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Sample records for silicon-based micro gas

  1. Development of a gas chromatography silicon-based microsystem in clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Lorenzelli, Leandro; Benvenuto, Antonella; Adami, Andrea; Guarnieri, Vittorio; Margesin, Benno; Mulloni, Viviana; Vincenzi, Donato

    2005-04-15

    The accurate determination of biological parameters by means of rapid, on-line measurements at low-concentrations is an important task within the fields of pharmaceutical screening and medical diagnostic. Nevertheless, in biological samples, the analytes of interest are present as minor components in complex mixtures and with interfering species. Biosensors are the best candidates for these applications providing a direct solution to this need of accuracy, but their intrinsic selectivity often excludes all the other components in the sample. A separation step introduced prior to the sensing component could allow both the increase of selectivity with respect the interfering species and the identification of a large spectrum of molecular components in the sample. This work reports the development of a silicon-based integrated separation microsystem for gas chromatography aimed to biomedical applications, with particular emphasis to monitor the homovanillic acid (HVA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) ratios in mass population screening for neuroblastoma diagnosis and prognosis. The miniaturised system consists of two main modules: (i) a metal oxide semiconductor detector and (ii) a micromachined separation capillary column. As first step, the metal oxide semiconductor capability to detect HVA and VMA has been demonstrated. Then, a technology for a silicon separation capillary microcolumn including the on-chip gas sensor housing has been proposed and a first prototype has been developed. The proposed microsystem is an analytical device with biosensing capabilities for diagnostic and biomedical applications, which yield an electronic signal proportional to the concentration of a specific analyte or group of analytes. PMID:15741065

  2. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a planar, silicon-based, monolithically integrated micro laminar flow fuel cell with a bridge-shaped microchannel cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Montesinos, P. O.; Yossakda, N.; Schmidt, A.; Brushett, F. R.; Pelton, W. E.; Kenis, P. J. A.

    2011-05-01

    We report the fabrication of a planar, silicon-based, monolithically integrated micro laminar flow fuel cell (μLFFC) using standard MEMS and IC-compatible fabrication technologies. The μLFFC operates with acid supported solutions of formic acid and potassium permanganate, as a fuel and oxidant respectively. The micro-fuel cell design features two in-plane anodic and cathodic microchannels connected via a bridge to confine the diffusive liquid-liquid interface away from the electrode areas and to minimize crossover. Palladium high-active-surface-area catalyst was selectively integrated into the anodic microchannel by electrodeposition, whereas no catalyst was required in the cathodic microchannel. A three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-convection model was developed to study the behavior of the diffusion zone and to extract appropriate cell-design parameters and operating conditions. Experimentally, we observed peak power densities as high as 26 mW cm-2 when operating single cells at a flow rate of 60 μL min-1 at room temperature. The miniature membraneless fuel cell design presented herein offers potential for on-chip power generation, which has long been prohibited by integration complexities associated with the membrane.

  3. Integration of a silicon-based microprobe into a gear measuring instrument for accurate measurement of micro gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, N.; Krah, T.; Jeong, D. C.; Metz, D.; Kniel, K.; Dietzel, A.; Büttgenbach, S.; Härtig, F.

    2014-06-01

    The integration of silicon micro probing systems into conventional gear measuring instruments (GMIs) allows fully automated measurements of external involute micro spur gears of normal modules smaller than 1 mm. This system, based on a silicon microprobe, has been developed and manufactured at the Institute for Microtechnology of the Technische Universität Braunschweig. The microprobe consists of a silicon sensor element and a stylus which is oriented perpendicularly to the sensor. The sensor is fabricated by means of silicon bulk micromachining. Its small dimensions of 6.5 mm × 6.5 mm allow compact mounting in a cartridge to facilitate the integration into a GMI. In this way, tactile measurements of 3D microstructures can be realized. To enable three-dimensional measurements with marginal forces, four Wheatstone bridges are built with diffused piezoresistors on the membrane of the sensor. On the reverse of the membrane, the stylus is glued perpendicularly to the sensor on a boss to transmit the probing forces to the sensor element during measurements. Sphere diameters smaller than 300 µm and shaft lengths of 5 mm as well as measurement forces from 10 µN enable the measurements of 3D microstructures. Such micro probing systems can be integrated into universal coordinate measuring machines and also into GMIs to extend their field of application. Practical measurements were carried out at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt by qualifying the microprobes on a calibrated reference sphere to determine their sensitivity and their physical dimensions in volume. Following that, profile and helix measurements were carried out on a gear measurement standard with a module of 1 mm. The comparison of the measurements shows good agreement between the measurement values and the calibrated values. This result is a promising basis for the realization of smaller probe diameters for the tactile measurement of micro gears with smaller modules.

  4. Fiber-optic gas pressure sensing with a laser-heated silicon-based Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel fiber-optic sensor for measurement of static gas pressure based on the natural convection of a heated silicon pillar attached to a fiber tip functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). A visible laser beam is guided by the fiber to efficiently heat the silicon pillar, while an infrared whitelight source, also guided by the fiber, is used to measure the temperature of the FPI, which is influenced both by the laser power and the pressure through natural convection. We theoretically and experimentally show that, by monitoring the fringe shift caused by the laser heating, air pressure sensing with little temperature cross-sensitivity can be achieved. The pressure sensitivity can be easily tuned by adjusting the heating laser power. In our experiment, the sensor performance within the temperature range from 20°C to 50°C and the pressure range from 0 to 1400 psi has been characterized, showing an average sensitivity of -0.52  pm/psi. Compared to the passive version of the sensor, the pressure sensitivity was ∼15 times larger, and the temperature cross-sensitivity was ∼100 times smaller. PMID:26030532

  5. Tilting pad gas bearing design for micro gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabuurs, M. J. H. W.; Al-Bender, F.; Reynaerts, D.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a dynamic stability investigation of a micro gas turbine supported by two flexible tilting pad bearings. The pad flexibility allows centrifugal and thermal shaft growth of the rotor but can also introduce undesirable rotor instabilities. An eigenvalue analysis on the linearised rotor-bearing dynamics is performed to estimate the required pad stiffness and damping for stability. Results of the eigenvalue analysis are evaluated by fully nonlinear orbit simulations.

  6. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Scott M.

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  7. Silicon-based nanoenergetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, Blaine; Son, Steven; Mason, Aaron; Yarrington, Cole; Cho, K Y; Gesner, J; Yetter, R A

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental combustion properties of silicon-based nano-energetic composites was studied by performing equilibrium calculations, 'flame tests', and instrumented burn-tube tests. That the nominal maximum flame temperature and for many Si-oxidizer systems is about 3000 K, with exceptions. Some of these exceptions are Si-metal oxides with temperatures ranging from 2282 to 2978 K. Theoretical maximum gas production of the Si composites ranged from 350-6500 cm{sup 3}/g of reactant with NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} - Si producing the most gas at 6500 cm{sup 3}/g and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} producing the least. Of the composites tested NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} - Si showed the fastest burning rates with the fastest at 2.1 km/s. The Si metal oxide burning rates where on the order of 0.03-75 mls the slowest of which was nFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Si.

  8. Integration of silicon-based neural probes and micro-drive arrays for chronic recording of large populations of neurons in behaving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Frédéric; Aarts, Arno; Holzhammer, Tobias; Ruther, Patrick; Borghs, Gustaaf; McNaughton, Bruce; Kloosterman, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Understanding how neuronal assemblies underlie cognitive function is a fundamental question in system neuroscience. It poses the technical challenge to monitor the activity of populations of neurons, potentially widely separated, in relation to behaviour. In this paper, we present a new system which aims at simultaneously recording from a large population of neurons from multiple separated brain regions in freely behaving animals. Approach. The concept of the new device is to combine the benefits of two existing electrophysiological techniques, i.e. the flexibility and modularity of micro-drive arrays and the high sampling ability of electrode-dense silicon probes. Main results. Newly engineered long bendable silicon probes were integrated into a micro-drive array. The resulting device can carry up to 16 independently movable silicon probes, each carrying 16 recording sites. Populations of neurons were recorded simultaneously in multiple cortical and/or hippocampal sites in two freely behaving implanted rats. Significance. Current approaches to monitor neuronal activity either allow to flexibly record from multiple widely separated brain regions (micro-drive arrays) but with a limited sampling density or to provide denser sampling at the expense of a flexible placement in multiple brain regions (neural probes). By combining these two approaches and their benefits, we present an alternative solution for flexible and simultaneous recordings from widely distributed populations of neurons in freely behaving rats.

  9. Determination of main and minor components of silicon based materials by a combustion with elemental fluorine. Separation of gaseous fluorination products by carrier gas distillation and gas mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Russe; Kipphardt; Broekaert

    2000-08-15

    For the determination of main and minor components in silicon-based ceramic powders, a decomposition by a combustion with elemental fluorine and separation of the volatile fluorination products by a carrier-gas distillation with a subsequent detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry is described. The necessity and success of the separation step is demonstrated for the determination of boron as a minor constituent in SiC, where the spectral interferences of silicon on the boron signals are decreased considerably. The method developed is shown to be directly applicable to determination of silicon in Si3N4, SiC, and SiO2. The determination of nitrogen in Si3N4 requires additional effort, to separate nitrogen from the excess of fluorine. For the determination of boron, a complete mobilization of BF3 is assured by the presence of an adequate amount of GeF4. Analysis results obtained with different types of calibration show a precision of 30 microg for boron at the milligram-per-gram level and a precision between 0.5 and 2% (m/m) for the main components, silicon and nitrogen. Within these standard deviations, the results agree well with the values expected from the stoichiometry, with the results for silicon and boron obtained by wet chemical decomposition and slurry techniques in combination with ICP-OES and with the results for nitrogen obtained by carrier gas heat extraction. PMID:10959976

  10. Recent advancements in the gas-phase MicroChemLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Wheeler, David; Sokolowski, Sara; Trudell, Dan; Byrnes, Joy; Okandan, Murat; Bauer, Joseph M.; Manley, Robert G.

    2004-12-01

    Sandia's hand-held MicroChemLabTM system uses a micromachined preconcentrator (PC), a gas chromatography channel (GC) and a quartz surface acoustic wave array (SAW) detector for sensitive/selective detection of gas-phase chemical analytes. Requisite system size, performance, power budget and time response mandate microfabrication of the key analytical system components. In the fielded system hybrid integration has been employed, permitting optimization of the individual components. Recent improvements in the hybrid-integrated system, using plastic, metal or silicon/glass manifolds, is described, as is system performance against semivolatile compounds and toxic industrial chemicals. The design and performance of a new three-dimensional micropreconcentrator is also introduced. To further reduce system dead volume, eliminate unheated transfer lines and simplify assembly, there is an effort to monolithically integrate the silicon PC and GC with a suitable silicon-based detector, such as a magnetically-actuated flexural plate wave sensor (magFPW) or a magnetically-actuated pivot plate resonator (PPR).

  11. Microfabricated silicon gas chromatographic micro-channels: fabrication and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, C.M.; Kottenstette, R.J.; Casalnuovo, S.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Hudson, M.L.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Manginell, R.P.; Wong, C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Using both wet and plasma etching, we have fabricated micro-channels in silicon substrates suitable for use as gas chromatography (GC) columns. Micro-channel dimensions range from 10 to 80 {micro}m wide, 200 to 400 {micro}m deep, and 10 cm to 100 cm long. Micro-channels 100 cm long take up as little as 1 cm{sup 2} on the substrate when fabricated with a high aspect ratio silicon etch (HARSE) process. Channels are sealed by anodically bonding Pyrex lids to the Si substrates. We have studied micro-channel flow characteristics to establish model parameters for system optimization. We have also coated these micro-channels with stationary phases and demonstrated GC separations. We believe separation performance can be improved by increasing stationary phase coating uniformity through micro-channel surface treatment prior to stationary phase deposition. To this end, we have developed microfabrication techniques to etch through silicon wafers using the HARSE process. Etching completely through the Si substrate facilitates the treatment and characterization of the micro- channel sidewalls, which domminate the GC physico-chemical interaction. With this approach, we separately treat the Pyrex lid surfaces that form the top and bottom surfaces of the GC flow channel.

  12. Measuring micro-organism gas production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Pearson, A. O.; Mills, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Transducer, which senses pressure buildup, is easy to assemble and use, and rate of gas produced can be measured automatically and accurately. Method can be used in research, in clinical laboratories, and for environmental pollution studies because of its ability to detect and quantify rapidly the number of gas-producing microorganisms in water, beverages, and clinical samples.

  13. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  14. Stirling engines for gas fired micro-cogen and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, N.W.; Beale, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and performance of free-piston Stirling engine-alternators particularly suited for use as natural gas fired micro-cogen and cooling devices. Stirling based cogen systems offer significant potential advantages over internal combustion engines in efficiency, to maintain higher efficiencies at lower power levels than than combustion engines significantly expands the potential for micro-cogen. System cost reduction and electric prices higher than the U.S. national average will have a far greater effect on commercial success than any further increase in Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling based cogen systems are competitive. Machines of this design are being considered for production in the near future as gas-fired units for combined heat and power in sufficiently large quantities to assure competitive prices for the final unit.

  15. A micro gas chromatography column with a micro thermal conductivity detector for volatile organic compound analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, J H; Cui, D F; Chen, X; Zhang, L L; Cai, H Y; Li, H

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a micro gas chromatography (μGC) system contained a μGC column and a micro thermal conductivity detector (μTCD) was proposed. In order to reduce the volume of the system, some micro heaters were integrated on the surface and backside of the GC column, which could provide a robust temperature programming capability and rapidly increase the temperature of the μGC column. In addition, a silicon-glass μTCD with four-thermistor thermal conductivity cells that can offer significant advantages over previously reported designs including low dead volume, good thermal isolation, and elimination of the thermal noise was proposed in this paper. Experimental results have indicated that the μGC system with a detection limit of several ppm concentration levels separated and detected the benzene, toluene, and styrene in less than 3 min, and the μGC system also exhibited a good linear response in the test range. PMID:23464240

  16. A micro gas chromatography column with a micro thermal conductivity detector for volatile organic compound analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. H.; Cui, D. F.; Chen, X.; Zhang, L. L.; Cai, H. Y.; Li, H.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a micro gas chromatography (μGC) system contained a μGC column and a micro thermal conductivity detector (μTCD) was proposed. In order to reduce the volume of the system, some micro heaters were integrated on the surface and backside of the GC column, which could provide a robust temperature programming capability and rapidly increase the temperature of the μGC column. In addition, a silicon-glass μTCD with four-thermistor thermal conductivity cells that can offer significant advantages over previously reported designs including low dead volume, good thermal isolation, and elimination of the thermal noise was proposed in this paper. Experimental results have indicated that the μGC system with a detection limit of several ppm concentration levels separated and detected the benzene, toluene, and styrene in less than 3 min, and the μGC system also exhibited a good linear response in the test range.

  17. Measuring Micro-Friction Torque in MEMS Gas Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xudong; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    An in situ measurement of micro-friction torque in MEMS gas bearings, which has been a challenging research topic for years, is realized by a system designed in this paper. In the system, a high accuracy micro-force sensor and an electronically-driven table are designed, fabricated and utilized. With appropriate installation of the sensor and bearings on the table, the engine rotor can be driven to rotate with the sensor using a silicon lever beam. One end of the beam is fixed to the shaft of the gas bearing, while the other end is free and in contact with the sensor probe tip. When the sensor begins to rotate with the table, the beam is pushed by the sensor probe to rotate in the same direction. For the beam, the friction torque from the gas bearing is balanced by the torque induced by pushing force from the sensor probe. Thus, the friction torque can be calculated as a product of the pushing force measured by the sensor and the lever arm, which is defined as the distance from the sensor probe tip to the centerline of the bearing. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this system, with a sensitivity of 1.285 mV/μN·m in a range of 0 to 11.76 μN·m when the lever arm is 20 mm long. The measuring range can be modified by varying the length of the lever arm. Thus, this system has wide potential applications in measuring the micro-friction torque of gas bearings in rotating MEMS machines. PMID:27213377

  18. Measuring Micro-Friction Torque in MEMS Gas Bearings.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xudong; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    An in situ measurement of micro-friction torque in MEMS gas bearings, which has been a challenging research topic for years, is realized by a system designed in this paper. In the system, a high accuracy micro-force sensor and an electronically-driven table are designed, fabricated and utilized. With appropriate installation of the sensor and bearings on the table, the engine rotor can be driven to rotate with the sensor using a silicon lever beam. One end of the beam is fixed to the shaft of the gas bearing, while the other end is free and in contact with the sensor probe tip. When the sensor begins to rotate with the table, the beam is pushed by the sensor probe to rotate in the same direction. For the beam, the friction torque from the gas bearing is balanced by the torque induced by pushing force from the sensor probe. Thus, the friction torque can be calculated as a product of the pushing force measured by the sensor and the lever arm, which is defined as the distance from the sensor probe tip to the centerline of the bearing. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this system, with a sensitivity of 1.285 mV/μN·m in a range of 0 to 11.76 μN·m when the lever arm is 20 mm long. The measuring range can be modified by varying the length of the lever arm. Thus, this system has wide potential applications in measuring the micro-friction torque of gas bearings in rotating MEMS machines. PMID:27213377

  19. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-04-06

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  20. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  1. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  2. Micro Pattern Gas Detectors for Nuclear Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanvo, Kondo

    2015-10-01

    Gaseous detectors have played a pivotal role as tracking devices in the field of particle physics experiments for the last fifty years. Nowadays, advances in photolithography and micro processing techniques have enabled the transition from the old generation of multi wire gaseous chamber (MWPCs) to a new family commonly refer to as Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs). MPGD technologies combine the basic gas amplification principle with micro-structure printed circuits to provide detectors with excellent spatial and time resolution, high rate capability, low material budget and high radiation tolerance. Several technical breakthroughs over the past decade have allowed the possibility for large area MPGDs, making them cost effective and high performance detector candidates for future nuclear physics (NP) and high energy physics (HEP) experiments. We give in the present talk, an overview of the state of the art of the MPGDs. We will then briefly present the CERN-based RD51 collaboration established in 2008 with the goal of further advancing technological developments and applications of MPGDs and associated electronic-readout systems. Finally we report on the rich and diverse R&D activities on MPGDs to prepare for the detector challenges of the next generation of accelerators and for the frontiers of physics research.

  3. Hot gas stream application in micro-bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrijasevic, Daniela; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Smetana, Walter; Boehm, Stefan; Brenner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept for bonding micro-parts with dimensions in the range of 50 μm to 300 μm. Two different kinds of adhesives - polyurethane adhesive foil and hot melt glue - were applied to a basic substrate by different techniques. The focused and concentrated hot gas stream softened glue which had been applied in a solid state. Micro-parts were then embossed in the softened glue, or covered and shielded by it. In this way, a rigid and compact bond was obtained after cooling. For the positioning of micro-parts (optical fibers), it has been necessary to manufacture adequate V-grooves. Finite element analyses using the ANSYS TM program package were performed in order to evaluate parameters which govern the heat transfer to the adhesive and substrate respectively. Experimental results are in good agreement with results obtained by the numerical simulations. The advantages of this new approach are small system size, low capital costs, simple usage, applicability to many material combinations, easy integration into existing production lines, etc.

  4. Towards molecular gas flows in micro propulsion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groll, Rodion; Rath, Hans J.

    Developing micro propulsion devices like cold gas thrusters the geometry has to be optimized for the varying pressure and temperature fields inside the unit. Modelling diluted gas flows in microchannels the influence of the mean free path of molecules has to be respected describing pressure drop and specific momentum of a micro-propulsion unit. With the molecule mass factor the density is given used for a five-equation-system modelling the momentum and heat diffusion inside a channel flow for higher Knudsen numbers. The five equations are transport equation for the three mean velocity components, the velocity standard deviation and the molecule collision rate. The present model does not base on the definition of a Dirichlet boundary condition. The momentum boundary condition is given by a shear stress function depending on the collision rate and the standard deviation square of the molecule velocity. With this new wall stress modelling method the slip velocity results from the computation of the transported parameters. The present model is validated computing Poiseuille and Couette flows with different Knudsen numbers. Showing the advantages of the present model the simulation results are compared with simulation results of the wall-distance depending diffusivity model of Lockerby and Reese and BGK results of a Lattice-Boltzmann simulation.

  5. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  6. Silicon-based wire electrode array for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Weihua; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shanshan; Fang, Xiaolei; Chen, Sanyuan; Gui, Qiang; Tang, Rongyu; Chen, Yuanfang; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongda

    2014-09-01

    Objectives. Metal-wire electrode arrays are widely used to record and stimulate neurons. Commonly, these devices are fabricated from a long insulated metal wire by cutting it into the proper length and using the cross-section as the electrode site. The assembly of a micro-wire electrode array with regular spacing is difficult. With the help of micro-machine technology, a silicon-based wire electrode array (SWEA) is proposed to simplify the assembling process and provide a wire-type electrode with tapered tips. Approach. Silicon wires with regular spacing coated with metal are generated from a silicon wafer through micro-fabrication and are ordered into a 3D array. A silicon wafer is cut into a comb-like structure with hexagonal teeth on both sides by anisotropic etching. To establish an array of silicon-based linear needles through isotropic wet etching, the diameters of these hexagonal teeth are reduced; their sharp edges are smoothed out and their tips are sharpened. The needle array is coated with a layer of parylene after metallization. The tips of the needles are then exposed to form an array of linear neural electrodes. With these linear electrode arrays, an array of area electrodes can be fabricated. Main results. A 6  ×  6 array of wire-type electrodes based on silicon is developed using this method. The time required to manually assemble the 3D array decreases significantly with the introduction of micro-fabricated 2D array. Meanwhile, the tip intervals in the 2D array are accurate and are controlled at no more than 1%. The SWEA is effective both in vitro and in vivo. Significance. Using this method, the SWEA can be batch-prepared in advance along with its parameters, such as spacing, length, and diameter. Thus, neural scientists can assemble proper electrode arrays in a short time.

  7. Autonomous micro and nano sensors for upstream oil and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David; Trybula, Walt

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the development of autonomous electronic micro and nanoscale sensor systems for very harsh downhole oilfield conditions and provides an overview of the operational requirements necessary to survive and make direct measurements of subsurface conditions. One of several significant developmental challenges is selecting appropriate technologies that are simultaneously miniaturize-able, integrate-able, harsh environment capable, and economically viable. The Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC) is employing a platform approach to developing and testing multi-chip, millimeter and micron-scale systems in a package at elevated temperature and pressure in API brine and oil analogs, with the future goal of miniaturized systems that enable the collection of previously unattainable data. The ultimate goal is to develop subsurface nanosensor systems that can be injected into oil and gas well bores, to gather and record data, providing an unparalleled level of direct reservoir characterization. This paper provides a status update on the research efforts and developmental successes at the AEC.

  8. Gold Nanoparticle Chemiresistor Arrays for Micro-Gas Chromatography Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, Elizabeth Laura

    Thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle (MPN) chemiresistors were studied as the sensing devices for micro-gas chromatography (microGC) systems. Because transport through chemiresistors is dominated by tunneling, they are highly sensitive. In order to improve their limit of detection, their fundamental noise was studied. Chemiresistors exhibit 1/f type noise where noise scales inversely with frequency. Chemiresistor noise was found to scale inversely with MPN film thickness. We lowered the noise prefactor of a 50x60 microm2 chemiresistor by coating a thick rather than monolayer MPN film. Electron beam induced crosslinking (EBIX) of the MPN film slightly reduced chemiresistor noise. A technique for patterning chemiresistor arrays with MPN films using EBIX was developed, and an array with four distinct MPNs was fabricated in an area ˜600 microm 2. This is the smallest chemiresistor array reported to date. Chemiresistors were exposed to vapors and provided differential sensitivities comparable to those from larger uncrosslinked chemiresistors. Chemiresistors were studied to assess their long term stability. Chemiresistors exhibited decreases in resistance over time that is likely caused by loss of MPN ligands. Temperature dependent current-voltage measurements verified the resistance change was not due to changes in the size of the MPN core. While resistance could change by orders of magnitude, vapor sensitivity did not show significant changes. Heating increased the change in resistance, but chemiresistors remained responsive after being held at 80°C for a cumulative 400 hours. It was unknown whether tunneling in the MPN film is through the highest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO) or lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). A new technique was explored to distinguish tunneling through the HOMO and LUMO by measuring the induced thermoelectric voltage caused by a temperature difference across the MPN film. For integration into a microGC system, we

  9. Impurity analyses of high-purity carbon monoxide gas using micro gas chromatography for development as a certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Takuro; Kato, Kenji

    2013-03-22

    High-purity carbon monoxide (CO) gas as a certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed using a micro gas chromatograph (micro-GC) with a micro thermal conductivity detector. The main reason to select the micro-GC was its compact size to provide a safe experimental environment. Thus, both the CO gas cylinder and the micro-GC were placed inside a draft shield with a limited small space. Peaks of several impurities were found in chromatograms of the micro-GC. The main impurities in the CO gas were helium, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. It was found that helium was the impurity of the highest concentration. High-accuracy calibration gas mixtures were used to construct calibration lines for the micro-GC. The mixtures were precisely prepared by the gravimetric blending method. Calibration lines had enough linearity and accuracy for quantitative analyses of the impurities. The values of detection limit of the impurities were 0.7-4μmol/mol. The purity of the high-purity CO gas was around 99.996%, which was the value estimated from the sum of the concentrations of the impurities. PMID:23415447

  10. Standalone ethanol micro-reformer integrated on silicon technology for onboard production of hydrogen-rich gas.

    PubMed

    Pla, D; Salleras, M; Morata, A; Garbayo, I; Gerbolés, M; Sabaté, N; Divins, N J; Casanovas, A; Llorca, J; Tarancón, A

    2016-08-01

    A novel design of a silicon-based micro-reformer for onboard hydrogen generation from ethanol is presented in this work. The micro-reactor is fully fabricated with mainstream MEMS technology and consists of an active low-thermal-mass structure suspended by an insulating membrane. The suspended structure includes an embedded resistive metal heater and an array of ca. 20k vertically aligned through-silicon micro-channels per square centimetre. Each micro-channel is 500 μm in length and 50 μm in diameter allowing a unique micro-reformer configuration that presents a total surface per projected area of 16 cm(2) cm(-2) and per volume of 320 cm(2) cm(-3). The walls of the micro-channels become the active surface of the micro-reformer when coated with a homogenous thin film of Rh-Pd/CeO2 catalyst. The steam reforming of ethanol under controlled temperature conditions (using the embedded heater) and using the micro-reformer as a standalone device are evaluated. Fuel conversion rates above 94% and hydrogen selectivity values of ca. 70% were obtained when using operation conditions suitable for application in micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs), i.e. 750 °C and fuel flows of 0.02 mlL min(-1) (enough to feed a one watt power source). PMID:27378399

  11. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  12. Storage sizing for embedding of local gas production in a micro gas grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkano, D.; Nefkens, W. J.; Scherpen, J. M. A.; Volkerts, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we study the optimal control of a micro grid of biogas producers. The paper considers the possibility to have a local storage device for each producer, who partly consumes his own production, i.e. prosumer. In addition, connected prosumers can sell stored gas to create revenue from it. An optimization model is employed to derive the size of storage device and to provide a pricing mechanism in an effort to value the stored gas. Taking into account physical grid constraints, the model is constructed in a centralized scheme of model predictive control. Case studies show that there is a relation between the demand and price profiles in terms of peaks and lows. The price profiles generally follow each other. The case studies are employed as well to to study the impacts of model parameters on deriving the storage size.

  13. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  14. Pulse-driven micro gas sensor fitted with clustered Pd/SnO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suematsu, Koichi; Shin, Yuka; Ma, Nan; Oyama, Tokiharu; Sasaki, Miyuki; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Kida, Tetsuya; Shimanoe, Kengo

    2015-08-18

    Real-time monitoring of specific gas concentrations with a compact and portable gas sensing device is required to sense potential health risk and danger from toxic gases. For such purposes, we developed an ultrasmall gas sensor device, where a micro sensing film was deposited on a micro heater integrated with electrodes fabricated by the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The developed device was operated in a pulse-heating mode to significantly reduce the heater power consumption and make the device battery-driven and portable. Using clustered Pd/SnO2 nanoparticles, we succeeded in introducing mesopores ranging from 10 to 30 nm in the micro gas sensing film (area: ϕ 150 μm) to detect large volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The micro sensor showed quick, stable, and high sensor responses to toluene at ppm (parts per million) concentrations at 300 °C even by operating the micro heater in a pulse-heating mode where switch-on and -off cycles were repeated at one-second intervals. The high performance of the micro sensor should result from the creation of efficient diffusion paths decorated with Pd sensitizers by using the clustered Pd/SnO2 nanoparticles. Hence we demonstrate that our pulse-driven micro sensor using nanostructured oxide materials holds promise as a battery-operable, portable gas sensing device. PMID:26196499

  15. Silicon Based Millimeter Wave and THz ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jixin; Hong, Wei; Tang, Hongjun; Yan, Pinpin; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guangqi; Hou, Debin; Wu, Ke

    In this paper, the research advances in silicon based millimeter wave and THz ICs in the State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves is reviewed, which consists of millimeter wave amplifiers, mixers, oscillators at Q, V and W and D band based on CMOS technology, and several research approaches of THz passive ICs including cavity and filter structures using SIW-like (Substrate Integrated Waveguide-like) guided wave structures based on CMOS and MEMs process. The design and performance of these components and devices are presented.

  16. Recognizing indoor formaldehyde in binary gas mixtures with a micro gas sensor array and a neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Pin; Tang, Zhenan; Wei, Guangfen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Zhengxing

    2007-09-01

    Low-concentration formaldehyde (HCHO) together with ethanol/toluene/acetone/α-pinene (as an interference gas of HCHO) is detected with a micro gas sensor array, composed of eight tin oxide (SnO2) thin film gas sensors with Au, Cu, Pt or Pd metal catalysts. The characteristics of the multi-dimensional signals from the eight sensors are evaluated. A multilayer neural network with an error backpropagation (BP) learning algorithm, plus the principal component analysis (PCA) technique, is implemented to recognize these indoor volatile organic compounds (VOC). The results show that the micro gas sensor array, plus the multilayer neural network, is very effective in recognizing 0.06 ppm HCHO in single gas component and in binary gas mixtures, toluene/ethanol/α-pinene with small relative error.

  17. In2O3-based micro gas sensor for detecting NO x gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bum-Joon; Song, In-Gyu; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2014-03-01

    In this study, NO x micro gas sensors for monitoring the indoor atmosphere of automobile were fabricated using MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology and a sol-gel process. The sensing electrode and micro heater were designed to have a co-planar typed structure in a Pt thin film layer. The thermal characteristics of a micro heater array were analyzed using a finite element method (FEM). The chip size of the gas sensor was approximately 2 mm × 2 mm. Indium oxide as a sensing material for NO x gas was synthesized by a sol-gel process with indium isopropoxide as a precursor. Field emission Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction showed that particle size of the synthesized In2O3 was approximately 17-45 nm. The maximum gas sensitivity as the relative resistance ( R s = R gas / R air ) was observed at 275°C with a value of 8.0 at 1 ppm NO2 gas. The response (80% saturation) and recovery times were within 1 min. The sensing properties of NO2 gas exhibited linear behavior with increasing gas concentration. The sensing mechanism of the gas sensor was explained by the variations in the electron depletion layers and the adsorption of gas molecules on the In2O3 particle surface. These results suggest that in the future, MEMS-based gas sensors can be used as automotive-exhaust-gas sensors.

  18. Gas holdup in cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Jiongtian; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Hongxiang; Deng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The present work has been carried out to investigate the effect of process variables on gas holdup and develop an empirical equation and a neural network model for online process control of the gas holdup based on the operating variables. In this study, the effect of process variables (nozzle diameter, circulation pressure, aeration rate, and frother dosage) on gas holdup in a cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column of an air/oily wastewater system was investigated. Gas holdup was estimated using a pressure difference method and an empirical equation was proposed to predict gas holdup. A general regression neural network (GRNN) model was also introduced to predict gas holdup for the cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column. The predictions from the empirical equation and the GRNN are in good agreement with the experiment data for gas holdup, while the GRNN provides higher accuracy and stability compared with that of the empirical equation. PMID:26293176

  19. Gas/liquid sensing via chemotaxis of Euglena cells confined in an isolated micro-aquarium.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate on-chip gas/liquid sensing by using the chemotaxis of live bacteria (Euglena gracilis) confined in an isolated micro-aquarium, and gas/liquid permeation through porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The sensing chip consisted of one closed micro-aquarium and two separated bypass microchannels along the perimeter of the micro-aquarium. Test gas/liquid and reference samples were introduced into the two individual microchannels separately, and the gas/liquid permeated through the PDMS walls and dissolved in the micro-aquarium water, resulting in a chemical concentration gradient in the micro-aquarium. By employing the closed micro-aquarium isolated from sample flows, we succeeded in measuring the chemotaxis of Euglena for a gas substance quantitatively, which cannot be achieved with the conventional flow-type or hydro-gel-type microfluidic devices. We found positive (negative) chemotaxis for CO2 concentrations below (above) 15%, with 64 ppm as the minimum concentration affecting the cells. We also observed chemotaxis for ethanol and H2O2. By supplying culture medium via the microchannels, the Euglena culture remained alive for more than 2 months. The sensing chip is thus useful for culturing cells and using them for environmental toxicity/nutrition studies by monitoring their motion. PMID:23934095

  20. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Silicon-Based Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis S.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and monolithic silicon nitride (Si3N4), are prime candidates for hot section structural components of next generation gas turbine engines. Silicon-based ceramics, however, suffer from rapid surface recession in combustion environments due to volatilization of the silica scale via reaction with water vapor, a major product of combustion. Therefore, application of silicon-based ceramic components in the hot section of advanced gas turbine engines requires development of a reliable method to protect the ceramic from environmental attack. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is considered a logical approach to achieve protection and CP long-term stability. The first generation EBC consisted of two layers, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) bond coat and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ, ZrO2-8 Wt.% Y2O3) top coat. Second generation EBCs, with substantially improved performance compared with the first generation EBC, were developed in the NASA High Speed Research-Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR-EPM) Program. The first generation EBC consisted of two layers, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) bond coat and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ, ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3) top coat. Second generation EBCs, with substantially improved performance compared with the first generation EBC, were developed in the NASA High Speed Research-Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR-EPM) Program (5). They consist of three layers, a silicon first bond coat, a mullite or a mullite + BSAS (BaO(1-x)-SrO(x)-Al2O3-2SiO2) second bond coat, and a BSAS top coat. The EPM EBCs were applied on SiC/SiC CMC combustor liners in three Solar Turbines (San Diego, CA) Centaur 50s gas turbine engines. The combined operation of the three engines has accumulated over 24,000 hours without failure (approximately 1,250 C maximum combustor liner temperature), with the engine in Texaco, Bakersfield, CA, accumulating about 14,000 hours. As the

  1. Gas transport by thermal transpiration in micro-channels -- A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Hudson, M.L.; Potter, D.L.; Bartel, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    A reliable micro gas pump is an essential element to the development of many micro-systems for chemical gas analyses. At Sandia, the authors are exploring a different pumping mechanism, gas transport by thermal transpiration. Thermal transpiration refers to the rarefied gas dynamics developed in a micro-channel with a longitudinal temperature gradient. To investigate the potential of thermal transpiration for gas pumping in micro-systems, the authors have performed simulations and model analysis to design micro-devices and to assess their design performance before the fabrication process. The effort is to apply ICARUS (a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code developed at Sandia) to characterize the fluid transport and evaluate the design performance. The design being considered has two plenums at different temperatures (hot and cold) separated by a micro-channel of 0.1 micron wide and 1 micron long. The temperature difference between the two plenums is 30 kelvin. ICARUS results, a quasi-steady analysis, predicts a net flow through the micro-channel with a velocity magnitude of about 0.4 m/s due to temperature gradient at the wall (thermal creep flow) at the early time. Later as the pressure builds up in the hot plenum, flow is reversed. Eventually when the system reaches steady state equilibrium, the net flow becomes zero. The thermal creep effect is compensated by the thermo-molecular pressure effect. This result demonstrates that it is important to include the thermo-molecular pressure effect when designing a pumping mechanism based on thermal transpiration. The DSMC technique can model this complex thermal transpiration problem.

  2. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; van Loon, R. V. A.; Brunets, I.; Schmitz, J.; Polman, A.

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  3. Preconcentration modeling for the optimization of a micro gas preconcentrator applied to environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Camara, Malick; Breuil, Philippe; Briand, Danick; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Pijolat, Christophe; de Rooij, Nico F

    2015-04-21

    This paper presents the optimization of a micro gas preconcentrator (μ-GP) system applied to atmospheric pollution monitoring, with the help of a complete modeling of the preconcentration cycle. Two different approaches based on kinetic equations are used to illustrate the behavior of the micro gas preconcentrator for given experimental conditions. The need for high adsorption flow and heating rate and for low desorption flow and detection volume is demonstrated in this paper. Preliminary to this optimization, the preconcentration factor is discussed and a definition is proposed. PMID:25810264

  4. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration. PMID:19173043

  5. Silicon based microfluidic cell for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragwanath, A. J.; Swift, G. P.; Dai, D.; Gallant, A. J.; Chamberlain, J. M.

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the design, fabrication and testing of a silicon based, microfluidic cell, for transmission terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the device is tested through a range of experiments involving primary alcohol/water mixtures. The dielectric properties of these solutions are subsequently extracted using a Nelder-Mead search algorithm, and are in good agreement with literature values obtained via alternative techniques. Quantities in the order of 2 μmol can be easily distinguished for primary alcohols in solution, even with the subwavelength optical path lengths used. A further display of the device sensitivity is shown through the analysis of commercial whiskeys, where there are clear, detectable differences between samples. Slight absorption variations were identified between samples of the same commercial brand, owing to a 2.5% difference in their alcoholic content. Results from data taken on subsequent days after system realignment are also presented, confirming the robustness of the technique, and the data extraction algorithm used. One final experiment, showing the possible use of this device to analyze aqueous biological samples is detailed; where biotin, a molecule known for its specific terahertz absorptions, is analyzed in solution. The device sensitivity is once again displayed, where quantities of 3 nmol can be clearly detected between samples.

  6. Passivation of micro-strip gas chambers with an interstitial germanium coating

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, J.; Knoll, G.F.; Amos, N.

    1996-12-31

    Micro-strip gas chambers (MSGCs) were constructed in the Solid-State Electronics Laboratory of the University of Michigan and their performance was studied. Many efforts have been made in the past to construct MSGCs that yield high absolute gas gain and stable gas gain. Introducing a thin germanium layer has been effective for passivation but difficulties associated with the poor adhesiveness of the thin layer have been a serious obstacle. This paper reports on a new method used to overcome these difficulties. Unlike the conventional coating method the thin germanium layer was successfully deposited between the strip lines. This technique requires a careful geometric alignment of a second photomask with the original micro-strip structure. The resulting detector performance was noteworthy and an absolute gas gain of 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 4} was easily achieved by the new chamber. The chamber`s gain instability was also reduced significantly compared with those without interstitial coating.

  7. The fabrication of all-silicon micro gas chromatography columns using gold diffusion eutectic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radadia, A. D.; Salehi-Khojin, A.; Masel, R. I.; Shannon, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature programming of gas chromatography (GC) separation columns accelerates the elution rate of chemical species through the column, increasing the speed of analysis, and hence making it a favorable technique to speedup separations in microfabricated GCs (micro-GC). Temperature-programmed separations would be preferred in an all-silicon micro-column compared to a silicon-Pyrex® micro-column given that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of silicon is 2 orders of magnitude higher than Pyrex®. This paper demonstrates how to fabricate all-silicon micro-columns that can withstand the temperature cycling required for temperature-programmed separations. The columns were sealed using a novel bonding process where they were first bonded using a gold eutectic bond, then annealed at 1100 °C to allow gold diffusion into silicon and form what we call a gold diffusion eutectic bond. The gold diffusion eutectic-bonded micro-columns when examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and blade insertion techniques showed bonding strength comparable to the previously reported anodic-bonded columns. Gas chromatography-based methane injections were also used as a novel way to investigate proper sealing between channels. A unique methane elution peak at various carrier gas inlet pressures demonstrated the suitability of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded channels as micro-GC columns. The application of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded all-silicon micro-columns to temperature-programmed separations (120 °C min-1) was demonstrated with the near-baseline separation of n-C6 to n-C12 alkanes in 35 s.

  8. Three dimensional studies of particle failure in silicon based composite electrodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Joseph; Sun, Ke; Huang, Meng; Lambros, John; Dillon, Shen; Chasiotis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Silicon based composite electrodes for lithium ion batteries are of significant interest because of their potential to be high capacity alternatives to the commonly used graphitic carbon anodes. A drawback to their use, however, is the Si particle debonding and fracture that occurs as a result of the volumetric expansion by the lithium host particles upon lithiation of the anode electrode. We use X-ray micro computed tomography to visualize the evolution of the internal microstructure of a silicon-based electrode before and after four lithiation steps during the first half cycle of the cell. We develop a novel threshold edge detect method to perform 3D volumetric measurements of silicon particle expansion. According to our results, 100% lithiation of the composite anode resulted in up to 290% volume expansion of individual Si particles. Furthermore, the global and localized image intensity histogram profiles from 3D data were used to analyze the silicon particle X-ray attenuation effects as a function of lithiation: a decreasing attenuation with lithiation and the propagation of the reaction front through a core-shell process between the original state and 25% lithiation of the silicon-based electrode have been observed.

  9. Characteristics of electrostatic gas micro-pump with integrated polyimide passive valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeahyeong; Yeom, Junghoon; Mensing, Glennys; Flachsbart, Bruce; Shannon, Mark A.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of electrostatic gas micro-pumps integrated with polyimide check valves. Touch-mode capacitance actuation, enabled by a fixed silicon electrode and a metal/polyimide diaphragm, creates the suction and push-out of the ambient gas; the gas flow is rectified by the check valves located at the inlet and outlet of the pump. The fabricated pumps were tested with various actuation voltages at different frequencies and duty cycles; an emphasis was placed on investigating the effect of valve flow conductance on the gas pumping characteristics. The pump with higher valve conductance could increase the operating frequency of the pump and affect the pumping characteristics from a pulsating flow to a continuous flow, leading to a higher gas flow rate. This electrostatic pump has a flow control resolution of 1 µL min-1 it could generate a gas flow up to 106 µL min-1.

  10. Volatile Reaction Products From Silicon-Based Ceramics in Combustion Environments Identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics and composites are prime candidates for use as components in the hot sections of advanced aircraft engines. These materials must have long-term durability in the combustion environment. Because water vapor is always present as a major product of combustion in the engine environment, its effect on the durability of silicon-based ceramics must be understood. In combustion environments, silicon-based ceramics react with water vapor to form a surface silica (SiO2) scale. This SiO2 scale, in turn, has been found to react with water vapor to form volatile hydroxides. Studies to date have focused on how water vapor reacts with high-purity silicon carbide (SiC) and SiO2 in model combustion environments. Because the combustion environment in advanced aircraft engines is expected to contain about 10-percent water vapor at 10-atm total pressure, the durability of SiC and SiO2 in gas mixtures containing 0.1- to 1-atm water vapor is of interest. The reactions of SiC and SiO2 with water vapor were monitored by measuring weight changes of sample coupons in a 0.5-atm water vapor/0.5-atm oxygen gas mixture with thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. Self-Powered Triboelectric Micro Liquid/Gas Flow Sensor for Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Hengyu; Zheng, Jiangeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Liu, Guanlin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-23

    Liquid and gas flow sensors are important components of the micro total analysis systems (μTAS) for modern analytical sciences. In this paper, we proposed a self-powered triboelectric microfluidic sensor (TMS) by utilizing the signals produced from the droplet/bubble via the capillary and the triboelectrification effects on the liquid/solid interface for real-time liquid and gas flow detection. By alternating capillary with different diameters, the sensor's detecting range and sensitivity can be adjusted. Both the relationship between the droplet/bubble and capillary size, and the output signal of the sensor are systematically studied. By demonstrating the monitoring of the transfusion process for a patient and the gas flow produced from an injector, it shows that TMS has a great potential in building a self-powered micro total analysis system. PMID:27490518

  12. Plasma-Sprayed Refractory Oxide Coatings on Silicon-Base Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, Surendra

    1997-01-01

    Silicon-base ceramics are promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as heat exchangers, gas turbines and advanced internal combustion engines. Composites based on these materials are leading candidates for combustor materials for HSCT gas turbine engines. These materials possess a combination of excellent physical and mechanical properties at high temperatures, for example, high strength, high toughness, high thermal shock resistance, high thermal conductivity, light weight and excellent oxidation resistance. However, environmental durability can be significantly reduced in certain conditions such as when molten salts, H2 or water vapor are present. The oxidation resistance of silicon-base materials is provided by SiO2 protective layer. Molten salt reacts with SiO2 and forms a mixture of SiO2 and liquid silicate at temperatures above 800C. Oxygen diffuses more easily through the chemically altered layer, resulting in a catastrophic degradation of the substrate. SiC and Si3N4 are not stable in pure H2 and decompose to silicon and gaseous species such as CH4, SiH, SiH4, N2, and NH3. Water vapor is known to slightly increase the oxidation rate of SiC and Si3N4. Refractory oxides such as alumina, yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttria and mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2) possess excellent environmental durability in harsh conditions mentioned above. Therefore, refractory oxide coatings on silicon-base ceramics can substantially improve the environmental durability of these materials by acting as a chemical reaction barrier. These oxide coatings can also serve as a thermal barrier. The purpose of this research program has been to develop refractory oxide chemical/thermal barrier coatings on silicon-base ceramics to provide extended temperature range and lifetime to these materials in harsh environments.

  13. Peristaltic Micro-pump Generated from Heating Trapped Gas in a Superhydrophobic Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hann, Sungyun; Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Study of micro-pumps has been actively pursued as they may be integrated into portable fluidic systems. Since one major application of developing portable fluidic devices is in medical drug delivery systems, the study of valveless micro-peristaltic pumps has attracted many researchers, particularly due to its low contamination risk of the working fluid. However, conventional peristaltic micro-pumps involve complex fabrication steps, including alignment of multiple device layers. The purpose of this research is to design a low cost, single layer peristaltic pump which utilizes thermal expansion of gas bubbles trapped in the microchannel walls. The microchannel walls are corrugated with a high roughness factor to prevent water from protruding into the gaps, thus rendering the surface superhydrophobic. The gas pockets are heated from the side walls, where the microheaters are fabricated by flowing molten metal into satellite microchannels and then solidifying them. We expect that the expanding gas pockets will act as a series of valves and that the fluid flow can be generated by sequentially heating the gas pockets along the microchannel.

  14. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  15. Transient Flow Dynamics in Optical Micro Well Involving Gas Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.; Chen, C. P.; Jenkins, A.; Spearing, S.; Monaco, L. A.; Steele, A.; Flores, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) team at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center is utilizing Lab-On-a-Chip to support technology development specifically for Space Exploration. In this paper, we investigate the transient two-phase flow patterns in an optic well configuration with an entrapped bubble through numerical simulation. Specifically, the filling processes of a liquid inside an expanded chamber that has bubbles entrapped. Due to the back flow created by channel expansion, the entrapped bubbles tend to stay stationary at the immediate downstream of the expansion. Due to the huge difference between the gas and liquid densities, mass conservation issues associated with numerical diffusion need to be specially addressed. The results are presented in terms of the movement of the bubble through the optic well. Bubble removal strategies are developed that involve only pressure gradients across the optic well. Results show that for the bubble to be moved through the well, pressure pulsations must be utilized in order to create pressure gradients across the bubble itself.

  16. X-ray Polarimetry with a Micro-Pattern Gas Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joe

    2005-01-01

    Topics covered include: Science drivers for X-ray polarimetry; Previous X-ray polarimetry designs; The photoelectric effect and imaging tracks; Micro-pattern gas polarimeter design concept. Further work includes: Verify results against simulator; Optimize pressure and characterize different gases for a given energy band; Optimize voltages for resolution and sensitivity; Test meshes with 80 micron pitch; Characterize ASIC operation; and Quantify quantum efficiency for optimum polarization sensitivity.

  17. Fabrication of a gas flow device consisting of micro-jet pump and flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Dau, Van T.; Otake, Tomonori; Dinh, Thien X.; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2008-12-01

    A gas-flow device consisting of a valveless micro jet pump and flow sensor has been designed and fabricated using a Si micromachining process. The valveless micro pump is composed of a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm actuator and flow channels. The design of the valvless pump focuses on a crosss junction formed by the neck of the pump chamber and one outlet and two opposite inlet channnels. The structure allows differences in the fluidic resistance and fluidic momentum inside the channels during each pump vibration cycle, which leads to the gas flow being rectified without valves. Before the Si micro-pump was developed, a prototype of it was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a conventional machining techinique, and experiments on it confirmed the working principles underlying the pump. The Si micro-pump was designed and fabricated based on these working principles. The Si pump was composed of a Si flow channel plate and top and botom covers of PMMA. The flow channels were easily fabricated by using a silicon etching process. To investigate the effects of the step nozzle structure on the gas flow rate, two types of pumps with different channel depths (2D- and 3D-nozzle structures) were designed, and flow simulations were done using ANSYS-Fluent software. The simulations and excperimental data revealed that the 3D-nozzle structure is more advantageous than the 2D-nozzle structure. A flow rate of 4.3 ml/min was obtained for the pump with 3D-nozzle structure when the pump was driven at a resonant frequency of 7.9 kHz by a sinusoidal voltage of 40Vpp. A hot wire was fabricated as a gas-flow sensor near the outlet port on the Si wafer.

  18. Efficient gas sensitivity in mixed bismuth ferrite micro (cubes) and nano (plates) structures

    SciTech Connect

    Waghmare, Shivaji D.; Jadhav, Vijaykumar V.; Gore, Shaym K.; Yoon, Seog-Joon; Ambade, Swapnil B.; Lokhande, B.J.; Mane, Rajaram S.; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Micro (cubes) structure embedded in nano (plates) of bismuth ferrite was prepared by a chemical method. ► These structures were characterized by XRD and SEM. ► LPG, CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 4} gases were exposed. ► Properties related to gas sensors were measured and reported. -- Abstract: Mixed micro (cubes) and nano (plates) structures of bismuth ferrite (BFO) have been synthesized by a simple and cost-effective wet-chemical method. Structural, morphological and phase confirmation characteristics are measured using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. The digital FE-SEM photo-images of BFO sample confirmed an incubation of discrete micro-cubes into thin and regularly placed large number of nano-plates. The bismuth ferrite, with mixed structures, films show considerable performance when used in liquefied petroleum (LPG), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and ammonium (NH{sub 3}) gas sensors application. Different chemical entities in LPG have made it more efficient with higher sensitivity, recovery and response times compared to CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases. Furthermore, effect of palladium surface treatment on the gas sensitivity and the charge transfer resistances of BFO mixed structures is investigated and reported.

  19. Xenon Additives Detection in Helium Micro-Plasma Gas Analytical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Electron energy spectra of Xe atoms at He filled micro-plasma afterglow gas analyzer were observed using Collisional Electron Spectroscopy (CES) method [1]. According to CES, diffusion path confinement for characteristic electrons makes it possible to measure electrons energy distribution function (EEDF) at a high (up to atmospheric) gas pressure. Simple geometry micro-plasma CES sensor consists of two plane parallel electrodes detector and microprocessor-based acquisition system providing current-voltage curve measurement in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. Electron energy spectra are deduced as 2-nd derivative of the measured current-voltage curve to select characteristic peaks of the species to be detected. Said derivatives were obtained by the smoothing-differentiating procedure using spline least-squares approximation of a current-voltage curve. Experimental results on CES electron energy spectra at 10-40 Torr in pure He and in admixture with 0.3% Xe are discussed. It demonstrates a prototype of the new miniature micro-plasma sensors for industry, safety and healthcare applications. [1]. A.A.Kudryavtsev, A.B.Tsyganov. US Patent 7,309,992. Gas analysis method and ionization detector for carrying out said method, issued December 18, 2007.

  20. Packaging of a silicon-based biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velten, Thomas; Biehl, Margit; Haberer, Werner; Koch, Timo; Ortiz, Pedro; Keegan, Neil; Spoors, Julia; Hedley, John; McNeil, Calum

    2009-02-01

    We present a sophisticated method for the packaging of a micro-electro-mechanical biochip, which leaves the sensitive surface area of the chip uncovered to allow for direct contact to aqueous environment. Together with adequate integration in a fluidic cartridge, the packaging method allows for the realization of a lab-on-chip (LOC). A fluidic interface to the cartridge is provided as well as electrical interfaces to the biochip electronics located in a readout instrument. The biochip features a central membrane and electrodes, both located in the central chip area, and bond pads distributed along the rim of the chip. The packaging method ensures a hermetic separation between the membrane sensing area interfaced to liquids and the bond pad area. Challenging was the fact that both, the freely moving membrane and the bond pads for electrical interconnection are positioned very close to each other on the same chip surface area. We mounted the biochip into a recess of a rigid printed circuit board and electrically connected it to the latter with a proprietary MicroFlex Interconnection (MFI) technology. A customized coating method using a specially shaped silicone casting-mold ensured a very thin, hermetic encapsulation, which left the membrane safe and freely accessible.

  1. Treatment to Control Adhesion of Silicone-Based Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Seals are used to facilitate the joining of two items, usually temporarily. At some point in the future, it is expected that the items will need to be separated. This innovation enables control of the adhesive properties of silicone-based elastomers. The innovation may also be effective on elastomers other than the silicone-based ones. A technique has been discovered that decreases the level of adhesion of silicone- based elastomers to negligible levels. The new technique causes less damage to the material compared to alternative adhesion mitigation techniques. Silicone-based elastomers are the only class of rubber-like materials that currently meet NASA s needs for various seal applications. However, silicone-based elastomers have natural inherent adhesive properties. This stickiness can be helpful, but it can frequently cause problems as well, such as when trying to get items apart. In the past, seal adhesion was not always adequately addressed, and has caused in-flight failures where seals were actually pulled from their grooves, preventing subsequent spacecraft docking until the seal was physically removed from the flange via an extravehicular activity (EVA). The primary method used in the past to lower elastomer seal adhesion has been the application of some type of lubricant or grease to the surface of the seal. A newer method uses ultraviolet (UV) radiation a mixture of UV wavelengths in the range of near ultraviolet (NUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths.

