriminate against long wavelength stray light or higher orders without additional losses due to filters. To solve these problems we have assembled a versatile detector based on an EMI venetian blind photomultiplier dynode chain in which the first dynode acts as the photochathode. The standard BeCu dynode has good efficiency in the 20-30 eV range, but it has a strong spectral dependence at higher energies. It was desirable therefore to be able to readily interchange the first dynode (cathode) with others coated with air stable materials, or to evaporate on the cathode in-situ. Total yield data for potential photocathodes is relatively scare in the 25-250 eV range. We have surveyed a number of materials looking for cathodes with good sensitivity, without sharp structure, and with sufficient wavelength selectivity to also act as filters. Suggestions will be given. A byproduct of this survey was materials which are sufficiently wavelenght intensive (e.g. air exposed Ge) to be better candidates for beam intensity monitors than the W or Au diodes commonly used.

  19. High-density optical interconnects by using silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urino, Yutaka; Usuki, Tatsuya; Fujikata, Junichi; Ishizaka, Masashige; Yamada, Koji; Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-02-01

    One of the most serious challenges facing the exponential performance growth in the information industry is a bandwidth bottleneck in inter-chip interconnects. Optical interconnects with silicon photonics have been expected to solve the problem because of the intrinsic properties of optical signals and the industrial advantages of silicon for use in the electronics industry. We therefore propose an optical interconnect system by using silicon photonics to solve the problem. We examined integration between photonics and electronics and integration between light sources and silicon substrates, and we propose a photonics-electronics convergence system based on these examinations. We also investigated the configurations and characteristics of optical components for the system, including silicon spot-size converters, silicon optical waveguides, silicon optical splitters, silicon optical modulators, germanium photodetectors, and arrayed laser diodes. We then demonstrated the feasibility of the system by fabricating a high-density silicon optical interposer by using silicon photonics hybridly integrated with arrayed laser diodes and monolithically integrated with the other optical components on a single silicon substrate. The pad pitches of optical modulators and photodetectors were designed to be 100 μm so that LSI bare chips were able to contact to them electrically by flip-chip bonding. Since this system was optically complete and closed and no temperature sensitive component was used, we did not need to align the fibers, control the polarization, or control the temperature throughout the experiments. As a result, we achieved errorfree data links at 20 Gbps and high bandwidth density of 30 Tbps/cm2 with the silicon optical interposer.

  20. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  1. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  2. Silicon charge detector for the CREAM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. H.; Park, N. H.; Nam, S. W.; Ahn, H. S.; Allison, P.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Baek, S. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Bigongiari, G.; Boyle, P.; Childers, J. T.; Conkin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Hyun, H. J.; Jeon, J. A.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lutz, L.; Maestro, P.; Malinine, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Minnick, S.; Mognet, S. I.; Nutter, S.; Park, J. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sina, R.; Swordy, S.; Wakely, S.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Yoon, Y. S.; Zei, R.; Zinn, S. Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) payload had its first successful flight in December 2004 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as a Long Duration Balloon mission. Its aim is to explore the supernova acceleration limit of cosmic rays, the relativistic gas of protons, electrons and heavy nuclei arriving at Earth from outside of the solar system. The instrument is equipped with several systems to measure charge and energy spectra for Z=1 26 nuclei over the energy range 10 10eV. The Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) is a precision device to measure the charge of incident cosmic rays. The design, construction, integration and preliminary performance of the SCD are detailed in this paper.

  3. Silicon strip detectors for the ATLAS upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.

    2011-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN will extend its current physics program by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, one of the two general-purpose experiments of the LHC, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of its internal tracker due to the harsh conditions in terms of particle rates and radiation doses. New radiation-hard prototype n-in-p silicon sensors have been produced for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS tracker. The sensors have been irradiated up to the fluences expected in the high-luminous LHC collider. This paper summarizes recent results on the performance of the irradiated n-in-p detectors. (authors)

  4. Niobium Silicon Alloys for Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; D'Addabbo, A.; Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Catalano, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Goupy, J.; Le Sueur, H.; Marnieros, S.

    2014-08-01

    We are studying the properties of Niobium Silicon amorphous alloys as a candidate material for the fabrication of highly sensitive kinetic inductance detectors (KID), optimized for very low optical loads. As in the case of other composite materials, the NbSi properties can be changed by varying the relative amounts of its components. Using a NbSi film with T = 1 K we have been able to obtain the first NbSi resonators, observe an optical response and acquire a spectrum in the band 50-300 GHz. The data taken show that this material has very high kinetic inductance and normal state surface resistivity . These properties are ideal for the development of KID. More measurements are planned to further characterize the NbSi alloy and fully investigate its potential.

  5. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis

    2004-08-31

    Disclosed herein is a photonic silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls selectively bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and determine the concentration of bound target.

  6. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ˜ 0.60 ( λ / n ) 3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ˜104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  7. Silicon detector readout system using commercially available items

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1986-05-01

    The basic properties of silicon detectors are briefly noted, including bulk and electrical properties. Thermal and shot noise in front end amplifiers is discussed. The configuration of detectors and preamps is then briefly described. A detector test is described and results are given. (LEW)

  8. Analysis of Silicon Photomultiplier Detector Waveforms from Cosmic Rays using Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Juan; Zavala, Favian; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Wedel, Zachary; Fan, Sewan; Ritt, Stefan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Silicon photomultiplier detectors exhibit high gain, low operating voltage, are insensitive to magnetic fields, and can detect light at the single photon level, making them very attractive for applications in fields such as particle physics, astrophysics, and medical physics. However, they exhibit effects that may prevent their optimal operation, including thermally induced high dark count rate, after pulse effects, and cross talk produced from photons in nearby pixels. In this presentation, we describe our coincidence setup using two scintillator pads and a Hamamatsu multipixel photon counter (MPPC) to gather cosmic ray produced signal pulses, and our methods of analysis for the detector waveforms. In particular, we discuss our methods of digitization, software implementation of low pass and Gaussian type filters, and the application of a domino ring sampler (DRS4) digitizing board to obtain signal waveforms to determine the operating characteristics for these detectors. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  9. THE 15 LAYER SILICON DRIFT DETECTOR TRACKER IN EXPERIMENT 896.

    SciTech Connect

    PANDY,S.U.

    1998-11-08

    Large linear silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for use in several experiments. Recently 15 detectors were used as a tracking device in BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). The detectors were successfully operated in a 6.2 T magnetic field. The behavior of the detectors, such as drift uniformity, resolution, and charge collection efficiency are presented. The effect of the environment on the detector performance is discussed. Some results from the experimental run are presented. The detectors performed well in an experimental environment. This is the first tracking application of these detectors.

  10. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S

    2013-02-21

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362-33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15° C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  11. Sputtered germanium/silicon devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nujhat, N.; Papouloute, J.-P.; DeBerry, M.; Jiang, L.; Korivi, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the ongoing investigation of magnetron sputtered germanium on silicon for photonics applications. Direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering has been used to deposit germanium layers on silicon at low growth temperatures and medium range vacuum levels. Standard photolithography has been used to make germanium photodetectors for the 1550 nm wavelength range. Electrical characterization, more specifically current-voltage measurements indicate that the devices function as intended. Sputtered silicon waveguides have also been fabricated and evaluated for possible applications in photonics integration. The sputtering-based developments in our present research are expected to provide for a flexible and economically viable manufacturing process for such devices.

  12. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  13. Near-IR photon number resolving detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanski, Jan; Huntington, Elanor H.

    2013-05-01

    Photon-Number-Resolving-Detection (PNRD) capability is crucial for many Quantum-Information (QI) applications, e.g. for Coherent-State-Quantum-Computing, Linear-Optics-Quantum-Computing. In Quantum-Key-Distribution and Quantum-Secret-Sharing over 1310/1550 nm fiber, two other important, defense and information security related, QI applications, it's crucial for the information transmission security to guarantee that the information carriers (photons) are single. Thus a PNRD can provide an additional security level against eavesdropping. Currently, there are at least a couple of promising PNRD technologies in the Near-Infrared, but all of them require cryogenic cooling. Thus a compact, portable PNRD, based on commercial Avalanche-Photo-Diodes (APDs), could be a very useful instrument for many QI experiments. For an APD-based PNRD, it is crucial to measure the APD-current in the beginning of the avalanche. Thus an efficient cancellation of the APD capacitive spikes is a necessary condition for the very weak APD current measurement. The detector's principle is based on two commercial, pair-matched InGaAs/InP APDs, connected in series. It leads to a great cancelation of the capacitive spikes caused by the narrow (300 ps), differential gate-pulses of maximum 4V amplitude assuming that both pulses are perfectly matched in regards to their phases, amplitudes, and shapes. The cancellation scheme could be used for other APD-technologies, e.g. Silicon, extending the detection spectrum from visible to NIR. The design distinguishes itself from other, APD-based, schemes by its scalability feature and its computer controlled cancellation of the capacitive spikes. Furthermore, both APDs could be equally used for the detection purpose, which opens a possibility for the odd-even photon number parity detection.

  14. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K.

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  15. Optical cross-talk effect in a semiconductor photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Kral, Lukas; Blazej, Josef

    2005-09-01

    Solid state single photon detectors are getting more and more attention in various areas of applied physics: optical sensors, communication, quantum key distribution, optical ranging and Lidar, time resolved spectroscopy, opaque media imaging and ballistic photon identification. Avalanche photodiodes specifically designed for single photon counting semiconductor avalanche structures have been developed on the basis of various materials: Si, Ge, GaP, GaAsP and InGaAs/InGaAsP at the Czech Technical University in Prague during the last 20 years. They have been tailored for numerous applications. Recently, there is a strong demand for the photon counting detector in a form of an array; even small arrays 10x1 or 3x3 are of great importance for users. Although the photon counting array can be manufactured, there exists a serious limitation for its performance: the optical cross-talk between individual detecting cells. This cross-talk is caused by the optical emission of the avalanche photon counting structure which accompanies the photon detection process. We have studied in detail the optical emission of the avalanche photon counting structure in the silicon shallow junction type photodiode. The timing properties, radiation pattern and spectral distribution of the emitted light have been measured for various detection structures and their different operating conditions. The ultimate limit for the cross-talk has been determined and the methods for its limitation have been proposed.

  16. Indium-bump-free antimonide superlattice membrane detectors on a silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamiri, M.; Klein, B.; Schuler, T.; Myers, S.; Cavallo, F.; Krishna, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present an approach to realize antimonide based superlattices on silicon substrates without using conventional Indium-bump hybridization. In this approach, PIN based superlattice detectors are grown on top of a 60 nm Al0.6Ga0.4Sb sacrificial layer on a GaSb host substrate. Following the growth, the individual pixels are transferred using our epitaxiallift off technique, which consists of a wet-etch to undercut the pixels followed by a dry-stamp process to transfer the pixels to a silicon substrate prepared with a gold layer. Structural and optical characterization of the transferred pixels was done using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The interface between the transferred pixels and the new substrate was abrupt and no significant degradation in the optical quality was observed. An Indium-bump-free membrane detector was then fabricated using this approach. Spectral response measurements provided a 100% cut-off wavelength of 4.3 μm at 77 K. The performance of the membrane detector was compared to a control detector on the as-grown substrate. The membrane detector was limited by surface leakage current. The proposed approach could pave the way for wafer-level integration of photonic detectors on silicon substrates, which could dramatically reduce the cost of these detectors.

  17. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  18. Flexible and tunable silicon photonic circuits on plastic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2012-01-01

    Flexible microelectronics has shown tremendous promise in a broad spectrum of applications, especially those that cannot be addressed by conventional microelectronics in rigid materials and constructions. These unconventional yet important applications range from flexible consumer electronics to conformal sensor arrays and biomedical devices. A recent paradigm shift in implementing flexible electronics is to physically transfer highly integrated devices made in high-quality, crystalline semiconductors on to plastic substrates. Here we demonstrate a flexible form of silicon photonics using the transfer-and-bond fabrication method. Photonic circuits including interferometers and resonators have been transferred onto flexible plastic substrates with preserved functionalities and performance. By mechanically deforming, the optical characteristics of the devices can be tuned reversibly over a remarkably large range. The demonstration of the new flexible photonic systems based on the silicon-on-plastic (SOP) platform could open the door to many future applications, including tunable photonics, optomechanical sensors and biomechanical and bio-photonic probes. PMID:22953043

  19. Single photon avalanche detectors: prospects of new quenching and gain mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-11-01

    While silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) have reached very high detection efficiency and timing resolution, their use in fibre-optic communications, optical free space communications, and infrared sensing and imaging remains limited. III-V compounds including InGaAs and InP are the prevalent materials for 1550 nm light detection. However, even the most sensitive 1550 nm photoreceivers in optical communication have a sensitivity limit of a few hundred photons. Today, the only viable approach to achieve single-photon sensitivity at 1550 nm wavelength from semiconductor devices is to operate the avalanche detectors in Geiger mode, essentially trading dynamic range and speed for sensitivity. As material properties limit the performance of Ge and III-V detectors, new conceptual insight with regard to novel quenching and gain mechanisms could potentially address the performance limitations of III-V SPADs. Novel designs that utilise internal self-quenching and negative feedback can be used to harness the sensitivity of single-photon detectors,while drastically reducing the device complexity and increasing the level of integration. Incorporation of multiple gain mechanisms, together with self-quenching and built-in negative feedback, into a single device also hold promise for a new type of detector with single-photon sensitivity and large dynamic range.

  20. Three dimensional silicon photonic crystals fabricated by two photon phase mask lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, P.; Braun, P. V.; Liao, H.; Brzezinski, A.; Chen, Y. C.; Nelson, E.; Shir, D.; Rogers, J. A.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

    2008-08-01

    We describe the fabrication of silicon three dimensional photonic crystals using polymer templates defined by a single step, two-photon exposure through a layer of photopolymer with relief molded on its surface. The resulting crystals exhibit high structural quality over large areas, displaying geometries consistent with calculation. Spectroscopic measurements of transmission and reflection through the silicon and polymer structures reveal excellent optical properties, approaching properties predicted by simulations that assume ideal layouts.

  1. Breakdown of silicon particle detectors under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeyrynen, S.; Raeisaenen, J.; Kassamakov, I.; Tuominen, E.

    2009-11-15

    Silicon particle detectors made on Czochralski and float zone silicon materials were irradiated with 7 and 9 MeV protons at a temperature of 220 K. During the irradiations, the detectors were biased up to their operating voltage. Specific values for the fluence and flux of the irradiation were found to cause a sudden breakdown in the detectors. We studied the limits of the fluence and the flux in the breakdown as well as the behavior of the detector response function under high flux irradiations. The breakdown was shown to be an edge effect. Additionally, the buildup of an oxide charge is suggested to lead to an increased localized electric field, which in turn triggers a charge carrier multiplication. Furthermore, we studied the influences of the type of silicon material and the configuration of the detector guard rings.

  2. Investigation of the Effect of Temperature and Light Emission from Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Castruita, Daniel; Ramos, Daniel; Hernandez, Victor; Niduaza, Rommel; Konx, Adrian; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura; Ritt, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is an extremely sensitive light detector capable of measuring very dim light and operates as a photon-number resolving detector. Its high gain comes from operating at slightly above the breakdown voltage, which is also accompanied by a high dark count rate. At this conference poster session we describe our investigation of using SiPMs, the multipixel photon counters (MPPC) from Hamamatsu, as readout detectors for development in a cosmic ray scintillating detector array. Our research includes implementation of a novel design that automatically adjusts for the bias voltage to the MPPC detectors to compensate for changes in the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we describe our investigations for the MPPC detector characteristics at different bias voltages, temperatures and light emission properties. To measure the faint light emitted from the MPPC we use a photomultiplier tube capable of detecting single photons. Our data acquisition setup consists of a 5 Giga sample/second waveform digitizer, the DRS4, triggered to capture the MPPC detector waveforms. Analysis of the digitized waveforms, using the CERN package PAW, would be discussed and presented. US Department of Education Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  3. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, H.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2001-11-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s nn=65 GeV and 130 GeV/ nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  4. Fabrication of detectors and transistors on high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, S.

    1988-06-01

    A new process for the fabrication of silicon p-i-n diode radiation detectors is described. The utilization of backside gettering in the fabrication process results in the actual physical removal of detrimental impurities from critical device regions. This reduces the sensitivity of detector properties to processing variables while yielding low diode reverse-leakage currents. In addition, gettering permits the use of processing temperatures compatible with integrated-circuit fabrication. P-channel MOSFETs and silicon p-i-n diodes have been fabricated simultaneously on 10 k..cap omega../center dot/cm<100> silicon using conventional integrated-circuit processing techniques. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Thick Silicon Double-Sided Strip Detectors for Low-Energy Small-Animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 μm strip pitch is attainable. Good trigger uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD (Double-sided strip detector) shows high potential for small-animal SPECT. PMID:20686626

  6. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  7. Cosmic ray positron research and silicon track detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon; Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to conduct research on: (1) position sensing detector systems, particularly those based upon silicon detectors, for use in future balloon and satellite experiments; and (2) positrons, electrons, proton, anti-protons, and helium particles as measured by the NASA NMSU Balloon Magnet Facility.

  8. Status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nahn

    2003-04-10

    A snapshot of the status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector is presented, with a summary of commissioning issues since the start of Run II, current performance of the detector, and the use of the data in both the trigger and offline reconstruction.

  9. Infrared transparent graphene heater for silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Schall, Daniel; Mohsin, Muhammad; Sagade, Abhay A; Otto, Martin; Chmielak, Bartos; Suckow, Stephan; Giesecke, Anna Lena; Neumaier, Daniel; Kurz, Heinrich

    2016-04-18

    Thermo-optical tuning of the refractive index is one of the pivotal operations performed in integrated silicon photonic circuits for thermal stabilization, compensation of fabrication tolerances, and implementation of photonic operations. Currently, heaters based on metal wires provide the temperature control in the silicon waveguide. The strong interaction of metal and light, however, necessitates a certain gap between the heater and the photonic structure to avoid significant transmission loss. Here we present a graphene heater that overcomes this constraint and enables an energy efficient tuning of the refractive index. We achieve a tuning power as low as 22 mW per free spectral range and fast response time of 3 µs, outperforming metal based waveguide heaters. Simulations support the experimental results and suggest that for graphene heaters the spacing to the silicon can be further reduced yielding the best possible energy efficiency and operation speed. PMID:27137229

  10. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  11. The Mark II Silicon Strip Vertex Detector and performance of a silicon detector telescope in the Mark II detector at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Labarga, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Gratta, G.; Litke, A.; Turala, M.; Zaccardelli, C. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Breakstone, A.; Parker, S. ); Barnett, B.; Dauncey, P.; Drewer, D.; Matthews, J. ); Jacobsen, R.; Lueth, V. )

    1989-12-01

    A Silicon Strip Vertex Detector (SSVD) consisting of 36 independent silicon detector modules has been built for use in the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). We discuss the performance of the individual modules and the stability and accuracy of their placement in the mechanical support. To gain operational experience at the SLC, we have assembled and placed inside the Mark II a telescope made of three Silicon Detector Modules. We present results from the first data run of the SLC on the overall performance of the Telescope, including backgrounds, charged particle tracking and spatial resolution. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Novel Waveguide Architectures for Light Sources in Silicon Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummidi, Ravi Sekhar

    Of the many challenges which are threatening to derail the success trend set by Moore's Law, perhaps the most prominent one is the "Interconnect Bottleneck". The metallic interconnections which carry inter-chip and intra-chip signals are increasingly proving to be inadequate to carry the enormous amount of data due to band-width limitations, cross talk and increased latency. A silicon based optical interconnect is showing enormous promise to address this issue in a cost effective manner by leveraging the extremely matured CMOS fabrication infrastructure. An optical interconnect system consists of a low loss waveguide, modulator, photo detector and a light source. Of these the only component yet to be demonstrated in silicon is a CMOS compatible electrically pumped silicon based laser. The present work is our endeavor towards the goal of a practical light source in silicon. To this end we have focused our efforts on horizontal slot waveguide which consists of a nm thin low index silica layer sandwiched between two high index silicon layers. Such a structure provides an exceptionally high confinement for the TM-like mode in the thin silica slot. The shallow ridge profile of the waveguide allows in principle for lateral electrical access to the core of the waveguide for excitation of the slot embedded gain material like erbium or nano-crystal sensitized erbium using tunneling, polarization transfer or transport. Low losses in the proposed structure are paramount due to the low gain expectation (˜1dB/cm) from CMOS compatible gain media. This dissertation details the novel techniques conceived to mitigate the severe lateral radiation leakage loss of the TM-like mode in these waveguides and resonators using "Magic Widths" and "Magic Radii" designs. New fabrication techniques are discussed which were developed to achieve ultra-smooth waveguide surfaces to substantially reduce the scattering induced losses in the Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) high index contrast system. This

  13. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  14. Indium-bump-free antimonide superlattice membrane detectors on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamiri, M.; Klein, B.; Schuler-Sandy, T.; Myers, S.; Dahiya, V.; Cavallo, F.; Krishna, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present an approach to realize antimonide superlattices on silicon substrates without using conventional Indium-bump hybridization. In this approach, PIN superlattices are grown on top of a 60 nm Al0.6Ga0.4Sb sacrificial layer on a GaSb host substrate. Following the growth, the individual pixels are transferred using our epitaxial-lift off technique, which consists of a wet-etch to undercut the pixels followed by a dry-stamp process to transfer the pixels to a silicon substrate prepared with a gold layer. Structural and optical characterization of the transferred pixels was done using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The interface between the transferred pixels and the new substrate was abrupt, and no significant degradation in the optical quality was observed. An Indium-bump-free membrane detector was then fabricated using this approach. Spectral response measurements provided a 100% cut-off wavelength of 4.3 μm at 77 K. The performance of the membrane detector was compared to a control detector on the as-grown substrate. The membrane detector was limited by surface leakage current. The proposed approach could pave the way for wafer-level integration of photonic detectors on silicon substrates, which could dramatically reduce the cost of these detectors.

  15. Photon Detection System for LBNE Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2014-03-01

    The LBNE (Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is the next generation accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment planned in US. The experiment will use a new muon-neutrino beam sent from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and will detect electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance using a Liquid Argon TPC located at a distance of 1300 km at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The primary physics goal of the LBNE is a definitive determination the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination the octant of the neutrino mixing angle theta-23, and precise measurement of CP violation in neutrino oscillation. Neutrino interaction in LAr result in charged particles producing ionization and scintillation light signals. Dedicated photon detection system is under design for use in the LBNE LArTPC far detectors. The baseline design couples wavelength-shifter coated ultraviolet transmitting acrylic to 3 mm2 silicon photomultipliers. By detecting scintillation light we aim to improve event reconstruction capabilities and efficiently separate neutrino events from background. Current status of the system will be described.

  16. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; van Hecke, H.; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two concentric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity {eta} distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  17. Broadband all-optical microwave photonics phase detector.

    PubMed

    Ashourian, Mohsen; Emami, Hossein; Sarkhosh, Niusha

    2013-12-15

    A microwave photonics phase detector is conceived and practically demonstrated. The phase-detector system employs a semiconductor optical amplifier as a four-wave mixer to enable phase detection over a broad frequency range. The system behavior is first mathematically modeled and then demonstrated practically. Phase measurement over a frequency range of 1-18 GHz is achieved. This phase detector is an excellent candidate for wideband applications such as frequency-agile radar. PMID:24322231

  18. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  19. Fabrication of a thin silicon detector with excellent thickness uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, E.; Eronen, T.; Nenonen, S.; Andersson, H.; Miikkulainen, K.; Eränen, S.; Ronkainen, H.; Mäkinen, J.; Husu, H.; Lassila, A.; Punkkinen, R.; Hirvonen, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated and tested a thin silicon detector with the specific goal of having a very good thickness uniformity. SOI technology was used in the detector fabrication. The detector was designed to be used as a ΔE detector in a silicon telescope for measuring solar energetic particles in space. The detector thickness was specified to be 20 μm with an rms thickness uniformity of±0.5%. The active area consists of three separate elements, a round centre area and two surrounding annular segments. A new method was developed for measuring the thickness uniformity based on a modified Fizeau interferometer. The thickness uniformity specification was well met with the measured rms thickness variation of 43 nm. The detector was electrically characterized by measuring the I- V and C- V curves and the performance was verified using a 241Am alpha source.

  20. Noise performance of the D0 layer 0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    A new inner detector called Layer 0 has been added to the existing silicon detector for the DZero colliding beams experiment. This detector has an all carbon fiber support structure that employs thin copper clad Kapton sheets embedded in the surface of the carbon fiber structure to improve the grounding of the structure and a readout system that fully isolates the local detector ground from the rest of the detector. Initial measurements show efficiencies greater than 90% and 0.3 ADC count common mode contribution to the signal noise.

  1. Comparison Between Two Monte Carlo Simulations of Angiographic Phantom Coupled to Silicon Strip Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño, L. M.; Sanchez, D.; Avila, C.; Sanabria, J.; Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D. D.; Cabal, A.; Ceballos, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Díaz García, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Giubellino, P.; Gombia, M.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L.; Sitta, M.; Swientek, K.; Taibi, A.; Tomassi, E.; Tuffanelli, A.; Wiacek, P.

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results of a dual energy angiography simulation using the Monte Carlo package GEANT 3.2113 are presented and compared to Monte Carlo MCNP-4C results reported before. The simulation is based on an experimental set up consisting of a Plexiglas-aluminium step wedge phantom with 4 cylindrical cavities filled with iodated contrast medium. The silicon 384 microstrip detector was set into edge-on configuration (incoming X-rays parallel to longitudinal axis of the strips) and the properties of the simulated detector just resemble the ones of the real detector. Monochromatic photon beams of 31.5keV and 35.5keV are used to take advantage of the discontinuous variation of the iodine photon absorption at the energy of the K-shell, the key to dual energy subtraction imaging.

  2. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis; Hart, Bradley R.

    2006-12-26

    Disclosed herein is a porous silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and calculate the concentration of bound target.

  3. Advantages of Photon Counting Detectors for Terahertz Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ezawa, Hajime

    2016-08-01

    For astronomical observation at terahertz frequencies, a variety of cryogenic detector technologies are being developed to achieve background-limited observation from space, where a noise equivalent power (NEP) of less than 10^{-18} W/Hz^{0.5} is often required. When each photon signal is resolved in time, the requirements on NEP are reduced and 1 ns time resolution corresponds to an NEP of approximately 10^{-17} W/Hz^{0.5} at THz frequencies. Furthermore, fast photon counting detectors have a high dynamic range to observe bright terahertz sources such as stars and active galactic nuclei. Applications of photon counting detector are discussed for cosmic microwave background and photon counting terahertz interferometry.

  4. Silicon Photonics with Applications to Data Center Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguinaldo, Ryan Francis

    In data center applications, fiber-based optical interconnects can be used to provide point-to-point links enabling high-bandwidth, inter-rack, data communications. In order to provide for future network scalability, which must be able to handle ultra-large data flows and bandwidth-intensive requests, optical technologies are increasingly introduced to different levels of the data center architecture to enable a variety of transparent network or all-optical networking schemes. However, the use of bulk optical components, which take up valuable rack-space real estate, can be extremely energy and cost prohibitive, especially when scaled up to the size of industrial warehouse-scale computing and considering that predictions of future data center networks are expected to contain millions of nodes. As such, we study chip-scale, silicon photonic, integrated circuits and their use as the optical hardware in future data center implementations. This work describes aspects of the design and integration of silicon photonic devices, which can be used for high-bandwidth, multi-channel, wavelength division multiplexed, optical communications. Examples of silicon photonic subsystems are discussed, including the realization of an on-chip channelized spectrum monitor and a network-node-on-a-chip. These optical integrated circuits are meant to replace bulk optical components with their functional equivalents on monolithic silicon. This work demonstrates that silicon photonics may be advantageous in meeting the urgent hardware-scaling demands of high-bandwidth, multi-user, communication networks.

  5. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector for Run II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rossin

    2004-01-06

    The 8 layer, 720k channel CDF Run II silicon detector is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the CDF experiment. A summary of the experience in commissioning and operating this double-sided detector during the first 2 years of Run II is presented. The performances of the silicon in term of resolution, efficiency are also described. The results of the studies of radiation damage and the expected operational limits are discussed. A short description of the SVT, the Level 2 Silicon Vertex Trigger, one of the major upgrades related to the new silicon device is also presented. Finally, some of the many physics results achieved by means of the new Silicon+SVT machinery are also reviewed.

  6. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  7. Generation of correlated photons in nanoscale silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharping, Jay E.; Lee, Kim F.; Foster, Mark A.; Turner, Amy C.; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Kumar, Prem

    2006-12-01

    .We experimentally study the generation of correlated pairs of photons through four-wave mixing (FWM) in embedded silicon waveguides. The waveguides, which are designed to exhibit anomalous group-velocity dispersion at wavelengths near 1555 nm, allow phase matched FWM and thus efficient pair-wise generation of non-degenerate signal and idler photons. Photon counting measurements yield a coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) of around 25 for a signal (idler) photon production rate of about 0.05 per pulse. We characterize the variation in CAR as a function of pump power and pump-to-sideband wavelength detuning. These measurements represent a first step towards the development of tools for quantum information processing which are based on CMOS-compatible, silicon-on-insulator technology.

  8. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing. PMID:26205309

  9. Indistinguishable Photons from Separated Silicon-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahigil, A.; Jahnke, K. D.; Rogers, L. J.; Teraji, T.; Isoya, J.; Zibrov, A. S.; Jelezko, F.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers in diamond can be used to efficiently generate coherent optical photons with excellent spectral properties. We show that these features are due to the inversion symmetry associated with SiV centers. The generation of indistinguishable single photons from separated emitters at 5 K is demonstrated in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interference experiment. Prospects for realizing efficient quantum network nodes using SiV centers are discussed.

