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Sample records for silicone microelectrode array

  1. Silicon ribbon cables for chronically implantable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hetke, J F; Lund, J L; Najafi, K; Wise, K D; Anderson, D J

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of miniature ultraflexible ribbon cables for use with micromachined silicon microprobes capable of chronic recording and/or stimulation in the central nervous system (CNS). These interconnects are of critical importance in reliably linking these microelectrodes to the external world through a percutaneous connector. The silicon cables allow the realization of multilead, multistrand shielded local interconnects that are extremely flexible and yet strong enough to withstand normal handling and surgical manipulation. Cables 5 microns thick, 1-5 cm long, and from 60 to 250 microns wide have been fabricated with up to eight leads. The series lead resistance is typically 4 k omega/cm for polysilicon and 500 omega/cm for tantalum, with shunt capacitance values of 5-10 pF/cm and an interlead capacitance below 10 fF/cm. Soak tests in buffered saline performed under electrical and mechanical stress have been underway for over three years and show subpicoampere leakage levels. Silicon microprobes with built-in ribbon cables have remained functional for up to one year in the guinea pig CNS, recording driven single-unit activity and maintaining impedance levels in the 1-7 M omega range. PMID:8063297

  2. Dual-side and three-dimensional microelectrode arrays fabricated from ultra-thin silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiangang; Roukes, Michael L.; Masmanidis, Sotiris C.

    2009-07-01

    A method for fabricating planar implantable microelectrode arrays was demonstrated using a process that relied on ultra-thin silicon substrates, which ranged in thickness from 25 to 50 µm. The challenge of handling these fragile materials was met via a temporary substrate support mechanism. In order to compensate for putative electrical shielding of extracellular neuronal fields, separately addressable electrode arrays were defined on each side of the silicon device. Deep reactive ion etching was employed to create sharp implantable shafts with lengths of up to 5 mm. The devices were flip-chip bonded onto printed circuit boards (PCBs) by means of an anisotropic conductive adhesive film. This scalable assembly technique enabled three-dimensional (3D) integration through formation of stacks of multiple silicon and PCB layers. Simulations and measurements of microelectrode noise appear to suggest that low impedance surfaces, which could be formed by electrodeposition of gold or other materials, are required to ensure an optimal signal-to-noise ratio as well a low level of interchannel crosstalk.

  3. BBB leakage, astrogliosis, and tissue loss correlate with silicon microelectrode array recording performance.

    PubMed

    Nolta, Nicholas F; Christensen, Michael B; Crane, Paul D; Skousen, John L; Tresco, Patrick A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of brain machine interfaces that employ penetrating silicon microelectrode arrays is limited by inconsistent performance at chronic time points. While it is widely believed that elements of the foreign body response (FBR) contribute to inconsistent single unit recording performance, the relationships between the FBR and recording performance have not been well established. To address this shortfall, we implanted 4X4 Utah Electrode Arrays into the cortex of 28 young adult rats, acquired electrophysiological recordings weekly for up to 12 weeks, used quantitative immunohistochemical methods to examine the intensity and spatial distribution of neural and FBR biomarkers, and examined whether relationships existed between biomarker distribution and recording performance. We observed that the FBR was characterized by persistent inflammation and consisted of typical biomarkers, including presumptive activated macrophages and activated microglia, astrogliosis, and plasma proteins indicative of blood-brain-barrier disruption, as well as general decreases in neuronal process distribution. However, unlike what has been described for recording electrodes that create only a single penetrating injury, substantial brain tissue loss generally in the shape of a pyramidal lesion cavity was observed at the implantation site. Such lesions were also observed in stab wounded animals indicating that the damage was caused by vascular disruption at the time of implantation. Using statistical approaches, we found that blood-brain barrier leakiness and astrogliosis were both associated with reduced recording performance, and that tissue loss was negatively correlated with recording performance. Taken together, our data suggest that a reduction of vascular damage at the time of implantation either by design changes or use of hemostatic coatings coupled to a reduction of chronic inflammatory sequela will likely improve the recording performance of high density

  4. Microfabrication of an Implantable silicone Microelectrode array for an epiretinal prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, M

    2003-06-10

    Millions of people suffering from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are legally blind due to the loss of photoreceptor function. Fortunately a large percentage of the neural cells connected to the photoreceptors remain viable, and electrical stimulation of these cells has been shown to result in visual perception. These findings have generated worldwide efforts to develop a retinal prosthesis device, with the hope of restoring vision. Advances in microfabrication, integrated circuits, and wireless technologies provide the means to reach this challenging goal. This dissertation describes the development of innovative silicone-based microfabrication techniques for producing an implantable microelectrode array. The microelectrode array is a component of an epiretinal prosthesis being developed by a multi-laboratory consortium. This array will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces. Because the array is intended as a long-term implant, vital biological and physical design requirements must be met. A retinal implant poses difficult engineering challenges due to the size of the intraocular cavity and the delicate retina. Not only does it have to be biocompatible in terms of cytotoxicity and degradation, but it also has to be structurally biocompatible, with regard to smooth edges and high conformability; basically mimicking the biological tissue. This is vital to minimize stress and prevent physical damage to the retina. Also, the device must be robust to withstand the forces imposed on it during fabrication and implantation. In order to meet these biocompatibility needs, the use of non-conventional microfabrication materials such as silicone is required. This mandates the enhancement of currently available polymer-based fabrication techniques and the development of new microfabrication methods. Through an iterative process, devices

  5. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrese, James C.; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach. Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results. Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  6. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Barrese, James C; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  7. Silicon Wafer-Based Platinum Microelectrode Array Biosensor for Near Real-Time Measurement of Glutamate in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wassum, Kate M.; Tolosa, Vanessa M.; Wang, Jianjun; Walker, Eric; Monbouquette, Harold G.; Maidment, Nigel T.

    2008-01-01

    Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, we have developed silicon wafer-based platinum microelectrode arrays (MEAs) modified with glutamate oxidase (GluOx) for electroenzymatic detection of glutamate in vivo. These MEAs were designed to have optimal spatial resolution for in vivo recordings. Selective detection of glutamate in the presence of the electroactive interferents, dopamine and ascorbic acid, was attained by deposition of polypyrrole and Nafion. The sensors responded to glutamate with a limit of detection under 1μM and a sub-1-second response time in solution. In addition to extensive in vitro characterization, the utility of these MEA glutamate biosensors was also established in vivo. In the anesthetized rat, these MEA glutamate biosensors were used for detection of cortically-evoked glutamate release in the ventral striatum. The MEA biosensors also were applied to the detection of stress-induced glutamate release in the dorsal striatum of the freely-moving rat. PMID:19543440

  8. A comparison of the tissue response to chronically implanted Parylene-C-coated and uncoated planar silicon microelectrode arrays in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Brent D; Christensen, Michael B; Yang, Wen-Kuo; Solzbacher, Florian; Tresco, Patrick A

    2010-12-01

    In this study we employed a quantitative immunohistochemical approach to compare the brain tissue response to planar silicon microelectrode arrays that were conformally coated with Parylene-C to uncoated controls at 2, 4, and 12 weeks following implantation into the cortex of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We did not find any difference in the relative intensity or the spatial distribution of neuronal or glial markers over the indwelling period, even though Parylene-C-coated substrates supported significantly less cell attachment, indicating that the foreign body response to planar silicon microelectrode arrays has little to do with the composition or decomposition of the silicon electrode. Moreover, our results suggest that changes in microelectrode surface chemistry do not have a strong influence on the cytoarchitectural changes that accompany the brain foreign body response to planar silicon microelectrode arrays. Our quantitative comparison over the indwelling period does not support progressive increases in astrocyte encapsulation and/or progressive neuronal loss in the recording zone as dominant failure mechanisms of the type of chronic recording device. Finally, we found evidence of two potentially new failure mechanisms that were associated with CD68 immunoreactivity including demyelination of adjacent neurons and BBB breakdown surrounding implanted electrodes at long indwelling times. PMID:20561678

  9. In vivo validation of custom-designed silicon-based microelectrode arrays for long-term neural recording and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Martin; Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S; Wang, Cindy X; McCreery, Douglas B

    2012-02-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays' insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays' recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  10. In Vivo Validation of Custom-Designed Silicon-Based Microelectrode Arrays for Long-Term Neural Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S.; Wang, Cindy X.; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays’ insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays’ recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  11. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  12. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  13. A silicon based implantable microelectrode array for electrophysiological and dopamine recording from cortex to striatum in the non-human primate brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Song, Yilin; Wang, Mixia; Zhang, Zhiming; Fan, Xinyi; Song, Xianteng; Zhuang, Ping; Yue, Feng; Chan, Piu; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-11-15

    Dual-mode, multielectrode recordings have become routine in rodent neuroscience research and have recently been adapted to the non-human primate. However, robust and reliable application of acute, multielectrode recording methods in monkeys especially for deep brain nucleus research remains a challenge. In this paper, We described a low cost silicon based 16-site implantable microelectrode array (MEA) chip fabricated by standard lithography technology for in vivo test. The array was 25mm long and designed to use in non-human primate models, for electrophysiological and electrochemical recording. We presented a detailed protocol for array fabrication, then showed that the device can record Spikes, LFPs and dopamine (DA) variation continuously from cortex to striatum in an esthetized monkey. Though our experiment, high-quality electrophysiological signals were obtained from the animal. Across any given microelectrode, spike amplitudes ranged from 70 to 300μV peak to peak, with a mean signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. Calibration results showed the MEA probe had high sensitivity and good selectivity for DA. The DA concentration changed from 42.8 to 481.6μM when the MEA probe inserted from cortex into deep brain nucleus of striatum, which reflected the inhomogeneous distribution of DA in brains. Compared with existing methods allowing single mode (electrophysiology or electrochemistry) recording. This system is designed explicitly for dual-mode recording to meet the challenges of recording in non-human primates. PMID:27155116

  14. Reducing surface area while maintaining implant penetrating profile lowers the brain foreign body response to chronically implanted planar silicon microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Skousen, John L; Merriam, Sr Mary Elizabeth; Srivannavit, Onnap; Perlin, Gaytri; Wise, Kensall D; Tresco, Patrick A

    2011-01-01

    A consistent feature of the foreign body response (FBR), irrespective of the type of implant, is persistent inflammation at the biotic-abiotic interface signaled by biomarkers of macrophage/microglial activation. Since macrophage-secreted factors shape the foreign body reaction, implant designs that reduce macrophage activation should improve biocompatibility and, with regard to recording devices, should improve reliability and longevity. At present, it is unclear whether the goal of seamless integration is possible or whether electrode developers can modulate specific aspects of the FBR by intentionally manipulating the constitutive properties of the implant. To explore this area, we studied the chronic brain FBR to planar solid silicon microelectrode arrays and planar lattice arrays with identical penetrating profiles but with reduced surface area in rats after an 8-week indwelling period. Using quantitative immunohistochemistry, we found that presenting less surface area after equivalent iatrogenic injury is accompanied by significantly less persistent macrophage activation, decreased blood brain barrier leakiness, and reduced neuronal cell loss. Our findings show that it is possible for implant developers to modulate specific aspects of the FBR by intentionally manipulating the constitutive properties of the implant. Our results also support the theory that the FBR to implanted electrode arrays, and likely other implants, can be explained by the presence of macrophages at the biotic-abiotic interface, which act as a sustained delivery source of bioactive agents that diffuse into the adjacent tissue and shape various features of the brain FBR. Further, our findings suggest that one method to improve the recording consistency and lifetime of implanted microelectrode arrays is to design implants that reduce the amount of macrophage activation at the biotic-abiotic interface and/or enhance the clearance or impact of their released factors. PMID:21867802

  15. Thin-Film Microelectrode Arrays for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Karen C.

    Microfabrication offers many advantages for the batch manufacture of reliable, microscale electrode arrays. Such arrays have been used for highly localized recording and stimulation of neural tissue. This chapter gives a survey of the most commonly used materials and methods in the fabrication of microelectrodes, including planar silicon-based electrodes, three-dimensional silicon-based electrodes, sieve electrodes, and polymer-based structures. Several techniques for electrode modification with nanostructures are described, including carbon nanotube and conductive polymer nanotube coatings. Biocompatibility is described in the context of central nervous system response to chronically implanted devices, which leads to the eventual development of a glial scar.