  2. Characterizing the Biological and Geochemical Architecture of Hydrothermally Derived Sedimentary Deposits: Coupling Micro Raman Spectroscopy with Noble Gas Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, D. M.; Conrad, P. G.; Steele, A.; Fries, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical species in cherts and glass fragments were analyzed using micro Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with measurements of heavy noble gas isotopes to characterize hydrothermally derived sedimentary environments.

  3. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  4. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples. PMID:27131686

  5. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N.; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-01-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir. PMID:26310236

  6. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N.; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-08-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir.

  7. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-01-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir. PMID:26310236

  8. Evolution of Bubbles through Gas Injection from a Micro-Tube into Liquid Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Rahimi, Payam; Nobes, David

    2008-11-01

    Generation of small-size bubbles is of importance in many processes such as chemical, medical and food industries. The most common method of bubble generation is injection of gas from an orifice into the liquid phase. In spite of simplicity of this method, appropriate conditions should exist to avoid bubble growth and obtain required small-size bubbles. Thorough understanding of the bubble formation and growth can reveal the required conditions and ensure detachment of the bubbles from the orifice with desired timing to control their size. In this work, evolution of bubbles from a micro-size gas injection tube into liquid cross-flow is investigated. Special attention has been devoted to optimize the conditions to generate micro-size bubbles. Specifically, the influence of gas injection tube size and location, gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and the geometry of the mixing chamber on the bubbles evolution is studied. High-speed shadowgraphy technique is applied to investigate bubbles size and shape. A Particle Tracking Velocimetry algorithm is also applied to calculate bubbles velocity. The velocity field of the liquid flow surrounding the bubbles is also characterized using a Mirco-Stereo-Particle Image Velocimetry technique.

  9. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Amelia; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick

    2015-10-01

    A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls. For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  10. Integration of a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine (UmuGT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, Florin

    2005-12-01

    Wave rotor technology has shown a significant potential for performance improvement of thermodynamic cycles. The wave rotor is an unsteady flow machine that utilizes shock waves to transfer energy from a high energy fluid to a low energy fluid, increasing both the temperature and the pressure of the low energy fluid. Used initially as a high pressure stage for a gas turbine locomotive engine, the wave rotor was commercialized only as a supercharging device for internal combustion engines, but recently there is a stronger research effort on implementing wave rotors as topping units or pressure gain combustors for gas turbines. At the same time, Ultra Micro Gas Turbines (UmuGT) are expected to be a next generation of power source for applications from propulsion to power generation, from aerospace industry to electronic industry. Starting in 1995, with the MIT "Micro Gas Turbine" project, the mechanical engineering research world has explored more and more the idea of "Power MEMS". Microfabricated turbomachinery like turbines, compressors, pumps, but also electric generators, heat exchangers, internal combustion engines and rocket engines have been on the focus list of researchers for the past 10 years. The reason is simple: the output power is proportional to the mass flow rate of the working fluid through the engine, or the cross-sectional area while the mass or volume of the engine is proportional to the cube of the characteristic length, thus the power density tends to increase at small scales (Power/Mass=L -1). This is the so-called "cube square law". This work investigates the possibilities of incorporating a wave rotor to an UmuGT and discusses the advantages of wave rotor as topping units for gas turbines, especially at microscale. Based on documented wave rotor efficiencies at larger scale and subsidized by both, a gasdynamic model that includes wall friction, and a CFD model, the wave rotor compression efficiency at microfabrication scale could be estimated

  11. Direct observations of gas-hydrate formation in natural porous media on the micro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouachi, M.; Sell, K.; Falenty, A.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.; Pinzer, B.; Saenger, E. H.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Gas hydrates (GH) are crystalline, inclusion compounds consisting of hydrogen-bonded water network encaging small gas molecules such as methane, ethane, CO2, etc (Sloan and Koh 2008). Natural gas hydrates are found worldwide in marine sediments and permafrost regions as a result of a reaction of biogenic or thermogenic gas with water under elevated pressure. Although a large amount of research on GH has been carried out over the years, the micro-structural aspects of GH growth, and in particular the contacts with the sedimentary matrix as well as the details of the distribution remain largely speculative. The present study was undertaken to shed light onto the well-established but not fully understood seismic anomalies, in particular the unusual attenuation of seismic waves in GH-bearing sediments, which may well be linked to micro-structural features. Observations of in-situ GH growth have been performed in a custom-build pressure cell (operating pressures up to several bar) mounted at the TOMCAT beam line of SLS/ PSI. In order to provide sufficient absorption contrast between phases and reduce pressure requirements for the cell we have used Xe instead of CH4. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first direct observation of GH growth in natural porous media with sub-micron spatial resolution and gives insight into the nucleation location and growth process of GH. The progress of the formation of sI Xe-hydrate in natural quartz sand was observed with a time-resolution of several minutes; the runs were conducted with an excess of a free-gas phase and show that the nucleation starts at the gas-water interface. Initially, a GH film is formed at this interface with a typical thickness of several μm; this film may well be permeable to gas as suggested in the past - which would explain the rapid transport of gas molecules for further conversion of water to hydrate, completed in less than 20 min. Clearly, initially the growth is directed mainly into the

  12. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  13. Effect of H2 and CO contents in syngas during combustion using Micro Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. F.; Boosroh, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic gas or syngas is produced from the gasification process. Its main compositions are hydrogen, H2; carbon monoxide, CO; methane, CH4; carbon dioxide, CO2 and nitrogen, N2. Syngas is a substitute for the depleting natural gas (80-90%.vol. CH4). Natural gas is combusted in gas turbine in gas-fired power plant to produce electricity. However, combustion of syngas using gas turbine is expected to show different behavior compared to natural gas combustion. This is because of H2 and CO contents in syngas have higher adiabatic flame temperature than CH4. In this study, different quality of syngas with different contents of H2 (0.6-0.8 %.vol.) and CO (1-3 %.vol.) were combusted using 30kW Micro Gas Turbine (MGT). Performances of different syngas quality were studied using NOx, CO, CO2 emissions and combustion efficiency parameters. NOx and CO are the main pollutants from the combustion process. NOx emissions were the highest for syngas with H2 contents of 0.8 %.vol. and CO contents of 3 %.vol. CO emissions were in the range of 220-310 ppm for all the tested syngas. While, CO2 emissions were in the range of 0.96-1.06 % for all the tested syngas. Combustion efficiencies were reduced for syngas with CO contents of 1 %.vol. and H2 contents of 0.6-0.8 %.vol. This is most probably due to the dilution effect of N2 in syngas.

  14. Development of gas micro-structure detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, S. D.; Belolipetskiy, S. V.; Bertsch, D. L.; Catelli, J. R.; Crawford, H.; Daniels, W. M.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fenker, H.; Gossan, B.; Hartman, R. C.; Hutchins, J. B.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Lindenstruth, V.; Martin, M. D.; Mitchell, J. W.; Pitts, W. K.; Simrall, J. H.; Sreekumar, P.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Visser, G.; Walsh, K. M.

    1997-05-01

    Large area gas micro-structure detectors are being developed for the next generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope as part of NASA's SR&T program to support new technologies. These low-cost detectors are produced by laser micromachining of metalized polyimide films layered on carbon fiber composite substrates. This integrated detector and support design reduces the detector complexity and associated assembly costs. Accomplishments to date include testing of a 32 channel ASIC for the front-end electronics and integration of functional hardware into prototype detectors for tests of the FPGA readout system and event display software.

  15. Evaluating the Effect of Syngas Composition on Micro gas turbine Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fareeza, N.; Tan, E. S.; Kumaran, P.; Indra, T. M.; Fadzilah, N.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2016-03-01

    Syngas in nature can be derived from many sources for instance biomass, natural gas and any hydrocarbon feedstock. Therefore it can replace our reliance on the fossil fuel in future, as they are finite. This research covers the analysis on the combustion efficiency on eight syngas composition that have various hydrogen and carbon moxide (H2/CO) ratio and the comparisons on the nitric oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Each syngas was tested from 0kW load to 3kW load and all the data was taken upon the micro gas turbine (MGT) reaching stable and steady state conditions. It was found that high amount of hydrogen content in syngas lead to an increase in the combustion efficiency and emits more NOx emissions. CO emissions were released when the combustion efficiency is low and increase with the CO content in the syngas.

  16. Experimental Investigation of A Twin Shaft Micro Gas-Turbine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadig, Hussain; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ibrahim, Idris

    2013-06-01

    Due to the fast depletion of fossil fuels and its negative impact on the environment, more attention has been concentrated to find new resources, policies and technologies, which meet the global needs with regard to fuel sustainability and emissions. In this paper, as a step to study the effect of burning low calorific value fuels on gas-turbine performance; a 50 kW slightly pressurized non-premixed tubular combustor along with turbocharger based twin shaft micro gas-turbine was designed and fabricated. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the system using LPG fuel. The tests include the analysis of the temperature profile, pressure and combustor efficiency as well as air fuel ratio and speed of the second turbine. The tests showed a stable operation with acceptable efficiency, air fuel ratio, and temperature gradient for the single and twin shaft turbines.

  17. Micro computed tomography and CFD simulation of drop deposition on gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, M.; Santini, M.; Lorenzi, M.; Knisel, V.; Fest-Santini, S.

    2014-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical power generation system which may achieve high energy efficiencies with environmentally friendly emissions. Among the different types, Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) seem at present one of the most promising choices. A very important component of a PEMFC is the gas diffusion layer (GDL), which has the primary role of managing water in the cell, allowing reactant gases transport to the catalyst layer while keeping the membrane correctly hydrated and preventing electrode flooding. Therefore, GDLs have to be porous and very hydrophobic. Carbon clothes or carbon papers coated with a hydrophobizing agent - typically a fluoropolymer - are used. Given the complex chemistry and morphology of the GDLs, wettability analyses on them present some critical issues when using the conventional contact angle measurement techniques. In this paper, the deposition of a drop on a GDL (produced using polytetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoroalcoxy vinyl ether as the fluorinated polymer) was investigated by means of micro computed tomography (microCT) and numerical simulation. The microCT facility operational at the University of Bergamo was used to acquire a 3D tomography of a water drop deposed on a sample GDL. The reconstructed drop dataset allows thorough understanding of the real drop shape, of its contact area and contact line. The GDL dataset was used to create a realistic mesh for the numerical simulation of the drop deposition, which was performed using the OpenFOAM® interFOAM solver.

  18. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  19. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-09

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  20. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Yonemura, Shigeru; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Miki, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  1. [Research on improving sensitivity of the characteristic spectrum in micro-gas monitor].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun-qiang; Lu, Xu-tao

    2010-07-01

    In order to realize the indoor micro noxious gas real-time monitor, and enhance measuring accuracy based on the characteristic spectrum examination method, a characteristic wavelengths filtration window was designed, in which the container is full with the highly concentrated testing gas. The container with the highly concentrated testing gas was used as the filtration window, the standard air as the reference window, the air chamber sufficient testing gas for testing density. The experiment demonstrated that using the WQF-520-FTIR infrared spectroscope to obtain the infrared absorption spectrum of dipropyl sebacate, there were mainly four characteristic wavelength lines: 3.385 26, 3.417.64, 5.797 11, and 8.561 65 microm, and the corresponding extinction was 1.520 0, 1.542 1, 2.431 8 and 1.352 6 respectively. The smallest content examined was 50 ppb, but using the characteristic wavelengths filtration window, the method could realize the 10(-4) nm magnitude alignment. The sensitivity was enhanced nearly 10 times, and the characteristic wavelengths filtration window method has the merits of high sensitivity, no discontinuity, real-time examination, and so on. PMID:20827993

  2. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation. PMID:27007287

  3. On-chip and freestanding elastic carbon films for micro-supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, P.; Lethien, C.; Pinaud, S.; Brousse, K.; Laloo, R.; Turq, V.; Respaud, M.; Demortière, A.; Daffos, B.; Taberna, P. L.; Chaudret, B.; Gogotsi, Y.; Simon, P.

    2016-02-01

    Integration of electrochemical capacitors with silicon-based electronics is a major challenge, limiting energy storage on a chip. We describe a wafer-scale process for manufacturing strongly adhering carbide-derived carbon films and interdigitated micro-supercapacitors with embedded titanium carbide current collectors, fully compatible with current microfabrication and silicon-based device technology. Capacitance of those films reaches 410 farads per cubic centimeter/200 millifarads per square centimeter in aqueous electrolyte and 170 farads per cubic centimeter/85 millifarads per square centimeter in organic electrolyte. We also demonstrate preparation of self-supported, mechanically stable, micrometer-thick porous carbon films with a Young’s modulus of 14.5 gigapascals, with the possibility of further transfer onto flexible substrates. These materials are interesting for applications in structural energy storage, tribology, and gas separation.

  4. On-chip and freestanding elastic carbon films for micro-supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, P; Lethien, C; Pinaud, S; Brousse, K; Laloo, R; Turq, V; Respaud, M; Demortière, A; Daffos, B; Taberna, P L; Chaudret, B; Gogotsi, Y; Simon, P

    2016-02-12

    Integration of electrochemical capacitors with silicon-based electronics is a major challenge, limiting energy storage on a chip. We describe a wafer-scale process for manufacturing strongly adhering carbide-derived carbon films and interdigitated micro-supercapacitors with embedded titanium carbide current collectors, fully compatible with current microfabrication and silicon-based device technology. Capacitance of those films reaches 410 farads per cubic centimeter/200 millifarads per square centimeter in aqueous electrolyte and 170 farads per cubic centimeter/85 millifarads per square centimeter in organic electrolyte. We also demonstrate preparation of self-supported, mechanically stable, micrometer-thick porous carbon films with a Young's modulus of 14.5 gigapascals, with the possibility of further transfer onto flexible substrates. These materials are interesting for applications in structural energy storage, tribology, and gas separation. PMID:26912855

  5. Porous silicon-based optical biosensors and biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Rea, Ilaria; Rotiroti, Lucia; De Stefano, Luca

    2007-04-01

    Porous silicon multilayered microstructures have unique optical and morphological properties that can be exploited in chemical and biological sensing. The large specific surface of nanostructured porous silicon can be chemically modified to link different molecular probes (DNA strands, enzymes, proteins and so on), which recognize the target analytes, in order to enhance the selectivity and specificity of the sensor device. We designed fabricated and characterized several photonic porous silicon-based structures, which were used in sensing some specific molecular interactions. The next step is the integration of the porous silicon-based optical transducer in biochip devices: at this aim, we have tested an innovative anodic bonding process between porous silicon and glass, and its compatibility with the biological probes.

  6. Silicone-based stoma accessories in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Elaine

    Advanced silicone technology has transformed the treatment of wounds and peri-wound skin. Recently, there has been interest in the use of silicone-based products in stoma care. Peristomal skin issues are a common problem, and can have a negative impact on the patient's quality of life, so helping the ostomate maintain good skin health is crucial. The author, a stoma care nurse, regularly sees 3-4 patients each week in her stoma care clinic with damaged or broken peristomal skin. This article explores the 'Trio' range of silicone-based accessories, discussing how these products compare with the traditional hydrocolloid, how they are applied and used. A series of case studies illustrates the circumstances in which these products may be applied. PMID:26973010

  7. Silicon Based Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Graff, Gordon L.; Yang, Zhenguo; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Deyu; Liu, Jun

    2012-06-15

    Silicon is environmentally benign and ubiquitous. Because of its high specific capacity, it is considered one of the most promising candidates to replace the conventional graphite negative electrode used in today's Li ion batteries. Silicon has a theoretical specific capacity of nearly 4200 mAh/g (Li21Si5), which is 10 times larger than the specific capacity of graphite (LiC6, 372 mAh/g). However, the high capacity of silicon is associated with huge volume changes (more than 300 percent) when alloyed with lithium, which can cause severe cracking and pulverization of the electrode and lead to significant capacity loss. Significant scientific research has been conducted to circumvent the deterioration of silicon based anode materials during cycling. Various strategies, such as reduction of particle size, generation of active/inactive composites, fabrication of silicon based thin films, use of alternative binders, and the synthesis of 1-D silicon nanostructures have been implemented by a number of research groups. Fundamental mechanistic research has also been performed to better understand the electrochemical lithiation and delithiation process during cycling in terms of crystal structure, phase transitions, morphological changes, and reaction kinetics. Although efforts to date have not attained a commercially viable Si anode, further development is expected to produce anodes with three to five times the capacity of graphite. In this chapter, an overview of research on silicon based anodes used for lithium-ion battery applications will be presented. The overview covers electrochemical alloying of the silicon with lithium, mechanisms responsible for capacity fade, and methodologies adapted to overcome capacity degradation observed during cycling. The recent development of silicon nanowires and nanoparticles with significantly improved electrochemical performance will also be discussed relative to the mechanistic understanding. Finally, future directions on the

  8. Response of silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based linear energy transfer (LET) telescope,(e. g., DOSTEL and RRMD) have recently been flown in space. LET spectra measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters show differences that need to be fully understood. A Monte Carlo technique based on: 1. radiation transport cluster intra-cascade model. 2. Landau-Vavilov distribution, 3. telescope geometry and detector coincidence & discriminator settings, 4. spacecraft shielding geometry, and 5. the external free space radiation environment, including recent albedo measurements, was developed.

  9. Visualisation by high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography of gas films on submerged superhydrophobic leaves.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Glavina, Kyriaki; Colmer, Timothy David; Winkel, Anders; Irvine, Sarah; Lefmann, Kim; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pedersen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Floods can completely submerge terrestrial plants but some wetland species can sustain O2 and CO2 exchange with the environment via gas films forming on superhydrophobic leaf surfaces. We used high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography in a novel approach to visualise gas films on submerged leaves of common cordgrass (Spartina anglica). 3D tomograms enabled a hitherto unmatched level of detail regarding the micro-topography of leaf gas films. Gas films formed only on the superhydrophobic adaxial leaf side (water droplet contact angle, Φ=162°) but not on the abaxial side (Φ=135°). The adaxial side of the leaves of common cordgrass is plicate with a longitudinal system of parallel grooves and ridges and the vast majority of the gas film volume was found in large ∼180μm deep elongated triangular volumes in the grooves and these volumes were connected to each neighbouring groove via a fine network of gas tubules (∼1.7μm diameter) across the ridges. In addition to the gas film retained on the leaf exterior, the X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography also successfully distinguished gas spaces internally in the leaf tissues, and the tissue porosity (gas volume per unit tissue volume) ranged from 6.3% to 20.3% in tip and base leaf segments, respectively. We conclude that X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is a powerful tool to obtain quantitative data of exterior gas features on biological samples because of the significant difference in electron density between air, biological tissues and water. PMID:25175398

  10. Chemical fingerprinting of silicone-based breast implants.

    PubMed

    Keizers, Peter H J; Vredenbregt, Marjo J; Bakker, Frank; de Kaste, Dries; Venhuis, Bastiaan J

    2015-01-01

    With millions of women worldwide carrying them, silicone-based breast implants represent a large market. Even though silicone breast implants already have a history of use of more than 50 years, the discussion on their safety has not yet come to an end. To improve safety assessment, regulatory authorities should have the availability of a set of tests to be able to determine parameters of implant identity and quality. Therefore, the gels and envelopes of various brands and types of silicone-based breast implants have been subjected to infrared, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. We show that by using a combination of complementary spectroscopic techniques breast implants of various origins can be distinguished on typical chemical hallmarks. It was found that typical silicone-based implants display a surplus of vinyl signals in the gel, cyclosiloxane impurities are tolerable at low levels only and a barrier layer is present in the implant envelope. The techniques presented here and the results obtained offer a good starting point for market surveillance studies. PMID:25459933

  11. Micro/Nano Gas Sensors: A New Strategy Towards In-Situ Wafer-Level Fabrication of High-Performance Gas Sensing Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Dai, Zhengfei; Duan, Guotao; Guo, Lianfeng; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yanxiang; Cai, Weiping; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-05-01

    Nano-structured gas sensing materials, in particular nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, enable high sensitivity at a ppb level for gas sensors. For practical applications, it is highly desirable to be able to manufacture such gas sensors in batch and at low cost. We present here a strategy of in-situ wafer-level fabrication of the high-performance micro/nano gas sensing chips by naturally integrating microhotplatform (MHP) with nanopore array (NPA). By introducing colloidal crystal template, a wafer-level ordered homogenous SnO2 NPA is synthesized in-situ on a 4-inch MHP wafer, able to produce thousands of gas sensing units in one batch. The integration of micromachining process and nanofabrication process endues micro/nano gas sensing chips at low cost, high throughput, and with high sensitivity (down to ~20 ppb), fast response time (down to ~1 s), and low power consumption (down to ~30 mW). The proposed strategy of integrating MHP with NPA represents a versatile approach for in-situ wafer-level fabrication of high-performance micro/nano gas sensors for real industrial applications.

  12. Study of deposit associated with discharge in micro-pixel gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Y.; Ochi, A.; Moriya, K.; Matsuda, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-02-01

    We found some deposits associated with discharge on dielectric (polyimide) substrates in "Micro-Pixel Gas Chambers" ( μ-PIC) operating with Ar/C2H6 90/10. Secondary electron images taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that they were a conductive material. Auger electron spectroscopy clearly showed that their main component was carbon (98%). Their origin was clarified using spark tests in which a single pixel was sparked a specific number of times. Secondary electron images clearly showed that discharge occurred in the narrow gaps between the electrodes. With a Ar/C2H6 50/50 gas mixture, the amount of carbon deposited depended on the number of sparks. The drop in the applied voltage after the test depended on the number of sparks. With pure N2 gas, no deposits were clearly found, however, a decrease in the applied voltage after the tests was observed. This can be attributed to carbonization of the polyimide surface. Although the SEM images did not show clear proof of this, this carbonization could contribute much less than the ethane dissociation.

  13. Analytical estimation of neutron yield in a micro gas-puff X pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M. S.; Galambos, P. C.; Hagen, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present the basic concepts for developing a micro x pinch as a small-scale neutron source. For compact sources, these concepts offer repetitive function at higher yields and pulsing rates than competing methods. The uniqueness of these concepts arises from the use of microelectronic technology to reduce the size of the target plasma and to efficiently heat the target gas. The use of repetitive microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) gas puff technology, as compared to cryogenic wires or solid targets (for the beam-target alternatives), has the potential to be robust and have a long lifetime because the plasma is not created from solid surfaces. The modeling suggests that a 50 J at the wall plug pulse could provide >10{sup 5} tritium (DT) neutrons and 10{sup 3} deuterium (DD) neutrons at temperatures of a few keV. At 1 kHz, this would be >10{sup 8} and 10{sup 6} neutrons per second, DT and DD, respectively, with a 250 {mu}m anode-cathode gap. DT gas puff devices may provide >10{sup 12} neutrons/s operating at 1 kHz and requiring 100 kW. The MEMs approach offers potentially high pulse rates and yields.

  14. A wall-function approach to incorporating Knudsen-layer effects in gas micro flow simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Reese, Jason M.

    2004-07-01

    For gas flows in microfluidic configurations, the Knudsen layer close to the wall can comprise a substantial part of the entire flowfield and has a major effect on quantities such as the mass flow rate through micro devices. The Knudsen layer itself is characterized by a highly nonlinear relationship between the viscous stress and the strain rate of the gas, so even if the Navier-Stokes equations can be used to describe the core gas flow they are certainly inappropriate for the Knudsen layer itself. In this paper we propose a 'wall-function' model for the stress/strain rate relations in the Knudsen layer. The constitutive structure of the Knudsen layer has been derived from results from kinetic theory for isothermal shear flow over a planar surface. We investigate the ability of this simplified model to predict Knudsen-layer effects in a variety of configurations. We further propose a semi-empirical Knudsen-number correction to this wall function, based on high-accuracy DSMC results, to extend the predictive capabilities of the model to greater degrees of rarefaction.

  15. Fault diagnosis for micro-gas turbine engine sensors via wavelet entropy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    Sensor fault diagnosis is necessary to ensure the normal operation of a gas turbine system. However, the existing methods require too many resources and this need can't be satisfied in some occasions. Since the sensor readings are directly affected by sensor state, sensor fault diagnosis can be performed by extracting features of the measured signals. This paper proposes a novel fault diagnosis method for sensors based on wavelet entropy. Based on the wavelet theory, wavelet decomposition is utilized to decompose the signal in different scales. Then the instantaneous wavelet energy entropy (IWEE) and instantaneous wavelet singular entropy (IWSE) are defined based on the previous wavelet entropy theory. Subsequently, a fault diagnosis method for gas turbine sensors is proposed based on the results of a numerically simulated example. Then, experiments on this method are carried out on a real micro gas turbine engine. In the experiment, four types of faults with different magnitudes are presented. The experimental results show that the proposed method for sensor fault diagnosis is efficient. PMID:22163734

  16. Fault Diagnosis for Micro-Gas Turbine Engine Sensors via Wavelet Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    Sensor fault diagnosis is necessary to ensure the normal operation of a gas turbine system. However, the existing methods require too many resources and this need can’t be satisfied in some occasions. Since the sensor readings are directly affected by sensor state, sensor fault diagnosis can be performed by extracting features of the measured signals. This paper proposes a novel fault diagnosis method for sensors based on wavelet entropy. Based on the wavelet theory, wavelet decomposition is utilized to decompose the signal in different scales. Then the instantaneous wavelet energy entropy (IWEE) and instantaneous wavelet singular entropy (IWSE) are defined based on the previous wavelet entropy theory. Subsequently, a fault diagnosis method for gas turbine sensors is proposed based on the results of a numerically simulated example. Then, experiments on this method are carried out on a real micro gas turbine engine. In the experiment, four types of faults with different magnitudes are presented. The experimental results show that the proposed method for sensor fault diagnosis is efficient. PMID:22163734

  17. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  18. Rarefied gas flow behavior in micro/nanochannels under specified wall heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaj, Mojtaba; Akhlaghi, Hassan; Roohi, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of convective heat transfer on the argon gas flow through micro/nanochannels subject to uniform wall heat flux (UWH) boundary condition using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Both the hot wall (qwall > 0) and the cold wall (qwall < 0) cases are considered. We consider the effect of wall heat flux on the centerline pressure, velocity profile and mass flow rate through the channel in the slip regime. The effects of rarefaction, property variations and compressibility are considered. We show that UWH boundary condition leads to the thermal transpiration. Our investigations showed that this thermal transpiration enhances the heat transfer rate at the walls in the case of hot walls and decreases it where the walls are being cooled. We also show that the deviation of the centerline pressure distribution from the linear distribution depends on the direction of the wall heat flux.

  19. Gas transport evaluation in lithium-air batteries with micro/nano-structured cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Wen, Kechun; Song, Yuanqiang; Ye, Luhan; Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Pan, Yu; Lv, Weiqiang; Liao, Yulong; He, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Inefficient gas transport in the porous cathode is disastrous for the lithium-air battery to achieve a high electrochemical performance. Previous evaluation of the cathode diffusivity relies on indirect calculations based on multiple V-I data obtained over the intact battery system, which inevitably induces evaluation uncertainty and material waste. In this report, an electrochemical device is designed for the out-of-cell diffusivity measurement in the lithium-air battery with micro/nano-sized cathodes. With the measured diffusivity, a few electrochemical parameters including the limiting current density and the concentration polarization associated with the porous cathodes can thus be directly evaluated. The work facilitates the development of highly-efficient cathode materials in the general field of metal-air battery field.

  20. A novel micropreconcentrator employing a laminar flow patterned heater for micro gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.-C.; Wu, T. H.; Lu, C.-J.; Chen, W. R.; Sheen, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple micromachined process based on one photomask is developed for a novel micropreconcentrator (µPCT) used in a micro gas chromatograph (µGC). Unique thick silver heating microstructures with a high surface area for microheater of µPCT are fabricated by combining the microfluidic laminar flow technique and the Tollens’ reaction within a microchannel. Silver deposition using this laminar flow patterning technique provides a higher deposition rate and easier microfabrication compared to conventional micromachined technologies for thick metal microstructures (>200 µm). An amorphous and porous carbon film that functions as an adsorbent is grown on microheaters inside the microchannel. The µPCT can be heated to >300 °C rapidly by applying a constant electrical power of ˜1 W with a heating rate of 10 °C s-1. Four volatile organic compounds, acetone, benzene, toluene and xylene, are collected through the proposed novel µPCTs and separated successfully using a 17 m long gas chromatography column. The peak widths at half height (PWHHs) of the four compounds are relatively narrow (<6 s), and the minimum PWHH of 3.75 s is obtained for acetone. The preconcentration factors are >38 000 for benzene and toluene.

  1. Enhancement of gas response of ZnO micro-nano structured films through plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yanagisawa, Kazumasa; Nishino, Toshiki; Yamada, Ichiro

    2007-02-01

    Films of ZnO micro-nano structures were deposited on quartz substrates and subsequently plasma treated in O II, N II and CF 4. It was found that exposure to oxygen plasma enhanced gas response to ethanol vapor of the ZnO films by a factor 2. The effect of surface plasma treatments on the gas response of the ZnO films was discussed in reference to surface morphology observed by high-magnification SEM and surface chemical state determined by XPS. SEM observation revealed that O II plasma treatment induced less surface roughening than N II and CF 4 plasmas, in agreement with the view that O II plasma should reduce preferential sputtering. Deconvolution of the O 1s X-ray photoelectron peak indicated an increase in the Zn-O bond surface density relatively to O-H bond density for the O II plasma treated surface, whereas the O-H bond surface density was increased relatively to the Zn-O bond density for the N II and CF 4 plasma treated films. The O II plasma was found to partially clean the surface from hydroxyl groups and to expose more Zn cations, which might have caused the enhancement of sensor response by increasing the density of active sites for oxidation/reduction reactions.

  2. X-ray Polarization Measurements with a Micro-pattern Gas Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Costa, E.; Kaaret, P.; Minuti, M.; Spandre, G.; Swank, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    The benefits of Astrophysical X-ray polarization measurements have been discussed in the literature for decades and with respect to a variety of detectors. Despite this, a dedicated polarimeter for the measurement of Astrophysical sources has not flown since the 1970's, when the definitive measurement of the Crab Nebula was made. More recently, an indirect measurement of the polarization of two gamma-ray bursts has been extracted from BATSE data, re-emphasizing the importance of polarization measurements in constraining a physical model. We describe a sensitive and, and extremely versatile, photoelectric polarimeter using a micro-pattern gas detector, with an 80micron pixel ASIC anode, to image the primary photoelectron track. The detector can be optimized to a preferred energy range between 1 keV and 50 keV. We present measurements of polarized 4.5 keV X-rays and unpolarized 6 keV X-rays obtained with a prototype detector using Carbon Dioxide gas.

  3. A novel method of encoded multiplexing readout for micro-pattern gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin-Xiang, Qi; Shu-Bin, Liu; Heng, Ji; Zhong-Tao, Shen; Si-Yuan, Ma; Hong-Bang, Liu; Wen-Qian, Huang; Qi, An

    2016-05-01

    The requirement of a large number of electronic channels poses a big challenge to the further applications of Micro-pattern Gas Detectors (MPGDs). By using the redundancy that at least two neighboring strips record the signal of a particle, a novel method of encoded multiplexing readout for MPGDs is presented in this paper. The method offers a feasible and easily-extensible way of encoding and decoding, and can significantly reduce the number of readout channels. A verification test was carried out on a 5 cm × 5 cm Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) detector using a 8 keV Cu X-ray source with 100 μm slit, where 166 strips were read out by 21 encoded readout channels. The test results show good linearity in its position response, and the spatial resolution root-mean-square (RMS) of the test system is about 260 μm. This method has potential to build large area detectors and can be easily adapted to other detectors similar to MPGDs. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11222552, 11265003)

  4. Coating Silicon-Based Ceramics With Durable Mullite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lee, Kang N.

    1996-01-01

    Improved plasma-spraying process deposits mullite on silicon carbide substrates. Prevents formation of amorphous mullite by maintaining high temperature of sprayed deposite to allow crystallization to occur. Deposited mullite adheres to substrate and exhibits little or no cracking during thermal cycling. Provides substantially greater resistance to oxidation in dry air and corrosion by molten salt. Process expected useful in depositing mullite on substrates made of other silicon-based ceramics and other ceramic substrates having coefficients of thermal expansion similar to those of mullite.

  5. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies. PMID:26927105

  6. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C.; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies. PMID:26927105

  7. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  8. Thermal/environmental barrier coating system for silicon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coating system for a substrate containing a silicon-based material, such as silicon carbide-containing ceramic matrix materials containing silicon carbide and used to form articles exposed to high temperatures, including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The coating system includes a layer of barium strontium aluminosilicate (BSAS) as a bond coat for a thermal-insulating top coat. As a bond coat, the BSAS layer serves to adhere the top coat to a SiC-containing substrate. The BSAS bond coat exhibits sufficient environmental resistance such that, if the top coat should spall, the BSAS bond coat continues to provide a level of environmental protection to the underlying SiC-containing substrate.

  9. Electroluminescence efficiencies of erbium in silicon-based hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Cueff, Sébastien E-mail: christophe.labbe@ensicaen.fr; Manel Ramírez, Joan; Berencén, Yonder; Garrido, Blas; Kurvits, Jonathan A.; Zia, Rashid; Rizk, Richard; Labbé, Christophe E-mail: christophe.labbe@ensicaen.fr

    2013-11-04

    We report on room-temperature 1.5 μm electroluminescence from trivalent erbium (Er{sup 3+}) ions embedded in three different CMOS-compatible silicon-based hosts: SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and SiN{sub x}. We show that although the insertion of either nitrogen or excess silicon helps enhance electrical conduction and reduce the onset voltage for electroluminescence, it drastically decreases the external quantum efficiency of Er{sup 3+} ions from 2% in SiO{sub 2} to 0.001% and 0.0004% in SiN{sub x} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, respectively. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that hot carrier injection is significantly more efficient than defect-assisted conduction for the electrical excitation of Er{sup 3+} ions. These results suggest strategies to optimize the engineering of on-chip electrically excited silicon-based nanophotonic light sources.

  10. Micro and nano-size pores of clay minerals in shale reservoirs: Implication for the accumulation of shale gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Han, Yufu; Fu, Changqin; Zhang, han; Zhu, Yanming; Zuo, Zhaoxi

    2016-08-01

    A pore is an essential component of shale gas reservoirs. Clay minerals are the adsorption carrier second only to organic matter. This paper uses the organic maturity test, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to study the structure and effect of clay minerals on storing gas in shales. Results show the depositional environment and organic maturity influence the content and types of clay minerals as well as their structure in the three types of sedimentary facies in China. Clay minerals develop multi-size pores which shrink to micro- and nano-size by close compaction during diagenesis. Micro- and nano-pores can be divided into six types: 1) interlayer, 2) intergranular, 3) pore and fracture in contact with organic matter, 4) pore and fracture in contact with other types of minerals, 5) dissolved and, 6) micro-cracks. The contribution of clay minerals to the presence of pores in shale is evident and the clay plane porosity can even reach 16%, close to the contribution of organic matter. The amount of clay minerals and pores displays a positive correlation. Clay minerals possess a strong adsorption which is affected by moisture and reservoir maturity. Different pore levels of clay minerals are mutually arranged, thus essentially producing distinct reservoir adsorption effects. Understanding the structural characteristics of micro- and nano-pores in clay minerals can provide a tool for the exploration and development of shale gas reservoirs.

  11. Silicon-Based Optical Modulator with Ferroelectric Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    According to a proposal, a silicon dioxide layer in a high-speed, low-power, silicon- based electro-optical modulator would be replaced by a layer of lead zirconate titanate or other ferroelectric oxide material. The purpose of this modification is to enhance the power performance and functionality of the modulator. In its unmodified form, the particular silicon- based electro-optical modulator is of an advanced design that overcomes the speed limitation of prior silicon-based electro- optical modulators. Whereas modulation frequencies of such devices had been limited to about 20 MHz, this modulator can operate at modulation frequencies as high as 1 GHz. This modulator can be characterized as a silicon-waveguide-based metal oxide/semiconductor (MOS) capacitor phase shifter in which modulation of the index of refraction in silicon is obtained by exploiting the free-charge-carrier-plasma dispersion effect. As shown in the figure, the modulator includes an n-doped crystalline silicon slab (the silicon layer of a silicon- on-insulator wafer) and a p-doped polycrystalline silicon rib with a gate oxide layer (the aforementioned silicon dioxide layer) sandwiched between them. Under accumulation conditions, the majority charge carriers in the silicon waveguide modify the index of refraction so that a phase shift is induced in the optical mode propagating in the waveguide. The advantage of using an MOS capacitor phase shifter is that it is possible to achieve high modulation speed because there are no slow carrier-generation or -recombination processes involved in the accumulation operation. The main advantage of the proposed substitution of a ferroelectric oxide layer for the silicon dioxide layer would arise from the spontaneous polarization effect of the ferroelectric layer: This spontaneous polarization would maintain accumulation conditions in the absence of applied voltage. Consequently, once the device had been switched to a given optical state, it would remain in

  12. Cycle Analysis of Micro Gas Turbine-Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimijima, Shinji; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    A hybrid system based on a micro gas turbine (µGT) and a high-temperature fuel cell, i.e., molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) or solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), is expected to achieve a much higher efficiency than conventional distributed power generation systems. In this study, a cycle analysis method and the performance evaluation of a µGT-MCFC hybrid system, of which the power output is 30kW, are investigated to clarify its feasibility. We developed a general design strategy in which a low fuel input to a combustor and higher MCFC operating temperature result in a high power generation efficiency. A high recuperator temperature effectiveness and a moderate steam-carbon ratio are the requirements for obtaining a high material strength in a turbine. In addition, by employing a combustor for complete oxidation of MCFC effluents without additional fuel input, i.e., a catalytic combustor, the power generation efficiency of a µGT-MCFC is achieved at over 60%(LHV).

  13. A prototype scalable readout system for micro-pattern gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qi-Bin; Liu, Shu-Bin; Tian, Jing; Li, Cheng; Feng, Chang-Qing; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A scalable readout system (SRS) is designed to provide a general solution for different micro-pattern gas detectors in various applications. The system mainly consists of three kinds of modules: the ASIC card, the adapter card and the front-end card (FEC). The ASIC cards, mounted with particular ASIC chips, are designed for receiving detector signals. The adapter card is in charge of digitizing the output signals from several ASIC cards. The FEC, edged-mounted with the adapter, has field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based reconfigurable logic and I/O interfaces, allowing users to choose different ASIC cards and adapters for different experiments, which expands the system to various applications. The FEC transfers data through Gigabit Ethernet protocol realized by a TCP processor (SiTCP) IP core in FPGA. By assembling a flexible number of FECs in parallel through Gigabit Ethernet, the readout system can be tailored to specific sizes to adapt to the experiment scales and readout requirements. In this paper, two kinds of multi-channel ASIC chip, VA140 and AGET, are applied to verify the scalability of this SRS architecture. Based on this VA140 or AGET SRS, one FEC covers 8 ASIC (VA140) cards handling 512 detector channels, or 4 ASIC (AGET) cards handling 256 detector channels, respectively. More FECs can be assembled in crates to handle thousands of detector channels. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11222552)

  14. Micro-machined planar field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer as a gas chromatographic detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Nazarov, E. G.; Miller, R. A.; Krylov, E. V.; Zapata, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    A planar high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (PFAIMS) with a micro-machined drift tube was characterized as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. The performance of the PFAIMS was compared directly to that of a flame ionization detector (FID) for the separation of a ketone mixture from butanone to decanone. Effluent from the column was continuously sampled by the detector and mobility scans could be obtained throughout the chromatographic analysis providing chemical inforrmation in mobility scans orthogonal to retention time. Limits of detection were approximately I ng for measurement of positive ions and were comparable or slightly better than those for the FID. Direct comparison of calibration curves for the FAIMS and the FID was possible over four orders of magnitude with a semi-log plot. The concentration dependence of the PFAIMS mobility scans showed the dependence between ion intensity and ion clustering, evident in other mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization technologies. Ions were identified using mass spectrometry as the protonated monomer and the proton bound dimer of the ketones. Residence time for column effluent in the PFAIMS was calculated as approximately 1 ms and a 36% increase in extra-column broadening versus the FID occurred with the PFAIMS.

  15. Modeling the Dynamics of Micro- and Macroparticles in a Combined Gas-Discharge Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinskii, V. V.; Bogach, M. I.; Burachevskii, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model of the dynamics of micro- and macroparticles in a combined gas-discharge installation that accounts for the processes of metal explosion (heating of a metal in its solid state, melting, heating of the liquid metal, intense evaporation, ionization in metal vapor), a magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma acceleration (on the basis of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws neglecting the plasma viscosity and thermal conductivity), and a description of the processes of energy transfer from a high-velocity stream to accelerated particles. It has been established that the process of melting terminates in 1.3 ns after the start of the discharge and that the evaporation terminates in 480 ns. The stage of cooling starts in 21 μs. The average density of the plasma upon completion of the evaporation process can be estimated to be 1.7·10-5 g/cm3, with the pressure being of the order of 1.5·104 Pa and the total time of discharge, of about 250 μs.

  16. Influence of Gas-Surface Interaction Models on Predicted Performance of a Micro-Resistojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Wadsworth, Dean C.; Muntz, E. P.

    2000-06-01

    The Free Molecule Micro-Resistojet was designed as a micropropulsion system capable of performing attitude control and primary maneuvers for nanospacecraft with a mass of less than or equal to 10 kg. The details of gas-surface interactions between propellant molecules and surfaces held at elevated temperature are critical in predicting the propulsion system's performance and efficiency. The aim of this study is to parametrically assess the performance of a typical thruster geometry using a general Maxwell scattering model and two versions of the Cercignani-Lampis-Lord model. The models are incorporated into a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo numerical code and are used to bound the predicted performance characteristics of the thruster. The total specific impulse varies by approximately 20% over range of accommodation coefficients from specular to diffuse surface scattering. However, there was only a maximum difference of about 5% between the models for a given accommodation coefficient. Other more microscopic parameters, such as axial velocity distribution functions, appear to depend more on the scattering model used.

  17. Modeling the Dynamics of Micro- and Macroparticles in a Combined Gas-Discharge Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinskii, V. V.; Bogach, M. I.; Burachevskii, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We present a model of the dynamics of micro- and macroparticles in a combined gas-discharge installation that accounts for the processes of metal explosion (heating of a metal in its solid state, melting, heating of the liquid metal, intense evaporation, ionization in metal vapor), a magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma acceleration (on the basis of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws neglecting the plasma viscosity and thermal conductivity), and a description of the processes of energy transfer from a high-velocity stream to accelerated particles. It has been established that the process of melting terminates in 1.3 ns after the start of the discharge and that the evaporation terminates in 480 ns. The stage of cooling starts in 21 μs. The average density of the plasma upon completion of the evaporation process can be estimated to be 1.7·10-5 g/cm3, with the pressure being of the order of 1.5·104 Pa and the total time of discharge, of about 250 μs.

  18. Silicon-based sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  19. Silicon-based sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Carrano, A.V.; Balch, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber is described that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis. 32 figs.

  20. Measurement of Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Micro-Pipes by a Capacitance Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haifeng; Li, Huajun; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    A capacitance measurement system is developed for the measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow in glass micro-pipes with inner diameters of 3.96, 2.65 and 1.56 mm, respectively. As a typical flow regime in a micro-pipe two-phase flow system, slug flow is chosen for this investigation. A capacitance sensor is designed and a high-resolution and high-speed capacitance measurement circuit is used to measure the small capacitance signals based on the differential sampling method. The performance and feasibility of the capacitance method are investigated and discussed. The capacitance signal is analyzed, which can reflect the voidage variation of two-phase flow. The gas slug velocity is determined through a cross-correlation technique using two identical capacitance sensors. The simulation and experimental results show that the presented capacitance measurement system is successful. Research work also verifies that the capacitance sensor is an effective method for the measurement of gas liquid two-phase flow parameters in micro-pipes. PMID:25587879

  1. Optical properties of porous-silicon-based structures with modified nanodiamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzova, V. A.; Korets, A. Ya.; Merkushev, F. F.; Semenova, O. V.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the optical properties of silicon-based sandwich structures with diamond-like films deposited by electrophoresis from aqueous suspensions of modified detonation nanodiamonds. It is shown that these films can be used as antireflection and protective coatings for silicon-based solar cells.

  2. In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Wilcoxon, Jess P.; Abrams, Billie L.

    2008-06-10

    A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

  3. A Highly Tunable Silicone-Based Magnetic Elastomer with Nanoscale Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Benjamin A.; Fiser, Briana L.; Prins, Willem J.; Rapp, Daniel J.; Shields, Adam R.; Glass, Daniel R.; Superfine, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic elastomers have been widely pursued for sensing and actuation applications. Silicone-based magnetic elastomers have a number of advantages over other materials such as hydrogels, but aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles within silicones is difficult to prevent. Aggregation inherently limits the minimum size of fabricated structures and leads to non-uniform response from structure to structure. We have developed a novel material which is a complex of a silicone polymer (polydimethylsiloxane-co-aminopropylmethylsiloxane) adsorbed onto the surface of magnetite (γ-Fe203) nanoparticles 7–10 nm in diameter. The material is homogenous at very small length scales (< 100 nm) and can be crosslinked to form a flexible, magnetic material which is ideally suited for the fabrication of micro- to nanoscale magnetic actuators. The loading fraction of magnetic nanoparticles in the composite can be varied smoothly from 0 – 50% wt. without loss of homogeneity, providing a simple mechanism for tuning actuator response. We evaluate the material properties of the composite across a range of nanoparticle loading, and demonstrate a magnetic-field-induced increase in compressive modulus as high as 300%. Furthermore, we implement a strategy for predicting the optimal nanoparticle loading for magnetic actuation applications, and show that our predictions correlate well with experimental findings. PMID:22184482

  4. Nanostructured antifouling poly(ethylene glycol) films for silicon-based microsystems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sadhana; Desai, Tejal A

    2005-02-01

    The creation of antifouling surfaces is one of the major prerequisites for silicon-based micro-electrical-mechanical systems for biomedical and analytical applications (known as BioMEMS). Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), a water-soluble, nontoxic, and nonimmunogenic polymer has the unique ability to reduce nonspecific protein adsorption and cell adhesion and, therefore, is generally coupled with a wide variety of surfaces to improve their biocompatibility. To this end, we have analyzed PEG thin films of various grafting densities (i.e., number of PEG chains per unit area) coupled to silicon using a single-step PEG-silane coupling reaction scheme using variable-angle ellipsometry. Initial PEG concentration and coupling time were varied to attain different grafting densities. These data were theoretically analyzed to understand the phenomenon of PEG film formation. Furthermore, all the PEG films were evaluated for their ability to control biofouling using albumin and fibrinogen as the model proteins. PEG thin films formed by using higher PEG concentrations ( > or = 10 mM PEG) or coupling time ( > or = 1 h) demonstrated enhanced protein fouling resistance behavior. This analysis is expected to be useful to form PEG films of desired grafting density on silicon substrates for appropriate application. PMID:15853141

  5. Microfabricated thermal modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional micro gas chromatography: design, thermal modeling, and preliminary testing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Reidy, Shaelah M; Block, Bruce P; Wise, Kensall D; Zellers, Edward T; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2010-07-01

    In comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC), a modulator is placed at the juncture between two separation columns to focus and re-inject eluting mixture components, thereby enhancing the resolution and the selectivity of analytes. As part of an effort to develop a microGC x microGC prototype, in this report we present the design, fabrication, thermal operation, and initial testing of a two-stage microscale thermal modulator (microTM). The microTM contains two sequential serpentine Pyrex-on-Si microchannels (stages) that cryogenically trap analytes eluting from the first-dimension column and thermally inject them into the second-dimension column in a rapid, programmable manner. For each modulation cycle (typically 5 s for cooling with refrigeration work of 200 J and 100 ms for heating at 10 W), the microTM is kept approximately at -50 degrees C by a solid-state thermoelectric cooling unit placed within a few tens of micrometres of the device, and heated to 250 degrees C at 2800 degrees C s(-1) by integrated resistive microheaters and then cooled back to -50 degrees C at 250 degrees C s(-1). Thermal crosstalk between the two stages is less than 9%. A lumped heat transfer model is used to analyze the device design with respect to the rates of heating and cooling, power dissipation, and inter-stage thermal crosstalk as a function of Pyrex-membrane thickness, air-gap depth, and stage separation distance. Experimental results are in agreement with trends predicted by the model. Preliminary tests using a conventional capillary column interfaced to the microTM demonstrate the capability for enhanced sensitivity and resolution as well as the modulation of a mixture of alkanes. PMID:20556268

  6. Growth and characterization of silicon-based optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filios, Adam A.

    Photonics, a blending of optics and electronics, has emerged as one of the world's most rapidly developing fields. Along with microelectronics, they constitute the core technologies of the information industry, and their advances are complementing each other in the tasks of the acquisition, transmission, storage, and processing of increasing amounts of information. Microelectronic device integration has progressed to the point that complete "systems-on-the-chip" have been realized. Photonic materials need to be integrated with standard electronic circuits for the implementation of the next generation optoelectronic "super-chip" where both electrons and photons participate in the transmission and processing of information. Silicon is the cornerstone material in conventional VLSI systems. However, having a relatively small and indirect fundamental energy band-gap, silicon is an inefficient lightemitter. On the other hand, direct integration of III-V photonic materials on a silicon chip is still very problematic. Squeezing light out of silicon itself appears to be an attractive alternative. Light emission from silicon is an important fundamental issue with enormous technological implications. In this work we explore several strategies towards developing silicon based optoelectronic devices. Porous silicon, a material produced by electrochemically etching silicon in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions, generated great interest in the early 1990s when it was shown to exhibit relatively bright, room temperature, visible photoluminescence. However, having a poor surface morphology, the material is fragile and chemically unstable leading to degradation of light emission and preventing integration with silicon processing technology. With the development of the epitaxially grown crystalline-Si/O superlattice, we attempt to overcome the morphological problems of porous silicon, retaining its light emission characteristics. Our multilayer c-Si/O device consists of thin silicon

  7. On-Chip Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Fourier Transform Infrared (MEMS FT-IR) Spectrometer-Based Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M; Sakr, Mohammad; Mortada, Bassem; Medhat, Mostafa; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we study the detection of acetylene (C2H2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) gases in the near-infrared (NIR) range using an on-chip silicon micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer in the wavelength range 1300-2500 nm (4000-7692 cm(-1)). The spectrometer core engine is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using a deep-etching technology producing self-aligned components. The light is free-space propagating in-plane with respect to the silicon chip substrate. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator corresponding to about 30 cm(-1) resolution. Multi-mode optical fibers are used to connect light between the wideband light source, the interferometer, the 10 cm gas cell, and the optical detector. A wide dynamic range of gas concentration down to 2000 parts per million (ppm) in only 10 cm length gas cell is demonstrated. Extending the wavelength range to the mid-infrared (MIR) range up to 4200 nm (2380 cm(-1)) is also experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, using a bulk micro-machined on-chip MEMS FT-IR spectrometer. The obtained results open the door for an on-chip optical gas sensor for many applications including environmental sensing and industrial process control in the NIR/MIR spectral ranges. PMID:27044847

  8. Miniature liquid flow sensor and feedback control of electroosmotic and pneumatic flows for a micro gas analysis system.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2006-01-01

    Accurate liquid flow control is important in most chemical analyses. In this work, the measurement of liquid flow in microliters per minute was performed, and feedback control of the flow rate was examined. The flow sensor was arranged on a channel made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) block. The center of the channel was cooled by a miniature Peltier device, and the change in temperature balance along the channel formed by the flow was measured by two temperature sensors. Using this flow sensor, feedback flow control was examined with two pumping methods. One was the electroosmotic flow method, made by applying a high voltage (HV) between the reagent and waste reservoirs; the other was the piezo valve method, in which a micro-valve-seat was fabricated in a PDMS cavity with a silicone diaphragm. The latter was adopted for a micro gas analysis system (microGAS) for measuring atmospheric H2S and SO2. The obtained baselines were stable, and better limits of detection were obtained. PMID:16429774

  9. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m³), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively. PMID:26402682

  10. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m3), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively. PMID:26402682

  11. Silicon based solar cells using a multilayer oxide as emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Wu, Weiliang; Liu, Zongtao; Shen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    In this work, n-type silicon based solar cells with WO3/Ag/WO3 multilayer films as emitter (WAW/n-Si solar cells) were presented via simple physical vapor deposition (PVD). Microstructure and composition of WAW/n-Si solar cells were studied by TEM and XPS, respectively. Furthermore, the dependence of the solar cells performances on each WO3 layer thickness was investigated. The results indicated that the bottom WO3 layer mainly induced band bending and facilitated charge-carriers separation, while the top WO3 layer degraded open-circuit voltage but actually improved optical absorption of the solar cells. The WAW/n-Si solar cells, with optimized bottom and top WO3 layer thicknesses, exhibited 5.21% efficiency on polished wafer with area of 4 cm2 under AM 1.5 condition (25 °C and 100 mW/cm2). Compared with WO3 single-layer film, WAW multilayer films demonstrated better surface passivation quality but more optical loss, while the optical loss could be effectively reduced by implementing light-trapping structures. These results pave a new way for dopant-free solar cells in terms of low-cost and facile process flow.