  10. Interferometric Quantum-Nondemolition Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Peter; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Two interferometric quantum-nondemolition (QND) devices have been proposed: (1) a polarization-independent device and (2) a polarization-preserving device. The prolarization-independent device works on an input state of up to two photons, whereas the polarization-preserving device works on a superposition of vacuum and single- photon states. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode would also be populated by a single photon. Like other QND devices, the proposed devices are potentially useful for a variety of applications, including such areas of NASA interest as quantum computing, quantum communication, detection of gravity waves, as well as pedagogical demonstrations of the quantum nature of light. Many protocols in quantum computation and quantum communication require the possibility of detecting a photon without destroying it. The only prior single- photon-detecting QND device is based on quantum electrodynamics in a resonant cavity and, as such, it depends on the photon frequency. Moreover, the prior device can distinguish only between one photon and no photon. The proposed interferometric QND devices would not depend on frequency and could distinguish between (a) one photon and (b) zero or two photons. The first proposed device is depicted schematically in Figure 1. The input electromagnetic mode would be a superposition of a zero-, a one-, and a two-photon quantum state. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode also would be populated by a single photon.

  11. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the

  12. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  13. Low loss etchless silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Jaime; Poitras, Carl B; Robinson, Jacob T; Preston, Kyle; Chen, Long; Lipson, Michal

    2009-03-16

    We demonstrate low loss silicon waveguides fabricated without any silicon etching. We define the waveguides by selective oxidation which produces ultra-smooth sidewalls with width variations of 0.3 nm. The waveguides have a propagation loss of 0.3 dB/cm at 1.55 microm. The waveguide geometry enables low bending loss of approximately 0.007 dB/bend for a 90 degrees bend with a 50 microm bending radius. PMID:19293905

  14. SENTIRAD—An innovative personal radiation detector based on a scintillation detector and a silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osovizky, A.; Ginzburg, D.; Manor, A.; Seif, R.; Ghelman, M.; Cohen-Zada, I.; Ellenbogen, M.; Bronfenmakher, V.; Pushkarsky, V.; Gonen, E.; Mazor, T.; Cohen, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The alarming personal radiation detector (PRD) is a device intended for Homeland Security (HLS) applications. This portable device is designed to be worn or carried by security personnel to detect photon-emitting radioactive materials for the purpose of crime prevention. PRD is required to meet the scope of specifications defined by various HLS standards for radiation detection. It is mandatory that the device be sensitive and simultaneously small, pocket-sized, of robust mechanical design and carriable on the user's body. To serve these specialized purposes and requirements, we developed the SENTIRAD, a new radiation detector designed to meet the performance criteria established for counterterrorist applications. SENTIRAD is the first commercially available PRD based on a CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal that is optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) serving as a light sensor. The rapidly developing technology of SiPM, a multipixel semiconductor photodiode that operates in Geiger mode, has been thoroughly investigated in previous studies. This paper presents the design considerations, constraints and radiological performance relating to the SENTIRAD radiation sensor.

  15. Communication Limits Due to Photon-Detector Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce E.; Farr, William H.

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted of the limit imposed by photon-detector jitter on the capacity of a pulse-position-modulated optical communication system in which the receiver operates in a photon-counting (weak-signal) regime. Photon-detector jitter is a random delay between impingement of a photon and generation of an electrical pulse by the detector. In the study, jitter statistics were computed from jitter measurements made on several photon detectors. The probability density of jitter was mathematically modeled by use of a weighted sum of Gaussian functions. Parameters of the model were adjusted to fit histograms representing the measured-jitter statistics. Likelihoods of assigning detector-output pulses to correct pulse time slots in the presence of jitter were derived and used to compute channel capacities and corresponding losses due to jitter. It was found that the loss, expressed as the ratio between the signal power needed to achieve a specified capacity in the presence of jitter and that needed to obtain the same capacity in the absence of jitter, is well approximated as a quadratic function of the standard deviation of the jitter in units of pulse-time-slot duration.

  16. Development of a GSO positron/single-photon imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Senda, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and tested a GSO (gadolinium oxyorthosilicate) position-sensitive gamma detector which can be used with positron and single-photon radionuclides for imaging breast cancer or sentinel lymph node detection. Because GSO has a relatively good energy resolution for annihilation gammas as well as low energy gamma photons, and does not contain any natural radioisotopes, it can be used for positron imaging and lower energy single-photon imaging. The imaging detector consists of a GSO block, 2 inch square multi-channel position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT), and associated electronics. The size of a single GSO element was 2.9 mm × 2.9 mm × 20 mm and these elements were arranged into 15 × 15 matrixes to form a block that was optically coupled to the PSPMT. It was possible to separate all GSO crystals into a two-dimensional position histogram for annihilation gammas (511 keV) and low energy gamma photons (122 keV). The typical energy resolution was 24% FWHM and 37% FWHM for 511 keV and 122 keV gamma photons, respectively. For the positron imaging, coincidence between the imaging detector and a single gamma probe is measured. For the single-photon imaging, a tungsten collimator is mounted in front of the imaging detector. With this configuration, it was possible to image both positron radionuclides and low energy single-photon radionuclides. We measured spatial resolution and sensitivity as well as image quality of the developed imaging detector. Results indicated that the developed imaging detector has the potential to be a new and useful instrument for nuclear medicine.

  17. The silicon strip vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The Belle II upgrade of the Belle experiment will extend the search for physics beyond the standard model. The upgrade is currently under construction, and foreseen to complete in time for the physics run scheduled for 2016. The vertex detector of the Belle II comprises two types of silicon detectors: the pixel detector (PXD) and the strip detector (SVD) using double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD). One of the most characteristic features of the SVD is a unique chip-on-sensor scheme which enabling good signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio while reducing the material budget. This paper describes the implementation of the scheme, status and future prospects of the Belle II SVD.

  18. A Photon Interference Detector with Continuous Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an apparatus which attempts to give a direct visual impression of the random detection of individual photons coupled with the recognition of the classical intensity distribution as a result of fairly high proton statistics. (Author/GA)

  19. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 105 with a mode-volume of ~1.7(λ/n)3. This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  20. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  1. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, RR; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner. PMID:24319305

  2. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, R. R.; Stolin, A.; Majewski, S.; Proffitt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26×58 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41×91 mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ~45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (~2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  3. Scaling silicon photonic switch fabrics for data center interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Dessislava; Rumley, Sébastien; Calhoun, David; Li, Qi; Hendry, Robert; Samadi, Payman; Bergman, Keren

    2015-01-26

    With the rapidly increasing aggregate bandwidth requirements of data centers there is a growing interest in the insertion of optically interconnected networks with high-radix transparent optical switch fabrics. Silicon photonics is a particularly promising and applicable technology due to its small footprint, CMOS compatibility, high bandwidth density, and the potential for nanosecond scale dynamic connectivity. In this paper we analyze the feasibility of building silicon photonic microring based switch fabrics for data center scale optical interconnection networks. We evaluate the scalability of a microring based switch fabric for WDM signals. Critical parameters including crosstalk, insertion loss and switching speed are analyzed, and their sensitivity with respect to device parameters is examined. We show that optimization of physical layer parameters can reduce crosstalk and increase switch fabric scalability. Our analysis indicates that with current state-of-the-art devices, a high radix 128 × 128 silicon photonic single chip switch fabric with tolerable power penalty is feasible. The applicability of silicon photonic microrings for data center switching is further supported via review of microring operations and control demonstrations. The challenges and opportunities for this technology platform are discussed. PMID:25835876

  4. Silicon graphene waveguide tunable broadband microwave photonics phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José; Domenech, David; Muñoz, Pascual

    2014-04-01

    We propose the use of silicon graphene waveguides to implement a tunable broadband microwave photonics phase shifter based on integrated ring cavities. Numerical computation results show the feasibility for broadband operation over 40 GHz bandwidth and full 360° radiofrequency phase-shift with a modest voltage excursion of 0.12 volt. PMID:24718185

  5. Polarization rotator-splitters in standard active silicon photonics platforms.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Wesley D; Barwicz, Tymon; Taylor, Benjamin J F; Poon, Joyce K S

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate various silicon-on-insulator polarization management structures based on a polarization rotator-splitter that uses a bi-level taper TM0-TE1 mode converter. The designs are fully compatible with standard active silicon photonics platforms with no new levels required and were implemented in the IME baseline and IME-OpSIS silicon photonics processes. We demonstrate a polarization rotator-splitter with polarization crosstalk < -13 dB over a bandwidth of 50 nm. Then, we improve the crosstalk to < -22 dB over a bandwidth of 80 nm by integrating the polarization rotator-splitter with directional coupler polarization filters. Finally, we demonstrate a polarization controller by integrating the polarization rotator-splitters with directional couplers, thermal tuners, and PIN diode phase shifters. PMID:24663698

  6. Hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes into silicon slot photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán Valdeiglesias, E.; Zhang, W.; Hoang, H. C.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Noury, A.; Serna, S.; Le Roux, X.; Cassan, E.; Izard, N.; Sarti, F.; Torrini, U.; Balestrieri, M.; Keita, A.-S.; Yang, H.; Bezugly, V.; Vinattieri, A.; Cuniberti, G.; Filoramo, A.; Gurioli, M.; Vivien, L.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics, due to its compatibility with the CMOS platform and unprecedented integration capability, has become the preferred solution for the implementation of next generation optical interconnects. However, current Si photonics require on-chip integration of several materials, including III-V for lasing, doped silicon for modulation and Ge for detection. The very different requirements of these materials result in complex fabrication processes that offset the cost-effectiveness of the Si photonics approach. We are developing an alternative route towards the integration of optoelectronic devices in Si photonic, relying on the use of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs can be considered as a Si compatible material able to emit, modulate and detect near-infrared light. Hence, they hold a unique potential to implement all active devices in the Si photonics platform. In addition, solution processed SWNTs can be integrated on Si using spin-coating techniques, obviating the need of complex epitaxial growth or chip bonding approaches. Here, we report on our recent progress in the coupling of SWNTs light emission into optical resonators implemented on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform.

  7. Silicon-photonics-based wideband radar beamforming: basic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2010-01-01

    Proposed is silicon-photonics-based phased array antenna beamforming for high-resolution long-range radars with wide instantaneous radio frequency (rf) bandwidth. Specifically, the proposed silicon-photonics beamformer platform offers the potential for cost-effective monolithic chip-scale integration of photonic delay lines, 2×2 optical switches, variable optical attenuators, and optical amplifiers that form the base unit of a rf transmit/receive array signal processor. In effect, the proposed silicon-photonics devices empower the design of a powerful proposed photonic beamformer with one time-delay unit per antenna element. Device-level designs studies are shown that promise meeting the high-resolution radar mission-critical requirements via time delays of up to 2.5 ns, switching times of less than 100 ns, optical isolations as good as 50 dB, and optical gains of up to 6 dB. Longer delays are achieved off chip using optical fibers.

  8. The non-linearity of the ESA Photon Counting Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llebaria, A.; Nieto, J.-L.; di Serego Alighieri, S.

    1986-11-01

    The time-resolved imaging mode (TRIM) suggested by di Serego Alighieri and Perryman (1986), in which photons are recorded separately on each television camera frame, was used to analyze the data obtained in 1984 on the nucleus of M31 with the ESA Photon Counting Detector (PCD) on the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope. Through the examination of the TRIM data, it was possible to detect nonlinearity in the response of the ESA PCD, which is interpreted as being due to phosphorescence in the intensifier. A quantitative measurement of this effect is shown. It is argued that if the interpretation is correct, the same kind of nonlinearity should be found in all photon counting detectors with phosphor screen. The amount of the nonlinearity is presumably higher in detectors with lower thresholds.

  9. Silicon detector upgrades for the Tevatron Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kruse

    2002-10-25

    The current silicon devices being used by the D0 and CDF collaborations for the Tevatron Run 2a, which is expected to end in 2005 after accumulating about 2 fb{sup -1} of data, will need to be replaced due to radiation damage for the following data collection period designated as Run 2b. We will discuss these silicon replacement plans, the more uniform design of the detectors between D0 and CDF, and the current status of their fabrication.

  10. Photon-number-resolving detector with 10 bits of resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Leaf A.; Dauler, Eric A.; Chang, Joshua T

    2007-06-15

    A photon-number-resolving detector with single-photon resolution is described and demonstrated. It has 10 bits of resolution, does not require cryogenic cooling, and is sensitive to near ir wavelengths. This performance is achieved by flood illuminating a 32x32 element In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}AsP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array that has an integrated counter and digital readout circuit behind each pixel.

  11. Photon-number-resolving detector with 10bits of resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Leaf A.; Dauler, Eric A.; Chang, Joshua T.

    2007-06-01

    A photon-number-resolving detector with single-photon resolution is described and demonstrated. It has 10bits of resolution, does not require cryogenic cooling, and is sensitive to near ir wavelengths. This performance is achieved by flood illuminating a 32×32 element InxGa1-xAsP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array that has an integrated counter and digital readout circuit behind each pixel.

  12. Influence of detector motion in entanglement measurements with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Landulfo, Andre G. S.; Matsas, George E. A.; Torres, Adriano C.

    2010-04-15

    We investigate how the polarization correlations of entangled photons described by wave packets are modified when measured by moving detectors. For this purpose, we analyze the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality as a function of the apparatus velocity. Our analysis is motivated by future experiments with entangled photons designed to use satellites. This is a first step toward the implementation of quantum information protocols in a global scale.

  13. Superconducting-nanowire single-photon-detector linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingyuan; McCaughan, Adam; Bellei, Francesco; Najafi, Faraz; De Fazio, Domenico; Dane, Andrew; Ivry, Yachin; Berggren, Karl K.

    2013-09-01

    We designed, fabricated, and tested a one-dimensional array of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors, integrated with on-chip inductors and resistors. The architecture is suitable for monolithic integration on a single chip operated in a cryogenic environment, and inherits the characteristics of individual superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors. We demonstrated a working array with four pixels showing position discrimination and a timing jitter of 124 ps. The electronic crosstalk between the pixels in the array was negligible.

  14. A novel pixellated solid-state photon detector for enhancing the Everhart-Thornley detector.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Joon Huang; Holburn, David

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a pixellated solid-state photon detector designed specifically to improve certain aspects of the existing Everhart-Thornley detector. The photon detector was constructed and fabricated in an Austriamicrosystems 0.35 µm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process technology. This integrated circuit consists of an array of high-responsivity photodiodes coupled to corresponding low-noise transimpedance amplifiers, a selector-combiner circuit and a variable-gain postamplifier. Simulated and experimental results show that the photon detector can achieve a maximum transimpedance gain of 170 dBΩ and minimum bandwidth of 3.6 MHz. It is able to detect signals with optical power as low as 10 nW and produces a minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 24 dB regardless of gain configuration. The detector has been proven to be able to effectively select and combine signals from different pixels. The key advantages of this detector are smaller dimensions, higher cost effectiveness, lower voltage and power requirements and better integration. The photon detector supports pixel-selection configurability which may improve overall SNR and also potentially generate images for different analyses. This work has contributed to the future research of system-level integration of a pixellated solid-state detector for secondary electron detection in the scanning electron microscope. PMID:23553907

  15. Characterization of IRAS doped silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented from a range of operating conditions which include background photo flux, operating temperature, and frequency. Each detector is equipped with a load resistor, a cryogenic field effect transistor preamplifier, and a temperature sensor. Data are also presented of detector signal, noise spectra, noise equivalent power, and spectral response.

  16. New silicon technologies enable high-performance arrays of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Maccagnani, Piera; Cova, Sergio; Ghioni, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    In order to fulfill the requirements of many applications, we recently developed a new technology aimed at combining the advantages of traditional thin and thick silicon Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD). In particular we demonstrated single-pixel detectors with a remarkable improvement in the Photon Detection Efficiency at the longer wavelengths (e.g. 40% at 800nm) while maintaining a timing jitter better than 100ps. In this paper we will analyze the factors the currently prevent the fabrication of arrays of SPADs by adopting such a Red-Enhanced (RE) technology and we will propose further modifications to the device structure that will enable the fabrication of high performance RE-SPAD arrays for photon timing applications. PMID:24353395

  17. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors implemented as near-perfect absorbers of coherent radiation.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mohsen K; Schelew, Ellen; Young, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    At the core of an ideal single-photon detector is an active material that absorbs and converts every incident photon to a discriminable signal. A large active material favours efficient absorption, but often at the expense of conversion efficiency, noise, speed and timing accuracy. In this work, short (8.5 μm long) and narrow (8 × 35 nm(2)) U-shaped NbTiN nanowires atop silicon-on-insulator waveguides are embedded in asymmetric nanobeam cavities that render them as near-perfect absorbers despite their small volume. At 2.05 K, when biased at 0.9 of the critical current, the resulting superconducting single-photon detectors achieve a near-unity on-chip quantum efficiency for ∼1,545 nm photons, an intrinsic dark count rate <0.1 Hz, a reset time of ∼7 ns, and a timing jitter of ∼55 ps full-width at half-maximum. Such ultracompact, high-performance detectors are essential for progress in integrated quantum optics. PMID:26359204

  18. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors implemented as near-perfect absorbers of coherent radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Mohsen K.; Schelew, Ellen; Young, Jeff F.

    2015-09-01

    At the core of an ideal single-photon detector is an active material that absorbs and converts every incident photon to a discriminable signal. A large active material favours efficient absorption, but often at the expense of conversion efficiency, noise, speed and timing accuracy. In this work, short (8.5 μm long) and narrow (8 × 35 nm2) U-shaped NbTiN nanowires atop silicon-on-insulator waveguides are embedded in asymmetric nanobeam cavities that render them as near-perfect absorbers despite their small volume. At 2.05 K, when biased at 0.9 of the critical current, the resulting superconducting single-photon detectors achieve a near-unity on-chip quantum efficiency for ~1,545 nm photons, an intrinsic dark count rate <0.1 Hz, a reset time of ~7 ns, and a timing jitter of ~55 ps full-width at half-maximum. Such ultracompact, high-performance detectors are essential for progress in integrated quantum optics.

  19. Design, performance and status of the CLEO III silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J.; Alam, M. S.; Alexander, J.; Anastassov, A.; Arndt, K.; Bean, A.; Bebek, C.; Boyd, R.; Brandenburg, G.; Cherwinka, J.; Darling, C.; Duboscq, J.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y.; Hopman, P.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kim, D.; Lee, J.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.; Oliver, J.; Rush, C.; Severini, H.; Shipsey, I.; Skubic, P.; Spencer, M.; Timm, S.; Tourne, E.; Ward, C.; Zoeller, M.

    1999-10-01

    The CLEO III silicon detector is part of a general upgrade of the CLEO detector to allow for operation at a luminosity of 2×10 33 cm-2 s-1, which will be provided by the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR) beginning in 1999. The silicon detector is a four-layer barrel design covering radii from 2.5 to 10.2 cm with 93% solid angle coverage. The silicon sensors are DC-coupled and double-sided with double-metal readout on the p-side. The n-type strips measure φ, with 50 μm pitch while the p-type strips measure z, the coordinate along the beam axis, with 100 μm pitch. The readout electronics are mounted on BeO hybrids attached to the conical support structure and connected to the silicon sensors via a thin kapton flex cable. The electronics consist of an R/ C chip with bias resistors and decoupling capacitors, a low-noise preamp/shaper chip and a digitizer/sparsifier chip. Readout is done using VME-based sequencer boards. Production of all detector components is nearing completion and installation of the detector will take place in early 1999.

  20. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  1. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, James D; Maurer, Richard H; Roth, David R; Haight, Robert C

    2003-02-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene. PMID:12537520

  2. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  3. An all-silicon single-photon source by unconventional photon blockade

    PubMed Central

    Flayac, Hugo; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of suitable quantum emitters in silicon and silicon-based materials has prevented the realization of room temperature, compact, stable, and integrated sources of single photons in a scalable on-chip architecture, so far. Current approaches rely on exploiting the enhanced optical nonlinearity of silicon through light confinement or slow-light propagation, and are based on parametric processes that typically require substantial input energy and spatial footprint to reach a reasonable output yield. Here we propose an alternative all-silicon device that employs a different paradigm, namely the interplay between quantum interference and the third-order intrinsic nonlinearity in a system of two coupled optical cavities. This unconventional photon blockade allows to produce antibunched radiation at extremely low input powers. We demonstrate a reliable protocol to operate this mechanism under pulsed optical excitation, as required for device applications, thus implementing a true single-photon source. We finally propose a state-of-art implementation in a standard silicon-based photonic crystal integrated circuit that outperforms existing parametric devices either in input power or footprint area. PMID:26061665

  4. An all-silicon single-photon source by unconventional photon blockade.

    PubMed

    Flayac, Hugo; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of suitable quantum emitters in silicon and silicon-based materials has prevented the realization of room temperature, compact, stable, and integrated sources of single photons in a scalable on-chip architecture, so far. Current approaches rely on exploiting the enhanced optical nonlinearity of silicon through light confinement or slow-light propagation, and are based on parametric processes that typically require substantial input energy and spatial footprint to reach a reasonable output yield. Here we propose an alternative all-silicon device that employs a different paradigm, namely the interplay between quantum interference and the third-order intrinsic nonlinearity in a system of two coupled optical cavities. This unconventional photon blockade allows to produce antibunched radiation at extremely low input powers. We demonstrate a reliable protocol to operate this mechanism under pulsed optical excitation, as required for device applications, thus implementing a true single-photon source. We finally propose a state-of-art implementation in a standard silicon-based photonic crystal integrated circuit that outperforms existing parametric devices either in input power or footprint area. PMID:26061665

  5. Photon detector for MEGA. [53 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, C.A.; Tribble, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The MEGA photon detector is designed to observe the 52.83-MeV photon produced in a [mu] [yields] e[gamma] decay with an energy resolution of 1.25 MeV, a position resolution of 2 [times] 5 mm[sup 2], a directional resolution of 10[degree], a time resolution of 500 ps, and an efficiency of about 5.4%. It will consist of three independent concentric cylindrical pair spectrometers mounted within a 1.5 T magnetic field produced by a superconducting solenoid magnet. Each pair spectrometer includes two thin Pb foils to convert photons into e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  6. The Silicon Drift Detector of the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Batigne, G.

    2005-10-12

    The ALICE experiment studies the properties of quark-gluon plasma and requires a good tracking system. This document presents the silicon drift detector which is part of the Inner Tracking System. Its principle and main features are given, especially its sensitivity to temperature variation and the effect of parasitic fields on measurement. Finally, the typical spatial resolution of this detector, which has been measured during beam tests, is shown.

  7. Charged particle detectors made from thin layers of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the feasibility of using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (..cap alpha..-Si:H) as solid state thin film charged particle detectors. /sup 241/Am alphas were successfully detected with ..cap alpha..-Si:H devices. The measurements and results of these experiments are presented. The problems encountered and changes in the fabrication of the detectors that may improve the performance are discussed.

  8. The silicon tracker of the H1 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Benno

    2006-10-01

    The H1 experiment at HERA is equipped with a silicon vertex detector, comprising a barrel part and two endcaps with disks. The barrel part uses double sided, DC coupled strip sensors, whereas the endcap parts use two types of wedge-shaped sensors, both single sided and AC coupled: u/v-sensors have strips parallel to one edge of the sensor, r-sensors have circular strips. Additional pad detectors provide fast triggering signals in the backward part.

  9. Operation of silicon microstrip detectors in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustinsky, J.S.; Alde, D.M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Jeppesen, R.G.; Lane, D.W.; Leitch, M.J.; Lillberg, J.W.; Lopez, T.A.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Peng, J.C. ); Brooks, B.M.; Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E. ); Lederman, L.M.; Schub, M.H. ); Brown, C.N.; Cooper, W.E.; Gounder, K.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Mishra, C.S. (Fermi National

    1990-01-01

    A Silicon Microstrip Spectrometer was recently installed and operated in an 800 GeV proton beamline at Fermilab as a major new component of experiment E789. The detectors received an estimated radiation exposure of up to 7.8 {times} 10{sup 12} minimum ionizing particles per cm{sup 2} over a period of two months. We report on the changes in detector performance that we have observed following preliminary data analysis. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Silicon Microstrip Detectors for the Jlab SBS Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Persio, F.; Kiprich, S.; Meddi, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    The INFN group of Rome is developing two silicon microstrip detector planes to be part of the tracking system of the SBS spectrometer, that will be installed in the experimental Hall A of Jefferson Labortatory, in order to improve its resolution. The detector and the PCB design were the results of models simulated using PSPICE. The entire assembly process will be realized in the INFN Roma clean room CL10000 facility.

  11. Means and method for calibrating a photon detector utilizing electron-photon coincidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An arrangement for calibrating a photon detector particularly applicable for the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions is based on electron photon coincidence utilizing crossed electron beam atom beam collisions. Atoms are excited by electrons which lose a known amount of energy and scatter with a known remaining energy, while the excited atoms emit photons of known radiation. Electrons of the known remaining energy are separated from other electrons and are counted. Photons emitted in a direction related to the particular direction of scattered electrons are detected to serve as a standard. Each of the electrons is used to initiate the measurements of a time interval which terminates with the arrival of a photon exciting the photon detector. Only the number of time intervals related to the coincidence correlation and of electrons scattered in the particular direction with the known remaining energy and photons of a particular radiation level emitted due to the collisions of such scattered electrons are counted. The detector calibration is related to the number of counted electrons and photons.

  12. High-Q microresonators as lasing elements for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borselli, Matthew

    Although the concept of constructing active optical waveguides in crystalline silicon has existed for over twenty years, it is only in the past few years that silicon photonics has been given serious attention as a, displacing technology. Fueled by the predicted saturation of "Moore's Law" within the next decade, universities and industries from all over the world are exploring the possibilities of creating truly integrated silicon opto-electronic devices in a cost effective manner. Some of the most promising silicon photonics technologies are chip-to-chip and intra-chip optical interconnects. Now that compact high-speed modulators in silicon have been achieved, the limiting factor in the widespread adoption of optical interconnects is the lack of practical on-chip optical sources. These sources are critical for the generation of the many wavelengths of light necessary for high-speed communication between the logical elements between and within microprocessors. Unfortunately, crystalline silicon is widely known as a poor emitter because of its indirect bandgap. This thesis focuses on the many challenges in generating silicon-based laser sources. As most CMOS compatible gain materials possess at most 1 dB/cm of gain, much of our work has been devoted to minimizing the optical losses in silicon optical microresonators. Silicon microdisk resonators fabricated from silicon-on-insulator wafers were employed to study and minimize the different sources of scattering and absorption present in high-index contrast Si microcavities. These microdisks supported whispering-gallery modes with quality factors as high as 5 x 106, close to the bulk limit of lightly doped silicon wafers. An external silica fiber taper probe was developed to test the microcavities in a rapid wafer-scale manner. Analytic theory and numerical simulation aided in the optimization of the cavity design and interpretation of experimental results. After successfully developing surface chemistry treatments

  13. EMC Diagnosis and Corrective Actions for Silicon Strip Tracker Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2006-06-06

    The tracker sub-system is one of the five sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment under construction at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The tracker subdetector is designed to reconstruct tracks of charged sub-atomic particles generated after collisions. The tracker system processes analogue signals from 10 million channels distributed across 14000 silicon micro-strip detectors. It is designed to process signals of a few nA and digitize them at 40 MHz. The overall sub-detector is embedded in a high particle radiation environment and a magnetic field of 4 Tesla. The evaluation of the electromagnetic immunity of the system is very important to optimize the performance of the tracker sub-detector and the whole CMS experiment. This paper presents the EMC diagnosis of the CMS silicon tracker sub-detector. Immunity tests were performed using the final prototype of the Silicon Tracker End-Caps (TEC) system to estimate the sensitivity of the system to conducted noise, evaluate the weakest areas of the system and take corrective actions before the integration of the overall detector. This paper shows the results of one of those tests, that is the measurement and analysis of the immunity to CM external conducted noise perturbations.

  14. Characterization of silicon detectors through TCT at Delhi University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, G.; Lalwani, K.; Dalal, R.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ranjan, K.

    2016-07-01

    Transient Current Technique (TCT) is one of the important methods to characterize silicon detectors and is based on the time evolution of the charge carriers generated when a laser light is shone on it. For red laser, charge is injected only to a small distance from the surface of the detector. For such a system, one of the charge carriers is collected faster than the readout time of the electronics and therefore, the effective signal at the electrodes is decided by the charge carriers that traverse throughout the active volume of the detector, giving insight to the electric field profile, drift velocity, effective doping density, etc. of the detector. Delhi University is actively involved in the silicon detector R&D and has recently installed a TCT setup consisting of a red laser system, a Faraday cage, a SMU (Source Measuring Unit), a bias tee, and an amplifier. Measurements on a few silicon pad detectors have been performed using the developed system, and the results have been found in good agreement with the CERN setup.

  15. Micro-channel plate photon detector studies for the TORCH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cowie, E. N.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Van Dijk, M.

    2015-07-01

    The Time Of internally Reflected Cherenkov light (TORCH) detector is under development. Charged particle tracks passing through a 1 cm plate of quartz will generate the Cherenkov photons, and their arrival will be timed by an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. As part of the TORCH R&D studies, commercial and custom-made micro-channel plate detectors are being characterized. The final photon detectors for this application are being produced in a three-phase program in collaboration with industry. Custom-made single-channel devices with extended lifetime have been manufactured and their performance is being systematically investigated in the laboratory. Optical studies for the preparation of beam and laboratory tests of a TORCH prototype are also underway.