  16. Characterization of a light switchable microelectrode array for retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Xiong, Tao; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Li, Zhihong

    2011-12-01

    A light switchable microelectrode array for retinal prosthesis, which is performed with the photosensitive conductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and of more advantages over the two major current retinal prosthetic categories, is characterized. Sensitivity to different visible wavelengths and light intensities are verified as well. Preliminary impedance test invitro shows appropriate impedance for neuron stimulation applications. It is indicated that such device provides a promising potential to restore a certain degree of visual function.

  17. Analysis of capacitive coupling within microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P R; Detlefsen, D E

    2006-01-01

    Capacitive coupling within high-density microelectrode arrays can degrade neural recording signal or disperse neural stimulation current. Material deterioration in a chronically implanted neural stimulation/recording system can cause such an undesired effect. We present a simple method with an iterative algorithm to quantify the cross-coupling capacitance, in-situ. PMID:17947024

  18. Microelectrode array with integrated nanowire FET switches for high-resolution retinal prosthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Suk Won; Ahn, Jaehyun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Oh, Sung Jin; ‘Dan' Cho, Dong-Il

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a novel microelectrode array integrated with nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) switches is developed for retinal prosthetic systems. Retinal prosthetic systems require many electrodes (generally more than several hundreds) and this paper presents a novel method of integrating silicon nanowire-FET switches with microelectrodes that can significantly reduce wiring complexity. Also, in order to fit the curvature of an eyeball, the silicon nanowire FETs are transferred to a flexible substrate. In order to demonstrate the concept of using FETs for switching collocated retinal microelectrodes, a microelectrode array with 32 × 32 pixels is fabricated, which has 1,024 microelectrodes. Using the FET switches in a two-dimensional array addressing configuration, 1,024 microelectrodes are addressed by only 64 lines (32 for scan and 32 for data), as compared to requiring 1,024 lines in the conventional one-to-one configuration. With the gate voltage of -5 V, the threshold voltage, current on/off ratio, and on-resistance of the fabricated silicon nanowire-FET switch are -0.4 V, 1 × 107, and 37-47 kΩ, respectively. The maximum allowable current injection limit of the silicon nanowire-FET switch integrated microelectrode is 44 μA with a pulse duration of 1 ms. These results show an excellent potential for high-resolution retinal prosthetic systems.

  19. Microelectrode arrays fabricated using a novel hybrid microfabrication method.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Mark W; Snyder, Russell L; Middlebrooks, John C; Bachman, Mark

    2012-02-01

    We present novel hybrid microfabrication methods for microelectrode arrays that combine microwire assembly, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques and precision tool-based micromachining. This combination enables hybrid microfabrication to produce complex geometries and structures, increase material selection, and improve integration. A 32-channel shank microelectrode array was fabricated to highlight the hybrid microfabrication techniques. The electrode shank was 130 μm at its narrowest, had a 127 μm thickness and had iridium oxide electrode sites that were 25 μm in diameter with 150 μm spacing. Techniques used to fabricate this electrode include microassembly of insulated gold wires into a micromold, micromolding the microelectrode shank, post molding machining, sacrificial release of the microelectrode and electrodeposition of iridium oxide onto the microelectrode sites. Electrode site position accuracy was shown to have a standard deviation of less than 4 μm. Acute in vivo recordings with the 32-channel shank microelectrode array demonstrated comparable performance to that obtained with commercial microelectrode arrays. This new approach to microelectrode array fabrication will enable new microelectrodes, such as multi-sided arrays, drug eluding electrodes and biodegradable shanks. PMID:21979567

  20. Microelectrode arrays fabricated using a novel hybrid microfabrication method

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Mark W.; Snyder, Russell L.; Middlebrooks, John C.; Bachman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present novel hybrid microfabrication methods for microelectrode arrays that combine microwire assembly, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques and precision tool-based micromachining. This combination enables hybrid microfabrication to produce complex geometries and structures, increase material selection, and improve integration. A 32-channel shank microelectrode array was fabricated to highlight the hybrid microfabrication techniques. The electrode shank was 130 μm at its narrowest, had a 127 μm thickness and had iridium oxide electrode sites that were 25 μm in diameter with 150 μm spacing. Techniques used to fabricate this electrode include microassembly of insulated gold wires into a micromold, micromolding the microelectrode shank, post molding machining, sacrificial release of the microelectrode and electrodeposition of iridium oxide onto the microelectrode sites. Electrode site position accuracy was shown to have a standard deviation of less than 4 μm. Acute in vivo recordings with the 32-channel shank microelectrode array demonstrated comparable performance to that obtained with commercial microelectrode arrays . This new approach to microelectrode array fabrication will enable new microelectrodes, such as multi-sided arrays, drug eluding electrodes and biodegradable shanks. PMID:21979567

  1. Vesicular exocytosis and microdevices - microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Amatore, Christian; Delacotte, Jérôme; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Among all the analytical techniques capable of monitoring exocytosis in real time at the single cell level, electrochemistry (particularly amperometry at a constant potential) using ultramicroelectrodes has been demonstrated to be an important and convenient tool for more than two decades. Indeed, because the electrochemical sensor is located in the close vicinity of the emitting cell ("artificial synapse" configuration), much data can be gathered from the whole cell activity (secretion frequency) to the individual vesicular release (duration, fluxes or amount of molecules released) with an excellent sensitivity. However, such a single cell analysis and its intrinsic benefits are at the expense of the spatial resolution and/or the number of experiments. The quite recent development of microdevices/microsystems (and mainly the microelectrode arrays (MEAs)) offers in some way a complementary approach either by combining spectroscopy-microscopy or by implementing a multianalysis. Such developments are described and discussed in the present review over the 2005-2014 period. PMID:25803190

  2. Sonochemically Fabricated Microelectrode Arrays for Use as Sensing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Collyer, Stuart D.; Davis, Frank; Higson, Séamus P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The development, manufacture, modification and subsequent utilisation of sonochemically-formed microelectrode arrays is described for a range of applications. Initial fabrication of the sensing platform utilises ultrasonic ablation of electrochemically insulating polymers deposited upon conductive carbon substrates, forming an array of up to 70,000 microelectrode pores cm−2. Electrochemical and optical analyses using these arrays, their enhanced signal response and stir-independence area are all discussed. The growth of conducting polymeric “mushroom” protrusion arrays with entrapped biological entities, thereby forming biosensors is detailed. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this approach, lending itself ideally to mass fabrication coupled with unrivalled sensitivity and stir independence makes commercial viability of this process a reality. Application of microelectrode arrays as functional components within sensors include devices for detection of chlorine, glucose, ethanol and pesticides. Immunosensors based on microelectrode arrays are described within this monograph for antigens associated with prostate cancer and transient ischemic attacks (strokes). PMID:22399926

  3. Fabrication of a flexible penetrating microelectrode array for use on curved surfaces of neural tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Donghak; Cho, Sung Joon; Kim, Sohee

    2013-12-01

    Conventionally, invasive neural microelectrodes for recording neuronal signals or stimulating the nervous system have been fabricated based on silicon substrate mainly due to well-established manufacturing processes. However, these silicon-based microelectrode devices have an issue of mechanical stability caused by the absence of flexibility when implanted onto curved surfaces of tissues. In this paper, a flexible and penetrating microelectrode array, a hybrid structure composed of silicon and elastomer, was devised and fabricated by bulk micromachining technologies. The structure uses individual silicon needles as independent electrodes in a square array and polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) as a base to support the needles. The dimensions of the electrode array and the needles are adjustable, depending on the number of needles, the pitch between the needles and the targeted penetration depth of the neural tissue. For mechanical characterization, the adhesion between PDMS and silicon was evaluated and the flexibility and integrity of the fabricated structure were investigated through flexural test and insertion test. Also, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the electrodes was measured. The results suggest that the proposed microelectrode array is promising for use in neuronal recording and stimulation over curved surfaces such as cortical surface and peripheral nerves with larger curvatures.

  4. Graphene microelectrode arrays for neural activity detection.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowei; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Ji; Huang, Shanluo; Cai, Qi; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate graphene microelectrode arrays (MEAs) using a simple and inexpensive method to solve the problem of opaque electrode positions in traditional MEAs, while keeping good biocompatibility. To study the interface differences between graphene-electrolyte and gold-electrolyte, graphene and gold electrodes with a large area were fabricated. According to the simulation results of electrochemical impedances, the gold-electrolyte interface can be described as a classical double-layer structure, while the graphene-electrolyte interface can be explained by a modified double-layer theory. Furthermore, using graphene MEAs, we detected the neural activities of neurons dissociated from Wistar rats (embryonic day 18). The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected signal was 10.31 ± 1.2, which is comparable to those of MEAs made with other materials. The long-term stability of the MEAs is demonstrated by comparing differences in Bode diagrams taken before and after cell culturing. PMID:25712492

  5. A three-dimensional microelectrode array for chronic neural recording.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, A C; Wise, K D

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes a 3-D microelectrode array for the chronic recording of single-unit activity in the central nervous system. The array is formed by a microassembly of planar silicon multishank microprobes, which are precisely positioned in a micromachined platform that resides on the surface of the cortex. Interconnects between the probes and the platform are formed using electroplated nickel lead transfers, implemented using automated computer control. All dimensions are controlled to +/- 1 micron and sank/probe separations as small as 100 microns are possible. Four-probe 16-shank prototype arrays have been tested chronically in guinea pig cortex. After three months in vivo, no significant tissue reaction has been observed surrounding these structures when they remain free to move with the brain, with normal appearing tissue between shanks spaced at 150 microns to 200 microns intervals. The array structure is compatible with the use of signal processing circuitry both on the probes and on the platform. A platform-based signal processing system has been designed to interface with several active probes, providing direct analog access to the recording sites, performing on-chip analog-to-digital conversion of neural activity, and providing simple binary-output recognition of single-unit spike events using a user-input threshold voltage. PMID:7851915

  6. Evaluation of the stability of intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xindong; McCreery, Douglas B; Bullara, Leo A; Agnew, William F

    2006-03-01

    In order to use recorded neural activities from the brain as control signals for neuroprosthesis devices, it is important to maintain a stable interface between chronically implanted microelectrodes and neural tissue. Our previous paper introduced a method to quantify the stability of the recording microelectrodes. In this paper, the method is refined 1) by incorporating stereotypical behavioral patterns into the spike sorting program and 2) by using a classifier based on Bayes theorem for assigning the recorded action potentials to the underlying neural generators. An improved method for calculating stability index is proposed. The results for the stability of microelectrode arrays that differ in structure are presented. PMID:16562636

  7. Neurotoxicity testing using Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs): a growing trend

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are groups of extracellular electrodes that are 10-30 microns in diameter and can be utilized in vivo or in vitro. For in vitro uses, an MEA typically contains up to 64 electrodes and can be utilized to measure the activity of cells and tissues that a...