  12. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  13. In situ calibration of micro-photoionization detectors in a multi-dimensional micro-gas chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Zhou, Menglian; Zhu, Hongbo; Nidetz, Robert; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2016-06-20

    A photoionization detector (PID) is widely used as a gas chromatography (GC) detector. By virtue of its non-destructive nature, multiple PIDs can be used in multi-dimensional GC. However, different PIDs have different responsivities towards the same chemical compound with the same concentration or mass due to different aging conditions of the PID lamps and windows. Here, we carried out a systematic study regarding the response of 5 Krypton μPIDs in a 1 × 4-channel 2-dimensional μGC system to 7 different volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the ionization potential ranging from 8.45 eV to 10.08 eV and the concentration ranging from ∼1 ng to ∼2000 ng. We used one of the PIDs as the reference detector and calculated the calibration factor for each of the remaining 4 PIDs against the first PID, which we found is quite uniform regardless of the analyte, its concentration, or chromatographic peak width. Based on the above observation, we were able to quantitatively reconstruct the coeluted peaks in the first dimension using the signal obtained with a PID array in the second dimension. Our work will enable rapid and in situ calibration of PIDs in a GC system using a single analyte at a single concentration. It will also lead to the development of multi-channel multi-dimensional GC where multiple PIDs are employed. PMID:27152367

  14. Numerical analysis of gas and micro-particle interactions in a hand-held shock-tube device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kendall, M A F

    2006-12-01

    A unique hand-held gene gun is employed for ballistically delivering biomolecules to key cells in the skin and mucosa in the treatment of the major diseases. One of these types of devices, called the Contoured Shock Tube (CST), delivers powdered micro-particles to the skin with a narrow and highly controllable velocity distribution and a nominally uniform spatial distribution. In this paper, we apply a numerical approach to gain new insights in to the behavior of the CST prototype device. The drag correlations proposed by Henderson (1976), Igra and Takayama (1993) and Kurian and Das (1997) were applied to predict the micro-particle transport in a numerically simulated gas flow. Simulated pressure histories agree well with the corresponding static and Pitot pressure measurements, validating the CFD approach. The calculated velocity distributions show a good agreement, with the best prediction from Igra & Takayama correlation (maximum discrepancy of 5%). Key features of the gas dynamics and gas-particle interaction are discussed. Statistic analyses show a tight free-jet particle velocity distribution is achieved (570 +/- 14.7 m/s) for polystyrene particles (39 +/- 1 microm), representative of a drug payload. PMID:16917664

  15. A Combined Micro-CT Imaging/Microfluidic Approach for Understating Methane Recovery in Coal Seam Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Armstrong, R. T.; Gerami, A.; Lamei Ramandi, H.; Ebrahimi Warkiani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Coal seam methane is a form of natural gas stored in coal beds and is one of the most important unconventional resources of energy. The flow and transport in coal beds occur in a well-developed system of natural fractures that are also known as cleats. We use micro-Computed Tomography (CT) imaging at both dry and wet conditions to resolve the cleats below the resolution of the image. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is used for calibration of micro-CT data. Using soft lithography technique, the cleat system is duplicated on a silicon mould. We fabricate a microfluidic chip using Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to study both imbibition and drainage in generated coal structures for understating gas and water transport in coal seam reservoirs. First, we use simple patterns observed on coal images to analyse the effects of wettability, cleat size and distribution on flow behaviour. Then, we study transport in a coal by injecting both distilled water and decane with a rate of 1 microliter/ min into the fabricated cleat structure (Figure 1), initially saturated with air. We repeat the experiment for different contact angles by plasma treating the microfluidic chip, and results show significant effects of wettability on the displacement efficiency. The breakthrough time in the imbibition setup is significantly longer than in the drainage. Using rapid video capturing, and high resolution microscopy, we measure the saturation of displacing fluid with respect to time. By measuring gas and liquid recovery in the outlet at different saturation, we predict relative permeability of coal. This work has important applications for optimising gas recovery and our results can serve as a benchmark in the verification of multiphase numerical models used in coal seam gas industry.

  16. Ultraviolet Nano Imprint Lithography Using Fluorinated Silicon-Based Resist Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi

    2010-02-01

    Fluorinated silicon-based resist materials have recently been applied as ultraviolet crosslinkable materials for nano imprint lithography. I report and demonstrate the step and flash nano imprint lithography process using the newly fluorinated silicon-based resist materials for next generation technologies. This paper presents progress in the formulation of advanced resist materials design, the development of suitable ultraviolet imprint conditions and etch processes to achieve thin residual resist layers, low volumetric shrinkage of the resist film, and low imprint pressures for defect reduction. High quality imprint images were produced with multiple pattern-structured templates on wafers using these developed fluorinated silicon-based resist materials.

  17. The information of oil and gas micro-seepage in Dongsheng region of inner Mongolia based on the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shu-Fang; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhou, Mi

    2008-11-01

    The technology of hyper-spectral remote sensing which has higher spatial resolution characteristic, and optimizes the qualification of identifying and extracting salt mines, not only enhances the capacity of natural scenes detection and recognition, but also advances the level of quantitative remote sensing. It has important meaning for using the technology of hyper-spectral remote sensing to quantitative extraction. The paper investigate gas micro-seepage based on the Airborne Hyper-spectral Remote Sensing in Dongsheng of Inner Mongolia on the basis of gas micro-seepage theory using EO-1 Hyperion data collected by Satellite-Borne Sensor which has highest spatial resolution presently in the world. On the basis of data pretreated this paper adopts band math extracted the distribution of oil and gas micro-seepage using diagnostic assimilating spectrum of alteration minerals by the numbers. With eigenvector length model evaluates the research area comprehensive index, oil and gas micro-seepage information model of the research area is established and key regions of oil and gas micro-seepage are confirmed, which offers academic gist for oil and gas resource exploitation of Dongsheng.

  18. High-power, micro-integrated diode laser modules at 767 and 780 nm for portable quantum gas experiments.

    PubMed

    Schiemangk, Max; Lampmann, Kai; Dinkelaker, Aline; Kohfeldt, Anja; Krutzik, Markus; Kürbis, Christian; Sahm, Alexander; Spießberger, Stefan; Wicht, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther; Peters, Achim

    2015-06-10

    We present micro-integrated diode laser modules operating at wavelengths of 767 and 780 nm for cold quantum gas experiments on potassium and rubidium. The master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept provides both narrow linewidth emission and high optical output power. With a linewidth (10 μs) below 1 MHz and an output power of up to 3 W, these modules are specifically suited for quantum optics experiments and feature the robustness required for operation at a drop tower or on-board a sounding rocket. This technology development hence paves the way toward precision quantum optics experiments in space. PMID:26192832

  19. Silicon-Compatible Carbon-Based Micro-Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaodong; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-05-17

    CSi electronics: Recently, Simon and co-workers demonstrated silicon-wafer-supported elastic carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) films without any delamination or cracks for micro-supercapacitor application. The fabrication of these CDC films is particularly important for the practical application of micro-supercapacitors in silicon-based electronics and flexible electronics. PMID:27101107

  20. Silicon-based plant defences, tooth wear and voles.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Ivan; Zub, Karol; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Zalewski, Andrzej; Merceron, Gildas

    2016-02-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are hypothesized to drive vole population cycles through the grazing-induced production of phytoliths in leaves. Phytoliths act as mechanical defences because they deter herbivory and lower growth rates in mammals. However, how phytoliths impair herbivore performance is still unknown. Here, we tested whether the amount of phytoliths changes tooth wear patterns. If confirmed, abrasion from phytoliths could play a role in population crashes. We applied dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) to laboratory and wild voles. Lab voles were fed two pelleted diets with differing amounts of silicon, which produced similar dental textures. This was most probably due to the loss of food mechanical properties through pelletization and/or the small difference in silicon concentration between diets. Wild voles were trapped in Poland during spring and summer, and every year across a population cycle. In spring, voles feed on silica-rich monocotyledons, while in the summer they also include silica-depleted dicotyledons. This was reflected in the results; the amount of silica therefore leaves a traceable record in the dental microwear texture of voles. Furthermore, voles from different phases of population cycles have different microwear textures. We tentatively propose that these differences result from grazing-induced phytolith concentrations. We hypothesize that the high amount of phytoliths in response to intense grazing in peak years may result in malocclusion and other dental abnormalities, which would explain how these silicon-based plant defences help provoke population crashes. DMTA could then be used to reconstruct vole population dynamics using teeth from pellets or palaeontological material. PMID:26889000

  1. Solid phase micro extraction - A new technique coupled with gas chromatograph for chloroethene analysis from aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.; Sewell, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    Once the chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene) contamination occurs in the subsurface environment, they tend to retain and form a Pollution plum in the aquifer because of their recalcitrance to aerobic oxidation. Currently, the most promising bioremediation method for chlorinated compounds is through anaerobic reductive biotransformation, in which each chlorine is replaced by a hydrogen. To study the biodegradation process, it is essential to monitor tetrachloroethene and its degradation daughter products frequently. An analytical method has been modified for chloroethene analysis by gas chromatography. Solid Phase Micro Extraction technique has been used to extract aqueous sample onto a fiber and then to desorb the sample directly into a gas chromatograph injection port. The total run time is less than 17 minutes.

  2. A micro gas chromatography with separation capability enhanced by polydimethylsiloxane stationary phase functionalized by carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubo; Zhang, Runzhou; Wang, Tao; Wang, Youhao; Wang, Yonghuan; Li, Lingfeng; Zhao, Weijun; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui

    2016-07-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stationary phases functionalized with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene, respectively, for the columns in micro gas chromatography are presented in this paper. To exploit the merits of MWCNTs and graphene in terms of their high specific surface area, low surface energy and chemical inertness, experimental conditions for separation (heating rate and final temperature of temperature programming, flow rate of carrier gas and the volume of samples injection) are investigated, and separations of both polar and nonpolar compound mixtures under these conditions are performed. Compared with PDMS-only coated stationary phases, the functionalization of the phases with carbon nano-materials improves the performance of columns in separation, repeatability, stability and revolution significantly. PMID:27154654

  3. Reactions of silicon-based ceramics in mixed oxidation chlorination environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, John E.; Kreidler, Eric R.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction of silicon-based ceramics with 2 percent Cl2/Ar and 1 percent Cl2/1 percent to 20 percent O2/Ar at 950 C was studied with thermogravimetric analysis and high-pressure mass spectrometry. Pure Si, SiO2, several types of SiC, and Si3N4 were examined. The primary corrosion products were SiCl4(g) and SiO2(s) with smaller amounts of volatile silicon oxychlorides. The reactions appear to occur by chlorine penetration of the SiO2 layer, and gas-phase diffusion of the silicon chlorides away from the sample appears to be rate limiting. Pure SiO2 shows very little reaction with Cl2, SiC with excess Si is more reactive than the other materials with Cl2, whereas SiC with excess carbon is more reactive than the other materials with Cl2/O2. Si3N4 shows very little reaction with Cl2. These differences are explained on the basis of thermodynamic and microstructural factors.

  4. Nested potassium hydroxide etching and protective coatings for silicon-based microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mas, Nuria; Schmidt, Martin A.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a multilayer, multichannel silicon-based microreactor that uses elemental fluorine as a reagent and generates hydrogen fluoride as a byproduct. Nested potassium hydroxide etching (using silicon nitride and silicon oxide as masking materials) was developed to create a large number of channels (60 reaction channels connected to individual gas and liquid distributors) of significantly different depths (50-650 µm) with sloped walls (54.7° with respect to the (1 0 0) wafer surface) and precise control over their geometry. The wetted areas were coated with thermally grown silicon oxide and electron-beam evaporated nickel films to protect them from the corrosive fluorination environment. Up to four Pyrex layers were anodically bonded to three silicon layers in a total of six bonding steps to cap the microchannels and stack the reaction layers. The average pinhole density in as-evaporated films was 3 holes cm-2. Heating during anodic bonding (up to 350 °C for 4 min) did not significantly alter the film composition. Upon fluorine exposure, nickel films (160 nm thick) deposited on an adhesion layer of Cr (10 nm) over an oxidized silicon substrate (up to 500 nm thick SiO2) led to the formation of a nickel fluoride passivation layer. This microreactor was used to investigate direct fluorinations at room temperature over several hours without visible signs of film erosion.

  5. Vapor-Induced Solid-Liquid-Solid Process for Silicon-based Nanowire Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Donghai; Choi, Daiwon; Fifield, Leonard S.; Wang, Chong M.; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Yang, Zhenguo; Pederson, Larry R.; Graff, Gordon L.

    2010-03-10

    Silicon based nanowires have been grown from commercial silicon powders under conditions of differing oxygen and carbon activities. Nanowires grown in the presence of carbon sources consisted of a crystalline SiC core with an amorphous SiOx shell. The thickness of SiOx shell decreased as the oxygen concentration in the precursor gases was lowered. Nanowires grown in a carbon-free environment consisted of amorphous silicon oxide with a typical composition of SiO1.8. The growth rate of nanowires decreased with decreasing oxygen content in the precursor gases. SiO1.8 nanowires exhibited an initial discharge capacity of ~ 1,300 mAh/g and better stability than those of silicon powders. A Vapor Induced Solid-Liquid-Solid (VI-SLS) mechanism is proposed to explain the nanowire growth (including silicon and other metal based nanowires) from powder sources. In this approach, both a gas source and a solid powder source are required for nanowire growth. This mechanism is consistent with experimental observations and can also be used to guide the design and growth of other nanowires.

  6. The measurement of electron number density in helium micro hollow gas discharge using asymmetric He I lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The electron number density N e in helium micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) is measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The structure of MHGD is a gold-alumina-gold sandwich with 250 μm alumina thickness and 100 μm diameter hole. The electron temperature T e and gas temperature T g in the discharge is determined using the relative intensity of He I lines and {{\\text{N}}2}+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σ\\text{u}+- {{X}2}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) R branch lines in the frame of BP technique, respectively. The simple procedure based on spectral line broadening theory was developed in MATLAB to generate synthetic neutral line asymmetric profiles. The synthetic profiles were compared with an experimental He I 447.1 nm and He I 492.2 nm line to obtain N e from the centre of a micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) source in helium. The N e results were compared with N e values obtained from the forbidden-to-allowed (F/A) intensity ratio technique. The comparison confirmed higher N e determined using a F/A ratio due to large uncertainty of the method. Applying the fitting formula for a He I 492.2 nm line derived from computer simulation (CS) gives the same N e values as the one determined using the MATLAB procedure in this study. The dependence of N e on gas pressure and electric current is investigated as well.

  7. Fabrication of silicon-based shape memory alloy micro-actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Busch, John D.; Ray, Curtis A.; Sloan, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film shape memory alloy has been integrated with silicon in a new actuation mechanism for microelectromechanical systems. This paper compares nickel-titanium film with other actuators, describes recent results of chemical milling processes developed to fabricate shape memory alloy microactuators in silicon, and describes simple actuation mechanisms which have been fabricated and tested.

  8. Highly sensitive and reproducible silicon-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors for real applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2016-08-15

    During the past few decades, thanks to silicon nanomaterials' outstanding electronic/optical/mechanical properties, large surface-to-volume ratio, abundant surface chemistry, facile tailorability and good compatibility with modern semiconductor industry, different dimensional silicon nanostructures have been widely employed for rationally designing and fabricating high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors for the detection of various chemical and biological species. Among these, two-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-modified silicon wafers and three-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-decorated SiNW arrays are of particular interest, and have been extensively exploited as promising silicon-based SERS-active substrates for the construction of high-performance SERS sensors. With an aim to retrospect these important and exciting achievements, we herein focus on reviewing recent representative studies on silicon-based SERS sensors for sensing applications from a broad perspective and possible future direction, promoting readers' awareness of these novel powerful silicon-based SERS sensing technologies. Firstly, we summarize the two unique merits of silicon-based SERS sensors, and those are high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Next, we present recent advances of two- and three-dimensional silicon-based SERS sensors, especially for real applications. Finally, we discuss the major challenges and prospects for the development of silicon-based SERS sensors. PMID:27414500

  9. Characterization and Modeling of Segmental Dynamics in Silicone Based Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R S; Baumann, T; Gee, R; Maiti, A; Patel, M; Lewicki, J

    2009-03-27

    content on a number of silicone based nanocomposite systems. This data is providing improved insight into the structural contributions to the changes in segmental dynamics. Here we provide an overview of our ongoing work toward understanding the influence of the network structure on the physical and chemical properties of advanced composite elastomers, including material performance in severe environments (high temperature, high strains, high radiation fluxes).

  10. Optical measurements of gas bubbles in oil behind a cavitating micro-orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, Uwe; Wolf, Fabian; Freudigmann, Hans-Arndt; Fröhlich, Jochen; Heller, Winfried

    2015-06-01

    In hydraulic systems, it is common for air release to occur behind valves or throttles in the form of bubbles. These air bubbles can affect the behavior and the performance of these systems to a substantial extent. In the paper, gas release in a liquid flow behind an orifice is analyzed by optical methods for various operation points. The bubbles are observed with a digital camera, and a detection algorithm based on the Hough transformation is used to determine their number and size. The appearance of gas bubbles is very sensitive to the inlet and outlet pressure of the orifice. Gas bubbles are only observed if choking cavitation occurs. An empirical relationship between an adjusted cavitation number and the appearance of gas release is presented. It is assumed that the observed bubbles contain mostly air. With the applied pressure differences, up to 30 % of the dissolved air was degassed in the form of bubbles.

  11. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  12. Gas and heat dynamics of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma reference jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; Golda, Judith; Turner, Miles M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Gas and heat dynamics of the ‘Cooperation on Science and Technology (COST) Reference Microplasma Jet’ (COST-jet), a European lead reference device for low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma application, are investigated. Of particular interest to many biomedical application scenarios, the temperature characteristics of a surface impacted by the jet are revealed. Schlieren imaging, thermocouple measurements, infrared thermal imaging and numerical modelling are employed. Temperature spatial profiles in the gas domain reveal heating primarily of the helium fraction of the gas mixture. Thermocouple and model temporal data show a bounded exponential temperature growth described by a single characteristic time parameter to reach  ∼63% or (1-1/e) fraction of the temperature increase. Peak temperatures occurred in the gas domain where the carrier jet exits the COST-jet, with values ranging from ambient temperatures to in excess of 100 °C in ‘α-mode’ operation. In a horizontal orientation of the COST-jet a curved trajectory of the helium effluent at low gas flows results from buoyant forces. Gas mixture profiles reveal significant containment of the helium concentrations for a surface placed in close proximity to the COST-jet. Surface heating of a quartz plate follows a similar bounded exponential temporal temperature growth as device heating. Spatial profiles of surface heating are found to correlate strongly to the impacting effluent where peak temperatures occur in regions of maximum surface helium concentration.

  13. Silicon-based semimetals and semiconductors for thermoelectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui

    The direct conversion between heat and electricity can be achieved by thermoelectric devices. Thus, thermoelectricity is considered as not only an environmentally friendly substitute for compressor-based refrigerators but also a promising energy solution to harvest waste heat. State-of-the-art thermoelectric materials are often comprised of expensive tellurium or germanium elements and hence are hardly suitable for mass production. The silicon-based thermoelectrics, e.g. semimetallic CoSi and semiconducting beta -FeSi2 materials we study here, are composed of abundant elements in nature. They are also chemically stable, non-toxic, and mechanically robust. Despite the above benefits, they exhibit relatively lower efficiencies compared to state-of-the-art materials. In this dissertation, we have intended to understand the thermal and electrical transport in these materials and enhance their thermoelectric performance. CoSi possesses one of the highest power factors among thermoelectrics due to the sharp features around the Fermi level in its electronic density of states. In order to improve the performance, the effects of p-type dopants, isoelectronic substitutions, n-type dopants, and double doping were systematically studied for arc-melted CoSi samples. The results show that p-type dopants like iron and gallium and n-type dopants like nickel and palladium deteriorate the electrical properties due to the introduction of excess holes and electrons, respectively. Boron and platinum have very limited solubility in CoSi and the segregated impurity phases at grain boundaries are helpful to improve the electrical properties. The isoelectronic substitutions influence the power factor slightly; however, they result in a drastic decrease in the lattice thermal conductivity and hence an enhancement in the figure of merit. In addition, CoSi samples prepared by powder processing were investigated to further reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. Unfortunately, all the

  14. Remote-Raman and Micro-Raman Studies of Solid CO2, CH4, Gas Hydrates and Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Exarhos, G. J.; Windisch, C. F., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that on Mars CO2 is the principal constituent of the thin atmosphere and on a seasonal basis CO2 snow and frost coats the polar caps. Also over 25% of the Martian atmosphere freezes out and sublimes again each year. The Mars Odyssey Emission Imaging system (THEMIS) has discovered water ice exposed near the edge of Mars southern perennials cap. In recent years, it has been suggested that in Martian subsurface CO2 may exist as gas hydrate (8CO2 + 44 H2O) with melting temperature of 10C. Since the crust of Mars has been stable for enough time there is also a possibility that methane formed by magmatic processes and/or as a byproduct of anaerobic deep biosphere activity to have raised toward the planet s surface. This methane would have been captured and stored as methane hydrate, which concentrates methane and water. Determination of abundance and distribution of these ices on the surface and in the near surface are of fundamental importance for understanding Martian atmosphere, and for future exploration of Mars. In this work, we have evaluated feasibility of using remote Raman and micro-Raman spectroscopy as potential nondestructive and non-contact techniques for detecting solid CO2, CH4 gas, and gas hydrates as well as water-ice on planetary surfaces.

  15. Optimum Operation Condition on Distributed Power Supply System with Micro Gas Turbine/Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yamada, Miki; Usui, Hiromoto; Komoda, Yoshiyuki

    In order to find the optimum operation condition of a distributed power supply system of 30kW class micro gas turbine (MGT) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) hybrid system with the combination of line electric power and supplied gas, a system analysis has been performed. In this study, an absorption chiller and a boiler were mounted to utilize the exhausted heat from the MGT/SOFC system. The time variation of energy consumption in 24 hours for house and market models was taken into consideration for the calculation of the energy saving ratio of the present system. The operation ratio defined with the ratio of power supply of MGT/SOFC system to the power required at the peak load was changed as a parameter. From the comparison with the system using line power and gas, it is found that the present system shows high energy saving ratio around 0.4 of the operation ratio, but the energy saving ratio severely decreases in the range of high operation ratio. In this study, it is revealed that the thermal storage system effectively improves the energy saving ratio especially for the house model in winter season.

  16. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  17. A low-power pressure-and temperature-programmed separation system for a micro gas chromatograph.

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, Richard D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Lambertus, Gordon R. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Potkay, Joseph A. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2006-10-01

    This thesis presents the theory, design, fabrication and testing of the microvalves and columns necessary in a pressure- and temperature-programmed micro gas chromatograph ({micro}GC). Two microcolumn designs are investigated: a bonded Si-glass column having a rectangular cross section and a vapor-deposited silicon oxynitride (Sion) column having a roughly circular cross section. Both microcolumns contain integrated heaters and sensors for rapid, controlled heating. The 3.2 cm x 3.2 cm, 3 m-long silicon-glass column, coated with a non-polar polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stationary phase, separates 30 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in less than 6 min. This is the most efficient micromachined column reported to date, producing greater than 4000 plates/m. The 2.7 mm x 1.4 mm Sion column eliminates the glass sealing plate and silicon substrate using deposited dielectrics and is the lowest power and fastest GC column reported to date; it requires only 11 mW to raise the column temperature by 100 C and has a response time of 11s and natural temperature ramp rate of 580 C/min. A 1 m-long PDMS-coated Sion microcolumn separates 10 VOCs in 52s. A system-based design approach was used for both columns.

  18. Start-up and Self-sustain Test of 500 W Ultra-Micro Gas Turbine Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Min; Park, Jun Young; Seog Choi, Bum

    2013-12-01

    This paper provides the performance test for start-up and self-sustaining of 500W ultra-micro gas turbine (UMGT) generator. Each component of UMGT, a centrifugal compressor, a radial turbine, an annular combustor and a shaft is already designed, manufactured and tested to meet design requirements in previous researches. However, they are not tested to work in an integrate system. Currently, integrated test unit with a compressor, a combustor and a turbine, is developed to find the proper condition of start-up and self-sustain. Ignition sequence depending on rotating speed is designed. Performance test for start-up and self-sustain is designed based on the ignition possible condition. An air impingement starter and a hot bulb inginer are applied. LPG is used as main fuel.

  19. Bias Dependence of Gallium Nitride Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Actuation Using a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Achraf Ben; Faucher, Marc; Grimbert, Bertrand; Cordier, Yvon; Fran\\{c}ois, Marc; Tilmant, Pascal; Werquin, Matthieu; Zhang, Victor; Ducatteau, Damien; Gaquière, Christophe; Buchaillot, Lionel; Théron, Didier

    2012-06-01

    The piezoelectric actuation of a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator based on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is studied under various bias conditions. Using an actuator electrode that is also a transistor gate, we correlate the mechanical behaviour to the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) presence. The measured amplitude of the actuated resonator is maximum at moderate negative biases and drops near the pinch-off voltage in concordance with the 2DEG becoming depleted. Below the pinch-off voltage, residual actuation is still present, which is attributed to a more complex electric field pattern supported by quantitative modelling. The results confirm that epitaxial AlGaN barriers are fully adapted to the piezoelectric actuation of MEMS.

  20. Numerical analysis of gas separator with thermal transpiration in micro channels II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaye, Shoeji; Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    A membrane gas separator which operates with only a small temperature difference across a membrane is designed, and its capability is numerically proved. The separator system consists of three Knudsen pumps - a motionless pump that utilizes the thermal transpiration of the rarefied gas. Each pump is composed of a porous membrane and one channel along each of the two surfaces of the membrane. Two of the pumps induce a variation of mole fraction using a combination of the thermal transpiration and pressure driven flow through the membrane, and the other one provides the former two pumps with a required pressure difference. This paper reports the first numerical calculations that demonstrate a neon-argon binary gas mixture can be separated into pure neon gas and argon gas with the proposed design. The temperature difference is no more than 90 K, and the total length of the membrane is ˜ 15 cm at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The production rate of the separator is proportional to the width of the membrane. For example, when the width is 10 cm, the flow rates of the product gases are 0.8 sccm for argon and 1.9 sccm for neon.

  1. [Characterization of compounds in crude oils by gas purge micro-syringe extraction coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Tong, Ting; Zhang, Wanfeng; Li, Donghao; Zhao, Jinhua; Chang, Zhenyang; Gao, Xuanbo; Dai, Wei; He, Sheng; Zhu, Shukui

    2014-10-01

    A novel sample pretreatment method, gas purge micro-syringe extraction (GP- MSE), coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC/TOFMS) has been developed for the characterization of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in crude oils. In the sample pretreatment process, the analytes were carried to the microsyringe barrel by inert gas, and at the same time, trapped by an organic solvent. The whole process of extraction takes less than 10 min, and only 20 μL of organic solvent was needed. Using two custom standard solutions containing alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the influences of the extraction conditions were investigated. The optimized conditions were as follows: 5 mg crude oil, 20 μL hexane (extraction solvent), extraction for 3 min at 300 °C, condensation temperature set at -2 °C, gas flow rate set at 2 mL/min. Under the optimized conditions, a real crude oil sample was extracted and then analyzed in detail. It showed that the proposed method was very effective in simultaneously analyzing the normal and branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and biomarkers of crude oil such as steranes and terpanes. The recoveries obtained ranged from 82.0% to 107.3% and the detection limits ranged from 34 to 93 μg/L. The correlation coefficients (R2) were more than 0.99. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5) for all the analytes were below 10%. The results indicate that the proposed method is suitable for the characterization of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in crude oils with easy operation, high sensitivity and efficiency. PMID:25739277

  2. A multi-phase, micro-dispersion reactor for the continuous production of methane gas hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Taboada Serrano, Patricia L; Ulrich, Shannon M; Szymcek, Phillip; McCallum, Scott; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Tsouris, Costas

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-jet hydrate reactor originally developed to generate a CO2 hydrate stream has been modified to continuously produce CH4 hydrate. The reactor has been tested in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), a 72-L pressure vessel available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During experiments, the reactor was submerged in water inside the SPS and received water from the surrounding through a submersible pump and CH4 externally through a gas booster pump. Thermodynamic conditions in the hydrate stability regime were employed in the experiments. The reactor produced a continuous stream of CH4 hydrate, and based on pressure values and amount of gas injected, the conversion of gas to hydrate was estimated. A conversion of up to 70% was achieved using this reactor.

  3. Smart multi-channel two-dimensional micro-gas chromatography for rapid workplace hazardous volatile organic compounds measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Seo, Jung Hwan; Li, Yubo; Chen, Di; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2013-03-01

    We developed a novel smart multi-channel two-dimensional (2-D) micro-gas chromatography (μGC) architecture that shows promise to significantly improve 2-D μGC performance. In the smart μGC design, a non-destructive on-column gas detector and a flow routing system are installed between the first dimensional separation column and multiple second dimensional separation columns. The effluent from the first dimensional column is monitored in real-time and decision is then made to route the effluent to one of the second dimensional columns for further separation. As compared to the conventional 2-D μGC, the greatest benefit of the smart multi-channel 2-D μGC architecture is the enhanced separation capability of the second dimensional column and hence the overall 2-D GC performance. All the second dimensional columns are independent of each other, and their coating, length, flow rate and temperature can be customized for best separation results. In particular, there is no more constraint on the upper limit of the second dimensional column length and separation time in our architecture. Such flexibility is critical when long second dimensional separation is needed for optimal gas analysis. In addition, the smart μGC is advantageous in terms of elimination of the power intensive thermal modulator, higher peak amplitude enhancement, simplified 2-D chromatogram re-construction and potential scalability to higher dimensional separation. In this paper, we first constructed a complete smart 1 × 2 channel 2-D μGC system, along with an algorithm for automated control/operation of the system. We then characterized and optimized this μGC system, and finally employed it in two important applications that highlight its uniqueness and advantages, i.e., analysis of 31 workplace hazardous volatile organic compounds, and rapid detection and identification of target gas analytes from interference background. PMID:23303462

  4. Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Dong, Junhang

    2014-09-30

    This is the final report for the program “Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments”, funded by NETL, and performed by Missouri University of Science and Technology, Clemson University and University of Cincinnati from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2014. Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is a central element to the mission of The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensor technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems. The main objective of this research program is to conduct fundamental and applied research that will lead to successful development and demonstration of robust, multiplexed, microstructured silica and single-crystal sapphire fiber sensors to be deployed into the hot zones of advanced power and fuel systems for simultaneous measurements of high temperature and gas pressure. The specific objectives of this research program include: 1) Design, fabrication and demonstration of multiplexed, robust silica and sapphire fiber temperature and dynamic gas pressure sensors that can survive and maintain fully operational in high-temperature harsh environments. 2) Development and demonstration of a novel method to demodulate the multiplexed interferograms for simultaneous measurements of temperature and gas pressure in harsh environments. 3) Development and demonstration of novel sapphire fiber cladding and low numerical aperture (NA) excitation techniques to assure high signal integrity and sensor robustness.

  5. Compatibility of RPECVD silicon dioxide with depletion gate materials for silicon-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, Mary Jo

    The focus of this work has been upon deposited oxide and gate materials suitable for use in silicon-based nanostructures. The latter use e-beam patterned depletion gates in order to create three-dimensional confinement of electrons in the 2-dimensional electron gas of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) inversion layer. Remote Plasma Enhanced chemical Vapor Deposition (RPECVD) silicon dioxide was selected as the deposited oxide. The deposition process was optimized using statistical techniques. Typically, low temperature deposited oxide is annealed in order to achieve device quality. The behavior of the oxide as a function of deposition and annealing temperature was characterized in order to understand the advantages of the anneal and the thermal budget required to accomplish the objectives of the MOSFET gate oxide quality oxide. Bulk oxide was assessed using etch rates in HF containing solutions, infrared absorption data, refractive index, and AFM measurements of surface roughness. The interface quality was examined using C-V measurements. Breakdown measurements were performed. The impact of the oxide deposition process on a thermally established Si/SiOsb2 interface was explored. Three materials were investigated for the role of depletion gates that might tolerate a high temperature aneal: cobalt silicide, cobalt and chrome. Their thermal stability was tested, sandwiched between a thermal oxide and a deposited oxide, for annealing temperatures of 700, 800 and 900 C by Auger electron spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron spectroscopy. The impact of the oxide deposition process on the depletion gates was significant and so this has been studied as well.

  6. MACRO- MICRO-PURGE SOIL GAS SAMPLING METHODS FOR THE COLLECTION OF CONTAMINANT VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purging influence on soil gas concentrations for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as affected by sampling tube inner diameter and sampling depth (i.e., dead-space purge volume), was evaluated at different field sites. A macro-purge sampling system consisted of a standard hollo...

  7. Porous Silicon-Based Quantum Dot Broad Spectrum Radiation Detector

    PubMed Central

    Urdaneta, M.; Stepanov, P.; Weinberg, I. N.; Pala, I. R.; Brock, S.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon is a convenient and inexpensive platform for radiation detection, but has low stopping power for x-rays and gamma-rays with high energy (e.g., 100 keV, as used in computed tomography and digital radiography, or 1 MeV, as desired for detection of nuclear materials). We have effectively increased the stopping power of silicon detectors by producing a layer of porous or micro-machined silicon, and infusing this layer with semiconductor quantum dots made of electron-dense materials. Results of prototype detectors show sensitivity to infrared, visible light, and x-rays, with dark current of less than 1 nA/mm2. PMID:24432047

  8. Micro- and nano-scale hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers by coaxial electrospinning: Preparation and gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jin; Choi, Sun-Woo; Kim, Sang Sub

    2011-11-15

    We report the preparation of micro- and nano-scale hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers using a coaxial electrospinning technique and their gas sensing properties in terms of CO. The diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers can be controlled from 200 nm to several micrometers by changing the viscosity of electrospinning solutions. Lower viscosities produce slim hollow nanofibers. In contrast, fat hollow microfibers are obtained in the case of higher viscosities. A simple mathematical expression is presented to predict the change in diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers as a function of viscosity. The successful control over the diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers is expected to bring extensive applications. To test a potential use of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers in chemical gas sensors, their sensing properties to CO are investigated at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Microstructures of as-prepared and calcined hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers prepared by the electrospinning technique with a coaxial needle. Dynamic response at various CO concentrations for the sensor fabricated with the hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers. Highlights: > Hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers were synthesized using a coaxial electrospinning technique. > Their diameter can be controlled by changing the viscosity of electrospinning solutions. > Lower viscosities produce slim hollow nanofibers. > In contrast, fat hollow microfibers are obtained in the case of higher viscosities. > Successful control over the diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers will bring extensive applications.

  9. Development of High Precision Metal Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems Column for Portable Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaya, Takamitsu; Akao, Shingo; Sakamoto, Toshihiro; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Nakaso, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    In the field of environmental measurement and security, a portable gas chromatograph (GC) is required for the on-site analysis of multiple hazardous gases. Although the gas separation column has been downsized using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology, an MEMS column made of silicon and glass still does not have sufficient robustness and a sufficiently low fabrication cost for a portable GC. In this study, we fabricated a robust and inexpensive high-precision metal MEMS column by combining diffusion-bonded etched stainless-steel plates with alignment evaluation using acoustic microscopy. The separation performance was evaluated using a desktop GC with a flame ionization detector and we achieved the high separation performance comparable to the best silicon MEMS column fabricated using a dynamic coating method. As an application, we fabricated a palm-size surface acoustic wave (SAW) GC combining this column with a ball SAW sensor and succeeded in separating and detecting a mixture of volatile organic compounds.

  10. A programmable palm-size gas analyzer for use in micro-autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordenker, Robert J. M.; Wise, Kensall D.

    2012-06-01

    Gas analysis systems having small size, low power, and high selectivity are badly needed for defense (detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents), homeland security, health care, and environmental applications. This paper presents a palm-size gas chromatography system having analysis times of 5-50sec, detection limits less than 1ppb, and an average power dissipation less than one watt. It uses no consumables. The three-chip fluidic system consists of a preconcentrator, a 25cm-3m separation column, and a chemi-resistive detector and is supported by a microcomputer and circuitry for programmable temperature control. The entire system, including the mini-pump and battery, occupies less than 200cc and is configured for use on autonomous robotic vehicles.

  11. Interactions Between Small Arrays of Atmospheric Pressure Micro-Plasma Jets: Gas Dynamic, Radiation and Electrostatic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are widely used devices for biomedical applications. A typical plasma jet consists of a tube through which noble gas or its mixture with a molecular gas flows. The noble gas creates a channel into the ambient air which is eventually dispersed by interdiffusion with the air. Plasma plumes are formed by the propagation of ionization waves (IWs) through the tubes and then through the noble gas phase channel. The IW typically propagates until the mole fraction of the ambient air in the channel increases above a critical values which requires a larger E/N to propagate the IW. By grouping several jets together to form an array of jets, one can in principle increase the area treated by the plume. If the jets are sufficiently far apart, the IWs and resulting plasma plumes are independent. As the spacing between the jets decreases, the plasma jets begin to mutually interact. In this talk, we discuss results from a computational investigation of small arrays of He/O2 micro-plasma jets propagating into ambient air. The model used in this work, nonPDPSIM, is a plasma hydrodynamics model in which continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for charged and neutral species with solution of Poisson's equation for the electric potential. Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the gas dynamics and radiation transport is addressed using a propagator method. We found that as the spacing between the jets decreases, the He channels from the individual jets tend to merge. The IWs from each channel also merge into regions having the highest He mole fraction and so lowest E/N to sustain the IW. The proximity of the IWs enable other forms of interaction. If the IWs are of the same polarity, electrostatic forces can warp the paths of the IWs. If in sufficient proximity, the photoionization from one IW can influence its neighbors. The synchronization of the voltage pulses of adjacent IWs can also influence its neighbors. With synchronized pulses

  12. An integrated approach for optimal design of micro gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuligno, Luca; Micheli, Diego; Poloni, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    The present work presents an approach for the optimized design of small gas turbine combustors, that integrates a 0-D code, CFD analyses and an advanced game theory multi-objective optimization algorithm. The output of the 0-D code is a baseline design of the combustor, given the required fuel characteristics, the basic geometry (tubular or annular) and the combustion concept (i.e. lean premixed primary zone or diffusive processes). For the optimization of the baseline design a simplified parametric CAD/mesher model is then defined and submitted to a CFD code. Free parameters of the optimization process are position and size of the liner hole arrays, their total area and the shape of the exit duct, while different objectives are the minimization of NOx emissions, pressure losses and combustor exit Pattern Factor. A 3D simulation of the optimized geometry completes the design procedure. As a first demonstrative example, the integrated design process was applied to a tubular combustion chamber with a lean premixed primary zone for a recuperative methane-fuelled small gas turbine of the 100 kW class.

  13. Modeling Transport in Gas Chromatography Columns for the Micro-ChemLab

    SciTech Connect

    ADKINS,DOUGLAS R.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; HUDSON,MARY L.; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; SALINGER,ANDREW G.; SHADID,JOHN N.; WONG, CHUNGNIN CHANN

    1999-09-01

    The gas chromatography (GC) column is a critical component in the microsystem for chemical detection ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) being developed at Sandia. The goal is to etch a meter-long GC column onto a 1-cm{sup 2} silicon chip while maintaining good chromatographic performance. Our design strategy is to use a modeling and simulation approach. We have developed an analytical tool that models the transport and surface interaction process to achieve an optimized design of the GC column. This analytical tool has a flow module and a separation module. The flow module considers both the compressibility and slip flow effects that may significantly influence the gas transport in a long and narrow column. The separation module models analyte transport and physico-chemical interaction with the coated surface in the GC column. It predicts the column efficiency and performance. Results of our analysis will be presented in this paper. In addition to the analytical tool, we have also developed a time-dependent adsorption/desorption model and incorporated this model into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate analyte transport and separation process in GC columns. CFD simulations can capture the complex three-dimensional flow and transport dynamics, whereas the analytical tool cannot. Different column geometries have been studied, and results will be presented in this paper. Overall we have demonstrated that the modeling and simulation approach can guide the design of the GC column and will reduce the number of iterations in the device development.

  14. Toward a Micro Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, D. V.; Eyre, F. B.; Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Garkarian, V.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature mass filters (e.g., quadrupoles, ion traps) have been the subject of several miniaturization efforts. A project is currently in progress at JPL to develop a miniaturized Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) system, incorporating and/or developing miniature system components including turbomolecular pumps, scroll type roughing pump, quadrupole mass filter, gas chromatograph, precision power supply and other electronic components. The preponderance of the system elements will be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The quadrupole mass filter will be fabricated using an X-ray lithography technique producing high precision, 5x5 arrays of quadrupoles with pole lengths of about 3 mm and a total volume of 27 cubic mm. The miniature scroll pump will also be fabricated using X-ray lithography producing arrays of scroll stages about 3 mm in diameter. The target detection range for the mass spectrometer is 1 to 300 atomic mass units (AMU) with are solution of 0.5 AMU. This resolution will allow isotopic characterization for geochronology, atmospheric studies and other science efforts dependant on the understanding of isotope ratios of chemical species. This paper will discuss the design approach, the current state-of-the art regarding the system components and the progress toward development of key elements. The full system is anticipated to be small enough in mass, volume and power consumption to allow in situ chemical analysis on highly miniaturized science craft for geochronology, atmospheric characterization and detection of life experiments applicable to outer planet roadmap missions.

  15. Silicon Carbide Micro-devices for Combustion Gas Sensing under Harsh Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Reza Loloee; Roger G. Tobin; Yung Ho Kahng

    2006-04-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. For fast and stable sensor response measurements, a gate activation process is required. Activation of all sensors took place by switching back and forth between oxidizing (1.0% oxygen in nitrogen) and reducing (10% hydrogen in nitrogen) gases for several hours at a sensor temperature {ge}620 C. All 52 devices on the sensor chip were activated simultaneously by flooding the entire chip with gas. The effects of activation on surface morphology and structure of Pt gates before and after activation were investigated. The optical images obtained from Pt gates demonstrated a clear transition from a smooth and shiny surface to a grainy and cloudy surface morphology. XRD scans collected from Pt gates suggest the presence of an amorphous layer and species other than Pt (111) after activation. The reliability of the gate insulator of our metal-oxide-SiC sensors for long-term device operation at 630 C was studied. We find that the dielectric is stable against breakdown due to electron injection from the substrate with gate leakage current densities as low at 5nA/cm{sup 2} at 630 C. We also designed and constructed a new nano-reactor capable of high gas flow rates at elevated pressure. Our reactor, which is a miniature version of an industrial reactor, is designed to heat the flowing gas up to 700 C. Measurements in ultrahigh vacuum demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide readily deposits sulfur on the gate surface, even at the very high hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide ratios (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5}) expected in applications. Once deposited, the sulfur adversely affects sensor response, and could not be removed by exposure to hydrogen at the temperatures and pressures accessible in

  16. Realization of porous silicon based miniature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichonat, T.; Gauthier-Manuel, B.

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new way of making low-cost miniature fuel cells for portable applications based on proton conducting porous silicon membranes. Our solution consists in the chemical grafting of silane molecules containing ionizable groups on the pores walls to mimic the structure of ionomer, such as Nafion ®, usually used to ensure the proton conductivity of PEM fuel cells. We obtain an inorganic, dimensionally stable, proton conducting membrane with many optimizable parameters such as the pore size, the pore structure of the membrane and the nature of the grafted molecules. Moreover, the use of a silicon substrate offers advantages of serial and parallel integration, the possibility of encapsulation by wafer bonding and gas feed and electrical contacts can be included into the membrane etching process thanks to simple KOH wet etching processes and metal sputtering. A power density of 17 mW cm -2 was obtained.

  17. Sequential Processes in Palladium-Catalyzed Silicon-Based Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Liu, Jack H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Although developed somewhat later, silicon-based cross-coupling has become a viable alternative to the more conventional Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille-Kosugi-Migita, and Negishi cross-coupling reactions because of its broad substrate scope, high stability of silicon-containing reagents, and low toxicity of waste streams. An empowering and yet underappreciated feature unique to silicon-based cross-coupling is the wide range of sequential processes available. In these processes, simple precursors are first converted to complex silicon-containing cross-coupling substrates, and the subsequent silicon-based cross-coupling reaction affords an even more highly functionalized product in a stereoselective fashion. In so doing, structurally simple and inexpensive starting materials are quickly transformed into value-added and densely substituted products. Therefore, sequential processes are often useful in constructing the carbon backbones of natural products. In this review, studies of sequential processes involving silicon-based cross-coupling are discussed. Additionally, the total syntheses that utilize these sequential processes are also presented. PMID:23293392

  18. Heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire micro-sensor array for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Dante; MacNaughton, Sam; Wang, Zhilong; Zhang, Xinjie; Sonkusale, Sameer; Vandervelde, Thomas E.

    2014-04-01

    Vanadium oxide, manganese oxide, tungsten oxide, and nickel oxide nanowires were investigated for their applicability as chemiresistive gas sensors. Nanowires have excellent surface-to-volume ratios which yield higher sensitivities than bulk materials. Sensing elements consisting of these materials were assembled in an array to create an electronic nose platform. Dielectrophoresis was used to position the nanomaterials onto a microfabricated array of electrodes, which was subsequently mounted onto a leadless chip carrier and printed circuit board for rapid testing. Samples were tested in an enclosed chamber with vapors of acetone, isopropanol, methanol, and aqueous ammonia. The change in resistance of each assembly was measured. Responses varied between nanowire compositions, each demonstrating unique and repeatable responses to different gases; this enabled direct detection of the gases from the ensemble response. Sensitivities were calculated based on the fractional resistance change in a saturated environment and ranged from 6 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-5%change ppm-1.

  19. Micro-hardness of nanocrystalline palladium and copper produced by inert-gas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Siegel, R.W. )

    1989-12-01

    This report describes the major results of a Vickers microhardness study of nanocrystalline palladium and copper produced by the inert-gas condensation method. Small grain size is known to have a strong influence on mechanical properties at low and intermediate temperatures, as observed in the Hall--Petch effect, Coble creep, and superplasticity. Until recently, the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials with mean grain diameters of 5 to 50 nm have not been explored. A microhardness study on conventional compacted tungsten powder indicated that the Hall--Petch effect extends to the 150 nm range; and effects of nanocrystalline grain size on mechanical properties of TiO{sub 2} have been investigated.

  20. High-temperature oxidation of CVD silicon-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Takashi; Hirai, Toshio; Iguchi, Yasutaka

    1996-12-31

    Oxidation behavior of CVD SiC and CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was studied at 1773 to 2023 K in Ar-O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} and CO-CO{sub 2} atmospheres. In Ar-O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} atmospheres, the active oxidation rates for CVD SiC and CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were dominated by oxygen diffusion through a gas boundary layer. The active-to-passive transition oxygen partial pressures for CVD SiC were slightly greater than those for CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. In CO-CO{sub 2} atmospheres, at PCO{sub 2}/PCO < 10{sup -3} inward diffusion of CO{sub 2} gas controlled the active oxidation rates for CVD SiC; however, a chemical reaction controlled the rates for CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. At PCO{sub 2}/PCO > 10 {sup -2}, SiO{sub 2} particles or layers formed during the active oxidation; the decomposition of SiO{sub 2} could control the active oxidation rates. The Wagner model can be used to explain the active-to-passive transition in these atmospheres for both CVD SiC and CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The volatility diagram and thermodynamic calculation, including mass balance relationship, were also useful to understand the transition behavior.

  1. Micro gas chromatography based on mems technology for the analysisof volatile species in planetary environmentsONMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Cyril; Coscia, David; Buch, Arnaud; Pineau, Jean-Pierre; Coll, Patrice

    2016-04-01

    Gas chromatography is used since the Mars Viking missions in the 70's to characterize the nature and amount of volatile chemical compounds present in planetary atmospheres, soils or rocks. This technique allows to separate the gaseous compound injected in the instrument for their subsequent detection either by a physical sensor, or a spectrometer giving information about the structure of the volatile. This pre-separation is precious to proceed to the identification of individual species present in a complex mixture. Moreover, it is a unique method to separate and quantify enantiomers of organic molecules which is a key information in astrobiology to assess the potential for such molecules to be related to a biotic or a pre-biotic process. Finally, the potential of this technique is proven by its current use in the Curiosity rover at the Mars surface, as it allowed to demonstrate the presence of organic material endogenous to Mars for the first time ever [1]. But despite its efficiency, this instrumentation is based on laboratory technologies and requires for resources which are limited (e.g. carrier gas), making it a resources consuming instrumentation. That prevents it to be considered for small and light scientific payloads. This is one among reasons why our team initiated a research and technology action with the aim to miniaturize this type of instrumentation. This work relies on the use of micro-electro mechanical systems and their integration into a complete chromatographic system with the aim to gain one order of magnitude in term of resources required to make it work. In this communication we will present the different components that were developed for this project and their tested performances which show the potential for this system to be used in future in situ exploration space probes. References [1] Freissinet et al., JGR planets 120, 495-514, (2015).

  2. Silicon Carbide Micro-devices for Combustion Gas Sensing under Harsh Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby Ghosh; Reza Loloee; Roger Tobin

    2008-09-30

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device, Pt/SiO{sub 2}/SiC that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature (600 C) environments. We demonstrate that the device can be used as a hydrogen monitor in syngas applications of common interferants as well as sulfur and water vapor. These measurements were made in the Catalyst Screening Unit at NETL, Morgantown under atmospheric conditions. The sensor response to hydrogen gas at 350 C is 240 mV/decade, this is significantly higher than the device response to room temperature gas or that predicted from vacuum chamber studies. The enhanced catalytic activity of the platinum sensing film under energy plant operating conditions was investigated via AFM, x-ray diffraction, TEM and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our characterization indicated that exposure to high temperature gases significantly modifies the morphology of the Pt catalytic film and the Pt/SiO{sub 2} interfacial region, which we tentatively attribute to the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of the sensing film. A model for the hydrogen/oxygen response of the SiC device under atmospheric conditions was developed. It is based on two independent phenomena: a chemically induced shift in the metal-semiconductor work function difference and the passivation/creation of charged states at the SiO{sub 2}-SiC interface. The optimum operating set point for the SiC sensor with respect to response time and long term reliability was determined to be close to mid-gap. Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) techniques were used to investigate the effects of sulfur contamination on the Pt gate. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide, even in the presence of hydrogen or oxygen at partial pressures of 20-600 times greater than the H2S level, rapidly coated the gate with a monolayer of sulfur. Although

  3. Quadruple-junction thin-film silicon-based solar cells with high open-circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Fai Tong; Kim, Do Yun; Santbergen, Rudi; Tan, Hairen; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Smets, Arno H. M.; Isabella, Olindo; Zeman, Miro

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a-SiOx:H/a-Si:H/nc-Si:H/nc-Si:H quadruple-junction thin-film silicon-based solar cells (4J TFSSCs) to obtain high spectral utilization and high voltages. By processing the solar cells on micro-textured superstrates, extremely high open-circuit voltages for photovoltaic technology based on thin-film silicon alloys up to 2.91 V have been achieved. Optical simulations of quadruple-junction solar cells using an advanced in-house model are a crucial tool to effectively tackle the challenging task of current matching among the individual sub-cells in such devices. After optimizing the optical design of the device and the absorber thicknesses, an energy conversion efficiency of 11.4% has been achieved. The open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and fill factor were 2.82 V, 5.49 mA/cm2, and 73.9%, respectively. Based on this demonstration, strategies for further development of highly efficient 4J TFSSCs are proposed.

  4. A Silicon-Based Nanothin Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Array with Edge Reinforced Support for Enhanced Thermal Mechanical Stability.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jong Dae; Yu, Chen-Chiang; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-04-13

    A silicon-based micro-solid oxide fuel cell (μ-SOFC) with electrolyte membrane array embedded in a thin silicon supporting membrane, featuring a unique edge reinforcement structure, was demonstrated by utilizing simple silicon micromachining processes. The square silicon supporting membrane, fabricated by combining deep reactive ion etching and through-wafer wet etching processes, has thicker edges and corners than the center portion of the membrane, which effectively improved the mechanical stability of the entire fuel cell array during cell fabrication and cell operation. The 20 μm thick single crystalline silicon membrane supports a large number of 80 nm thick free-standing yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. The fuel cell array was stably maintained at the open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.04 V for more than 30 h of operation at 350 °C. A high peak power density of 317 mW/cm(2) was obtained at 400 °C. During a rigorous in situ thermal cycling between 150 and 400 °C at a fast cooling and heating rate of 25 °C/min, the OCV of the μ-SOFC recovered to its high value of 1.07 V without any drop caused by membrane failure, which justifies the superior thermal stability of this novel cell architecture. PMID:26990604

  5. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    2016-09-06

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  6. SILICON CARBIDE MICRO-DEVICES FOR COMBUSTION GAS SENSING UNDER HARSH CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias; Roger G. Tobin

    2004-10-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. For these capacitive sensors we have determined that the optimum sensor operating point in terms of sensor lifetime and response time is at midgap. Detailed measurements of the oxide leakage current as a function of temperature were performed to investigate the high temperature reliability of the devices. In addition, robust metallization and electrical contacting techniques have been developed for device operation at elevated temperatures. To characterize the time response of the sensor responses in the millisecond range, a conceptually new apparatus has been built. Using laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques we have shown that the gas underneath the sensor can be completely exchanged with a time constant under 1 millisecond. Ultrahigh vacuum studies of the surface chemistry of the platinum gate have shown that sensor deactivation by adsorbed sulfur is a possible problem. Investigations on the chemical removal of sulfur by catalytic oxidation or reduction are continuing.