  16. Synchrotron beam test with a photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Brönnimann, C; Florin, S; Lindner, M; Schmitt, B; Schulze-Briese, C

    2000-09-01

    Synchrotron beam measurements were performed with a single-photon-counting pixel detector to investigate the influence of threshold settings on charge sharing. Improvement of image homogeneity by adjusting the threshold of each pixel individually was demonstrated. With a flat-field correction, the homogeneity could be improved. A measurement of the point spread function is reported. PMID:16609212

  17. Application of photon detectors in the VIP2 experiment to test the Pauli Exclusion Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, A.; Bartalucci, S.; Bazzi, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Curceanu, C.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; D’Ufflzi, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Ponta, T.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez-Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) was introduced by the austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli in 1925. Since then, several experiments have checked its validity. From 2006 until 2010, the VIP (Violation of the Pauli Principle) experiment took data at the LNGS underground laboratory to test the PEP. This experiment looked for electronic 2p to Is transitions in copper, where 2 electrons are in the Is state before the transition happens. These transitions violate the PEP. The lack of detection of X-ray photons coming from these transitions resulted in a preliminary upper limit for the violation of the PEP of 4.7 × 10-29. Currently, the successor experiment VIP2 is under preparation. The main improvements are, on one side, the use of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) as X-ray photon detectors. On the other side an active shielding is implemented, which consists of plastic scintillator bars read by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The employment of these detectors will improve the upper limit for the violation of the PEP by around 2 orders of magnitude.

  18. Advanced Silicon Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of silicon detectors for high energy astrophysics missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Background: Motivation for Event-Driven CCD; 2) Report of Grant Activity; 3) Packaged EDCCD; 4) Measured X-ray Energy Resolution of the Gen1 EDCCDs Operated in "Conventional Mode"; and 5) EDCCD Gen 1.5-Lot 1 Planning.

  19. A 16 x 16 element extrinsic silicon detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two bismuth-doped silicon accumulation-mode charge-injection device (AMCID) infrared detector arrays are studied. The geometry and composition of the arrays, and a description of the cold and warm electronics components of the system are described. Instructions for setting up and operating the array system, plus results of a functional test, are included.

  20. Tunable photonic structures based on silicon and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perova, Tatiana S.; Tolmachev, Vladimir A.; Astrova, Ekaterina V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design, fabrication and characterization of the conventional and tunable photonic devices based on grooved silicon, serving as one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal. The advantages of these photonic structures are as follows: the large refractive index contrast, in-plane moulding of the light flow, the possibility to fabricate a composite photonic structures by filling the grooves with a different compounds and compatibility with current semiconductor processing techniques. The optical properties of grooved Si structures were simulated using a transfer matrix method and gap map method and have been verified experimentally using FTIR microscopy. The air spaces in the basic silicon-air matrices were infiltrated with nematic liquid crystal E7. It is shown that the optical properties of the obtained composite 1D photonic crystals can be tuned by means of electro- and thermo-optical effects. Such a structures suit well for the various elements of the integrated optics and can serve as a building blocks for optical interconnects.

  1. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  2. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  3. The development of a silicon multiplicity detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Kraner, H.W.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Polychronakos, V.; Radeka, V.; Sondericker, J.; Stephani, D.; Barrette, J.; Hall, J.; Mark, S.K.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wolfe, D.; Borenstein, S.R.

    1991-12-31

    The physics program and the design criteria for a Silicon Pad Detector at RHIC are reviewed. An end cap double sided readout detector configuration for RHIC is presented. Its performance as an on-line and off-line centrality tagging device is studied by means of simulations with Fritiof as the event generator. The results of an in-beam test of a prototype double-sided Si-detector are presented. Good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained with front junction and the resistive back side readout. Good separation between one and two minimum-ionizing particle signals is achieved.

  4. The read-out ASIC for silicon drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E.; Ivanov, P.; Krivchenko, A.; Levin, V.; Gusev, A.; Malankin, E.; Normanov, D.; Rotin, A.; Sagdiev, I.; Shumikhin, V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the read-out ASIC for silicon X-ray drift detectors. The ASIC has been designed in CMOS 0.35 μm technology and contains two read-out channels. Each channel includes a preamplifier and shaper. The preamplifier in the first channel has a built-in input transistor, the preamplifier in second channel works with an external JFET, which is built in the detector structure. Preamplifiers have been optimized for operation with detectors with capacitances of 100 fF. The 6-th order shaper has controllable time constants (0.5 - 8 μs).

  5. Silicon Photonics Research in Hong Kong: Microresonator Devices and Optical Nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Andrew W.; Zhou, Linjie; Xu, Fang; Li, Chao; Chen, Hui; Liang, Tak-Keung; Liu, Yang; Tsang, Hon K.

    In this review paper we showcase recent activities on silicon photonics science and technology research in Hong Kong regarding two important topical areas-microresonator devices and optical nonlinearities. Our work on silicon microresonator filters, switches and modulators have shown promise for the nascent development of on-chip optoelectronic signal processing systems, while our studies on optical nonlinearities have contributed to basic understanding of silicon-based optically-pumped light sources and helium-implanted detectors. Here, we review our various passive and electro-optic active microresonator devices including (i) cascaded microring resonator cross-connect filters, (ii) NRZ-to-PRZ data format converters using a microring resonator notch filter, (iii) GHz-speed carrier-injection-based microring resonator modulators and 0.5-GHz-speed carrier-injection-based microdisk resonator modulators, and (iv) electrically reconfigurable microring resonator add-drop filters and electro-optic logic switches using interferometric resonance control. On the nonlinear waveguide front, we review the main nonlinear optical effects in silicon, and show that even at fairly modest average powers two-photon absorption and the accompanied free-carrier linear absorption could lead to optical limiting and a dramatic reduction in the effective lengths of nonlinear devices.

  6. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to -25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  7. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to –25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  8. High performance fiber-coupled NbTiN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors with Gifford-McMahon cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen

    2013-04-22

    We present high performance fiber-coupled niobium titanium nitride superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated on thermally oxidized silicon substrates. The best device showed a system detection efficiency (DE) of 74%, dark count rate of 100 c/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps under a bias current of 18.0 μA with a practical Gifford-McMahon cryocooler system. We also introduced six detectors into the cryocooler and confirmed that the system DE of all detectors was higher than 67% at the dark count rate of 100 c/s. PMID:23609728

  9. A four-dimensional photon detector for PET application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrocchi, M.; Ambrosi, G.; Bisogni, M. G.; Boretto, M.; Bosi, F.; Cerello, P.; Del Guerra, A.; Ionica, M.; Liu, B.; Pennazio, F.; Piliero, M. A.; Pirrone, G.; Postolache, V.; Wheadon, R.

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed a photon detector for positron emission tomography with high spatial resolution and depth of interaction capability. The detector is composed of a monolithic LYSO scintillator crystal coupled on top and bottom sides to two custom SiPM arrays. We investigated the ability to reconstruct the DOI of the 511 keV photon comparing the number of triggered SiPMs on the two sides of the module. Acquisitions were performed scanning the lateral surface of the crystal with a collimated 511 keV photon beam at different incident positions. A standard deviation of 1.5 mm in depth of interaction was obtained at the center of the module.

  10. Modelling superconducting nanowire single photon detectors in a waveguide cavity.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Nicola A; Barreto, Jorge; Villarreal-Garcia, Gerardo E; Bonneau, Damien; Sahin, Döndü; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G

    2016-04-18

    In this work we report on a single photon detector system which offers near-unity detection efficiency using waveguide-coupled superconducting nanowires with lengths on the order of 1 μm. This is achieved by embedding the nanowires in a racetrack resonator where the interaction time with the photons trapped in the cavity is increased, thereby allowing for shorter nanowires. We expect this to lead to a higher fabrication yield as the amount of inhomogeneities decreases for shorter nanowires. Our simulations show a system with a 1 μm long superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) operating at near-unity detection efficiency using design parameters that can be realistically achieved with conventional fabrication processes. The resonant cavity introduces spectral selectivity to the otherwise broad-band SNSPDs and the cavity induced timing jitter is shown to be insignificant for SNSPDs longer than 1 μm. PMID:27137314

  11. The Silicon Detector (SiD) And Linear Collider Detector R&D in Asia And North America

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Fujii, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-11

    In Asia and North America research and development on a linear collider detector has followed complementary paths to that in Europe. Among the developments in the US has been the conception of a detector built around silicon tracking, which relies heavily on a pixel (CCD) vertex detector, and employs a silicon tungsten calorimeter. Since this detector is quite different from the TESLA detector, we describe it here, along with some of the sub-system specific R&D in these regions.

  12. Silicon photonic device for wavelength sensing and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Lopez, German R.

    Over the last decade advances and innovations from Silicon Photonics technology were observed in the telecommunications and computing industries. This technology which employs Silicon as an optical medium, relies on current CMOS micro-electronics fabrication processes to enable medium scale integration of many nano-photonic devices to produce photonic integrated circuitry. However, other fields of research such as optical sensor processing can benefit from silicon photonics technology, specially in sensors where the physical measurement is wavelength encoded. In this research work, we present a design and application of a thermally tuned silicon photonic device as an optical sensor interrogator. The main device is a micro-ring resonator filter of 10 mum of diameter. A photonic design toolkit was developed based on open source software from the research community. With those tools it was possible to estimate the resonance and spectral characteristics of the filter. From the obtained design parameters, a 7.8 x 3.8 mm optical chip was fabricated using standard micro-photonics techniques. In order to tune a ring resonance, Nichrome micro-heaters were fabricated on top of the device. Some fabricated devices were systematically characterized and their tuning response were determined. From measurements, a ring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 18.4 nm and with a bandwidth of 0.14 nm was obtained. Using just 5 mA it was possible to tune the device resonance up to 3 nm. In order to apply our device as a sensor interrogator in this research, a model of wavelength estimation using time interval between peaks measurement technique was developed and simulations were carried out to assess its performance. To test the technique, an experiment using a Fiber Bragg grating optical sensor was set, and estimations of the wavelength shift of this sensor due to axial strains yield an error within 22 pm compared to measurements from spectrum analyzer. Results from this study

  13. Porous Silicon-Based Quantum Dot Broad Spectrum Radiation Detector

    PubMed Central

    Urdaneta, M.; Stepanov, P.; Weinberg, I. N.; Pala, I. R.; Brock, S.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon is a convenient and inexpensive platform for radiation detection, but has low stopping power for x-rays and gamma-rays with high energy (e.g., 100 keV, as used in computed tomography and digital radiography, or 1 MeV, as desired for detection of nuclear materials). We have effectively increased the stopping power of silicon detectors by producing a layer of porous or micro-machined silicon, and infusing this layer with semiconductor quantum dots made of electron-dense materials. Results of prototype detectors show sensitivity to infrared, visible light, and x-rays, with dark current of less than 1 nA/mm2. PMID:24432047

  14. Approaching high temperature photon counting with electron-injection detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathipour, V.; Jang, S. J.; Hassaninia, I.; Mohseni, H.

    2014-10-01

    Our group has designed and developed a novel telecom band photon detector called the electron-injection detector. The detector provides a high avalanche-free internal-amplification and a stable excess noise factor of near unity while operating at linear-mode with low bias voltages. In our previous reports on un-isolated detectors, the large dark current of the detectors prevented long integration times in the camera. Furthermore, the bandwidth of the un-isolated detectors was in the KHz range. Recently, by changing the 3D geometry and isolating the detectors from each other, we have achieved 3 orders of magnitude reduction in dark current at same bias voltage and temperature compared to our previous results. Isolated detectors have internal dark current densities of 0.1nA/cm2 at 160 K. Furthermore, they have a bandwidth that is 4 orders of magnitude higher than the un-isolated devices. In this paper we report room temperature and low temperature characteristics of the isolated electron-injection detectors. We show that the measured optical gain displays a small dependence on temperature over our measured range down to 220 K.

  15. Silicon detectors for combined MR-PET and MR-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studen, A.; Brzezinski, K.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Cochran, E.; Grošičar, B.; Grkovski, M.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Llosa, G.; Mikuž, M.; Stankova, V.; Weilhammer, P.; Žontar, D.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon based devices can extend PET-MR and SPECT-MR imaging to applications, where their advantages in performance outweigh benefits of high statistical counts. Silicon is in many ways an excellent detector material with numerous advantages, among others: excellent energy and spatial resolution, mature processing technology, large signal to noise ratio, relatively low price, availability, versatility and malleability. The signal in silicon is also immune to effects of magnetic field at the level normally used in MR devices. Tests in fields up to 7 T were performed in a study to determine effects of magnetic field on positron range in a silicon PET device. The curvature of positron tracks in direction perpendicular to the field's orientation shortens the distance between emission and annihilation point of the positron. The effect can be fully appreciated for a rotation of the sample for a fixed field direction, compressing range in all dimensions. A popular Ga-68 source was used showing a factor of 2 improvement in image noise compared to zero field operation. There was also a little increase in noise as the reconstructed resolution varied between 2.5 and 1.5 mm. A speculative applications can be recognized in both emission modalities, SPECT and PET. Compton camera is a subspecies of SPECT, where a silicon based scatter as a MR compatible part could inserted into the MR bore and the secondary detector could operate in less constrained environment away from the magnet. Introducing a Compton camera also relaxes requirements of the radiotracers used, extending the range of conceivable photon energies beyond 140.5 keV of the Tc-99m. In PET, one could exploit the compressed sub-millimeter range of positrons in the magnetic field. To exploit the advantage, detectors with spatial resolution commensurate to the effect must be used with silicon being an excellent candidate. Measurements performed outside of the MR achieving spatial resolution below 1 mm are reported.

  16. Microwave Photon Detector in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose; Romero, Guillermo; Solano, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    In this work we propose a design for a microwave photodetector based on elements from circuit QED such as the ones used in qubit designs. Our proposal consists on a microwave guide in which we embed circuital elements that can absorb photons and irreversibly change state. These incoherent absorption processes constitute the measurement itself. We first model this design using a general master equation for the propagating photons and the absorbing elements. We find that the detection efficiency for a single absorber is limited to 50%, and that this efficiency can be quickly increased by adding more elements with a moderate separation, obtaining 80% and 90% for two and three absorbers. Our abstract design has at least one possible implementation in which the absorbers are current biased Josephson junction. We demonstrate that the coupling between the guide and the junctions is strong enough, irrespectively of the microwave guide size, and derivate realistic parameters for high fidelity operation with current experiments. Patent pending No. 200802933, Oficina Espanola de Patentes y Marcas, 17/10/2008.

  17. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range. PMID:25410792

  18. A new detector concept for silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadigov, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahmadov, G.; Ariffin, A.; Khorev, S.; Sadygov, Z.; Suleymanov, S.; Zerrouk, F.; Madatov, R.

    2016-07-01

    A new design and principle of operation of silicon photomultipliers are presented. The new design comprises a semiconductor substrate and an array of independent micro-phototransistors formed on the substrate. Each micro-phototransistor comprises a photosensitive base operating in Geiger mode and an individual micro-emitter covering a small part of the base layer, thereby creating, together with this latter, a micro-transistor. Both micro-emitters and photosensitive base layers are connected with two respective independent metal grids via their individual micro-resistors. The total value of signal gain in the proposed silicon photomultiplier is a result of both the avalanche gain in the base layer and the corresponding gain in the micro-transistor. The main goals of the new design are: significantly lower both optical crosstalk and after-pulse effects at high signal amplification, improve speed of single photoelectron pulse formation, and significantly reduce the device capacitance.

  19. Photon assisted tunneling in pairs of silicon donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, K. L.; Pavlov, S. G.; Hübers, H.-W.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Murdin, B. N.

    2014-06-01

    Shallow donors in silicon are favorable candidates for the implementation of solid-state quantum computer architectures because of the promising combination of atomiclike coherence properties and scalability from the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Quantum processing schemes require (among other things) controlled information transfer for readout. Here we demonstrate controlled electron tunneling at 10 K from P to Sb impurities and vice versa with the assistance of resonant terahertz photons.

  20. Polymer/Perovskite Amplifying Waveguides for Active Hybrid Silicon Photonics.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Isaac; Juárez-Pérez, Emilio J; Bisquert, Juan; Mora-Seró, Iván; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2015-10-28

    The emission properties of hybrid halide perovskites are exploited to implement a stable and very low power operation waveguide optical amplifier integrated in a silicon platform. By optimizing its design with a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) encapsulation, this novel photonic device presents a net gain of around 10 dB cm(-1) and 3-4 nm linewidth with an energy threshold as low as 2 nJ pulse(-1) and exhibiting no degradation after one year. PMID:26331838

  1. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with <10 pJ energy. We demonstrate a ~1-ps free-carrier-induced pulse acceleration and show that picosecond input pulses are critical to these observations. These experiments are enabled by a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide and an ultra-sensitive frequency-resolved electrical gating technique to detect the ultralow energies in the nanostructured device. Strong agreement with a nonlinear Schrödinger model confirms the measurements. These results further our understanding of nonlinear waves in silicon and open the way to soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  2. Energy calibration of a multilayer photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The job of energy calibration was broken into three parts: gain normalization of all equivalent elements; determination of the functions for conversion of pulse height to energy; and gain stabilization. It is found that calorimeter experiments are no better than their calibration systems - calibration errors will be the major source of error at high energies. Redundance is found to be necessary - the system should be designed such that every element could be replaced during the life of the experiment. It is found to be important to have enough data taken during calibration runs and during the experiment to be able to sort out where the calibration problems were after the experiment is over. Each layer was normalized independently with electrons, and then the pulse height to energy conversion was determined with photons. The primary method of gain stabilization used the light flasher system. (LEW)

  3. Travelling-wave single-photon detectors integrated with diamond photonic circuits: operation at visible and telecom wavelengths with a timing jitter down to 23 ps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Patrik; Vetter, Andreas; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Nebel, Christoph; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and measurement of travelling-wave superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) integrated with polycrystalline diamond photonic circuits. We analyze their performance both in the near-infrared wavelength regime around 1600 nm and at 765 nm. Near-IR detection is important for compatibility with the telecommunication infrastructure, while operation in the visible wavelength range is relevant for compatibility with the emission line of silicon vacancy centers in diamond which can be used as efficient single-photon sources. Our detectors feature high critical currents (up to 31 μA) and high performance in terms of efficiency (up to 74% at 765 nm), noise-equivalent power (down to 4.4×10-19 W/Hz1/2 at 765 nm) and timing jitter (down to 23 ps).

  4. Test results on the silicon pixel detector for the TTF-FEL beam trajectory monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, S.; Ischebeck, R.; Müller, U. C.; Roth, S.; Hansen, K.; Holl, P.; Karstensen, S.; Kemmer, J.; Klanner, R.; Lechner, P.; Leenen, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Schmüser, P.; Strüder, L.

    2001-02-01

    Test measurements on the silicon pixel detector for the beam trajectory monitor at the free-electron laser of the TESLA test facility are presented. To determine the electronic noise of the detector and the read-out electronics and to calibrate the signal amplitude of different pixels, the 6 keV photons of the manganese K α/K β line are used. Two different methods determine the spatial accuracy of the detector: in one setup a laser beam is focused to a straight line and moves across the pixel structure. In the other, the detector is scanned using a low-intensity electron beam of an electron microscope. Both methods show that the symmetry axis of the detector defines a straight line within 0.4 μm. The sensitivity of the detector to low-energy X-rays is measured using a vacuum ultraviolet beam at the synchrotron light source HASYLAB. Additionally, the electron microscope is used to study the radiation hardness of the detector.

  5. Thermal detectors as single photon X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Mather, J. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1985-01-01

    In a thermal detector employed for X-ray spectroscopy applications, the energy of an X-ray is converted to heat in a small mass, and the energy of that X-ray inferred from the size of the temperature rise. The present investigation is concerned with the possibility to make an extremely low heat capacity calorimeter which can be employed as a thermal detector. Several types of calorimeters were fabricated and tested at temperatures as low as approximately 0.05 K. The obtained devices make use of thermistors constructed of melt-doped silicon, nuclear transmutation doped (NTD) germanium, and ion-implanted silicon with a variety of materials for the support and electrical leads. The utility of these microcalorimeters as X-ray spectrometers could be verified.

  6. Position Sensitive Detectors Mounted with Scintillators and Silicon Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Bonifácio, Daniel A. B.; Moralles, Maurício

    2011-08-01

    This work presents the first results obtained in the "Assembly and characterization of position sensitive detectors composed of scintillators coupled to silicon photomultipliers" project. The development of new x and γ radiation detectors have found several technological applications, especially in medical physics, where γ detectors that can be used in high intensity magnetic field are of particular importance. The experimental setup consisted of coupling of two silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) to the small sides of a 3×3×100 mm3 scintillator and the coupling of one SiPM to one of the small sides of a 3×3×10 mm3 scintillator. We found that the detectors used in this study presented an energy resolution that is in agreement with those observed in scintillators of the same family coupled to conventional photomultipliers. Besides that, there is a strong correlation between the difference of the light intensity in both SiPMs of the long detector and the position of the γ source. The results confirm the great potential of application of such detectors.

  7. Characterization of segmented Silicon detectors for neutron beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Americo; McGaughey, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The ``Nab'', and ``UCNB'' collaborations will measure the correlation parameters ``a'', ``b'', and ``B'' that are found in the triple differential rate equation from neutron β-decay ( n ->p + e + νe). These parameters that offer an atractive platform for searches of signals of new physics beyond standard model will be measured using unpolarized cold neutrons (Nab) at SNS, ORNL,and polarized ultracold neutrons (UCNB) at LANL. Following a neutron β-decay the electron and proton, will be accelerated in a 4π-field spectrometer, and detected by a novel detector design consisting of two opposite large area and thick silicon detectors segmented in 127 pixels per detector, and operated at ˜ 100 Kelvin. We have successfully completed the first phase of detector characterization, operating 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm thick Silicon detectors of 11 cm in diameter for neutron β-decay experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and detected ˜ 300 Hz protons from 15 to 35 keV at NCSU with a FWHM resolution of ˜ 3.2 keV with a potential of another factor of two improvement. Custom amplifiers based on FETs mounted directly on the detector reduced the noise and made possible the proton detection.

  8. A silicon carbide room-temperature single-photon source.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, S; Johnson, B C; Ivády, V; Stavrias, N; Umeda, T; Gali, A; Ohshima, T

    2014-02-01

    Over the past few years, single-photon generation has been realized in numerous systems: single molecules, quantum dots, diamond colour centres and others. The generation and detection of single photons play a central role in the experimental foundation of quantum mechanics and measurement theory. An efficient and high-quality single-photon source is needed to implement quantum key distribution, quantum repeaters and photonic quantum information processing. Here we report the identification and formation of ultrabright, room-temperature, photostable single-photon sources in a device-friendly material, silicon carbide (SiC). The source is composed of an intrinsic defect, known as the carbon antisite-vacancy pair, created by carefully optimized electron irradiation and annealing of ultrapure SiC. An extreme brightness (2×10(6) counts s(-1)) resulting from polarization rules and a high quantum efficiency is obtained in the bulk without resorting to the use of a cavity or plasmonic structure. This may benefit future integrated quantum photonic devices. PMID:24240243

  9. Test of an amorphous silicon detector in medical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, M.; Hesse, B. M.; Nairz, O.; Jäkel, O.

    2011-05-01

    Ion beam radiation therapy for cancer treatment allows for improved dose confinement to the target in comparison with the standard radiation therapy using high energy photons. Dose delivery to the patient using focused ion beam scanning over the target volume is going to be increasingly used in the upcoming years. The high precision of the dose delivery achieved in this way has to be met by practical methods for beam monitoring with sufficient spatial resolution in two dimensions. Flat panel detectors, used for photon portal imaging at the newest medical linear accelerators, are an interesting candidate for this purpose. Initial detector tests presented here were performed using proton beams with the highest available energy. The investigations include measurements of beam profiles at different beam intensities and for different beam width, as well as the signal linearity. Radiation damage was also investigated. The obtained results show that the detector is a promising candidate to be used in the therapeutic proton beams.

  10. Si-strip photon counting detectors for contrast-enhanced spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Buxin; Reiser, Ingrid; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasi; Chen, Chin-Tu; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barber, William C.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the development of silicon strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical mammography. Typically, X-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a-Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting Si strip detectors. The required performance for mammography in terms of the output count rate, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view for the application, thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and particular scanning techniques. Room temperature Si strip detector, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the X-ray energy ranges of the application. We present our methods and results from the optimization of Si-strip detectors for contrast enhanced spectral mammography. We describe the method being developed for quantifying iodine contrast using the energy-resolved detector with fixed thresholds. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method by scanning an iodine phantom with clinically relevant contrast levels.

  11. Investigation of Hamamatsu H8500 phototubes as single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, R. A.; Hoek, M.; Lucherini, V.; Mirazita, M.; Orlandi, A.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Pisano, S.; Rossi, P.; Viticchiè, A.; Witchger, A.

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the response of a significant sample of Hamamatsu H8500 MultiAnode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MAPMTs) as single photon detectors, in view of their use in a ring imaging Cherenkov counter for the CLAS12 spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For this, a laser working at 407.2 nm wavelength was employed. The sample is divided equally into standard window type, with a spectral response in the visible light region, and UV-enhanced window type MAPMTs. The studies confirm the suitability of these MAPMTs for single photon detection in such a Cherenkov imaging application.

  12. Accessing photon bunching with a photon number resolving multi-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Tan, Si Hui; Chekhova, Maria V; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2011-05-01

    In quantum optics and its applications, there is an urgent demand for photon-number resolving detectors. Recently, there appeared multi-pixel counters (MPPC) that are able to distinguish between 1,2,..10 photons. At the same time, strong coupling between different pixels (crosstalk) hinders their photon-number resolution. In this work, we suggest a method for `filtering out' the crosstalk effect in the measurement of intensity correlation functions. The developed approach can be expanded to the analysis of higher-order intensity correlations by using just a single MPPC. PMID:21643191

  13. The response of a 300 micron silicon detector to monoenergetic neutrons determined by the use of the Monte Carlo technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahezadeh, M.; Anno, G.

    1972-01-01

    The response of a 300 micron thick silicon detector to an incident monoenergetic neutron beam is evaluated by the Monte Carlo method for the cases of both a shielded and a bare detector. The result of Monte Carlo calculation, using elastic, inelastic, and absorption reactions indicates that the response of the silicon detector to neutrons is basically due to the elastic scattering. In addition, the gamma rays generated in the shield of the detector will result in a response which is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude smaller than response to incident photons. The response of a bare silicon detector is calculated for neutron energies up to 6 MeV and bias energies from 50 to 250 KeV. It is found that the maximum response for a 300 micron thick silicon detector is less than .004 c/n within this selected neutron and bias energy range. When the pulse height defect is introduced in the calculation the results at low energy neutrons were reduced.

  14. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  15. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  16. High efficiency neutron sensitive amorphous silicon pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1993-11-01

    A multi-layer a-Si:H based thermal neutron detector was designed, fabricated and simulated by Monte Carlo method. The detector consists of two PECVD deposited a-Si:H pin detectors interfaced with coated layers of Gd, as a thermal neutron converter. Simulation results indicate that a detector consisting of 2 Gd films with thicknesses of 2 and 4 {mu}m, sandwiched properly with two layers of sufficiently thick ({approximately}30{mu}m) amorphous silicon diodes, has the optimum parameters. The detectors have an intrinsic efficiency of about 42% at a threshold setting of 7000 electrons, with an expected average signal size of {approximately}12000 electrons which is well above the noise. This efficiency will be further increased to nearly 63%, if we use Gd with 50% enrichment in {sup 157}Gd. We can fabricate position sensitive detectors with spatial resolution of 300 {mu}m with gamma sensitivity of {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. These detectors are highly radiation resistant and are good candidates for use in various application, where high efficiency, high resolution, gamma insensitive position sensitive neutron detectors are needed.

  17. Inhomogeneous critical current in nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudio, R. Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Sahin, D.; Fiore, A.

    2014-12-01

    A superconducting thin film with uniform properties is the key to realize nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) with high performance and high yield. To investigate the uniformity of NbN films, we introduce and characterize simple detectors consisting of short nanowires with length ranging from 100 nm to 15 μm. Our nanowires, contrary to meander SSPDs, allow probing the homogeneity of NbN at the nanoscale. Experimental results, endorsed by a microscopic model, show the strongly inhomogeneous nature of NbN films on the sub-100 nm scale.

  18. Efficiently heralded silicon ring resonator photon-pair source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Fanto, Michael L.; Tison, Christopher C.; Wang, Zihao; Alsing, Paul M.; Preble, Stefan F.

    2016-05-01

    Presented here are results on a silicon ring resonator photon pair source with a high heralding efficiency. Previous ring resonator sources suffered from an effective 50% loss because, in order to generate the photons, the pump must be able to couple into the resonator which is an effective loss channel. However, in practice the optical loss of the pump can be traded off for a dramatic increase in heralding efficiency. This research found theoretically that the heralding efficiency should increase by a factor of ~ 3:75 with a factor of 10 increase in the required pump power. This was demonstrated experimentally by varying the separation (gap) between the input waveguide and the ring while maintaining a constant drop port gap. The ring (R = 18:5μm, W = 500nm, and H = 220nm) was pumped by a tunable laser (λ ≍ 1550nm). The non-degenerate photons, produced via spontaneous four wave mixing, exited the ring and were coupled to fiber upon which they were filtered symmetrically about the pump. Coincidence counts were collected for all possible photon path combinations (through and drop port) and the ratio of the drop port coincidences to the sum of the drop port and cross term coincidences (one photon from the drop port and one from the through port) was calculated. With a 350nm pump waveguide gap (2:33 times larger than the drop port gap) we confirmed our theoretical predictions, with an observed improvement in heralding efficiency by a factor of ~ 2:61 (96:7% of correlated photons coupled out of the drop port). These results will enable increased photon flux integrated photon sources which can be utilized for high performance quantum computing and communication systems.

  19. Intercomparison of cryogenic radiometers using silicon trap detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassila, A.; Hofer, H.; Ikonen, E.; Liedquist, L.; Stock, K. D.; Varpula, T.