  8. Physicochemical properties of peptide-coated microelectrode arrays and their in vitro effects on neuroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ghane-Motlagh, Bahareh; Javanbakht, Taraneh; Shoghi, Fatemeh; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Martel, Richard; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Silicon micromachined neural electrode arrays, which act as an interface between bioelectronic devices and neural tissues, play an important role in chronic implants, in vivo. The biological compatibility of chronic microelectrode arrays (MEA) is an essential factor that must be taken into account in their design and fabrication. In order to improve biocompatibility of the MEAs, the surface of the electrodes was coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and parylene-C, which are biocompatible polymers. An in vitro study was performed to test the capacity of poly-d-lysine (PDL) to improve neural-cell adhesion and proliferation. Increased proliferation of the neuroblast cells on the microelectrodes was observed in the presence of the PDL. The presence of the peptide on the electrode surface was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impedance of the electrodes was not changed significantly before and after PDL deposition. Mouse neuroblast cells were seeded and cultured on the PDL coated and uncoated neural MEAs with different tip-coatings such as platinum, molybdenum, gold, sputtered iridium oxide, and carbon nanotubes. The neuroblast cells grew preferentially on and around peptide coated-microelectrode tips, as compared to the uncoated microelectrodes. PMID:27524064

  9. Electrochemical platinum coatings for improving performance of implantable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    de Haro, C; Mas, R; Abadal, G; Muñoz, J; Perez-Murano, F; Dominguez, C

    2002-12-01

    The formation and properties of electrochemical platinum films grown on platinum contacts contained in implantable flexible microelectrodes were investigated. The resulting platinum deposits were obtained by applying cyclic voltammetry to baths containing concentrations around 70 mM of chloroplatinic acid. A pre-activation step was necessary before the platinum-electroplating step in order to achieve good adhesive properties. The benefits of this process were ascribed to higher corrosion resistance, lower impedance and improved adhesion to the sputtered platinum. These improvements can make the application of this electrochemical technique highly useful for increasing the lifetime of implantable microelectrode arrays, such as cuff structures (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 40 (1993) 640). These medical devices, obtained by semiconductor technology could be used for selective stimulation of nerve fascicles, although, poor long-term performance has been achieved with them. The dissolution rate for platinum thin-film microelectrodes under fixed corrosion test conditions was 38.8 ng/C. Lower rates were observed for electroplated microelectrodes, obtaining a dissolution rate of 7.8 ng/C under analogous experimental ageing conditions. The corrosion behaviour of the electroplated platinum during stimulation experimental conditions was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:12322971

  10. Three-dimensional micro-electrode array for recording dissociated neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Musick, Katherine; Khatami, David; Wheeler, Bruce C

    2009-07-21

    This work demonstrates the design, fabrication, packaging, characterization, and functionality of an electrically and fluidically active three-dimensional micro-electrode array (3D MEA) for use with neuronal cell cultures. The successful function of the device implies that this basic concept-construction of a 3D array with a layered approach-can be utilized as the basis for a new family of neural electrode arrays. The 3D MEA prototype consists of a stack of individually patterned thin films that form a cell chamber conducive to maintaining and recording the electrical activity of a long-term three-dimensional network of rat cortical neurons. Silicon electrode layers contain a polymer grid for neural branching, growth, and network formation. Along the walls of these electrode layers lie exposed gold electrodes which permit recording and stimulation of the neuronal electrical activity. Silicone elastomer micro-fluidic layers provide a means for loading dissociated neurons into the structure and serve as the artificial vasculature for nutrient supply and aeration. The fluidic layers also serve as insulation for the micro-electrodes. Cells have been shown to survive in the 3D MEA for up to 28 days, with spontaneous and evoked electrical recordings performed in that time. The micro-fluidic capability was demonstrated by flowing in the drug tetrotodoxin to influence the activity of the culture. PMID:19568672

  11. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations. PMID:22149873

  12. Flexible polyimide microelectrode array for in vivo recordings and current source density analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C; Renaud, Philippe; Tanila, Heikki; Djupsund, Kaj

    2007-03-15

    This work presents implantable, flexible polymer-based probes with embedded microelectrodes for acute and chronic neural recordings in vivo, as tested on rodents. Acute recordings using this array were done in mice under urethane anesthesia and compared to those made using silicon-based probes manufactured at the Center for Neural Communication Technology, University of Michigan. The two electrode arrays yielded similar results. Recordings with chronically implanted polymer-based electrodes were performed for 60 days post-surgically in awake, behaving rats. The microelectrodes were used to monitor local field potentials and capture laminar differences in function of cortex and hippocampus, and produced response waveforms of undiminished amplitude and signal-to-noise ratios 8 weeks after chronic implantation. The polymer-based electrodes could also be connected to a lesion current to mark specific locations in the tissue. Current source density (CSD) analysis from the recordings depicted a source - sink-composition. Tissue response was assessed 8 weeks after insertion by immunochemical labeling with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocytes, and histological analysis showed minimal tissue reaction to the implanted structures. PMID:17027251

  13. An array of microactuated microelectrodes for monitoring single-neuronal activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Gilletti, Aaron; Baker, Michael S; Jain, Tilak

    2005-08-01

    Arrays of microelectrodes used for monitoring single- and multi-neuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time for several technical and biological reasons. We report here a novel Neural Probe chip with a 3-channel microactuated microelectrode array that will enable precise repositioning of the individual microelectrodes within the brain tissue after implantation. Thermal microactuators and associated microelectrodes in the Neural Probe chip are microfabricated using the Sandia's Ultraplanar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiTV) process, a 5-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, Albuquerque, NM. The Neural Probe chip enables precise bi-directional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with a step resolution in the order of 8.8 microm. The thermal microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation in either direction was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multi-unit activity. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats over a period of three days demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the microelectrode insulation and chip packaging will be necessary before this technology can be validated in chronic experiments. PMID:16119243

  14. An Array of Microactuated Microelectrodes for Monitoring Single-Neuronal Activity in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Okandan, Murat; Gilletti, Aaron; Baker, Michael S.; Jain, Tilak

    2006-01-01

    Arrays of microelectrodes used for monitoring single-and multi-neuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time for several technical and biological reasons. We report here a novel Neural Probe chip with a 3-channel microactuated microelectrode array that will enable precise repositioning of the individual microelectrodes within the brain tissue after implantation. Thermal microactuators and associated microelectrodes in the Neural Probe chip are microfabricated using the Sandia’s Ultraplanar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiTV) process, a 5-layer polysilicon microma-chining technology of the Sandia National labs, Albuquerque, NM. The Neural Probe chip enables precise bi-directional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with a step resolution in the order of 8.8μm. The thermal microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation in either direction was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multi-unit activity. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats over a period of three days demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the microelectrode insulation and chip packaging will be necessary before this technology can be validated in chronic experiments. PMID:16119243

  15. A tapered aluminium microelectrode array for improvement of dielectrophoresis-based particle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Buyong, Muhamad Ramdzan; Larki, Farhad; Faiz, Mohd Syafiq; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Yunas, Jumrail; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (F(DEP)) response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA). The F(DEP) is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF) and cross-over frequency (f(xo)). The performance of TAMA with various side wall angles is compared to that of microelectrodes with a straight cut sidewall profile over a wide range of frequencies through FEM numerical simulations. Additionally, electric field measurement (EFM) is performed through scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in order to obtain the region of force focus in both platforms. Results showed that the tapered profile microelectrodes with angles between 60° and 70° produce the highest electric field gradient on the particles. Also, the region of the strongest electric field in TAMA is located at the bottom and top edge of microelectrode while the strongest electric field in microelectrodes with straight cut profile is found at the top corner of the microelectrode. The latter property of microelectrodes improves the probability of capturing/repelling the particles at the microelectrode's side wall. PMID:25970255

  16. Biomechanical analysis of silicon microelectrode-induced strain in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjung; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.; Sun, Wei; Levenston, Marc E.

    2005-12-01

    The ability to successfully interface the brain to external electrical systems is important both for fundamental understanding of our nervous system and for the development of neuroprosthetics. Silicon microelectrode arrays offer great promise in realizing this potential. However, when they are implanted into the brain, recording sensitivity is lost due to inflammation and astroglial scarring around the electrode. The inflammation and astroglial scar are thought to result from acute injury during electrode insertion as well as chronic injury caused by micromotion around the implanted electrode. To evaluate the validity of this assumption, the finite element method (FEM) was employed to analyze the strain fields around a single Michigan Si microelectrode due to simulated micromotion. Micromotion was mimicked by applying a force to the electrode, fixing the boundaries of the brain region and applying appropriate symmetry conditions to nodes lying on symmetry planes. Characteristics of the deformation fields around the electrode including maximum electrode displacement, strain fields and relative displacement between the electrode and the adjacent tissue were examined for varying degrees of physical coupling between the brain and the electrode. Our analysis demonstrates that when physical coupling between the electrode and the brain increases, the micromotion-induced strain of tissue around the electrode decreases as does the relative slip between the electrode and the brain. These results support the use of neuro-integrative coatings on electrode arrays as a means to reduce the micromotion-induced injury response.