  7. Controlled synthesis of ZnO from nanospheres to micro-rods and its gas sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Navale, Shalaka C; Gosavi, S W; Mulla, I S

    2008-06-15

    1D ZnO rods are synthesized using less explored hydrazine method. Here we find, besides being combustible hydrazine can also be used as a structure-directing agent. The ratio of zinc nitrate (ZN) to hydrazine is found to control the morphology of ZnO. At lower concentration of ZN as compared with hydrazine the morphology of ZnO is found to be spherical. As we increase the hydrazine content the morphology changes from spherical (diameter approximately 100 nm) to the elongated structures including shapes like Y, T as well dumbbell (diameter approximately 40 nm and length approximately 150 nm). Interestingly for more than 50% of hydrazine ZnO micro-rods are formed. Such rods are of diameter approximately 120 nm having length of about 1 microm for ZN to hydrazine ratio of 1:9, isolated as well as bundle of rods are seen in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals the phase formation with average particle size of 37 nm as calculated using Scherrer's formula. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is also done to confirm the d-spacing in ZnO. Gas sensing study for these samples shows high efficiency and selectivity towards LPG at all operating temperatures. Photoluminescence (PL) study for these samples is performed at room temperature to find potential application as photoelectric material. PMID:18585218

  8. Toward a microfabricated preconcentrator-focuser for a wearable micro-scale gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Genevier, Jonathan; Zellers, Edward T

    2015-11-27

    This article describes work leading to a microfabricated preconcentrator-focuser (μPCF) designed for integration into a wearable microfabricated gas chromatograph (μGC) for monitoring workplace exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ranging in vapor pressure from ∼0.03 to 13kPa at concentrations near their respective Threshold Limit Values. Testing was performed on both single- and dual-cavity, etched-Si μPCF devices with Pyrex caps and integrated resistive heaters, packed with the graphitized carbons Carbopack X (C-X) and/or Carbopack B (C-B). Performance was assessed by measuring the 10% breakthrough volumes and injection bandwidths of a series of VOCs, individually and in mixtures, as a function of the VOC air concentrations, mixture complexity, sampling and desorption flow rates, adsorbent masses, temperature, and the injection split ratio. A dual-cavity device containing 1.4mg of C-X and 2.0mg of C-B was capable of selectively and quantitatively capturing a mixture of 14 VOCs at low-ppm concentrations in a few minutes from sample volumes sufficiently large to permit detection at relevant concentrations for workplace applications with the μGC detector that we ultimately plan to use. Thermal desorption at 225°C for 40s yielded ≥99% desorption of all analytes, and injected bandwidths as narrow as 0.6s facilitated efficient separation on a downstream 6-m GC column in <3min. A preconcentration factor of 620 was achieved for benzene from a sample of just 31mL. Increasing the mass of C-X to 2.3mg would be required for exhaustive capture of the more volatile target VOCs at high-ppm concentrations. PMID:26530144

  9. Vapor sensors using porous silicon-based optical interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting

    The ability to detect or monitor various gases is important for many applications. Smaller, more portable, lower power, and less expensive gas sensors are needed. Porous silicon (PS) has attracted attention for use in such devices due to its unique optical and electronic properties and its large surface area. This thesis describes the preparation and characteristics of vapor sensors using thin PS Fabry-Perot films. The average refractive index of the PS layer increases when the PS film is exposed to analyte vapors, causing the optical fringes to shift to longer wavelengths. Two methods for monitoring the shifts in these optical fringes are explored in this thesis. The first technique measures the reflection spectrum using a white light source, and the second measures the intensity of reflected light using a low-power red diode laser source. The latter method offers a simple, low-cost and reliable transduction mechanism for vapor sensing. A vapor sensor with a detection limit of 250 ppb and a wide dynamic range (five orders of magnitude) is demonstrated. The effect of the PS film thickness and porosity on sensitivity are systematically studied. A model based on the Bruggeman approximation and capillary condensation is proposed to explain this sensing behavior. Two approaches to improve the sensitivity of the PS sensors are explored. In the first, porous Si is chemically modified and the investigation shows that the sensing response varies with different surface properties. In a second study, thin polymer layers are coated on the porous Si substrate to selectively filter solvent vapors. This bi-layer approach is also applied to porous Si layers that have luminescent quantum structures. These latter structures sense adsorbates based on quenching of luminescence from the quantum-confined silicon nanostructures. In the course of this thesis, an anomalous response of ozone-oxidized PS films to water vapor was discovered. The effect was studied by optical interferometry

  10. Miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation for in situ measurements: micro gas chromatography coupled with miniature quadrupole array and paul ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, P.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M.; Orient, O.

    2002-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical instrumentation is needed for in situ measurements in planetary exploration and other spaceflight applications where factors such as reduction in payload requirements and enhanced robustness are important. In response to this need, we are 'continuing to develop miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation which combines chemical separations by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) to provide positive identification of chemical compounds in complex mixtures of gases, such as those found in the International Space Station's cabin atmosphere. Our design approach utilizes micro gas chromatography components coupled with either a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array (QMSA) or compact, high-resolution Paul ion trap.

  11. Nanoscale phosphorus atom arrays created using STM for the fabrication of a silicon based quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, R. G.; Dzurak, A. S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, B. E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, M. E.; Brown, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer 'resist' with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites. Keywords: Quantum computing, nanotechriology scanning turincling microscopy, hydrogen lithography

  12. Critical roles of binders and formulation at multiscales of silicon-based composite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouzi, D.; Karkar, Z.; Reale Hernandez, C.; Jimenez Manero, P.; Guyomard, D.; Roué, L.; Lestriez, B.

    2015-04-01

    In this review we try to shed a comprehensive understanding on the influence of the different parameters of the formulation of silicon-based composite electrode on its cyclability, i.e. the binder, the conductive additives, the current collector, the electrode porosity and solid loading, in view of a more rational assessment of the relevancy of these parameters for the battery technology. The reasons of the better efficiency of carboxymethyl cellulose and alternative new binders than PVdF are first addressed into details. The critical effects of the active mass loading and porosity on the cyclability are highlighted. Then the influence of the conductive additive type and current collector texture are discussed. Putting everything together shows that it is required to meticulously optimize all the different scales of the composite electrode to hopefully raise the performance of silicon-based electrode above that of graphite commercial ones.

  13. Determination of n-alkanes contamination in soil samples by micro gas chromatography functionalized by multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubo; Zhang, Runzhou; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yonghuan; Xu, Tianbai; Li, Lingfeng; Zhao, Weijun; Dong, Shurong; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui

    2016-09-01

    A new method for separation of 11 n-alkanes: octane, o-nonane, n-decane, n-undecane, n-dodecane, n-tridecane, n-tetradecane, n-pentdecne, n-hexadecath, heptadecane, n-octadecane in soil samples was developed. Kuderna-Danish (K.D.) concentrator enrichment prior to ultrasonic extraction and the silicone chromatography column purification and with gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) could be used for n-alkanes determination. The micro channels of open tubular column were fabricated onto a silicon wafer to replace the quartz capillary chromatographic column. The column structure and analysis parameters that affected the column separation were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the extract reagent was centrifuged and collected. A silicone chromatography column and a K.D. concentrator were used for further clean-up and enrichment. Using this method, the limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) were obtained in the range of 0.03-0.15 and 0.1-0.5 mg kg(-1) in soil samples, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was under 12%. The optimized procedure that presented good analytical performance (with recoveries ranging from 56.5% to 89.2%), was successfully applied to determine n-alkane content in farmland soil samples adjacent to a highway. The results showed that the MWCNTs-functionalized column is capable of separating the alkane contaminations with high resolution in about 3 min, which is much shorter than that of GC-MS and other conventional analytical methods, demonstrating its great potential for rapid analysis. PMID:27262105

  14. A contribution to spectroscopic diagnostics and cathode sheath modeling of micro-hollow gas discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cvejic, M.; Spasojevic, Dj.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen Balmer beta line shape from a micro-hollow gas discharge (MHGD) in argon with traces of hydrogen is used for simultaneous diagnostics of plasma and cathode sheath (CS) parameters. For this purpose, a simple model of relevant processes responsible for the line broadening is introduced and applied to the Balmer beta profile recorded from a MHGD generated in the microhole (diameter 100 {mu}m at narrow side and 130 {mu}m at wider side) of a gold-alumina-gold sandwich in the pressure range (100-900 mbar). The electron number density N{sub e} in the range (0.4-4.5) x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} is determined from the width of the central part of the Balmer beta line profile, while, from the extended wings of the Balmer beta profile, induced by dc Stark effect, the next three parameters are determined: the average value E{sub a} of electric field strength in the CS in the range (16-95 kV/cm), the electric field strength E{sub 0} at the cathode surface in the range (32-190 kV/cm), and the CS thickness z{sub g} in the range (18-70 {mu}m). All four MHGD parameters, N{sub e}, E{sub a}, E{sub 0}, and z{sub g}, compare reasonably well with results of the modeling experiment by M. J. Kushner [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, 1633 (2005)]. The results for N{sub e} are compared with other emission experiments.

  15. Design and analysis of a silicon-based antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remley, Kate A.; Weisshaar, Andreas

    1996-08-01

    The design of a silicon-based antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) chemical sensor is presented, and its theoretical performance is compared with that of a conventional structure. The use of an ARROW structure permits incorporation of a thick guiding region for efficient coupling to a single-mode fiber. A high-index overlay is added to fine tune the sensitivity of the ARROW chemical sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor is presented, and design trade-offs are discussed.

  16. A service evaluation of the use of silicone-based adhesive remover.

    PubMed

    Rudoni, Caroline

    Evidence-based practice has become a priority for nurses, but until the publication of Caring for Stoma Patients, Best Practice Guidelines (Clinimed Resource for Education and Specialist Training, 2006), there was very little evidence published for many aspects of stoma care nursing. This document provides best practice information for many specific areas of stoma care, but there is still a lack of evidence on which clinical decisions regarding subjective issues can be based. As a result, the stoma care department at St George's Healthcare NHS Trust undertook a study on the use of a silicone-based adhesive remover. Dykes (2001) highlights the trauma that can occur as a result of skin stripping during pouch removal. The use of a silicone-based adhesive remover allows for the rapid and painless removal of a stoma pouch without the associated problems of skin stripping (Cutting, 2006). Results from the study conclude that patients experience great benefit from the use of a silicone-based adhesive remover and that all patients should be offered the use of one. PMID:18418930

  17. Well-constructed silicon-based materials as high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lehao; Lyu, Jing; Li, Tiehu; Zhao, Tingkai

    2016-01-14

    Silicon has been considered as one of the most promising anode material alternates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries, because of its high theoretical capacity, environmental friendliness, high safety, low cost, etc. Nevertheless, silicon-based anode materials (especially bulk silicon) suffer from severe capacity fading resulting from their low intrinsic electrical conductivity and great volume variation during lithiation/delithiation processes. To address this challenge, a few special constructions from nanostructures to anchored, flexible, sandwich, core-shell, porous and even integrated structures, have been well designed and fabricated to effectively improve the cycling performance of silicon-based anodes. In view of the fast development of silicon-based anode materials, we summarize their recent progress in structural design principles, preparation methods, morphological characteristics and electrochemical performance by highlighting the material structure. We also point out the associated problems and challenges faced by these anodes and introduce some feasible strategies to further boost their electrochemical performance. Furthermore, we give a few suggestions relating to the developing trends to better mature their practical applications in next-generation lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26666682

  18. Well-constructed silicon-based materials as high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lehao; Lyu, Jing; Li, Tiehu; Zhao, Tingkai

    2015-12-01

    Silicon has been considered as one of the most promising anode material alternates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries, because of its high theoretical capacity, environmental friendliness, high safety, low cost, etc. Nevertheless, silicon-based anode materials (especially bulk silicon) suffer from severe capacity fading resulting from their low intrinsic electrical conductivity and great volume variation during lithiation/delithiation processes. To address this challenge, a few special constructions from nanostructures to anchored, flexible, sandwich, core-shell, porous and even integrated structures, have been well designed and fabricated to effectively improve the cycling performance of silicon-based anodes. In view of the fast development of silicon-based anode materials, we summarize their recent progress in structural design principles, preparation methods, morphological characteristics and electrochemical performance by highlighting the material structure. We also point out the associated problems and challenges faced by these anodes and introduce some feasible strategies to further boost their electrochemical performance. Furthermore, we give a few suggestions relating to the developing trends to better mature their practical applications in next-generation lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Silicon-based guided-wave optical flow sensor using a diaphragm with a small opening as an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Masashi; Sato, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Our proposed silicon-based guided-wave optical flow sensor consists of a diaphragm with a small opening used as an orifice and a waveguide across the diaphragm. The sensor operates based on Bernoulli's theorem and the elasto-optic effect. A sensor, which had a 10×10-mm2, 50-μm-thick diaphragm with a 0.34×0.34-mm2 opening, was fabricated to demonstrate and confirm the sensor operation. Measured output power as a function of flow rate using oxygen gas agreed quite well with the theoretical prediction although slight deviation was seen in the high flow rate region. Moreover, according to Bernoulli's theorem, sensitivity is strongly dependent on sectional area of opening. So, three sensors with different opening areas, such as 0.28×0.28, 0.34×0.34, and 0.55×0.55 mm2, were fabricated to examine such a dependence, which would be helpful to design the sensor. The measured sensitivity was found to be almost proportional to area of the opening, similar to the theoretical prediction.

  20. Origin of microplasma instabilities during DC operation of silicon based microhollow cathode devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, Valentin; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Aubry, Olivier; Golda, Judith; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Dussart, Rémi

    2016-04-01

    The failure mechanisms of micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) in silicon have been investigated using their I-V characteristics, high speed photography and scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were carried out in helium. We observed I-V instabilities in the form of rapid voltage decreases associated with current spikes. The current spikes can reach values more than 100 times greater than the average MHCD current. (The peaks can be more than 1 Ampere for a few 10’s of nanoseconds.) These current spikes are correlated in time with 3-10 μm diameter optical flashes that occur inside the cavities. The SEM characterizations indicated that blister-like structures form on the Si surface during plasma operation. Thin Si layers detach from the surface in localized regions. We theorize that shallow helium implantation occurs and forms the ‘blisters’ whenever the Si is biased as the cathode. These blisters ‘explode’ when the helium pressure inside them becomes too large leading to the transient micro-arcs seen in both the optical emission and the I-V characteristics. We noted that blisters were never found on the metal counter electrode, even when it was biased as the cathode (and the Si as the anode). This observation led to a few suggestions for delaying the failure of Si MHCDs. One may coat the Si cathode (cavities) with blister resistant material; design the MHCD array to operate with the Si as the anode rather than as the cathode; or use a gas additive to prevent surface damage. Regarding the latter, tests using SF6 as the gas additive successfully prevented blister formation through rapid etching. The result was an enhanced MHCD lifetime.

  1. Experimental verification of the feasibility of a 100 W class micro-scale gas turbine at an impeller diameter of 10 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Kousuke; Murayama, Motohide; Teramoto, Susumu; Hikichi, Kousuke; Endo, Yuki; Togo, Shinichi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of a 100 W class micro-scale gas turbine with a centrifugal impeller of 10 mm diameter has been studied by experimentally verifying the four major component performance requirements found from cycle analysis. The rotor is required to rotate at 870 000 rpm to generate the compressor pressure ratio 3, and it has successfully been achieved by using hydroinertia gas bearings. A compressor efficiency higher than that required by the target cycle has been measured. After correcting the effect of the heat leakage, approximately 65% of the compressor adiabatic efficiency is estimated to be achievable. The combustor has achieved stable self-sustained combustion at a combustion efficiency higher than 99.9%. The heat conduction analysis based on measured data showed that it is possible to keep the compressor below 170 °C when the turbine inlet temperature is 1050 °C. All four requirements are proven to be achievable, and hence, the feasibility of the micro-scale gas turbine at an impeller of 10 mm diameter has successfully been proven at component level.

  2. A new method to integrate ZnO nano-tetrapods on MEMS micro-hotplates for large scale gas sensor production.

    PubMed

    Marasso, S L; Tommasi, A; Perrone, D; Cocuzza, M; Mosca, R; Villani, M; Zappettini, A; Calestani, D

    2016-09-23

    A new method, which is easily scalable to large scale production, has been developed to obtain gas sensor devices based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures with a 'tetrapod' shape. The method can be easily extended to other kinds of nanostructures and is based on the deposition of ZnO nanostructures through polymeric masks by centrifugation, directly onto properly designed MEMS micro-hotplates. The micromachined devices, after the mask is peeled off, are ready for electrical bonding and sensing test. Sensor response has been successfully measured for some gases and volatile organic compounds with different chemical properties (ethanol, methane, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen sulfide). PMID:27532770

  3. Neutron and X-ray irradiation of silicon based Mach-Zehnder modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nasr-Storey, S. S.; Détraz, S.; Olanterä, L.; Sigaud, C.; Soós, C.; Pezzullo, G.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.; Zeiler, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    We report on our recent investigation into the potential for using silicon-based Mach-Zehnder modulators in the harshest radiation environments of the High-Luminosity LHC. The effect of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the performance of the devices have been investigated using the 20 MeV neutron beam line at the Cyclotron Resource Centre in Louvain-La-Neuve and the X-ray irradiation facility in the CERN PH department. The devices were exposed to a total fluence and ionizing dose of 1.2×1015 n cm-2 and 1.3 MGy respectively.

  4. Micromachined silicon-based analytical microinstruments for space science and planetary exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Grunthaner, F.J.; Stalder, R.E.; Boumsellek, S.; Van Zandt, T.R.; Kenny, T.W.; Hecht, M.H.; Ksendzov, A.; Homer, M.L.; Terhune, R.W.; Lane, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    For future planetary science missions, the authors are developing a series of microinstruments using the techniques of silicon-based micromachining. Conventional instruments such as chemical sensors, charged particle analyzers and mass spectrometers are reduced in size and effective volume to the dimension of cubic centimeters, while maintaining or enhancing performance. Using wafer/wafer bonding techniques, selective chemical etching, thin Film growth, and high resolution lithography, complex three dimensional structures can be assembled. This paper discusses the design, implementation and performance of two new instruments: The Micromachined Bessel Box Auger Electron Spectrometer, and the Mars Soil Chemistry Experiment (MOx).

  5. Study of the properties of silicon-based semiconductor converters for betavoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Polikarpov, M. A.; Yakimov, E. B.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon p-i-n diodes are studied in a scanning electron microscope under conditions simulating the β-radiation from a radioactive Ni{sup 63} source with an activity of 10 mCi/cm{sup 2}. The attainable parameters of β-voltaic cells with a source of this kind and a silicon-based converter of β-particle energy to electric current are estimated. It is shown that the power of elements of this kind can reach values of ∼10 nW/cm{sup 2} even for a cell with an area of one centimeter, which is rather close to the calculated value.

  6. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, S.M.; Tao, H.; Todd-Copley, J.A.

    1991-06-11

    A process is disclosed for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength. 1 figure.

  7. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, Stephen M.; Tao, Hongyi; Todd-Copley, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength.

  8. Silicon-Based Thermoelectrics: Harvesting Low Quality Heat Using Economically Printed Flexible Nanostructured Stacked Thermoelectric Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UIUC is experimenting with silicon-based materials to develop flexible thermoelectric devices—which convert heat into energy—that can be mass-produced at low cost. A thermoelectric device, which resembles a computer chip, creates electricity when a different temperature is applied to each of its sides. Existing commercial thermoelectric devices contain the element tellurium, which limits production levels because tellurium has become increasingly rare. UIUC is replacing this material with microscopic silicon wires that are considerably cheaper and could be equally effective. Improvements in thermoelectric device production could return enough wasted heat to add up to 23% to our current annual electricity production.

  9. Intersubband absorption of silicon-based quantum wells for infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chan-Ion; Pan, Dee-Son

    1988-01-01

    The 10-micron intersubband absorption in quantum wells made of the silicon-based system, Si/Si(1-x)Ge(x), has been calculated. The necessary details of the effective-mass anisotropy are included in the present analysis. It is found that it is readily possible to achieve an absorption constant of order of 10,000/cm in Si quantum wells with current doping technology. For 110-line and 111-line growth directions, a further advantage of Si quantum wells is pointed out, namely, an allowed absorption at normal incidence due to the anisotropic effective mass in Si.

  10. [Applications of multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device for analysis of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiru; Chen, Fangxiang; Shi, Yamei; Tan, Connieal; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    A multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device has been designed and made for the silylation derivatization of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl )-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) with 1% catalyst tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane (TBDMCS) at a high temperature. The tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives then could be automatically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using the pressure-assisted device, the silylation reaction may occur at a temperature higher than the boiling points of the reagents, and several micro-volume samples can be simultaneously pretreated in the same device to shorten the sample-preparation time and to improve the repeatability. The derivatization conditions including the headspace volume of the vial, the evaporative surface area of the reagent, derivatization temperature and time have been discussed for the use of the pressure-assisted device. The experimental results proved that the device is an effective way for the simultaneous derivatization of several micro-volume samples at a high temperature. Compared with a common device, the derivative amounts were obviously increased when using the pressure-assisted device at 90 degrees C. Quantitative derivatization can be achieved even at 150 degrees C while there was no common device could be applied at such a high temperature due to the heavy losses of reagents by evaporation. However, no obviously higher reaction speed has been observed in such a circumstance with a higher temperature and a higher pressure using the pressure-assisted device. PMID:23667982

  11. A silicon-based two-dimensional chalcogenide: growth of Si₂Te₃ nanoribbons and nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Keuleyan, Sean; Wang, Mengjing; Chung, Frank R; Commons, Jeffrey; Koski, Kristie J

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis of high-quality single-crystal two-dimensional, layered nanostructures of silicon telluride, Si2Te3, in multiple morphologies controlled by substrate temperature and Te seeding. Morphologies include nanoribbons formed by VLS growth from Te droplets, vertical hexagonal nanoplates through vapor-solid crystallographically oriented growth on amorphous oxide substrates, and flat hexagonal nanoplates formed through large-area VLS growth in liquid Te pools. We show the potential for doping through the choice of substrate and growth conditions. Vertical nanoplates grown on sapphire substrates, for example, can incorporate a uniform density of Al atoms from the substrate. We also show that the material may be modified after synthesis, including both mechanical exfoliation (reducing the thickness to as few as five layers) and intercalation of metal ions including Li(+) and Mg(2+), which suggests applications in energy storage materials. The material exhibits an intense red color corresponding to its strong and broad interband absorption extending from the red into the infrared. Si2Te3 enjoys chemical and processing compatibility with other silicon-based material including amorphous SiO2 but is very chemically sensitive to its environment, which suggests applications in silicon-based devices ranging from fully integrated thermoelectrics to optoelectronics to chemical sensors. PMID:25764295

  12. A silicon-based peptide biosensor for label-free detection of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Nicola M.; Rea, Ilaria; Ruggiero, Immacolata; Terracciano, Monica; De Stefano, Luca; Migliaccio, Nunzia; Dardano, Principia; Arcari, Paolo; Rendina, Ivo; Lamberti, Annalisa

    2015-05-01

    Sensitive and accurate detection of cancer cells plays a crucial role in diagnosis of cancer and minimal residual disease, so being one of the most hopeful approaches to reduce cancer death rates. In this paper, a strategy for highly selective and sensitive detection of lymphoma cells on planar silicon-based biosensor has been evaluated. In this setting an Idiotype peptide, able to specifically bind the B-cell receptor (BCR) of A20 cells in mice engrafted with A20 lymphoma, has been covalently linked to the sensor active surface and used as molecular probe. The biochip here presented showed a coverage efficiency of 85% with a detection efficiency of 8.5×10-3 cells/μm2. The results obtained suggested an efficient way for specific label-free cell detection by using a silicon-based peptide biosensor. In addition, the present recognition strategy, besides being useful for the development of sensing devices capable of monitoring minimal residual disease, could be used to find and characterize new specific receptor-ligand interactions through the screening of a recombinant phage library.

  13. Electronic and Optical Properties of Novel Phases of Silicon and Silicon-Based Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chin Shen; Choi, Sangkook; Louie, Steven

    2014-03-01

    The vast majority of solar cells in the market today are made from crystalline silicon in the diamond-cubic phase. Nonetheless, diamond-cubic Si has an intrinsic disadvantage: it has an indirect band gap with a large energy difference between the direct gap and the indirect gap. In this work, we perform a careful study of the electronic and optical properties of a newly discovered cubic-Si20 phase of Si that is found to sport a direct band gap. In addition, other silicon-based derivatives have also been discovered and found to be thermodynamically metastable. We carry out ab initio GW and GW-BSE calculations for the quasiparticle excitations and optical spectra, respectively, of these new phases of silicon and silicon-based derivatives. This work was supported by NSF grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility and the NSF through XSEDE resources at NICS.

  14. Accuracy and Precision of Silicon Based Impression Media for Quantitative Areal Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Robert H.; Darras, Laurent P.; Purnell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis. PMID:25991505

  15. Novel silicone-based polymer containing active methylene designed for the removal of indoor formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Niu, Song; Yan, Hongxia

    2015-04-28

    Indoor air pollution is caused inevitably due to complicated home decoration, in which formaldehyde is one of the most typical pollutants. It will be a convenient, economical and effective strategy to remove indoor formaldehyde if imparting a feature of formaldehyde removal to decorative coatings. We have successfully explored a novel silicone-based polymer containing active methylene used as a formaldehyde absorbent in coatings via a straightforward transesterification process using inexpensive and easily available chemicals. The polymer has been characterized by (13)C NMR, FTIR, GC and GPC. Formaldehyde removal capacity of the coating films containing different contents of the polymer has been investigated. The results indicated that coatings incorporating 4wt% of the polymer could make the coating films exhibit significant improvement on formaldehyde removal including purificatory performance (>85%) and durability of purificatory effect (>60%), compared to those consisting of absorbents without any silicon, and improve yellowing resistance performance, while other properties, such as gloss, adhesion, pencil hardness, flexibility and impact resistance, were kept almost unaffected. The chemical absorption process of the silicone-based polymer filled in interior decorative coatings is demonstrated as a promising technology to purify indoor formaldehyde and thus can reduce the harm to individuals. PMID:25661173

  16. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  17. Development of new method of δ(13)C measurement for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas using solid phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongping; Wang, Xibin; Li, Liwu; Zhang, Mingjie; Tao, Mingxin; Xing, Lantian; Cao, Chunhui; Xia, Yanqing

    2014-11-01

    Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of normal-level hydrocarbons (C1-C4) in natural gas is often successfully used in natural gas origin identification and classification, but little progress so far has been made for trace level hydrocarbons (C5-C14) in natural gas. In this study, we developed a method for rapid analysis of carbon isotopic ratios for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples. This method can be described as a combined approach characterized by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) technique coupled to gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). In this study, the CAR-PDMS fiber was chosen as the SPME adsorptive material after comparative experiments with other four fibers, and the parameters, including equilibration time, extraction temperature and desorption time, for efficient extraction of trace hydrocarbons were systematically optimized. The results showed the carbon isotopic fractionation was not observed as a function of equilibration time and extraction temperature. And the δ(13)C signatures determined by SPME-GC/IRMS were in good agreement with the known δ(13)C values of C5-C14 measured by GC-IRMS, and the accuracy is generally within ±0.5‰. Five natural gas samples were analyzed using this method, and the δ(13)C values for C5-C14 components were obtained with satisfied repeatability. The SPME-GC/IRMS approach fitted with CAR-PDMS fiber is well suited for the preconcentration of trace hydrocarbons and provides so far the most reliable carbon isotopic analysis for trace compounds in natural gas. PMID:25465020

  18. Quartz Crystal Micro-Balance Gas Sensor with Ink-Jet Printed Nano-Diamond Sensitive Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulha, Pavel; Kroutil, Jiří; Laposa, Alexandr; Procházka, Václav; Husák, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    the paper presents fabrication and characterization of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance based gas sensor with a diamond powder sensitive layer deposited using the ink-jet printing technique. The sensor was exposed to a low concentration of ammonia, acetone vapors and different levels of humidity. Impedance characteristics close to the natural resonant frequency of 10 MHz were examined. The sensor exhibits significant shifts in serial resonant frequency under different gas environments.

  19. Graphene as a transparent electrode for amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaianella, F. Rosolen, G.; Maes, B.

    2015-06-28

    The properties of graphene in terms of transparency and conductivity make it an ideal candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in a transparent conducting electrode. However, graphene is not always as good as ITO for some applications, due to a non-negligible absorption. For amorphous silicon photovoltaics, we have identified a useful case with a graphene-silica front electrode that improves upon ITO. For both electrode technologies, we simulate the weighted absorption in the active layer of planar amorphous silicon-based solar cells with a silver back-reflector. The graphene device shows a significantly increased absorbance compared to ITO-based cells for a large range of silicon thicknesses (34.4% versus 30.9% for a 300 nm thick silicon layer), and this result persists over a wide range of incidence angles.

  20. Intensity dependence of the minority-carrier difusion length in amorphous silicon based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M.; Shur, M.

    1984-04-01

    Many of the recent measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length (Lp) in amorphous silicon based alloys have been based on a utilization of the surface photovoltage (SPV). In this case an equation relating photon flux and Lp under ideal conditions has to be modified because of the back diffusion of carriers and the effects of high field regions. To account for the high field region, the 'aparent' diffusion length has been determined for varying intensities of bias light. In the present investigation, a theoretical analysis shows that the zero field diffusion length is indeed intensity dependent and that this dependence can be directly related to the slope of the density of states near the valence band edge. The intensity dependence of the minority carrier diffusion length and the energy slope of the density of states near the valence band edge are obtained on the basis of experimental results.

  1. Corrosion-Prevention Capabilities of a Water-Borne, Silicone-Based, Primerless Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.; Vinje, Rubie D.

    2005-01-01

    Comparative tests have been performed to evaluate the corrosion-prevention capabilities of an experimental paint of the type described in Water-Borne, Silicone-Based, Primerless Paints, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 30. To recapitulate: these paints contain relatively small amounts of volatile organic solvents and were developed as substitutes for traditional anticorrosion paints that contain large amounts of such solvents. An additional desirable feature of these paints is that they can be applied without need for prior application of primers to ensure adhesion. The test specimens included panels of cold-rolled steel, stainless steel 316, and aluminum 2024-T3. Some panels of each of these alloys were left bare and some were coated with the experimental water-borne, silicone-based, primerless paint. In addition, some panels of aluminum 2024-T3 and some panels of a fourth alloy (stainless steel 304) were coated with a commercial solvent-borne paint containing aluminum and zinc flakes in a nitrile rubber matrix. In the tests, the specimens were immersed in an aerated 3.5-weight-percent aqueous solution of NaCl for 168 hours. At intervals of 24 hours, the specimens were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and measurements of corrosion potentials. The specimens were also observed visually. As indicated by photographs of specimens taken after the 168-hour immersion (see figure), the experimental primerless silicone paint was effective in preventing corrosion of stainless steel 316, but failed to protect aluminum 2024-T3 and cold-rolled steel. The degree of failure was greater in the case of the cold-rolled steel. On the basis of visual observations, EIS, and corrosion- potential measurements, it was concluded that the commercial aluminum and zinc-filled nitrile rubber coating affords superior corrosion protection to aluminum 2024-T3 and is somewhat less effective in protecting stainless steel 304.

  2. Development of a bar adsorptive micro-extraction-large-volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method for pharmaceuticals and personal care products in environmental water matrices.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Nogueira, J M F

    2012-01-01

    The combination of bar adsorptive micro-extraction using activated carbon (AC) and polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer (PS-DVB) sorbent phases, followed by liquid desorption and large-volume injection gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, under selected ion monitoring mode acquisition, was developed for the first time to monitor pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in environmental water matrices. Assays performed on 25 mL water samples spiked (100 ng L(-1)) with caffeine, gemfibrozil, triclosan, propranolol, carbamazepine and diazepam, selected as model compounds, yielded recoveries ranging from 74% to 99% under optimised experimental conditions (equilibrium time, 16 h (1,000 rpm); matrix characteristics: pH 5, 5% NaCl for AC phase; LD: methanol/acetonitrile (1:1), 45 min). The analytical performance showed good precision (RSD < 18%), convenient detection limits (5-20 ng L(-1)) and excellent linear dynamic range (20-800 ng L(-1)) with remarkable determination coefficients (r(2) > 0.99), where the PS-DVB sorbent phase showed a much better efficiency. By using the standard addition methodology, the application of the present analytical approach on tap, ground, sea, estuary and wastewater samples allowed very good performance at the trace level. The proposed method proved to be a suitable sorption-based micro-extraction alternative for the analysis of priority pollutants with medium-polar to polar characteristics, showing to be easy to implement, reliable, sensitive and requiring a low sample volume to monitor PPCPs in water matrices. PMID:22076312

  3. Design, Fabrication and Prototype testing of a Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator combined On-Board Range Extender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we present the design, fabrication and prototype testing of Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator (CIμ-PFCA) combined On-Board Range Extender (O-BRE). CIμ-PFCA is silicon based micro-PEM fuel cell system with an integrated hydrogen storage feature (palladium metal hydride), the run time of CIμ-PFCA is dependent on the stored hydrogen, and in order to extend its run time an O-BRE is realized (catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride, NaBH4. Combining the CIμ-PFCA and O-BRE on a system level have few important design requirements to be considered; hydrogen regulation, gas -liquid separator between the CIμ-PFCA and the O-RE. The usage of traditional techniques to regulate hydrogen (tubes), gas-liquid phase membranes (porous membrane separators) are less desirable in the micro domain, due to its space constraint. Our approach is to use a passive hydrogen regulation and gas-liquid phase separation concept; to use palladium membrane. Palladium regulates hydrogen by concentration diffusion, and its property to selectively adsorb only hydrogen is used as a passive gas-liquid phase separator. Proof of concept is shown by realizing a prototype system. The system is an assembly of CIμ-PFCA, palladium membrane and the O-BRE. The CIμ-PFCA consist of 2 individually processed silicon chips, copper supported palladium membrane realized by electroplating followed by high temperature annealing process under inter atmosphere and the O-BRE is realized out of a polymer substrate by micromilling process with platinum coated structures, which functions as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of NaBH4. The functionality of the assembled prototype system is demonstrated by the measuring a unit cell (area 1 mm2) when driven by the catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride (NaBH4 and the prototype system shows run time more than 15 hours.

  4. Pore scale distribution of gas hydrates in sediments by micro X-ray Computed Tomography (X-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, G.; Li, C.; Ye, Y.; Liu, C.; Best, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    A dedicated apparatus was developed to observe in-situ pore scale distribution of gas hydrate directly during hydrate formation in artificial cores. The high-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (type: GE Sensing & Inspection Technologies GmbH Phoenix x-ray V/tomex/s) was used and the effective resolution for observing gas hydrate bearing sediments can up to about 18μm. Methane gas hydrate was formed in 0.425-0.85mm sands under a pressure of 6MPa and a temperature of 3°C. During the process, CT scanning was conducted if there's a pressure drop (the scanning time is 66 minutes each time), so that the hydrate morphology could be detected. As a result, five scanning CT images of the same section during gas hydrate formation (i.e. hydrate saturation at 3.9%, 24.6%, 35.0%, 51.4% and 97.0%) were obtained. The result shows that at each hydrate saturation level, hydrate morphology models are complicated. The occurrence of 'floating model' (i.e. hydrate floats in pore fluid), 'contact model' (i.e. hydrate contact with the sediment particle), and the 'cementing model' (i.e. hydrates cement the sediment particles) can be found at the same time (Fig. 1). However, it shows that at different hydrate formation stages, the dominant hydrate morphology are not the same. For instance, at the first stage of hydrate formation, although there are some hydrates floating in the pore fluid, most hydrates connect the sediment particles. Consequently, the hydrate morphology at this moment can be described as a cementing model. With this method, it can be obtained that at the higher level of saturation (e.g., hydrate saturation at 24.6% and 35.0%), hydrates are mainly grow as a floating model. As hydrate saturation is much higher (e.g. after hydrate saturation is more than 51.4%), however, the floating hydrates coalesce with each other and the hydrates cement the sediment particle again. The direct observed hydrate morphology presented here may have significant impact on investigating

  5. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J.; Sbarra, C.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed.

  6. Neutral gas temperature maps of the pin-to-plate argon micro discharge into the ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.; Majeed, Asif

    2015-03-15

    This study is designed to explore the two dimensional temperature maps of the atmospheric argon discharge consisting of pin-to-plane electrodes supplied by a high voltage DC source. After checking the stability of the micro discharge, the two dimensional image plane focused by a quartz lens was scanned by the fiber probe driven by a 3D Mobile Platform. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are calculated using nitrogen emissions collected by the high resolution spectrometer and high sensitive intensified charge coupled device. The rotational temperature varies from 1558.15 K to 2621.14 K and vibrational temperature varies from 3010.38 K to 3774.69 K, indicating a great temperature gradient due to small discharge size. The temperature maps show a lateral expansion and a sharp truncation in the radial direction. A double layers discharge is identified, where an arc discharge coats the glow discharge.

  7. The synthesis of porous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} micro cuboid structures by solvothermal approach and investigation of its gas sensing properties and catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, Saba; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun; Li, Songnan; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Milin

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Micro cuboid Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle prepared by solvothermal method. • Study of morphology of synthesized cuboids before and after calcinations. • Investigation of formation mechanism of porous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} from cuboid CoCO{sub 3}. • Investigation of gas sensing properties of porous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • Study of catalytic activity of product. - Abstract: The cobalt carbonate cuboids are prepared by adopting a simple solvothermal approach by using diethylene glycol and water in specific ratio as solvent. The prepared cobalt carbonate is subjected to different instrumentation to investigate its morphology and other properties. It is clear from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that the product is distinct cuboid in shape with a size of approximately 3 μm from each face of the cube. Each particle of cuboid cobalt carbonate seems to comprise of layer by layer assembly of unit cells that consequently leads to a cuboid geometry. The cuboid cobalt carbonate was calcined at 700 °C in a furnace under argon atmosphere that decompose cobalt carbonate into porous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} with the loosely packed arrangement of nano architectures. The gas sensing properties and catalytic activity of porous cuboids Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are also investigated.

  8. The use of gas chromatography for the quantitative determination of micro-amounts of insecticide picked up by mosquitos*

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, J. T.; Miskus, R.; Craig, R.

    1964-01-01

    The test method recommended by the WHO Expert Committee on Insecticides for determining the susceptibility or resistance of adult mosquitos to insecticides has been evaluated quantitatively by the use of gas chromatography to measure the amount of dieldrin picked up by adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say (= C. pipiens fatigans Wiedemann). A strain homozygous for dieldrin-resistance was used to determine the pick-up as a function of time and concentration of dieldrin. The results of experiments using electron-capture detection with gas chromatography suggest that the pick-up is a linear function of the concentration on the paper and also of the time of exposure, even of the 24-hour exposure to the 4.0% dieldrin paper. PMID:14122446

  9. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.

    2008-04-28

    determine sulfur speciation (sulfide, sulfate or elemental sulfur) in these glasses, Gooding et al. and Burgess et al. carried out vacuum pyrolysis experiments on these GRIM glasses (also called Lith C) using quadrupole mass-spectrometric methods. They found that the evolved S-bearing gases from these samples consisted of both SO{sub 2} (from sulfate) and H{sub 2}S (from sulfide) in varying proportions. However, as mass-spectrometric studies do not provide details about spatial association of these S-species in these samples, we have studied the spatial distribution of sulfides and sulfates in GRIM glasses using sulfur K micro-XANES techniques in the present study. The microscale speciation of S may have important implications for the Rb-Sr isotope systematics of EET79001 Lith C glasses. In reference to oxidative weathering of surface basalts on Mars yielding secondary iron sulfates, Solberg and Burns examined a GRIM glass in EET79001 by Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques and showed that the percentage of Fe{sup 3+} in Lith C is <2%. They suggested that the Lith C contains very little Fe{sup 3+} despite the occurrence of oxidized sulfate in them, indicating that the conditions leading to the formation of these glasses were insufficiently oxidizing to produce Fe{sup 3+} from Fe{sup 2+} in these glasses. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the GRIM glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques. The S and Fe K micro-XANES measurements were performed on thin sections from EET79001: 506 from Lith A and 507 from Lith B.

  10. On-Wafer Measurement of a Silicon-Based CMOS VCO at 324 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Man Fung, King; Gaier, Todd; Huang, Daquan; Larocca, Tim; Chang, M. F.; Campbell, Richard; Andrews, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The world s first silicon-based complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) operating in a frequency range around 324 GHz has been built and tested. Concomitantly, equipment for measuring the performance of this oscillator has been built and tested. These accomplishments are intermediate steps in a continuing effort to develop low-power-consumption, low-phase-noise, electronically tunable signal generators as local oscillators for heterodyne receivers in submillimeter-wavelength (frequency > 300 GHz) scientific instruments and imaging systems. Submillimeter-wavelength imaging systems are of special interest for military and law-enforcement use because they could, potentially, be used to detect weapons hidden behind clothing and other opaque dielectric materials. In comparison with prior submillimeter- wavelength signal generators, CMOS VCOs offer significant potential advantages, including great reductions in power consumption, mass, size, and complexity. In addition, there is potential for on-chip integration of CMOS VCOs with other CMOS integrated circuitry, including phase-lock loops, analog- to-digital converters, and advanced microprocessors.

  11. Prediction of silicon-based room temperature quantum spin Hall insulator via orbital mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huixia; Ren, Jun; Chen, Lan; Si, Chen; Qiu, Jinglan; Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Jin; Sun, Jiatao; Li, Hui; Wu, Kehui; Duan, Wenhui; Meng, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    The search for realistic materials capable of supporting the room temperature quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect remains a challenge, especially when compatibility with the current electronics industry is required. We report a theoretical prediction to identify halogenated silicon films as excellent candidates, which demonstrate high stability, flexibility, and tunable spin-orbit coupling (SOC) gaps up to ∼0.5 eV under minimal strain below 3%. The extraordinary SOC strength is mainly contributed by the p-orbital of heavy halogen atoms hybridized with the p x,y -orbitals of Si scaffold, and thus can be easily manipulated by strain (being ∼100 times more effective than in silicene) or substrate. Not only the instability problem of silicene for real applications is solved, but also it provides a new strategy to drastically enhance SOC of light-element scaffolds by orbital hybridization. The silicon-based QSH insulator is most promising for developing next-generation, low-power consumption nanoelectronics and spintronics at ambient conditions.

  12. Biological characterization of a new silicon based coating developed for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ibáñez, M; Juan-Díaz, M J; Lara-Saez, I; Coso, A; Franco, J; Gurruchaga, M; Suay Antón, J; Goñi, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account the influence of Si in osteoblast cell proliferation, a series of sol-gel derived silicon based coating was prepared by controlling the process parameters and varying the different Si-alkoxide precursors molar rate in order to obtain materials able to release Si compounds. For this purpose, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were hydrolysed together and the sol obtained was used to dip-coat the different substrates. The silicon release ability of the coatings was tested finding that it was dependent on the TEOS precursor content, reaching a Si amount value around ninefolds higher for coatings with TEOS than for the pure MTMOS material. To test the effect of this released Si, the in vitro performance of developed coatings was tested with human adipose mesenchymal stem cells finding a significantly higher proliferation and mineralization on the coating with the higher TEOS content. For in vivo evaluation of the biocompatibility, coated implants were placed in the tibia of the rabbit and a histological analysis was performed. The evaluation of parameters such as the bone marrow state, the presence of giant cells and the fibrous capsule proved the biocompatibility of the developed coatings. Furthermore, coated implants seemed to produce a qualitatively higher osteoblastic activity and a higher number of bone spicules than the control (uncoated commercial SLA titanium dental implant). PMID:26936366

  13. Silicon-based optoelectronic integrated circuit for label-free bio/chemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Xianshu; Kee, Jack Sheng; Han, Kyungsup; Li, Chao; Park, Mi Kyoung; Tu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Qing; Jia, Lianxi; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate a silicon-based optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) for label-free bio/chemical sensing application. Such on-chip OEIC sensor system consists of optical grating couplers for vertical light coupling into silicon waveguides, a thermal-tunable microring as a tunable filter, an exposed microring as an optical label-free sensor, and a Ge photodetector for a direct electrical readout. Different from the conventional wavelength-scanning method, we adopt low-cost broadband ASE light source, together with the on-chip tunable filter to generate sliced light source. The effective refractive index change of the sensing microring induced by the sensing target is traced by scanning the supplied electrical power applied onto the tracing microring, and the detected electrical signal is read out by the Ge photodetector. For bulk refractive index sensing, we demonstrate using such OEIC sensing system with a sensitivity of ~15 mW/RIU and a detection limit of 3.9 μ-RIU, while for surface sensing of biotin-streptavidin, we obtain a surface mass sensitivity of S(m) = ~192 µW/ng·mm(-2) and a surface detection limit of 0.3 pg/mm(2). The presented OEIC sensing system is suitable for point-of-care applications. PMID:23938665

  14. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  15. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  16. A compact polarization converter for silicon-based slot waveguides using a hybrid plasmonic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yin; Xiao, Jinbiao; Sun, Xiaohan

    2014-08-01

    A compact polarization converter for silicon-based slot waveguides is proposed, in which a metal strip of silver (Ag) with a right-angled cross section located at the upper-right corner of the slot waveguide is embedded in its upper claddings. Owing to the characteristics of the introduced asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide, the modal hybridness is highly enhanced and the optimal optical axis rotation angle, 45°, is realized by optimizing the location and size of the Ag, resulting in high polarization conversion efficiency (PCE). Numerical results show that a polarization converter of 15.2 μm in length, operating at a wavelength of 1.55 μm for TM-to-TE conversion, is achieved, where the PCE and insertion loss are 96.9% and 0.7 dB, respectively, and bandwidth with PCE >92% is ˜67 nm (from 1524 to 1591 nm), covering the entire C-band. Moreover, fabrication tolerances to the structural parameters and field evolution along the propagation distance are investigated.

  17. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  18. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  19. A Silicon-Based, Sequential Coat-and-Etch Process to Fabricate Nearly Perfect Substrate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Stearns, D G; Robinson, J C; Olynick, D L; Salmassi, F; Liddle, J A; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2005-07-05

    For many thin-film applications substrate imperfections such as particles, pits, scratches, and general roughness, can nucleate film defects which can severely detract from the coating's performance. Previously we developed a coat-and-etch process, termed the ion beam thin film planarization process, to planarize substrate particles up to {approx} 70 nm in diameter. The process relied on normal incidence etching; however, such a process induces defects nucleated by substrate pits to grow much larger. We have since developed a coat-and-etch process to planarize {approx}70 nm deep by 70 nm wide substrate pits; it relies on etching at an off-normal incidence angle, i.e., an angle of {approx} 70{sup o} from the substrate normal. However, a disadvantage of this pit smoothing process is that it induces defects nucleated by substrate particles to grow larger. Combining elements from both processes we have been able to develop a silicon-based, coat-and-etch process to successfully planarize {approx}70 nm substrate particles and pits simultaneously to at or below 1 nm in height; this value is important for applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. The coat-and-etch process has an added ability to significantly reduce high-spatial frequency roughness, rendering a nearly perfect substrate surface.

  20. Physical influence on larvicidal and pupicidal activity of the silicone-based monomolecular film.

    PubMed

    Ngrenngarmlert, Warunee; Sukkanon, Chutipong; Yaicharoen, Rapeeporn; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2016-10-01

    Although silicone-based monomolecular film (MMF) has been accepted as larvicide in several countries, its mosquito control potential has never been investigated in Thailand. Laboratory assessment in this study was conducted to determine the MMF efficacy against Aedes aegypti. At the recommended dosage (1mL/m(2) of water surface), mortality of pupae (99.17±0.83%) was significantly greater than mortality of old and young larvae (73.33±9.13, 11.67±3.47%; respectively). Pupicidal activity was rapidly exhibited within hours while larvicidal activity took at least one day. Interestingly, among the survived mosquitoes after MMF exposure, larval length (3.6±0.18mm), pupation (0%) and adult emergence (0%) were significantly less than the control group. Gravid females also avoided laying eggs in MMF-treated oviposition cups. There was no influence of physical factors on MMF efficacy and no toxic effects on fish and plants. These results indicated the MMF is promising to provide not only larvicidal and pupicidal activity but also inhibition of larval development as indicated by both larval length and stage transformation. PMID:27443608

  1. Optimization and characterization of a homogeneous carboxylic surface functionalization for silicon-based biosensing.

    PubMed

    Chiadò, Alessandro; Palmara, Gianluca; Ricciardi, Serena; Frascella, Francesca; Castellino, Micaela; Tortello, Mauro; Ricciardi, Carlo; Rivolo, Paola

    2016-07-01

    A well-organized immobilization of bio-receptors is a crucial goal in biosensing, especially to achieve high reproducibility, sensitivity and specificity. These requirements are usually attained with a controlled chemical/biochemical functionalization that creates a stable layer on a sensor surface. In this work, a chemical modification protocol for silicon-based surfaces to be applied in biosensing devices is presented. An anhydrous silanization step through 3-aminopropylsilane (APTES), followed by a further derivatization with succinic anhydride (SA), is optimized to generate an ordered flat layer of carboxylic groups. The properties of APTES/SA modified surface were compared with a functionalization in which glutaraldehyde (GA) is used as crosslinker instead of SA, in order to have a comparison with an established and largely applied procedure. Moreover, a functionalization based on the controlled deposition of a plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAA) thin film was used as a reference for carboxylic reactivity. Advantages and drawbacks of the considered methods are highlighted, through physico-chemical characterizations (OCA, XPS, and AFM) and by means of a functional Protein G/Antibody immunoassay. These analyses reveal that the most homogeneous, reproducible and active surface is achieved by using the optimized APTES/SA coupling. PMID:27022864

  2. Microscopic silicon-based lateral high-aspect-ratio structures for thin film conformality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Arpiainen, Sanna; Puurunen, Riikka L.

    2015-01-15

    Film conformality is one of the major drivers for the interest in atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. This work presents new silicon-based microscopic lateral high-aspect-ratio (LHAR) test structures for the analysis of the conformality of thin films deposited by ALD and by other chemical vapor deposition means. The microscopic LHAR structures consist of a lateral cavity inside silicon with a roof supported by pillars. The cavity length (e.g., 20–5000 μm) and cavity height (e.g., 200–1000 nm) can be varied, giving aspect ratios of, e.g., 20:1 to 25 000:1. Film conformality can be analyzed with the microscopic LHAR by several means, as demonstrated for the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} processes from Me{sub 3}Al/H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O. The microscopic LHAR test structures introduced in this work expose a new parameter space for thin film conformality investigations expected to prove useful in the development, tuning and modeling of ALD and other chemical vapor deposition processes.

  3. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  4. Single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study friction and wear at MEMS sidewall interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, N.; Ashurst, W. R.

    2012-02-01

    Since the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, friction and wear are considered as key factors that determine the lifetime and reliability of MEMS devices that contain contacting interfaces. However, to date, our knowledge of the mechanisms that govern friction and wear in MEMS is insufficient. Therefore, systematically investigating friction and wear at MEMS scale is critical for the commercial success of many potential MEMS devices. Specifically, since many emerging MEMS devices contain more sidewall interfaces, which are topographically and chemically different from in-plane interfaces, studying the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces is important. The microinstruments that have been used to date to investigate the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces possess several limitations induced either by their design or the structural film used to fabricate them. Therefore, in this paper, we report on a single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study the frictional and wear behavior of MEMS sidewalls, which not only addresses some of the limitations of other microinstruments but is also easy to fabricate. The design, modeling and fabrication of the microinstrument are described in this paper. Additionally, the coefficients of static and dynamic friction of octadecyltrichlorosilane-coated sidewall surfaces as well as sidewall surfaces with only native oxide on them are also reported in this paper.

  5. Silicon-based current-controlled reconfigurable magnetoresistance logic combined with non-volatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Luo, Zhaochu

    2015-03-01

    Silicon-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors have achieved great success. However, the traditional development pathway is approaching its fundamental limits. Magnetoelectronics logic, especially magnetic-field-based logic, shows promise for surpassing the development limits of CMOS logic. Existing proposals of magnetic-field-based logic are based on exotic semiconductors and difficult for further technological implementation. We proposed a kind of diode-assisted geometry-enhanced low-magnetic-field magnetoresistance (MR) mechanism. It couples p-n junction's nonlinear transport characteristic and Lorentz force by geometry, and shows extremely large low-magnetic-field MR (>120% at 0.15 T) Further, it is applied to experimentally demonstrate current-controlled reconfigurable MR logic on the silicon platform at room temperature. This logic device could perform Boolean logic AND, OR, NAND and NOR in one device. Combined with non-volatile magnetic memory, this logic architecture has the advantages of current-controlled reconfiguration, zero refresh consumption, instant-on performance and would bridge the processor-memory gap.

  6. Eliminating the dose-rate effect in a radiochromic silicone-based 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, E. M.; Balling, P.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Skyt, P. S.

    2015-07-01

    Comprehensive dose verification, such as 3D dosimetry, may be required for safe introduction and use of advanced treatment modalities in radiotherapy. A radiochromic silicone-based 3D dosimetry system has recently been suggested, though its clinical use has so far been limited by a considerable dose-rate dependency of the dose response. In this study we have investigated the dose-rate dependency with respect to the chemical composition of the dosimeter. We found that this dependency was reduced with increasing dye concentration, and the dose response was observed to be identical for dosimeters irradiated with 2 and 6 Gy min-1 at concentrations of 0.26% (w/w) dye and 1% (w/w) dye solvent. Furthermore, for the optimized dosimeter formulation, no dose-rate effect was observed due to the attenuation of the beam fluence with depth. However, the temporal stability of the dose response decreased with dye concentration; the response was reduced by (62  ±  1)% within approximately 20 h upon irradiation, at the optimal chemical composition and storage at room temperature. In conclusion, this study presents a chemical composition for a dose-rate independent silicone dosimeter which has considerably improved the clinical applicability of such dosimeters, but at the cost of a decreased stability.

  7. Centrifugal forming and mechanical properties of silicone-based elastomers for soft robotic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Parth

    This thesis describes the centrifugal forming and resulting mechanical properties of silicone-based elastomers for the manufacture of soft robotic actuators. This process is effective at removing bubbles that get entrapped within 3D-printed, enclosed molds. Conventional methods for rapid prototyping of soft robotic actuators to remove entrapped bubbles typically involve degassing under vacuum, with open-faced molds that limit the layout of formed parts to raised 2D geometries. As the functionality and complexity of soft robots increase, there is a need to mold complete 3D structures with controlled thicknesses or curvatures on multiples surfaces. In addition, characterization of the mechanical properties of common elastomers for these soft robots has lagged the development of new designs. As such, relationships between resulting material properties and processing parameters are virtually non-existent. One of the goals of this thesis is to provide guidelines and physical insights to relate the design, processing conditions, and resulting properties of soft robotic components to each other. Centrifugal forming with accelerations on the order of 100 g's is capable of forming bubble-free, true 3D components for soft robotic actuators, and resulting demonstrations in this work include an aquatic locomotor, soft gripper, and an actuator that straightens when pressurized. Finally, this work shows that the measured mechanical properties of 3D geometries fabricated within enclosed molds through centrifugal forming possess comparable mechanical properties to vacuumed materials formed from open-faced molds with raised 2D features.