    1997-02-01

    An intercomparison of cryogenic radiometers of HUT/VTT (Finland), PTB (Germany) and SP (Sweden) using silicon trap detectors was performed. Also results of monitoring of the responsivities of trap detectors over a 6 year period are presented. It was noticed that several non-idealities can undermine the agreement between results of calibrations. The non-uniformity of the responsivity of trap detectors made the results sensitive to alignment and beam size. The nonlinearity of some trap detectors was found to be large. The average relative differences in the results of the laboratories, when all known corrections are applied, are 0957-0233/8/2/003/img9 for HUT-PTB, 0957-0233/8/2/003/img10 for SP-PTB and 0957-0233/8/2/003/img11 for SP-HUT, with standard uncertainties of 0957-0233/8/2/003/img12 and 0957-0233/8/2/003/img13, respectively.

  20. Photon-noise limited sensitivity in titanium nitride kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubmayr, J. Beall, J.; Becker, D.; Cho, H.-M.; Hilton, G. C.; Li, D.; Pappas, D. P.; Van Lanen, J.; Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.; Devlin, M.; Dober, B.; Groppi, C.; Mauskopf, P.; Irwin, K. D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, L. F.

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrate photon-noise limited performance at sub-millimeter wavelengths in feedhorn-coupled, microwave kinetic inductance detectors made of a TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer superconducting film, tuned to have a transition temperature of 1.4 K. Micro-machining of the silicon-on-insulator wafer backside creates a quarter-wavelength backshort optimized for efficient coupling at 250 μm. Using frequency read out and when viewing a variable temperature blackbody source, we measure device noise consistent with photon noise when the incident optical power is >0.5 pW, corresponding to noise equivalent powers >3×10{sup −17} W/√(Hz). This sensitivity makes these devices suitable for broadband photometric applications at these wavelengths.

  1. Characterization of Silicon Photomultiplier based detectors with digital electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, Hadyn; Taylor, Steven; Hasse, Adam; Grzywacz, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Due to their compact design and good timing performance Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMT) were chosen to be used to readout the light from the plastic scintillator detector used as a trigger for the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). Prior to development of the new system, we have performed proof of principle studies, to demonstrate that the SiPMT, provided by Sensl is a viable replacement for the conventional photomultiplier. We have build a prototype detector, develop electronics readout chain and characterized its performance using the Digital Data Acquisition system at the University of Tennessee. This experience led to construction of segmented trigger detector which will be used in future VANDLE experiments. *This research was sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FG52-08NA28552 and the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. Due to their compact design and good timing performance Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMT) were chosen to be used to readout the light from the plastic scintillator detector used as a trigger for the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). Prior to development of the new system, we have performed proof of principle studies, to demonstrate that the SiPMT, provided by Sensl is a viable replacement for the conventional photomultiplier. We have build a prototype detector, develop electronics readout chain and characterized its performance using the Digital Data Acquisition system at the University of Tennessee. This experience led to construction of segmented trigger detector which will be used in future VANDLE experiments. *This research was sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FG52-08NA28552 and the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. University of Tennessee

  2. Cross two photon absorption in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide fiber taper coupler with a physical junction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkissian, Raymond O'Brien, John

    2015-01-21

    Cross two photon absorption in silicon is characterized using a tapered fiber photonic crystal silicon waveguide coupler. There is a physical junction between the tapered fiber and the waveguide constituting a stand-alone device. This device is used to obtain the spectrum for cross two photon absorption coefficient per unit volume of interaction between photons of nondegenerate energy. The corresponding Kerr coefficient per unit volume of interaction is also experimentally extracted. The thermal resistance of the device is also experimentally determined and the response time of the device is estimated for on-chip all-optical signal processing and data transfer between optical signals of different photon energies.

  3. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehrs, Sascha; DelGuerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 × 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of ~70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than ~0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm).

  4. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM).

    PubMed

    Moehrs, Sascha; Del Guerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 x 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of approximately 70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than approximately 0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm). PMID:16481681

  5. Comparison of TPB and bis-MSB as VUV waveshifters in prototype LBNE photon detector paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, B.; Mufson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Project is expected to provide facilities that will enable a program in neutrino physics that can measure fundamental physical parameters, explore physics beyond the Standard Model and better elucidate the nature of matter and anti-matter. The LBNE Photon Detection subsystem is primarily designed to detect the scintillation photons produced at 128 nm as ionizing particles traverse the liquid argon. The LBNE reference design for the photon detector subsystem uses adiabatic light guides consisting of cast acrylic bars whose surface is embedded with waveshifter to convert the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) 128 nm photons into the optical bandpass of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). In this investigation, we describe comparative studies of two VUV waveshifters — TPB and bis-MSB. We find that bis-MSB is more efficient than TPB at 128 nm. We also find that the efficiency of converting VUV photons into the optical for both waveshifters rises from 170-200 nm. Studies of the long wavelength behavior of the waveshifters supports the result that the efficiency is rising.

  6. Initial experience with the CDF layer 00 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hill

    2003-03-17

    We report on initial experience with the CDF Layer 00 Detector. Layer 00 is an innovative, low-mass, silicon detector installed in CDF during the upgrade for Run 2A of the Tevatron. Noise pickup present during operation at CDF is discussed. An event-by-event pedestal correction implemented by CDF is presented. This off-line solution prevents L00 from being used in the current incarnation of the on-line displaced track trigger. Preliminary performance of Layer 00 is described.

  7. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    SciTech Connect

    Campabadal, F.; Fleta, C.; Key, M.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Rafi, J.M.; Ullan, M.; Johansen, L.; Pommeresche, B.; Stugu, B.; Ciocio, A.; Fadeyev, V.; Gilchriese, M.; Haber, C.; Siegrist,J.; Spieler, H.; Vu, C.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Dowell, J.D.; Gallop, B.J.; Homer, R.J.; Jovanovic, P.; Mahout, G.; McMahon, T.J.; Wilson, J.A.; Barr, A.J.; Carter, J.R.; Fromant, B.P.; Goodrick, M.J.; Hill, J.C.; Lester, C.G.; Palmer, M.J.; Parker, M.A.; Robinson, D.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Shaw, R.J.; Anghinolfi, F.; Chesi, E.; Chouridou, S.; Fortin, R.; Grosse-Knetter, M.; Gruwe, M.; Ferrari, P.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Macpherson, A.; Niinikoski, T.; Pernegger, H.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Ruggiero, G.; Wallny, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Bialas, W.; Dabrowski, W.; Grybos, P.; Koperny, S.; Blocki, J.; Bruckman, P.; Gadomski, S.; Godlewski, J.; Gornicki, E.; Malecki, P.; Moszczynski, A.; Stanecka, E.; Stodulski, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Turala, M.; Wolter, M.; Ahmad, A.; Benes, J.; Carpentieri, C.; Feld, L.; Ketterer, C.; Ludwig,J.; Meinhardt, J.; Runge, K.; Mikulec, B.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; D'Onofrio,M.; Donega, M.; Moed, S.; Sfyrla, A.; Ferrere, D.; Clark, A.G.; Perrin,E.; Weber, M.; Bates, R.L.; Cheplakov, A.; Saxon, D.H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.M.; Iwata, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Kohriki, T.; Kondo, T.; Terada, S.; Ujiie, N.; Ikegami, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Brodbeck, T.; Chilingarov, A.; Hughes, G.; Ratoff, P.; Sloan, T.; Allport, P.P.; Casse,G.-L.; Greenall, A.; Jackson, J.N.; Jones, T.J.; King, B.T.; Maxfield,S.J.; Smith, N.A.; Sutcliffe, P.; Vossebeld, J.; Beck, G.A.; Carter,A.A.; Lloyd, S.L.; Martin, A.J.; Morris, J.; Morin, J.; Nagai, K.; Pritchard, T.W.; Anderson, B.E.; Butterworth, J.M.; Fraser, T.J.; Jones,T.W.; Lane, J.B.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.R.M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Freestone, J.; Foster, J.M.; Ibbotson, M.; Loebinger, F.K.; Pater, J.; Snow, S.W.; Thompson, R.J.; Atkinson, T.M.; et al.

    2004-08-18

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalized in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 1014 protons per square centimeter. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  8. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2015-05-01

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications.

  9. Recent advances in superconducting nanowire single photon detectors for single-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V. B.; Allman, M. S.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Stern, J. A.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array, as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  10. Twin photon pairs in a high-Q silicon microresonator

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Steven; Lu, Xiyuan; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2015-07-27

    We report the generation of high-purity twin photon pairs through cavity-enhanced non-degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator. Twin photon pairs are created within the same cavity mode and are consequently expected to be identical in all degrees of freedom. The device is able to produce twin photons at telecommunication wavelengths with a pair generation rate as large as (3.96 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 5} pairs/s, within a narrow bandwidth of 0.72 GHz. A coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 660 ± 62 was measured, the highest value reported to date for twin photon pairs, at a pair generation rate of (2.47 ± 0.04) × 10{sup 4} pairs/s. Through careful engineering of the dispersion matching window, we have reduced the ratio of photons resulting from degenerate FWM to non-degenerate FWM to less than 0.15.

  11. Silicon strip detector for a novel 2D dosimetric method for radiotherapy treatment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocci, A.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Espino, J. M.; Arráns, R.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Abou-Haïdar, Z.; Quesada, J. M.; Pérez Vega-Leal, A.; Pérez Nieto, F. J.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize a silicon strip detector and its associated data acquisition system, based on discrete electronics, to obtain in a near future absorbed dose maps in axial planes for complex radiotherapy treatments, using a novel technique. The experimental setup is based on two phantom prototypes: the first one is a polyethylene slab phantom used to characterize the detector in terms of linearity, percent depth dose, reproducibility, uniformity and penumbra. The second one is a cylindrical phantom, specifically designed and built to recreate conditions close to those normally found in clinical environments, for treatment planning assessment. This system has been used to study the dosimetric response of the detector, in the axial plane of the phantom, as a function of its angle with respect to the irradiation beam. A software has been developed to operate the rotation of this phantom and to acquire signals from the silicon strip detector. As an innovation, the detector was positioned inside the cylindrical phantom parallel to the beam axis. Irradiation experiments were carried out with a Siemens PRIMUS linac operating in the 6 MV photon mode at the Virgen Macarena Hospital. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using Geant4 toolkit and results were compared to Treatment Planning System (TPS) calculations for the absorbed dose-to-water case. Geant4 simulations were used to estimate the sensitivity of the detector in different experimental configurations, in relation to the absorbed dose in each strip. A final calibration of the detector in this clinical setup was obtained by comparing experimental data with TPS calculations.

  12. Ultraviolet /UV/ sensitive phosphors for silicon imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Cowens, M. W.; Butner, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of UV sensitive organic phosphors and the radiometric properties of phosphor coated silicon detectors in the VUV, UV, and visible wavelengths are described. With evaporated films of coronene and liumogen, effective quantum efficiencies of up to 20% have been achieved on silicon photodiodes in the vacuum UV. With thin films of methylmethacrylate (acrylic), which are doped with organic laser dyes and deposited from solution, detector quantum efficiencies of the order of 15% for wavelengths of 120-165 nm and of 40% for wavelengths above 190 nm have been obtained. The phosphor coatings also act as antireflection coatings and thereby enhance the response of coated devices throughout the visible and near IR.

  13. Design Fabrication and Characterization of High Density Silicon Photonic Components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Our burgeoning appetite for data relentlessly demands exponential scaling of computing and communications resources leading to an overbearing and ever-present drive to improve e ciency while reducing on-chip area even as photonic components expand to ll application spaces no longer satis ed by their electronic counterparts. With a high index contrast, low optical loss, and compatibility with the CMOS fabrication infrastructure, silicon-on-insulator technology delivers a mechanism by which e cient, sub-micron waveguides can be fabricated while enabling monolithic integration of photonic components and their associated electronic infrastructure. The result is a solution leveraging the superior bandwidth of optical signaling on a platform capable of delivering the optical analogue to Moore's Law scaling of transistor density. Device size is expected to end Moore's Law scaling in photonics as Maxwell's equations limit the extent to which this parameter may be reduced. The focus of the work presented here surrounds photonic device miniaturization and the development of 3D optical interconnects as approaches to optimize performance in densely integrated optical interconnects. In this dissertation, several technological barriers inhibiting widespread adoption of photonics in data communications and telecommunications are explored. First, examination of loss and crosstalk performance in silicon nitride over SOI waveguide crossings yields insight into the feasibility of 3D optical interconnects with the rst experimental analysis of such a structure presented herein. A novel measurement platform utilizing a modi ed racetrack resonator is then presented enabling extraction of insertion loss data for highly e cient structures while requiring minimal on-chip area. Finally, pioneering work in understanding the statistical nature of doublet formation in microphotonic resonators is delivered with the resulting impact on resonant device design detailed.

  14. Design, fabrication, and characterization of high density silicon photonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adam Michael

    Our burgeoning appetite for data relentlessly demands exponential scaling of computing and communications resources leading to an overbearing and ever-present drive to improve eciency while reducing on-chip area even as photonic components expand to ll application spaces no longer satised by their electronic counterparts. With a high index contrast, low optical loss, and compatibility with the CMOS fabrication infrastructure, silicon-on-insulator technology delivers a mechanism by which ecient, sub-micron waveguides can be fabricated while enabling monolithic integration of photonic components and their associated electronic infrastructure. The result is a solution leveraging the superior bandwidth of optical signaling on a platform capable of delivering the optical analogue to Moore's Law scaling of transistor density. Device size is expected to end Moore's Law scaling in photonics as Maxwell's equations limit the extent to which this parameter may be reduced. The focus of the work presented here surrounds photonic device miniaturization and the development of 3D optical interconnects as approaches to optimize performance in densely integrated optical interconnects. In this dissertation, several technological barriers inhibiting widespread adoption of photonics in data communications and telecommunications are explored. First, examination of loss and crosstalk performance in silicon nitride over SOI waveguide crossings yields insight into the feasibility of 3D optical interconnects with the rst experimental analysis of such a structure presented herein. A novel measurement platform utilizing a modied racetrack resonator is then presented enabling extraction of insertion loss data for highly ecient structures while requiring minimal on-chip area. Finally, pioneering work in understanding the statistical nature of doublet formation in microphotonic resonators is delivered with the resulting impact on resonant device design detailed.

  15. (Test, calibrate, and prepare a BGO photon detector system)

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, T.C.

    1990-10-19

    The traveler spent the year at CERN primarily to test, calibrate, and prepare a BGO photon detector system for use in the August 1990 run of WA80 with sulfur beams and for use in future planned runs with an expanded BGO detector. The BGO was used in test-beam runs in December 1989 and April--May 1990 and in the August data-taking run. The Midrapidity Calorimeters (MIRAC) were also prepared in a new geometry for the August run with a new transverse energy trigger. The traveler also continued to refine and carry out simulations of photon detector systems in present and future planned photon detection experiments. The traveler participated in several WA80 collaboration meetings, which were held at CERN throughout the period of stay. Invited talks were presented at the Workshop on High Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimetry in Stockholm, Sweden, November 9--11, 1989, and at the International Workshop on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, and Expert Systems for High-Energy and Nuclear Physics at Lyon, France, March 19--24, 1990. The traveler participated in an experiment to measure particle--particle correlations at 30-MeV/nucleon incident energies at the SARA facility in Grenoble from November 11--24, 1989.

  16. Laser ranging and mapping with a photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Priedhorsky, W C; Smith, R C; Ho, C

    1996-01-20

    We propose a new technique for remote sensing: photon-counting laser mapping. MicroChannel plate detectors with a crossed delay-line (MCP/CDL) readout combine high position accuracy and subnanosecond photon timing, at event rates of 10(6) detected photons per second and more. A mapping system would combine an MCP/CDL detector with a fast-pulse, high-repetition-rate laser illuminator. The system would map solid targets with exceptional in-range and cross-range resolution. The resulting images would be intrinsically three dimensional, without resorting to multiple viewing angles, so that objects of identical albedo could be discriminated. For a detector time resolution and pulse width of the order of 10(-10) s, the in-range resolution would be a few centimeters, permitting the discrimination of surfaces by their textures. Images could be taken at night, at illumination levels up to full moonlight, from ground, airborne, or space platforms. We discuss signal to noise as a function of laser flux and background level and present simulated images. PMID:21069029

  17. Thin-film scintillators for extended ultraviolet /UV/ response silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation and radiometric properties of silicon detectors coated with fluorescent thin films are described. The films are deposited from solutions of clear plastics, such as acrylic resins, polyvinyl toluene or polystyrene, and of organic laser dyes in a common solvent. They are optically clear, mechanically and chemically stable, yet easily applied and removed. Multiple doped films of a few microns thickness exhibit broad-band absorption from less than 250 nm to about 450 nm and narrow band emissions with peaks ranging from 380 nm to 600 nm. Internal quantum efficiencies are close to 100 percent and fluorescence decay times are in the nanosecond range. When deposited on optically denser media, a large fraction of the fluorescent emission is trapped in the substrate. Silicon photodiodes coated with multiple doped films exhibit high external quantum efficiencies and virtually flat photon response in the near UV.

  18. Modeling of kinetic processes in thermoelectric single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, Armen; Nikoghosyan, Vahan; Kuzanyan, Astghik

    2015-05-01

    The results of computer modeling of the thermoelectric single-photon detector are presented. We observe the processes of heat distribution after absorption of a photon of 0.1-1 keV energy in different parts of the absorber for different geometries of absorbers and thermoelectric sensors. The calculations were carried out by the matrix method for differential equations using parameters for the tungsten absorber and thermoelectric sensor made of (La, Ce)B6. The results of calculations show that it is realistic to detect photons about 0.1-1 keV and determine their energy with accuracy of not less than 1%. High count rates up to 200 GHz can be achieved.

  19. On-chip, photon-number-resolving, telecommunication-band detectors for scalable photonic information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E.; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan A.; Fox, Anna E.; Linares, Antia Lamas; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Spring, Justin B.; Langford, Nathan K.; Walmsley, Ian A.; Gates, James C.; Smith, Peter G. R.

    2011-12-15

    Integration is currently the only feasible route toward scalable photonic quantum processing devices that are sufficiently complex to be genuinely useful in computing, metrology, and simulation. Embedded on-chip detection will be critical to such devices. We demonstrate an integrated photon-number-resolving detector, operating in the telecom band at 1550 nm, employing an evanescently coupled design that allows it to be placed at arbitrary locations within a planar circuit. Up to five photons are resolved in the guided optical mode via absorption from the evanescent field into a tungsten transition-edge sensor. The detection efficiency is 7.2{+-}0.5 %. The polarization sensitivity of the detector is also demonstrated. Detailed modeling of device designs shows a clear and feasible route to reaching high detection efficiencies.

  20. Experience with parallel optical link for the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Hou

    2003-04-11

    The Dense Optical Interface Module (DOIM) is a byte-wide optical link developed for the Run II upgrade of the CDF silicon tracking system [1]. The module consists of a transmitter with a laser-diode array for conversion of digitized detector signals to light outputs, a 22 m optical fiber ribbon cable for light transmission, and a receiver converting the light pulses back to electrical signals. We report on the design feature, characteristics, and radiation tolerance.

  1. Integrated cooling channels in position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andricek, L.; Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Gomis, P.; Marinas, C.; Ninkovic, J.; Perelló, M.; Villarejo, M. A.; Vos, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present an approach to construct position-sensitive silicon detectors with an integrated cooling circuit. Tests on samples demonstrate that a very modest liquid flow very effectively cool the devices up to a power dissipation of over 10 W/cm2. The liquid flow is found to have a negligible impact on the mechanical stability. A finite-element simulation predicts the cooling performance to an accuracy of approximately 10%.

  2. Silicon photonics for compact, energy-efficient interconnects [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwicz, T.; Byun, H.; Gan, F.; Holzwarth, C. W.; Popovic, M. A.; Rakich, P. T.; Watts, M. R.; Ippen, E. P.; Kã¤Rtner, F. X.; Smith, H. I.; Orcutt, J. S.; Ram, R. J.; Stojanovic, V.; Olubuyide, O. O.; Hoyt, J. L.; Spector, S.; Geis, M.; Grein, M.; Lyszczarz, T.; Yoon, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the research program that we describe is to break the emerging performance wall in microprocessor development arising from limited bandwidth and density of on-chip interconnects and chip-to-chip (processor-to-memory) electrical interfaces. Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor compatible photonic devices provide an infrastructure for deployment of a range of integrated photonic networks, which will replace state-of-the-art electrical interconnects, providing significant gains at the system level. Scaling of wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) architectures using high-index-contrast (HIC) waveguides offers one path to realizing the energy efficiency and density requirements of high data rate links. HIC microring-resonator filters are well suited to support add-drop nodes in dense WDM photonic networks with high aggregate data rates because they support high Q's and, due to their traveling-wave character, naturally support physically separated input and drop ports. A novel reconfigurable, 'hitless' switch is presented that does not perturb the express channels either before, during, or after reconfiguration. In addition, multigigahertz operation of low-power, Mach-Zehnder silicon modulators as well as germanium-on-silicon photodiodes are presented.

  3. Design and simulation of silicon photonic schematics and layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flueckiger, Jonas; Wang, Xu; Klein, Jackson; Liu, Amy; Jhoja, Jaspreet; Pond, James

    2016-05-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is common for the design to begin at the physical component level, and create a layout by connecting components with interconnects. In this paper, we discuss how to create a schematic from the physical layout via netlist extraction, which enables circuit simulations. Post-layout extraction can also be used to predict how fabrication variability and non-uniformity will impact circuit performance. This is based on the component position information, compact models that are parameterized for dimensional variations, and manufacturing variability models such as a simulated wafer thickness map. This final step is critical in understanding how real-world silicon photonic circuits will behave. We present an example based on treating the ring resonator as a circuit. A silicon photonics design kit, as described here, is available for download at http://github.com/lukasc-ubc/SiEPIC_EBeam_PDK.

  4. Photon bunching and the photon-noise-limited performance of infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The photon-noise-limited performance of a radiation detector exposed to a thermal background of temperature T is analyzed by calculating the resulting specific detectivity. Both ideal photon detectors of arbitrary quantum efficiency eta and ideal thermal detectors of arbitrary emissivity eta are considered; and the effects of both shot noise and excess noise are taken into account. The relative contributions of these two sources depend on the quantum efficiency or emissivity of the system. For frequencies nu such that hnu/kT is much less than eta, excess noise can make an appreciable contribution to the total system noise. For the case of the detection of the narrow-band radiation, the specific detectivity is independent of eta in the limit hnu/kT is much less than eta.

  5. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Can Aydiner, C.; Almer, J.; Bernier, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Haeffner, D.; Kump, K.; Lee, P. L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A.; Vera, G.; LANL; GE Healthcare

    2008-01-01

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO{sub 2} powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s{sup -1} in radiography mode, 30 frames s{sup -1} in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO{sub 2} in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements.

  6. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, John H; Aydiner, C Can; Almer, Jonathan; Bernier, Joel; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Haeffner, Dean; Kump, Ken; Lee, Peter L; Lienert, Ulrich; Miceli, Antonino; Vera, German

    2008-09-01

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 microm x 200 microm pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 microm x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO(2) powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s(-1) in radiography mode, 30 frames s(-1) in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO(2) in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements. PMID:18728319

  7. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  8. Characterization of the CLYC detector for neutron and photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Mussi, C.; Miller, E. C.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Gueorguiev, A.

    2014-02-01

    Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) is a new scintillator that is suitable for dual gamma-neutron detectors due to its gamma spectroscopic capabilities while producing monoenergetic pulses from neutron captures with 6Li. We present new characterization results for a 2×2 cm2 CLYC crystal. The detector resolution was characterized using weak check photon sources including 137Cs, and the detector's neutron capture capabilities were characterized with several measurements of 252Cf with varying thicknesses of polyethylene moderator. It was found that the 6Li neutron capture rate was maximized when using approximately 7.6 cm of polyethylene moderator. A 5% resolution for the 662-keV line of 137Cs and a 3.4% resolution of the 6Li neutron capture peak were measured with our experimental set-up. MCNPX-PoliMi was used to model the measurements performed with the CLYC detector, and MPPost was used to determine the light output distribution, convert 6Li neutron captures into light, and apply energy resolution. It was found that the modeling technique was capable of predicting 137Cs photon light output distributions for all light output greater than 200 keVee, and also to predict the same optimal polyethylene thickness as the measurement. Intrinsic neutron capture efficiency was estimated to be about 10%, which is a factor-of-5 improvement over an equivalent volume of 3He at a pressure of 10 atm.

  9. Development of Photon Detectors for a Fast Focusing DIRC

    SciTech Connect

    Field, C.; Hadig, T.; Leith, David W.G.S.; Mazaheri, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Schwiening, J.; Uher, J.; Va'vra, J.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    We report progress in developing a Focusing DIRC with very good timing resolution. This basic detector development has been motivated by a possible upgrade of the very successful BaBar DIRC particle identification detector for a future Super B-factory. We have built a single bar full size prototype, which aims to reduce the chromatic error by precise timing, and to remove the effect of bar thickness with a focusing mirror. This paper describes the design of the prototype, and systematic studies of the timing resolution and position response for single photons for two 64-pixel detectors: (a) Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs, and (b) Burle MCP-PMTs. To test the prototype, we have developed new electronics for {approx}300 pixels capable of measuring a single electron timing resolution to {approx}100ps. We also report on a first measurement of aging with the MCP-PMT.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of a MOSFET detector for clinical application in photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Nishio, Teiji; Miyagishi, Tomoko; Goka, Tomonori; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of a metal oxide-silicon semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector are studied with megavoltage photon beams for patient dose verification. The major advantages of this detector are its size, which makes it a point dosimeter, and its ease of use. In order to use the MOSFET detector for dose verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and in-vivo dosimetry for radiation therapy, we need to evaluate the dosimetric properties of the MOSFET detector. Therefore, we investigated the reproducibility, dose-rate effect, accumulated-dose effect, angular dependence, and accuracy in tissue-maximum ratio measurements. Then, as it takes about 20 min in actual IMRT for the patient, we evaluated fading effect of MOSFET response. When the MOSFETs were read-out 20 min after irradiation, we observed a fading effect of 0.9% with 0.9% standard error of the mean. Further, we applied the MOSFET to the measurement of small field total scatter factor. The MOSFET for dose measurements of small field sizes was better than the reference pinpoint chamber with vertical direction. In conclusion, we assessed the accuracy, reliability, and usefulness of the MOSFET detector in clinical applications such as pinpoint absolute dosimetry for small fields. PMID:20821164

  11. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  12. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  13. Compton-edge-based energy calibration of double-sided silicon strip detectors in Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Ju Hahn; Lee, Chun Sik; Sung Lee, Jae

    2011-05-01

    Accurate energy calibration of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) is very important, but challenging for high-energy photons. In the present study, the calibration was improved by considering the Compton edge additionally to the existing low-energy calibration points. The result, indeed, was very encouraging. The energy-calibration errors were dramatically reduced, from, on average, 15.5% and 16.9% to 0.47% and 0.31% for the 356 (133Ba) and 662 keV (137Cs) peaks, respectively. The imaging resolution of a double-scattering-type Compton camera using DSSDs as the scatterer detectors, for a 22Na point-like source, also was improved, by ˜9%.

  14. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  15. Silicon photonic waveguide metrology using Mach-Zehnder interferometers.

    PubMed

    Oton, C J; Manganelli, C; Bontempi, F; Fournier, M; Fowler, D; Kopp, C

    2016-03-21

    We propose a procedure for characterizing fabrication deviations within a chip and among different chips in a wafer in silicon photonics technology. In particular, independent measurements of SOI thickness and waveguide width deviations can be mapped through the wafer, allowing a precise and non-destructive characterization of how these variations are distributed along the surface of the wafer. These deviations are critical for most wavelength-dependent integrated devices, like microring resonators, filters, etc. We also show that the technique allows for the characterization of proximity effects. PMID:27136819

  16. Silicon photonic crystal resonators for label free biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Amrita Kumar; Honzawa, Keita; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a two-dimensional (2D) silicon photonic crystal biosensor consisting of waveguides and cavity-type and defect-type resonators for enhancing the interactions between light and biomaterials. Sensitivity was measured using sucrose solution and the sensor showed the highest sensitivity [1570 nm/RIU (refractive index unit)] ever reported. We also investigated cavity size effects on resonance wavelength shift, and we observed that a large cavity exhibits a greater resonance wavelength shift. The fabricated sensor has shown a high Q of ∼105 in water and a device figure of merit of 1.2 × 105, which represent the improvements of the device performance over other photonic-crystal-based sensors.

  17. Photonic measurement of microwave frequency using a silicon microdisk resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Fan; Yan, Siqi; Min, Shucun; He, Mengying; Gao, Dingshan; Dong, Jianji

    2015-01-01

    A simple photonic approach to the measurement of microwave signal frequency with adjustable measurement range and resolution is proposed and demonstrated. In this approach, the unknown microwave signal is converted to an optical signal with single sideband modulation. Subsequently, a notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) is implemented by employing a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator (MDR). The MPF is tunable by changing the frequency interval between the optical carrier and the MDR notch so as to obtain different amplitude responses. A fixed frequency-to-power mapping is established by obtaining an amplitude comparison function (ACF) of the microwave power ratio and the microwave frequency. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrates a frequency measurement range of 10 GHz, with measurement error of ±0.1 GHz. Different frequency measurement ranges and resolutions are also discussed.

  18. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Stephanie; Vasani, Roshan B.; Zhao, Wei; Perrier, Sébastien; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-08-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye.