  17. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  18. Dielectrophoretic registration of living cells to a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darren S; Tan, John L; Voldman, Joel; Chen, Christopher S

    2004-02-15

    We present a novel microfabricated device to simultaneously and actively trap thousands of single mammalian cells in alignment with a planar microelectrode array. Thousands of 3 micromdiameter trapping electrodes were fabricated within the bottom of a parallel-plate flow chamber. Cells were trapped on the electrodes and held against destabilizing fluid flows by dielectrophoretic forces generated in the device. In general, each electrode trapped only one cell. Adhesive regions were patterned onto the surface in alignment with the traps such that cells adhered to the array surface and remained in alignment with the electrodes. By driving the device with different voltages, we showed that trapped cells could be killed by stronger electric fields. However, with weaker fields, cells were not damaged during trapping, as indicated by the similar morphologies and proliferation rates of trapped cells versus controls. As a test of the device, we patterned approximately 20000 cells onto a 1cm(2) grid of rectangular adhesive regions, with two electrodes and thus two cells per rectangle. Our method obtained 70+/-1% fidelity versus 17+/-1% when using an existing cell-registration technique. By allowing the placement of desired numbers of cells at specified locations, this approach addresses many needs to manipulate and register cells to the surfaces of biosensors and other devices with high precision and fidelity. PMID:14709396

  19. Dielectrophoretic registration of living cells to a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darren S; Tan, John L; Voldman, Joel; Chen, Christopher S

    2004-07-15

    We present a novel microfabricated device to simultaneously and actively trap thousands of single mammalian cells in alignment with a planar microelectrode array. Thousands of 3 Ipm diameter trapping electrodes were fabricated within the bottom of a parallel-plate flow chamber. Cells were trapped on the electrodes and held against destabilizing fluid flows by dielectrophoretic forces generated in the device. In general, each electrode trapped only one cell. Adhesive regions were patterned onto the surface in alignment with the traps such that cells adhered to the array surface and remained in alignment with the electrodes. By driving the device with different voltages, we showed that trapped cells could be killed by stronger electric fields. However, with weaker fields, cells were not damaged during trapping, as indicated by the similar morphologies and proliferation rates of trapped cells versus controls. As a test of the device, we patterned approximately 20,000 cells onto aI cm2 grid of rectangular adhesive regions, with two electrodes and thus two cells per rectangle. Our method obtained 70 +/- 1% fidelity versus 17 +/- 1% when using an existing cell-registration technique. By allowing the placement of desired numbers of cells at specified locations, this approach addresses many needs to manipulate and register cells to the surfaces of biosensors and other devices with high precision and fidelity. PMID:15198083

  20. Highly Doped Polycrystalline Silicon Microelectrodes Reduce Noise in Neuronal Recordings In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0–200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes (0–15 μV) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9–10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes (>150–200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n = 6 and n = 8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ± 10.13 pW) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ± 2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements. PMID:20667815

  1. Ordered polymeric microhole array made by selective wetting and applications for electrochemical microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hui; Hwang, Seongpil; Kwak, Juhyoun

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report the microelectrode array fabrication using selective wetting/dewetting of polymers on a chemical pattern which is a simple and convenient method capable of creating negative polymeric replicas using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a clean and nontoxic sacrificial layer. The fabricated hole-patterned polypropylene film on gold demonstrated enhanced electrochemical properties. The chemical pattern is fabricated by microcontact printing using octadecanethiol (ODT) as an ink on gold substrate. When PEG is spin-cast on the chemical pattern, PEG solution selectively dewets the ODT patterned areas and wets the remaining bare gold areas, leading to the formation of arrayed PEG dots. A negative replicas of the PEG dot array is obtained by spin-coating of polypropylene (PP) solution in hexane which preferentially interacts with the hydrophobic ODT region on the patterned gold surface. The arrayed PEG dots are not affected the during PP spin-coating step because of their intrinsic immiscibility. Consequently, the hole-patterned PP film is obtained after PEG removal. The electrochemical signal of the PP film demonstrates the negligible leakage current by high dielectric and self-healing of defects on the chemical pattern by the polymer. This method is applicable to fabrication of microelectrode arrays and possibly can be employed to fabricate a variety of functional polymeric structures, such as photomasks, arrays of biomolecules, cell arrays, and arrays of nanomaterials. PMID:21634409

  2. Fabrication and testing of polyimide-based microelectrode arrays for cortical mapping of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Myllymaa, Sami; Myllymaa, Katja; Korhonen, Hannu; Töyräs, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Djupsund, Kaj; Tanila, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2009-06-15

    Modern microfabrication techniques make it possible to develop microelectrode arrays that may be utilized not only in neurophysiological research but also in the clinic, e.g. in neurosurgery and as elements of neural prostheses. The aim of this study was to test whether a flexible microelectrode array is suitable for recording cortical surface field potentials in rats. Polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by utilizing microfabrication techniques e.g. photolithography and magnetron sputter deposition. The present microelectrode array consists of eight platinum microelectrodes (round-shaped, Ø: 200 microm), transmission lines and connector pads sandwiched between two thin layers of biocompatible polyimide. The microelectrode arrays were electrochemically characterized by impedance spectroscopy in physiological saline solution and successfully tested in vivo by conducting acute and chronic measurements of evoked potentials on the surface of rat cortex. The arrays proved excellent flexibility and mechanical strength during handling and implantation onto the surface of cortex. The excellent electrochemical characteristics and stable in vivo recordings with high spatiotemporal resolution highlight the potential of these arrays. The fabrication protocol described here allows implementation of several other neural interfaces with different layouts, material selections or target areas either for recording or stimulation purposes. PMID:19380223

  3. Low Frequency Activity of Cortical Networks on Microelectrode Arrays is Differentially Altered by Bicuculline and Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals need to be characterized for their neurotoxicity potential. Neurons grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are an in vitro model used to screen chemicals for functional effects on neuronal networks. Typically, after removal of low frequency components, effec...

  4. Microelectrode Arrays: A Physiologically-based Neurotoxicity Testing Platform for the 21st Century

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) have been in use over the past decade and a half to study multiple aspects ofelectrically excitable cells. Inparticular, MEAs have been applied to explore the pharmacological and toxicological effects ofnumerous compounds on spontaneous activity ofneu...

  5. Evaluation of a Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Testing Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically active cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemicals, or particles. However, conventional single well MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screenin...

  6. Evaluation of Multi-Well Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Screening Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically-excitable cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemical or particles. However, conventional single well-MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screen...

  7. A Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Array for Improvement of Dielectrophoresis-Based Particle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Buyong, Muhamad Ramdzan; Larki, Farhad; Faiz, Mohd Syafiq; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Yunas, Jumrail; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA). The FDEP is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF) and cross-over frequency (fxo). The performance of TAMA with various side wall angles is compared to that of microelectrodes with a straight cut sidewall profile over a wide range of frequencies through FEM numerical simulations. Additionally, electric field measurement (EFM) is performed through scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in order to obtain the region of force focus in both platforms. Results showed that the tapered profile microelectrodes with angles between 60° and 70° produce the highest electric field gradient on the particles. Also, the region of the strongest electric field in TAMA is located at the bottom and top edge of microelectrode while the strongest electric field in microelectrodes with straight cut profile is found at the top corner of the microelectrode. The latter property of microelectrodes improves the probability of capturing/repelling the particles at the microelectrode’s side wall. PMID:25970255

  8. Investigating brain functional evolution and plasticity using microelectrode array technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate long and short-term plasticity responsible for memory formation in dissociated neuronal networks. In order to address this issue, a set of experiments was designed and implemented in which the microelectrode array electrode grid was divided into four quadrants, two of which were chronically stimulated, every two days for one hour with a stimulation paradigm that varied over time. Overall network and quadrant responses were then analyzed to quantify what level of plasticity took place in the network and how this was due to the stimulation interruption. The results demonstrate that there were no spatial differences in the stimulus-evoked activity within quadrants. Furthermore, the implemented stimulation protocol induced depression effects in the neuronal networks as demonstrated by the consistently lower network activity following stimulation sessions. Finally, the analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of the stimulation decreased over time, thus suggesting a habituation phenomenon. These findings are sufficient to conclude that electrical stimulation is an important tool to interact with dissociated neuronal cultures, but localized stimuli are not enough to drive spatial synaptic potentiation or depression. On the contrary, the ability to modulate synaptic temporal plasticity was a feasible task to achieve by chronic network stimulation. PMID:26476356

  9. An active, flexible carbon nanotube microelectrode array for recording electrocorticograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Chan; Hsu, Hui-Lin; Lee, Yu-Tao; Su, Huan-Chieh; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Yew, Tri-Rung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Yao, Da-Jeng; Chang, Yen-Chung; Chen, Hsin

    2011-06-01

    A variety of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) has been developed for monitoring intra-cortical neural activity at a high spatio-temporal resolution, opening a promising future for brain research and neural prostheses. However, most MEAs are based on metal electrodes on rigid substrates, and the intra-cortical implantation normally causes neural damage and immune responses that impede long-term recordings. This communication presents a flexible, carbon-nanotube MEA (CMEA) with integrated circuitry. The flexibility allows the electrodes to fit on the irregular surface of the brain to record electrocorticograms in a less invasive way. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) further improve both the electrode impedance and the charge-transfer capacity by more than six times. Moreover, the CNTs are grown on the polyimide substrate directly to improve the adhesion to the substrate. With the integrated recording circuitry, the flexible CMEA is proved capable of recording the neural activity of crayfish in vitro, as well as the electrocorticogram of a rat cortex in vivo, with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the proposed CMEA can be employed as a less-invasive, biocompatible and reliable neuro-electronic interface for long-term usage.

  10. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays.

    PubMed

    Varney, Michael W; Aslam, Dean M; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors. PMID:25586924

  11. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Varney, Michael W.; Aslam, Dean M.; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors. PMID:25586924

  12. Carbonization-assisted integration of silica nanowires to photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Zhang, Lei; Xi, Shuang; Li, Xiaoping; Lai, Wuxing

    2011-11-01

    We propose a novel technique of integrating silica nanowires to carbon microelectrode arrays on silicon substrates. The silica nanowires were grown on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode arrays during carbonization of patterned photoresist in a tube furnace at 1000 °C under a gaseous environment of N2 and H2 in the presence of Cu catalyst, sputtered initially as a thin layer on the structure surface. Carbonization-assisted nucleation and growth are proposed to extend the Cu-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism for the nanowire integration behaviour. The growth of silica nanowires exploits Si from the etched silicon substrate under the Cu particles. It is found that the thickness of the initial Cu coating layer plays an important role as catalyst on the morphology and on the amount of grown silica nanowires. These nanowires have lengths of up to 100 µm and diameters ranging from 50 to 200 nm, with 30 nm Cu film sputtered initially. The study also reveals that the nanowire-integrated microelectrodes significantly enhance the electrochemical performance compared to blank ones. A specific capacitance increase of over 13 times is demonstrated in the electrochemical experiment. The platform can be used to develop large-scale miniaturized devices and systems with increased efficiency for applications in electrochemical, biological and energy-related fields.