  8. Design and fabrication of a foldable 3D silicon based package for solid state lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskij, R.; Liu, P.; van Zeijl, H. W.; Mimoun, B.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2015-05-01

    Miniaturization of solid state lighting (SSL) luminaires as well as reduction of packaging and assembly costs are of prime interest for the SSL lighting industry. A novel silicon based LED package for lighting applications is presented in this paper. The proposed design consists of 5 rigid Si tiles connected by flexible polyimide hinges with embedded interconnects (ICs). Electrical, optical and thermal characteristics were taken into consideration during design. The fabrication process involved polyimide (PI) application and patterning, aluminium interconnect integration in the flexible hinge, LED reflector cavity formation and metalization followed by through wafer DRIE etching for chip formation and release. A method to connect chip front to backside without TSVs was also integrated into the process. Post-fabrication wafer level assembly included LED mounting and wirebond, phosphor-based colour conversion and silicone encapsulation. The package formation was finalized by vacuum assisted wrapping around an assembly structure to form a 3D geometry, which is beneficial for omnidirectional lighting. Bending tests were performed on the flexible ICs and optical performance at different temperatures was evaluated. It is suggested that 3D packages can be expanded to platforms for miniaturized luminaire applications by combining monolithic silicon integration and system-in-package (SiP) technologies.

  9. Deterministic Integration of Single Photon Sources in Silicon Based Photonic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Iman Esmaeil; Elshaari, Ali W; Jöns, Klaus D; Fognini, Andreas; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J; Reimer, Michael E; Zwiller, Val

    2016-04-13

    A major step toward fully integrated quantum optics is the deterministic incorporation of high quality single photon sources in on-chip optical circuits. We show a novel hybrid approach in which preselected III-V single quantum dots in nanowires are transferred and integrated in silicon based photonic circuits. The quantum emitters maintain their high optical quality after integration as verified by measuring a low multiphoton probability of 0.07 ± 0.07 and emission line width as narrow as 3.45 ± 0.48 GHz. Our approach allows for optimum alignment of the quantum dot light emission to the fundamental waveguide mode resulting in very high coupling efficiencies. We estimate a coupling efficiency of 24.3 ± 1.7% from the studied single-photon source to the photonic channel and further show by finite-difference time-domain simulations that for an optimized choice of material and design the efficiency can exceed 90%. PMID:26954298

  10. CO Sensing Performance of a Micro Thermoelectric Gas Sensor with AuPtPd/SnO2 Catalyst and Effects of a Double Catalyst Structure with Pt/α-Al2O3

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tomoyo; Itoh, Toshio; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Shin, Woosuck

    2015-01-01

    The CO sensing properties of a micro thermoelectric gas sensor (micro-TGS) with a double AuPtPd/SnO2 and Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst were investigated. While several nanometer sized Pt and Pd particles were uniformly dispersed on SnO2, the Au particles were aggregated as particles measuring >10 nm in diameter. In situ diffuse reflectance Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis of the catalyst showed a CO adsorption peak on Pt and Pd, but no clear peak corresponding to the interaction between CO and Au was detected. Up to 200 °C, CO combustion was more temperature dependent than that of H2, while H2 combustion was activated by repeated exposure to H2 gas during the periodic gas test. Selective CO sensing of the micro-TGS against H2 was attempted using a double catalyst structure with 0.3–30 wt% Pt/α-Al2O3 as a counterpart combustion catalyst. The sensor output of the micro-TGS decreased with increasing Pt content in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst, by cancelling out the combustion heat from the AuPtPd/SnO2 catalyst. In addition, the AuPtPd/SnO2 and 0.3 wt% Pt/α-Al2O3 double catalyst sensor showed good and selective CO detection. We therefore demonstrated that our micro-TGS with double catalyst structure is useful for controlling the gas selectivity of CO against H2. PMID:26694397

  11. Characterization of Pt-doped SnO2 catalyst for a high-performance micro gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naoyoshi; Suzuki, Takuya; Kobayashi, Makoto; Togoh, Fumiaki; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2013-11-01

    The atomic scale structure and its dependence on Pt concentration of a Pt-doped SnO2 (Pt-SnO2) thin film produced by a sputter-deposition method was investigated, which showed high-performance as a methane gas sensor. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that Pt-SnO2 has a rutile structure similar to SnO2 crystals at less than 10 at% Pt where the Pt ion was located at the Sn position in the rutile structure. There was no evidence that Pt metal clusters were formed in the Pt-SnO2 films. The Pt-SnO2 structure became amorphous at greater than 11 at% Pt. We found a good correlation between the methane activity and local structure of Pt. PMID:24045584

  12. Characterization of a Functional Hydrogel Layer on a Silicon-Based Grating Waveguide for a Biochemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yoo-Seung; Kim, Jongseong; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2016-01-01

    We numerically demonstrated the characteristics of a functional hydrogel layer on a silicon-based grating waveguide for a simple, cost-effective refractive index (RI) biochemical sensor. The RI of the functional hydrogel layer changes when a specific biochemical interaction occurs between the hydrogel-linked receptors and injected ligand molecules. The transmission spectral profile of the grating waveguide shifts depends on the amount of RI change caused by the functional layer. Our characterization includes the effective RI change caused by the thickness, functional volume ratio, and functional strength of the hydrogel layer. The results confirm the feasibility of, and set design rules for, hydrogel-assisted silicon-based grating waveguides. PMID:27322286

  13. Characterization of a Functional Hydrogel Layer on a Silicon-Based Grating Waveguide for a Biochemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoo-Seung; Kim, Jongseong; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2016-01-01

    We numerically demonstrated the characteristics of a functional hydrogel layer on a silicon-based grating waveguide for a simple, cost-effective refractive index (RI) biochemical sensor. The RI of the functional hydrogel layer changes when a specific biochemical interaction occurs between the hydrogel-linked receptors and injected ligand molecules. The transmission spectral profile of the grating waveguide shifts depends on the amount of RI change caused by the functional layer. Our characterization includes the effective RI change caused by the thickness, functional volume ratio, and functional strength of the hydrogel layer. The results confirm the feasibility of, and set design rules for, hydrogel-assisted silicon-based grating waveguides. PMID:27322286

  14. Nanoscale phosphorous atom arrays created using STM for the fabricaton of a silicon-based quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, Robert G.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, Bruce E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, Marilyn E.; Brown, Geoffrey W.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer resist with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites.

  15. Sunlight-assisted, biocatalytic formate synthesis from CO2 and water using silicon-based photoelectrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Eun Jin; Ko, Jong Wan; Kuk, Su Keun; Choe, Hyunjun; Lee, Sumi; Kim, Jae Hong; Nam, Dong Heon; Ryu, Gyeong Min; Kim, Yong Hwan; Park, Chan Beum

    2016-08-11

    We report on a silicon-based photoelectrochemical cell that integrates a formate dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus sp. (TsFDH) to convert CO2 to formate using water as an electron donor under visible light irradiation and an applied bias. Our current study suggests that the deliberate integration of biocatalysis to a light-harvesting platform could provide an opportunity to synthesize valuable chemicals with the use of earth-abundant materials and sustainable resources. PMID:27411734

  16. Formaldehyde vapor produced from hexamethylenetetramine and pesticide: Simultaneous monitoring of formaldehyde and ozone in chamber experiments by flow-based hybrid micro-gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Akira; Hozumi, Naruto; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Asako; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3 was performed by the developed flow analysis system to prove that HCHO vapor is produced from solid pesticide in the presence of O3. HCHO is produced in many ways, including as primary emissions from fuel combustion and in secondary production from anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds by photochemical reactions. In this work, HCHO production from pesticides was investigated for the first time. Commonly pesticide contains surfactant such as hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), which is a heterocyclic compound formed from six molecules of HCHO and four molecules of NH3. HMT can react with gaseous oxidants such as ozone (O3) to produce HCHO. In the present study, a flow analysis system was developed for simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3, and this system was used to determine if solid pesticides produced HCHO vapor in the presence of O3. HMT or the pesticide jimandaisen, which contains mancozeb as the active ingradient and HMT as a stabilizer was placed at the bottom of a 20-L stainless steel chamber. Air in the chamber was monitored using the developed flow system. Analyte gases were collected into an absorbing solution by a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber that was previously developed for a micro gas analysis system (μGAS). Subsequently, indigotrisulfonate, a blue dye, was added to the absorbing solution to detect O3, which discolored the solution. HCHO was detected after mixing with the Hantzsch reaction reagent. Both gases could be detected at concentrations ranging from parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 1000 ppbv with good linearity. Both HMT and jimandaisen emitted large amount of HCHO in the presence of O3. PMID:26653496

  17. Optimization and application of headspace-solid-phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of volatile compounds in cherry wines.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Zhou, Xuan; Niu, Yunwei; Yu, Dan; Zhu, Jiancai; Zhu, Guangyong

    2015-01-26

    A simple, rapid and solvent-free multi-residue method has been developed and applied to confirm and quantify a series of volatile compounds in five cherry wines by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Four parameters (e.g., coating material of fiber, temperature and time of extraction, and addition of sodium chloride in the solution) of headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) were optimized, resulting in the best extraction condition including 50/30 μm DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber, 45 min and 50 °C of SPME, and 2g of sodium chloride addition in the wine during the extraction. The SPME had LODs and LOQs ranging from 0.03 to 7.27 μg L(-1) and 0.10 to 24.24 μg L(-1) for analytic compounds, respectively. Repeatability and reproducibility values were all below 19.8%, with mean values of 12.7% and 10.5%, respectively. Regression coefficients (R(2)) of detective linearity of the standard curves was higher than 0.9852. Moreover, relative recoveries of analytical targets were achieved in a range of 60.7-125.6% with good relative standard deviation values (≤20.6%). In addition, a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the aroma profiles of the wines, which indicated that five samples were distinctly divided into two groups based on their different geographical origins and volatile compounds. PMID:25544009

  18. A Micro-Preconcentrator Combined Olfactory Sensing System with a Micromechanical Cantilever Sensor for Detecting 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Gas Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myung-Sic; Kim, Jinsik; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Kang, Ji Yoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2015-01-01

    Preventing unexpected explosive attacks and tracing explosion-related molecules require the development of highly sensitive gas-vapor detection systems. For that purpose, a micromechanical cantilever-based olfactory sensing system including a sample preconcentrator was developed to detect 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), which is a well-known by-product of the explosive molecule trinitrotoluene (TNT) and exists in concentrations on the order of parts per billion in the atmosphere at room temperature. A peptide receptor (His-Pro-Asn-Phe-Ser-Lys-Tyr-Ile-Leu-His-Gln-Arg) that has high binding affinity for 2,4-DNT was immobilized on the surface of the cantilever sensors to detect 2,4-DNT vapor for highly selective detection. A micro-preconcentrator (µPC) was developed using Tenax-TA adsorbent to produce higher concentrations of 2,4-DNT molecules. The preconcentration was achieved via adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena occurring between target molecules and the adsorbent. The µPC directly integrated with a cantilever sensor and enhanced the sensitivity of the cantilever sensor as a pretreatment tool for the target vapor. The response was rapidly saturated within 5 min and sustained for more than 10 min when the concentrated vapor was introduced. By calculating preconcentration factor values, we verified that the cantilever sensor provides up to an eightfold improvement in sensing performance. PMID:26213944

  19. High-separation efficiency micro-fabricated multi-capillary gas chromatographic columns for simulants of the nerve agents and blister agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To achieve both high speed and separation efficiency in the separation of a mixture of nerve and blister agent simulants, a high-aspect-ratio micro-fabricated multi-capillary column (MCC, a 50-cm-long, 450-μm-deep, and 60-μm-wide four-capillary column) was fabricated by the application of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques. Mixtures of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants - dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and methyl salicylate - were used as samples. The fabricated MCC allowed for the separation of all the components of the gaseous mixture within 24 s, even when the difference in boiling point was 4°C, as in the case of TEP and methyl salicylate. Furthermore, interfering agents - dichloromethane, ethanol, and toluene - were also included in the subsequent gaseous mixture samples. The boiling point of these six components ranged from 78°C to 219°C. All six components were clearly separated within 70 s. This study is the first to report the clear separation of gas mixtures of components with close boiling points. The column efficiency was experimentally determined to be 12,810 plates/m. PMID:24899869

  20. 4E analysis and multi objective optimization of a micro gas turbine and solid oxide fuel cell hybrid combined heat and power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaye, Sepehr; Katebi, Arash

    2014-02-01

    Energy, exergy, economic and environmental (4E) analysis and optimization of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine (SOFC-MGT) system for use as combined generation of heat and power (CHP) is investigated in this paper. The hybrid system is modeled and performance related results are validated using available data in literature. Then a multi-objective optimization approach based on genetic algorithm is incorporated. Eight system design parameters are selected for the optimization procedure. System exergy efficiency and total cost rate (including capital or investment cost, operational cost and penalty cost of environmental emissions) are the two objectives. The effects of fuel unit cost, capital investment and system power output on optimum design parameters are also investigated. It is observed that the most sensitive and important design parameter in the hybrid system is fuel cell current density which has a significant effect on the balance between system cost and efficiency. The selected design point from the Pareto distribution of optimization results indicates a total system exergy efficiency of 60.7%, with estimated electrical energy cost 0.057 kW-1 h-1, and payback period of about 6.3 years for the investment.

  1. High-separation efficiency micro-fabricated multi-capillary gas chromatographic columns for simulants of the nerve agents and blister agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Du, Xiaosong; Wang, Yang; Tai, Huiling; Qiu, Dong; Lin, Qinghao; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-05-01

    To achieve both high speed and separation efficiency in the separation of a mixture of nerve and blister agent simulants, a high-aspect-ratio micro-fabricated multi-capillary column (MCC, a 50-cm-long, 450-μm-deep, and 60-μm-wide four-capillary column) was fabricated by the application of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) techniques. Mixtures of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants - dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and methyl salicylate - were used as samples. The fabricated MCC allowed for the separation of all the components of the gaseous mixture within 24 s, even when the difference in boiling point was 4°C, as in the case of TEP and methyl salicylate. Furthermore, interfering agents - dichloromethane, ethanol, and toluene - were also included in the subsequent gaseous mixture samples. The boiling point of these six components ranged from 78°C to 219°C. All six components were clearly separated within 70 s. This study is the first to report the clear separation of gas mixtures of components with close boiling points. The column efficiency was experimentally determined to be 12,810 plates/m.

  2. Evaluation of solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the headspace analysis of volatile compounds in cocoa products.

    PubMed

    Ducki, Sylvie; Miralles-Garcia, Javier; Zumbé, Albert; Tornero, Antonio; Storey, David M

    2008-02-15

    The aroma profile of cocoa products was investigated by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). SPME fibers coated with 100 microm polydimethylsiloxane coating (PDMS), 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene coating (PDMS-DVB), 75 microm carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane coating (CAR-PDMS) and 50/30 microm divinylbenzene/carboxen on polydimethylsiloxane on a StableFlex fiber (DVB/CAR-PDMS) were evaluated. Several extraction times and temperature conditions were also tested to achieve optimum recovery. Suspensions of the samples in distilled water or in brine (25% NaCl in distilled water) were investigated to examine their effect on the composition of the headspace. The SPME fiber coated with 50/30 microm DVB/CAR-PDMS afforded the highest extraction efficiency, particularly when the samples were extracted at 60 degrees C for 15 min under dry conditions with toluene as an internal standard. Forty-five compounds were extracted and tentatively identified, most of which have previously been reported as odor-active compounds. The method developed allows sensitive and representative analysis of cocoa products with high reproducibility. Further research is ongoing to study chocolate making processes using this method for the quantitative analysis of volatile compounds contributing to the flavor/odor profile. PMID:18371766

  3. Performance Analysis and Optimum Operation Planning of Distributed Energy System Based on Micro Gas Turbine-Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Aina; Kimijima, Shinji

    In this paper, the economical and energy saving advantages of the distributed energy system, which consists of a micro gas turbine-solid oxide fuel cell hybrid power generation system, waste heat recovery devices and air-conditioning equipments, are investigated. Firstly, the thermodynamical performance evaluation of the hybrid system with the heat recovery devices is discussed to estimate the energy conversion efficiency of the whole system. Secondly, by using 1inear programming technique, the optimum operation planning of the cogeneration plant based on the hybrid system is discussed to predict the reduction of the primary fuel consumption and utility cost. Throughout detailed investigation, it is found that the energy conversion efficiency, which includes the waste heat utilization, reaches over 80% (LHV). In addition, the optimum operation of the hybrid system, of which power generation capacity is appropriate for the energy demand, achieve the highly effective energy saving against the traditional energy supply scheme, that is, the fuel reduction reaches around 40% to the conventional value.

  4. In-syringe dispersive micro-solid phase extraction using carbon fibres for the determination of chlorophenols in human urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García-Valverde, M T; Lucena, R; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2016-09-16

    In this article, carbon fibres (CFs) are presented as sorbent material for the dispersive micro-solid phase extraction of twelve chlorophenols from urine samples. CFs are synthesized by a reagentless and green procedure consisting of heating raw cotton, a natural precursor, at high temperature (400°C) in an inert atmosphere (Ar) during 2h. The resulting fibres, which present good water dispersibility, are finally loaded on an in-syringe device. This device, which integrates the extraction and final elution of the analytes, is disposable and it is adapted to process low sample volumes. Working at the optimum conditions, the extraction procedure in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry allows the determination of the analytes in urine at the low μg/L range. In fact, the limits of quantification (LOQs) of the analytes were in the interval from 1μg/L to 2.5μg/L with precision values, expressed as relative standard deviations (RSD), better than 13%. Relative recovery values, ranging from 74.5% to 113%, demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:27558356

  5. Silicon based multilayer photoelectrodes for photoelectrolysis of water to produce hydrogen from the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, Faisal

    The main objective of this work is to study different materials for the direct photosynthesis of hydrogen from water. A variety of photocatalysts such as titanium dioxide, titanium oxy-nitride, silicon carbide, and gallium nitride are being investigated by others for the clean production of hydrogen for fuel cells and hydrogen economy. Our approach was to deposit suitable metallic regions on photocatalyst nanoparticles to direct the efficient synthesis of hydrogen to a particular site for convenient collection. We studied different electrode metals such as gold, platinum, titanium, palladium, and tungsten. We also studied different solar cell materials such as silicon (p- and n-types), silicon carbide and titanium dioxide semiconductors in order to efficiently generate electrons under illumination. We introduced a novel silicon-based multilayer photosynthesis device to take advantage of suitable properties of silicon and tungsten to efficiently produce hydrogen. The device consisted of a silicon (0.5mm) substrate, a deposited atomic layer of Al2O 3 (1nm), a doped polysilicon (0.1microm), and finally a tungsten nanoporous (5-10nm) layer acting as an interface electrode with water. The Al2O 3 layer was introduced to reduce leakage current and to prevent the spreading of the diffused p-n junction layer between the silicon and doped polysilicon layers. The surface of the photoelectrode was coated with nanotextured tungsten nanopores (TNP), which increased the surface area of the electrodes to the electrolyte, assisting in electron-hole mobility, and acting as a photocatalyst. The reported device exhibited a fill factor (%FF) of 27.22% and solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.03174%. This thesis describes the structures of the device, and offers a characterization and comparison between different photoelectrodes.

  6. Silicon-based quantum dots induce inflammation in human lung cells and disrupt extracellular matrix homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Sima, Cornelia; Cinteza, Ludmila Otilia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nanocrystalline semiconductor materials that have been tested for biological applications such as cancer therapy, cellular imaging and drug delivery, despite the serious lack of information of their effects on mammalian cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Si/SiO2 QDs to induce an inflammatory response in MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Cells were exposed to different concentrations of Si/SiO2 QDs (25-200 μg·mL(-1)) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The results obtained showed that uptake of QDs was dependent on biocorona formation and the stability of nanoparticles in various biological media (minimum essential medium without or with 10% fetal bovine serum). The cell membrane damage indicated by the increase in lactate dehydrogenase release after exposure to QDs was dose- and time-dependent. The level of lysosomes increased proportionally with the concentration of QDs, whereas an accumulation of autophagosomes was also observed. Cellular morphology was affected, as shown by the disruption of actin filaments. The enhanced release of nitric oxide and the increase in interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 protein expression suggested that nanoparticles triggered an inflammatory response in MRC-5 cells. QDs decreased the protein expression and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and also MMP-1 caseinase activity, whereas the protein levels of MMP-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 increased. The present study reveals for the first time that silicon-based QDs are able to generate inflammation in lung cells and cause an imbalance in extracellular matrix turnover through a differential regulation of MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 protein expression. PMID:26032556

  7. Compatibility study of thin passivation layers with hydrazine for silicon-based MEMS microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pijus; Ghosh, Avijit; Das, Soumen; Bhattacharyya, T. K.

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the compatibility studies of silicon and its different multilayer structures with hydrazine for possible applications to MEMS have been reported. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction patterns of the r.f. sputtered Si/SiO2/Si3N4 stack layer show preferably oriented crystalline structure after hydrazine treatment at different temperatures. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurement reveals that local bonding of the constituent atoms of the surface layers, where Si-O bond is replaced partially by Si-N bond while treated. Further, the surface morphology carried out by atomic force microscopy exhibits the tendency of reducing surface roughness with the increase in temperature during hydrazine treatment. From the axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA), it is observed that static contact angle changes slightly for different wettability nature of solid surface due to aggregation of crystallites in the valley of the surface fluctuation and anisotropic modification in preferred orientation of the film surface. On the basis of equation of state theory with approximation of solid surface-liquid, interfacial energy was applied to determine the solid surface free energy providing the limited variation in different stack layers. Lastly, the J-V characteristic of the stack layer treated by hydrazine at different temperatures shows multiple current conduction regions with the same current density for varying electric field. Therefore, among various single or multilayer silicon-based thin film combinations, the Si/SiO2/Si3N4 stack layer is the most promising passivation layer for hydrazine-based MEMS applications.

  8. Interaction of silicon-based quantum dots with gibel carp liver: oxidative and structural modifications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    oxidative stress induced 7 days after silicon-based QDs exposure in an efficient manner. PMID:23718202

  9. Interaction of silicon-based quantum dots with gibel carp liver: oxidative and structural modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, Loredana; Petrache, Sorina Nicoleta; Serban, Andreea Iren; Staicu, Andrea Cristina; Sima, Cornelia; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Zărnescu, Otilia; Dinu, Diana; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2013-05-01

    oxidative stress induced 7 days after silicon-based QDs exposure in an efficient manner.

  10. Process Development for Silicon-Based Nanostructures Using Pulsed UV Laser Induced Epitaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chaodan

    1995-01-01

    Nanometer-scale devices have attracted great attention as the ultimate evolution of silicon integrated circuit technology. However, fabrication of nanometer-scale silicon based devices has met great difficulty because it places severe constraints on process technology. This is especially true for SiGe/Si heterostructures because they are particularly sensitive to strain relaxation and/or process induced defects. Recently developed Pulsed Laser Induced Epitaxy (PLIE) offers a promising approach for the fabrication of nanometer-scale SiGe/Si devices. It possesses the advantage of ultra-short time, low thermal budget and full compatibility with current silicon technology. The selective nature of the process allows epitaxial growth of high quality, localized SiGe layers in silicon. In this thesis, a process to fabricate SiGe nanowires in silicon using PLIE is described. In particular, Ge nanowires with a cross-section of {~}6times60 rm nm^2 are first formed using a lift-off process on the silicon substrate with e-beam lithography, followed by a thin low-temperature oxide deposition. Defect-free SiGe nanowires with a cross-section of {~ }25times95 rm nm^2 are then produced by impinging the laser beam on the sample. We thus demonstrate PLIE is a suitable fabrication technique for SiGe/Si nanostructures. Fabrication of Ge nanowires is also studied using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) micromachining techniques. Based on the SiGe nanowire process, we propose two advanced device structures, a quantum wire MOSFET and a lateral SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT). MEDICI simulation of the lateral SiGe HBT demonstrates high performance of the device. In order to characterize the SiGe nanowires using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, an advanced versatile focused ion beam assisted sample preparation technique using a multi-layer stack scheme for localized surface structures is developed and described in this thesis.

  11. Deposition of Amorphous Silicon and Silicon-Based Dielectrics by Remote Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: Application to the Fabrication of Tft's and Mosfet's.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Soo

    1990-01-01

    This thesis discusses the deposition of device quality silicon dioxide (SiO_2), silicon nitride (Si_3N_4 ), and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by the remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (Remote PECVD) technique at low substrate temperature (100 ^circC < T _{rm s} < 450^ circC). An ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) compatible, multi-chamber integrated processing system has been built and used for this study. This system provides: (1) in -situ substrate processing; (2) surface analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and reflected high energy electron diffraction (RHEED); and (3) thin film deposition by Remote PECVD. Six issues are addressed: (1) in-situ semiconductor surface cleaning for Si, Ge, GaAs, and CdTe; (2) substrate surface characterization by using RHEED and AES; (3) process gas-substrate interactions (subcutaneous oxidation) occurring during the thin film deposition; (4) the thin film deposition process for silicon-based dielectrics and for doped and intrinsic amorphous silicon; (5) physical properties of the thin films deposited by Remote PECVD using in-situ AES, and ex-situ infrared (ir) spectroscopy and ellipsometry; and (6) electrical performance of thin films in device structures including metal-oxide/or insulator-semiconductor (MOS or MIS) capacitors formed on silicon, and hydrogenated -amorphous silicon thin film transistors (a-Si:H TFT's). Atomically clean semiconductor surfaces are obtained by a remote hydrogen plasma treatment prior to thin film deposition. In the remote PECVD process the process gases are selectively excited, the silane reactant, the source of silicon atoms in the films is never directly plasma excited, and the substrate is also remote from the plasma discharge region. These differences between the remote PECVD process and the conventional direct PECVD process, result in improved control of the insulator stoichiometry, and a reduction in level of chemical impurities such as hydrogen. We find that the

  12. Silicon-Based Optical Waveguide Modulators and Mode-Locked TITANIUM:SAPPHIRE Laser Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanming

    Single-mode deeply-etched silicon-germanium/silicon (SiGe/Si) rib waveguides have been fabricated and characterized with low propagation losses and strong guiding. Such a waveguide structure is suitable for bent waveguide devices and provides efficient field overlapping, which is needed for devices requiring strong nonlinear coupling. Using the deeply-etched waveguide technique, we have fabricated Si/SiGe/Si Mach-Zehnder modulators, which show strong single-mode waveguiding but only small electro -optic modulation has been observed so far. Another Si modulator is a Fabry-Perot interferometer. We have demonstrated all-optical modulation at 1.3 μm and 1.5 μm in the reflection mode of the asymmetric Si Fabry-Perot interferometer by a control light beam at 0.85 mum. Both switching -on and switching-off operations are demonstrated by transversely moving the etalon. In addition, we have analyzed that silicon carbide (SiC) waveguides exhibit low loss for fundamental modes and high loss for higher-order modes at wavelengths from 0.6 to 1.6 mum. Electro-optic modulation is analyzed with a SiC-on-SiO_2 waveguide structure. Such modulators are potential candidates for high-speed electro-optic modulation for silicon-based optoelectronic devices. Furthermore, we studied the dynamics of a Kerr -lens self-mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, generating 40 -fs pulses and tunable from 750 nm to 920 nm. A moving mirror was first proposed as a starting mechanism for self -mode locking and the starting dynamics is studied in detail. In addition, periodic pulse-train amplitude modulations have been observed and studied. The observation of the amplitude modulation further confirms the dynamic Kerr-lens self -focusing model of self-mode locking in Ti:sapphire lasers and helps us better understand the laser performance. Furthermore, dual-wavelength mode locking is observed over a broad tuning range, which would be very useful for two-wavelength subpicosecond optical sampling, such as pump

  13. Millimeter-wave silicon-based ultra-wideband automotive radar transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vipul

    Since the invention of the integrated circuit, the semiconductor industry has revolutionized the world in ways no one had ever anticipated. With the advent of silicon technologies, consumer electronics became light-weight and affordable and paved the way for an Information-Communication-Entertainment age. While silicon almost completely replaced compound semiconductors from these markets, it has been unable to compete in areas with more stringent requirements due to technology limitations. One of these areas is automotive radar sensors, which will enable next-generation collision-warning systems in automobiles. A low-cost implementation is absolutely essential for widespread use of these systems, which leads us to the subject of this dissertation---silicon-based solutions for automotive radars. This dissertation presents architectures and design techniques for mm-wave automotive radar transceivers. Several fully-integrated transceivers and receivers operating at 22-29 GHz and 77-81 GHz are demonstrated in both CMOS and SiGe BiCMOS technologies. Excellent performance is achieved indicating the suitability of silicon technologies for automotive radar sensors. The first CMOS 22-29-GHz pulse-radar receiver front-end for ultra-wideband radars is presented. The chip includes a low noise amplifier, I/Q mixers, quadrature voltage-controlled oscillators, pulse formers and variable-gain amplifiers. Fabricated in 0.18-mum CMOS, the receiver achieves a conversion gain of 35-38.1 dB and a noise figure of 5.5-7.4 dB. Integration of multi-mode multi-band transceivers on a single chip will enable next-generation low-cost automotive radar sensors. Two highly-integrated silicon ICs are designed in a 0.18-mum BiCMOS technology. These designs are also the first reported demonstrations of mm-wave circuits with high-speed digital circuits on the same chip. The first mm-wave dual-band frequency synthesizer and transceiver, operating in the 24-GHz and 77-GHz bands, are demonstrated. All

  14. Micro-solid phase extraction followed by thermal extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass selective detector for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-08-01

    A method of analyzing environmental contaminants in water based on micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) followed by thermal extraction (TE) and a cold-trapping step, coupled with gas chromatography-mass selective detection (GC-MSD) was developed and validated. μ-SPE-TE- GC-MSD was employed in the determination of five polybrominated diphenyl ethers. The μ-SPE sorbent was chitosan-graphene oxide (CS-GO) composite, which was prepared by mixing CS and GO by means of ultrasonication. The CS in the composite was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. After μ-SPE, the analytes in the extract were extracted thermally in a thermal desorption unit tube combined with a cooled injection system, coupled to GC-MSD. The extraction conditions were optimized for the detection of the target compounds in water. This method provided linearity ranges of between 0.1 and 20μgL(-1) (depending on the analytes), with coefficients of determination, r(2), ≥0.9982. The calculated relative recoveries were between 71.52 and 96.15% whereas precision (based on % relative standard deviations) was between 3.54 and 11.36%. The method showed limit of detection and limit of quantification ranges of between 0.007 and 0.016μgL(-1), and between 0.023 and 0.054μgL(-1), for the two groups of analytes, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of the target analytes in water. PMID:27373376

  15. Identification of metabolites from liquid chromatography-coulometric array detection profiling: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and refractionation provide essential information orthogonal to LC-MS/microNMR.

    PubMed

    Gathungu, Rose M; Bird, Susan S; Sheldon, Diane P; Kautz, Roger; Vouros, Paul; Matson, Wayne R; Kristal, Bruce S

    2014-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-coulometric array detection (LC-EC) is a sensitive, quantitative, and robust metabolomics profiling tool that complements the commonly used mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based approaches. However, LC-EC provides little structural information. We recently demonstrated a workflow for the structural characterization of metabolites detected by LC-EC profiling combined with LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and microNMR. This methodology is now extended to include (i) gas chromatography (GC)-electron ionization (EI)-MS analysis to fill structural gaps left by LC-ESI-MS and NMR and (ii) secondary fractionation of LC-collected fractions containing multiple coeluting analytes. GC-EI-MS spectra have more informative fragment ions that are reproducible for database searches. Secondary fractionation provides enhanced metabolite characterization by reducing spectral overlap in NMR and ion suppression in LC-ESI-MS. The need for these additional methods in the analysis of the broad chemical classes and concentration ranges found in plasma is illustrated with discussion of four specific examples: (i) characterization of compounds for which one or more of the detectors is insensitive (e.g., positional isomers in LC-MS, the direct detection of carboxylic groups and sulfonic groups in (1)H NMR, or nonvolatile species in GC-MS), (ii) detection of labile compounds, (iii) resolution of closely eluting and/or coeluting compounds, and (iv) the capability to harness structural similarities common in many biologically related, LC-EC-detectable compounds. PMID:24657819

  16. Measurement of non-enteric emission fluxes of volatile fatty acids from a California dairy by solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Phillip; Sorenson, Mark; Beene, Matt; Krauter, Charles; Shamp, Brian; Hasson, Alam S.

    Dairies are a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's San Joaquin Valley; a region that experiences high ozone levels during summer. Short-chain carboxylic acids, or volatile fatty acids (VFAs), are believed to make up a large fraction of VOC emissions from these facilities, although there are few studies to substantiate this. In this work, a method using a flux chamber coupled to solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) fibers followed by analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed to quantify emissions of six VFAs (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid) from non-enteric sources. The technique was then used to quantify VFA fluxes from a small dairy located on the campus of California State University Fresno. Both animal feed and animal waste are found to be major sources of VFAs, with acetic acid contributing 70-90% of emissions from the sources tested. Measured total acid fluxes during spring (with an average temperature of 20 °C) were 1.84 ± 0.01, 1.06 ± 0.08, (1.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -2, (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -2 and (1.2 ± 0.5) × 10 -2 g m -2 h -1 from silage, total mixed rations, flushing lane, open lot and lagoon sources, respectively. VFA emissions from the sources tested total 390 ± 80 g h -1. The data indicate high fluxes of VFAs from dairy facilities, but differences in the design and operation of dairies in the San Joaquin Valley as well as seasonal variations mean that additional measurements must be made to accurately determine emissions inventories for the region.

  17. Silicon based nano-architectures for high power lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Rahul

    Lithium-ion batteries have now become an inseparable part of modern day society as the power source for several portable electronics like cell phones, digital cameras and laptops. Their high energy density compared with other electrochemical battery systems has been their most attractive feature. This has lead to a great interest in developing lithium-ion batteries for hybrid and all-electric vehicles. Eventually such vehicles will help drastically reduce the carbon footprint making the environment cleaner and healthier. In spite of their high energy density, Li-ion batteries are known to have poor power densities. This forms a major limitation in their deployment as a power source on vehicles. Electric vehicles need power sources that can provide both high energy and power densities. This requires the development of anode, cathode and electrolyte materials that would transform the capabilities of existing Li-ion batteries. Among anode materials silicon has received great attention because of its very large theoretical capacity of ˜4200 mAh/g based on the alloy Li22Si5. It should be noted that storage of charge in the anode occurs through the alloying of Li with the host anode material. However, the large specific capacity of silicon also results in a ˜400% volume expansion which could lead to pulverization and delamination reducing the cycle life of the electrode. These failure processes are exacerbated at high rates making it extremely difficult to use silicon for high-power Li-ion battery anodes. The major research thrust supporting this Ph.D. thesis involved exploring silicon based nano-architectures that would provide high energy and power densities over a long cycle life. The key technique used to design different nano-architectures was DC Magnetron sputtering with oblique angle deposition. The main development of this research was a functionally strain graded Carbon-Aluminum-Silicon nanoscoop architecture for high-power Li-ion battery anodes. This

  18. Preparation of 2,3-Disubstituted Indoles by Sequential Larock Heteroannulation and Silicon-Based Cross-Coupling Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Baird, John D.

    2009-01-01

    A simple and convergent synthesis of 2,3-disubstituted indoles has been developed using a sequential Larock indole synthesis and silicon-based, cross-coupling reaction. Substituted 2-iodoanilines reacted with an alkynyldimethylsilyl tert-butyl ether to afford indole-2-silanols under the Larock heteroannulation conditions after hydrolysis. The corresponding sodium 2-indolylsilanolate salts successfully engaged in cross-coupling with aryl bromides and chlorides to afford multi-substituted indoles. The development of an alkynyldimethylsilyl tert-butyl ether as a masked silanol equivalent enabled a smooth heteroannulation process and the identification of a suitable catalyst/ligand combination provided for a facile cross-coupling reaction. PMID:19784400

  19. Design and Performance Evaluation of Optical Ethernet Switching Architecture with Liquid Crystal on Silicon-Based Beam-Steering Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jiuh; Chou, H.-H.; Shiau, Yhi; Cheng, Shu-Ying

    2016-07-01

    A non-blocking optical Ethernet switching architecture with liquid crystal on a silicon-based beam-steering switch and optical output buffer strategies are proposed. For preserving service packet sequencing and fairness of routing sequence, priority and round-robin algorithms are adopted at the optical output buffer in this research. Four methods were used to implement tunable fiber delay modules for the optical output buffers to handle Ethernet packets with variable bit-rates. The results reported are based on the simulations performed to evaluate the proposed switching architecture with traffic analysis under a traffic model captured from a real-core network.

  20. Study of silicone-based materials for the packaging of optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yeong-Her

    degradations, and thus cause reliability issues and shorten the lifetime. A new high performance silicone has been developed and its performance has been compared with other commercial silicone products in the packaging of high power white LEDs. The high performance silicone also has better results than commercial high refractive index silicone and optical grade epoxy under JEDEC reliability standard for moisture sensitivity test. In synthesis of red dye-doped particles by sol-gel method, it is a novel method to get high color rendering index (CRI) LEDs. These red dye-doped particles, with average diameter of 5 mum, can be mixed with liquid encapsulants to form a uniform distribution in polymer matrix. The red dye-doped particles can be excited by phosphor-emitted yellow light instead of blue light from LED chip. Therefore, warm white LEDs with high CRI can be gotten at high lumen efficiency. The second part of this work is silicone elastomer for biomedical applications, especially in making urological implantable devices. A cross-linked, heat curable, addition-reaction silicone material is prepared. The material may be molded or formed into one or more medical devices. One such medical device could be a catheter used in urological applications. The material is a long term indwelling material that resists encrustation like a metal stent, but is more comfortable because it is silicone-based. The material can be made relatively cheaply compared to metal stents. Furthermore, the material is biocompatible with bladder epithelial cells.

  1. Development of high-energy silicon-based anode materials for lithium-ion storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ran

    The emerging markets of electric vehicles (EV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) generate a tremendous demand for low-cost lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with high energy and power densities, and long cycling life. The development of such LIBs requires development of low cost, high-energy-density cathode and anode materials. Conventional anode materials in commercial LIBs are primarily synthetic graphite-based materials with a capacity of ˜370 mAh/g. Improvements in anode performance, particularly in anode capacity, are essential to achieving high energy densities in LIBs for EV and HEV applications. This dissertation focuses on development of micro-sized silicon-carbon (Si-C) composites as anode materials for high energy and power densities LIBs. First, a new, low-cost, large-scale approach was developed to prepare a micro-sized Si-C composite with excellent performance as an anode material for LIBs. The composite shows a reversible capacity of 1459 mAh/g after 200 cycles at 1 A/g (97.8% capacity retention) and excellent high rate performance of 700 mAh/g at 12.8 A/g, and also has a high tap density of 0.78 g/cm3. The structure of the composite, micro-sized as a whole, features the interconnected nanoscale size of the Si building blocks and the uniform carbon filling, which enables the maximum utilization of silicon even when the micro-sized particles break into small pieces upon cycling. To understand the effects of key parameters in designing the micro-sized Si-C composites on their electrochemical performance and explore how to optimize them, the influence of Si nanoscale building block size and carbon coating on the electrochemical performance of the micro-sized Si-C composites were investigated. It has been found that the critical Si building block size is 15 nm, which enables a high capacity without compromising the cycling stability, and that carbon coating at higher temperature improves the 1st cycle coulombic efficiency (CE) and the rate capability

  2. Design and evaluation of a low nitrogen oxides natural gas-fired conical wire-mesh duct burner for a micro-cogeneration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar Barka Ab

    A novel low NOx conical wire-mesh duct burner was designed, built and tested in the present research. This thesis documents the design process and the in-depth evaluation of this novel duct burner for the development of a more efficient micro-cogeneration unit. This duct burner provides the thermal energy necessary to raise the microturbine exhaust gases temperature to increase the heat recovery capability. The duct burner implements both lean-premixed and surface combustion techniques to achieve low NOx and CO emissions. The design of the duct burner was supported by a qualitative flow visualization study for the duct burner premixer to provide insight into the premixer flow field (mixing process). Different premixer geometries were used to control the homogeneity of the fuel-oxidant mixture at the exit of the duct burner premixer. Laser sheet illumination (LSI) technique was used to capture images of the mixing process, for each configuration studied. A quasi-quantitative analysis technique was developed to rank the different premixer geometries in terms of mixing effectiveness. The premixer geometries that provided better mixing were selected and used for the combustion tests. The full-scale gas-fired duct burner was installed in the exhaust duct of a micro-cogeneration unit for the evaluation. Three wire-mesh burners with different pressure drops were used. Each burner has a conical shape made from FeCrAL alloy mat and was designed based on a heat release per unit area of 2500 kW/m2 and a total heat release of 240kW at 100 percent excess air. The local momentum of the gaseous mixture introduced through the wire-mesh was adjusted so that the flame stabilized outside the burner mesh (surface combustion). Cold flow tests (i.e., the duct burner was off, but the microturbine was running) were conducted to measure the effect of different duct burner geometrical parameters on flow split between the combustion zone and the bypass channel, and on pressure drop across

  3. Silicon-Based Chemical Motors: An Efficient Pump for Triggering and Guiding Fluid Motion Using Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple yet highly efficient chemical motor that can be controlled with visible light. The motor made from a noble metal and doped silicon acts as a pump, which is driven through a light-activated catalytic reaction process. We show that the actuation is based on electro-osmosis with the electric field generated by chemical reactions at the metal and silicon surfaces, whereas the contribution of diffusio-osmosis to the actuation is negligible. Surprisingly, the pump can be operated using water as fuel. This is possible because of the large ζ-potential of silicon, which makes the electro-osmotic fluid motion sizable even though the electric field generated by the reaction is weak. The electro-hydrodynamic process is greatly amplified with the addition of reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which generates higher electric fields. Another remarkable finding is the tunability of silicon-based pumps. That is, it is possible to control the speed of the fluid with light. We take advantage of this property to manipulate the spatial distribution of colloidal microparticles in the liquid and to pattern colloidal microparticle structures at specific locations on a wafer surface. Silicon-based pumps hold great promise for controlled mass transport in fluids. PMID:26349036

  4. Silicon-Based Chemical Motors: An Efficient Pump for Triggering and Guiding Fluid Motion Using Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Esplandiu, Maria J; Farniya, Ali Afshar; Bachtold, Adrian

    2015-11-24

    We report a simple yet highly efficient chemical motor that can be controlled with visible light. The motor made from a noble metal and doped silicon acts as a pump, which is driven through a light-activated catalytic reaction process. We show that the actuation is based on electro-osmosis with the electric field generated by chemical reactions at the metal and silicon surfaces, whereas the contribution of diffusio-osmosis to the actuation is negligible. Surprisingly, the pump can be operated using water as fuel. This is possible because of the large ζ-potential of silicon, which makes the electro-osmotic fluid motion sizable even though the electric field generated by the reaction is weak. The electro-hydrodynamic process is greatly amplified with the addition of reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which generates higher electric fields. Another remarkable finding is the tunability of silicon-based pumps. That is, it is possible to control the speed of the fluid with light. We take advantage of this property to manipulate the spatial distribution of colloidal microparticles in the liquid and to pattern colloidal microparticle structures at specific locations on a wafer surface. Silicon-based pumps hold great promise for controlled mass transport in fluids. PMID:26349036

  5. [Determination of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in drinking water using headspace solid phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass-spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianguo; Liu, Kaiying; Bai, Mindong; Cheng, Chao; Yu, Yixuan; Zhou, Xinying

    2015-12-01

    The odorous compounds of 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) and geosmin (GSM) heavily produced and released in water source are one of the most important factors leading to off-flavor emergencies and resident water consumption panic in drinking water. A headspace solid phase micro-extraction ( HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was established for the simultaneous determination of these two trace earthy and musty compounds in reservoir water, reservoir soil and tap water. The conditions of HS-SPME, such as salt amount, extraction time and extraction temperature, were optimized based on orthogonal analysis. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of 2-MIB and GSM were carried out in the electron impact (EI) -selective ion scanning mode. The results showed that the linear relationship between peak area and concentration of 2-MIB and GSM was good enough (r2 0.998) from 5 to 1 000 ng/L, the limits of detection were 0.72 ng/L for 2-MIB, 0.34 ng/L for GSM and the limits of quantification were 2.40 ng/L for 2-MIB, 1.13 ng/L for GSM. When the target samples spiked in the range of 10-600 ng/L, the average recoveries of the target compounds were 93.6% - 107.7% ( RSD ≤ 6.1%, n = 6). Based on the above method, the target compounds in reservoir water, reservoir soil and tap water in a certain region of Liaoning Province were analyzed. The results showed that the two target odors in reservoir water were 3.0 -3.6 ng/L. As for the extract of the soil around the reservoir, 2-MIB was 8.1 ng/L and GSM was 17.8 ng/L. The odorous substances were not detected in the tap water. This method is simple, accurate, reliable, highly sensitive and no need of organic solvents. And it is suitable for the detection of 2-MIB and GSM in drinking water. PMID:27097462

  6. Self-assembly micro optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping (Cerina); Le, Kevin; Malalur-Nagaraja-Rao, Smitha; Hsu, Lun-Chen; Chiao, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Optical communication and sensor industry face critical challenges in manufacturing for system integration. Due to the assembly complexity and integration platform variety, micro optical components require costly alignment and assembly procedures, in which many required manual efforts. Consequently, self-assembly device architectures have become a great interest and could provide major advantages over the conventional optical devices. In this paper, we discussed a self-assembly integration platform for micro optical components. To demonstrate the adaptability and flexibility of the proposed optical device architectures, we chose a commercially available MEMS fabrication foundry service - MUMPs (Multi-User MEMS Process). In this work, polysilicon layers of MUMPS are used as the 3-D structural material for construction of micro component framework and actuators. However, because the polysilicon has high absorption in the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges, it is not suitable for optical interaction. To demonstrate the required optical performance, hybrid integration of materials was proposed and implemented. Organic compound materials were applied on the silicon-based framework to form the required optical interfaces. Organic compounds provide good optical transparency, flexibility to form filters or lens and inexpensive manufacturing procedures. In this paper, we have demonstrated a micro optical filter integrated with self-assembly structures. We will discuss the self-assembly mechanism, optical filter designs, fabrication issues and results.

  7. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  8. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, Ned A.; Koehler, Dale R.; Liang, Alan Y.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1993-01-01

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  9. A broadband micro-machined far-infrared absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Datesman, A. M.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, K. H.; Quijada, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is >0.95 from 1 to 20 THz (300-15 μm) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 K. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers ≈100 μm in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model.

  10. A broadband micro-machined far-infrared absorber.

    PubMed

    Wollack, E J; Datesman, A M; Jhabvala, C A; Miller, K H; Quijada, M A

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is >0.95 from 1 to 20 THz (300-15 μm) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 K. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers ≈100 μm in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model. PMID:27250445

  11. A Broadband Micro-Machined Far-Infrared Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datesman, A. M.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, K. H.; Wollack, E. J.; Quijada, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is greater than 0.95 from 1 to 20 terahertz (300-15 microns) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 degrees Kelvin. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers approximately 100 microns in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model.

  12. Silicon-based tunable optical delay lines and switches for next generation optical telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linjie; Xie, Jingya; Lu, Liangjun; Li, Zuxiang; Chen, Jianping

    2015-02-01

    We report our recent progress on reconfigurable optical true time delay lines (RTTDL) and optical switches. The RTTDL is composed of 8 stages of MZIs connected by 7 waveguide pairs with an incremental length difference. Variable optical attenuators are inserted in the delay waveguides to suppress crosstalk caused by the residual signals from noise paths. Transmission of a 25 Gbps PRBS signal confirms the signal fidelity after a maximum of 1.27 ns delay. The optical switch is based on a Benes architecture with Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZI) as the switching elements. Both p-i-n diodes and silicon resistive micro-heaters are integrated in the MZI arms for electrical tuning and phase correction, respectively. The measured on-chip insertion loss of the 4×4 switch is < 8 dB. Transmission of a 50 Gb/s quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) optical signal verifies its switching functionality.

  13. Focused ion beam high resolution grayscale lithography for silicon-based nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmanis, M. Tittonen, I.

    2014-02-17

    Nanofabrication techniques providing a fine control over the profile of silicon structures are of great importance for nanophotonics, plasmonics, sensing, micro- and nano fluidics, and biomedical applications. We report on the applicability of focused ion beam for the fine grayscale lithography, which yields surface profiles that are customized at nanoscale. The approach is based on a correlation between the ion beam irradiation dose of inorganic resist and the mask etching rate in the reactive ion etching. An exceptional property of this method is the number of gray tones that are not limited by the resist characteristics. We apply the process to fabricate unique periodic nanostructures with a slope angle varying across the structure and a period as small as 200 nm.

  14. Silicon-based three-dimensional microstructures for radiation dosimetry in hadrontherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, C. Solberg, T.; Carabe, A.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Fleta, C.; Esteban, S.; Lozano, M.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Gómez, F.

    2015-07-13

    In this work, we propose a solid-state-detector for use in radiation microdosimetry. This device improves the performance of existing dosimeters using customized 3D-cylindrical microstructures etched inside silicon. The microdosimeter consists of an array of micro-sensors that have 3D-cylindrical electrodes of 15 μm diameter and a depth of 5 μm within a silicon membrane, resulting in a well-defined micrometric radiation sensitive volume. These microdetectors have been characterized using an {sup 241}Am source to assess their performance as radiation detectors in a high-LET environment. This letter demonstrates the capability of this microdetector to be used to measure dose and LET in hadrontherapy centers for treatment plan verification as part of their patient-specific quality control program.

  15. Silicon Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Chip for Portable Consumer Electronics -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Ludwiszewski

    2009-06-29

    LSI’s fuel cell uses efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (“SOFC”) technology, is manufactured using Micro Electrical Mechanical System (“MEMS”) fabrication methods, and runs on high energy fuels, such as butane and ethanol. The company’s Fuel Cell on a Chip™ technology enables a form-factor battery replacement for portable electronic devices that has the potential to provide an order-of-magnitude run-time improvement over current batteries. Further, the technology is clean and environmentally-friendly. This Department of Energy funded project focused on accelerating the commercialization and market introduction of this technology through improvements in fuel cell chip power output, lifetime, and manufacturability.

  16. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  17. Micro Navigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Kia, T.; Chau, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature high-performance low-mass space avionics systems are desired for planned future outer planetary exploration missions (i.e. Europa Orbiter/Lander, Pluto-Kuiper Express). The spacecraft fuel and mass requirements enabling orbit insertion is the driving requirement. The Micro Navigator is an integrated autonomous Guidance, Navigation & Control (GN&C)micro-system that would provide the critical avionics function for navigation, pointing, and precision landing. The Micro Navigator hardware and software allow fusion of data from multiple sensors to provide a single integrated vehicle state vector necessary for six degrees of freedom GN&C. The benefits of this MicroNavigator include: 1) The Micro Navigator employs MEMS devices that promise orders of magnitude reductions in mass power and volume of inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes), celestial sensing devices (startracker, sun sensor), and computing element; 2) The highly integrated nature of the unit will reduce the cost of flight missions. a) The advanced miniaturization technologies employed by the Micro Navigator lend themselves to mass production, and therefore will reduce production cost of spacecraft. b) The integral approach simplifies interface issues associated with discrete components and reduces cost associated with integration and test of multiple components; and 3) The integration of sensors and processing elements into a single unit will allow the Micro Navigator to encapsulate attitude information and determination functions into a single object. This is particularly beneficial for object-oriented software architectures that are used in advanced spacecraft. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  19. High temperature electrical conductivity and thermal decomposition of phenolic- and silicon-based dielectrics for fireset housings

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.T. Jr.; Biefeld, R.M.

    1981-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and thermal decomposition characteristics of several phenolic- and silicone-based materials of interest for fireset case housings have been measured to 600 to 700/sup 0/C. The materials are phenolic or silicone resins reinforced with glass chopped fabric or cloth. The conductivity temperature dependence was measured during decomposition in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of approx. 10/sup 0/C/minute. Applied electric fields were from 4 x 10/sup 2/ to 4 x 10/sup 3/ volts/cm. Thermal decomposition characteristics were investigated by mass spectroscopy in vacuum and thermal gravimetric analysis in nitrogen and air. Nearly ohmic voltage-current characteristics were obtained, except where decomposition and/or outgassing was pronounced.

  20. Synthesis of silicon-based nanoparticles by 10.6 μm nanosecond CO2 laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, D. M.; Chai, J. S.; Zekic, A. A.; Trtica, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Maletic, S.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles were produced by irradiating a single-crystal silicon target with 10.6 μm nanosecond transverse excited atmospheric (TEA) pulsed CO2 laser in de-ionized water. The effects of the laser pulse energies and repetition rate were studied. To reveal the role of thermal effects, a low laser repetition rate has been applied, excluding the interaction of the laser beam with the previously generated cavitation bubble. The analysis of the influence of the laser pulse energies and the laser repetition rate showed that the increase of the laser pulse energies leads to an increase of the nanoparticle size. An explanation of such results was proposed and the importance of the role of the target surface temperature in the ablation process is discussed.