  19. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye. PMID:25177227

  20. Estimation of mammary gland composition using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihori, Akiko; Okamoto, Chizuru; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Ai; Kato, Misa; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    Energy resolved photon-counting mammography is a new technology, which counts the number of photons that passes through an object, and presents it as a pixel value in an image of the object. Silicon semiconductor detectors are currently used in commercial mammography. However, the disadvantage of silicon is the low absorption efficiency for high X-ray energies. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) series detector has a high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate the composition of the mammary gland using a CdTe series detector as a photon-counting detector. The fact that the detection rate of breast cancer in mammography is affected by mammary gland composition is now widely accepted. Assessment of composition of the mammary gland has important implications. An important advantage of our proposed technique is its ability to discriminate photons using three energy bins. We designed the CdTe series detector system using the MATLAB simulation software. The phantom contains nine regions with the ratio of glandular tissue and adipose varying in increments of 10%. The attenuation coefficient for each bin's energy was calculated from the number of input and output photons possessed by each. The evaluation results obtained by plotting the attenuation coefficient μ in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot show that the plots had a regular composition order congruent with that of the mammary gland. Consequently, we believe that our proposed method can be used to estimate the composition of the mammary gland.

  1. Performance of a PET detector module utilizing an array of silicon photodiodes to identify the crystal of interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E. ); Nutt, R.; Digby, W.M.; Williams, C.W.; Andreaco, M. )

    1992-11-01

    We present initial performance results for a new multi-layer PET detector module consisting of an array of 3 mm square by 30 mm deep BGO crystals coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube and on the opposite end to an array of 3 mm square silicon photodiodes. The photomultiplier tube provides an accurate timing pulse and energy discrimination for the all the crystals in the module, while the silicon photodiodes identify the crystal of interaction. When a single BGO crystal at +25[degree]C is excited with 511 key photons, we measure a photodiode signal centered at 700 electrons (e[sup [minus

  2. Radiation tests of the silicon drift detectors for LOFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Monte, E.; Azzarello, P.; Bozzo, E.; Bugiel, S.; Diebold, S.; Evangelista, Y.; Kendziorra, E.; Muleri, F.; Perinati, E.; Rachevski, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Feroci, M.; Pohl, M.; Santangelo, A.; Vacchi, A.

    2014-07-01

    During the three years long assessment phase of the LOFT mission, candidate to the M3 launch opportunity of the ESA Cosmic Vision programme, we estimated and measured the radiation damage of the silicon drift detectors (SDDs) of the satellite instrumentation. In particular, we irradiated the detectors with protons (of 0.8 and 11 MeV energy) to study the increment of leakage current and the variation of the charge collection efficiency produced by the displacement damage, and we "bombarded" the detectors with hypervelocity dust grains to measure the effect of the debris impacts. In this paper we describe the measurements and discuss the results in the context of the LOFT mission.

  3. Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification algorithm using silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fino, L.; Zaconte, V.; Ciccotelli, A.; Larosa, M.; Narici, L.

    2012-08-01

    Active detectors used as radiation monitors in space are not usually able to perform Particle Identification (PID). Common techniques need energy loss spectra with high statistics to estimate ion abundances. The ALTEA-space detector system is a set of silicon strip particle telescopes monitoring the radiation environment on board the International Space Station since July 2006 with real-time telemetry capabilities. Its large geometrical factor due to the concurrent use of six detectors permits the acquisition of good energy loss spectra even in a short period of observation. In this paper we present a novel Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification (FPPI) algorithm developed for the ALTEA data analysis in order to perform nuclear identification with low statistics and, with some limitations, also in real time.

  4. A Proposal to Upgrade the Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard; Michael, LeVine; Jonathan, Bouchet; Stephane, Bouvier; Artemios, Geromitsos; Gerard, Guilloux; Sonia, Kabana; Christophe, Renard; Howard, Matis; Jim, Thomas; Vi Nham, Tram

    2007-11-05

    The STAR Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) was built by a collaboration of Nantes, Strasbourg and Warsaw collaborators. It is a beautiful detector; it can provide 500 mu m scale pointing resolution at the vertex when working in combination with the TPC. It was first used in Run 4, when half the SSD was installed in an engineering run. The full detector was installed for Run 5 (the Cu-Cu run) and the operation and performance of the detector was very successful. However, in preparation for Run 6, two noisy ladders (out of 20) were replaced and this required that the SSD be removed from the STAR detector. The re-installation of the SSD was not fully successful and so for the next two Runs, 6 and 7, the SSD suffered a cooling system failure that allowed a large fraction of the ladders to overheat and become noisy, or fail. (The cause of the SSD cooling failure was rather trivial but the SSD could not be removed betweens Runs 6 and 7 due to the inability of the STAR detector to roll along its tracks at that time.)

  5. A large area silicon UCN detector with the analysis of UCN polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasakov, M. S.; Serebrov, A. P.; Khusainov, A. Kh.; Pustovoit, A.; Borisov, Yu. V.; Fomin, A. K.; Geltenbort, P.; Kon'kov, O. I.; Kotina, I. M.; Shablii, A. I.; Solovei, V. A.; Vasiliev, A. V.

    2005-06-01

    A silicon UCN detector with an area of 45 cm2 and with a 6LiF converter was developed at PNPI. The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at ILL. The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a 6LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarization was developed and tested. The analyzing power of this detector assembly reaches up to 75% for the main part of UCN spectrum. This UCN detector with analysis of UCN polarization can be used in the new EDM spectrometer.

  6. The silicon micro-strip detector plane for the LOFT/wide-field monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Ferrando, P.; Götz, D.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Limousin, O.; Basa, S.; Bertoli, W.; Delagnes, Eric; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gevin, O.; Gros, A.; Gouiffes, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Lachaud, C.; Llored, M.; Olivetto, C.; Prevot, G.; Renaud, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Rossin, C.; Schanne, S.; Soldi, S.; Varniere, P.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) on the LOFT mission is to provide unambiguous detection of the high-energy sources in a large field of view, in order to support science operations of the LOFT primary instrument, the LAD. The monitor will also provide by itself a large number of results on the timing and spectral behavior of hundreds of galactic compact objects, Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The WFM is based on the coded aperture concept where a position sensitive detector records the shadow of a mask projected by the celestial sources. The proposed WFM detector plane, based on Double Sided micro-Strip Silicon Detectors (DSSD), will allow proper 2-dimensional recording of the projected shadows. Indeed the positioning of the photon interaction in the detector with equivalent fine resolution in both directions insures the best imaging capability compatible with the allocated budgets for this telescope on LOFT. We will describe here the overall configuration of this 2D-WFM and the design and characteristics of the DSSD detector plane including its imaging and spectral performances. We will also present a number of simulated results discussing the advantages that this configuration offers to LOFT. A DSSD-based WFM will in particular reduce significantly the source confusion experienced by the WFM in crowded regions of the sky like the Galactic Center and will in general increase the observatory science capability of the mission.

  7. Possibility of gated silicon drift detector detecting hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Fukushima, Shinya; Sakurai, Shungo; Ishikawa, Shohei; Takeshita, Akinobu; Hidaka, Atsuki

    2015-08-01

    One of the authors has proposed a simple-structure silicon X-ray detector (gated silicon drift detector: GSDD), whose structure is much simpler than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). SDDs contain multiple built-in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) or implanted resistors, whose fabrication processes lower the yield rate of detectors, and also require at least two high-voltage sources. On the other hand, GSDDs do not contain built-in MOSFETs or implanted resistors. Moreover, GSDDs require only one high-voltage source. Therefore, GSDDs greatly reduce the cost of the X-ray detection system. We fabricated prototype GSDDs that contained 0.625-mm-thick Si substrates with an active area of 18 mm2, operated by Peltier cooling and a single voltage source. Its energy resolution at 5.9 keV from an 55Fe source was 145 eV at -38°C and -90°V. Thicker Si substrates are required to enhance its absorption of X-rays. To detect X-ray photons with energies up to 77 keV for X-ray absorbance higher than 15%, we simulate the electric potential distribution in GSDDs with Si thicknesses from 0.625 to 3.0 mm. We obtain an adequate electric potential distribution in the thicknesses of up to 3.0 mm, and the capacitance of the GSDD remains small and its X-ray count rate remain high. The high reverse bias required in the 3-mm-thick GSDD was a third of that in a 3-mm-thick pin diode.

  8. Stress induced long wavelength photoconductivity in doped silicon infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The long wavelength cutoff of a Si:P detector was extended to 34 microns by the application of a uniaxial stress. An unstressed Si:P photoconductive detector responds to photons of up to 28 microns wavelength. By applying a uniaxial stress to a detector along the /100/ crystal axis, the response was extended to approximately 34 microns. The /100/ axis was chosen as the stress direction because theoretical calculations predicted that such a stress extends the wavelength response more than one along the /110/ axis. These theoretical calculations were based upon fits to experimental data obtained at stresses of up to approximately kbar, and indicated that the extension in wavelength response continues to increase at much larger stresses.

  9. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  10. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K.; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  11. Development of an anti-Compton veto for HPGe detectors operated in liquid argon using silicon photo-multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Aghaei Khozani, H.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.

    2011-10-01

    A proof of concept detector is presented for scintillation light detection in liquid argon using silicon photo-multipliers. The aim of the work is to build an anti-Compton veto for germanium detectors operated directly in liquid argon as in the GERDA experiment. Wavelength shifting fibers are used to collect the scintillation light and to guide it to Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC). Sufficient light yield was achieved to realize an effective anti-Compton veto. Properties of the MPPC were studied at cryogenic temperatures and are additionally reported.

  12. Athermal Photonic Devices and Circuits on a Silicon Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Vivek

    In recent years, silicon based optical interconnects has been pursued as an effective solution that can offer cost, energy, distance and bandwidth density improvements over copper. Monolithic integration of optics and electronics has been enabled by silicon photonic devices that can be fabricated using CMOS technology. However, high levels of device integration result in significant local and global temperature fluctuations that prove problematic for silicon based photonic devices. In particular, high temperature dependence of Si refractive index (thermo-optic (TO) coefficient) shifts the filter response of resonant devices that limit wavelength resolution in various applications. Active thermal compensation using heaters and thermo-electric coolers are the legacy solution for low density integration. However, the required electrical power, device foot print and number of input/output (I/O) lines limit the integration density. We present a passive approach to an athermal design that involves compensation of positive TO effects from a silicon core by negative TO effects of the polymer cladding. In addition, the design rule involves engineering the waveguide core geometry depending on the resonance wavelength under consideration to ensure desired amount of light in the polymer. We develop exact design requirements for a TO peak stability of 0 pm/K and present prototype performance of 0.5 pm/K. We explore the material design space through initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of 2 polymer cladding choices. We study the effect of cross-linking on the optical properties of a polymer and establish the superior performance of the co-polymer cladding compared to the homo-polymer. Integration of polymer clad devices in an electronic-photonic architecture requires the possibility of multi-layer stacking capability. We use a low temperature, high density plasma chemical vapor deposition of SiO2/SiN x to hermetically seal the athermal. Further, we employ visible light for

  13. An organophosphonate strategy for functionalizing silicon photonic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Cheng, Fang; Dubey, Manish; Kaplan, Justin M.; Rawal, Meghana; Jiang, Xi; Newburg, David S.; Sullivan, Philip A.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photonic microring resonators have established their potential for label-free and low-cost biosensing applications. However, the long-term performance of this optical sensing platform requires robust surface modification and biofunctionalization. Herein, we demonstrate a conjugation strategy based on an organophosphonate surface coating and vinyl sulfone linker to biofunctionalize silicon resonators for biomolecular sensing. To validate this method, a series of glycans, including carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, were immobilized on divinyl sulfone (DVS)/organophosphonate-modified microrings and used to characterize carbohydrate-protein and norovirus particle interactions. This biofunctional platform was able to orthogonally detect multiple specific carbohydrate-protein interactions simultaneously. Additionally, the platform was capable of reproducible binding after multiple regenerations by high-salt, high-pH or low-pH solutions and after 1-month storage in ambient conditions. This remarkable stability and durability of the organophosphonate immobilization strategy will facilitate the application of silicon microring resonators in various sensing conditions, prolong their lifetime, and minimize the cost for storage and delivery; these characteristics are requisite for developing biosensors for point-of-care and distributed diagnostics and other biomedical applications. In addition, the platform demonstrated its ability to characterize carbohydrate-mediated host-virus interactions, providing a facile method for discovering new anti-viral agents to prevent infectious disease. PMID:22220731

  14. Porous silicon photonic crystals for detection of infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, B.; Guan, B.; Reece, P. J.; Gooding, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of modifying porous silicon (PSi) particles with surface chemistry and immobilizing a biopolymer, gelatin for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. To immobilize gelatin in the pores of the particles, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with an alkyne, 1,8-nonadiyne via hydrosilylation to protect the silicon surfaces from oxidation. This modification allows for further functionality to be added such as the coupling of gelatin. Exposure of the gelatin modified particles to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The ability to monitor the spectroscopic properties of microparticles, and shifts in the optical signature due to changes in the refractive index of the material within the pore space, is demonstrated.

  15. Laminated Amorphous Silicon Neutron Detector (pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Harry McHugh, Howard Branz, Paul Stradins, and Yueqin Xu

    2009-01-29

    An internal R&D project was conducted at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), to determine the feasibility of developing a multi-layer boron-10 based thermal neutron detector using the amorphous silicon (AS) technology currently employed in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays. The boron-10 neutron reaction produces an alpha that can be readily detected. A single layer detector, limited to an approximately 2-micron-thick layer of boron, has a theoretical sensitivity of about 3%; hence a thin multi-layer device with high sensitivity can theoretically be manufactured from single layer detectors. Working with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), an AS PiN diode alpha detector was developed and tested. The PiN diode was deposited on a boron-10 coated substrate. Testing confirmed that the neutron sensitivity was nearly equal to the theoretical value of 3%. However, adhesion problems with the boron-10 coating prevented successful development of a prototype detector. Future efforts will include boron deposition work and development of integrated AS signal processing circuitry.

  16. Use of silicon pixel detectors in double electron capture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, P.; Stekl, I.; Shitov, Yu A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, E. N.; Jose, J. M.; Cermak, J.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Brudanin, V. B.; Loaiza, P.

    2011-01-01

    A novel experimental approach to search for double electron capture (EC/EC) is discussed in this article. R&D for a new generation EC/EC spectrometer based on silicon pixel detectors (SPDs) has been conducted since 2009 for an upgrade of the TGV experiment. SPDs built on Timepix technology with a spectroscopic readout from each individual pixel are an effective tool to detect the 2νEC/EC signature of the two low energy X-rays hitting two separate pixels. The ability of SPDs to indentify α/β/γ particles and localize them precisely leads to effective background discrimination and thus considerable improvement of the signal-to-background ratio (S/B). A multi-SPD system, called a Silicon Pixel Telescope (SPT), is planned based on the experimental approach of the TGV calorimeter which measures thin foils of enriched EC/EC-isotope sandwiched between HPGe detectors working in coincidence mode. The sources of SPD internal background have been identified by measuring SPD radiopurity with a low-background HPGe detector as well as by long-term SPD background runs in the Modane underground laboratory (LSM, France), and results of these studies are presented.

  17. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  18. High quantum efficiency S-20 photocathodes in photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. A.; DeFazio, J.; Duarte Pinto, S.; Glazenborg, R.; Kernen, E.

    2016-04-01

    Based on conventional S-20 processes, a new series of high quantum efficiency (QE) photocathodes has been developed that can be specifically tuned for use in the ultraviolet, blue or green regions of the spectrum. The QE values exceed 30% at maximum response, and the dark count rate is found to be as low as 30 Hz/cm2 at room temperature. This combination of properties along with a fast temporal response makes these photocathodes ideal for application in photon counting detectors, which is demonstrated with an MCP photomultiplier tube for single and multi-photoelectron detection.

  19. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Michael G; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H

    2014-03-24

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack. PMID:24664022

  20. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  1. Evaluation of the usefulness of a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom for 6-MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Kitou, Satoshi; Goka, Tomonori; Matsubara, Kana; Kameoka, Satoru; Matsuura, Taeko; Ariji, Takaki; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a metal oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector as a in vivo dosimeter, we performed in vivo dosimetry using the MOSFET detector with an anthropomorphic phantom. We used the RANDO phantom as an anthropomorphic phantom, and dose measurements were carried out in the abdominal, thoracic, and head and neck regions for simple square field sizes of 10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 3 x 3 cm(2) with a 6-MV photon beam. The dose measured by the MOSFET detector was verified by the dose calculations of the superposition (SP) algorithm in the XiO radiotherapy treatment-planning system. In most cases, the measured doses agreed with the results of the SP algorithm within +/-3%. Our results demonstrated the utility of the MOSFET detector for in vivo dosimetry even in the presence of clinical tissue inhomogeneities. PMID:20821083

  2. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  3. The silicon solar cell as a photometric detector.

    PubMed

    Witherell, P G; Faulhaber, M E

    1970-01-01

    Early in their development, silicon solar cells were recognized to have characteristics desirable for photometric detectors. It is therefore surprising that their use in this way has not become more widespread. Results of an investigation to establish more completely the photometric capabilities of these cells are presented in this paper. An equivalent circuit model is used to predict performance from basic cell parameters and the dependence on illumination level and load impedance is established. When load impedance is low, silicon cells have a small temperature coefficient and the cell current is accurately proportional to illumination. With high impedance loads and high illumination levels, the cell voltage is logarithmically related to illumination and the temperature sensitivity is approximately an order of magnitude greater. Variation of spectral response between unselected cells from the same manufacturer was found to be considerably less than that typically measured for unselected phototubes. PMID:20076139

  4. Silicon photodiode as the two-color detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, D. B.; Zakharenko, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a silicon photodiode as the two-color photodetector. The work of one photodiode in two spectral ranges is achieved due to the changes of the spectral sensitivity of the photodiodes in the transition from photodiode mode for photovoltaic in the short circuit mode. On the basis of silicon photodiode FD-256 the layout of the spectral ratio pyrometer was assembled and the results of theoretical calculations was confirmed experimentally. The calculated dependences of the coefficient of error of the spectral ratio pyrometer from temperature reverse voltage 10 and 100 V was presented. The calculated dependence of the instrumental error and the assessment of methodological errors of the proposed photodetector spectral ratio was done. According to the results of the presented research was set the task of development photodiode detectors which change the spectral sensitivity depending on the applied voltage.

  5. Readout of silicon strip detectors with position and timing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Irmler, C.; Pernicka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Low-noise front-end amplifiers for silicon strip detectors are already available for decades, providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio and thus very precise spatial resolution, but at the cost of a long shaping time in the microsecond range. Due to occupancy and pile-up issues, modern experiments need much faster electronics. With submicron ASICs, adequate readout and data processing, it is possible to obtain not only spatial hit data, but also accurate timing information—a feature which is rarely exploited so far. We present the concept of a silicon vertex detector readout system intended for an upgrade of the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). The APV25 front-end chip, originally developed for CMS at CERN, is used in a way where it delivers multiple samples along the shaped waveform, such that not only the analog pulse height, but also the timing of each particle hit can be determined. We developed a complete readout system including an FADC +Processor VME module which performs zero-suppression in FPGAs. The hit time measurement is also planned on the same module. As fast amplifiers are inherently more susceptible to noise, which largely depends on the load capacitance, the front-end chips should be located as close to the detector as possible. On the other hand, the material budget, especially in a low-energy electron-positron machine such as Belle, should be minimized. We tried to merge those demands with a fully functional "Flex_Module", where thinned APV25 readout chips are mounted on the silicon sensor.

  6. High-fidelity frequency down-conversion of visible entangled photon pairs with superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Kato, Hiroshi; Kusaka, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Koashi, Masato

    2014-12-04

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-fidelity visible-to-telecommunicationwavelength conversion of a photon by using a solid-state-based difference frequency generation. In the experiment, one half of a pico-second visible entangled photon pair at 780 nm is converted to a 1522-nm photon. Using superconducting single-photon detectors with low dark count rates and small timing jitters, we observed a fidelity of 0.93±0.04 after the wavelength conversion.

  7. Field Funneling and Range Straggling in Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Malone, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Magnitudes of field funneling and range straggling determined in silicon-surface-barrier (Schottky-barrier) charged-particle detectors (SSBD's) through meaurement of charges collected from alpha-particle tracks. Method used extended to straightforward measurement of charge collection from heavy-ion tracks in these and other semiconductor devices. Such measurements used to assess single-event upsets in integratedcircuit chips, with view toward making them resistant to radiation. Field funneling and range straggling measured with electronic system in which charge collected from individual ions measured and recorded by multichannel analyzer.

  8. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. PMID:27337649

  9. Nonlinear silicon photonics from the near to mid infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung Soo

    This dissertation presents experimental work investigating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic waveguides for parametric nonlinear optic devices. An introduction is presented in Chapter 1, including background and motivation for exploring SOI as a platform for integrated photonics, as well as an overview of integrated nonlinear optic devices. Chapter 2 discusses on-chip slow light structures based on coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROW), potentially useful for enhancing nonlinearities for efficient chip-scale nonlinear optics. Although slowing light is limited by fabrication tolerance-induced disorder, a fundamental phenomenon is observed: the Anderson localization of optical waves. Chapter 3 of the dissertation discusses four-wave mixing in SOI waveguides. SOI waveguide fabrication is described in detail, including achieving low fiber-to-chip coupling loss and waveguide propagation loss. Two approaches for dispersion engineering are presented: with the design of waveguide dimensions and with a thin-film cladding. Parametric wavelength conversion by degenerate (single-pump) FWM in these dispersion-engineered waveguides is demonstrated and discussed. Chapter 4 concerns FWM with two pumps, an approach that promises functionalities not possible with a single pump such as multiple sideband generation with self-seeded higher-order pumps. In addition to demonstrating the generation of up to ten sidebands with dual pumps and subsequent self-seeded higher order pumps, we characterize trade-offs in maximum conversion efficiency due to nondegenerate two-photon absorption (TPA). The work presented in Chapter 5 takes a novel approach to SOI parametric devices by exploring a new spectral range, toward the mid-infrared (mid-IR), near 2 mum and beyond. We measure FWM in silicon waveguides with a pump near 2 mum, which itself is generated by the parametric conversion of a 1300 nm seed by a 1589 nm pump in a highly-nonlinear fiber (HNLF). Fundamentally, our results show

  10. Photon-Noise Limited Direct Detector Based on Disorder-Controlled Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B.; McGrath, W.; Gershenson, M.; Sergeev, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a transition edge sensor (1-meu size bridge) made form a disordered superconducting film.

  11. Broadband illumination of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the detailed behaviour of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors such as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) requires knowledge of the nonequilibrium quasiparticle energy distributions. We have previously calculated the steady state distributions resulting from uniform absorption of monochromatic sub gap and above gap frequency radiation by thin films. In this work, we use the same methods to calculate the effect of illumination by broadband sources, such as thermal radiation from astrophysical phenomena or from the readout system. Absorption of photons at multiple above gap frequencies is shown to leave unchanged the structure of the quasiparticle energy distribution close to the superconducting gap. Hence for typical absorbed powers, we find the effects of absorption of broadband pair breaking radiation can simply be considered as the sum of the effects of absorption of many monochromatic sources. Distribution averaged quantities, like quasiparticle generation efficiency η, match exactly a weighted average over the bandwidth of the source of calculations assuming a monochromatic source. For sub gap frequencies, however, distributing the absorbed power across multiple frequencies does change the low energy quasiparticle distribution. For moderate and high absorbed powers, this results in a significantly larger η-a higher number of excess quasiparticles for a broadband source compared to a monochromatic source of equal total absorbed power. Typically in KIDs the microwave power absorbed has a very narrow bandwidth, but in devices with broad resonance characteristics (low quality factors), this increase in η may be measurable.

  12. Physical characterization of a scanning photon counting digital mammography system based on Si-strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aaslund, Magnus; Cederstroem, Bjoern; Lundqvist, Mats; Danielsson, Mats

    2007-06-15

    The physical performance of a scanning multislit full field digital mammography system was determined using basic image quality parameters. The system employs a direct detection detector comprised of linear silicon strip sensors in an edge-on geometry connected to photon counting electronics. The pixel size is 50 {mu}m and the field of view 24x26 cm{sup 2}. The performance was quantified using the presampled modulation transfer function, the normalized noise power spectrum and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Compared to conventional DQE methods, the scanning geometry with its intrinsic scatter rejection poses additional requirements on the measurement setup, which are investigated in this work. The DQE of the photon counting system was found to be independent of the dose level to the detector in the 7.6-206 {mu}Gy range. The peak DQE was 72% and 73% in the scan and slit direction, respectively, measured with a 28 kV W-0.5 mm Al anode-filter combination with an added 2 mm Al filtration.

  13. Physical characterization of a scanning photon counting digital mammography system based on Si-strip detectors.

    PubMed

    Aslund, Magnus; Cederström, Björn; Lundqvist, Mats; Danielsson, Mats

    2007-06-01

    The physical performance of a scanning multislit full field digital mammography system was determined using basic image quality parameters. The system employs a direct detection detector comprised of linear silicon strip sensors in an edge-on geometry connected to photon counting electronics. The pixel size is 50 microm and the field of view 24 x 26 cm2. The performance was quantified using the presampled modulation transfer function, the normalized noise power spectrum and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Compared to conventional DQE methods, the scanning geometry with its intrinsic scatter rejection poses additional requirements on the measurement setup, which are investigated in this work. The DQE of the photon counting system was found to be independent of the dose level to the detector in the 7.6-206 microGy range. The peak DQE was 72% and 73% in the scan and slit direction, respectively, measured with a 28 kV W-0.5 mm Al anode-filter combination with an added 2 mm Al filtration. PMID:17654894

  14. Neutron fluence rate measurements in a PGNAA 208-liter drum assay system using silicon carbide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulloo, A. R.; Ruddy, F. H.; Seidel, J. G.; Lee, S.; Petrović, B.; McIlwain, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is being implemented for the nondestructive assay (NDA) of mercury, cadmium and lead in containers of radioactive waste. A PGNAA prototype system capable of assaying 208-liter (55-gallon) drums has already been built and demonstrated. As part of the evaluation of this system, the thermal neutron fluence rate distribution in a drum containing a combustible waste surrogate was measured during PGNAA runs using a silicon carbide neutron detector. The fast charge-collection time of this detector type enabled the investigation of the neutron kinetics at various locations within the matrix during and between pulses of the system's 14-MeV neutron source. As expected, the response of a SiC detector equipped with a lithium-6 fluoride layer is dominated by thermal neutron-induced events between pulses. The measurement results showed that the thermal neutron fluence rate is relatively uniform over a radial depth of several centimeters in the matrix region that contributes a significant fraction of the prompt gamma radiation incident on the system's photon detector.

  15. Timing Measurements of Scintillator Bars with Silicon Phtotomultiplier Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To track and analyze cosmic rays via precise measurements of muon and similarly penetrating particle's airshower axes directions, we constructed a prototype consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is embedded with green wavelength shifting fibers to increase detection rate of two silicon photomultiplier, SiPM, light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The focus of the experiment was to determine the performance of these devices. Evaluation was performed for two makes of SiPM models - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. Timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions to filter out noise such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detectors in self-triggered mode. The SiPM detector waveforms were digitized using a 4-channel fast waveform sampler, the DRS4 digitizer. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. From our results, we deduced the speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules to be about 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the specifications of the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  16. High bit rate germanium single photon detectors for 1310nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing interest in development of high speed, low noise and readily fieldable near infrared (NIR) single photon detectors. InGaAs/InP Avalanche photodiodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode (GM) are a leading choice for NIR due to their preeminence in optical networking. After-pulsing is, however, a primary challenge to operating InGaAs/InP single photon detectors at high frequencies1. After-pulsing is the effect of charge being released from traps that trigger false ("dark") counts. To overcome this problem, hold-off times between detection windows are used to allow the traps to discharge to suppress after-pulsing. The hold-off time represents, however, an upper limit on detection frequency that shows degradation beginning at frequencies of ~100 kHz in InGaAs/InP. Alternatively, germanium (Ge) single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD) have been reported to have more than an order of magnitude smaller charge trap densities than InGaAs/InP SPADs2, which allowed them to be successfully operated with passive quenching2 (i.e., no gated hold off times necessary), which is not possible with InGaAs/InP SPADs, indicating a much weaker dark count dependence on hold-off time consistent with fewer charge traps. Despite these encouraging results suggesting a possible higher operating frequency limit for Ge SPADs, little has been reported on Ge SPAD performance at high frequencies presumably because previous work with Ge SPADs has been discouraged by a strong demand to work at 1550 nm. NIR SPADs require cooling, which in the case of Ge SPADs dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency of the Ge at 1550 nm. Recently, however, advantages to working at 1310 nm have been suggested which combined with a need to increase quantum bit rates for quantum key distribution (QKD) motivates examination of Ge detectors performance at very high detection rates where InGaAs/InP does not perform as well. Presented in this paper are measurements of a commercially available Ge APD

  17. Rise time of voltage pulses in NbN superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, K. V.; Divochiy, A. V.; Vakhtomin, Yu. B.; Sidorova, M. V.; Karpova, U. V.; Morozov, P. V.; Seleznev, V. A.; Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    We have found experimentally that the rise time of voltage pulse in NbN superconducting single photon detectors increases nonlinearly with increasing the length of the detector L. The effect is connected with dependence of resistance of the detector Rn, which appears after photon absorption, on its kinetic inductance Lk and, hence, on the length of the detector. This conclusion is confirmed by our calculations in the framework of two temperature model.

  18. Optical nonreciprocal transmission in an asymmetric silicon photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zheng; Chen, Juguang; Ji, Mengxi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xia, Jinsong; Wang, Yi E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wu, Ying E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-11-30

    An optical nonreciprocal transmission (ONT) is realized by employing the nonlinear effects in a compact asymmetric direct-coupled nanocavity-waveguide silicon photonic crystal structure with a high loaded quality factor (Q{sub L}) of 42 360 and large extinction ratio exceeding 30 dB. Applying a single step lithography and successive etching, the device can realize the ONT in an individual nanocavity, alleviating the requirement to accurately control the resonance of the cavities. A maximum nonreciprocal transmission ratio of 21.1 dB as well as a working bandwidth of 280 pm in the telecommunication band are obtained at a low input power of 76.7 μW. The calculated results by employing a nonlinear coupled-mode model are in good agreement with the experiment.