  13. Close-Packed Silicon Microelectrodes for Scalable Spatially Oversampled Neural Recording

    PubMed Central

    Scholvin, Jörg; Kinney, Justin P.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Moore-Kochlacs, Caroline; Kopell, Nancy; Fonstad, Clifton G.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neural recording electrodes are important tools for understanding neural codes and brain dynamics. Neural electrodes that are close-packed, such as in tetrodes, enable spatial oversampling of neural activity, which facilitates data analysis. Here we present the design and implementation of close-packed silicon microelectrodes, to enable spatially oversampled recording of neural activity in a scalable fashion. Methods Our probes are fabricated in a hybrid lithography process, resulting in a dense array of recording sites connected to submicron dimension wiring. Results We demonstrate an implementation of a probe comprising 1000 electrode pads, each 9 × 9 μm, at a pitch of 11 μm. We introduce design automation and packaging methods that allow us to readily create a large variety of different designs. Significance Finally, we perform neural recordings with such probes in the live mammalian brain that illustrate the spatial oversampling potential of closely packed electrode sites. PMID:26699649

  14. Alternative Post-Processing on a CMOS Chip to Fabricate a Planar Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    López-Huerta, Francisco; Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Estrada-López, Johan J.; Zuñiga-Islas, Carlos; Cervantes-Sanchez, Blanca; Soto, Enrique; Soto-Cruz, Blanca S.

    2011-01-01

    We present an alternative post-processing on a CMOS chip to release a planar microelectrode array (pMEA) integrated with its signal readout circuit, which can be used for monitoring the neuronal activity of vestibular ganglion neurons in newborn Wistar strain rats. This chip is fabricated through a 0.6 μm CMOS standard process and it has 12 pMEA through a 4 × 3 electrodes matrix. The alternative CMOS post-process includes the development of masks to protect the readout circuit and the power supply pads. A wet etching process eliminates the aluminum located on the surface of the p+-type silicon. This silicon is used as transducer for recording the neuronal activity and as interface between the readout circuit and neurons. The readout circuit is composed of an amplifier and tunable bandpass filter, which is placed on a 0.015 mm2 silicon area. The tunable bandpass filter has a bandwidth of 98 kHz and a common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 87 dB. These characteristics of the readout circuit are appropriate for neuronal recording applications. PMID:22346681

  15. Agarose microwell based neuronal micro-circuit arrays on microelectrode arrays for high throughput drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gyumin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Chang-Soo; Nam, Yoonkey

    2009-11-21

    For cell-based biosensor applications, dissociated neurons have been cultured on planar microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to measure the network activity with substrate-embedded microelectrodes. There has been a need for a multi-well type platform to reduce the data collection time and increase the statistical power for data analysis. This study presents a novel method to convert a conventional MEA into a multi-well MEA with an array of micrometre-sized neuronal culture ('neuronal micro-circuit array'). An MEA was coated first with cell-adhesive layer (poly-D-lysine) which was subsequently patterned with a cell-repulsive layer (agarose hydrogel) to both pattern the cell adhesive region and isolate neuronal micro-circuits from each other. For a few weeks, primary hippocampal neurons were cultured on the agarose microwell MEA and the development of spontaneous electrical activities were characterized with extracellular action potentials. Using neurotransmission modulators, the simultaneous monitoring of drug responses from neuronal micro-circuit arrays was also demonstrated. The proposed approach will be powerful for neurobiological functional assay studies or neuron-based biosensor fields which require repeated trials to obtain a single data point due to biological variations. PMID:19865730

  16. A High Aspect Ratio Microelectrode Array for Mapping Neural Activity in-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kibler, Andrew B.; Jamieson, Brian G.; Durand, Dominique M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel high-aspect-ratio penetrating microelectrode array was designed and fabricated for the purpose of recording neural activity. The array allows two dimensional recording of 64 sites in vitro with high aspect ratio penetrating electrodes. Traditional surface electrode arrays, although easy to fabricate, do not penetrate to the viable tissue such as central hippocampus slices and thus have a lower signal/noise ratio and lower selectivity than a penetrating array. In the unfolded hippocampus preparation, the CA1–CA3 pyramidal cell layer in the whole unfolded rodent hippocampus preparation is encased by the alveus on one side and the Schaffer tract on the other and requires penetrating electrodes for high signal to noise ratio recording. An array of 64 electrode spikes, each with a target height of 200 μm and diameter of 20μm, was fabricated in silicon on a transparent glass substrate. The impedance of the individual electrodes was measured to be approximately 1.5MΩ± 497kΩ. The signal to noise ratio was measured and found to be 19.4 ± 3 dB compared to 3.9 ± 0.8 dB S/N for signals obtained with voltage sensitive dye RH414. A mouse unfolded hippocampus preparation was bathed in solution containing 50 micro-molar 4-Amino Pyridine and a complex two dimensional wave of activity was recorded using the array. These results indicate that this novel penetrating electrode array is able to obtain data superior to that of voltage sensitive dye techniques for broad field two-dimensional neuronal activity recording. When used with the unfolded hippocampus preparation, the combination forms a uniquely capable tool for imaging hippocampal network activity in the entire hippocampus. PMID:22179041

  17. Microelectrode Arrays with Overlapped Diffusion Layers as Electroanalytical Detectors: Theory and Basic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tomčík, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given. PMID:24152927

  18. A PARYLENE-BASED MICROELECTRODE ARRAY IMPLANT FOR SPINAL CORD STIMULATION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Nandra, Mandheerej. S.; Lavrov, Igor A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an epidural spinal cord implant using a parylene-based microelectrode array is presented. Rats with hindlimb paralysis from a complete spinal cord transection were implanted with the device and studied for up to eight weeks, where we have demonstrated recovery of hindlimb stepping functionality through pulsed stimulation. The microelectrode array allows for a high degree of freedom and specificity in selecting the site of stimulation compared to wire-based implants, and triggers varied biological responses that can lead to an increased understanding of the spinal cord and locomotion recovery for victims of spinal cord injury. PMID:21841938

  19. Microelectrode array microscopy: investigation of dynamic behavior of localized corrosion at type 304 stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lister, Tedd E; Pinhero, Patrick J

    2005-04-15

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and a recently developed microelectrode array microscope have been used to study localized corrosion and electron-transfer characteristics of native oxide layers of type 304 stainless steels. The I-/I3- redox couple was employed as a mediator and allowed sensitive detection of oxide breakdown events. In solutions containing I-, a signal at the microelectrode was observed on type 304 stainless steel surfaces at active pitting corrosion sites. Under conditions where pitting corrosion occurs, SECM was used to track the temporal characteristics of the reaction in a spatial manner. However, because of the time required to create an image, much of the temporal information was not obtained. To improve the temporal resolution of the measurement, microelectrode array microscopy (MEAM) was developed as a parallel method of performing SECM. The demonstration shown reveals the potential of MEAM for analysis of surface chemistry on temporal and spatial domains. PMID:15828799

  20. Acute human brain responses to intracortical microelectrode arrays: challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eduardo; Greger, Bradley; House, Paul A; Aranda, Ignacio; Botella, Carlos; Albisua, Julio; Soto-Sánchez, Cristina; Alfaro, Arantxa; Normann, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The emerging field of neuroprosthetics is focused on the development of new therapeutic interventions that will be able to restore some lost neural function by selective electrical stimulation or by harnessing activity recorded from populations of neurons. As more and more patients benefit from these approaches, the interest in neural interfaces has grown significantly and a new generation of penetrating microelectrode arrays are providing unprecedented access to the neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). These microelectrodes have active tip dimensions that are similar in size to neurons and because they penetrate the nervous system, they provide selective access to these cells (within a few microns). However, the very long-term viability of chronically implanted microelectrodes and the capability of recording the same spiking activity over long time periods still remain to be established and confirmed in human studies. Here we review the main responses to acute implantation of microelectrode arrays, and emphasize that it will become essential to control the neural tissue damage induced by these intracortical microelectrodes in order to achieve the high clinical potentials accompanying this technology. PMID:25100989

  1. Effects of Organophosphorus Flame Retardants on Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks Grown on Microelectrode Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON SPONTANEOUS ACTIVITY IN NEURONAL NETWORKS GROWN ON MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS TJ Shafer1, K Wallace1, WR Mundy1, M Behl2,. 1Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA, 2National Toxicology Program, NIEHS, RTP, NC...

  2. Sonochemically fabricated enzyme microelectrode arrays for the environmental monitoring of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Jeanette; Law, Karen; Vakurov, Alexander; Millner, Paul; Higson, Séamus P J

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel sonochemically fabricated microelectrode based acetylcholinesterase and polyaniline carbon/cobalt phthalocyanine biosensor for the ultra-sensitive determination of pesticides. Arrays of this type are fabricated using microelectrode templates with population densities of 2 x 10(5) cm(-2). The enzymatic response of the sensors is inhibited upon incubation with the pesticide and in this report it is shown that paraoxon may be determined down to concentrations of 1 x 10(-17) M. This sensitivity has thus far not been achieved and mechanisms accounting for the enhancement of the sensitivity reported here are discussed. PMID:15522591

  3. Design, Fabrication, Simulation and Characterization of a Novel Dual-Sided Microelectrode Array for Deep Brain Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zongya; Gong, Ruxue; Huang, Hongen; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel dual-sided microelectrode array is specially designed and fabricated for a rat Parkinson’s disease (PD) model to study the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The fabricated microelectrode array can stimulate the subthalamic nucleus and simultaneously record electrophysiological information from multiple nuclei of the basal ganglia system. The fabricated microelectrode array has a long shaft of 9 mm and each planar surface is equipped with three stimulating sites (diameter of 100 μm), seven electrophysiological recording sites (diameter of 20 μm) and four sites with diameter of 50 μm used for neurotransmitter measurements in future work. The performances of the fabricated microelectrode array were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the stimulating effects of the fabricated microelectrode were evaluated by finite element modeling (FEM). Preliminary animal experiments demonstrated that the designed microelectrode arrays can record spontaneous discharge signals from the striatum, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus interna. The designed and fabricated microelectrode arrays provide a powerful research tool for studying the mechanisms of DBS in rat PD models. PMID:27314356

  4. Design, Fabrication, Simulation and Characterization of a Novel Dual-Sided Microelectrode Array for Deep Brain Recording and Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zongya; Gong, Ruxue; Huang, Hongen; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel dual-sided microelectrode array is specially designed and fabricated for a rat Parkinson's disease (PD) model to study the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The fabricated microelectrode array can stimulate the subthalamic nucleus and simultaneously record electrophysiological information from multiple nuclei of the basal ganglia system. The fabricated microelectrode array has a long shaft of 9 mm and each planar surface is equipped with three stimulating sites (diameter of 100 μm), seven electrophysiological recording sites (diameter of 20 μm) and four sites with diameter of 50 μm used for neurotransmitter measurements in future work. The performances of the fabricated microelectrode array were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the stimulating effects of the fabricated microelectrode were evaluated by finite element modeling (FEM). Preliminary animal experiments demonstrated that the designed microelectrode arrays can record spontaneous discharge signals from the striatum, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus interna. The designed and fabricated microelectrode arrays provide a powerful research tool for studying the mechanisms of DBS in rat PD models. PMID:27314356

  5. Flexible complementary metal oxide semiconductor microelectrode arrays with applications in single cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajouhi, H.; Jou, A. Y.; Jain, R.; Ziabari, A.; Shakouri, A.; Savran, C. A.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-11-01