  1. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  2. InGaAlAsPN: A Materials System for Silicon Based Optoelectronics and Heterostructure Device Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekaert, T. P. E.; Tang, S.; Wallace, R. M.; Beam, E. A., III; Duncan, W. M.; Kao, Y. -C.; Liu, H. -Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new material system is proposed for silicon based opto-electronic and heterostructure devices; the silicon lattice matched compositions of the (In,Ga,Al)-(As,P)N 3-5 compounds. In this nitride alloy material system, the bandgap is expected to be direct at the silicon lattice matched compositions with a bandgap range most likely to be in the infrared to visible. At lattice constants ranging between those of silicon carbide and silicon, a wider bandgap range is expected to be available and the high quality material obtained through lattice matching could enable applications such as monolithic color displays, high efficiency multi-junction solar cells, opto-electronic integrated circuits for fiber communications, and the transfer of existing 3-5 technology to silicon.

  3. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  4. Comparison of clinical explants and accelerated hydrolytic aging to improve biostability assessment of silicone-based polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Touchet, Tyler; Sears, Nick; Kishan, Alysha; Jenney, Christopher; Padsalgikar, Ajay D; Chen, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Although silicone-based polyurethanes have demonstrated increased oxidative stability, there have been conflicting reports of the long-term hydrolytic stability of Optim™ and PurSil(®) 35 based on recent temperature-accelerated hydrolysis studies. The goal of the current study was to identify in vitro-in vivo correlations to determine the relevance of this accelerated in vitro model for predicting clinical outcomes. Temperature-accelerated hydrolytic aging of three commonly used cardiac lead insulation materials, Optim™, Elasthane™ 55D, Elasthane™ 80A, and a related silicone-polyurethane, PurSil(®) 35, was performed. After 1 year at 85°C, similar losses in Mn and Mz were observed for the poly(ether urethanes), but an increase in Mz loss as compared to Mn loss was observed for the silicone-based polyurethanes. A similar trend of increased Mz loss as compared to Mn loss was observed in explanted Optim™ leads after 2-3 years; however, no statistically significant Mn loss was detected between 2-3 and 7-8 years of implantation. Given this preferential loss of high molecular weight chains, it was hypothesized that the observed differences between the polyurethanes were due to allophanate dissociation rather than backbone chain scission. Following full dissociation of the small percentage of allophanates in vivo, the observed molecular weight stability and proven clinical performance of Optim™ was attributed to the well-documented stability of the urethane bond under physiological conditions. This allophanate dissociation reaction is incompatible with the first order mechanism proposed in previous temperature-accelerated hydrolysis studies and may be the reason for the model's inaccurate prediction of significant and progressive molecular weight loss in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1805-1816, 2016. PMID:26990709

  5. Biocompatibility Assessment of Si-based Nano- and Micro-particles

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Hamsa; Godin, Biana

    2012-01-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant chemical elements found on the Earth. Due to its unique chemical and physical properties, silicon based materials and their oxides (e.g. silica) have been used in several industries such as building and construction, electronics, food industry, consumer products and biomedical engineering/medicine. This review summarizes studies on effects of silicon and silica nano- and micro-particles on cells and organs following four main exposure routes, namely, intravenous, pulmonary, dermal and oral. Further, possible genotoxic effects of silica based nanoparticles are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on improving and standardizing biocompatibility assessment for nano- and micro-particles. PMID:22634160

  6. Local Heating of Discrete Droplets Using Magnetic Porous Silicon-Based Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Ho; Derfus, Austin M.; Segal, Ester; Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Sailor, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for local heating of discrete micro-liter scale liquid droplets. The droplets are covered with magnetic porous Si microparticles, and heating is achieved by application of an external alternating electromagnetic field. The magnetic porous Si microparticles consist of two layers: the top layer contains a photonic code and it is hydrophobic, with surface-grafted dodecyl moieties. The bottom layer consists of a hydrophilic Si oxide host layer that is infused with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The amphiphilic microparticles spontaneously align at the interface of a water droplet immersed in mineral oil, allowing manipulation of the droplets by application of a magnetic field. Application of an oscillating magnetic field (338 kHz, 18A RMS current in a coil surrounding the experiment) generates heat in the superparamagnetic particles that can raise the temperature of the enclosed water droplet to >80 °C within 5 min. A simple microfluidics application is demonstrated: combining complementary DNA strands contained in separate droplets and then thermally inducing dehybridization of the conjugate. The complementary oligonucleotides were conjugated with the cyanine dye fluorophores Cy3 and Cy5 to quantify the melting/re-binding reaction by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The magnetic porous Si microparticles were prepared as photonic crystals, containing spectral codes that allowed the identification of the droplets by reflectivity spectroscopy. The technique demonstrates the feasibility of tagging, manipulating, and heating small volumes of liquids without the use of conventional microfluidic channel and heating systems. PMID:16771508

  7. Silicone-based elastic composites able to generate energy on micromechanical impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racles, Carmen; Ignat, Mircea; Bele, Adrian; Dascalu, Mihaela; Lipcinski, Daniel; Cazacu, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Elastic composites were prepared based on a polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (M w = 139 000 g mol‑1), different α,ω-bis(trimethylsiloxy)poly(methylcyanopropyl-methylhexyl-methylhydro)siloxanes as the polar group component and TEOS as a cross-linking agent and silica generator. The resulting materials consisted of polar–nonpolar interconnected networks as matrices which had 7.4 or 9.5 wt% in situ generated silica and contained up to 2.74 wt% CN groups. The films formed were tested for electromechanical response to a micromechanical impulse. It was found that their performance was proportional to their electromechanical sensitivity (β = ε‧/Y, where ε‧ is the dielectric permittivity and Y is Young’s modulus); thus it can be adjusted by their composition, via tailoring the dielectric and mechanical properties. The generated voltage peak-to-peak measured was between 3.75 and 12.3 V mm‑1. The best result for the tested materials (i.e. harvested energy of 460 nJ or energy density of 4.6 μJ cm‑3, as a response to a micro-impulse of 0.017 kg m s‑1) was obtained for a film having ε‧ = 3.6 and Y = 0.19 MPa.

  8. A micro surface tension alveolus (MISTA) in a glass microchip.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing Yue Larry; Wu, Lan-Qin; Zhang, Na; Hu, Li-Dan; Li, You; Li, Wen-Juan; Li, Dong-Hui; Huang, Ping; Zhou, Yong-Liang

    2009-11-21

    We have designed a non-membrane micro surface tension alveolus (MISTA) in a glass microchip for direct gas exchange and micro gradient control. Hemoglobin (Hb) in the liquid phase indicates the rapid gas gradient changes of O2 and CO2 shifted by the difference in pressure between the liquid and the gas. PMID:19865732

  9. A thermally self-sustained micro-power plant with integrated micro-solid oxide fuel cells, micro-reformer and functional micro-fluidic carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Barbara; Evans, Anna; Santis-Alvarez, Alejandro J.; Jiang, Bo; Martynczuk, Julia; Galinski, Henning; Nabavi, Majid; Prestat, Michel; Tölke, René; Bieberle-Hütter, Anja; Poulikakos, Dimos; Muralt, Paul; Niedermann, Philippe; Dommann, Alex; Maeder, Thomas; Heeb, Peter; Straessle, Valentin; Muller, Claude; Gauckler, Ludwig J.

    2014-07-01

    Low temperature micro-solid oxide fuel cell (micro-SOFC) systems are an attractive alternative power source for small-size portable electronic devices due to their high energy efficiency and density. Here, we report on a thermally self-sustainable reformer-micro-SOFC assembly. The device consists of a micro-reformer bonded to a silicon chip containing 30 micro-SOFC membranes and a functional glass carrier with gas channels and screen-printed heaters for start-up. Thermal independence of the device from the externally powered heater is achieved by exothermic reforming reactions above 470 °C. The reforming reaction and the fuel gas flow rate of the n-butane/air gas mixture controls the operation temperature and gas composition on the micro-SOFC membrane. In the temperature range between 505 °C and 570 °C, the gas composition after the micro-reformer consists of 12 vol.% to 28 vol.% H2. An open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V and maximum power density of 47 mW cm-2 at 565 °C is achieved with the on-chip produced hydrogen at the micro-SOFC membranes.

  10. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups. PMID:22447403

  11. Numerical simulation of temperature field and thermal stress field in silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode irradiated by multipulsed millisecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhi; Jin, Guangyong; Tan, Yong; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-10-01

    Laser induced morphological damage have been observed in silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode. This paper adopted the methods of the theoretical calculation and finite element numerical simulation to model, then solved the temperature field and thermal stress field in silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode irradiated by multipulsed millisecond laser, and researched the features and laws of the temperature field and thermal stress field. As for the thermal-mechanical problem of multipulsed millisecond laser irradiating silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode, based on Fourier heat conduction and thermoelasticity theories, we established a two-dimensional axisymmetric mathematical model .Then adopted finite element method to simulate the transient temperature field and thermal stress field. The temperature dependences of the material parameters and the absorption coefficient were taken into account in the calculation. The results indicated that there was the heat accumulation effect when multipulsed millisecond laser irradiating silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode. The morphological damage threshold were obtained numerically. The evolution of temperature at the central point of the top surface, the temperature distribution along the radial direction in the end of laser irradiation and the temperature distribution along the axial direction in the end of laser irradiation were considered. Meanwhile, the radial stress, hoop stress, axial stress on the top surface and the R=500μm axis were also considered. The results showed that the morphological damage threshold decreased with the increased of the pulse number. The results of this study have reference significance of researching the thermal and thermal stress effect evolution's features when multipulsed millisecond laser irradiating silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode, then revealing the mechanism of interactions between millisecond laser and

  12. A phononic crystal strip based on silicon for support tether applications in silicon-based MEMS resonators and effects of temperature and dopant on its band gap characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Thi Dep; Bao, JingFu

    2016-04-01

    Phononic crystals (PnCs) and n-type doped silicon technique have been widely employed in silicon-based MEMS resonators to obtain high quality factor (Q) as well as temperature-induced frequency stability. For the PnCs, their band gaps play an important role in the acoustic wave propagation. Also, the temperature and dopant doped into silicon can cause the change in its material properties such as elastic constants, Young's modulus. Therefore, in order to design the simultaneous high Q and frequency stability silicon-based MEMS resonators by two these techniques, a careful design should study effects of temperature and dopant on the band gap characteristics to examine the acoustic wave propagation in the PnC. Based on these, this paper presents (1) a proposed silicon-based PnC strip structure for support tether applications in low frequency silicon-based MEMS resonators, (2) influences of temperature and dopant on band gap characteristics of the PnC strips. The simulation results show that the largest band gap can achieve up to 33.56 at 57.59 MHz and increase 1280.13 % (also increase 131.89 % for ratio of the widest gaps) compared with the counterpart without hole. The band gap properties of the PnC strips is insignificantly effected by temperature and electron doping concentration. Also, the quality factor of two designed length extensional mode MEMS resonators with proposed PnC strip based support tethers is up to 1084.59% and 43846.36% over the same resonators with PnC strip without hole and circled corners, respectively. This theoretical study uses the finite element analysis in COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB softwares as simulation tools. This findings provides a background in combination of PnC and dopant techniques for high performance silicon-based MEMS resonators as well as PnC-based MEMS devices.

  13. MEG II drift chamber characterization with the silicon based cosmic ray tracker at INFN Pisa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.; Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Cei, F.; D`Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Nicolò, D.; Signorelli, G.

    2016-07-01

    High energy physics experiments at the high intensity frontier place ever greater demands on detectors, and in particular on tracking devices. In order to compare the performance of small size tracking prototypes, a high resolution cosmic ray tracker has been assembled to provide an external track reference. It consists of four spare ladders of the external layers of the Silicon Vertex Tracker of the BaBar experiment. The test facility, operating at INFN Sezione di Pisa, provides the detector under test with an external track with an intrinsic resolution of 15-30 μm. The MEG II tracker is conceived as a unique volume wire drift chamber filled with He-isobutane 85-15%. The ionization density in this gas mixture is about 13 clusters/cm and this results in a non-negligible bias of the impact parameters for tracks crossing the cell close to the anode wire. We present the telescope performance in terms of tracking efficiency and resolution and the results of the characterization of a MEG II drift chamber prototype.

  14. Wafer-scale micro-optics replication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Markus; Rudmann, Hartmut; Marty, Brigitte; Maciossek, Andreas

    2003-11-01

    For many high-volume applications of micro-optical elements and systems the most cost-effective fabrication technology is replication in polymer materials with techniques such as UV embossing, hot embossing, and injection molding. Replication significantly reduces the cost in volume production in comparison to silicon-based etched components. However, the temperature and humidity stability of most commercial polymers is not suitable for the application of replicated elements in areas such as telecom or datacom. A process based on UV-replication in chemically durable polymers has been developed. Technologies for all fabrication steps from mastering over tooling to replication on wafer-scale, post-processing and characterization are described. We present results of various projects with double-sided micro-optics for telecom/datacom and various sensor applications.

  15. Micro stereo lithography and fabrication of 3D microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1999-08-01

    Micro Stereo Lithography (MSL) is a poor man's LIGA for fabricating high aspect ratio MEMS devices in UV curable semiconducting polymers using either two computer-controlled low inertia galvanometric mirrors with the aid of focusing lens or an array of optical fibers. For 3D MEMS devices, the polymers need to have conductive and possibly piezoelectric or ferroelectric properties. Such polymers are being developed at Penn State resulting in microdevices for fluid and drug delivery. Applications may include implanted medical delivery systems, chemical and biological instruments, fluid delivery in engines, pump coolants and refrigerants for local cooling of electronic components. With the invention of organic thin film transistor, now it is possible to fabricate 3D polymeric MEMS devices with built-in-electronics similar to silicon based microelectronics. In this paper, a brief introduction of MSL system is presented followed by a detailed design and development of micro pumps using this approach.

  16. PREFACE: E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Symposium M: More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Christian; Fompeyrine, Jean; Vallée, Christophe; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    More than Moore explores a new area of Silicon based microelectronics, which reaches beyond the boundaries of conventional semiconductor applications. Creating new functionality to semiconductor circuits, More than Moore focuses on motivating new technological possibilities. In the past decades, the main stream of microelectronics progresses was mainly powered by Moore's law, with two focused development arenas, namely, IC miniaturization down to nano scale, and SoC based system integration. While the microelectronics community continues to invent new solutions around the world to keep Moore's law alive, there is increasing momentum for the development of 'More than Moore' technologies which are based on silicon technologies but do not simply scale with Moore's law. Typical examples are RF, Power/HV, Passives, Sensor/Actuator/MEMS or Bio-chips. The More than Moore strategy is driven by the increasing social needs for high level heterogeneous system integration including non-digital functions, the necessity to speed up innovative product creation and to broaden the product portfolio of wafer fabs, and the limiting cost and time factors of advanced SoC development. It is believed that More than Moore will add value to society on top of and beyond advanced CMOS with fast increasing marketing potentials. Important key challenges for the realization of the 'More than Moore' strategy are: perspective materials for future THz devices materials systems for embedded sensors and actuators perspective materials for epitaxial approaches material systems for embedded innovative memory technologies development of new materials with customized characteristics The Hot topics covered by the symposium M (More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics) at E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, 14-18 May 2012 have been: development of functional ceramics thin films New dielectric materials for advanced microelectronics bio- and CMOS compatible

  17. Highly compact imaging using Bessel beams generated by ultraminiaturized multi-micro-axicon systems.

    PubMed

    Weber, Niklas; Spether, Dominik; Seifert, Andreas; Zappe, Hans

    2012-05-01

    Employing Bessel beams in imaging takes advantage of their self-reconstructing properties to achieve small focal points while maintaining a large depth of focus. Bessel beams are efficiently generated using axicons, and their utility in scanning imaging systems, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), has been demonstrated. As these systems are miniaturized to allow, for example, endoscopic implementations, micro-axicons are required to assure the maintenance of a large depth of focus. We demonstrate here the design, fabrication, and application of molded micro-axicons for use in silicon-based micro-optical benches. It is shown that arrangements of multiple convex and concave axicons may be implemented to optimize the depth of focus in a miniaturized OCT system, using a telescopic optical arrangement of considerably shorter optical system length than that achievable with classical micro-optics. PMID:22561940

  18. Design of a compact and integrated TM-rotated/TE-through polarization beam splitter for silicon-based slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Xiao, Jinbiao

    2016-01-20

    A compact and integrated TM-rotated/TE-through polarization beam splitter for silicon-based slot waveguides is proposed and characterized. For the input TM mode, it is first transferred into the cross strip waveguide using a tapered directional coupler (DC), and then efficiently rotated to the corresponding TE mode using an L-shaped bending polarization rotator (PR). Finally, the TE mode for slot waveguide at the output end is obtained with the help of a strip-to-slot mode converter. By contrast, for the input TE mode, it almost passes through the slot waveguide directly and outputs at the bar end with nearly neglected coupling due to a large mode mismatch. Moreover, an additional S-bend connecting the tapered DC and bending PR is used to enhance the performance. Results show that a total device length of 19.6 μm is achieved, where the crosstalk (CT) and polarization conversion loss are, respectively -26.09 and 0.54 dB, for the TM mode, and the CT and insertion loss are, respectively, -22.21 and 0.41 dB, for the TE mode, both at 1.55 μm. The optical bandwidth is approximately 50 nm with a CT<-20  dB. In addition, fabrication tolerances and field evolution are also presented. PMID:26835937

  19. In Vivo Validation of Custom-Designed Silicon-Based Microelectrode Arrays for Long-Term Neural Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S.; Wang, Cindy X.; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays’ insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays’ recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  20. Ferromagnetic Resonance Spin Pumping and Electrical Spin Injection in Silicon-Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pu, Y; Odenthal, P M; Adur, R; Beardsley, J; Swartz, A G; Pelekhov, D V; Flatté, M E; Kawakami, R K; Pelz, J; Hammel, P C; Johnston-Halperin, E

    2015-12-11

    We present the measurement of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR-)driven spin pumping and three-terminal electrical spin injection within the same silicon-based device. Both effects manifest in a dc spin accumulation voltage V_{s} that is suppressed as an applied field is rotated to the out-of-plane direction, i.e., the oblique Hanle geometry. Comparison of V_{s} between these two spin injection mechanisms reveals an anomalously strong suppression of FMR-driven spin pumping with increasing out-of-plane field H_{app}^{z}. We propose that the presence of the large ac component to the spin current generated by the spin pumping approach, expected to exceed the dc value by 2 orders of magnitude, is the origin of this discrepancy through its influence on the spin dynamics at the oxide-silicon interface. This convolution, wherein the dynamics of both the injector and the interface play a significant role in the spin accumulation, represents a new regime for spin injection that is not well described by existing models of either FMR-driven spin pumping or electrical spin injection. PMID:26705647

  1. Titanium dioxide/silicon hole-blocking selective contact to enable double-heterojunction crystalline silicon-based solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Ken A.; Avasthi, Sushobhan; Sahasrabudhe, Girija; Man, Gabriel; Jhaveri, Janam; Berg, Alexander H.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Wagner, Sigurd; Sturm, James C.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we use an electron-selective titanium dioxide (TiO2) heterojunction contact to silicon to block minority carrier holes in the silicon from recombining at the cathode contact of a silicon-based photovoltaic device. We present four pieces of evidence demonstrating the beneficial effect of adding the TiO2 hole-blocking layer: reduced dark current, increased open circuit voltage (VOC), increased quantum efficiency at longer wavelengths, and increased stored minority carrier charge under forward bias. The importance of a low rate of recombination of minority carriers at the Si/TiO2 interface for effective blocking of minority carriers is quantitatively described. The anode is made of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) heterojunction to silicon which forms a hole selective contact, so that the entire device is made at a maximum temperature of 100 °C, with no doping gradients or junctions in the silicon. A low rate of recombination of minority carriers at the Si/TiO2 interface is crucial for effective blocking of minority carriers. Such a pair of complementary carrier-selective heterojunctions offers a path towards high-efficiency silicon solar cells using relatively simple and near-room temperature fabrication techniques.

  2. Ferromagnetic Resonance Spin Pumping and Electrical Spin Injection in Silicon-Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Y.; Odenthal, P. M.; Adur, R.; Beardsley, J.; Swartz, A. G.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Flatté, M. E.; Kawakami, R. K.; Pelz, J.; Hammel, P. C.; Johnston-Halperin, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present the measurement of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR-)driven spin pumping and three-terminal electrical spin injection within the same silicon-based device. Both effects manifest in a dc spin accumulation voltage Vs that is suppressed as an applied field is rotated to the out-of-plane direction, i.e., the oblique Hanle geometry. Comparison of Vs between these two spin injection mechanisms reveals an anomalously strong suppression of FMR-driven spin pumping with increasing out-of-plane field Happz . We propose that the presence of the large ac component to the spin current generated by the spin pumping approach, expected to exceed the dc value by 2 orders of magnitude, is the origin of this discrepancy through its influence on the spin dynamics at the oxide-silicon interface. This convolution, wherein the dynamics of both the injector and the interface play a significant role in the spin accumulation, represents a new regime for spin injection that is not well described by existing models of either FMR-driven spin pumping or electrical spin injection.

  3. Nonlinear phenomenon in monocrystalline silicon based PV module for low power system: Lead acid battery for low energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amrani, A.; El Amraoui, M.; El Abbassi, A.; Messaoudi, C.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, we report the indoor photo-electrical measurements of monocrystalline silicon based photovoltaic (PV) module associated with 4 Ah lead acid battery as a storage unit for low power PV system applications. Concerning the PV module, our measurements show, at low illumination regime, that the short circuit current ISC increases linearly with the illumination power levels. Moreover, for high illumination levels, the mechanism of bimolecular recombination and space charge limitation may be intensified and hence the short current of the PV module ISCMod depends sublinearly on the incident optical power; the behavior is nonlinear. For the open circuit voltage of the PV module VOCMod measurements, a linear variation of the VOCMod versus the short circuit current in semi-logarithmic scale has been noticed. The diode ideality factor n and diode saturation current Is have been investigated; the values of n and Is are approximately of 1.3 and 10-9 A, respectively. In addition, we have shown, for different discharging-charging currents rates (i.e. 0.35 A, 0.2 A and 0.04 A), that the battery voltage decreases with discharging time as well as discharging battery capacity, and on the other hand it increases with the charging time and will rise up until it maximized value. The initial result shows the possibility to use such lead acid battery for low power PV system, which is generally designed for the motorcycle battery.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Pradip; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Dusane, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 μm and 0.5 μm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  5. Response of Silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers: Implication for Radiation Risk Assessment in Space Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    2001-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing silicon-based telescopes because of their compactness and low power requirements. Three such telescopes have been flown on board the Space Shuttle to measure the linear energy transfer spectra of trapped, galactic cosmic ray, and solar energetic particles. Dosimeters based on single silicon detectors have also been flown on the Mir orbital station. A comparison of the absorbed dose and radiation quality factors calculated from these telescopes with that estimated from measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter show differences which need to be fully understood if these telescopes are to be used for astronaut radiation risk assessments. Instrument performance is complicated by a variety of factors. A Monte Carlo-based technique was developed to model the behavior of both single element detectors in a proton beam, and the performance of a two-element, wide-angle telescope, in the trapped belt proton field inside the Space Shuttle. The technique is based on: (1) radiation transport intranuclear-evaporation model that takes into account the charge and angular distribution of target fragments, (2) Landau-Vavilov distribution of energy deposition allowing for electron escape, (3) true detector geometry of the telescope, (4) coincidence and discriminator settings, (5) spacecraft shielding geometry, and (6) the external space radiation environment, including albedo protons. The value of such detailed modeling and its implications in astronaut risk assessment is addressed. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Silicon Based System for Single-Nucleotide-Polymorphism Detection: Chip Fabrication and Thermal Characterization of Polymerase Chain Reaction Microchamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Bivragh; Jones, Ben; Tezcan, Deniz S.; Tutunjyan, Nina; Haspeslagh, Luc; Peeters, Sara; Fiorini, Paolo; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Van Hoof, Chris; Hiraoka, Maki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Ichiro

    2012-04-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a difference in the DNA sequence of one nucleotide only. We recently proposed a lab-on-a-chip (LoC) system which has the potentiality of fast, sensitive and highly specific SNP detection. Most of the chip components are silicon based and fabricated within a single process. In this paper, the newly developed fabrication method for the silicon chip is presented. The robust and reliable process allows etching structures on the same chip with very different aspect ratios. The characterization of a crucial component to the LoC SNP detector, the microreactor where DNA amplification is performed, is also detailed. Thanks to innovative design and fabrication methodologies, the microreactor has an excellent thermal isolation from the surrounding silicon substrate. This allows for highly localized temperature control. Furthermore, the microreactor is demonstrated to have rapid heating and cooling rates, allowing for rapid amplification of the target DNA fragments. Successful DNA amplification in the microreactor is demonstrated.

  7. Response of silicon-based linear energy transfer spectrometers: implication for radiation risk assessment in space flights.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; O'Neill, P M

    2001-07-11

    There is considerable interest in developing silicon-based telescopes because of their compactness and low power requirements. Three such telescopes have been flown on board the Space Shuttle to measure the linear energy transfer spectra of trapped, galactic cosmic ray, and solar energetic particles. Dosimeters based on single silicon detectors have also been flown on the Mir orbital station. A comparison of the absorbed dose and radiation quality factors calculated from these telescopes with that estimated from measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter show differences which need to be fully understood if these telescopes are to be used for astronaut radiation risk assessments. Instrument performance is complicated by a variety of factors. A Monte Carlo-based technique was developed to model the behavior of both single element detectors in a proton beam, and the performance of a two-element, wide-angle telescope, in the trapped belt proton field inside the Space Shuttle. The technique is based on: (1) radiation transport intranuclear-evaporation model that takes into account the charge and angular distribution of target fragments, (2) Landau-Vavilov distribution of energy deposition allowing for electron escape, (3) true detector geometry of the telescope, (4) coincidence and discriminator settings, (5) spacecraft shielding geometry, and (6) the external space radiation environment, including albedo protons. The value of such detailed modeling and its implications in astronaut risk assessment is addressed. PMID:11858255

  8. In vivo validation of custom-designed silicon-based microelectrode arrays for long-term neural recording and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Martin; Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S; Wang, Cindy X; McCreery, Douglas B

    2012-02-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays' insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays' recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  9. Numerical simulation of millisecond laser-induced damage in silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode.

    PubMed

    Li, Zewen; Wang, Xi; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2012-05-10

    An axisymmetric mathematical model was established for millisecond-pulsed Nd:YAG laser heating of silicon-based positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The temperature dependences of the material parameters and the absorption coefficient were taken into account in the calculation. The results indicate that the optical absorption coefficient and the thermal conductivity are the two key factors for the temperature evolution. The diffusion of boron in the liquid phase and the introduction of deep-level defects in the depletion region of the photodiode were the two reasons for the millisecond laser-induced electrical degradation of the photodiode. The morphological damage threshold and electrical degradation threshold of the photodiode were obtained numerically. Meanwhile, the influence of the antireflection coating, the doping concentration, and the junction depth were also considered. The results show that the morphological damage threshold decreases with adding an antireflection coating, the increase of the doping concentration, and junction depth. The electrical degradation threshold increases only with the junction depth. PMID:22614501

  10. Titanium dioxide/silicon hole-blocking selective contact to enable double-heterojunction crystalline silicon-based solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamatsu, Ken A. Man, Gabriel; Jhaveri, Janam; Berg, Alexander H.; Kahn, Antoine; Wagner, Sigurd; Sturm, James C.; Avasthi, Sushobhan; Sahasrabudhe, Girija; Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2015-03-23

    In this work, we use an electron-selective titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) heterojunction contact to silicon to block minority carrier holes in the silicon from recombining at the cathode contact of a silicon-based photovoltaic device. We present four pieces of evidence demonstrating the beneficial effect of adding the TiO{sub 2} hole-blocking layer: reduced dark current, increased open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), increased quantum efficiency at longer wavelengths, and increased stored minority carrier charge under forward bias. The importance of a low rate of recombination of minority carriers at the Si/TiO{sub 2} interface for effective blocking of minority carriers is quantitatively described. The anode is made of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) heterojunction to silicon which forms a hole selective contact, so that the entire device is made at a maximum temperature of 100 °C, with no doping gradients or junctions in the silicon. A low rate of recombination of minority carriers at the Si/TiO{sub 2} interface is crucial for effective blocking of minority carriers. Such a pair of complementary carrier-selective heterojunctions offers a path towards high-efficiency silicon solar cells using relatively simple and near-room temperature fabrication techniques.

  11. Response of silicon-based linear energy transfer spectrometers: implication for radiation risk assessment in space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    2001-07-01

    There is considerable interest in developing silicon-based telescopes because of their compactness and low power requirements. Three such telescopes have been flown on board the Space Shuttle to measure the linear energy transfer spectra of trapped, galactic cosmic ray, and solar energetic particles. Dosimeters based on single silicon detectors have also been flown on the Mir orbital station. A comparison of the absorbed dose and radiation quality factors calculated from these telescopes with that estimated from measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter show differences which need to be fully understood if these telescopes are to be used for astronaut radiation risk assessments. Instrument performance is complicated by a variety of factors. A Monte Carlo-based technique was developed to model the behavior of both single element detectors in a proton beam, and the performance of a two-element, wide-angle telescope, in the trapped belt proton field inside the Space Shuttle. The technique is based on: (1) radiation transport intranuclear-evaporation model that takes into account the charge and angular distribution of target fragments, (2) Landau-Vavilov distribution of energy deposition allowing for electron escape, (3) true detector geometry of the telescope, (4) coincidence and discriminator settings, (5) spacecraft shielding geometry, and (6) the external space radiation environment, including albedo protons. The value of such detailed modeling and its implications in astronaut risk assessment is addressed.

  12. Silicon based light emitters utilizing radiation from dislocations; electric field induced shift of the dislocation-related luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguirov, T.; Mchedlidze, T.; Kittler, M.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Hoang, T.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2009-05-01

    Dislocation rich regions can be controllably formed at a certain location inside a silicon wafer. We studied the light emission properties of such regions located in an electric field of a p-n junction under different excitation conditions. It was found that the luminescence spectra of the dislocations are significantly influenced by the presence of the junction. The dislocation-related luminescence peak position appears red-shifted due to the built-in electric field. A suppression of that field by photo-generation of carriers or by applying a forward bias voltage at the junction leads to a gradual decrease in the energy position of the peaks. The dependence of the peak position on the electric field was found to be a quadratic function, similar to that observed for semiconductor nanostructures. We show that the shift of the peak position is due to the Stark effect on dislocation-related excitonic states. The characteristic constant of the shift, obtained by fitting the data with the quadratic Stark effect equation, was 0.0186 meV/(kV/cm) 2. The observed effect opens new possibilities for integration of a silicon based light emitter, combining the radiation from dislocations with a Stark effect based modulator.

  13. Investigation of failure mechanisms in silicon based half cells during the first cycle by micro X-ray tomography and radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fu; Markötter, Henning; Dong, Kang; Manke, Ingo; Hilger, Andre; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Banhart, John

    2016-07-01

    Two proof-of-concept batteries were designed and prepared for X-ray microtomography and radiography characterizations to investigate the degradation mechanisms of silicon (Si) based half cells during the first cycle. It is highlighted here for the first time that, apart from the significant volume expansion-induced pulverization, the electrochemical "deactivation" mechanism contributes significantly to the capacity loss during the first charge process. In addition, the unexpected electrochemically inactive Si particles are also believed to substantially decrease the energy density due to the inefficient utilization of loaded active material. These unexpected findings, which cannot be deduced from macroscopic electrochemical characterizations, expand the inherent explanations for performance deterioration of Si-anode material based lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and emphasize the vital value of microscopic techniques in revealing the correlation between macroscopic electrode structure and the overall electrochemical performance.

  14. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out-of-flatness and cyclic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements of thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) as a function of temperature and its thermal contact resistance (TCR) with treated and untreated gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The thermal conductivity of the BPP decreases with temperature and its thermal contact resistance with GDLs, which has been overlooked in the literature, is found to be dominant over a relatively wide range of compression. The effects of PTFE loading, micro porous layer (MPL), compression, and BPP out-of-flatness are also investigated experimentally. It is found that high PTFE loadings, MPL and even small BPP out-of-flatness increase the BPP-GDL thermal contact resistance dramatically. The paper also presents the effect of cyclic load on the total resistance of a GDL-BPP assembly, which sheds light on the behavior of these materials under operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  15. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro- or nanochannel: heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Nedea, S V; van Steenhoven, A A; Markvoort, A J; Spijker, P; Giordano, D

    2014-05-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and reflected molecules in molecular dynamics and used as effective coefficients in Maxwell-like boundary conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic wall interactions are studied, and the effect of the gas-surface interaction potential on the heat flux and other characteristic parameters like density and temperature is shown. The heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficient is shown for different fluid-wall mass ratios. We find that the accommodation coefficient is increasing considerably when the mass ratio is decreased. An effective map of the heat flux depending on the accommodation coefficient is given and we show that MC heat flux predictions using Maxwell boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficient give good results when compared to pure molecular dynamics heat predictions. The accommodation coefficients computed for a dilute gas for different gas-wall interaction parameters and mass ratios are transferred to compute the heat flux predictions for a dense gas. Comparison of the heat fluxes derived using explicit MD, MC with Maxwell-like boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficients, and pure Maxwell boundary conditions are discussed. A map of the heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficients for a dense gas, and the effective accommodation coefficients for different gas-wall interactions are given. In the end, this approach is applied to study the gas-surface interactions of argon and xenon molecules on a platinum surface. The derived accommodation coefficients are compared with values of experimental results. PMID:25353885

  16. iHWG-μNIR: a miniaturised near-infrared gas sensor based on substrate-integrated hollow waveguides coupled to a micro-NIR-spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Rohwedder, J J R; Pasquini, C; Fortes, P R; Raimundo, I M; Wilk, A; Mizaikoff, B

    2014-07-21

    A miniaturised gas analyser is described and evaluated based on the use of a substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG) coupled to a microsized near-infrared spectrophotometer comprising a linear variable filter and an array of InGaAs detectors. This gas sensing system was applied to analyse surrogate samples of natural fuel gas containing methane, ethane, propane and butane, quantified by using multivariate regression models based on partial least square (PLS) algorithms and Savitzky-Golay 1(st) derivative data preprocessing. The external validation of the obtained models reveals root mean square errors of prediction of 0.37, 0.36, 0.67 and 0.37% (v/v), for methane, ethane, propane and butane, respectively. The developed sensing system provides particularly rapid response times upon composition changes of the gaseous sample (approximately 2 s) due the minute volume of the iHWG-based measurement cell. The sensing system developed in this study is fully portable with a hand-held sized analyser footprint, and thus ideally suited for field analysis. Last but not least, the obtained results corroborate the potential of NIR-iHWG analysers for monitoring the quality of natural gas and petrochemical gaseous products. PMID:24867650

  17. Microstructure of amorphous-silicon-based solar cell materials by small-angle x-ray scattering. Annual subcontract report, 6 April 1994--5 April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The general objective of this research is to provide detailed microstructural information on the amorphous-silicon-based, thin-film materials under development for improved multijunction solar cells. The experimental technique used is small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) providing microstructural data on microvoid fractions, sizes, shapes, and their preferred orientations. Other microstructural features such as alloy segregation, hydrogen-rich clusters and alloy short-range order are probed.

  18. Ultracompact and high efficient silicon-based polarization splitter-rotator using a partially-etched subwavelength grating coupler

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yin; Xiao, Jinbiao

    2016-01-01

    On-chip polarization manipulation is pivotal for silicon-on-insulator material platform to realize polarization-transparent circuits and polarization-division-multiplexing transmissions, where polarization splitters and rotators are fundamental components. In this work, we propose an ultracompact and high efficient silicon-based polarization splitter-rotator (PSR) using a partially-etched subwavelength grating (SWG) coupler. The proposed PSR consists of a taper-integrated SWG coupler combined with a partially-etched waveguide between the input and output strip waveguides to make the input transverse-electric (TE) mode couple and convert to the output transverse-magnetic (TM) mode at the cross port while the input TM mode confine well in the strip waveguide during propagation and directly output from the bar port with nearly neglected coupling. Moreover, to better separate input polarizations, an additional tapered waveguide extended from the partially-etched waveguide is also added. From results, an ultracompact PSR of only 8.2 μm in length is achieved, which is so far the reported shortest one. The polarization conversion loss and efficiency are 0.12 dB and 98.52%, respectively, together with the crosstalk and reflection loss of −31.41/−22.43 dB and −34.74/−33.13 dB for input TE/TM mode at wavelength of 1.55 μm. These attributes make the present device suitable for constructing on-chip compact photonic integrated circuits with polarization-independence. PMID:27306112

  19. Breast imaging using an amorphous silicon-based full-field digital mammographic system: stability of a clinical prototype.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Suryanarayanan, S; D'Orsi, C J; Hendrick, R E

    2000-11-01

    An amorphous silicon-based full-breast imager for digital mammography was evaluated for detector stability over a period of 1 year. This imager uses a structured CsI:TI scintillator coupled to an amorphous silicon layer with a 100-micron pixel pitch and read out by special purpose electronics. The stability of the system was characterized using the following quantifiable metrics: conversion factor (mean number of electrons generated per incident x-ray), presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), detector linearity and sensitivity, detector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom scores. Qualitative metrics such as flat field uniformity, geometric distortion, and Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) test pattern image quality were also used to study the stability of the system. Observations made over this 1-year period indicated that the maximum variation from the average of the measurements were less than 0.5% for conversion factor, 3% for presampling MTF over all spatial frequencies, 5% for signal response, linearity and sensitivity, 12% for SNR over seven locations for all 3 target-filter combinations, and 0% for ACR accreditation phantom scores. ACR mammographic accreditation phantom images indicated the ability to resolve 5 fibers, 4 speck groups, and 5 masses at a mean glandular dose of 1.23 mGy. The SMPTE pattern image quality test for the display monitors used for image viewing indicated ability to discern all contrast steps and ability to distinguish line-pair images at the center and corners of the image. No bleeding effects were observed in the image. Flat field uniformity for all 3 target-filter combinations displayed no artifacts such as gridlines, bad detector rows or columns, horizontal or vertical streaks, or bad pixels. Wire mesh screen images indicated uniform resolution and no geometric distortion. PMID:11110258

  20. Design, Fabrication, and Experimental Validation of Novel Flexible Silicon-Based Dry Sensors for Electroencephalography Signal Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Shao-Wei; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available electroencephalography (EEG) sensors, including conventional wet and dry sensors, can cause skin irritation and user discomfort owing to the foreign material. The EEG products, especially sensors, highly prioritize the comfort level during devices wear. To overcome these drawbacks for EEG sensors, this paper designs Societe Generale de Surveillance S \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\cdot $ \\end{document} A \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\cdot $ \\end{document} (SGS)-certified, silicon-based dry-contact EEG sensors (SBDSs) for EEG signal measurements. According to the SGS testing report, SBDSs extract does not irritate skin or induce noncytotoxic effects on L929 cells according to ISO10993-5. The SBDS is also lightweight, flexible, and nonirritating to the skin, as well as capable of easily fitting to scalps without any skin preparation or use of a conductive gel. For forehead and hairy sites, EEG signals can be measured reliably with the designed SBDSs. In particular, for EEG signal measurements at hairy sites, the acicular and flexible design of SBDS can push the hair aside to achieve satisfactory scalp contact, as well as maintain low skin-electrode interface impedance. Results of this paper demonstrate that the proposed sensors perform well in the EEG measurements and are feasible for practical applications. PMID:27170884

  1. Ultracompact and high efficient silicon-based polarization splitter-rotator using a partially-etched subwavelength grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yin; Xiao, Jinbiao

    2016-06-01

    On-chip polarization manipulation is pivotal for silicon-on-insulator material platform to realize polarization-transparent circuits and polarization-division-multiplexing transmissions, where polarization splitters and rotators are fundamental components. In this work, we propose an ultracompact and high efficient silicon-based polarization splitter-rotator (PSR) using a partially-etched subwavelength grating (SWG) coupler. The proposed PSR consists of a taper-integrated SWG coupler combined with a partially-etched waveguide between the input and output strip waveguides to make the input transverse-electric (TE) mode couple and convert to the output transverse-magnetic (TM) mode at the cross port while the input TM mode confine well in the strip waveguide during propagation and directly output from the bar port with nearly neglected coupling. Moreover, to better separate input polarizations, an additional tapered waveguide extended from the partially-etched waveguide is also added. From results, an ultracompact PSR of only 8.2 μm in length is achieved, which is so far the reported shortest one. The polarization conversion loss and efficiency are 0.12 dB and 98.52%, respectively, together with the crosstalk and reflection loss of ‑31.41/‑22.43 dB and ‑34.74/‑33.13 dB for input TE/TM mode at wavelength of 1.55 μm. These attributes make the present device suitable for constructing on-chip compact photonic integrated circuits with polarization-independence.

  2. Ultracompact and high efficient silicon-based polarization splitter-rotator using a partially-etched subwavelength grating coupler.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Xiao, Jinbiao

    2016-01-01

    On-chip polarization manipulation is pivotal for silicon-on-insulator material platform to realize polarization-transparent circuits and polarization-division-multiplexing transmissions, where polarization splitters and rotators are fundamental components. In this work, we propose an ultracompact and high efficient silicon-based polarization splitter-rotator (PSR) using a partially-etched subwavelength grating (SWG) coupler. The proposed PSR consists of a taper-integrated SWG coupler combined with a partially-etched waveguide between the input and output strip waveguides to make the input transverse-electric (TE) mode couple and convert to the output transverse-magnetic (TM) mode at the cross port while the input TM mode confine well in the strip waveguide during propagation and directly output from the bar port with nearly neglected coupling. Moreover, to better separate input polarizations, an additional tapered waveguide extended from the partially-etched waveguide is also added. From results, an ultracompact PSR of only 8.2 μm in length is achieved, which is so far the reported shortest one. The polarization conversion loss and efficiency are 0.12 dB and 98.52%, respectively, together with the crosstalk and reflection loss of -31.41/-22.43 dB and -34.74/-33.13 dB for input TE/TM mode at wavelength of 1.55 μm. These attributes make the present device suitable for constructing on-chip compact photonic integrated circuits with polarization-independence. PMID:27306112

  3. Atomic-scale modeling of chemical vapor deposition processes from new complicated gas-phase mixtures for micro- and nanoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhviladze, T. M.; Sarychev, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the most important processes for obtaining thin films widely used in semiconductor and in IC technology. Because of the baffling complexity of deposition process the usually-used approaches in CVD modeling include a great number of empiric non-calculated parameters, and this drawback becomes a grave disadvantage if one needs to model the process with new reagents and materials which were not used before. So we place primary emphasis upon the development of non-empirical deposition models that rely on phenomenological theories and experimental data only to a minimal extent. We are presenting the atomistic-scale models and software package throughout the entire deposition process that are based mainly on the first principles and ab initio methods. The main modeling stages are studied and discussed in detail, namely: atomistic modeling of gas-phase and surface reactions, determination of the basic chemical and physical mechanisms for the considered gas mixtures, calculations of the reactions rates for elementary reactions and acts, Monte Carlo and/or molecular dynamics simulation of the thin film growth, and modeling of macrokinetic processes in realistic deposition flow-reactor chamber. The modeling results for thin films deposition from actual gas mixtures are given. The physical properties of films as well as their stoichiometric composition and structure in dependence of process conditions are discussed.

  4. Self-assembled SnO2 micro- and nanosphere-based gas sensor thick films from an alkoxide-derived high purity aqueous colloid precursor.

    PubMed

    Kelp, G; Tätte, T; Pikker, S; Mändar, H; Rozhin, A G; Rauwel, P; Vanetsev, A S; Gerst, A; Merisalu, M; Mäeorg, U; Natali, M; Persson, I; Kessler, V G

    2016-04-01

    Tin oxide is considered to be one of the most promising semiconductor oxide materials for use as a gas sensor. However, a simple route for the controllable build-up of nanostructured, sufficiently pure and hierarchical SnO2 structures for gas sensor applications is still a challenge. In the current work, an aqueous SnO2 nanoparticulate precursor sol, which is free of organic contaminants and sorbed ions and is fully stable over time, was prepared in a highly reproducible manner from an alkoxide Sn(OR)4 just by mixing it with a large excess of pure neutral water. The precursor is formed as a separate liquid phase. The structure and purity of the precursor is revealed using XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, HRTEM imaging, FTIR, and XRF analysis. An unconventional approach for the estimation of the particle size based on the quantification of the Sn-Sn contacts in the structure was developed using EXAFS spectroscopy and verified using HRTEM. To construct sensors with a hierarchical 3D structure, we employed an unusual emulsification technique not involving any additives or surfactants, using simply the extraction of the liquid phase, water, with the help of dry butanol under ambient conditions. The originally generated crystalline but yet highly reactive nanoparticles form relatively uniform spheres through self-assembly and solidify instantly. The spheres floating in butanol were left to deposit on the surface of quartz plates bearing sputtered gold electrodes, producing ready-for-use gas sensors in the form of ca. 50 μm thick sphere-based-films. The films were dried for 24 h and calcined at 300 °C in air before use. The gas sensitivity of the structures was tested in the temperature range of 150-400 °C. The materials showed a very quickly emerging and reversible (20-30 times) increase in electrical conductivity as a response to exposure to air containing 100 ppm of H2 or CO and short (10 s) recovery times when the gas flow was stopped. PMID:26960813

  5. Effect of silicon-based fertilizer applications on the reproduction and development of the citrus mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) feeding on green coleus.

    PubMed

    Hogendorp, Brian K; Cloyd, Raymond A; Swiader, John M

    2009-12-01

    Mealybugs are major insect pests of greenhouses, interiorscapes, and conservatories because they feed on a wide-range of horticultural crops. Furthermore, mealybugs are difficult to regulate with insecticides due to the presence of a nearly impervious protective waxy covering, which means that alternative management strategies are required. As such, this study, involving two replicated experiments, was designed to determine the value of applying silicon-based fertilizers, as potassium silicate, to coleus, Solenstemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd, plants as a way to prevent outbreaks of the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). The first experiment evaluated the effects of different application methods (foliar and drench), at 50 ppm silicon, using the commercially-available product, ProTek 0-0-3 The Silicon Solution. The second experiment entailed applying the silicon-based fertilizer as a drench to the growing medium at different rates (0, 100, 400, 800, and 1,600 ppm silicon). We determined the effects of the silicon-based fertilizer treatments on citrus mealybug life history parameters including number of eggs laid by the adult female, body size, and developmental time from first instar to ovipositing adult female. Furthermore, we used a plant alkaline fusion technique to assess the concentration (milligrams per kilogram or ppm) of silicon in the coleus plant tissues at variable time intervals (days). In general, this technique involved dry-ashing plant tissue in a muffle furnace, followed by alkaline fusion and then colormetric analysis. The silicon-based fertilizer application treatments, in both experiments, did not negatively affect any of the citrus mealybug life history parameters measured. In the first experiment, citrus mealybug female egg load ranged from 199.5 (drench application) to 219.4 (combination spray and drench application), and developmental time (days) from first instar crawler to ovipositing female ranged from

  6. Integrated Microfluidic Gas Sensors for Water Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Sniadecki, N.; DeVoe, D. L.; Beamesderfer, M.; Semancik, S.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based microhotplate tin oxide (SnO2) gas sensor integrated into a polymer-based microfluidic system for monitoring of contaminants in water systems is presented. This device is designed to sample a water source, control the sample vapor pressure within a microchannel using integrated resistive heaters, and direct the vapor past the integrated gas sensor for analysis. The sensor platform takes advantage of novel technology allowing direct integration of discrete silicon chips into a larger polymer microfluidic substrate, including seamless fluidic and electrical interconnects between the substrate and silicon chip.

  7. Self-assembled SnO2 micro- and nanosphere-based gas sensor thick films from an alkoxide-derived high purity aqueous colloid precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelp, G.; Tätte, T.; Pikker, S.; Mändar, H.; Rozhin, A. G.; Rauwel, P.; Vanetsev, A. S.; Gerst, A.; Merisalu, M.; Mäeorg, U.; Natali, M.; Persson, I.; Kessler, V. G.

    2016-03-01

    Tin oxide is considered to be one of the most promising semiconductor oxide materials for use as a gas sensor. However, a simple route for the controllable build-up of nanostructured, sufficiently pure and hierarchical SnO2 structures for gas sensor applications is still a challenge. In the current work, an aqueous SnO2 nanoparticulate precursor sol, which is free of organic contaminants and sorbed ions and is fully stable over time, was prepared in a highly reproducible manner from an alkoxide Sn(OR)4 just by mixing it with a large excess of pure neutral water. The precursor is formed as a separate liquid phase. The structure and purity of the precursor is revealed using XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, HRTEM imaging, FTIR, and XRF analysis. An unconventional approach for the estimation of the particle size based on the quantification of the Sn-Sn contacts in the structure was developed using EXAFS spectroscopy and verified using HRTEM. To construct sensors with a hierarchical 3D structure, we employed an unusual emulsification technique not involving any additives or surfactants, using simply the extraction of the liquid phase, water, with the help of dry butanol under ambient conditions. The originally generated crystalline but yet highly reactive nanoparticles form relatively uniform spheres through self-assembly and solidify instantly. The spheres floating in butanol were left to deposit on the surface of quartz plates bearing sputtered gold electrodes, producing ready-for-use gas sensors in the form of ca. 50 μm thick sphere-based-films. The films were dried for 24 h and calcined at 300 °C in air before use. The gas sensitivity of the structures was tested in the temperature range of 150-400 °C. The materials showed a very quickly emerging and reversible (20-30 times) increase in electrical conductivity as a response to exposure to air containing 100 ppm of H2 or CO and short (10 s) recovery times when the gas flow was stopped.Tin oxide is considered to be one of the

  8. A method to detect diphenylamine contamination of apple fruit and storages using headspace solid phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Forney, Charles F; Jordan, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of headspace concentrations of diphenylamine using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) was examined for its suitability to detect DPA contamination and off-gassing in apple (Malus domestica) fruit, storage rooms and storage materials. Four SPME fibre coatings including polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 100 μm), PDMS/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB), Polyacrylate (PA) and PDMS 7 μm were evaluated. The average limits of detection and of quantification for head space DPA ranged from 0.13 to 0.72 μg L(-1) and 0.42 to 2.35 μg L(-1), respectively. Polyacrylate was identified to be the most suitable and compatible fibre for DPA analysis in apple samples, because of its high sensitivity to DPA and low fruit volatile interferences. SPME techniques were further applied to study contamination of DPA in apples, storage rooms and packaging materials. DPA was found in the air of storage rooms containing apples that were not treated with DPA. Wood and plastic bin material, bin liners, and foam insulation all adsorbed and off-gassed DPA and could be potential sources of contamination of untreated apples. PMID:24799236

  9. Analysis of micro-encapsulated d-limonene dimercaptan, a possible herbicide marker for Cannabis sprayed with paraquat, using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Turner, C E; Ma, C Y; Russell, M H; Elsohly, M A

    1981-01-01

    A method for the determination of encapsulated d-limonene dimercaptan (d-LDM), a possible marker for Cannabis sativa L. sprayed with herbicide, has been developed. The methodology includes a single-step extraction, followed by gas chromatography with flame photometric detector (FDP) using n-octadecyl mercaptan (n-octadecylthiol) as an internal standard. A liner relationship was obtained from spiked samples with an average coefficient of variation of 9.0 per cent. The method has been used to determine part-per-million levels of LDM in actual field experiments in Mexico. The FDP limit was found to be 7 ng for d-LDM. PMID:6913415

  10. Design and development of wafer-level short wave infrared micro-camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Ashok K.; Richwine, Robert A.; Pethuraja, Gopal; Puri, Yash R.; Lee, Je-Ung; Haldar, Pradeep; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2013-06-01

    Low cost IR Sensors are needed for a variety of Defense and Commercial Applications as low cost imagers for various Army and Marine missions. SiGe based IR Focal Planes offers a low cost alternative for developing wafer-level shortwave infrared micro-camera that will not require any cooling and can operate in the Visible-NIR band. The attractive features of SiGe based IRFPA's will take advantage of Silicon based technology, that promises small feature size and compatibility with the low power silicon CMOS circuits for signal processing. SiGe technology offers a low cost alternative for developing Visible-NIR sensors that will not require any cooling and can operate from 0.4- 1.7 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based IRFPA's will take advantage of Silicon based technology that can be processed on 12-inch silicon substrates, that can promise small feature size and compatibility with the Silicon CMOS circuit for signal processing. In this paper, we will discuss the design and development of Wafer-Level Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) Micro-Camera. We will discuss manufacturing approaches and sensor configurations for short wave infrared (SWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) that significantly reduce the cost of SWIR FPA packaging, optics and integration into micro-systems.