  19. Deterministic Integration of Single Photon Sources in Silicon Based Photonic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Iman Esmaeil; Elshaari, Ali W; Jöns, Klaus D; Fognini, Andreas; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J; Reimer, Michael E; Zwiller, Val

    2016-04-13

    A major step toward fully integrated quantum optics is the deterministic incorporation of high quality single photon sources in on-chip optical circuits. We show a novel hybrid approach in which preselected III-V single quantum dots in nanowires are transferred and integrated in silicon based photonic circuits. The quantum emitters maintain their high optical quality after integration as verified by measuring a low multiphoton probability of 0.07 ± 0.07 and emission line width as narrow as 3.45 ± 0.48 GHz. Our approach allows for optimum alignment of the quantum dot light emission to the fundamental waveguide mode resulting in very high coupling efficiencies. We estimate a coupling efficiency of 24.3 ± 1.7% from the studied single-photon source to the photonic channel and further show by finite-difference time-domain simulations that for an optimized choice of material and design the efficiency can exceed 90%. PMID:26954298

  20. SOI metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor photon detector based on single-hole counting.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Inokawa, Hiroshi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Ono, Atsushi

    2011-08-01

    In this Letter, a scaled-down silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is characterized as a photon detector, where photogenerated individual holes are trapped below the negatively biased gate and modulate stepwise the electron current flowing in the bottom channel induced by the positive substrate bias. The output waveforms exhibit clear separation of current levels corresponding to different numbers of trapped holes. Considering this capability of single-hole counting, a small dark count of less than 0.02 s(-1) at room temperature, and low operation voltage of 1 V, SOI MOSFET could be a unique photon-number-resolving detector if the small quantum efficiency were improved. PMID:21808317

  1. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, J.; Puzovic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  2. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector’s performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods. PMID:22352658

  3. Lossless compression of projection data from photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunhavanich, Picha; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    With many attractive attributes, photon counting detectors with many energy bins are being considered for clinical CT systems. In practice, a large amount of projection data acquired for multiple energy bins must be transferred in real time through slip rings and data storage subsystems, causing a bandwidth bottleneck problem. The higher resolution of these detectors and the need for faster acquisition additionally contribute to this issue. In this work, we introduce a new approach to lossless compression, specifically for projection data from photon counting detectors, by utilizing the dependencies in the multi-energy data. The proposed predictor estimates the value of a projection data sample as a weighted average of its neighboring samples and an approximation from other energy bins, and the prediction residuals are then encoded. Context modeling using three or four quantized local gradients is also employed to detect edge characteristics of the data. Using three simulated phantoms including a head phantom, compression of 2.3:1-2.4:1 was achieved. The proposed predictor using zero, three, and four gradient contexts was compared to JPEG-LS and the ideal predictor (noiseless projection data). Among our proposed predictors, three-gradient context is preferred with a compression ratio from Golomb coding 7% higher than JPEG-LS and only 3% lower than the ideal predictor. In encoder efficiency, the Golomb code with the proposed three-gradient contexts has higher compression than block floating point. We also propose a lossy compression scheme, which quantizes the prediction residuals with scalar uniform quantization using quantization boundaries that limit the ratio of quantization error variance to quantum noise variance. Applying our proposed predictor with three-gradient context, the lossy compression achieved a compression ratio of 3.3:1 but inserted a 2.1% standard deviation of error compared to that of quantum noise in reconstructed images. From the initial

  4. Photonic integration in indium-phosphide membranes on silicon (IMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, Jos; Pello, Josselin; Bhat, Shrivatsa; Jiao, Yuqing; Heiss, Dominik; Roelkens, Gunther; Ambrosius, Huub; Smit, Meint

    2014-03-01

    A new photonic integration technique is presented, based on the use of an indium phosphide membrane on top of a silicon chip. This can provide electronic chips (CMOS) with an added optical layer (IMOS) for resolving the communication bottleneck. A major advantage of InP is the possibility to integrate passive and active components (SOAs, lasers) in a single membrane. In this paper we describe progress achieved in both the passive and active components. For the passive part of the circuit we succeeded to bring the propagation loss of our circuits close to the values obtained with silicon; we achieved propagation loss as low as 3.3 dB/cm through optimization of the lithography and the introduction of C60 (fullerene) in an electro resist. Further we report the smallest polarisation converter reported for membrane waveguides ( <10 μm) with low-loss (< 1 dB from 1520- 1550 nm), > 95% polarisation conversion efficiency over the whole C-band and tolerant fabrication. We also demonstrate an InP-membrane wavelength demultiplexer with a loss of 2.8 dB, a crosstalk level of better than 18 dB and a uniformity over the 8 channels of better than 1.2 dB. For the integration of active components we are testing a twin guide integration scheme. We present our design based on optical and electrical simulations and the fabrication techniques.

  5. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulaski, Marina; Babinec, Thomas; Buckley, Sonia; Rundquist, Armand; Provine, J.; Alassaad, Kassem; Ferro, Gabriel; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2014-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) combines many of the outstanding material properties of other well-known optical and quantum optical materials, including strong optical nonlinearity, high Young's modulus, and a host of optically-active crystalline defects, in a single CMOS-compatible platform. For many applications in classical and quantum information processing, the material properties of the cubic silicon carbide polytype (3C-SiC) in particular are advantageous. We therefore present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities in cubic 3C-SiC thin films (200 nm). We demonstrate cavity resonances across the infrared telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1.25 - 1.6 μm. Finally, we highlight our progress developing higher Q/V nanobeam cavities, as well as extending this optical cavity platform towards integration with SiC color centers. PECASE Grant ECCS-10 25811, NSF Grant ECS-9731293, Stanford Graduate Fellowship, National Science Graduate Fellowship.

  6. Sub-Wavelength Silicon Photonic Devices for Optical Interconnect Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Eric F.

    As our demand for information grows, so too does the demand for networks capable of handling this flood of data. Conventional on-chip electrical networks are approaching their limits in terms of latency, power consumption and data rates and will need to be replaced with new technology in the near future. Photonic networks promise great improvements over electrical networks, but several key challenges still hinder their widespread deployment. This thesis focuses on addressing the problem of encoding and routing data inside integrated optical communication networks. This is accomplished through electrically driven optical switches or modulators that are able to produce a binary optical data stream from a binary electrical input signal. The primary metrics used to evaluate the performance of these devices are spatial footprint, modulation/switching speed, operating voltage and power consumption per bit. Secondary concerns are device bandwidth, CMOS compatibility, tolerance to fabrication errors and device losses. In this thesis, we present a theoretical design for an electrically driven optical switch utilizing hybrid silicon-insulator-metal waveguides with a 30 square micrometer footprint, 57 Gbit/s switching speed, 2.6 fJ/bit power consumption and 1V operation. We also present experimental confirmation of the optical properties of hybrid silicon-insulator-metal waveguides which form the basis of this design.

  7. Biomolecular screening with encoded porous-silicon photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Cunin, Frédérique; Schmedake, Thomas A; Link, Jamie R; Li, Yang Yang; Koh, Jennifer; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Sailor, Michael J

    2002-09-01

    Strategies to encode or label small particles or beads for use in high-throughput screening and bioassay applications focus on either spatially differentiated, on-chip arrays or random distributions of encoded beads. Attempts to encode large numbers of polymeric, metallic or glass beads in random arrays or in fluid suspension have used a variety of entities to provide coded elements (bits)--fluorescent molecules, molecules with specific vibrational signatures, quantum dots, or discrete metallic layers. Here we report a method for optically encoding micrometre-sized nanostructured particles of porous silicon. We generate multilayered porous films in crystalline silicon using a periodic electrochemical etch. This results in photonic crystals with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features, whose wavelengths are determined by the etching parameters. Millions of possible codes can be prepared this way. Micrometre-sized particles are then produced by ultrasonic fracture, mechanical grinding or by lithographic means. A simple antibody-based bioassay using fluorescently tagged proteins demonstrates the encoding strategy in biologically relevant media. PMID:12618846

  8. Broad working bandwidth and "endlessly" single-mode guidance within hybrid silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Bougot-Robin, K; Hugonin, J-P; Besbes, M; Benisty, H

    2015-08-01

    The successes of nonlinear photonics and hybrid silicon photonics with a growing variety of functional materials entail ever-enlarging bandwidths. It is best exemplified by parametric comb frequency generation. Such operation challenges the dielectric channel waveguide as the basis for guidance, because of the adverse advent of higher order modes at short wavelengths. Surprisingly, the popular mechanism of endlessly single-mode guidance [Opt. Lett.22, 961 (1997).] operating in photonic crystal fibers has not been transposed within silicon photonics yet. We outline here the strategy and potential of this approach within planar and hybrid silicon photonics, whereby in-plane and vertical confinement are shown to be amenable to near-single-mode behavior in the typical silicon band, i.e., λ=1.1  μm to ∼5  μm. PMID:26258345

  9. Characterization of Si-PIN radiation detector with photon counting mode CMOS readout front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young; Jin, Seongoh; Park, Jongduk; Lee, Jae Yun; Kang, Bo Sun; Cho, Gyuseong

    2007-06-01

    An X-ray pixel detector with photon counting technique for digital X-ray imaging was designed and developed. Si detector was fabricated starting from 5 in., FZ-refined, 620 μm-thick, <1 1 1> oriented, n-typed silicon wafer with high resistivity of 6000-12,000 Ω cm. Readout front-end, which consists of the preamplifier, comparator, and bias circuits including the band-gap reference circuits, was designed and fabricated using 0.25 μm-triple-well CMOS standard process. In detector, the several types of guard-ring structures were tested. The biased p-type guard ring showed more reasonable results in the leakage current and breakdown voltage. The experimental results for the readout chip prove that its functionality is correctly operated up to 100 mV, 2.5 M events/s. In radiation experiment under irradiation of 60Co at dose rate 10 krad/h the measurement indicate that the band gap reference generator (BGR) circuits work up to 240 krad and the maximum variation of output voltage is 0.4% (peak-to-peak) of operational voltage at the range of 0-240 krad. It cannot lead to any critical problem for use in its operation.

  10. Experimental demonstration of reservoir computing on a silicon photonics chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandoorne, Kristof; Mechet, Pauline; van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Fiers, Martin; Morthier, Geert; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-03-01

    In today’s age, companies employ machine learning to extract information from large quantities of data. One of those techniques, reservoir computing (RC), is a decade old and has achieved state-of-the-art performance for processing sequential data. Dedicated hardware realizations of RC could enable speed gains and power savings. Here we propose the first integrated passive silicon photonics reservoir. We demonstrate experimentally and through simulations that, thanks to the RC paradigm, this generic chip can be used to perform arbitrary Boolean logic operations with memory as well as 5-bit header recognition up to 12.5 Gbit s-1, without power consumption in the reservoir. It can also perform isolated spoken digit recognition. Our realization exploits optical phase for computing. It is scalable to larger networks and much higher bitrates, up to speeds >100 Gbit s-1. These results pave the way for the application of integrated photonic RC for a wide range of applications.

  11. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1991-11-01

    A control and data acquisition system has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Contrast cancellation technique applied to digital x-ray imaging using silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Lopez, J.; Sanabria, J. C.; Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Gombia, M.; Cabal, A.E.; Ceballos, C.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Taibi, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Giubellino, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Prino, F.; Tomassi, E.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Swientek, K.

    2005-12-15

    Dual-energy mammographic imaging experimental tests have been performed using a compact dichromatic imaging system based on a conventional x-ray tube, a mosaic crystal, and a 384-strip silicon detector equipped with full-custom electronics with single photon counting capability. For simulating mammal tissue, a three-component phantom, made of Plexiglass, polyethylene, and water, has been used. Images have been collected with three different pairs of x-ray energies: 16-32 keV, 18-36 keV, and 20-40 keV. A Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment has also been carried out using the MCNP-4C transport code. The Alvarez-Macovski algorithm has been applied both to experimental and simulated data to remove the contrast between two of the phantom materials so as to enhance the visibility of the third one.

  13. Contrast cancellation technique applied to digital x-ray imaging using silicon strip detectors.

    PubMed

    Avila, C; Lopez, J; Sanabria, J C; Baldazzi, G; Bollini, D; Gombia, M; Cabal, A E; Ceballos, C; Diaz Garcia, A; Gambaccini, M; Taibi, A; Sarnelli, A; Tuffanelli, A; Giubellino, P; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Prino, F; Tomassi, E; Grybos, P; Idzik, M; Swientek, K; Wiacek, P; Montaño, L M; Ramello, L; Sitta, M

    2005-12-01

    Dual-energy mammographic imaging experimental tests have been performed using a compact dichromatic imaging system based on a conventional x-ray tube, a mosaic crystal, and a 384-strip silicon detector equipped with full-custom electronics with single photon counting capability. For simulating mammal tissue, a three-component phantom, made of Plexiglass, polyethylene, and water, has been used. Images have been collected with three different pairs of x-ray energies: 16-32 keV, 18-36 keV, and 20-40 keV. A Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment has also been carried out using the MCNP-4C transport code. The Alvarez-Macovski algorithm has been applied both to experimental and simulated data to remove the contrast between two of the phantom materials so as to enhance the visibility of the third one. PMID:16475775

  14. Charge collection and noise analysis of heavily irradiated silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S.; Sciortino, S.; Leroy, C.

    1998-04-01

    Measurements performed on high-resistivity silicon detectors irradiated with proton and neutron fluences, up to 3.5 {times} 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}, and 4 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} respectively, are presented. The charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the output noise of the devices have been measured to carry out a detector performance study after irradiation. The CCE is found to slowly decrease for fluences increasing up to approximately 1.8 {times} 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}. For higher particle fluences, the device inefficiency increases rapidly because full depletion could not be reached (up to 75% for the highest fluence: 4 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}). A complete analysis of the noise of the irradiated devices has been carried out assuming a simple model which correlates the main noise sources to the fluence and the leakage current. A linear dependence of the square of the noise amplitude on the fluence has been observed: a value of the leakage current damage constant has been found to be in good agreement with the values reported in literature, obtained with current-voltage (IV) analysis. An extension of the noise analysis is carried out considering the detectors irradiated with very high fluences, up to 4 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Superlattice-doped silicon detectors: progress and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Hennessy, John; Jewell, April D.; Sgro, Joseph; Tsur, Shraga; McClish, Mickel; Farrell, Richard

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the physics and performance of silicon detectors passivated with wafer-scale molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). MBE growth of a two-dimensional (2D) doping superlattice on backside-illuminated (BSI) detectors provides nearly perfect protection from interface traps, even at trap densities in excess of 1014 cm-2. Superlattice-doped, BSI CMOS imaging detectors show no measurable degradation of quantum efficiency or dark current from long-term exposure to pulsed DUV lasers. Wafer-scale superlattice-doping has been used to passivate CMOS and CCD imaging arrays, fully-depleted CCDs and photodiodes, and large-area avalanche photodiodes. Superlattice-doped CCDs with ALD-grown antireflection coatings achieved world record quantum efficiency at deep and far ultraviolet wavelengths (100-300nm). Recently we have demonstrated solar-blind, superlattice doped avalanche photodiodes using integrated metal-dielectric coatings to achieve selective detection of ultraviolet light in the 200-250 nm spectral range with high out-of-band rejection.

  16. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  17. Silicon photonics: Design, fabrication, and characterization of on-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, I.-Wei

    In recent years, the research field of silicon photonics has been developing rapidly from a concept to a demonstrated technology, and has gathered much attention from both academia and industry communities. Its many potential applications in long-haul telecommunication, mid-range data-communication, on-chip optical interconnection networks, and nano-scale sensing as well as its compatibility with electronic integrated circuits have driven much effort in realizing silicon photonics both as a disruptive technology for existing markets and as an enabling technology for new ones. Despite the promising future of silicon photonics, many fundamental issues still remain to be understood---both in the linear- and nonlinear-optical regimes. There are also many engineering challenges to make silicon photonics the gold standard in photonic integrated circuits. In this thesis, we focus on the design, fabrication, and characterization of active and passive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic devices. The SOI material system differs from most conventional optical material platforms because of its high-refractive-index-contrast, which enables engineers to design very compact integrated photonic networks with sub-micron transverse waveguide dimensions and sharp bends. On the other hand, because most analytical formulas for designing waveguide devices are valid only in low-index-contrast cases, SOI photonic devices need to be analyzed numerically for accurate results. The second chapter of this thesis describes some common numerical methods such as Beam Propagation Method (BPM) and Finite Element Method (FEM) for waveguide-design simulations, and presents two design studies based on these methods. The compatibility of silicon photonic integrated circuits with conventional CMOS fabrication technology is another important aspect that distinguishes silicon photonics from others such as III-V materials and lithium niobate. However, the requirements for fabricating silicon photonic

  18. Development of a fast read-out system of a single photon counting detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C.; Rigon, L.; Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2011-12-01

    A single-photon counting detector read-out system for mammography with synchrotron radiation has been developed with the aim to meet the needs of the mammographic imaging station of the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. The system called PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) is a modular detector that implements a read-out system with MYTHEN II ASICs, an embedded Linux-based controller board and a Scientific Linux acquisition workstation. The system architecture and characteristics are herein presented. The system was tested at the SYRMEP beamline and achieved a frame rate of 33 Hz for 8448 channels at 24-bit dynamic range, and it is capable of continuously acquiring up to 2000 frames. Standard mammographic phantoms were imaged and good quality images were obtained at doses comparable with what is delivered in conventional full field mammographic systems.

  19. Athermal avalanche in bilayer superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V. B.; Lita, A. E.; Stevens, M. J.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that two superconducting nanowires separated by a thin insulating barrier can undergo an avalanche process. In this process, Joule heating caused by a photodetection event in one nanowire and the associated production of athermal phonons which are transmitted through the barrier cause the transition of the adjacent nanowire from the superconducting to the normal state. We show that this process can be utilized in the fabrication of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, reduce system jitter, maximize device area, and increase the external efficiency over a very broad range of wavelengths. Furthermore, the avalanche mechanism may provide a path towards a superconducting logic element based on athermal gating.

  20. Tunable porous silicon photonic bandgap structures: Mirrors for optical interconnects and optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Sharon M.

    Silicon is the dominant material in the microelectronics industry but it does not play a major role in optoelectronics because its optical properties are not sensitive to electric fields. In order to transfer the advantages of the well-established silicon processing infrastructure to the optoelectronics domain, the materials and optical properties of silicon must be manipulated. Porous silicon is a unique material that can provide the link between silicon technology and optoelectronic devices because it is inherently silicon-based, which facilitates device integration into a standard microelectronics platform, and it is porous, which allows for tuning of its optical properties. Through an effective medium approximation, a wide range of refractive indices can be achieved by varying the percentage of void space in porous silicon. Moreover, optically active species can be infiltrated into the silicon matrix to enable dynamic tuning of the porous silicon refractive index. In this work, tunable porous silicon photonic bandgap filters are fabricated as a first step towards silicon-based optical components. The basic structures for the tunable filters are multilayer porous silicon microcavities infiltrated with liquid crystals. The reflectance of the devices is tuned based on a physical rotation and subsequent refractive index change of the liquid crystals in response to thermal or electric field modulation. Extinction ratios exceeding 10 dB have been demonstrated. To better regulate the active tuning, a general method to minimize thermally induced drifts of silicon-based photonic bandgap structures is developed based on a simple oxidation treatment. Oxide coverage of the silicon matrix introduces a stress that provides a counterforce to the effect of the temperature dependent silicon refractive index in the typical operating temperature range of computer processors, 25°C to 85°C. The formation of tunable porous silicon photonic bandgap devices opens the door for the

  1. A four-pixel single-photon pulse-position array fabricated from WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, V. B. Horansky, R.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Stern, J. A.; Shaw, M. D.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a scalable readout scheme for an infrared single-photon pulse-position camera consisting of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. For an N × N array, only 2 × N wires are required to obtain the position of a detection event. As a proof-of-principle, we show results from a 2 × 2 array.

  2. The statistical distribution of the number of counted scintillation photons in digital silicon photomultipliers: model and validation.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Schaart, Dennis R

    2012-08-01

    In the design and application of scintillation detectors based on silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), e.g. in positron emission tomography imaging, it is important to understand and quantify the non-proportionality of the SiPM response due to saturation, crosstalk and dark counts. A new type of SiPM, the so-called digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM), has recently been introduced. Here, we develop a model of the probability distribution of the number of fired microcells, i.e. the number of counted scintillation photons, in response to a given amount of energy deposited in a scintillator optically coupled to a dSiPM. Based on physical and functional principles, the model elucidates the statistical behavior of dSiPMs. The model takes into account the photon detection efficiency of the detector; the light yield, excess variance and time profile of the scintillator; and the crosstalk probability, dark count rate, integration time and the number of microcells of the dSiPM. Furthermore, relations for the expectation value and the variance of the number of fired cells are deduced. These relations are applied in the experimental validation of the model using a dSiPM coupled to a LSO:Ce,Ca scintillator. Finally, we propose an accurate method for the correction of energy spectra measured with dSiPM-based scintillation detectors. PMID:22796633

  3. Radiation tolerance studies of neutron irradiated double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, M.; Larionov, P.; Balog, T.; Heuser, J.; Malygina, H.; Momot, I.; Sorokin, I.; Sturm, C.

    2016-07-01

    Radiation tolerance studies were made on double-sided silicon microstrip detectors for the Silicon Tracking System of the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR. The prototype detectors from two different vendors were irradiated to twice the highest expected fluence (1 ×1014 1 MeVneqcm-2) in the CBM experimental runs of several years. Test results from these prototype detectors both before and after irradiations have been discussed.

  4. 100 ps time resolution with thin silicon pixel detectors and a SiGe HBT amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Favre, Y.; Iacobucci, G.; Nessi, M.; Paolozzi, L.; Shu, K.

    2016-03-01

    A 100 μm thick silicon detector with 1 mm2 pad readout optimized for sub-nanosecond time resolution has been developed and tested. Coupled to a purposely developed amplifier based on SiGe HBT technology, this detector was characterized at the H8 beam line at the CERN SPS. An excellent time resolution of (106 ± 1) ps for silicon detectors was measured with minimum ionizing particles.

  5. Testing of the KRI-developed Silicon PIN Radioxenon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2015-01-23

    Radioxenon detectors are used for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) in a network of detectors throughout the world called the International Monitoring System (IMS). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with testing a V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and Lares Ltd-developed Silicon PIN detector for radioxenon detection. PNNL measured radioxenon with the silicon PIN detector and determined its potential compared to current plastic scintillator beta cells. While the PNNL tested Si detector experienced noise issues, a second detector was tested in Russia at Lares Ltd, which did not exhibit the noise issues. Without the noise issues, the Si detector produces much better energy resolution and isomer peak separation than a conventional plastic scintillator cell used in the SAUNA systems in the IMS. Under the assumption of 1 cm3 of Xe in laboratory-like conditions, 24-hr count time (12-hr count time for the SAUNA), with the respective shielding the minimum detectable concentrations for the Si detector tested by Lares Ltd (and a conventional SAUNA system) were calculated to be: 131mXe – 0.12 mBq/m3 (0.12 mBq/m3); 133Xe – 0.18 mBq/m3 (0.21 mBq/m3); 133mXe – 0.07 mBq/m3 (0.15 mBq/m3); 135Xe – 0.45 mBq/m3 (0.67 mBq/m3). Detection limits, which are one of the important factors in choosing the best detection technique for radioxenon in field conditions, are significantly better than for SAUNA-like detection systems for 131mXe and 133mXe, but similar for 133Xe and 135Xe. Another important factor is the amount of “memory effect” or carry over signal from one radioxenon measurement to the subsequent sample. The memory effect is

  6. Silicon Photonics: All-Optical Devices for Linear and Nonlinear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Jeffrey B.

    Silicon photonics has grown rapidly since the first Si electro-optic switch was demonstrated in 1987, and the field has never grown more quickly than it has over the past decade, fueled by milestone achievements in semiconductor processing technologies for low loss waveguides, high-speed Si modulators, Si lasers, Si detectors, and an enormous toolbox of passive and active integrated devices. Silicon photonics is now on the verge of major commercialization breakthroughs, and optical communication links remain the force driving integrated and Si photonics towards the first commercial telecom and datacom transceivers; however other potential and future applications are becoming uncovered and refined as researchers reveal the benefits of manipulating photons on the nanoscale. This thesis documents an exploration into the unique guided-wave and nonlinear properties of deeply-scaled high-index-contrast sub-wavelength Si waveguides. It is found that the tight confinement inherent to single-mode channel waveguides on the silicon-on-insulator platform lead to a rich physics, which can be leveraged for new devices extending well beyond simple passive interconnects and electro-optic devices. The following chapters will concentrate, in detail, on a number of unique physical features of Si waveguides and extend these attributes towards new and interesting devices. Linear optical properties and nonlinear optical properties are investigated, both of which are strongly affected by tight optical confinement of the guided waveguide modes. As will be shown, tight optical confinement directly results in strongly vectoral modal components, where the electric and magnetic fields of the guided modes extend into all spatial dimensions, even along the axis of propagation. In fact, the longitudinal electric and magnetic field components can be just as strong as the transverse fields, directly affecting the modal group velocity and energy transport properties since the longitudinal fields

  7. CDF Run-II Silicon Detector: Operations and Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Michelle; /Fermilab

    2011-09-10

    The CDF Run-II silicon microstrip detector has seen almost 12 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions over the last 10 years. It has shown remarkable performance, with 80% of its channels still operating error-free, and only one of its eight layers approaching the operational limits for full depletion. The measured depletion voltage and signal-to-noise ratio of these sensors give unique information about the behavior of sensors irradiated slowly over a long period of time. Data from heavily irradiated, double-sided sensors excludes a monotonic electric field inside the sensor and is instead consistent with a doubly-peaked field that is lower in the center of the sensor and higher at the edges.

  8. Efficient data transmission from silicon wafer strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Lackner, K.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sharp, D.H.; Winter, L.; Ziock, H.J.

    1991-12-31

    An architecture for on-wafer processing is proposed for central silicon-strip tracker systems as they are currently designed for high energy physics experiments at the SSC, and for heavy ion experiments at RHIC. The data compression achievable with on-wafer processing would make it possible to transmit all data generated to the outside of the detector system. A set of data which completely describes the state of the wafer for low occupancy events and which contains important statistical information for more complex events can be transmitted immediately. This information could be used in early trigger decisions. Additional data packages which complete the description of the state of the wafer vary in size and are sent through a second channel. By buffering this channel the required bandwidth can be kept far below the peak data rates which occur in rate but interesting events. 18 refs.

  9. Detector telescope array: silicon--CsI(Tl)--photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbeck, E.; Yang, L. B.; Pogodin, P.; Ingram, F. D.

    1999-10-01

    A closely packed array of 60 telescopes was developed for use at forward angles in the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The telescopes resolve isotopes and cover nearly 100% of the solid angle assigned to the array. These requirements and limitations of space and funding resulted in a number of novel features, some of which will be useful in other applications. These features include: photodiodes of arbitrary shape with no frame around the edge, replacement of aluminized Mylar with aluminum leaf, an inexpensive silicon diode leakage current monitor that presents a graph of leakage current vs detector number, and a low noise but inexpensive preamplifier chip. Experience with the array showed that compounds in the outer insulation layer of some types of coax cable can seriously contaminate a vacuum system. The use of computer aided design and computer controlled machine tools reduced the cost of the structural parts by orders of magnitude.

  10. A new generation of ultra-dense optical I/O for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodawski, Mitchell S.; Kopp, Victor I.; Park, Jongchul; Singer, Jonathan; Hubner, Eric E.; Neugroschl, Daniel; Chao, Norman; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2014-03-01

    In response to the optical packaging needs of a rapidly growing silicon photonics market, Chiral Photonics, Inc. (CPI) has developed a new generation of ultra-dense-channel, bi-directional, all-optical, input/output (I/O) couplers that bridge the data transport gap between standard optical fibers and photonic integrated circuits. These couplers, called Pitch Reducing Optical Fiber Arrays (PROFAs), provide a means to simultaneously match both the mode field and channel spacing (i.e. pitch) between an optical fiber array and a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). Both primary methods for optically interfacing with PICs, via vertical grating couplers (VGCs) and edge couplers, can be addressed with PROFAs. PROFAs bring the signal-carrying cores, either multimode or singlemode, of many optical fibers into close proximity within an all-glass device that can provide low loss coupling to on-chip components, including waveguides, gratings, detectors and emitters. Two-dimensional (2D) PROFAs offer more than an order of magnitude enhancement in channel density compared to conventional one-dimensional (1D) fiber arrays. PROFAs can also be used with low vertical profile solutions that simplify optoelectronic packaging while reducing PIC I/O real estate usage requirements. PROFA technology is based on a scalable production process for microforming glass preform assemblies as they are pulled through a small oven. An innovative fiber design, called the "vanishing core," enables tailoring the mode field along the length of the PROFA to meet the coupling needs of disparate waveguide technologies, such as fiber and onchip. Examples of single- and multi-channel couplers fabricated using this technology will be presented.

  11. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Solobodan; Datskou, Irene C.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  12. Performance of SIS photon detectors for superconductive imaging submillimeter-wave camera (SISCAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nagata, H.; Mori, Y.; Kobayashi, J.; Okaniwa, T.; Yamakura, T.; Otani, C.; Ariyoshi, S.