    A highly flexible microelectrode array with an embedded complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation amplifier suitable for sensing surfaces of biological entities is developed. The array is based on ultrathin CMOS islands that are thermally isolated from each other and are interconnected by meandered nano-scale wires that can adapt to cellular surfaces with micro-scale curvatures. CMOS temperature sensors are placed in the islands and are optimally biased to have high temperature sensitivity. While no live cell thermometry is conducted, a measured temperature sensitivity of 0.15 °C in the temperature range of 35 to 40 °C is achieved by utilizing a low noise CMOS lock-in amplifier implemented in the same technology. The monolithic nature of CMOS sensors and amplifier circuits and their versatile flexible interconnecting wires overcome the sensitivity and yield limitations of microelectrode arrays fabricated in competing technologies.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Barrese, James C; Aceros, Juan; Donoghue, John P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Signal attenuation is a major problem facing intracortical sensors for chronic neuroprosthetic applications. Many studies suggest that failure is due to gliosis around the electrode tips, however, mechanical and material causes of failure are often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to progressive signal decline by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize structural changes in chronically implanted arrays and histology to examine the tissue response at corresponding implant sites. Approach We examined eight chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) explanted from non-human primates at times ranging from 37 to 1051 days post-implant. We used SEM, in vivo neural recordings, and histology (GFAP, Iba-1, NeuN). Three MEAs that were never implanted were also imaged as controls. Main results SEM revealed progressive corrosion of the platinum electrode tips and changes to the underlying silicon. The parylene insulation was prone to cracking and delamination, and in some instances the silicone elastomer also delaminated from the edges of the MEA. Substantial tissue encapsulation was observed and was often seen growing into defects in the platinum and parylene. These material defects became more common as the time in vivo increased. Histology at 37 and 1051 days post-implant showed gliosis, disruption of normal cortical architecture with minimal neuronal loss, and high Iba-1 reactivity, especially within the arachnoid and dura. Electrode tracts were either absent or barely visible in the cortex at 1051 days, but were seen in the fibrotic encapsulation material suggesting that the MEAs were lifted out of the brain. Neural recordings showed a progressive drop in impedance, signal amplitude, and viable channels over time. Significance These results provide evidence that signal loss in MEAs is truly multifactorial. Gliosis occurs in the first few months after implantation but does not

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrese, James C.; Aceros, Juan; Donoghue, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Signal attenuation is a major problem facing intracortical sensors for chronic neuroprosthetic applications. Many studies suggest that failure is due to gliosis around the electrode tips, however, mechanical and material causes of failure are often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to progressive signal decline by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize structural changes in chronically implanted arrays and histology to examine the tissue response at corresponding implant sites. Approach. We examined eight chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) explanted from non-human primates at times ranging from 37 to 1051 days post-implant. We used SEM, in vivo neural recordings, and histology (GFAP, Iba-1, NeuN). Three MEAs that were never implanted were also imaged as controls. Main results. SEM revealed progressive corrosion of the platinum electrode tips and changes to the underlying silicon. The parylene insulation was prone to cracking and delamination, and in some instances the silicone elastomer also delaminated from the edges of the MEA. Substantial tissue encapsulation was observed and was often seen growing into defects in the platinum and parylene. These material defects became more common as the time in vivo increased. Histology at 37 and 1051 days post-implant showed gliosis, disruption of normal cortical architecture with minimal neuronal loss, and high Iba-1 reactivity, especially within the arachnoid and dura. Electrode tracts were either absent or barely visible in the cortex at 1051 days, but were seen in the fibrotic encapsulation material suggesting that the MEAs were lifted out of the brain. Neural recordings showed a progressive drop in impedance, signal amplitude, and viable channels over time. Significance. These results provide evidence that signal loss in MEAs is truly multifactorial. Gliosis occurs in the first few months after implantation but does

  8. A technique to prevent dural adhesions to chronically implanted microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Maynard, E M; Fernandez, E; Normann, R A

    2000-04-15

    Minimizing relative movements between neural tissues and arrays of microelectrodes chronically implanted into them is expected to greatly enhance the capacity of the microelectrodes to record from single cortical neurons on a long-term basis. We describe a new surgical technique to minimize the formation of adhesions between the dura and an implanted electrode array using a 12 microm (0.5 mil) thick sheet of Teflon film positioned between the array and the dura. A total of 15 cats were implanted using this technique. Gross examination of 12 implant sites at the time of sacrifice failed to find evidence of adhesions between the arrays and the dura when the Teflon(R) film remained in its initial position. In six implants from which recordings were made, an average of nine of the 11 (81%) connected electrodes in each array recorded evoked neural activity after 180 days post implantation. Further, on average, two separable units were identified on each of the implanted electrodes in these arrays. No significant change was found in the density of cell bodies around implanted electrodes of four of the implanted electrode arrays. However, histological evaluation of the implant sites revealed evidence of meningeal proliferation beneath the arrays. The technique described is shown to be effective at preventing adhesions between implanted electrode arrays and improve the characteristics of chronic recordings obtained with these structures. PMID:10788663

  9. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  10. Preliminary study of the thermal impact of a microelectrode array implanted in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohee; Normann, Richard A; Harrison, Reid; Solzbacher, Florian

    2006-01-01

    One requirement of a chronically implantable, wireless neural interface device is the integration of electronic circuitry with the microelectrode array. Since the electronic IC dissipates a certain amount of power, it will affect the temperature in the tissues surrounding the implant site. In this paper, the thermal influence of an integrated, 3-dimensional Utah electrode array, to be implanted in the brain was investigated with simulations using the finite element method (FEM). A temperature increase in the brain tissue was predicted using preliminary simulations with simplified models. The model and method used in the simulations were verified by simple in vitro experiments. PMID:17946999

  11. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  12. The Fabrication of PDMS mould for Microelectrode Array Biochip using NIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beh, Khi Khim; Samsuri, Fahmi; Lee, Tze Pin; Mohamed, Khairudin

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, low-cost micro and nano fabrication process have gain intention from the manufacturing industry. Biochip is a platform of miniaturized microarrays arranged on a solid substrate that allows various biological tests to achieve immediate results. The development of biochip has established a new platform in biomedical industry. However, to fulfill the demands and availability in the market with affordable cost requires high volume manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of the biochips. In this article we will discuss the fabrication of PDMS mould for replicating microelectrode array of biochip. The fabrication of the microelectrodes utilizes the Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique. Finally, the fabrication of PDMS mould has been demonstrated successfully for using Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique and achieved 13% of size difference in overall.

  13. A Multi-Channel, Flex-Rigid ECoG Microelectrode Array for Visual Cortical Interfacing

    PubMed Central

    Tolstosheeva, Elena; Gordillo-González, Víctor; Biefeld, Volker; Kempen, Ludger; Mandon, Sunita; Kreiter, Andreas K.; Lang, Walter

    2015-01-01

    High-density electrocortical (ECoG) microelectrode arrays are promising signal-acquisition platforms for brain-computer interfaces envisioned, e.g., as high-performance communication solutions for paralyzed persons. We propose a multi-channel microelectrode array capable of recording ECoG field potentials with high spatial resolution. The proposed array is of a 150 mm2 total recording area; it has 124 circular electrodes (100, 300 and 500 μm in diameter) situated on the edges of concentric hexagons (min. 0.8 mm interdistance) and a skull-facing reference electrode (2.5 mm2 surface area). The array is processed as a free-standing device to enable monolithic integration of a rigid interposer, designed for soldering of fine-pitch SMD-connectors on a minimal assembly area. Electrochemical characterization revealed distinct impedance spectral bands for the 100, 300 and 500 μm-type electrodes, and for the array's own reference. Epidural recordings from the primary visual cortex (V1) of an awake Rhesus macaque showed natural electrophysiological signals and clear responses to standard visual stimulation. The ECoG electrodes of larger surface area recorded signals with greater spectral power in the gamma band, while the skull-facing reference electrode provided higher average gamma power spectral density (γPSD) than the common average referencing technique. PMID:25569757

  14. Redox processes in silicon dioxide thin films using copper microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappertzhofen, S.; Menzel, S.; Valov, I.; Waser, R.

    2011-11-01

    Although SiO2 is a typical insulator, we demonstrate an electrochemical characteristic of the Cu/Cu+ oxidation at the interface with 30 nm thick silicon dioxide thin films studied by cyclic voltammetry. This study reveals the process of anodic oxidation and subsequent reduction of oxidized Cu ions injected in the SiO2 layer with special attention to the kinetics of the redox process. We estimated the diffusion coefficient and the mobility of Cu ions in SiO2. The results gain deeper insight in the processes involved during resistive switching of Cu/SiO2 based nonvolatile memory devices.

  15. Microelectrode Arrays and the Use of PEG-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Sakshi; Graaf, Matthew D.; Moeller, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    PEG-modified diblock copolymer surfaces have been examined for their compatibility with microelectrode array based analytical methods. The use of PEG-modified polymer surfaces on the arrays was initially problematic because the redox couples used in the experiments were adsorbed by the polymer. This led the current measured by cyclic voltammetry for the redox couple to be unstable and increase with time. However, two key findings allow the experiments to be successful. First, after multiple cyclic voltammograms the current associated with the redox couple does stabilize so that a good baseline current can be established. Second, the rate at which the current stabilizes is consistent every time a particular coated array is used. Hence, multiple analytical experiments can be conducted on an array coated with a PEG-modified diblock copolymer and the data obtained is comparable as long as the data for each experiment is collected at a consistent time point. PMID:25587425

  16. Rapid odor perception in rat olfactory bulb by microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Dong, Qi; Zhuang, Liu-jing; Li, Rong; Wang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    Responses of 302 mitral/tufted (M/T) cells in the olfactory bulb were recorded from 42 anesthetized freely breathing rats using a 16-channel microwire electrode array. Saturated vapors of four pure chemicals, anisole, carvone, citral and isoamyl acetate were applied. After aligning spike trains to the initial phase of the inhalation after odor onset, the responses of M/T cells showed transient temporal features including excitatory and inhibitory patterns. Both odor-evoked patterns indicated that mammals recognize odors within a short respiration cycle after odor stimulus. Due to the small amount of information received from a single cell, we pooled results from all responsive M/T cells to study the ensemble activity. The firing rates of the cell ensembles were computed over 100 ms bins and population vectors were constructed. The high dimension vectors were condensed into three dimensions for visualization using principal component analysis. The trajectories of both excitatory and inhibitory cell ensembles displayed strong dynamics during odor stimulation. The distances among cluster centers were enlarged compared to those of the resting state. Thus, we presumed that pictures of odor information sent to higher brain regions were depicted and odor discrimination was completed within the first breathing cycle. PMID:23225857

  17. Synchronization of neurons in micro-electrode array cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposti, F.; Signorini, M. G.