  11. Multiprobe Study of the Solid Electrolyte Interphase on Silicon-Based Electrodes in Full-Cell Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, P.; De Vito, E.; Quazuguel, L.; Boniface, M.; Bordes, A.; Rudisch, C.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Guyomard, D.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mechanism of silicon-based electrodes has been studied only in a half-cell configuration so far. Here, a combination of 7Li, 19F MAS NMR, XPS, TOF-SIMS, and STEM-EELS, provides an in-depth characterization of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on the surface of silicon and its evolution upon aging and cycling with LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 as the positive electrode in a full Li-ion cell configuration. This multiprobe approach indicates that the electrolyte degradation process observed in the case of full Li-ion cells exhibits many similarities to what has been observed in the case of half-cells in previous works, in particular during the early stages of the cycling. Like in the case of Si/Li half-cells, the development of the inorganic part of the SEI mostly occurs during the early stage of cycling while an incessant degradation of the organic solvents of the electrolyte occurs upon cycling. However, for extended cycling, all the lithium available for cycling is consumed because of parasitic reactions and is either trapped in an intermediate part of the SEI or in the electrolyte. This nevertheless does not prevent the further degradation of the organic electrolyte solvents, leading to the formation of lithium-free organic degradation products at the extreme surface of the SEI. At this point, without any available lithium left, the cell cannot function properly anymore. Cycled positive and negative electrodes do not show any sign of particles disconnection or clogging of their porosity by electrolyte degradation products and can still function in half-cell configuration. The failure mechanism for full Li-ion cells appears then very different from that known for half-cells and is clearly due to a lack of cyclable lithium because of parasitic reactions occurring before the accumulation of electrolyte degradation products clogs the porosity of the composite electrode or disconnects the active material particles. PMID:27212791

  12. Microstructure, oxidation behavior and mechanical behavior of lens deposited niobium-titanium-silicon and niobium-titanium-silicon based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehoff, Ryan Richard

    With current high temperature structural materials such as nickel based superalloys being pushed to the limits of suitable operating conditions, there comes a need for replacement materials with even higher temperature capabilities. Niobium silicon based systems have been shown to have superior density normalized strength at elevated temperatures when compared to currently used alloys. The drawbacks associated with the niobium silicon system are due to catastrophic oxidation behavior at elevated temperatures. Alloying addition have been shown to increase the oxidation resistance near suitable levels, but also decrease the high temperature strength and increases creep rates when compared to the binary alloy system. The microstructure of the material is similar to metal matrix composites in which high melting temperature silicides are dispersed in a niobium based matrix phase. The silicides produce high temperature strength while the niobium based matrix increases the room temperature properties such as fracture toughness. The bulk of the research has been conducted on directionally solidified material which has a coarse microstructure due to the slow cooling rates associated with the processing condition. The current research uses a powder metallurgy process termed Laser Engineered Net Shaping, or LENS, to produce material with a significantly refined microstructure due to fast cooling rates associated with the laser process. Several compositions of alloys were examined and the ideal processing parameters were determined for each alloy. The resulting microstructures show a refinement of the microstructure as expected with a fine scale distribution of Nb5Si3 and Nb3Si dispersed in a niobium based matrix phase. The high temperature oxidation behavior of the LENS deposited alloys was comparable to alloys produced using other techniques. A non protective oxide scale formed on samples exposed for only 0.5 hours but was not protective and showed large amounts of

  13. Evanescent straight tapered-fiber coupling of ultra-high Q optomechanical micro-resonators in a low-vibration helium-4 exchange-gas cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, R.; Arcizet, O.; Schliesser, A.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2013-04-01

    We developed an apparatus to couple a 50-μm diameter whispering-gallery silica microtoroidal resonator in a helium-4 cryostat using a straight optical tapered-fiber at 1550 nm wavelength. On a top-loading probe specifically adapted for increased mechanical stability, we use a specifically-developed "cryotaper" to optically probe the cavity, allowing thus to record the calibrated mechanical spectrum of the optomechanical system at low temperatures. We then demonstrate excellent thermalization of a 63-MHz mechanical mode of a toroidal resonator down to the cryostat's base temperature of 1.65 K, thereby proving the viability of the cryogenic refrigeration via heat conduction through static low-pressure exchange gas. In the context of optomechanics, we therefore provide a versatile and powerful tool with state-of-the-art performances in optical coupling efficiency, mechanical stability, and cryogenic cooling.

  14. Development, validation and application of a method to analyze phenols in water samples by solid phase micro extraction-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Lanças, Fernando M; Olivares, Igor R B; Alves, Priscila M

    2007-01-01

    In this work the development, validation and application of method using Solid Phase Microexctration (SPME) for the analyses of five pollutants (phenol, 2-nitrophenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chloro, 3-methyl phenol) in supplying water, using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID) is described. The optimal conditions obtained for SPME were: fiber type: Poliacrylate (PA); extraction time: 40 minutes; extraction temperature: 70 degrees C; amount of salt added to sample (NaCl): 15%; desorption temperature: 8 minutes. The parameters studied in the method validation were: limit of detection (0.3 and 3.5 microg.L(- 1)); precision, measured by the variation coefficient (between 2.1 and 8.8%); calibration curve and linearity, by using the external standardization method (between 1 and 50 50 microg.L(- 1)). After the methodology development, samples of water collected in Atibaia River (São Paulo - Brazil) were analyzed, using the optimized methodology. Three water samples collected in the rain season showed a peak with retention time close to 4-chloro, 3 methyl phenol further analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for the identity confirmation. In spite of the fact that none target compounds were found in the river water samples analyzed, the presence of two phenols different from those investigated (p-terc butyl phenol; butylated hydroxytoluene) were detected. These results together with the results of the limit of detection (that showed to be lower than the maximum concentration of phenols demanded by different environment control agencies), and the results of the validation, indicate the applicability of this method for the analysis of selected phenols in river water samples. PMID:17562456

  15. Diamond single micro-crystals and graphitic micro-balls’ formation in plasmoids under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Kartaschew, Konstantin; Bibinov, Nikita; Havenith, Martina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Plasmoids are produced in the argon filamentary discharge. By going through hydrocarbon gas, the plasmoids collect carbon material. These plasmoids produce diamond single micro-crystals upon contact on the inner surface of cavity in air atmosphere. When the plasmoid’s contact point on the substrate is in inert atmosphere, they deposit their material as micro-balls with a graphite core. The dimension and nature of the micro-materials deposited by the plasmoids are analysed using scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. The compressive residual stress in the deposited micro-diamonds varies in the range -7 to -21 GPa.

  16. MicroED data collection and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; Cruz, M. Jason de la; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    The collection and processing of MicroED data are presented. MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges.

  17. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  18. Optimization of a sensitive method for the determination of nitro musk fragrances in waters by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with micro electron capture detection using factorial experimental design.

    PubMed

    Polo, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria; Cela, Rafael

    2007-08-01

    A solid-phase microextraction method (SPME) followed by gas chromatography with micro electron capture detection for determining trace levels of nitro musk fragrances in residual waters was optimized. Four nitro musks, musk xylene, musk moskene, musk tibetene and musk ketone, were selected for the optimization of the method. Factors affecting the extraction process were studied using a multivariate approach. Two extraction modes (direct SPME and headspace SPME) were tried at different extraction temperatures using two fiber coatings [Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB)] selected among five commercial tested fibers. Sample agitation and the salting-out effect were also factors studied. The main effects and interactions between the factors were studied for all the target compounds. An extraction temperature of 100 degrees C and sampling the headspace over the sample, using either CAR/PDMS or PDMS/DVB as fiber coatings, were found to be the experimental conditions that led to a more effective extraction. High sensitivity, with detection limits in the low nanogram per liter range, and good linearity and repeatability were achieved for all nitro musks. Since the method proposed performed well for real samples, it was applied to different water samples, including wastewater and sewage, in which some of the target compounds (musk xylene and musk ketone) were detected and quantified. PMID:17565486

  19. Micropump and venous valve by micro stereo lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    2000-06-01

    Micro Stereo Lithography (MSL) is a poor man's LIGA for fabricating high aspect ratio MEMS devices in UV curable semiconducting polymers using either two computer-controlled low inertia galvanometric mirrors with the aid of focusing lens or an array of optical fibers. For 3D MEMS devices, the polymers need to have conductive and possibly piezoelectric or ferroelectric properties. Such polymers are being developed at Penn State resulting in microdevices for fluid and drug delivery. Applications may include implanted medical delivery system, artificial heart valves, chemical and biological instruments, fluid delivery in engines, pump coolants and refrigerants for local cooling of electronic components. With the invention of organic thin film transistor, now it is possible to fabricate 3D polymeric MEMS devices with built-in-electronics similar to silicon based microelectronics.

  20. In situ and operando atomic force microscopy of high-capacity nano-silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitung, Ben; Baumann, Peter; Sommer, Heino; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Silicon is a promising next-generation anode material for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. While the alloying of nano- and micron size silicon with lithium is relatively well understood, the knowledge of mechanical degradation and structural rearrangements in practical silicon-based electrodes during operation is limited. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in situ and operando atomic force microscopy (AFM) of nano-silicon anodes containing polymer binder and carbon black additive. With the help of this technique, the surface topography is analyzed while electrochemical reactions are occurring. In particular, changes in particle size as well as electrode structure and height are visualized with high resolution. Furthermore, the formation and evolution of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) can be followed and its thickness determined by phase imaging and nano-indentation, respectively. Major changes occur in the first lithiation cycle at potentials below 0.6 V with respect to Li/Li+ due to increased SEI formation - which is a dynamic process - and alloying reactions. Overall, these results provide insight into the function of silicon-based composite electrodes and further show that AFM is a powerful technique that can be applied to important battery materials, without restriction to thin film geometries.Silicon is a promising next-generation anode material for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. While the alloying of nano- and micron size silicon with lithium is relatively well understood, the knowledge of mechanical degradation and structural rearrangements in practical silicon-based electrodes during operation is limited. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in situ and operando atomic force microscopy (AFM) of nano-silicon anodes containing polymer binder and carbon black additive. With the help of this technique, the surface topography is analyzed while electrochemical reactions are occurring. In particular, changes in particle

  1. Invited Article: A materials investigation of a phase-change micro-valve for greenhouse gas collection and other potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Rejent, Jerome A.; Vianco, Paul T.; Grazier, Mark J.; Wroblewski, Brian D.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2012-03-01

    The deleterious consequences of climate change are well documented. Future climate treaties might mandate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions measurement from signatories in order to verify compliance. The acquisition of atmospheric chemistry would benefit from low cost, small size/weight/power of microsystems. In this paper, we investigated several key materials science aspects of a phase-change microvalve (PCμV) technology with low power/size/weight/cost for ubiquitous GHG sampling. The novel design, based on phase-change material low-melting-point eutectic metal alloys (indium-bismuth, InBi and tin-lead, SnPb), could be actuated at temperatures as low as 72 °C. Valve manufacturing was based on standard thick and thin-film processes and solder technologies that are commonly used in industry, enabling low-cost, high-volume fabrication. Aging studies showed that it was feasible to batch fabricate the PCμVs and store them for future use, especially in the case of SnPb alloys. Hermetic sealing of the valve prototypes was demonstrated through helium leak testing, and Mil spec leak rates less than 1 × 10-9 atm cm3/s were achieved. This confirms that the sample capture and analysis interval can be greatly expanded, easing the logistical burdens of ubiquitous GHG monitoring. Highly conservative and hypothetical CO2 bias due to valve actuation at altitude in 1 cm3 microsamplers would be significantly below 1.0 and 2.2 ppmv for heat-treated InBi and SnPb solders, respectively. The CO2 bias from the PCμV scales well, as a doubling of sampler volume halved the bias. We estimated the shelf life of the SnPb PCμVs to be at least 2.8 years. These efforts will enable the development of low cost, low dead volume, small size/weight microsystems for monitoring GHGs and volatile organic compounds.

  2. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition chamber and process with multiple gas inlets

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Povolny, Henry S.

    2004-06-29

    A thin film deposition method uses a vacuum confinement cup that employs a dense hot filament and multiple gas inlets. At least one reactant gas is introduced into the confinement cup both near and spaced apart from the heated filament. An electrode inside the confinement cup is used to generate plasma for film deposition. The method is used to deposit advanced thin films (such as silicon based thin films) at a high quality and at a high deposition rate.

  3. Micro-machined thermo-conductivity detector

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad

    2003-01-01

    A micro-machined thermal conductivity detector for a portable gas chromatograph. The detector is highly sensitive and has fast response time to enable detection of the small size gas samples in a portable gas chromatograph which are in the order of nanoliters. The high sensitivity and fast response time are achieved through micro-machined devices composed of a nickel wire, for example, on a silicon nitride window formed in a silicon member and about a millimeter square in size. In addition to operating as a thermal conductivity detector, the silicon nitride window with a micro-machined wire therein of the device can be utilized for a fast response heater for PCR applications.

  4. Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Guney, Umit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 1 minute (Group 2), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 3 minutes (Group 3), resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 1 minute (Group 4), and resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 3 minutes (Group 5). The resilient liner specimens were processed between 2 PMMA blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA was compared by tensile test with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were evaluated by 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α=0.05). RESULTS The highest mean value of force was observed in Group 3 specimens. The differences between groups were statistically significant (P<.05), except between Group 1 and Group 4 (P=.063). CONCLUSION Immersion of silicone-based soft denture liners in iBMA for 3 minutes doubled the tensile bond strength between the silicone soft liner and PMMA denture base materials compared to the control group. PMID:24843397

  5. In situ and operando atomic force microscopy of high-capacity nano-silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Breitung, Ben; Baumann, Peter; Sommer, Heino; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Silicon is a promising next-generation anode material for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. While the alloying of nano- and micron size silicon with lithium is relatively well understood, the knowledge of mechanical degradation and structural rearrangements in practical silicon-based electrodes during operation is limited. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in situ and operando atomic force microscopy (AFM) of nano-silicon anodes containing polymer binder and carbon black additive. With the help of this technique, the surface topography is analyzed while electrochemical reactions are occurring. In particular, changes in particle size as well as electrode structure and height are visualized with high resolution. Furthermore, the formation and evolution of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) can be followed and its thickness determined by phase imaging and nano-indentation, respectively. Major changes occur in the first lithiation cycle at potentials below 0.6 V with respect to Li/Li(+) due to increased SEI formation - which is a dynamic process - and alloying reactions. Overall, these results provide insight into the function of silicon-based composite electrodes and further show that AFM is a powerful technique that can be applied to important battery materials, without restriction to thin film geometries. PMID:27222212

  6. MicroED data collection and processing

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M. Jason; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  7. Graphene oxide-based dispersive micro-solid phase extraction for separation and preconcentration of nicotine from biological and environmental water samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has showed great potential to use as an adsorbent in sample preparation procedures. In this research, GO was used as an effective adsorbent in a simple GO-based dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (GO-D-µ-SPE) method for isolation and preconcentration of nicotine prior to gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The prepared GO was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy techniques. Various experimental parameters affecting the extraction recovery, including the amount of GO, extraction time, pH of the sample solution, salt concentration, and desorption conditions were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 5-2000 ng mL(-1) with a determination coefficient of 0.9987. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method at a signal to noise ratio of 3 was 1.5 ng mL(-1). The linearity was in the concentration range of 5-2000 ng mL(-1) with a determination coefficient of 0.9987. Intraday and inter-day precisions were obtained equal to 2.7% and 5.2%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the nicotine analysis in biological and water samples with the recoveries in the range of 88.7-109.7%. PMID:25159381

  8. Simultaneous analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air samples by using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography dual electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Mokbel, Haifaa; Al Dine, Enaam Jamal; Elmoll, Ahmad; Liaud, Céline; Millet, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    An analytical method associating accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) in immersion mode combined with gas chromatography dual electrons capture detectors (SPME-GC-2ECD) has been developed and studied for the simultaneous determination of 19 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 22 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in air samples (active and XAD-2 passive samplers). Samples were extracted with ASE with acetonitrile using the following conditions: temperature, 150 °C; pressure, 1500 psi; static, 15 min; cycles, 3; purge, 300 s; flush, 100 %. Extracts were reduced to 1 mL, and 500 μL of this extract, filled with deionised water, was subject to SPME extraction. Experimental results indicated that the proposed method attained the best extraction efficiency under the optimised conditions: extraction of PCB-OCP mixture using 100-μm PDMS fibre at 80 °C for 40 min with no addition of salt. The performance of the proposed ASE-SPME-GC-2ECD methodology with respect to linearity, limit of quantification and detection was evaluated by spiking of XAD-2 resin with target compounds. The regression coefficient (R (2)) of most compounds was found to be high of 0.99. limits of detection (LODs) are between 0.02 and 4.90 ng m(-3), and limits of quantification (LOQs) are between 0.05 and 9.12 ng m(-3) and between 0.2 and 49 ng/sampler and 0.52 and 91 ng/sampler, respectively, for XAD-2 passive samplers. Finally, a developed procedure was applied to determine selected PCBs and OCPs in the atmosphere. PMID:26780048

  9. Experimental Study of Red-, Green-, and Blue-Based Light Emitting Diodes Visible Light Communications for Micro-Projector Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, H.-H.; Liaw, S.-K.; Jiang, J.-S.; Teng, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this research, an experimental short-range visible light communication link using red-, green-, and blue-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for portable micro-projector applications is presented. A Reconfigurable design of a post-equalizer aimed to improve the inherent narrow modulation bandwidth of red-, green-, and blue-based LEDs has been experimentally implemented, and its effectiveness with optical filters at the receiver is investigated. Reflective liquid-crystal-on-silicon-based micro-projection architecture, widely used in portable micro-projectors, was set up to evaluate the proposed visible light communication system. The measurement results demonstrated that a significant aggregative bandwidth improvement of 162 MHz as well as an aggregative data transmission rate of nearly 400 Mb/s can be achieved by using a non-return-to-zero-on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) modulation scheme based on only one polarization state of incident light without any offline signal processing.

  10. Increased Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yaun-Min; Bennett, Murray S.; Yang, Liyou

    1997-07-08

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  11. Increasing Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yaun-Min; Bennett, Murray S.; Yang, Liyou

    1999-08-24

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  12. On-Chip All-Optical Passive 3.55 Gbit/s NRZ-to-PRZ Format Conversion Using a High-Q Silicon-Based Microring Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yao; Chen, Shao-Wu; Ren, Guang-Hui

    2010-10-01

    We report the experimental result of all-optical passive 3.55 Gbit/s non-return-to-zero (NRZ) to pseudo-return-to-zero (PRZ) format conversion using a high-quality-factor (Q-factor) silicon-based microring resonator notch filter on chip. The silicon-based microring resonator has 23800 Q-factor and 22 dB extinction ratio (ER), and the PRZ signals has about 108ps width and 4.98 dB ER.

  13. Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems-Based Micro-Ro-Boat Utilizing Steam as Propulsion Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ju Chan; Choi, Young Chan; Kyoo Lee, June; Kong, Seong Ho

    2012-06-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)-based microactuator, that floats on the surface of water and is driven by steam. We named the actuator “micro-Ro-boat”, a compound word created from the words “robot” and “boat”. The MEMS-based micro-Ro-boat utilizes steam as the propulsion power, giving it a high speed and long lifetime. A hydrophobic surface has been utilized for the wing of the actuator to enhance the buoyancy. Instead of using gas or fuel, the proposed micro-Ro-boat utilizes steam form electrically heated water. The velocity of the micro-Ro-boat is in the range of 0.5-2 cm/s and the maximum loading capability for a device size of 10 ×10 mm2 is 0.4 g.

  14. Electrical and luminescence properties of silicon-based tunnel transit-time light-emitting diodes p{sup +}/n{sup +}/n-Si:Er

    SciTech Connect

    Shmagin, V. B.; Kuznetsov, V. P.; Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Obolensky, S. V.; Kozlov, V. A.; Krasil'nik, Z. F.

    2010-11-15

    The electrical and luminescence properties of silicon-based tunnel transit-time light-emitting diodes (LEDs) p{sup +}/n{sup +}/n-Si:Er, emitting under reverse bias on the p{sup +}/n{sup +} junction in the breakdown regime, have been investigated. The room-temperature emission power at the wavelength {lambda} {approx} 1.5 {mu}m ({approx}5 {mu}W), external quantum efficiency ({approx}10{sup -5}), and excitation efficiency of erbium ions ({approx}2 x 10{sup -20} cm{sup 2} s) have been determined. At the same excitation efficiency, tunnel transit-time LEDs exhibit higher emission power in comparison with p{sup +}/n-Si:Er diode structures. The experimental results are compared with the model predictions for these structures. The factors limiting the electroluminescence intensity and impact excitation efficiency for erbium ions in tunnel transit-time LEDs are discussed.

  15. Performance characterization of thin-film-silicon based solar modules under clouded and clear sky conditions in comparison to crystalline silicon modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weicht, J. A.; Rasch, R.; Behrens, G.; Hamelmann, F. U.

    2016-07-01

    For a precise prediction of the energy yield of amorphous ( a-Si) and amorphous-microcrystalline tandem ( a-Si/ μc-Si) thinfilm-silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules it is important to know their performance ratio under different light conditions. The efficiency of solar modules is an important value for the monitoring and planning of PV-systems. The efficiency of a-Si solar modules shows no significant changes in the performance ratio at clouded or clear sky conditions. The efficiency of crystalline silicon-based ( c-Si) and a-Si/ μc-Si solar modules shows a lower efficiency for fully clouded conditions without direct irradiation compared to conditions with direct irradiation (clear sky). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Microstructure of amorphous-silicon-based solar cell materials by small-angle x-ray scattering. Annual technical report, April 6, 1995--April 5, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to provide detailed microstructural information on the amorphous silicon based thin film materials under development for improved multijunction solar cells. Correlation of microstructure with opto-electrical properties and device performance is an integral part of the research. During this second phase of our three-year program we have obtained information on the microstructure of materials relevant to the Low-, Mid-, and High-bandgap Teams and the results are appropriately divided into these three types of material as presented below. The experimental methods, data analysis, and interpretation procedures are the same as those described in detail in the phase-one report and in the review paper published last year.

  17. A progress report on the LDRD project entitled {open_quotes}Microelectronic silicon-based chemical sensors: Ultradetection of high value molecules{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    This work addresses a new kind of silicon based chemical sensor that combines the reliability and stability of silicon microelectronic field effect devices with the highly selective and sensitive immunoassay. The sensor works on the principle that thin SiN layers on lightly doped Si can detect pH changes rapidly and reversibly. The pH changes affect the surface potential, and that can be quickly determined by pulsed photovoltage measurements. To detect other species, chemically sensitive films were deposited on the SiN where the presence of the chosen analyte results in pH changes through chemical reactions. A invention of a cell sorting device based on these principles is also described. A new method of immobilizing enzymes using Sandia`s sol-gel glasses is documented and biosensors based on the silicon wafer and an amperometric technique are detailed.

  18. Sensitive Detection of Protein and miRNA Cancer Biomarkers using Silicon-Based Photonic Crystals and A Resonance Coupling Laser Scanning Platform

    PubMed Central

    George, Sherine; Chaudhery, Vikram; Lu, Meng; Takagi, Miki; Amro, Nabil; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Tan, Yafang; Ferreira, Placid; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of the fluorescent output of surface-based fluorescence assays by performing them upon nanostructured photonic crystal (PC) surfaces has been demonstrated to increase signal intensities by >8000×. Using the multiplicative effects of optical resonant coupling to the PC in increasing the electric field intensity experienced by fluorescent labels (“enhanced excitation”) and the spatially biased funneling of fluorophore emissions through coupling to PC resonances (“enhanced extraction”), PC enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) can be adapted to reduce the limits of detection of disease biomarker assays, and to reduce the size and cost of high sensitivity detection instrumentation. In this work, we demonstrate the first silicon-based PCEF detection platform for multiplexed biomarker assay. The sensor in this platform is a silicon-based PC structure, comprised of a SiO2 grating that is overcoated with a thin film of high refractive index TiO2 and is produced in a semiconductor foundry for low cost, uniform, and reproducible manufacturing. The compact detection instrument that completes this platform was designed to efficiently couples fluorescence excitation from a semiconductor laser to the resonant optical modes of the PC, resulting in elevated electric field strength that is highly concentrated within the region <100 nm from the PC surface. This instrument utilizes a cylindrically focused line to scan a microarray in <1 minute. To demonstrate the capabilities of this sensor-detector platform, microspot fluorescent sandwich immunoassays using secondary antibodies labeled with Cy5 for two cancer biomarkers (TNF-α and IL-3) were performed. Biomarkers were detected at concentrations as low as 0.1 pM. In a fluorescent microarray for detection of a breast cancer miRNA biomarker miR-21, the miRNA was detectable at a concentration of 0.6 pM. PMID:23963502

  19. Fabrication of a Flexible Micro CO Sensor for Micro Reformer Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2010-01-01

    Integration of a reformer and a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is problematic due to the presence in the gas from the reforming process of a slight amount of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide poisons the catalyst of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell subsequently degrading the fuel cell performance, and necessitating the sublimation of the reaction gas before supplying to fuel cells. Based on the use of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology to manufacture flexible micro CO sensors, this study elucidates the relation between a micro CO sensor and different SnO2 thin film thicknesses. Experimental results indicate that the sensitivity increases at temperatures ranging from 100–300 °C. Additionally, the best sensitivity is obtained at a specific temperature. For instance, the best sensitivity of SnO2 thin film thickness of 100 nm at 300 °C is 59.3%. Moreover, a flexible micro CO sensor is embedded into a micro reformer to determine the CO concentration in each part of a micro reformer in the future, demonstrating the inner reaction of a micro reformer in depth and immediate detection. PMID:22163494

  20. Fabrication of a flexible micro CO sensor for micro reformer applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2010-01-01

    Integration of a reformer and a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is problematic due to the presence in the gas from the reforming process of a slight amount of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide poisons the catalyst of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell subsequently degrading the fuel cell performance, and necessitating the sublimation of the reaction gas before supplying to fuel cells. Based on the use of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology to manufacture flexible micro CO sensors, this study elucidates the relation between a micro CO sensor and different SnO2 thin film thicknesses. Experimental results indicate that the sensitivity increases at temperatures ranging from 100-300 °C. Additionally, the best sensitivity is obtained at a specific temperature. For instance, the best sensitivity of SnO2 thin film thickness of 100 nm at 300 °C is 59.3%. Moreover, a flexible micro CO sensor is embedded into a micro reformer to determine the CO concentration in each part of a micro reformer in the future, demonstrating the inner reaction of a micro reformer in depth and immediate detection. PMID:22163494

  1. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  2. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  3. Simultaneous determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol B in beverages and powdered infant formula by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Almeida, C; Mendes, E; Fernandes, J O

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable, cost-effective, fast and simple method to quantify simultaneously both bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol B (BPB) in liquid food matrixes such as canned beverages (soft drinks and beers) and powdered infant formula using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) with in-situ derivatisation coupled with heart-cutting gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the optimisation of the DLLME procedure different amounts of various extractive and dispersive solvents as well as different amounts of the derivative reagent were compared for their effects on extraction efficiency and yields. The optimised procedure consisted of the injection of a mixture containing tetrachloroethylene (extractant), acetonitrile (dispersant) and acetic anhydride (derivatising reagent) directly into an aliquot of beverage samples or into an aqueous extract of powdered milk samples obtained after a pretreatment of the samples. Given the compatibility of the solvents used, and the low volumes involved, the procedure was easily associated with GC-MS end-point determination, which was accomplished by means of an accurate GC dual column (heart-cutting) technique. Careful optimisation of heart-cutting GC-MS conditions, namely pressure of front and auxiliary inlets, have resulted in a good analytical performance. The linearity of the matrix-matched calibration curves was acceptable, with coefficients of determination (r2) always higher than 0.99. Average recoveries of the BPA and BPB spiked at two concentration levels into beverages and powdered infant formula ranged from 68% to 114% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was <15%. The limits of detection (LOD) in canned beverages were 5.0 and 2.0 ng l(-1) for BPA and BPB, respectively, whereas LOD in powdered infant formula were 60.0 and 30.0 ng l(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) in canned beverages were 10.0 and 7.0 ng l-1 for BPA and BPB, respectively

  4. Fluid inclusion volatile analysis by gas chromatography with photoionization micro-thermal conductivity detectors: Applications to magmatic MoS 2 and other H 2O-CO 2 and H 2O-CH 4 fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, C. J.; Spooner, E. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen fluid inclusion volatile peaks have been detected and identified from 1-2 g samples (quartz) by gas chromatography using heated (~105°C) on-line crushing, helium carrier gas, a single porous polymer column (HayeSep R; 10' × 1/8″: 100/120#; Ni alloy tubing), two temperature programme conditions for separate sample aliquots, micro-thermal conductivity (TCD) and photoionization detectors (PID; 11.7 eV lamp), and off-line digital peak processing. In order of retention time these volatile peaks are: N 2, Ar, CO, CH 4, CO 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6, C 2H 2, COS, C 3H 6, C 3H 8, C 3H 4 (propyne), H 2O (22.7 min at 80°C), SO 2, ± iso- C4H10 ± C4H8 (1-butene) ± CH3SH, C 4H 8 (iso-butylene), (?) C 4H 6 (1,3 butadiene) and ± n- C4H10 ± C4H8 (trans-2-butene) (80 and -70°C temperature programme conditions combined). H 2O is analysed directly. O 2 can be analysed cryogenically between N 2 and Ar, but has not been detected in natural samples to date in this study. H 2S, SO 2, NH 3, HCl, HCN, and H 2 ca nnot be analysed at present. Blanks determined by crushing heat-treated Brazilian quartz (800-900°C/4 h) are zero for 80°C temperature programme conditions, except for a large, unidentified peak at ~64 min, but contain H 2O, CO 2, and some low molecular weight hydrocarbons at -70°C temperature conditions due to cryogenic accumulation from the carrier gas and subsequent elution. TCD detection limits are ~30 ppm molar in inclusions; PID detection limits are ~ 1 ppm molar in inclusions and lower for unsaturated hydrocarbons (e.g., ~0.2 ppm for C 2H 4; ~ 1 ppb for C 2H 2; ~0.3 ppb for C 3H 6). Precisions (1σ) are ~ ±1-2% and ~ ± 13% for H 2O in terms of total moles detected; the latter value is equivalent to ±0.6 mol% at the 95 mol% H 2O level. Major fluid inclusion volatile species have been successfully analysed on a ~50 mg fluid inclusion section chip (~7 mm × ~10 mm × ~100 μm). Initial inclusion volatile analyses of fluids of interpreted magmatic origin from

  5. Application of Cement Science to Improved Wellbore Infrastructures Mileva Radonjic and Darko Kupresan Craft & Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, Louisiana State University, USA Corresponding author: mileva@lsu.edu Key words: micro-annular gas flow, nano-properties of wellbore cements, micro-porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent focus on carbon emission from cement industry inspired researchers to improve CSH properties by reducing Ca/Si ratio at the nanoscale, and lower porosity (permeability) of hydrated cement at micro scale. If implemented in wellbore cement technology, both of these efforts could provide advanced properties for wellbore infrastructure. These advancements would further reduce the issue of leaky wellbores in fluid injections, hydraulic fracturing and subsurface storage for existing operating wells. Numerous inadequately abandoned wells, however, pose more complex engineering problems, primarily due to the difficulty in locating fluid flow pathways along the wellbore structure. In order to appreciate the difficulty of this problem, we need to remind ourselves that: a typical 30,000-ft. wellbore with an average production casing of 8 inches in diameter can be presented in scale by a 6-m long human hair of 150 μm these structures are placed in the subsurface, often not just vertical in geometry but deviated close to 90° tangent where monitoring and remediation becomes demanding and if we consider that wellbore cement is not continuously placed along the wellbore and it is approximately 1/10 of a wellbore diameter, we can see that the properties of these materials demand application of nano-science and a different scale phenomena than perhaps previously acknowledged. The key concept behind Ca/Si reduction associated with improved mechanical properties is traditionally achieved chemically, by addition of supplemental cementitious materials. In our study we have tried to evaluate CSH alterations due to mechanically induced phase transformation. The data suggest that confined compression-extrusion of hydrated wellbore cement and the consequent propagation of pore water can change cement composition by dissolving and removing Ca, therefore reducing Ca/Si of cement phases. The advantage of this approach is that the process is less impacted by pressure

  6. Development of a Silicon Based Electron Beam Transmission Window for Use in a KrF Excimer Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Gentile; H.M. Fan; J.W. Hartfield; R.J. Hawryluk; F. Hegeler; P.J. Heitzenroeder; C.H. Jun; L.P. Ku; P.H. LaMarche; M.C. Myers; J.J. Parker; R.F. Parsells; M. Payen; S. Raftopoulos; J.D. Sethian

    2002-11-21

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is currently investigating various novel materials (single crystal silicon, <100>, <110> and <111>) for use as electron-beam transmission windows in a KrF excimer laser system. The primary function of the window is to isolate the active medium (excimer gas) from the excitation mechanism (field-emission diodes). Chosen window geometry must accommodate electron energy transfer greater than 80% (750 keV), while maintaining structural integrity during mechanical load (1.3 to 2.0 atm base pressure differential, approximate 0.5 atm cyclic pressure amplitude, 5 Hz repetition rate) and thermal load across the entire hibachi area (approximate 0.9 W {center_dot} cm superscript ''-2''). In addition, the window must be chemically resistant to attack by fluorine free-radicals (hydrofluoric acid, secondary). In accordance with these structural, functional, and operational parameters, a 22.4 mm square silicon prototype window, coated with 500 nm thin-film silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), has been fabricated. The window consists of 81 square panes with a thickness of 0.019 mm {+-} 0.001 mm. Stiffened (orthogonal) sections are 0.065 mm in width and 0.500 mm thick (approximate). Appended drawing (Figure 1) depicts the window configuration. Assessment of silicon (and silicon nitride) material properties and CAD modeling and analysis of the window design suggest that silicon may be a viable solution to inherent parameters and constraints.

  7. Micro-laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  8. Selectively Transparent and Conducting Photonic Crystals and their Potential to Enhance the Performance of Thin-Film Silicon-Based Photovoltaics and Other Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul G.

    2011-12-01

    The byproducts of human engineered energy production are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations well above their natural levels and accompanied continual decline in the natural reserves of fossil fuels necessitates the development of green energy alternatives. Solar energy is attractive because it is abundant, can be produced in remote locations and consumed on site. Specifically, thin-film silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) solar cells have numerous inherent advantages including their availability, non-toxicity, and they are relatively inexpensive. However, their low-cost and electrical performance depends on reducing their thickness to as great an extent as possible. This is problematic because their thickness is much less than their absorption length. Consequently, enhanced light trapping schemes must be incorporated into these devices. Herein, a transparent and conducting photonic crystal (PC) intermediate reflector (IR), integrated into the rear side of the cell and serving the dual function as a back-reflector and a spectral splitter, is identified as a promising method of boosting the performance of thin-film silicon-based PV. To this end a novel class of PCs, namely selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystals (STCPC), is invented. These STCPCs are a significant advance over existing 1D PCs because they combine intense wavelength selective broadband reflectance with the transmissive and conductive properties of sputtered ITO. For example, STCPCs are made to exhibit Bragg-reflectance peaks in the visible spectrum of 95% reflectivity and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 200nm. At the same time, the average transmittance of these STCPCs is greater than 80% over the visible spectrum that is outside their stop-gap. Using wave-optics analysis, it is shown that STCPC intermediate reflectors increase the current generated in micromorph cells by 18%. In comparison, the more conventional IR comprised of a single homogeneous

  9. MicroSight Optics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. MicroSight Optics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  12. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  13. Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Method for Micro Droplet Utilizing Micro LIF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Horita, Ryo

    This paper describes a novel measurement technique for three-dimensional shape of micro droplet utilizing micro LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) technique. A measurement system consisted of microscope equipped with 10x lens, high sensitive CCD camera, mercury lamp, optical filters and so on. Calibration curve between thickness of micro droplet and emission of fluorescence dye solution was obtained by the use of the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchip, whose depth varied from 10 to 95 μm fabricated using photo lithography technique. The microchip based calibration method provides high measurement accuracy and eliminate photobleaching effect. Measurement accuracy of the present method in depth direction was about 0.57 μm assessed using laser con-focal microscope and the spatial resolution in the horizontal plane became 6.7 μm. The technique is useful to investigate a gas-liquid two-phase flow in micro scale.

  14. A silicon based implantable microelectrode array for electrophysiological and dopamine recording from cortex to striatum in the non-human primate brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Song, Yilin; Wang, Mixia; Zhang, Zhiming; Fan, Xinyi; Song, Xianteng; Zhuang, Ping; Yue, Feng; Chan, Piu; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-11-15

    Dual-mode, multielectrode recordings have become routine in rodent neuroscience research and have recently been adapted to the non-human primate. However, robust and reliable application of acute, multielectrode recording methods in monkeys especially for deep brain nucleus research remains a challenge. In this paper, We described a low cost silicon based 16-site implantable microelectrode array (MEA) chip fabricated by standard lithography technology for in vivo test. The array was 25mm long and designed to use in non-human primate models, for electrophysiological and electrochemical recording. We presented a detailed protocol for array fabrication, then showed that the device can record Spikes, LFPs and dopamine (DA) variation continuously from cortex to striatum in an esthetized monkey. Though our experiment, high-quality electrophysiological signals were obtained from the animal. Across any given microelectrode, spike amplitudes ranged from 70 to 300μV peak to peak, with a mean signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. Calibration results showed the MEA probe had high sensitivity and good selectivity for DA. The DA concentration changed from 42.8 to 481.6μM when the MEA probe inserted from cortex into deep brain nucleus of striatum, which reflected the inhomogeneous distribution of DA in brains. Compared with existing methods allowing single mode (electrophysiology or electrochemistry) recording. This system is designed explicitly for dual-mode recording to meet the challenges of recording in non-human primates. PMID:27155116

  15. Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Shane D.; Loveridge, M. J.; Lain, Michael J.; Ferrari, Stefania; Polzin, Bryant J.; Bhagat, Rohit; Dashwood, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Commercial Li-ion batteries are typically cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V. These voltages limits are chosen based on the characteristics of the cathode (e.g. lithium cobalt oxide) and anode (e.g. graphite). When alternative anode/cathode chemistries are studied the same cut-off voltages are often, mistakenly, used. Silicon (Si) based anodes are widely studied as a high capacity alternative to graphite for Lithium-ion batteries. When silicon-based anodes are paired with high capacity cathodes (e.g. Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium Oxide; NCA) the cell typically suffers from rapid capacity fade. The purpose of this communication is to understand how the choice of upper cut-off voltage affects cell performance in Si/NCA cells. A careful study of three-electrode cell data will show that capacity fade in Si/NCA cells is due to an ever-evolving silicon voltage profile that pushes the upper voltage at the cathode to >4.4 V (vs. Li/Li+). This behaviour initially improves cycle efficiency, due to liberation of new lithium, but ultimately reduces cycling efficiency, resulting in rapid capacity fade.

  16. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  17. Particle size distribution of aerosols sprayed from household hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based and silicone-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japan has published safety guideline on waterproof aerosol sprays. Furthermore, the Aerosol Industry Association of Japan has adopted voluntary regulations on waterproof aerosol sprays. Aerosol particles of diameter less than 10 µm are considered as "fine particles". In order to avoid acute lung injury, this size fraction should account for less than 0.6% of the sprayed aerosol particles. In contrast, the particle size distribution of aerosols released by hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based or silicone-based compounds have not been investigated in Japan. Thus, the present study investigated the aerosol particle size distribution of 16 household hand-pump sprays. In 4 samples, the ratio of fine particles in aerosols exceeded 0.6%. This study confirmed that several hand-pump sprays available in the Japanese market can spray fine particles. Since the hand-pump sprays use water as a solvent and their ingredients may be more hydrophilic than those of aerosol sprays, the concepts related to the safety of aerosol-sprays do not apply to the hand pump sprays. Therefore, it may be required for the hand-pump spray to develop a suitable method for evaluating the toxicity and to establish the safety guideline. PMID:26821469

  18. Simulation of micro-magnet stray-field dynamics for spin qubit manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, R.; Schreiber, L. R.

    2015-05-21

    High-fidelity control and unprecedented long dephasing times in silicon-based single spin qubits have recently confirmed the prospects of solid-state quantum computation. We investigate the feasibility of using a micro-magnet stray field for all-electrical, addressable spin qubit control in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot. For a micro-magnet geometry optimized for high Rabi-frequency, addressability, and robustness to fabrication misalignment as previously demonstrated by Yoneda et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 267601 (2014)], we simulate the qubit decoherence due to magnetic stray-field fluctuations, which may dominate in nuclear spin-free systems, e.g., quantum dots in Si/SiGe, Si-MOS structures and (bilayer) graphene. With calculated Rabi-frequencies of 15 MHz, a qubit addressability error below 10{sup −3} is achievable. Magnetic fluctuations from a micro-magnet limits the spin relaxation time to T{sub 1} ≳ 3 s, while pure spin dephasing is negligible. Our results show that micro-magnets are a promising tool for spin qubit computation in nuclear spin-free systems.

  19. Application of Micro Discharge for Air Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Sugiyama, Takeki; L. S., Manisha Nishamani; Kanamori, Masaki

    Micro discharge is investigated which is occurred with a pair of electrodes covered with dielectric barrier. The discharge gap is set at an order of micro meters by changing a spacer from 0 to 100μm. Paschen's law states the minimum sparking voltage of various gases for respective discharge gaps in atmospheric pressure. In this paper, characteristics of micro discharges, such as discharge voltages, discharge currents, discharge power, which is obtained with the help of Lissajous figures, and the relationships between these characteristics are presented. Characteristics of ozone generation and treatment of high concentration NOx, which is contained in exhaust gas of automobiles, are investigated. Byproducts are confirmed by FT-IR and GC-MS.

  20. Microcrystalline silicon oxides for silicon-based solar cells: impact of the O/Si ratio on the electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, M.; Starr, D. E.; Lambertz, A.; Holländer, B.; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Gorgoi, M.; Yang, W.; Wilks, R. G.; Heske, C.

    2014-10-01

    of Si 3p - O 2p hybridization in the upper valence band. This coincides with a significant increase of the material's resistivity, possibly indicating the breakdown of the conducting crystalline Si network. Silicon oxide layers with a thickness of several hundred nanometres were deposited in a PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) multi chamber system using an excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz with a plasma power density of 0.3 W/cm2. Glass (Corning type Eagle) and mono-crystalline silicon wafer substrates were coated in the same run at a substrate temperature of 185°C. The deposition pressure was 4 mbar and the substrate-electrode distance 20 mm. Mixtures of silane (SiH4), 1% TMB (B(CH3)3) diluted in helium, hydrogen (H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) gases were used at flow rates of 1.25 - 0.18/0.32/500/0 - 1.07) sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute) for the deposition of μc-SiOx:H(B) layers. By changing the CO2/SiH4 gas flow rate ratio from 0 to 6, μc-SiOx:H(B) layers with a composition of 0 <= x = O/Si <= 1 were prepared using a constant sum of SiH4 and CO2. The TMB flow and the H2 flow were kept constant within the series. For more details see Ref. [1]. The oxygen content in the films was determined using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). With RBS, the area-related atomic density of oxygen and silicon can be determined (+/- 2% [2]), and thus x can be calculated. This quantity considers only the number of silicon / oxygen atoms and not the number of atoms of other elements, such as hydrogen, which is also incorporated to a considerable extent: up to 20% in μc-SiOx:H (measured using the hydrogen effusion method). To avoid charging effects, the measurements were performed on films deposited on a substrate of mono-crystalline silicon wafers. The electrical conductivity was measured in the planar direction of the film in a vacuum cryostat, using voltages from - 100 V to + 100 V. For that two co-planar Ag contacts were evaporated

  1. Microcrystalline silicon oxides for silicon-based solar cells: impact of the O/Si ratio on the electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, M.; Starr, D. E.; Lambertz, A.; Holländer, B.; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Gorgoi, M.; Yang, W.; Wilks, R. G.; Heske, C.

    2014-10-01

    of Si 3p - O 2p hybridization in the upper valence band. This coincides with a significant increase of the material's resistivity, possibly indicating the breakdown of the conducting crystalline Si network. Silicon oxide layers with a thickness of several hundred nanometres were deposited in a PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) multi chamber system using an excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz with a plasma power density of 0.3 W/cm2. Glass (Corning type Eagle) and mono-crystalline silicon wafer substrates were coated in the same run at a substrate temperature of 185°C. The deposition pressure was 4 mbar and the substrate-electrode distance 20 mm. Mixtures of silane (SiH4), 1% TMB (B(CH3)3) diluted in helium, hydrogen (H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) gases were used at flow rates of 1.25 - 0.18/0.32/500/0 - 1.07) sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute) for the deposition of μc-SiOx:H(B) layers. By changing the CO2/SiH4 gas flow rate ratio from 0 to 6, μc-SiOx:H(B) layers with a composition of 0 <= x = O/Si <= 1 were prepared using a constant sum of SiH4 and CO2. The TMB flow and the H2 flow were kept constant within the series. For more details see Ref. [1]. The oxygen content in the films was determined using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). With RBS, the area-related atomic density of oxygen and silicon can be determined (+/- 2% [2]), and thus x can be calculated. This quantity considers only the number of silicon / oxygen atoms and not the number of atoms of other elements, such as hydrogen, which is also incorporated to a considerable extent: up to 20% in μc-SiOx:H (measured using the hydrogen effusion method). To avoid charging effects, the measurements were performed on films deposited on a substrate of mono-crystalline silicon wafers. The electrical conductivity was measured in the planar direction of the film in a vacuum cryostat, using voltages from - 100 V to + 100 V. For that two co-planar Ag contacts were evaporated

  2. Effect of structural heat conduction on the performance of micro-combustors and micro-thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Timothy Thierry

    This thesis investigates the effect of gas-structure interaction on the design and performance of miniaturized combustors with characteristic dimensions less than a few millimeters. These are termed 'micro-combustors' and are intended for use in devices ranging from micro-scale rocket motors for micro, nano, and pico-satellite propulsion, to micro-scale engines for micro-Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) propulsion and compact power generation. Analytical models for the propagation of a premixed laminar flame in a micro-channel are developed. The models' predictions are compared to the results of more detailed numerical simulations that incorporate multi-step chemistry, distributed heat transfer between the reacting gas and the combustor structure, heat transfer between the combustor and the environment, and heat transfer within the combustor structure. The results of the modeling and simulation efforts are found to be in good qualitative agreement and demonstrate that the behavior of premixed laminar flames in micro-channels is governed by heat transfer within the combustor structure and heat loss to the environment. The key findings of this work are as follows: First, heat transfer through the micro-combustor's structure tends to increase the flame speed and flame thickness. The increase in flame thickness with decreasing passage height suggests that micro-scale combustors will need to be longer than their conventional-scale counterparts. However, the increase in flame speed more than compensates for this effect and the net effect is that miniaturizing a combustor can increase its power density substantially. Second, miniaturizing chemical rocket thrusters can substantially increase thrust/weight ratio but comes at the price of reduced specific impulse (i.e. overall efficiency). Third, heat transfer through the combustor's structure increases steady-state and transient flame stability. This means that micro-scale combustors will be more stable than their conventional

  3. Search for Bs0 --> micro+ micro- and B0 --> micro+ micro- decays with 2 fb-1 of pp collisions.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-03-14

    We have performed a search for B(s)(0) --> micro(+) micro(-) and B(0) --> micro(+) micro(-) decays in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV using 2 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B(s)(0) and B0 candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limits on the branching fractions are B(B(s)0) --> micro(+) micro(-)) <5.8 x 10(-8) and B(B(0) --> micro(+) micro(-))<1.8 x 10(-8) at 95% C.L. PMID:18352173

  4. Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-01-06

    Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  5. Analysis of Membrane Lipids of Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNaughton, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    A method of characterization of airborne micro-organisms in a given location involves (1) large-volume filtration of air onto glass-fiber filters; (2) accelerated extraction of membrane lipids of the collected micro-organisms by use of pressurized hot liquid; and (3) identification and quantitation of the lipids by use of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. This method is suitable for use in both outdoor and indoor environments; for example, it can be used to measure airborne microbial contamination in buildings ("sick-building syndrome"). The classical approach to analysis of airborne micro-organisms is based on the growth of cultureable micro-organisms and does not provide an account of viable but noncultureable micro-organisms, which typically amount to more than 90 percent of the micro-organisms present. In contrast, the present method provides an account of all micro-organisms, including cultureable, noncultureable, aerobic, and anaerobic ones. The analysis of lipids according to this method makes it possible to estimate the number of viable airborne micro-organisms present in the sampled air and to obtain a quantitative profile of the general types of micro-organisms present along with some information about their physiological statuses.

  6. A comprehensive viscosity model for micro magnetic particle dispersed in silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Im Doo; Kim, Moobum; Park, Seong Jin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetorheological behavior of micro magnetic particle dispersed in silicone oil has been characterized by a multiplied form of phenomenological models taking the effect of shear rate, powder volume fraction, temperature and magnetic flux density. Magnetorheological fluid samples with seven different particle volume fraction were prepared by adding ferrite particles in silicone base oil and their shear viscosity of fluid samples were measured under three different temperatures (40 °C, 70 °C, and 110 °C) and ten different magnetic flux density (0-100 mT). The fluid had an upper limit to the increase of viscosity under the effect of external magnetic field and the saturation values were dependent on the operating temperature, shear rate and volume fraction of magnetic powder. The rheological behaviors have been characterized by our developed model which can be very useful for the precise control of the magnetorheological fluid.

  7. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wu, Xiaoqing; Shi, Peng; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN) composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing. PMID:26771617

  8. Effect of materials for micro-electro-mechanical systems on PCR yield.

    PubMed

    Potrich, Cristina; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Forti, Stefania; Vozzi, Diego; Pasquardini, Laura; Vanzetti, Lia; Panciatichi, Cristina; Anderle, Mariano; Pederzolli, Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    In this study we analyzed the surface properties of different silicon-based materials used for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) production, such as thermally grown silicon oxide, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-treated silicon oxide, reactive-ion etch (RIE)-treated silicon oxide, and Pyrex. Substrates were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to define the surface chemical and morphological properties, and by fluorescence microscopy to directly assess the absorption of the different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) components. By using microchips fabricated with the same materials we investigated their compatibility with PCR reactions, exploiting the use of different enzymes and reagents or proper surface treatments. We established the best conditions for DNA amplification in silicon/Pyrex microdevices depending on the type of device and fabrication method used and the quality of reagents, rather than on the passivation treatment or increment in standard Taq polymerase concentration. PMID:19455320

  9. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wu, Xiaoqing; Shi, Peng; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN) composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing. PMID:26771617

  10. Ultrasound-driven Megahertz Faraday Waves for Generation of Monodisperse Micro Droplets and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chen S.; Mao, Rong W.; Lin, Shih K.; Tsai, Shirley C.; Boss, Gerry; Brenner, Matt; Smaldone, Gerry; Mahon, Sari; Shahverdi, Kaveh; Zhu, Yun

    Our theoretical findings on instability of Faraday waves at megahertz (MHz) drive frequency and realization of silicon-based MHz multiple-Fourier horn ultrasonic nozzles (MFHUNs) together have enabled generation of mono-disperse droplets of controllable diameter (2.5-6.0 μm) at very low electrical drive power (<0.5 Watt). The resulting battery-run clogging-free droplet generator has imminent application to pulmonary (inhalation) drug delivery and other potential applications. Here an update of advances on analysis and design of the MHz MFHUNs and the underlying physical mechanism for generation of mono-disperse micro droplets, and the nebulizer platform for application to detoxification of cyanide poisoning are presented.

  11. Microplasmas and micro-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Aubert, X.; Marinov, D.; Guaitella, O.; Stancu, G.; Welzel, S.; Pipa, A.; Ropcke, J.; Sadeghi, N.; Rousseau, A.

    2008-07-01

    Microplasmas are now widely investigated, one of their advantages being to generate a plasma at relatively high pressure close to the Paschen minimum (Schoenbach et al. 1997). Here, the microplasma is generated in a microhollow cathode type configuration made of a hole drilled through a metal/dielectric/metal sandwich (Schoenbach et al. 1997). One of the electrodes acts as the cathode (K) and the other as the anode (A1). The hole diameter ranges from 100 to 400 mu m and the pressure ranges from 50 to 500 Torr. When a second electrode (A2) is added, a large volume of plasma plume may be generated between A1 and A2, at a low electric field (1-20Td depending upon the gas) (Stark et al. 1999). A microhollow cathode type discharge operates in three different regimes depending on the plasma current: abnormal, self-pulsing and normal regime. The self-pulsing regime is achieved in the range of 1-100 kHz, in argon, helium, nitrogen and oxygen. The self-pulsing frequency is controlled by the microplasma device capacitance, the gas breakdown voltage, and the average discharge current (Rousseau et al. 2006, Aubert et al. 2007). i) First, in pure argon, the radial dependence of atoms excitation mechanisms and of the electronic density is studied inside the micro-hole. Imaging of the emission from the microplasma is performed with a spatial resolution of few mu m. The electron density is estimated from the Stark broadening of the H beta-line. The radial distribution of the emission intensities of an Ar atomic line and an Ar^+ ionic line are used for the excitation study. Ar and Ar^+ lines are excited in the cathode sheath edge by beam electrons accelerated within the sheath. These two excitations show the decay of the energy of electrons in negative glow. The Ar line presents also production of excited atoms by recombination of argon ions with electrons at the center of the micro-hole.Work is in progress to evaluate the contribution of the static electric field on the strak

  12. Research on defects and transport in amorphous-silicon-based semiconductors. Final subcontract report, 20 February 1991--19 April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, E.A.; Antoniadis, H.; Gu, Q.; Lee, J.K.; Wang, Q.; Zafar, S.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes work on three individual tasks as follows. (1) Electron and hole drift measurements in a-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:H and a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H p-i-n solar cells. Multijunction solar cells incorporating modified band gap a-Si:H in a triple-junction structure are generally viewed as the most promising avenue for achieving an amorphous silicon-based solar call with 15% stabilized conversion efficiency. The specific objective of this task was to document the mobilities and deep-trapping mobility-lifetime products for electrons and holes in a-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:H and a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H alloys materials. (2) Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potential (V{sub bi}) in solar cells. V{sub bi} in a p-i-n solar call may be limiting the open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) in wide-band-gap cells (E{sub g} > 1.8 eV) currently under investigation as the top cell for 15% triple junction devices. The research addressed four issues that need to be resolved before the method can yield an error less than 0.1 V for V{sub bi}. The details are presented in this report. (3) Defect relaxation and Shockley-Read kinetics in a-Si:H. Quantitative modeling of solar cells is usually based on Shockley-Read kinetics.`` An important assumption of this approach is that the rate of emission of a photocarrier trapped on a defect is independent of quasi-Fermi level location.