    2006-06-01

    High sensitivity submillimeter-wave focal plane array using SIS photon detector is being developed, which we call SISCAM, the superconductive imaging submillimeter-wave camera. In the course of the detector evaluations, we have measured performance of the SIS photon detectors under various operating conditions. Advantages of the SIS photon detectors are explained by the nature of antenna coupled quantum detectors. Their input coupling can be designed to have band-pass characteristics owing to the distributed junction design. This reduces requirements for infrared blocking filters and enhances optical efficiency. The detector performance is evaluated under background loading and they show background limited performance. Measurement at 4 K shows the SIS photon detector operates under shot noise limit of thermal leakage current and its NEP is 1x10 -14 W/Hz 0.5, that is better than bolometers at 4.2 K, whereas the same detector has NEP of 10 -16 W/Hz 0.5 at 0.3 K. Dynamic range of SIS photon detectors is estimated to be higher than 10 9, which surpass the dynamic range achievable with TES bolometers. Nine-element array of SIS photon detector, SISCAM-9, is developed and their performance is evaluated in a submillimeter-wave telescope. With a development of integrated electronics with GaAs-JFET charge integrating readout circuit, the SIS photon detector will be an ideal imaging array in submillimeter-wave region. Due to its large dynamic range and shot noise limited performance under various operating condition, SIS photon detectors can be used for various astronomical instrumentations as well as for other fields of terahertz technologies.

  13. On-chip hybrid photonic-plasmonic light concentrator for nanofocusing in an integrated silicon photonics platform.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ye; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Apuzzo, Aniello; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Nguyen, Kim Ngoc; Blaize, Sylvain; Adibi, Ali

    2015-02-11

    The enhancement and confinement of electromagnetic radiation to nanometer scale have improved the performances and decreased the dimensions of optical sources and detectors for several applications including spectroscopy, medical applications, and quantum information. Realization of on-chip nanofocusing devices compatible with silicon photonics platform adds a key functionality and provides opportunities for sensing, trapping, on-chip signal processing, and communications. Here, we discuss the design, fabrication, and experimental demonstration of light nanofocusing in a hybrid plasmonic-photonic nanotaper structure. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind the operation of this device, the coupling mechanisms, and how to engineer the energy transfer from a propagating guided mode to a trapped plasmonic mode at the apex of the plasmonic nanotaper with minimal radiation loss. Optical near-field measurements and Fourier modal analysis carried out using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) show a tight nanofocusing of light in this structure to an extremely small spot of 0.00563(λ/(2n(rmax)))(3) confined in 3D and an exquisite power input conversion of 92%. Our experiments also verify the mode selectivity of the device (low transmission of a TM-like input mode and high transmission of a TE-like input mode). A large field concentration factor (FCF) of about 4.9 is estimated from our NSOM measurement with a radius of curvature of about 20 nm at the apex of the nanotaper. The agreement between our theory and experimental results reveals helpful insights about the operation mechanism of the device, the interplay of the modes, and the gradual power transfer to the nanotaper apex. PMID:25562706

  14. Silicon photonics packaging with lateral fiber coupling to apodized grating coupler embedded circuit.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Chee, Koh Sing; Tao, Jifang; Zhang, Huijuan; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, G Q

    2014-10-01

    We report a novel lateral packaging approach using laser welding technique with angle polished fiber coupling to grating coupler embedded silicon photonic circuit. Measurements show the relax alignment tolerance for fiber packaging process. The packaging excess loss of 1.2 dB is achieved. The use of angle polished fiber for lateral fiber coupling enables an alternative way for cost-effective deployment of silicon photonics packaging in telecommunication systems. PMID:25321998

  15. Fabrication and characterization of silicon woodpile photonic crystals with a complete bandgap at telecom wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Staude, I; Thiel, M; Essig, S; Wolff, C; Busch, K; von Freymann, G; Wegener, M

    2010-04-01

    By using direct laser writing into a novel commercially available photoresist and a silicon-double-inversion procedure followed by tempering of the silicon structures, we realize high-quality centered-tetragonal woodpile photonic crystals with complete photonic bandgaps near 1.55 microm wavelength. The 6.9% gap-to-midgap ratio bandgap is evidenced by the comparison of measured transmittance and reflectance spectra with band-structure and scattering-matrix calculations. PMID:20364228

  16. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  17. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4 ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics.

  18. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4 ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics. PMID:25581847

  19. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4 ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics. PMID:25581847

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting NbN Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of high-speed, single photon detectors using superconducting NbN nanowires at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A 15 by 15 micron detector with a detector efficiency of 40% has been measured. Due to kinetic inductance, the recovery time of such large area detectors is longer than that of smaller or single wire detectors. The recovery time of our detectors (50 ns) has been characterized by measuring the inter-arrival time statistics of our detector.

  1. Bayesian deconvolution as a method for the spectroscopy of X-rays with highly pixelated photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, P.; Weber, T.; Michel, T.; Klammer, J.; Büermann, L.; Anton, G.

    2012-03-01

    The energy deposition spectrum of highly pixelated photon-counting pixel detectors with a semiconductor sensor layer (e.g. silicon) differs significantly from the impinging X-ray spectrum. This is mainly due to Compton scattering, charge sharing, an energy-dependent sensor efficiency, fluorescence photons and back-scattered photons from detector parts. Therefore, the determination of the impinging X-ray spectrum from the measured distribution of the energy deposition in the detector is a non-trivial task. For the deconvolution of the measured distribution into the impinging spectrum, a set of monoenergetic response functions is needed. Those have been calculated with the Monte Carlo simulation framework ROSI, utilizing EGS4 and including all relevant physical processes in the sensor layer. We have investigated the uncertainties that spectrum reconstruction algorithms, like spectrum stripping, impose on reconstruction results. We can show that applying the Bayesian deconvolution method significantly improves the stability of the deconvolved spectrum. This results in a reduced minimum radiation flux needed for reconstruction. In this paper, we present our investigations and measurements on spectrum reconstruction for polychromatic X-ray spectra at low flux with a focus on Bayesian deconvolution.

  2. A robust silicon photonic platform for multiparameter biological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Ryan C.; Washburn, Adam L.; Qavi, Abraham J.; Iqbal, Muzammil; Gleeson, Martin; Tybor, Frank; Gunn, L. Cary

    2009-02-01

    Silicon photonic technology has incredible potential to transform multiplexed bioanalysis on account of the scalability of device fabrication, which maps favorably to a myriad of medical diagnostic applications. The optical properties of CMOS-fabricated microring resonators are incredibly responsive to changes in the local dielectric environment accompanying a biological binding event near the ring surface. Arrays of high-Q microrings were designed to be individually addressable both in surface derivitization, using well-established microarraying technologies, and in optical evaluation. The optical response of each ring can be determined in near real time allowing multiple biomolecular interactions to be simultaneously monitored. We describe a stable and robust measurement platform that allows sensitive visualization of small molecule surface chemical derivitization as well as monitoring of biological interactions, including the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. We also present recent results demonstrating multiplexed measurement of cancer markers. These demonstrations establish a pathway to higher level multiparameter analysis from real-world patient samples; a development that will enable individualized disease diagnostics and personalized medicine.

  3. Rapid, Multiplexed Phosphoprotein Profiling Using Silicon Photonic Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular signaling is commonly mediated through post-translational protein modifications that propagate messages from membrane-bound receptors to ultimately regulate gene expression. Signaling cascades are ubiquitously intertwined, and a full understanding of function can only be gleaned by observing dynamics across multiple key signaling nodes. Importantly, targets within signaling cascades often represent opportunities for therapeutic development or can serve as diagnostic biomarkers. Protein phosphorylation is a particularly important post-translational modification that controls many essential cellular signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, aberrant phosphorylation is found in many human diseases, including cancer, and phosphoprotein-based biomarker signatures hold unrealized promise for disease monitoring. Moreover, phosphoprotein analysis has wide-ranging applications across fundamental chemical biology, as many drug discovery efforts seek to target nodes within kinase signaling pathways. For both fundamental and translational applications, the analysis of phosphoprotein biomarker targets is limited by a reliance on labor-intensive and/or technically challenging methods, particularly when considering the simultaneous monitoring of multiplexed panels of phosphoprotein biomarkers. We have developed a technology based upon arrays of silicon photonic microring resonator sensors that fills this void, facilitating the rapid and automated analysis of multiple phosphoprotein levels from both cell lines and primary human tumor samples requiring only minimal sample preparation. PMID:26539563

  4. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-03-28

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  5. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing; Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-03-01

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ˜50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3-10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ˜815-900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10-100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  6. Non-Geiger mode single photon detector with multiple amplification and gain control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nawar Rahman, Samia Hall, David; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2014-05-07

    A new type of single photon detector, Multiple Amplification Gain with Internal Control (MAGIC), is proposed and analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations based on a physical model of the device. The MAGIC detector has two coupled amplification mechanisms, avalanche multiplication and bipolar gain, and the net gain is regulated by a built-in feedback mechanism. Compared to conventional Geiger mode single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs), the MAGIC detector produces a much greater single photon detection efficiency of nearly 100%, low bit-error-ratio for single photon signals, and a large dynamic range. All these properties are highly desirable for applications that require single photon sensitivity and are absent for conventional Geiger-mode SPADs.

  7. Up-conversion single-photon detector using multi-wavelength sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Bienfang, Joshua C; Slattery, Oliver; Tang, Xiao

    2011-03-14

    The maximum achievable data-rate of a quantum communication system can be critically limited by the efficiency and temporal resolution of the system's single-photon detectors. Frequency up-conversion technology can be used to increase detection efficiency for IR photons. In this paper we describe a scheme to improve the temporal resolution of an up-conversion single-photon detector using multi-wavelength optical-sampling techniques, allowing for increased transmission rates in single-photon communications systems. We experimentally demonstrate our approach with an up-conversion detector using two spectrally and temporally distinct pump pulses, and show that it allows for high-fidelity single-photon detection at twice the rate supported by a conventional single-pump up-conversion detector. We also discuss the limiting factors of this approach and identify important performance-limiting trade offs. PMID:21445185

  8. An ultra-fast superconducting Nb nanowire single-photon detector for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inderbitzin, K.; Engel, A.; Schilling, A.; Il'in, K.; Siegel, M.

    2012-10-15

    Although superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are well studied regarding the detection of infrared/optical photons and keV-molecules, no studies on continuous x-ray photon counting by thick-film detectors have been reported so far. We fabricated a 100 nm thick niobium x-ray SNSPD (an X-SNSPD) and studied its detection capability of photons with keV-energies in continuous mode. The detector is capable to detect photons even at reduced bias currents of 0.4%, which is in sharp contrast to optical thin-film SNSPDs. No dark counts were recorded in extended measurement periods. Strikingly, the signal amplitude distribution depends significantly on the photon energy spectrum.

  9. A Silicon UCN Detector With Large Area and With Analysis of UCN Polarization.

    PubMed

    Lasakov, M; Serebrov, A; Khusainov, A; Pustovoit, A; Borisov, Yu; Fomin, A; Geltenbort, P; Kon'kov, O; Kotina, I; Shablii, A; Solovei, V; Vasiliev, A

    2005-01-01

    A silicon ultracold neutron (UCN) detector with an area of 45 cm(2) and with a (6)LiF converter is developed at St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL). The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a (6)LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarization was developed and tested. The analyzing power of this detector assembly reaches up 75 % for the main part of UCN spectrum. This UCN detector with analysis of UCN polarization can be used in the new electric dipole moment (EDM) spectrometer. PMID:27308138

  10. A Silicon UCN Detector With Large Area and With Analysis of UCN Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lasakov, M.; Serebrov, A.; Khusainov, A.; Pustovoit, A.; Borisov, Yu.; Fomin, A.; Geltenbort, P.; Kon’kov, O.; Kotina, I.; Shablii, A.; Solovei, V.; Vasiliev, A.

    2005-01-01

    A silicon ultracold neutron (UCN) detector with an area of 45 cm2 and with a 6LiF converter is developed at St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at Institut Max von Laue – Paul Langevin (ILL). The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a 6LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarization was developed and tested. The analyzing power of this detector assembly reaches up 75 % for the main part of UCN spectrum. This UCN detector with analysis of UCN polarization can be used in the new electric dipole moment (EDM) spectrometer. PMID:27308138

  11. Design of nanobeam photonic crystal resonators for a silicon-on-lithium-niobate platform.

    PubMed

    Witmer, Jeremy D; Hill, Jeff T; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H

    2016-03-21

    We outline the design for a photonic crystal resonator made in a hybrid Silicon/Lithium Niobate material system. Using the index contrast between silicon and lithium niobate, it is possible to guide and confine photonic resonances in a thin film of silicon bonded on top of lithium niobate. Quality factors greater than 106 at optical wavelength scale mode volumes are achievable. We show that patterning electrodes on such a system can yield an electro-optic coupling rate of 0.6 GHz/V (4 pm/V). PMID:27136784

  12. Design of nanobeam photonic crystal resonators for a silicon-on-lithium-niobate platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witmer, Jeremy D.; Hill, Jeff T.; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2016-03-01

    We outline the design for a photonic crystal resonator made in a hybrid Silicon/Lithium Niobate material system. Using the index contrast between silicon and lithium niobate, it is possible to guide and confine photonic resonances in a thin film of silicon bonded on top of lithium niobate. Quality factors greater than $10^6$ at optical wavelength scale mode volumes are achievable. We show that patterning electrodes on such a system can yield an electro-optic coupling rate of 0.6 GHz/V (4 pm/V).

  13. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  14. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting NbN Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the fabrication of large area superconducting Niobium Nitride nanowire single photon detectors. The topics include: 1) Introduction and Motivation; 2) Operation of SNSPD Detectors; 3) NbTiN Deposition; 4) Fabrication Details; 5) Backside Coupled SNSPD; 6) Measurement Apparatus; 7) Electrical Response of a 15x15 micrometer SNSPD to 1064nm radiation; 8) Detector Efficiency vs Bias Current; 9) Interarrival Time Plot; 10) Detector Linearity; and 11) Conclusion.

  16. High-Q silicon-on-insulator slot photonic crystal cavity infiltrated by a liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Caër, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric

    2013-12-16

    We report the experimental realization of a high-Q slot photonic crystal cavity in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) configuration infiltrated by a liquid. Loaded Q-factor of 23 000 is measured at telecom wavelength. The intrinsic quality factor inferred from the transmission spectrum is higher than 200 000, which represents a record value for slot photonic crystal cavities on SOI, whereas the maximum of intensity of the cavity is roughly equal to 20% of the light transmitted in the waveguide. This result makes filled slot photonic crystal cavities very promising for silicon-based light emission and ultrafast nonlinear optics.

  17. High-Q silicon-on-insulator slot photonic crystal cavity infiltrated by a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caër, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric

    2013-12-01

    We report the experimental realization of a high-Q slot photonic crystal cavity in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) configuration infiltrated by a liquid. Loaded Q-factor of 23 000 is measured at telecom wavelength. The intrinsic quality factor inferred from the transmission spectrum is higher than 200 000, which represents a record value for slot photonic crystal cavities on SOI, whereas the maximum of intensity of the cavity is roughly equal to 20% of the light transmitted in the waveguide. This result makes filled slot photonic crystal cavities very promising for silicon-based light emission and ultrafast nonlinear optics.

  18. Ultra-high-speed wavelength conversion in a silicon photonic chip.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael; Pu, Minhao; Peucheret, Christophe; Christian H Mulvad, Hans; Yvind, Kresten; Hvam, Jørn M; Jeppesen, Palle; Oxenløwe, Leif K

    2011-10-10

    We have successfully demonstrated all-optical wavelength conversion of a 640-Gbit/s line-rate return-to-zero differential phase-shift keying (RZ-DPSK) signal based on low-power four wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon photonic chip with a switching energy of only ~110 fJ/bit. The waveguide dispersion of the silicon nanowire is nano-engineered to optimize phase matching for FWM and the switching power used for the signal processing is low enough to reduce nonlinear absorption from two-photon-absorption (TPA). These results demonstrate that high-speed wavelength conversion is achievable in silicon chips with high data integrity and indicate that high-speed operation can be obtained at moderate power levels where nonlinear absorption due to TPA and free-carrier absorption (FCA) is not detrimental. This demonstration can potentially enable high-speed optical networks on a silicon photonic chip. PMID:21996996

  19. Narrow bandgap semiconducting silicides: Intrinsic infrared detectors on a silicon chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Work done during the final report period is presented. The main technical objective was to achieve epitaxial growth on silicon of two semiconducting silicides, ReSi2 and CrSi2. ReSi2 thin films were grown on (001) silicon wafers by vacuum evaporation of rhenium onto hot substrates in ultrahigh vacuum. The preferred epitaxial relationship was found to be ReSi2(100)/Si(001) with ReSi2(010) parallel to Si(110). The lattice matching consists of a common unit mesh of 120 A(sup 2) area, and a mismatch of 1.8 percent. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the existence of rotation twins corresponding to two distinct but equivalent azimuthal orientations of the common unit mesh. MeV He(+) backscattering spectrometry revealed a minimum channeling yield of 2 percent for an approximately 1,500 A thick film grown at 650 C. Although the lateral dimension of the twins is on the order of 100 A, there is a very high degree of alignment between the ReSi2(100) and the Si(001) planes. Highly oriented films of CrSi2 were grown on (111) silicon substrates, with the matching crystallographic faces being CrSi2(001)/Si(111). The reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the films consist of sharp streaks, symmetrically arranged. The predominant azimuthal orientation of the films was determined to be CrSi2(210) parallel to Si(110). This highly desirable heteroepitaxial relationship has been obtained previously by others; it may be described with a common unit mesh of 51 A(sup 2) and mismatch of 0.3 percent. RHEED also revealed the presence of limited film regions of a competing azimuthal orientation, CrSi2(110) parallel to Si(110). A channeling effect for MeV He(+) ions was not found for this material. Potential commercial applications of this research may be found in silicon-integrated infrared detector arrays. Optical characterizations showed that semiconducting ReSi2 is a strong absorber of infrared radiation, with the adsorption constant increasing above 2 x

  20. Micromorph silicon tandem solar cells with fully integrated 3D photonic crystal intermediate reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üpping, J.; Bielawny, A.; Fahr, S.; Rockstuhl, C.; Lederer, F.; Steidl, L.; Zentel, R.; Beckers, T.; Lambertz, A.; Carius, R.; Wehrspohn, R. B.

    2010-05-01

    A 3D photonic intermediate reflector for textured micromorph silicon tandem solar cells has been investigated. In thin-film silicon tandem solar cells consisting of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon with two junctions of a-Si/c-Si, efficiency enhancements can be achieved by increasing the current density in the a-Si top cell providing an optimized current matching at high current densities. For an ideal photon-management between top and bottom cell, a spectrally-selective intermediate reflective layer (IRL) is necessary. We present the first fully-integrated 3D photonic thin-film IRL device incorporated on a planar substrate. Using a ZnO inverted opal structure the external quantum efficiency of the top cell in the spectral region of interest could be enhanced. As an outlook we present the design and the preparation of a 3D self organized photonic crystal structure in a textured micromorph tandem solar cell.

  1. Nano-optical observation of cascade switching in a parallel superconducting nanowire single photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Robert M. Tanner, Michael G.; Casaburi, Alessandro; Hadfield, Robert H.; Webster, Mark G.; San Emeterio Alvarez, Lara; Jiang, Weitao; Barber, Zoe H.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-02-10

    The device physics of parallel-wire superconducting nanowire single photon detectors is based on a cascade process. Using nano-optical techniques and a parallel wire device with spatially separate pixels, we explicitly demonstrate the single- and multi-photon triggering regimes. We develop a model for describing efficiency of a detector operating in the arm-trigger regime. We investigate the timing response of the detector when illuminating a single pixel and two pixels. We see a change in the active area of the detector between the two regimes and find the two-pixel trigger regime to have a faster timing response than the one-pixel regime.

  2. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-01

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  3. Photon fluence perturbation correction factors for solid state detectors irradiated in kilovoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobit, Paul N.; Sandison, George A.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2000-02-01

    Dose perturbation correction factors, gamma (p ), for LiF, CaF2 and Li2 B4 O7 solid state detectors have been determined using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Each detector was simulated in the form of a disc of diameter 3.61 mm and thickness 1 mm irradiated in a clinical kilovoltage photon beam at a depth of 1 cm in a water phantom. The perturbation correction factor gamma (p ) is defined as the deviation of the absorbed dose ratio from the average mass energy absorption coefficient ratio of water to the detector material, (mubar en /rho )med,det , which is evaluated assuming that the photon fluence spectrum in the medium and in the detector material are identical. We define another mass energy absorption coefficient ratio, (kappabar en /rho )med,det , which is evaluated using the actual photon fluence spectrum in the medium and detector for LiF and CaF2 rather than assuming they are identical. (kappabar en /rho )med,det predicts the average absorbed dose ratio of the medium to the detector material within 0.3%. When the difference in atomic number between the cavity and the phantom material is large then their photon fluence spectra will differ substantially resulting in a difference between (kappabar en /rho )med,det and (

  4. Stacked silicide/silicon mid- to long-wavelength infrared detector

    DOEpatents

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1990-03-13

    The use of stacked Schottky barriers (16) with epitaxially grown thin silicides (10) combined with selective doping (22) of the barriers provides high quantum efficiency infrared detectors (30) at longer wavelengths that is compatible with existing silicon VLSI technology.

  5. The bipolar silicon microstrip detector: A proposal for a novel precision tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisberger, R.

    1990-03-01

    It is proposed to combine the technology of fully depleted silicon microstrip detectors fabricated on n doped high resistivity silicon with the concept of the bipolar transistor. This is done by adding a n ++ doped region inside the normal p + implanted region of the reverse biased p + n diode. Teh resulting structure has amplifying properties and is referred to as bipolar pixel transistor. The simplest readout scheme of a bipolar pixel array by an aluminium strip bus leads to the bipolar microstrip detector. The bipolar pixel structure is expected to give a better signal-to-noise performance for the detection of minimum ionizing charged particle tracks than the normal silicon diode strip detector and therefore should allow in future the fabrication of thinner silicon detectors for precision tracking.

  6. Fine Grained Silicon-Tungsten Calorimetry for a Linear Collider Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, D.; Frey, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Freytag, D.; Graf, N.; Haller, G.; Milgrome, O.; Radeka, V.; /Brookhaven

    2006-02-08

    A fine grained silicon-tungsten calorimeter is ideal for use as the electromagnetic calorimeter in a linear collider detector optimized for particle-flow reconstruction. We are designing a calorimeter that is based on readout chips which are bump bonded to the silicon wafers that serve as the active medium in the calorimeter. By using integrated electronics we plan to demonstrate that fine granularity can be achieved at a reasonable price. Our design minimizes the gap between tungsten layers leading to a small Moliere radius, an important figure of merit for particle-flow detectors. Tests of the silicon detectors to be used in a test beam prototype as well as timing measurements based on similar silicon detectors are discussed.

  7. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  8. Optical position detectors based on thin film amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Jasmine; Livingstone, John

    2001-10-01

    Thin film optical position sensitive detectors (PSDs) based on novel hydrogenated amorphous silicon Schottky barrier (SB) structures are compared in this work. The three structures reported here have been tested under different light sources to measure their linear properties and wavelength response characteristics. The sputtered a-Si sensors were configured as layered structures of platinum, a-Si and indium tin oxide, forming SB-i-n devices and exhibited linear properties similar to multi-layer a-Si p-i- n devices produced by complex chemical vapor deposition procedures, which involve flammable and toxic gases. All structures were test4ed as possible configurations for 2D sensors. The devices were tested under white light, filtered white light and also a red diode laser. Each of the three structures responded quite differently to each of the sources. Results, based on the correlation coefficient, which measures the linearity of output and which has a maximum value of 1, produced r values ranging between 0.992 to 0.999, in the best performances.

  9. Photon detector configured to employ the Gunn effect and method of use

    SciTech Connect

    Cich, Michael J

    2015-03-17

    Embodiments disclosed herein relate to photon detectors configured to employ the Gunn effect for detecting high-energy photons (e.g., x-rays and gamma rays) and methods of use. In an embodiment, a photon detector for detecting high-energy photons is disclosed. The photon detector includes a p-i-n semiconductor diode having a p-type semiconductor region, an n-type semiconductor region, and a compensated i-region disposed between the p-type semiconductor region and the n-type semiconductor region. The compensated i-region and has a width of about 100 .mu.m to about 400 .mu.m and is configured to exhibit the Gunn effect when the p-i-n semiconductor diode is forward biased a sufficient amount. The compensated i-region is doped to include a free carrier concentration of less than about 10.sup.10 cm.sup.-3.

  10. Vertically etched silicon nano-rods as a sensitive electron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajmirzaheydarali, M.; Akbari, M.; Soleimani-Amiri, S.; Sadeghipari, M.; Shahsafi, A.; Farahani, A. Akhavan; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have used vertically etched silicon nano-rods to realize electron detectors suitable for scanning electron microscopes. The results of deep etching of silicon nano-structures are presented to achieve highly ordered arrays of nano-rods. The response of the electron detector to energy of the primary electron beam and the effects of various sizes and materials has been investigated, indicating its high sensitivity to secondary and back-scattered electrons. The miniaturized structure of this electron detector allows it to be placed in the vicinity of the specimen to improve the resolution and contrast. This detector collects electrons and converts the electron current to voltage directly by means of n-doped silicon nano-rods on a p-type silicon substrate. Silicon nano-rods enhance the surface-to-volume ratio of the detector as well as improving the yield of electron detection. The use of nano-structures and silicon nanowires as an electron detector has led to higher sensitivities than with micro-structures.

  11. Nonlinear optical effects of ultrahigh-Q silicon photonic nanocavities immersed in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiankai; Zhang, Xufeng; Schuck, Carsten; Tang, Hong X.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic nanocavities are a key component in many applications because of their capability of trapping and storing photons and enhancing interactions of light with various functional materials and structures. The maximal number of photons that can be stored in silicon photonic cavities is limited by the free-carrier and thermo-optic effects at room temperature. To reduce such effects, we performed the first experimental study of optical nonlinearities in ultrahigh-Q silicon disk nanocavities at cryogenic temperatures in a superfluid helium environment. At elevated input power, the cavity transmission spectra exhibit distinct blue-shifted bistability behavior when temperature crosses the liquid helium lambda point. At even lower temperatures, the spectra restore to symmetric Lorentzian shapes. Under this condition, we obtain a large intracavity photon number of about 40,000, which is limited ultimately by the local helium phase transition. These new discoveries are explained by theoretical calculations and numerical simulations. PMID:23486445

  12. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; CERN RD-48 ROSE Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers ({ge} 100 micrometers) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects (interstitial and vacancies), possibly by as-grown defects, in epitaxial layers. The ``sinking`` process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  13. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.

    1997-11-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers (>100 {mu}m) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5{center_dot}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects, in epitaxial layers. The {open_quotes}sinking{close_quotes} process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1{center_dot}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  14. Hard x-ray and gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopy using scintillators coupled to silicon drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, P.; Eckhard, R.; Fiorini, C.; Gola, A.; Longoni, A.; Niculae, A.; Peloso, R.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2008-07-01

    Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) are used as low-capacitance photon detectors for the optical light emitted by scintillators. The scintillator crystal is directly coupled to the SDD entrance window. The entrance window's transmittance can be optimized for the scintillator characteristic by deposition of a wavelength-selective anti-reflective coating. Compared to conventional photomultiplier tubes the SDD readout offers improved energy resolution and avoids the practical problems of incompatibility with magnetic fields, instrument volume and requirement of high voltage. A compact imaging spectrometer for hard X-rays and γ-rays has been developed by coupling a large area (29 × 26 mm2) monolithic SDD array with 77 hexagonal cells to a single non-structured CsI-scintillator of equal size. The scintillation light generated by the absorption of an energetic photon is seen by a number of detector cells and the position of the photon interaction is reconstructed by the centroid method. The measured spatial resolution of the system (<= 500 μm) is considerably smaller than the SDD cell size (3.2 mm) and in the order required at the focal plane of high energy missions. The energy information is obtained by summing the detector cell signals. Compared to direct converting pixelated detectors, e.g. CdTe with equal position resolution the scintillator-SDD combination requires a considerably lower number of readout channels. In addition it has the advantages of comprehensive material experience, existing technologies, proven long term stability, and practically unlimited availability of high quality material.

  15. Feasibility of Amorphous Selenium Based Photon Counting Detectors for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; O'Connor, P.; Lehnert, J., De Geronimo, G., Dolazza, E., Tousignant, O., Laperriere, L., Greenspan, J., Zhao, W.

    2009-02-27

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been incorporated successfully in direct conversion flat panel x-ray detectors, and has demonstrated superior image quality in screening mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under energy integration mode. The present work explores the potential of a-Se for photon counting detectors in DBT. We investigated major factors contributing to the variation in the charge collected by a pixel upon absorption of each x-ray photon. These factors included x-ray photon interaction, detector geometry, charge transport, and the pulse shaping and noise properties of the photon counting readout circuit. Experimental measurements were performed on a linear array test structure constructed by evaporating an a-Se layer onto an array of 100 {mu}m pitch strip electrodes, which are connected to a 32 channel low noise photon counting integrated circuit. The measured pulse height spectrum (PHS) under polychromatic xray exposure was interpreted quantitatively using the factors identified. Based on the understanding of a-Se photon counting performance, design parameters were proposed for a 2D detector with high quantum efficiency and count rate that could meet the requirements of photon counting detector for DBT.

  16. Bias-free true random number generation using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuhao; Zhang, Weijun; Zhou, Hui; You, Lixing; Lv, Chaolin; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Sijing; Ren, Min; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a bias-free true random number generator (TRNG) based on single photon detection using superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs). By comparing the photon detection signals of two consecutive laser pulses and extracting the random bits by the von Neumann correction method, we achieved a random number generation efficiency of 25% (a generation rate of 3.75 Mbit s‑1 at a system clock rate of 15 MHz). Using a multi-channel superconducting nanowire single photon detector system with controllable pulse signal amplitudes, we detected the single photons with photon number resolution and positional sensitivity, which could further increase the random number generation efficiency. In a three-channel SNSPD system, the random number bit generation efficiency was improved to 75%, corresponding to a generation rate of 7.5 Mbit s‑1 with a 10 MHz system clock rate. All of the generated random numbers successfully passed the statistical test suite.