    2008-12-01

    A lot of methods were created in last decade for the spatio-temporal analysis of multi-electrode array (MEA) neuronal data sets. In this paper we show how a new simple analysis approach that considers the total network activity, is able to show interesting neuronal network system dynamical features. In particular, we perform two different analyses: a neuronal connectivity examination studying networks at different days in vitro (div) and an analysis of the long per- iod effects of the administration of two common neuroactive drugs, Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), to spontaneously spiking mature neuronal networks. Our analysis is performed considering burst topology, i.e., cataloguing network bursts as Global (if they involve more than the 25% of the MEA channels) or Local (if less that 25%). In the first analysis, this division allows to understand the network connectivity developments. The networking increases from div 1 to 6 building up an undifferentiated highly connected network. From div 6 to 10 the networking decreases (pruning) till reaching a plateau in a small-world like organization. The second analysis highlights substantial differences between long period effects of TTX and AP5. Results show that AP5, selectively blocking NMDA receptors and inhibiting long term potentiation, is unable to produce activity twisting in a network that already reached a developmental plateau, but it is able to desynchronize sub-network (Local) activity. TTX, on the other side, blocking any type of electrical communication among neurons, acts on the whole network synchronization. The important activity increment in the post-TTX epoch (+66%), together with the Global activity explosion, suggests the possibility of a long-term inhibitory-synapse depression mechanism.

  18. Substrate arrays of iridium oxide microelectrodes for in vitro neuronal interfacing.

    PubMed

    Gawad, Shady; Giugliano, Michele; Heuschkel, Marc; Wessling, Börge; Markram, Henry; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Renaud, Philippe; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    The design of novel bidirectional interfaces for in vivo and in vitro nervous systems is an important step towards future functional neuroprosthetics. Small electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high-resolution and target-selectivity during stimulation and recording of neuronal networks, while significant charge transfer and large signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate time resolution. In addition, the physical properties of the interface should remain stable across time, especially when chronic in vivo applications or in vitro long-term studies are considered, unless a procedure to actively compensate for degradation is provided. In this short report, we describe the use and fabrication of arrays of 120 planar microelectrodes (MEAs) of sputtered Iridium Oxide (IrOx). The effective surface area of individual microelectrodes is significantly increased using electrochemical activation, a procedure that may also be employed to restore the properties of the electrodes as required. The electrode activation results in a very low interface impedance, especially in the lower frequency domain, which was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The increase in the roughness of the microelectrodes surface was imaged using digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy. Aging of the activated electrodes was also investigated, comparing storage in saline with storage in air. Demonstration of concept was achieved by recording multiple single-unit spike activity in acute brain slice preparations of rat neocortex. Data suggests that extracellular recording of action potentials can be achieved with planar IrOx MEAs with good signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:19194527

  19. Microelectrode Array Recordings from the Ventral Roots in Chronically Implanted Cats

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Shubham; Bauman, Matthew J.; Fisher, Lee E.; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The ventral spinal roots contain the axons of spinal motoneurons and provide the only location in the peripheral nervous system where recorded neural activity can be assured to be motor rather than sensory. This study demonstrates recordings of single unit activity from these ventral root axons using floating microelectrode arrays (FMAs). Ventral root recordings were characterized by examining single unit yield and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with 32-channel FMAs implanted chronically in the L6 and L7 spinal roots of nine cats. Single unit recordings were performed for implant periods of up to 12 weeks. Motor units were identified based on active discharge during locomotion and inactivity under anesthesia. Motor unit yield and SNR were calculated for each electrode, and results were grouped by electrode site size, which were varied systematically between 25 and 160 μm to determine effects on signal quality. The unit yields and SNR did not differ significantly across this wide range of electrode sizes. Both SNR and yield decayed over time, but electrodes were able to record spikes with SNR >2 up to 12 weeks post-implant. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to record single unit activity from multiple isolated motor units with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the ventral spinal roots. This approach could be useful for creating a spinal nerve interface for advanced neural prostheses, and results of this study will be used to improve design of microelectrodes for chronic neural recording in the ventral spinal roots. PMID:25071697

  20. Microelectrode array recordings from the ventral roots in chronically implanted cats.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Shubham; Bauman, Matthew J; Fisher, Lee E; Weber, Douglas J; Gaunt, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The ventral spinal roots contain the axons of spinal motoneurons and provide the only location in the peripheral nervous system where recorded neural activity can be assured to be motor rather than sensory. This study demonstrates recordings of single unit activity from these ventral root axons using floating microelectrode arrays (FMAs). Ventral root recordings were characterized by examining single unit yield and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with 32-channel FMAs implanted chronically in the L6 and L7 spinal roots of nine cats. Single unit recordings were performed for implant periods of up to 12 weeks. Motor units were identified based on active discharge during locomotion and inactivity under anesthesia. Motor unit yield and SNR were calculated for each electrode, and results were grouped by electrode site size, which were varied systematically between 25 and 160 μm to determine effects on signal quality. The unit yields and SNR did not differ significantly across this wide range of electrode sizes. Both SNR and yield decayed over time, but electrodes were able to record spikes with SNR >2 up to 12 weeks post-implant. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to record single unit activity from multiple isolated motor units with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the ventral spinal roots. This approach could be useful for creating a spinal nerve interface for advanced neural prostheses, and results of this study will be used to improve design of microelectrodes for chronic neural recording in the ventral spinal roots. PMID:25071697

  1. Advancements in electrode design and laser techniques for fabricating micro-electrode arrays as part of a retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, C W D; Schuettler, M; Guenther, T; Lovell, N H; Suaning, G J

    2011-01-01

    Retinal micro-electrode arrays (MEAs) for a visual prosthesis were fabricated by laser structuring of platinum (Pt) foil and liquid silicone rubber. A new design was created using a folding technique to create a multi-layered array from a single Pt sheet. This method allowed a reduction in both the electrode pitch, and the overall width of the array, while maintaining coplanar connection points for more stable interconnections to other components of the system. The design also included a section which could be rolled to create a cylindrical segment in order to minimise the size of the exit in the sclera after implantation. A picosecond mode-locked 532 nm laser system was investigated as a replacement for the nanosecond Q-switched 1064 nm laser currently in use. Trials showed that the ps system could produce high quality electrode tracks with a minimum pitch of 30 μm, less than 40% the pitch achievable with the ns laser. A method was investigated for the cutting of Pt foils without damaging the underlying silicone by laser machining to a depth just below the thickness of the foil. Initial samples showed promise with full penetration of the foil only occurring at cross points of the laser paths. The ps laser was also used to create roughened surfaces, in order to increase the electrochemical surface area of the electrodes. Surfaces were imaged using a scanning electron microscope, and compared to surfaces roughened with the ns laser. The ps laser was seen to offer a reduction in feature size, as well as an increase in control over the appearance of the electrode surface. PMID:22254389

  2. Development of Microelectrode Arrays Using Electroless Plating for CMOS-Based Direct Counting of Bacterial and HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ota, Shoko; Gamo, Kohei; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The development of two new types of high-density, electroless plated microelectrode arrays for CMOS-based high-sensitivity direct bacteria and HeLa cell counting are presented. For emerging high-sensitivity direct pathogen counting, two technical challenges must be addressed. One is the formation of a bacteria-sized microelectrode, and the other is the development of a high-sensitivity and high-speed amperometry circuit. The requirement for microelectrode formation is that the gold microelectrodes are required to be as small as the target cell. By improving a self-aligned electroless plating technique, the dimensions of the microelectrodes on a CMOS sensor chip in this work were successfully reduced to 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm. This is 1/20th of the smallest size reported in the literature. Since a bacteria-sized microelectrode has a severe limitation on the current flow, the amperometry circuit has to have a high sensitivity and high speed with low noise. In this work, a current buffer was inserted to mitigate the potential fluctuation. Three test chips were fabricated using a 0.6- μm CMOS process: two with 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm (1024 × 1024 and 4 × 4) sensor arrays and one with 6- μm square (16 × 16) sensor arrays; and the microelectrodes were formed on them using electroless plating. The uniformity among the 1024 × 1024 electrodes arranged with a pitch of 3.6 μm × 4.45 μm was optically verified. For improving sensitivity, the trenches on each microelectrode were developed and verified optically and electrochemically for the first time. Higher sensitivity can be achieved by introducing a trench structure than by using a conventional microelectrode formed by contact photolithography. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements obtained using the 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm 4 × 4 and 6- μm square 16 × 16 sensor array with electroless-plated microelectrodes successfully demonstrated direct counting of the bacteria-sized microbeads and HeLa cells. PMID:26561481

  3. Microfabricated FSCV-Compatible Microelectrode Array for Real-time Monitoring of Heterogeneous Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Zachek, Matthew K.; Park, Jinwoo; Takmakov, Pavel; Wightman, R. Mark; McCarty, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has been used previously to detect neurotransmitter release and reuptake in vivo. An advantage that FSCV has over other electrochemical techniques is its ability to distinguish neurotransmitters of interest (i.e. monoamines) from their metabolites using their respective characteristic cyclic voltammogram. While much has been learned with this technique, it has generally only been used in a single working electrode arrangement. Additionally, traditional electrode fabrication techniques tend to be difficult and somewhat irreproducible. Described in this report is a fabrication method for a FSCV compatible microelectrode array (FSCV-MEA) that is capable of functioning in vivo. The microfabrication techniques employed here allow for better reproducibility than traditional fabrication methods of carbon fiber microelectrodes, and enable batch fabrication of electrode arrays. The reproducibility and electrochemical qualities of the probes were assessed along with cross talk in vitro. Heterogeneous release of electrically stimulated dopamine was observed in real-time in the striatum of an anesthetized rat using the FSCV-MEA. The heterogeneous effects of pharmacology on the striatum was also observed and shown to be consistent across multiple animals. PMID:20464031

  4. A Multimodal, SU-8 - Platinum - Polyimide Microelectrode Array for Chronic In Vivo Neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Márton, Gergely; Orbán, Gábor; Kiss, Marcell; Fiáth, Richárd; Pongrácz, Anita; Ulbert, István

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of polymers as insulator and bulk materials of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) makes the realization of flexible, biocompatible sensors possible, which are suitable for various neurophysiological experiments such as in vivo detection of local field potential changes on the surface of the neocortex or unit activities within the brain tissue. In this paper the microfabrication of a novel, all-flexible, polymer-based MEA is presented. The device consists of a three dimensional sensor configuration with an implantable depth electrode array and brain surface electrodes, allowing the recording of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals with laminar ones, simultaneously. In vivo recordings were performed in anesthetized rat brain to test the functionality of the device under both acute and chronic conditions. The ECoG electrodes recorded slow-wave thalamocortical oscillations, while the implanted component provided high quality depth recordings. The implants remained viable for detecting action potentials of individual neurons for at least 15 weeks. PMID:26683306

  5. A Multimodal, SU-8 - Platinum - Polyimide Microelectrode Array for Chronic In Vivo Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Márton, Gergely; Orbán, Gábor; Kiss, Marcell; Fiáth, Richárd; Pongrácz, Anita; Ulbert, István