  13. A silicon-based photocathode for water reduction with an epitaxial SrTiO3 protection layer and a nanostructured catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Li; McDaniel, Martin D.; Wang, Shijun; Posadas, Agham B.; Li, Xiaohan; Huang, Haiyu; Lee, Jack C.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Bard, Allen J.; Ekerdt, John G.; Yu, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly increasing global demand for energy combined with the environmental impact of fossil fuels has spurred the search for alternative sources of clean energy. One promising approach is to convert solar energy into hydrogen fuel using photoelectrochemical cells. However, the semiconducting photoelectrodes used in these cells typically have low efficiencies and/or stabilities. Here we show that a silicon-based photocathode with a capping epitaxial oxide layer can provide efficient and stable hydrogen production from water. In particular, a thin epitaxial layer of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) was grown directly on Si(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. Photogenerated electrons can be transported easily through this layer because of the conduction-band alignment and lattice match between single-crystalline SrTiO3 and silicon. The approach was used to create a metal-insulator-semiconductor photocathode that, under a broad-spectrum illumination at 100 mW cm-2, exhibits a maximum photocurrent density of 35 mA cm-2 and an open circuit potential of 450 mV there was no observable decrease in performance after 35 hours of operation in 0.5 M H2SO4. The performance of the photocathode was also found to be highly dependent on the size and spacing of the structured metal catalyst. Therefore, mesh-like Ti/Pt nanostructured catalysts were created using a nanosphere lithography lift-off process and an applied-bias photon-to-current efficiency of 4.9% was achieved.

  14. A techno-economic & environmental analysis of a novel technology utilizing an internal combustion engine as a compact, inexpensive micro-reformer for a distributed gas-to-liquids system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Joshua B.

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) contribute to global warming, and must be mitigated. With GHG mitigation as an overarching goal, this research aims to study the potential for newfound and abundant sources of natural gas to play a role as part of a GHG mitigation strategy. However, recent work suggests that methane leakage in the current natural gas system may inhibit end-use natural gas as a robust mitigation strategy, but that natural gas as a feedstock for other forms of energy, such as electricity generation or liquid fuels, may support natural-gas based mitigation efforts. Flaring of uneconomic natural gas, or outright loss of natural gas to the atmosphere results in greenhouse gas emissions that could be avoided and which today are very large in aggregate. A central part of this study is to look at a new technology for converting natural gas into methanol at a unit scale that is matched to the size of individual natural gas wells. The goal is to convert stranded or otherwise flared natural gas into a commercially valuable product and thereby avoid any unnecessary emission to the atmosphere. A major part of this study is to contribute to the development of a novel approach for converting natural gas into methanol and to assess the environmental impact (for better or for worse) of this new technology. This Ph. D. research contributes to the development of such a system and provides a comprehensive techno-economic and environmental assessment of this technology. Recognizing the distributed nature of methane leakage associated with the natural gas system, this work is also intended to advance previous research at the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy that aims to show that small, modular energy systems can be made economic. This thesis contributes to and analyzes the development of a small-scale gas-to-liquids (GTL) system aimed at addressing flared natural gas from gas and oil wells. This thesis includes system engineering around a design that

  15. A techno-economic & environmental analysis of a novel technology utilizing an internal combustion engine as a compact, inexpensive micro-reformer for a distributed gas-to-liquids system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Joshua B.

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) contribute to global warming, and must be mitigated. With GHG mitigation as an overarching goal, this research aims to study the potential for newfound and abundant sources of natural gas to play a role as part of a GHG mitigation strategy. However, recent work suggests that methane leakage in the current natural gas system may inhibit end-use natural gas as a robust mitigation strategy, but that natural gas as a feedstock for other forms of energy, such as electricity generation or liquid fuels, may support natural-gas based mitigation efforts. Flaring of uneconomic natural gas, or outright loss of natural gas to the atmosphere results in greenhouse gas emissions that could be avoided and which today are very large in aggregate. A central part of this study is to look at a new technology for converting natural gas into methanol at a unit scale that is matched to the size of individual natural gas wells. The goal is to convert stranded or otherwise flared natural gas into a commercially valuable product and thereby avoid any unnecessary emission to the atmosphere. A major part of this study is to contribute to the development of a novel approach for converting natural gas into methanol and to assess the environmental impact (for better or for worse) of this new technology. This Ph. D. research contributes to the development of such a system and provides a comprehensive techno-economic and environmental assessment of this technology. Recognizing the distributed nature of methane leakage associated with the natural gas system, this work is also intended to advance previous research at the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy that aims to show that small, modular energy systems can be made economic. This thesis contributes to and analyzes the development of a small-scale gas-to-liquids (GTL) system aimed at addressing flared natural gas from gas and oil wells. This thesis includes system engineering around a design that

  16. Mesoporous Silicon-Based Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peramunage, Dharmasena

    2015-01-01

    For high-capacity, high-performance lithium-ion batteries. A new high-capacity anode composite based on mesoporous silicon is being developed. With a structure that resembles a pseudo one-dimensional phase, the active anode material will accommodate significant volume changes expected upon alloying and dealloying with lithium (Li).

  17. Micro-algal biosensors.

    PubMed

    Brayner, Roberta; Couté, Alain; Livage, Jacques; Perrette, Catherine; Sicard, Clémence

    2011-08-01

    Fighting against water pollution requires the ability to detect pollutants for example herbicides or heavy metals. Micro-algae that live in marine and fresh water offer a versatile solution for the construction of novel biosensors. These photosynthetic microorganisms are very sensitive to changes in their environment, enabling the detection of traces of pollutants. Three groups of micro-algae are described in this paper: chlorophyta, cyanobacteria, and diatoms. PMID:21626188

  18. The Mars Development of a Micro-Isolation Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Juergen; Vargo, Steven; Forgrave, John; Bame, David; Chakraborty, Indrani; Tang, William

    1999-01-01

    A feasibility investigation for a newly proposed microfabricated, normally-closed isolation valve was initiated. The micro-isolation valve is silicon based and relies on the principle of melting a silicon plug, opening an otherwise sealed flow passage. This valve may thus serve a similar role as a conventional pyrovalve and is intended for use in micropropulsion systems onboard future microspacecraft, having wet masses of no more than 10-20 kg, as well as in larger scale propulsion systems having only low flow rate requirements, such as ion propulsion or Hall thruster systems. Two key feasibility issues - melting of the plug and pressure handling capability - were addressed. Thermal finite element modeling showed that valves with plugs having widths between 10 and 50 gm have power requirements of only 10 . 30 Watts to open over a duration of 0.5 ms or less. Valve chips featuring 5 0 micron plugs were burst pressure tested and reached maximum pressure values o f 2900 psig (19.7 Mpa).

  19. MEMS compatible illumination and imaging micro-optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer, A.; Dannberg, P.; Duparré, J.; Höfer, B.; Schreiber, P.; Scholles, M.

    2007-01-01

    The development of new MOEMS demands for cooperation between researchers in micromechanics, optoelectronics and microoptics at a very early state. Additionally, microoptical technologies being compatible with structured silicon have to be developed. The microoptical technologies used for two silicon based microsystems are described in the paper. First, a very small scanning laser projector with a volume of less than 2 cm 3, which operates with a directly modulated lasers collimated with a microlens, is shown. The laser radiation illuminates a 2D-MEMS scanning mirror. The optical design is optimized for high resolution (VGA). Thermomechanical stability is realized by design and using a structured ceramics motherboard. Secondly, an ultrathin CMOS-camera having an insect inspired imaging system has been realized. It is the first experimental realization of an artificial compound eye. Micro-optical design principles and technology is used. The overall thickness of the imaging system is only 320 μm, the diagonal field of view is 21°, and the f-number is 2.6. The monolithic device consists of an UV-replicated microlens array upon a thin silica substrate with a pinhole array in a metal layer on the back side. The pitch of the pinholes differs from that of the lens array to provide individual viewing angle for each channel. The imaging chip is directly glued to a CMOS sensor with adapted pitch. The whole camera is less than 1mm thick. New packaging methods for these systems are under development.

  20. Femtosecond laser fabrication of hybrid micro-optical elements and their integration on the fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Gilbergs, Holger; Zukauskas, Albertas; Belazaras, Kastytis; Purlys, Vytautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Bickauskaite, Gabija; Momot, Andrej; Paipulas, Domas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Piskarskas, Algis

    2010-05-01

    Femtosecond laser photo-polymerization of zirconium-silicon based sol-gel photopolymer SZ2080 is used to fabricate micro-optical elements with a single and hybrid optical functions. We demonstrate photo-polymerization of the solid immersion and Fresnel lenses. Gratings can be added onto the surface of lenses. The effective refractive index of polymerized structures can be controlled via the volume fraction of polymer. We used woodpile structure with volume fraction of 0.65-0.8. Tailoring of dispersion properties of micro-optical elements by changing filling ratio of polymer are discussed. Direct write approach is used to form such structures on a cover glass and on the tip of an optical fiber. Close matching of refractive indices between the polymer and substrate in visible and near infra red spectral regions (nSZ2080 = 1.504, nglass = 1.52) is favorable for such integration. The surface roughness of laser-polymerized resits was ~30 nm (min-max value), which is acceptable for optical applications in the visible range. For the bulk micro-optical elements the efficiency of 3D laser polymerization is increased by a factor ~ (2 - 4) × 102 times (depends on the design) by the shell-formation polymerization: (i) contour scanning for definition of shell-surface, (ii) development for removal of nonfunctional resist, and (iii) UV exposure for the final volumetric polymerization of an enclosed volume.

  1. Micro-turbo-generator design and fabrication: A preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegele, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    The size and weight of portable electronic products are often dictated by the physical characteristics of the power supply system. The design of energy storage systems is therefore critical to market competitiveness. An alternative to energy storage is proposed in this paper which relies on a very small power generation system which converts a pressure difference in a gas into electrical power: a micro-turbo-generator. The design of the micro-turbo-generator involved combining two very different machines, a micro-generator and a micro-turbine, into a single device which could be fabricated within the constraints of current microelectronic processing techniques. Research into power generation on the micro-scale has begun to take place in the form of electromagnetic micro-motor design and fabrication. These variable reluctance machines can be transformed into power generation devices by implementing accurate rotor position sensing, high-speed current switching and a means for inducing rotor motion. This leads to the implementation of a switched reluctance generator, which is well-understood on the macro-scale but has not been attempted on the micro-scale. The most significant hurdle facing researchers is the task of coupling a prime mover, such as a micro-turbine, to the rotor of a power generation device efficiently and effectively while maintaining relative simplicity in the fabrication procedures. The design presented here offers a potential solution to this problem.

  2. Research on high-band-gap materials and amorphous-silicon-based solar cells. Annual subcontract report, May 15, 1994--May 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, E.A.; Gu, Q.; Jiang, L.; Wang, Q.

    1995-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of thin BP:H and BPC:H films prepared by plasma deposition using phosphine, diborane, tri-methylboron, and hydrogen as precursor gases. The objective of this research is to find out whether such films might offer a superior window layer film for application to wide bandgap a-Si solar cells. The research has shown good optical properties in a-BP:H films, but electrical properties acceptable for use in window layers have not been demonstrated yet. We have also found an interesting, conductive and transparent BPC:H film in a remote deposition region of the reactor, but have been unable to transfer deposition of this film to the standard interelectrode region. We have developed our capability to deposit nip sequence amorphous silicon based solar cells, and have demonstrated an open circuit voltage greater than 0.7 V. We have continued our studies of built-in potentials in a-Si based solar cells using the electroabsorption technique, extending our measurements to include cells with wider bandgap intrinsic layers and Schottky barrier test structures. We have made the first time-of-flight drift mobility measurements on a-Si:H prepared by hot wire (HW) deposition. Initial work has shown that light-soaked HW material can have much better ambipolar diffusion lengths than the plasma-deposited material following extended light soaking. We have performed some theoretical work which addresses a difficulty in understanding photocarrier recombination in a-Si:H first identified by Marvin Silver. In particular, electron-hole recombination is much slower than expected from the well-known {open_quotes}diffusion-controlled{close_quotes} models for Onsager (geminate) recombination and Langevin recombination. This slowness is essential to the success of a-Si in solar cells, but is unexplained. We have done work on high field electron drift mobilities in a-Si:H and on the validity of the Einstein relation connecting the diffusion and drift of holes in a-Si:H.

  3. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  4. Micro-machining.

    PubMed

    Brinksmeier, Ekkard; Preuss, Werner

    2012-08-28

    Manipulating bulk material at the atomic level is considered to be the domain of physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. However, precision engineering, especially micro-machining, has become a powerful tool for controlling the surface properties and sub-surface integrity of the optical, electronic and mechanical functional parts in a regime where continuum mechanics is left behind and the quantum nature of matter comes into play. The surprising subtlety of micro-machining results from the extraordinary precision of tools, machines and controls expanding into the nanometre range-a hundred times more precise than the wavelength of light. In this paper, we will outline the development of precision engineering, highlight modern achievements of ultra-precision machining and discuss the necessity of a deeper physical understanding of micro-machining. PMID:22802498

  5. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  6. Method of fabricating a micro machine

    DOEpatents

    Stalford, Harold L

    2014-11-11

    A micro machine may be in or less than the micrometer domain. The micro machine may include a micro actuator and a micro shaft coupled to the micro actuator. The micro shaft is operable to be driven by the micro actuator. A tool is coupled to the micro shaft and is operable to perform work in response to at least motion of the micro shaft.

  7. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED.

    PubMed

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. PMID:25303172

  8. Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester. Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2008-09-23

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  9. The Micro-Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    To reduce teacher isolation and encourage sharing of expertise, schools should consider brief workshops or 15-minute "micro-shops" on various topics ranging from making electrical circuit boards to setting up a salt-water aquarium. This article and accompanying sidebar discuss benefits and set-up strategies. (MLH)

  10. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  11. Micro-Bubble Experiments at the Van de Graaff Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wardle, Kent E.; Quigley, K. J.; Gromov, Roman; Youker, A. J.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Bailey, James; Stepinski, D. C.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2015-02-01

    In order to test and verify the experimental designs at the linear accelerator (LINAC), several micro-scale bubble ("micro-bubble") experiments were conducted with the 3-MeV Van de Graaff (VDG) electron accelerator. The experimental setups included a square quartz tube, sodium bisulfate solution with different concentrations, cooling coils, gas chromatography (GC) system, raster magnets, and two high-resolution cameras that were controlled by a LabVIEW program. Different beam currents were applied in the VDG irradiation. Bubble generation (radiolysis), thermal expansion, thermal convection, and radiation damage were observed in the experiments. Photographs, videos, and gas formation (O2 + H2) data were collected. The micro-bubble experiments at VDG indicate that the design of the full-scale bubble experiments at the LINAC is reasonable.

  12. Fused fiber micro-knots.

    PubMed

    Shahal, Shir; Klein, Avi; Masri, Gilad; Fridman, Moti

    2016-06-10

    We present fusing of a fiber micro-knot by a CO2 laser beam. We demonstrate tuning of the coupling strength and tuning of the spectral resonance of the micro-knot by the fusing process. The experimental results reveal that fusing the fiber micro-knots increases the coupling efficiency and improves the robustness and the stability of the micro-knots. PMID:27409009

  13. Autonomous, agile micro-satellites and supporting technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Breitfeller, E; Dittman, M D; Gaughan, R J; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; Ledebuhr, A G; Ng, L C; Whitehead, J C; Wilson, B

    1999-07-19

    This paper updates the on-going effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop autonomous, agile micro-satellites (MicroSats). The objective of this development effort is to develop MicroSats weighing only a few tens of kilograms, that are able to autonomously perform precision maneuvers and can be used telerobotically in a variety of mission modes. The required capabilities include satellite rendezvous, inspection, proximity-operations, docking, and servicing. The MicroSat carries an integrated proximity-operations sensor-suite incorporating advanced avionics. A new self-pressurizing propulsion system utilizing a miniaturized pump and non-toxic mono-propellant hydrogen peroxide was successfully tested. This system can provide a nominal 25 kg MicroSat with 200-300 m/s delta-v including a warm-gas attitude control system. The avionics is based on the latest PowerPC processor using a CompactPCI bus architecture, which is modular, high-performance and processor-independent. This leverages commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies and minimizes the effects of future changes in processors. The MicroSat software development environment uses the Vx-Works real-time operating system (RTOS) that provides a rapid development environment for integration of new software modules, allowing early integration and test. We will summarize results of recent integrated ground flight testing of our latest non-toxic pumped propulsion MicroSat testbed vehicle operated on our unique dynamic air-rail.

  14. Breakthrough: micro-electronic photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin

    2014-06-23

    Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon micro-PV cells will be cheaper and have greater efficiencies than current PV collectors. Micro-PV cells require relatively little material to form well-controlled, highly efficient devices. Cell fabrication uses common microelectric and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques.

  15. Breakthrough: micro-electronic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin

    2012-04-23

    Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon micro-PV cells will be cheaper and have greater efficiencies than current PV collectors. Micro-PV cells require relatively little material to form well-controlled, highly efficient devices. Cell fabrication uses common microelectric and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques.

  16. Furanic compounds and furfural in different coffee products by headspace liquid-phase micro-extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: survey and effect of brewing procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaichi, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh-Mohammadi, Vahid; Hashemi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Abdorreza

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the levels of furan, 2-methylfuran, 2,5-dimethylfuran, vinyl furan, 2-methoxymethyl-furan and furfural in different coffee products were evaluated. Simultaneous determination of these six furanic compounds was performed by a head space liquid-phase micro-extraction (HS-LPME) method. A total of 67 coffee powder samples were analysed. The effects of boiling and espresso-making procedures on the levels of furanic compounds were investigated. The results showed that different types of coffee samples contained different concentrations of furanic compounds, due to the various processing conditions such as temperature, degree of roasting and fineness of grind. Among the different coffee samples, the highest level of furan (6320 µg kg⁻¹) was detected in ground coffee, while coffee-mix samples showed the lowest furan concentration (10 µg kg⁻¹). Levels in brewed coffees indicated that, except for furfural, brewing by an espresso machine caused significant loss of furanic compounds. PMID:25356540

  17. Methods and systems for micro bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Stalford, Harold L

    2015-01-27

    A micro drive assembly may comprise a substrate, a micro shaft oriented in-plane with the substrate and at least one micro bearing to support rotation of the micro shaft. The micro shaft and micro bearing may be in or less than the micrometer domain.

  18. Methods and systems for micro transmissions

    DOEpatents

    Stalford, Harold L

    2014-12-23

    Methods and systems for micro transmissions for a micro machine may comprise an input shaft assembly coupled to a micro actuator, an output shaft assembly coupled to a micro shaft, and one or more power conversion elements operable to convert a first type of movement from the micro actuator into a second, disparate type of movement for the micro shaft.

  19. Methods and systems for micro bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Stalford, Harold L.

    2012-10-09

    A micro drive assembly may comprise a substrate, a micro shall oriented in-plane with the substrate and at least one micro bearing to support rotation of the micro shaft. The micro shaft and micro bearing may be in or less than the micrometer domain.

  20. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  1. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, Warren C.; Blau, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch.

  2. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  3. Micro borehole drilling platform

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This study by CTES, L.C. meets two main objectives. First, evaluate the feasibility of using coiled tubing (CT) to drill 1.0 inches-2.5 inches diameter directional holes in hard rocks. Second, develop a conceptual design for a micro borehole drilling platform (MBDP) meeting specific size, weight, and performance requirements. The Statement of Work (SOW) in Appendix A contains detailed specifications for the feasibility study and conceptual design.

  4. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, W.C.; Blau, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch. 2 figs.

  5. Quantitative micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2005-09-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 μm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients μ in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  6. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  7. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  8. Characterization of Gas Amplification in Varied Gas Mixtures for Stacked Gas Electron Multiplier and Micromegas Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Micropattern Gas Detectors (MPGDs) represent a promising group of gas amplification technologies. Utilizing large electric fields over geometries on the order of tens of micrometers, these elements can achieve large gas amplification while minimizing field distortions by minimizing the number of ions escaping from the amplification stage. Such properties are extremely useful for readout in gaseous detectors such as Time Projection Chambers. Two types of MPGDs are of particular interest, Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and Micro-mesh Gaseous Structure (Micromegas) detectors. These elements may be stacked, which allows for the utilization of the best properties of both, further improving the amplification performance. We report here on the characterization of 2 GEMs stacked on top of a Micromegas. In particular, I will present the dependence of gas amplification on Micromegas voltage in various gas mixtures, as well as an investigation into stability of the elements against sparking.

  9. LCVD-grown micro carbon rod for MEMS applications: a study on the Raman spectroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvan, Jayaraman S.; Jeong, Sungho

    2002-11-01

    We have fabricated micro carbon rod/needle structures of size 30 to 400 μm on graphite substrate by the pyrolytic decomposition of ethylene precursor gas using argon ion laser (514.5 nm) at different laser power and chamber pressure. The micro carbon rods were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and two broad peaks centered at 1320-1345 cm-1 and 1589-1602 cm-1 were observed, which corresponds to D (disorder) and G (graphitic) bands, respectively. LCVD grown micro carbon rods consists of highly polycrystalline graphite as well as amorphous carbon phase. The microstructural features of the LCVD grown micro carbon rods are discussed in detail.

  10. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  11. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  12. Combustion of Micro- and Nanothermites under Elevating Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monogarov, K.; Pivkina, Alla; Muravyev, N.; Meerov, D.; Dilhan, D.

    Non-equilibrium process of combustion-wave propagation of thermite compositions (Mg/Fe2O3) inside the sealed steel tube have been investigated to study the burning rate at elevating pressure. Under confinement the hot gas-phase products, formed during thermite combustion result in considerable overpressure inside the tube that reverses the gas flow and leads to pressure-driven preheating effect of the burned-gas permeation. Convective origin of this preheating effect is discussed. The pressure-time dependency is obtained experimentally. The composition was pressed inside the steel tube in pellets; the size of each part was measured to obtain burning rate - pressure dependency. Both micro- and nanosized components were used to prepare thermite compositions under study. The significant difference in burning parameters of micron- and nanosized thermites is observed and analyzed. Based on obtained results, the combustion mechanism of thermites with the micro- and nanosized components is discussed.

  13. Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion

    DOEpatents

    Fassel, V.A.; Rice, G.W.; Lawrence, K.E.

    1984-03-06

    A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

  14. Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion

    DOEpatents

    Fassel, Velmer A.; Rice, Gary W.; Lawrence, Kimberly E.

    1986-03-11

    A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05 mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

  15. Femtosecond laser polymerization of hybrid/integrated micro-optical elements and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Žukauskas, Albertas; Purlys, Vytautas; Belazaras, Kastytis; Momot, Andrej; Paipulas, Domas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Piskarskas, Algis; Gilbergs, Holger; Gaidukevičiūtė, Arunė; Sakellari, Ioanna; Farsari, Maria; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2010-12-01

    The femtosecond laser-induced multi-photon polymerization of a zirconium-silicon based sol-gel photopolymer was employed for the fabrication of a series of micro-optical elements with single and combined optical functions: convex and Fresnel lenses, gratings, solid immersion lenses on a glass slide and on the tip of an optical fiber. The microlenses were produced as polymer caps of varying radii from 10 to 90 µm. The matching of refractive indices between the polymer and substrate was exploited for the creation of composite glass-resist structures which functioned as single lenses. Using this principle, solid immersion lenses were fabricated and their performance demonstrated. The magnification of the composite solid immersion lenses corresponded to the calculated values. The surface roughness of the lenses was below ~ 30 nm, acceptable for optical applications in the visible range. In addition, the integration of micro-optical elements onto the tip of an optical fiber was demonstrated. To increase the efficiency of the 3D laser polymerization, the lenses were formed by scanning only the outer shell and polymerizing the interior by exposure to UV light.

  16. Analysis of the Multi Strategy Goal Programming for Micro-Grid Based on Dynamic ant Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, J. P.; Niu, D. X.

    Micro-grid is one of the key technologies of the future energy supplies. Take economic planning. reliability, and environmental protection of micro grid as a basis for the analysis of multi-strategy objective programming problems for micro grid which contains wind power, solar power, and battery and micro gas turbine. Establish the mathematical model of each power generation characteristics and energy dissipation. and change micro grid planning multi-objective function under different operating strategies to a single objective model based on AHP method. Example analysis shows that in combination with dynamic ant mixed genetic algorithm can get the optimal power output of this model.

  17. Micro-optical instrumentation for process spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocombe, Richard A.; Flanders, Dale C.; Atia, Walid

    2004-12-01

    Traditional laboratory ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared spectroscopy instruments are tabletop-sized pieces of equipment that exhibit very high performance, but are generally too large and costly to be widely distributed for process control applications or used as spectroscopic sensors. Utilizing a unique, and proven, micro-optical technology platform origi-nally developed, qualified and deployed in the telecommunications industry, we have developed a new class of spectro-scopic micro-instrumentation that has laboratory quality resolution and spectral range, with superior speed and robust-ness. The fundamentally lower cost and small form factor of the technology will enable widespread use in process moni-toring and control. This disruption in the ground rules of spectroscopic analysis in these processes is enabled by the re-placement of large optics and detector arrays with a high-finesse, high-speed micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) tunable filter and a single detector, that enable the manufacture of a high performance and extremely rugged spectrome-ter in the footprint of a credit card. Specific process monitoring and control applications discussed in the paper include pharmaceutical, gas sensing and chemical processing applications.

  18. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  19. Western Gas Sands Subprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The Western Gas Sands Subprogram (WGSS) is a multidisciplinary research effort within the US Department of Energy program on Unconventional Gas Recovery. The subprogram, managed by DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is directed towards the development of tight (very low permeability) lenticular gas sands in the western United States. The purpose of the subprogram is to demonstrate the feasibility of economically producing natural gas from low-permeability reservoirs. The subprogram has two broad goals: (1) to reduce the uncertainty of the reservoir production potential and (2) to improve the extraction technology. With input from the gas industry, universities, and geologic and engineering consulting firms, the WGSS was broadened to include more fundamental research and development. Consequently, for the last five years it has focused on improving diagnostic instrumentation, geophysical and engineering interpretation, and stimulation techniques. Integrated geologic studies of the three priority basins containing tight sands and selected by DOE as research targets have also been pursued as part of this new effort. To date, the following tentative conclusions have evolved: Permeability of the tight gas sands can be as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than conventional gas deposits. Nineteen western geologic basins and trends containing significant amounts of tight gas have been identified. Gas resources in the priority geologic basins are Piceance Basin, 49 tcf., Uinta Basin, 20 tcf., and Greater Green River Basin, 136 tcf. The presence of natural micro-fractures within the production zone of a reservoir and the effective propped length of hydraulically-induced fractures are the critical parameters for successful development of tight sand resources. 8 figures.

  20. Western gas sands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of economically producing natural gas from low-permeability reservoirs. Two broad research goals have been defined: (1) reducing the uncertainty of the reservoir production potential, and (2) improving the extraction technology. These goals are being pursued by conducting research and encouraging industrial efforts in developing the necessary technology, including: (1) providing fundamental research into the nature of tight, lenticular gas sands and the technologies for diagnosing and developing them: (2) developing and verifying the technology for effective gas production; and (3) promoting the transfer of research products and technology advances to the gas industry in usable forms. The focus of the research for the last several years has been improving diagnostic instrumentation for reservoir and stimulation performance evaluation, geophysical and engineering interpretation, and stimulation techniques. Integrated geologic studies of three basins containing tight lenticular sands, which were selected by DOE as priority research targets, have also been pursued as part of this new effort. To date, the following tentative conclusions have been formed: Permeability of the tight gas sands can be as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional gas deposits. Nineteen western geologic basins and trends containing significant volumes of tight gas have been identified. Gas resources in the priority geologic basins have been estimated - Piceance Basin 49 Tcf.; Greater Green River Basin, 136 Tcf.; Uinta Basin, 20 Tcf. Presence of natural micro-fractures within a reservoir and the effective propped length of hydraulically induced fratures are the critical parameters for successful development of tight sand resources. Stimulation technology at the present time is insufficient to efficiently recover gas from lenticular tight reservoirs. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Electromagnetic micro-actuators, micro-motors, and micro-robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, M.; Waldschik, A.; Büttgenbach, S.

    2007-12-01

    Due to the development of new technologies, more and more complex MEMS applications can be realized. Especially electromagnetic micro actuators have reached a growing interest in micro technology in addition to commercial applications during the last years. Their basic construction exists of electric conductors and coil systems as well as of soft-magnetic and/or hard-magnetic materials that were fabricated in additive technology via UV-depth lithography and electroplating. For UV-depth lithography, photo resists like Epon SU-8, AZ9260, Intervia-3D-N and CAR44 were applied and optimized. Layer thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios over 60 were achieved. Special micro composites were developed. This allowed the fabrication of micro magnets with arbitrary shape and properties, revealing a complete compatibility to existing process chains. With these potential technologies, several complex 3-D micro actuators like micro motors and micro robots were developed and successfully tested. These developments include in detail: linear and rotatory reluctance micro stepper motors with compensated attraction force as well as a special "Lorentz force actuator", which was used for micro robots and micro motors. The micro robots were deployed for assembling and for micro-/nano positioning. Furthermore "plunger coil actuators" were realized based on a voice coil principle, which were used e.g. for a micro switch or a micro mirror. Moreover, rotatory synchronous motors were developed and successfully tested. All these devices have been realized by outstanding fabrication technologies and can be used for a wide range of applications.

  2. Array servo scanning micro EDM of 3D micro cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao; Li, Yong; Yi, Futing

    2010-12-01

    Micro electro discharge machining (Micro EDM) is a non-traditional processing technology with the special advantages of low set-up cost and few cutting force in machining any conductive materials regardless of their hardness. As well known, die-sinking EDM is unsuitable for machining the complex 3D micro cavity less than 1mm due to the high-priced fabrication of 3D microelectrode itself and its serous wear during EDM process. In our former study, a servo scanning 3D micro-EDM (3D SSMEDM) method was put forward, and our experiments showed it was available to fabricate complex 3D micro-cavities. In this study, in order to improve machining efficiency and consistency accuracy for array 3D micro-cavities, an array-servo-scanning 3D micro EDM (3D ASSMEDM) method is presented considering the complementary advantages of the 3D SSMEDM and the array micro electrodes with simple cross-section. During 3D ASSMEDM process, the array cavities designed by CAD / CAM system can be batch-manufactured by servo scanning layer by layer using array-rod-like micro tool electrodes, and the axial wear of the array electrodes is compensated in real time by keeping discharge gap. To verify the effectiveness of the 3D ASSMEDM, the array-triangle-micro cavities (side length 630 μm) are batch-manufactured on P-doped silicon by applying the array-micro-electrodes with square-cross-section fabricated by LIGA process. Our exploratory experiment shows that the 3D ASSMEDM provides a feasible approach for the batch-manufacture of 3D array-micro-cavities of conductive materials.

  3. Array servo scanning micro EDM of 3D micro cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao; Li, Yong; Yi, Futing

    2011-05-01

    Micro electro discharge machining (Micro EDM) is a non-traditional processing technology with the special advantages of low set-up cost and few cutting force in machining any conductive materials regardless of their hardness. As well known, die-sinking EDM is unsuitable for machining the complex 3D micro cavity less than 1mm due to the high-priced fabrication of 3D microelectrode itself and its serous wear during EDM process. In our former study, a servo scanning 3D micro-EDM (3D SSMEDM) method was put forward, and our experiments showed it was available to fabricate complex 3D micro-cavities. In this study, in order to improve machining efficiency and consistency accuracy for array 3D micro-cavities, an array-servo-scanning 3D micro EDM (3D ASSMEDM) method is presented considering the complementary advantages of the 3D SSMEDM and the array micro electrodes with simple cross-section. During 3D ASSMEDM process, the array cavities designed by CAD / CAM system can be batch-manufactured by servo scanning layer by layer using array-rod-like micro tool electrodes, and the axial wear of the array electrodes is compensated in real time by keeping discharge gap. To verify the effectiveness of the 3D ASSMEDM, the array-triangle-micro cavities (side length 630 μm) are batch-manufactured on P-doped silicon by applying the array-micro-electrodes with square-cross-section fabricated by LIGA process. Our exploratory experiment shows that the 3D ASSMEDM provides a feasible approach for the batch-manufacture of 3D array-micro-cavities of conductive materials.

  4. Sensing Materials for the Detection of Chlorine Gas Using Embedded Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    T. L. Porter, T. Vail, A. Wooley, R. J. Venedam

    2008-10-01

    Embedded piezoresistive microcantilever (EPM) sensors may be constructed for a variety of sensing applications. In each application, a custom sensing material is designed that will respond volumetrically to the desired analyte. Here, we have constructed EPM sensors for the detection of chlorine gas (Cl2). The sensing materials used consisted of polymer matrices combined with sodium iodide crystals. Sensors constructed from a silicone-based matrix exhibited the greatest response to Cl2, with detection limits in an outdoor exposure setting of approximately 20 parts per million.

  5. An Experimental Study on the Fabrication of Glass-based Acceleration Sensor Body Using Micro Powder Blasting Method

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Sam; Yun, Dae-Jin; Cho, Myeong-Woo; Shin, Bong-Cheol

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of the micro powder blasting technique for the micro fabrication of sensor structures using the Pyrex glass to replace the existing silicon-based acceleration sensor fabrication processes. As the preliminary experiments, the effects of the blasting pressure, the mass flow rate of abrasive and the number of nozzle scanning times on erosion depth of the Pyrex and the soda lime glasses were examined. From the experimental results, optimal blasting conditions were selected for the Pyrex glass machining. The dimensions of the designed glass sensor was 1.7×1.7×0.6mm for the vibrating mass, and 2.9×0.7×0.2mm for the cantilever beam. The machining results showed that the dimensional errors of the machined glass sensor ranged from 3 μm in minimum to 20 μm in maximum. These results imply that the micro powder blasting method can be applied for the micromachining of glass-based acceleration sensors to replace the exiting method.

  6. Space project IONOSAT- MICRO - goals and realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Lizunov, Georgii; Fedorov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    The IONOSAT-MICRO project is a first stage of IONOSAT program devoted to the multi-point global monitoring of dynamic processes in the ionosphere. The IONOSAT program is planned to be realized in 2015-2020 with the help of three satellites at coordinated low Earth orbits (LEO). IONOSAT-MICRO is the forerunner project scheduled for launch in 2014 at sun-synchronous orbit with the aim to test the IONOSAT mission scientific postulates and preliminary collection of related space data. The main goal of the IONOSAT-MICRO project is the systematic study of the dynamic response of the ionosphere to the influence "from above" (sun, geomagnetic activity) and "from below" (powerful meteorological, seismic and anthropogenic impacts). More in details, the study of following formations in the ionosphere is foreseen: - Space-temporal structure and global distribution of inhomogeneities in neutral atmosphere and ionosphere; - Global structure and dynamics of quasi-stationary electric currents, electric and magnetic fields; - Wave structures and turbulences at different spatial and temporal scales. To realize such a research, the scientific payload of the MICROSAT spacecraft will provide the measurements of following parameters: - Neutral gas and plasma parameters - concentration, temperature; - DC-ELF-VLF electromagnetic field vectors and ELF-VLF plasma current fluctuations; - Total electron content (TEC); - Spectral content of plasma oscillations. Synchronous experiments with ground support facilities - both active and passive ones - are also foreseen. The IONOSAT-MICRO project will be realized onboard of MICROSAT microsatellite platform, manufactured by Yuzhnoye Design Office with new experimental models of ammonia propulsion system, battery, solar arrays and panels with thermal control coating, the in-flight tests of which are also planned in frames of the project. The composition of the scientific equipment developed by the international team of participants and sensors

  7. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  8. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOEpatents

    Setter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-09-12

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  9. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  10. Micro-materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. G.; Kaplan, R. A.; Arthurs, E. G.

    1982-06-01

    A model analysis of the absorption of laser energy in the millijoule range by a thin film on a substrate is presented to illustrate the underlying physical mechanism of laser micro-materials processing. The analysis is followed by a discussion of several applications from the electronics and semiconductor industries, including resistor trimming, laserscribing, laser damage gettering, laser marking, ablation of metal films, and mask repair. Finally, several uses of lasers in the diamond industry, such as removal of flaws from gemstone diamonds, diamond sawing, and diamond inscription, are briefly reviewed.

  11. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  12. Fluid inclusion volatile analysis by gas chromatography with photoionization/micro-thermal conductivity detectors: Applications to magmatic MoS sub 2 and other H sub 2 O-CO sub 2 and H sub 2 O-CH sub 4 fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, C.J.; Spooner, E.T.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen fluid inclusion volatile peaks have been detected and identified from 1-2 g samples (quartz) by gas chromatography using heated on-line crushing, helium carrier gas, a single porous polymer column, two temperature programmed conditions for separate sample aliquots, micro-thermal conductivity (TCD) and photoionization detectors (PID), and off-line digital peak processing. In order of retention time these volatile peaks are: N{sub 2}, Ar, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, COS, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, C{sub 3}H{sub 4} (propyne), H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2} {plus minus} iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} {plus minus} C{sub 4}H{sub 8} (1-butene) {plus minus} CH{sub 3}SH, C{sub 4}H{sub 8} (iso-butylene), ( ) C{sub 4}H{sub 6} (1,3 butadiene), and {plus minus} n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} {plus minus}C{sub 4}H{sub 8} (trans-2-butene). H{sub 2}O is analyzed directly. O{sub 2} can be analyzed cryogenically between N{sub 2} and Ar, but has not been detected in natural samples to date in this study. Initial inclusion volatile analyses of fluids of interpreted magmatic origin from the Cretaceous Boss Mtn. monzogranite stock-related MoS{sub 2} deposit, central British Columbia of 97 mol% H{sub 2}O, 3% CO{sub 2}, 140-150 ppm N{sub 2}, and 16-39 ppm CH{sub 4} are reasonable in comparison with high temperature volcanic gas analyses from four, active calc-alkaline volcanoes, e.g., the H{sub 2}O contents of volcanic gases from the White Island (New Zealand), Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA), Merapi (Bali, Indonesia), and Momotombo (Nicaragua) volcanoes are 88-95%, > 90%, 88-95% and 93%, respectively; CO{sub 2} contents are 3-10%, 1-10%, 3-8%, and 3.5%. It appears that low, but significant concentrations of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes have been detected in magmatically derived fluids.

  13. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  14. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  15. A micro-coupling for micro mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhou, Zhixiong; Zhang, Bi; Xiao, Yunya

    2016-05-01

    The error motions of micro mechanical systems, such as micro-spindles, increase with the increasing of the rotational speed, which not only decreases the rotational accuracy, but also promotes instability and limits the maximum operational speed. One effective way to deal with it is to use micro-flexible couplings between the drive and driven shafts so as to reduce error motions of the driven shaft. But the conventional couplings, such as diaphragm couplings, elastomeric couplings, bellows couplings, and grooved couplings, etc, cannot be directly used because of their large and complicated structures. This study presents a novel micro-coupling that consists of a flexible coupling and a shape memory alloy (SMA)-based clamp for micro mechanical systems. It is monolithic and can be directly machined from a shaft. The study performs design optimization and provides manufacturing considerations, including thermo-mechanical training of the SMA ring for the desired Two-Way-Shape-Memory effect (TWSMe). A prototype micro-coupling and a prototype micro-spindle using the proposed coupling are fabricated and tested. The testing results show that the prototype micro-coupling can bear a torque of above 5 N • mm and an axial force of 8.5 N and be fitted with an SMA ring for clamping action at room temperature (15 °C) and unclamping action below-5 °C. At the same time, the prototype micro-coupling can work at a rotational speed of above 200 kr/min with the application to a high-speed precision micro-spindle. Moreover, the radial runout error of the artifact, as a substitute for the micro-tool, is less than 3 μm while that of turbine shaft is above 7 μm. It can be concluded that the micro-coupling successfully accommodates misalignment errors of the prototype micro-spindle. This research proposes a micro-coupling which is featured with an SMA ring, and it is designed to clamp two shafts, and has smooth transmission, simple assembly, compact structure, zero-maintenance and

  16. A micro-coupling for micro mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhou, Zhixiong; Zhang, Bi; Xiao, Yunya

    2016-04-01

    The error motions of micro mechanical systems, such as micro-spindles, increase with the increasing of the rotational speed, which not only decreases the rotational accuracy, but also promotes instability and limits the maximum operational speed. One effective way to deal with it is to use micro-flexible couplings between the drive and driven shafts so as to reduce error motions of the driven shaft. But the conventional couplings, such as diaphragm couplings, elastomeric couplings, bellows couplings, and grooved couplings, etc, cannot be directly used because of their large and complicated structures. This study presents a novel micro-coupling that consists of a flexible coupling and a shape memory alloy (SMA)-based clamp for micro mechanical systems. It is monolithic and can be directly machined from a shaft. The study performs design optimization and provides manufacturing considerations, including thermo-mechanical training of the SMA ring for the desired Two-Way-Shape-Memory effect (TWSMe). A prototype micro-coupling and a prototype micro-spindle using the proposed coupling are fabricated and tested. The testing results show that the prototype micro-coupling can bear a torque of above 5 N • mm and an axial force of 8.5 N and be fitted with an SMA ring for clamping action at room temperature (15 °C) and unclamping action below-5 °C. At the same time, the prototype micro-coupling can work at a rotational speed of above 200 kr/min with the application to a high-speed precision micro-spindle. Moreover, the radial runout error of the artifact, as a substitute for the micro-tool, is less than 3 μm while that of turbine shaft is above 7 μm. It can be concluded that the micro-coupling successfully accommodates misalignment errors of the prototype micro-spindle. This research proposes a micro-coupling which is featured with an SMA ring, and it is designed to clamp two shafts, and has smooth transmission, simple assembly, compact structure, zero-maintenance and

  17. Methods and systems for positioning micro elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stalford, Harold L

    2015-04-28

    A micro device may comprise a substrate, a first micro structure coupled to the substrate, a second micro structure coupled to the substrate, and port configured to receive an input. The first micro structure is configured to move into engagement with the second micro structure in response to the input.

  18. Methods and systems for positioning micro elements

    DOEpatents

    Stalford; Harold L.

    2012-03-13

    A micro device may comprise a substrate, a first micro structure coupled to the substrate, a second micro structure coupled to the substrate, and port configured to receive an input. The first micro structure is configured to move into engagement with the second micro structure in response to the input.

  19. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-28

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current–voltage (I–V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} = 10⁵) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I–V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance–voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35–2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0–1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  20. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (ION/IOFF = 105) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I-V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance-voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35-2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0-1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  1. Infrared micro-optics technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogmann, Dirk; Tholl, Hans D.

    2004-08-01

    Bodenseewerk GmbH generally works on challenging projects comprising Microsystems, e.g. micro-optics (micro-lenses, micro-mirrors). We utilize state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and simulation software (e.g. optical design with ZEMAX, ASAP and GLAD). Our recent activities on the development of several infrared micro-optical devices focus on high speed imaging of scenes with high angular resolution including the analysis of physical properties of the detected light (e.g. spectral content, polarization) utilizing staring IR sensors with focal-plane-arrays operating in a snap shot mode at high frame rates. We report about the development of so called micro-optical multiplexers which: (a) comprise micro-optical arrays and electro-mechanical micro-actuators, (b) image several fields of view with high resolution onto a single focal-plane-array, (c) image several fields of view with enhanced spatial resolution [by the factor of four compared to (b)] in a modified realization onto one focal-plane-array and (d) analyze the spectral content of an image using a single-band photon detector-array and multi-frame processing. The micro-opto-electro-mechanical multiplexer (MOEM) systems all consist of a primary objective, a MOEM image-steering respectively image coding device and a secondary objective. The primary objective images one or more suitable formed individual fields of view onto a common intermediate image plane. The MOEM devices comprise combinations of focusing and defocusing micro-lens-arrays, micro-shutter-arrays and micro-filter-arrays which are mounted parallel to each other near the intermediate image plane. The MOEM devices exhibit their above mentioned function modes by laterally displacing the micro-arrays with the help of modern micro-actuators. The secondary objective is utilized as relay optical stage. A modern common focal-plane-array is used as detector device. The micro-actuators responsible for the relative displacement of the micro-arrays are highly

  2. A Micro-Ultrastable Oscillator (micro-US0) for Micro/Nano Sciencecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Syntonics LLC developed a prototype micro-Ultra Stable Oscillator (micro-USO) under a Space Base Technology Grant (NAGS-10395). Syntonics conducted the micro-USO Program in two phases. In Phase I, we developed a set of verified analytical models (including thermal, electrical, and control models) for a baseline USO, conducted a series of six technology studies, and built three approx.9OOg prototype units. These prototypes provided a tool for evaluating competing design topologies. In Phase II we prepared the conceptual design of a approx.100-15Og micro-USO.

  3. Micro rotary machine and methods for using same

    DOEpatents

    Stalford, Harold L.

    2012-04-17

    A micro rotary machine may include a micro actuator and a micro shaft coupled to the micro actuator. The micro shaft comprises a horizontal shaft and is operable to be rotated by the micro actuator. A micro tool is coupled to the micro shaft and is operable to perform work in response to motion of the micro shaft.

  4. Micro rotary machine and methods for using same

    DOEpatents

    Stalford, Harold

    2015-01-13

    A micro rotary machine may include a micro actuator and a micro shaft coupled to the micro actuator. The micro shaft comprises a horizontal shaft and is operable to be rotated by the micro actuator. A micro tool is coupled to the micro shaft and is operable to perform work in response to motion of the micro shaft.

  5. Micro-Particles as Electrostatic Probes for Plasma Sheath Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Haass, Moritz; Ockenga, Taalke; Kersten, Holger; Blazec, Joseph; Basner, Ralf

    2008-09-07

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles of different sizes with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purpose. In the plasma micro-disperse particles are negatively charged and confined in the sheath. The particles are trapped by an equilibrium of gravity, electric field force and ion drag force. From the behavior, local electric fields can be determined, e.g. particles are used as electrostatic probes. In combination with additional measurements of the plasma parameters with Langmuir probes and thermal probes as well as by comparison with an analytical sheath model, the structure of the sheath can be described. In the present work we focus on the behavior of micro-particles of different sizes and several plasma parameters e.g. the gas pressure and the rf-power.

  6. Programming in Micro-PROLOG

    SciTech Connect

    DeSaram, H.

    1985-01-01

    Programming in Micro-PROLOG enables readers to carry out substantial projects of their own devising. It offers an explanation of how Micro-PROLOG works and a wide range of examples. Contents: Basic Processes; Some Built-in Commands; List Processing; Modules; Games and Puzzles; Augmented Turtle Graphics; Databases; Natural Language; Appendix.

  7. Micro-channel plate detector

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  8. NEAR REAL-TIME ON GC ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING AN ON-LINE MICRO-TAP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micro-traps act as sample preconcentrators for gas chromatography (GC) that can be used to make repetitive injections every few seconds. hermal desorption micro-trap is made from a short segment of thin tubing containing an adsorbent or a chromatographic stationary phase. arrier ...

  9. Micro pulse lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering has been demonstrated. The transmitter of the micropulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited by optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that systems built on the micropulse lidar concept are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  10. Micro Environmental Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  11. Chemical micro-sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2005-05-03

    An integrated optical capillary electrophoresis system for analyzing an analyte. A modulated optical pump beam impinges on an capillary containing the analyte/buffer solution which is separated by electrophoresis. The thermally-induced change in the index of refraction of light in said electrophoresis capillary is monitored using an integrated micro-interferometer. The interferometer includes a first interferometer arm intersecting the electrophoresis capillary proximate the excitation beam and a second, reference interferometer arm. Changes in index of refraction in the analyte measured by interrogating the interferometer state using white light interferometry and a phase-generated carrier demodulation technique. Background thermo-optical activity in the buffer solution is cancelled by splitting the pump beam and exciting pure buffer solution in a second section of capillary where it crosses the reference arm of the interferometer.

  12. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  13. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  14. Micro UV detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Sickenberger, Richard; Underwood, William J.; Sickenberger, David W.

    2004-09-01

    A lightweight, tactical biological agent detection network offers the potential for a detect-to-warn capability against biological aerosol attacks. Ideally, this capability can be achieved by deploying the sensors upwind from the protected assets. The further the distance upwind, the greater the warning time. The technological challenge to this concept is the biological detection technology. Here, cost, size and power are major factors in selecting acceptable technologies. This is in part due to the increased field densities needed to cover the upwind area and the fact that the sensors, when deployed forward, must operate autonomously for long periods of time with little or no long-term logistical support. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency"s (DARPA) Solid-state Ultraviolet Optical Source (SUVOS) program offers an enabling technology to achieving a detector compatible with this mission. As an optical source, these devices emit excitation wavelengths known to be useful in the detection of biological aerosols. The wavelength band is absorbed by the biological aerosol and results in visible fluorescence. Detection of a biological aerosol is based on the observed intensity of this fluorescence signal compared to a background reference. Historically this has been accomplished with emission sources that are outside the boundaries for low cost, low power sensors. The SUVOS technology, on the other hand, provides the same basic wavelengths needed for the detection process in a small, low power package. ECBC has initiated an effort to develop a network array based on micro UV detectors that utilize the SUVOS technology. This paper presents an overview of the micro UV detector and some of the findings to date. This includes the overall design philosophy, fluid flow calculations to maximize presentation of aerosol particles to the sources, and the fluorescence measurements.

  15. Micro-UV detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Sickenberger, Richard; Underwood, William J.; Sickenberger, David W.

    2004-12-01

    A lightweight, tactical biological agent detection network offers the potential for a detect-to-warn capability against biological aerosol attacks. Ideally, this capability can be achieved by deploying the sensors upwind from the protected assets. The further the distance upwind, the greater the warning time. The technological challenge to this concept is the biological detection technology. Here, cost, size and power are major factors in selecting acceptable technologies. This is in part due to the increased field densities needed to cover the upwind area and the fact that the sensors, when deployed forward, must operate autonomously for long periods of time with little or no long-term logistical support. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency"s (DARPA) Solid-state Ultraviolet Optical Source (SUVOS) program offers an enabling technology to achieving a detector compatible with this mission. As an optical source, these devices emit excitation wavelengths known to be useful in the detection of biological aerosols. The wavelength band is absorbed by the biological aerosol and results in visible fluorescence. Detection of a biological aerosol is based on the observed intensity of this fluorescence signal compared to a background reference. Historically this has been accomplished with emission sources that are outside the boundaries for low cost, low power sensors. The SUVOS technology, on the other hand, provides the same basic wavelengths needed for the detection process in a small, low power package. ECBC has initiated an effort to develop a network array based on micro UV detectors that utilize the SUVOS technology. This paper presents an overview of the micro UV detector and some of the findings to date. This includes the overall design philosophy, fluid flow calculations to maximize presentation of aerosol particles to the sources, and the fluorescence measurements.

  16. Low-temperature growth of epitaxial (1 0 0) silicon based on silane and disilane in a 300 mm UHV/CVD cold-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, T. N.; Bedell, S.; Reznicek, A.; Sadana, D. K.; Venkateshan, A.; Tsunoda, T.; Seino, T.; Nakatsuru, J.; Shinde, S. R.

    2010-11-01

    Epitaxial (1 0 0) silicon layers were grown at temperatures ranging from 500 to 800 °C in a commercial cold-wall type UHV/CVD reactor at pressures less than 7×10 -5 Torr. The substrates were 300 mm SIMOX SOI wafers and spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to assess growth rates and deposition uniformities. High-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to verify the atomic terrace configuration that resulted from epitaxial step-flow growth. Deposition from disilane exhibited a nearly perfect reaction limit for low temperatures and high precursor flow rates (partial pressures) with measured activation energies of ≈2.0 eV, while a linear dependence of growth rate on precursor gas flow was found for the massflow-controlled regime. A similar behavior was observed in the case of silane with substantially reduced deposition rates in the massflow-limited regime and nearly a factor of 2 reduced growth rates deep in the reaction limited regime. High growth rates of up to 50 μm/h and non-uniformities as low as 1 σ=1.45% were obtained in the massflow-limited deposition regime. Silicon layers as thin as 0.6 nm (4.5 atomic layers ) were deposited continuously as determined using a unique wet chemical etching technique as well as cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In contrast, epitaxial silicon deposited in RPCVD at 10 Torr using disilane within the same temperature range showed imperfect reaction limitation. While activation energies similar to that of UHV/CVD were found, no partial pressure limitation could be observed. Furthermore, layers deposited using disilane in RPCVD exhibited a large number of defects that appeared to form randomly during growth. We attribute this effect to gas phase reactions that create precursor fragments and radicals—an effect that is negligible in UHV/CVD.

  17. Synthesis of micro-sized interconnected Si-C composites

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Donghai; Yi, Ran; Dai, Fang

    2016-02-23

    Embodiments provide a method of producing micro-sized Si--C composites or doped Si--C and Si alloy-C with interconnected nanoscle Si and C building blocks through converting commercially available SiO.sub.x (0gas containing organic molecules that have carbon atoms.

  18. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  19. Gas sensors based on silicon devices with a porous layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillaro, G.; Diligenti, A.; Nannini, A.; Strambini, L. M.

    2005-06-01

    In this work two silicon devices, that is a FET and a p crystalline silicon resistor having porous silicon as adsorbing layer are presented as gas sensors. Owing to they are easily integrable with silicon electronics, these devices could represent an improvement of the functionality of silicon for sensor applications. Unlike other porous silicon-based sensors, in this case the sensing variable is a current flowing in the crystalline silicon, so that the porous silicon film has only the function of adsorbing layer and its properties, electrical or optical, are not directly involved in the measurement. The fabrication processes and an electrical characterization in presence of isopropanol vapors are presented and discussed for both devices.

  20. Influence of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochun; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Micro-bubble drag reduction experiments were conducted in a turbulent water channel flow. Compressed nitrogen was used to force flow through a slot injector located in the plate beneath the boundary layer of the tunnel test section. Gas and bubbly mixtures were injected into a turbulent boundary layer (TBL), and the resulting friction drag was measured downstream of the injector. Injection into tap water, a surfactant solution (Triton X-100, 20 ppm), and a salt-water solution (35 ppt) yielded bubbles of average diameter 476, 322 and 254 μm, respectively. In addition, lipid stabilized gas bubbles (44 μm) were injected into the boundary layer. Thus, bubbles with d + values of 200 to 18 were injected. The results indicate that the measured drag reduction by micro-bubbles in a TBL is related strongly to the injected gas volumetric flow rate and the static pressure in the boundary layer, but is essentially independent of the size of the micro-bubbles over the size range tested.