  17. Search for ultra-high energy photons using Telescope Array surface detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rubtsov, G. I.; Troitsky, S. V.; Ivanov, D.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomson, G. B.

    2011-09-22

    We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive an upper limit on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10{sup 19} eV.

  18. Development of a high-frequency electronic integrator for photon-number resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Kristina; Wayne, Michael; Kwiat, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Efficient photon-number-resolving single-photon detectors are a critical resource for optical quantum information processing, e.g., for realizing deterministic single-photon production. Previously, we have developed Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) that can detect single photons with high quantum efficiency. The detector configuration allows photons to initiate multiple electron avalanches simultaneously, creating a signal with a charge proportional to the number of photons detected. One current obstacle is the extraction of the total charge of each pulse at frequencies ranging from 200 MHz to 20 GHz. The charge of each pulse is proportional to the area under the input signal and so we are currently developing an electronic integrator that, with appropriate signal amplification, will produce an output signal of pulses with heights equal to the integral of the VLPC pulse, thereby fully realizing the photon-number resolving capabilities of these detectors. Finally, we are also studying the use of optical annealing to reduce the detector's dark counts.

  19. Spherical silicon-shell photonic band gap structures fabricated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yang, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition was applied in fabricating three-dimensional (3D) spherical-shell photonic band gap (PBG) structures by depositing silicon shells covering silica particles, which had been self-assembled into 3D colloidal crystals. The colloidal crystals of self-assembled silica particles were formed on silicon substrates using the isothermal heating evaporation approach. A continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (1064nm wavelength) was used to deposit silicon shells by thermally decomposing disilane gas. Periodic silicon-shell/silica-particle PBG structures were obtained. By removing the silica particles enclosed in the silicon shells using hydrofluoric acid, hollow spherical silicon-shell arrays were produced. This technique is capable of fabricating structures with complete photonic band gaps, which is predicted by simulations with the plane wave method. The techniques developed in this study have the potential to flexibly engineer the positions of the PBGs by varying both the silica particle size and the silicon-shell thickness. Ellipsometry was used to investigate the specific photonic band gaps for both structures.

  20. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  1. Porous silicon microcavities: synthesis, characterization, and application to photonic barcode devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Fenollosa, Roberto; Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Garín, Moises; Meseguer, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a new type of porous silicon we name as porous silicon colloids. They consist of almost perfect spherical silicon nanoparticles with a very smooth surface, able to scatter (and also trap) light very efficiently in a large-span frequency range. Porous silicon colloids have unique properties because of the following: (a) they behave as optical microcavities with a high refractive index, and (b) the intrinsic photoluminescence (PL) emission is coupled to the optical modes of the microcavity resulting in a unique luminescence spectrum profile. The PL spectrum constitutes an optical fingerprint identifying each particle, with application for biosensing. In this paper, we review the synthesis of silicon colloids for developing porous nanoparticles. We also report on the optical properties with special emphasis in the PL emission of porous silicon microcavities. Finally, we present the photonic barcode concept.

  2. Porous silicon microcavities: synthesis, characterization, and application to photonic barcode devices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed a new type of porous silicon we name as porous silicon colloids. They consist of almost perfect spherical silicon nanoparticles with a very smooth surface, able to scatter (and also trap) light very efficiently in a large-span frequency range. Porous silicon colloids have unique properties because of the following: (a) they behave as optical microcavities with a high refractive index, and (b) the intrinsic photoluminescence (PL) emission is coupled to the optical modes of the microcavity resulting in a unique luminescence spectrum profile. The PL spectrum constitutes an optical fingerprint identifying each particle, with application for biosensing. In this paper, we review the synthesis of silicon colloids for developing porous nanoparticles. We also report on the optical properties with special emphasis in the PL emission of porous silicon microcavities. Finally, we present the photonic barcode concept. PMID:22943136

  3. Power detectors for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun Jane; Li, James C.; Tang, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes and compares three different types of detectors, including CMOS power detectors, bipolar power detectors, and super-regenerative detectors, deployed in the literature for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies. Each detector has unique working mechanism and demonstrates different behavior with respects to bias conditions, input signal power, as well as bandwidth responses. Two Figure-of-Merits for both wideband and narrowband imaging have been defined to quantify the detector performance comparison. CMOS and Bipolar detectors are good for passive imaging, while super regenerative detectors are superior for active imaging. The analytical results have been verified by both simulation and measurement results. These analyses intend to provide design insights and guidance for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging power detectors.

  4. Beam test results for the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel, G. Chiodini et al.

    2000-09-28

    The authors report the results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector tests carried out in the MTest beam at Fermilab in 1999--2000. The pixel detector spatial resolution has been studied as a function of track inclination, sensor bias, and readout threshold.

  5. SPY: A monitoring system for the silicon vertex detector of CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Galeotti, S.; Gherarducci, F.; Mariotti, M.; Morsani, F.; Passuello, D.; Tartarelli, F.; Grieco, G.M.; Nelson, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Harber, C.; Ristori, L.; Bailey, M.; Sciacca, G.F.; Turini, N.; Cei, M.

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe the basic principles and the fundamentals of the design of the system of monitoring the CDF silicon vertex detector. Also described are some results and possible future developments of this promising way of checking complex detectors with high amount of channels.

  6. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  7. Robust hybrid quantum dot laser for integrated silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Kurczveil, Géza; Liang, Di; Fiorentino, Marco; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2016-07-11

    We demonstrate the first quantum dot (QD) laser on a silicon substrate with efficient coupling of light to a silicon waveguide under the QD gain region. Continuous wave operation up to 100 °C and multiwavelength operation are demonstrated, paving the way towards highly efficient CMOS-compatible, uncooled, WDM sources. PMID:27410883

  8. SILICON DRIFT DETECTORS FOR THE STAR/SVT EXPERIMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TAKAHASHI,J.

    1998-06-14

    Large area linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) were developed to be used in the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) of the STAR experiment at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The SDD is in its final design and has been submitted for large scale production. Test results show that the detector exhibits excellent position resolution and low noise. A special characterization procedure was developed to test detector wafers in order to select good detectors for the SVT. Recently, 15 STAR/SVT SDD's were assembled as a tracking device in a BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). It is the first tracking application of these detectors and their corresponding front-end electronics in an experimental environment. Preliminary results indicating good detector performance are shown and discussed in this paper.

  9. Design and Integration of Discrete Components for Low Energy WDM Silicon Photonics on CMOS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zortman, William A.

    2011-12-01

    The historical and continuing exponential growth in processor capability continues to provide the parallel growth in supercomputer and datacenter capacity. Technological requirements to continue this growth include high speed interconnects to access memory and to link the thousands of chips in a large machine. This presentation describes a body of work in silicon photonic transmitter technology that provides the chip-to-chip optical interconnect bandwidth for future multiprocessors. The silicon photonic technology demonstrated is, to our knowledge, the lowest power and lowest voltage external optical modulator of any kind in the world. Compatibility with current and proposed low voltage signaling is demonstrated. Intimate integration with CMOS technology is obtained in monolithic and two dimensional integration schemes. Additionally, the high volume manufacturing impacts, on what heretofore had been only piece part demonstrations, is quantified. Finally, the prospect of geographically separated data center virtualization is supported with the demonstration and theory of the long haul capability of silicon photonic microdisk modulators.

  10. Electronic-state-controlled reset operation in quantum dot resonant-tunneling single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; Zhu, Z. Q.; An, Z. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2014-02-03

    The authors present a systematic study of an introduced reset operation on quantum dot (QD) single photon detectors operating at 77 K. The detectors are based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diode with an adjacent layer of self-assembled InAs QDs. Sensitive single-photon detection in high (dI)/(dV) region with suppressed current fluctuations is achieved. The dynamic detection range is extended up to at least 10{sup 4} photons/s for sensitive imaging applications by keeping the device far from saturation by employing an appropriate reset frequency.

  11. A simple method for afterpulse probability measurement in high-speed single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junliang; Li, Yongfu; Ding, Lei; Zhang, Chunfang; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2016-07-01

    A simple statistical method is proposed for afterpulse probability measurement in high-speed single-photon detectors. The method is based on in-laser-period counting without the support of time-correlated information or delay adjustment, and is readily implemented with commercially available logic devices. We present comparisons among the proposed method and commonly used methods which use the time-correlated single-photon counter or the gated counter, based on a 1.25-GHz gated infrared single-photon detector. Results show that this in-laser-period counting method has similar accuracy to the commonly used methods with extra simplicity, robustness, and faster measuring speed.

  12. Optical time domain reflectometry with low noise waveguide-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, C.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Ma, X.; Tang, H. X.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate optical time domain reflectometry over 200 km of optical fiber using low-noise NbTiN superconducting single-photon detectors integrated with Si3N4 waveguides. Our small detector footprint enables high timing resolution of 50 ps and a dark count rate of 3 Hz with unshielded fibers, allowing for identification of defects along the fiber over a dynamic range of 37.4 dB. Photons scattered and reflected back from the fiber under test can be detected in free-running mode without showing dead zones or other impairments often encountered in semiconductor photon-counting optical time domain reflectometers.

  13. Silicon Photomultipliers, A New Device For Low Light Level Photon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Hans-Guenther

    2006-10-27

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are novel detectors for low level light detection based on arrays of avalanche photodiodes operating in Geiger mode. Offering good characteristics (fast response, high gain, photon counting capability, insensitivity to magnetic fields, low voltage operation) they have the potential to replace classical photomultipliers (PMT) in many applications. Drawbacks are dark rate and optical cross talk. Though their quantum efficiency is already comparable or better than that of bialkali PMT it is still limited by the structures on the light sensitive front surface. A new concept, presently developed at the Max-Planck semiconductor laboratory, allows boosting the efficiency to almost 100%. Using a fully depleted substrate the light enters through the unstructured backside. A drift diode structure collects the electrons on a small 'point like' avalanche structure for multiplication. Engineering the thin entrance window at the backside using antireflective layers a high efficiency can be achieved in a wide wavelength range (300-1000nm). The paper will summarize the status of front illuminated SiPMs and report on the development of the backside illuminated devices.

  14. The Los Alamos Photon Counting Detector Debris Detection Project: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cheng; Priedhorsky, W.; Baron, M.; Casperson, D.

    1995-03-01

    At Los Alamos, the authors have been pursuing a project for space debris detection using a photon counting detector with high spatial and time resolution. By exploiting the three dimensionality of the high quality data, they expect to be able to detect an orbiting object of size below 2 cm, using a moderate size telescope and state-of-the-art photon counting detector. A working tube has been used to collect skyward looking data during dusk. In this paper, they discuss the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system. They also report on analysis and results of these data sets.

  15. Experimental investigation of the detection mechanism in WSi nanowire superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, Rosalinda; Renema, Jelmer J.; Zhou, Zili; Verma, Varun B.; Lita, Adriana E.; Shainline, Jeffrey; Stevens, Martin J.; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo; van Exter, Martin P.; de Dood, Michiel J. A.; Fiore, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    We use quantum detector tomography to investigate the detection mechanism in WSi nanowire superconducting single photon detectors. To this purpose, we fabricated a 250 nm wide and 250 nm long WSi nanowire and measured its response to impinging photons with wavelengths ranging from λ = 900 nm to λ = 1650 nm. Tomographic measurements show that the detector response depends on the total excitation energy only. Moreover, for total absorbed energies >0.8 eV the current-energy relation is linear, similar to what was observed in NbN nanowires, whereas the current-energy relation deviates from linear behavior for total energies below 0.8 eV.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy with a time- and space-resolved single-photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Pinaud, F. F.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-10-01

    We have recently developed a wide-field photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) having high-temporal and highspatial resolutions and capable of recording up to 500,000 photons per sec. Its temporal performance has been previously characterized using solutions of fluorescent materials with different lifetimes, and its spatial resolution using sub-diffraction objects (beads and quantum dots). Here we show its application to fluorescence lifetime imaging of live cells and compare its performance to a scanning confocal TCSPC approach. With the expected improvements in photocathode sensitivity and increase in detector throughput, this technology appears as a promising alternative to the current lifetime imaging solutions.

  17. High-speed bridge circuit for InGaAs avalanche photodiode single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Tomita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2014-02-01

    Because of low power consumption and small footprint, avalanche photodiodes (APD) have been commonly applied to photon detection. Recently, high speed quantum communication has been demonstrated for high bit-rate quantum key distribution. For the high speed quantum communication, photon detectors should operate at GHz-clock frequencies. We propose balanced detection circuits for GHz-clock operation of InGaAs-APD photon detectors. The balanced single photon detector operates with sinusoidal wave gating. The sinusoidal wave appearing in the output is removed by the subtraction from APD signal without sharp band-elimination filters. Omission of the sharp filters removes the constraint on the operating frequency of the single photon detector. We present two designs, one works with two identical APDs, the other with one APD and a low-pass filter. The sinusoidal gating enables to eliminate the gating noise even with the simple configuration of the latter design. We demonstrated the balanced single photon detector operating with 1.020GHz clock at 233 K, 193 K, and 186.5 K. The dark count probability was 4.0 x 10-4 counts/pulse with the quantum efficiency of 10% at 233K, and 1.6 x 10-4 counts/pulse at 186.5 K. These results were obtained with easily available APDs (NR8300FP-C.C, RENESASS) originally developed for optical time-domain reflectmeters.

  18. Towards a direction-sensitive optical module for neutrino telescopes based on a hybrid photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Tilman K.; Gebert, Ulrike; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela; Séguinot, Jacques; Joram, Christian

    2009-12-01

    The optical modules of all currently operating neutrino telescopes contain one standard PMT with a large hemispherical photo-cathode. The maximum spatial resolution of this detection principle is thus limited to the photo-cathode area and no information is obtained on the direction of the incoming photons. We propose a new direction-sensitive design featuring a fisheye lens and a hybrid photon detector. The lens system maps incoming photons from one direction on a well-defined point on the photo-cathode of the hybrid photon detector. The photo-electrons are accelerated in a cross-focussed optics and detected using a pixelated anode, which allows for very high spatial resolution. As a candidate chip for the photo-electron detection we propose the Timepix detector of the Medipix family. We have successfully shown its capability to detect photo-electrons in the experiment and evaluated the time resolution by simulation and measurement.

  19. Indirectly illuminated X-ray area detector for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuya; Imai, Ryo; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2010-11-01

    An indirectly illuminated X-ray area detector is employed for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). The detector consists of a phosphor screen, an image intensifier (microchannel plate), a coupling lens and either a CCD or CMOS image sensor. By changing the gain of the image intensifier, both photon-counting and integrating measurements can be performed. Speckle patterns with a high signal-to-noise ratio can be observed in a single shot in the integrating mode, while XPCS measurement can be performed with much fewer photons in the photon-counting mode. By switching the image sensor, various combinations of frame rate, dynamic range and active area can be obtained. By virtue of these characteristics, this detector can be used for XPCS measurements of various types of samples that show slow or fast dynamics, a high or low scattering intensity, and a wide or narrow range of scattering angles. PMID:20975218

  20. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  1. Application of different TL detectors for the photon dosimetry in mixed radiation fields used for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burgkhardt, B; Bilski, P; Budzanowski, M; Böttger, R; Eberhardt, K; Hampel, G; Olko, P; Straubing, A

    2006-01-01

    Different approaches for the measurement of a relatively small gamma dose in strong fields of thermal and epithermal neutrons as used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) have been studied with various thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs). CaF(2):Tm detectors are insensitive to thermal neutrons but not tissue-equivalent. A disadvantage of applying tissue-equivalent (7)LiF detectors is a strong neutron signal resulting from the unavoidable presence of (6)Li traces. To overcome this problem it is usual to apply pairs of LiF detectors with different (6)Li content. The experimental determination of the thermal neutron response ratio of such a pair at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF) operated by PTB enables measurement of the photon dose. In the experimental mixed field of thermal neutrons and photons of the TRIGA reactor at Mainz the photon dose measured with different types of (7)LiF/(nat)LiF TLD pairs agree within a standard uncertainty of 6% whereas the CaF(2):Tm detectors exhibit a photon dose by more than a factor of 2 higher. It is proposed to determine suitable photon energy correction factors for CaF(2):Tm detectors with the help of the (7)LiF/(nat)LiF TLD pairs in the radiation field of interest. PMID:16644976

  2. Polymer Replicas of Photonic Porous Silicon for Sensing and Drug Delivery Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang Yang; Cunin, Frédérique; Link, Jamie R.; Gao, Ting; Betts, Ronald E.; Reiver, Sarah H.; Chin, Vicki; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Sailor, Michael J.

    2003-03-01

    Elaborate one-dimensional photonic crystals are constructed from a variety of organic and biopolymers, which can be dissolved or melted, by templating the solution-cast or injection-molded materials in porous silicon or porous silicon dioxide multilayer (rugate dielectric mirror) structures. After the removal of the template by chemical dissolution, the polymer castings replicate the photonic features and the nanostructure of the master. We demonstrate that these castings can be used as vapor sensors, as deformable and tunable optical filters, and as self-reporting, bioresorbable materials.

  3. Polymer replicas of photonic porous silicon for sensing and drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang Yang; Cunin, Frédérique; Link, Jamie R; Gao, Ting; Betts, Ronald E; Reiver, Sarah H; Chin, Vicki; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Sailor, Michael J

    2003-03-28

    Elaborate one-dimensional photonic crystals are constructed from a variety of organic and biopolymers, which can be dissolved or melted, by templating the solution-cast or injection-molded materials in porous silicon or porous silicon dioxide multilayer (rugate dielectric mirror) structures. After the removal of the template by chemical dissolution, the polymer castings replicate the photonic features and the nanostructure of the master. We demonstrate that these castings can be used as vapor sensors, as deformable and tunable optical filters, and as self-reporting, bioresorbable materials. PMID:12663921

  4. Non-degenerate two-photon absorption in silicon waveguides. Analytical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanbing; Husko, Chad; Lefrancois, Simon; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Schröder, Jochen; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-22

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the nonlinear evolution of two optical pulses in a silicon waveguide. We provide an analytic solution for the weak probe wave undergoing non-degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) from the strong pump. At larger pump intensities, we employ a numerical solution to study the interplay between TPA and photo-generated free carriers. We develop a simple and powerful approach to extract and separate out the distinct loss contributions of TPA and free-carrier absorption from readily available experimental data. Our analysis accounts accurately for experimental results in silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

  5. SiPMs characterization and selection for the DUNE far detector photon detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Maricic, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) together with the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) hosted at the Fermilab will provide a unique, world-leading program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of neutrino physics and astrophysics. CP violation in neutrino flavor mixing is one of its most important potential discoveries. Additionally, the experiment will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and precisely measure the neutrino mixing parameters which may potentially reveal new fundamental symmetries of nature. Moreover, the DUNE is also designed for the observation of nucleon decay and supernova burst neutrinos. The photon detection (PD) system in the DUNE far detector provides trigger for cosmic backgrounds, enhances supernova burst trigger efficiency and improves the energy resolution of the detector. The DUNE adopts the technology of liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) that requires the PD sensors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), to be carefully chosen to not only work properly in LAr temperature, but also meet certain specifications for the life of the experiment. A comprehensive testing of SiPMs in cryostat is necessary since the datasheet provided by the manufactures in the market does not cover this temperature regime. This paper gives the detailed characterization results of SenSL C-Series 60035 SiPMs, including gain, dark count rate (DCR), cross-talk and after-pulse rate. Characteristic studies on SiPMs from other vendors are also discussed in order to avoid any potential problems associated with using a single source. Moreover, the results of the ongoing mechanical durability tests are shown for the current candidate, SenSL B/C-Series 60035 SiPMs.

  6. Search for SM Higgs decaying to two photons via ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yaquan

    This dissertation reports the discovery potential of the Standard Model Higgs boson with the di-photon decay using the ATLAS detector. First, photon calibration techiques is studied and a likelihood method for photon identification and jet rejection is developed. A method to evaluate photon identification and fake photon backgrounds with data was also discussed. The potential of an inclusive SM Higgs decaying to two photons search and Higgs boson searches in association with one or two high PT jets is evaluated. Finally an extended maximum likelihood fit together with event classifications was performed to estimate the sensitivity of the search. With 30 1/fb data, the expected sensitivity for the channel Higgs decaying to two photons is above 5 sigma for Higgs masses between 120 and 140 GeV.

  7. Development of an optical biosensing platform using porous silicon one-dimensional photonic bandgap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huimin

    Porous silicon has proven to be a good host material for developing sensitive, easy to use, and low cost biosensing platforms. In this work, a label-free optical biosensing platform using porous silicon one-dimensional photonic bandgap structures have been developed. The device is a microcavity consisting of two Bragg mirrors and a defect layer. The reflectance spectrum of the microcavity is characterized by a sharp resonance dip, whose position is very sensitive to the binding of biological molecules inside the pores. Comprehensive modeling was performed to investigate the sensor performance and transform it into a practical tool for quantitative detection. The ultimate sensitivity of the biosensors was investigated theoretically and experimentally and the device configuration and material nanostructure that lead to optimum performance of the sensor were identified. To enable the use of these porous silicon biosensors in macromolecule detection, a novel macroporous porous silicon morphology with pore diameters around 120 nm has been developed. Quantitative and selective detection using the new macroporous silicon one-dimensional photonic bandgap microcavity sensors was demonstrated using different probe-target systems, such as Tir-Intimin (30 kDa), biotin-Streptavidin (60 kDa) and immunoglobulin G (150 kDa). Protein concentrations down to 1˜2 muM (equivalent to 0.3 ng/mm2) have been detected. Details of the porous silicon photonic bandgap biosensor design, material development, device fabrication, characterization and application are described in this thesis.

  8. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  9. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  10. Tunable narrowband microwave photonic filter created by stimulated Brillouin scattering from a silicon nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Bedoya, Alvaro; Morrison, Blair; Pagani, Mattia; Marpaung, David; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate the first functional signal processing device based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in a silicon nanowire. We use only 1 dB of on-chip SBS gain to create an RF photonic notch filter with 48 dB of suppression, 98 MHz linewidth, and 6 GHz frequency tuning. This device has potential applications in on-chip microwave signal processing and establishes the foundation for the first CMOS-compatible high performance RF photonic filter.

  11. Correlated photon pair generation in low-loss double-stripe silicon nitride waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Yanbing; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate correlated photon pair generation via spontaneous four-wave mixing in a low-loss double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide with a coincidence-to-accidental ratio over 10. The coincidence-to-accidental ratio is limited by spontaneous Raman scattering, which can be mitigated by cooling in the future. This demonstration suggests that this waveguide structure is a potential platform to develop integrated quantum photonic chips for quantum information processing.

  12. Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J.; Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D.; Lee, P. L.; Lienert, U.; Aydiner, C.; Vera, G.; Kump, K.; LANL; GE Healthcare

    2007-01-01

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41 x 41 cm{sup 2} with 200 x 200 {micro}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate - 8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode - make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  13. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  14. Monolithic silicon photonics in a sub-100nm SOI CMOS microprocessor foundry: progress from devices to systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Miloš A.; Wade, Mark T.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Sun, Chen; Georgas, Michael; Moss, Benjamin; Kumar, Rajesh; Alloatti, Luca; Pavanello, Fabio; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Nammari, Kareem; Notaros, Jelena; Atabaki, Amir; Leu, Jonathan; Stojanović, Vladimir; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-02-01

    We review recent progress of an effort led by the Stojanović (UC Berkeley), Ram (MIT) and Popović (CU Boulder) research groups to enable the design of photonic devices, and complete on-chip electro-optic systems and interfaces, directly in standard microelectronics CMOS processes in a microprocessor foundry, with no in-foundry process modifications. This approach allows tight and large-scale monolithic integration of silicon photonics with state-of-the-art (sub-100nm-node) microelectronics, here a 45nm SOI CMOS process. It enables natural scale-up to manufacturing, and rapid advances in device design due to process repeatability. The initial driver application was addressing the processor-to-memory communication energy bottleneck. Device results include 5Gbps modulators based on an interleaved junction that take advantage of the high resolution of the sub-100nm CMOS process. We demonstrate operation at 5fJ/bit with 1.5dB insertion loss and 8dB extinction ratio. We also demonstrate the first infrared detectors in a zero-change CMOS process, using absorption in transistor source/drain SiGe stressors. Subsystems described include the first monolithically integrated electronic-photonic transmitter on chip (modulator+driver) with 20-70fJ/bit wall plug energy/bit (2-3.5Gbps), to our knowledge the lowest transmitter energy demonstrated to date. We also demonstrate native-process infrared receivers at 220fJ/bit (5Gbps). These are encouraging signs for the prospects of monolithic electronics-photonics integration. Beyond processor-to-memory interconnects, our approach to photonics as a "More-than- Moore" technology inside advanced CMOS promises to enable VLSI electronic-photonic chip platforms tailored to a vast array of emerging applications, from optical and acoustic sensing, high-speed signal processing, RF and optical metrology and clocks, through to analog computation and quantum technology.

  15. Boron imaging with a microstrip silicon detector for applications in BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, A.; Basilico, F.; Bolognini, D.; Borasio, P.; Cappelletti, P.; Chiari, P.; Conti, V.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Giannini, G.; Hasan, S.; Mascagna, V.; Mauri, P.; Monti, A. F.; Mozzanica, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Vallazza, E.; Zanini, A.

    2009-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapic technique exploiting the α particles produced after the irradiation of the isotope 10 of boron with thermal neutrons in the capture reaction B(n,α)710Li. It is used to treat tumours that for their features (radioresistance, extension, localization near vital organs) cannot be treated through conventional photon-beams radiotherapy. One of the main limitations of this technique is the lack of specificity (i.e. the ability of localizing in tumour cells, saving the healthy tissues) of the compounds used to carry the 10B isotope in the organs to be treated. This work, developed in the framework of the INFN PhoNeS project, describes the possibility of boron imaging performed exploiting the neutrons photoproduced by a linac (the Clinac 2100C/D of the S. Anna Hospital Radiotherapy Unit in Como, Italy) and detecting the α s with a non-depleted microstrip silicon detector: the result is a 1D scan of the boron concentration. Several boron doped samples have been analysed, from solutions of H3BO3 (reaching a minimum detectable amount of 25 ng of 10B) to biological samples of urine containing BPA and BSH (the two molecules currently used for the clinical trials in BNCT) in order to build kinetic curves (showing the absolute 10B concentration as a function of time). Further measurements are under way to test the imaging system with 10BPA-Fructose complex perfused human lung samples.

  16. Thermal properties of D0 Run IIb silicon detector staves

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; Fast, James; /Fermilab

    2001-06-01

    A proposed stave design for the D0 Run IIb silicon tracker outer layers featuring central cooling channels and hybrid substrates mounted directly to the silicon sensor surfaces is evaluated for heat transfer characteristics and thermal deflections. In order to control leakage current noise in the silicon it is necessary to maintain the silicon in Layer 2 (R {approx} 100mm) at or below +5C. The current cooling system using 30% ethylene glycol in water can deliver coolant to the inlet of the silicon tracker at a temperature of -8C to -10C. This paper also investigates some alternative coolant options for Run IIB. While these are not required for the outer layers of silicon, they may be needed for L0, which sits at R {approx} 15mm. In this case the silicon must be kept at or below -5C, very near the lower limit for delivery of 30% glycol/water coolant. However, for the inner layers the electronics will be mounted independently from the silicon so the local heat flux is greatly reduced. This paper does not consider the cooling issues for the inner layers.

  17. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  18. Large area silicon drift detectors for x-rays -- New results

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Tull, C.R.; Segal, J.D.; Kenney, C.J.; Bradley, J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1999-06-01

    Large area silicon drift detectors, consisting of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter hexagons, were fabricated on 0.35 mm thick high resistivity n-type silicon. An external FET and a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier were used for testing the prototype detectors. The detector performance was measured in the range {minus}75 to 25 C using Peltier cooling, and from 0.125 to 6 {micro}s amplifier shaping time. Measured energy resolutions were 159 eV FWHM and 263 eV FWHM for the 0.5 cm{sup 2} and 1 cm{sup 2} detectors, respectively (at 5.9 keV, {minus}75 C, 6 {micro}s shaping time). The uniformity of the detector response over the entire active area (measured using 560 nm light) was <0.5%.

  19. Si(Li) x-ray detectors with amorphous silicon passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Wong, Y.K.; Cork, C.P.

    1983-10-01

    Lithium-drifted silicon (Si(Li)) detectors with thin lithium n/sup +/ contacts and amorphous silicon (..cap alpha..-Si) junction passivation are described. These detectors (7 mm thick, 9 cm/sup 2/ area) are intended for use in a six element detector array which is designed to measure trace amounts of plutonium in soil samples. Results are given showing a spectral resolution of approx. 400 eV (FWHM) for the 17.8 keV N/sub p/ L x-rays entering through either these detectors. Measurements on the effects of the fractional H/sub 2/ concentration on the electrical behavior of the ..cap alpha..-Si/Si interface are reported. The increase with time in the lithium window thickness when the detectors are stored at room temperature is discussed.

  20. Large area silicon drift detectors for x-rays -- New results

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Tull, C.R.; Segal, J.D.; Kenney, C.J.; Bradley, J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1998-12-31

    Large area silicon drift detectors, consisting of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter hexagons, were fabricated on 0.35 mm thick high resistivity n-type silicon. An external FET and a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier were used for testing the prototype detectors. The detector performance was measured in the range 75 to 25 C using Peltier cooling, and from 0.125 to 6 {micro}s amplifier shaping time. Measured energy resolutions were 159 eV FWHM and 263 eV FWHM for the 0.5 cm{sup 2} and 1 cm{sup 2} detectors, respectively (at 5.9 keV, {minus}75 C, 6 {micro}s shaping time). The uniformity of the detector response over the entire active area (measured using 560 nm light) was < 0.5%.