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of polymers as insulator and bulk materials of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) makes the realization of flexible, biocompatible sensors possible, which are suitable for various neurophysiological experiments such as in vivo detection of local field potential changes on the surface of the neocortex or unit activities within the brain tissue. In this paper the microfabrication of a novel, all-flexible, polymer-based MEA is presented. The device consists of a three dimensional sensor configuration with an implantable depth electrode array and brain surface electrodes, allowing the recording of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals with laminar ones, simultaneously. In vivo recordings were performed in anesthetized rat brain to test the functionality of the device under both acute and chronic conditions. The ECoG electrodes recorded slow-wave thalamocortical oscillations, while the implanted component provided high quality depth recordings. The implants remained viable for detecting action potentials of individual neurons for at least 15 weeks. PMID:26683306

  6. Investigations of redox magnetohydrodynamic fluid flow at microelectrode arrays using microbeads.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily C; Weston, Melissa C; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2010-04-01

    Microbeads are used to track fluid flow over microband electrode arrays to investigate fundamentals of redox magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD) in a confined solution. The results may lead toward the design of micro total analysis systems with microfluidics based on the redox-MHD concept. Ion flux was generated by reduction and oxidation of electroactive potassium ferri- and ferrocyanide at selected individually addressable microelectrodes in the array. An external magnetic field was produced by a small, permanent magnet (0.38 T) placed directly below the array with its field perpendicular to the plane of the array. The cross product of ion flux and magnetic field produces a magnetic force (a portion of the Lorentz force equation) that causes the fluid to rotate around the active electrodes. Velocities up to 1.4 mm/s are demonstrated here. The effects on velocities were obtained for different concentrations of redox species, widths of electrodes, gaps between electrodes, and combinations of anodically- and cathodically polarized electrodes. The microbeads allowed mapping of flow patterns and velocities, both parallel and perpendicular to the array chip. The influence of counteracting shear forces, drag along the walls, and reinforcing flow are discussed. A significant result is the fairly flat flow profile across 650 microm, attained between electrodes that are oppositely biased. PMID:20210341

  7. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 KΩ impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future. PMID:22442134

  8. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 KΩ impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future.

  9. Hydrophilic modification of neural microelectrode arrays based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Su, Huan-Chieh; Chuang, Shih-Chang; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Yung-Chan; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, Hsin; Yew, Tri-Rung; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2010-12-01

    To decrease the impedance of microelectrode arrays, for neuroscience applications we have fabricated and tested MEA based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes. With decreasing physical size of a microelectrode, its impedance increases and charge-transfer capability decreases. To decrease the impedance, the effective surface area of the electrode must generally be increased. We explored the effect of plasma treatment on the surface wettability of MWCNT. With a steam-plasma treatment the surface of MWCNT becomes converted from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic; this hydrophilic property is attributed to -OH bonding on the surface of MWCNT. We reported the synthesis at 400 °C of MWCNT on nickel-titanium multilayered metal catalysts by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Applying plasma with a power less than 25 W for 10 s improved the electrochemical and biological properties, and circumvented the limitation of the surface reverting to a hydrophobic condition; a hydrophilic state is maintained for at least one month. The MEA was used to record neural signals of a lateral giant cell from an American crayfish. The response amplitude of the action potential was about 275 µV with 1 ms period; the recorded data had a ratio of signal to noise up to 40.12 dB. The improved performance of the electrode makes feasible the separation of neural signals and the recognition of their distinct shapes. With further development the rapid treatment will be useful for long-term recording applications.

  10. Platinum nanowire microelectrode arrays for neurostimulation applications: Fabrication, characterization, and in-vitro retinal cell stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, John J., III

    Implantable electrical neurostimulating devices are being developed for a number of applications, including artificial vision through retinal stimulation. The epiretinal prosthesis will use a two-dimensional array microelectrodes to address individual cells of the retina. MEMS fabrication processes can produce arrays of microelectrodes with these dimensions, but there are two critical issues that they cannot satisfy. One, the stimulating electrodes are the only part of the implanted electrical device that penetrate through the water impermeable package, and must do so without sacrificing hermeticity. Two, As electrode size decreases, the current density (A cm-2 ) increases, due to increased electrochemical impedance. This reduces the amount of charge that can be safely injected into the tissue. To date, MEMS processing method, cannot produce electrode arrays with good, prolonged hermetic properties. Similarly, MEMS approaches do not account for the increased impedance caused by decreased surface area. For these reasons there is a strong motivation for the development of a water-impermeable, substrate-penetrating electrode array with low electrochemical impedance. This thesis presents a stimulating electrode array fabricated from platinum nanowires using a modified electrochemical template synthesis approach. Nanowires are electrochemically deposited from ammonium hexachloroplatinate solution into lithographically patterned nanoporous anodic alumina templates to produce microarrays of platinum nanowires. The platinum nanowires penetrating through the ceramic aluminum oxide template serve as parallel electrical conduits through the water impermeable, electrically insulating substrate. Electrode impedance can be adjusted by either controlling the nanowire hydrous platinum oxide content or by partially etching the alumina template to expose additional surface area. A stepwise approach to this project was taken. First, the electrochemistry of ammonium

  11. Further Evaluation of DNT Hazard Screening using Neural Networks from Rat Cortical Neurons on Multi-well Microelectrode Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals have not been characterized for their DNT potential. Due to the need for DNT hazard identification, efforts to develop screening assays for DNT potential is a high priority. Multi-well microelectrode arrays (MEA) measure the spontaneous activity of electr...

  12. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  13. Multielement microelectrode array sensors and compact instrumentation development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.; Balazs, G.B.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Hargrove, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    The increasing emphasis on environmental issues, waste reduction, and improved efficiency for industrial processes has spurred the development of new chemical sensors for field, or in-plant use. Specifically, sensors are needed to gauge the effectiveness of remediation efforts for sites which have become contaminated, to effect waste minimization, and to detect the presence of toxic, hazardous, or otherwise regulated chemicals in waste effluents, drinking water, and other environmental systems. In this regard, electrochemical sensors are particularly useful for the measurement of inorganics in aqueous systems. Electrochemical sensors have the attractive features of high sensitivity, low cost, small size, versatility of use, and are capable of stand-alone operation. This paper reviews our work on the development of microelectrode array sensors and user-friendly, compact instrumentation which we have developed for environmental and process control applications.

  14. Automated navigation of a glass micropipette on a high-density microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Jing Lin; Obien, Marie Engelene J; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Urs

    2015-08-01

    High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEAs) provide the capability to monitor the extracellular electric potential of multiple neurons at subcellular resolution over extended periods of time. In contrast, patch clamp allows for intracellular, sub-threshold recordings from a single patched neuron for very limited time on the order of an hour. Therefore, it will be beneficial to combine HDMEA and patch clamp for simultaneous intra- and extracellular recording of neuronal activity. Previously, it has been shown that the HDMEA can be used to localize and steer a glass micropipette towards a target location without using an optical microscope [1]. Here, we present an automated system, implemented in LabVIEW, which automatically locates and moves the glass micropipette towards a user-defined target. The presented system constitutes a first step towards developing an automated system to navigate a pipette to patch a neuron in vitro. PMID:26736403

  15. Decoding grating orientation from microelectrode array recordings in monkey cortical area V4.

    PubMed

    Manyakov, Nikolay V; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2010-04-01

    We propose an invasive brain-machine interface (BMI) that decodes the orientation of a visual grating from spike train recordings made with a 96 microelectrodes array chronically implanted into the prelunate gyrus (area V4) of a rhesus monkey. The orientation is decoded irrespective of the grating's spatial frequency. Since pyramidal cells are less prominent in visual areas, compared to (pre)motor areas, the recordings contain spikes with smaller amplitudes, compared to the noise level. Hence, rather than performing spike decoding, feature selection algorithms are applied to extract the required information for the decoder. Two types of feature selection procedures are compared, filter and wrapper. The wrapper is combined with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, and the filter is followed by a radial-basis function support vector machine classifier. In addition, since we have a multiclass classification problen, different methods for combining pairwise classifiers are compared. PMID:20411593

  16. Thermal impact of an active 3-D microelectrode array implanted in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohee; Tathireddy, Prashant; Normann, Richard A; Solzbacher, Florian

    2007-12-01

    A chronically implantable, wireless neural interface device will require integrating electronic circuitry with the interfacing microelectrodes in order to eliminate wired connections. Since the integrated circuit (IC) dissipates a certain amount of power, it will raise the temperature in surrounding tissues where it is implanted. In this paper, the thermal influence of the integrated 3-D Utah electrode array (UEA) device implanted in the brain was investigated by numerical simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) and by experimental measurement in vitro as well as in vivo. The numerically calculated and experimentally measured temperature increases due to the UEA implantation were in good agreement. The experimentally validated numerical model predicted that the temperature increases linearly with power dissipation through the UEA, with a slope of 0.029 degree C/mW over the power dissipation levels expected to be used. The influences of blood perfusion, brain metabolism, and UEA geometry on tissue heating were also investigated using the numerical model. PMID:18198706

  17. Cortical stimulation mapping using epidurally implanted thin-film microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Molina-Luna, Katiuska; Buitrago, Manuel M; Hertler, Benjamin; Schubring, Maximilian; Haiss, Florent; Nisch, Wilfried; Schulz, Jörg B; Luft, Andreas R

    2007-03-30

    Stimulation mapping of motor cortex is an important tool for assessing motor cortex physiology. Existing techniques include intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) which has high spatial resolution but damages cortical integrity by needle penetrations, and transcranial stimulation which is non-invasive but lacks focality and spatial resolution. A minimally invasive epidural microstimulation (EMS) technique using chronically implanted polyimide-based thin-film microelectrode arrays (72 contacts) was tested in rat motor cortex and compared to ICMS within individual animals. Results demonstrate reliable mapping with high reproducibility and validity with respect to ICMS. No histological evidence of cortical damage and the absence of motor deficits as determined by performance of a motor skill reaching task, demonstrate the safety of the method. EMS is specifically suitable for experiments integrating electrophysiology with behavioral and molecular biology techniques. PMID:17178423

  18. Reusable conductimetric array of interdigitated microelectrodes for the readout of low-density microarrays.

    PubMed

    Mallén, Maria; Díaz-González, María; Bonilla, Diana; Salvador, Juan P; Marco, María P; Baldi, Antoni; Fernández-Sánchez, César

    2014-06-17

    Low-density protein microarrays are emerging tools in diagnostics whose deployment could be primarily limited by the cost of fluorescence detection schemes. This paper describes an electrical readout system of microarrays comprising an array of gold interdigitated microelectrodes and an array of polydimethylsiloxane microwells, which enabled multiplexed detection of up to thirty six biological events on the same substrate. Similarly to fluorescent readout counterparts, the microarray can be developed on disposable glass slide substrates. However, unlike them, the presented approach is compact and requires a simple and inexpensive instrumentation. The system makes use of urease labeled affinity reagents for developing the microarrays and is based on detection of conductivity changes taking place when ionic species are generated in solution due to the catalytic hydrolysis of urea. The use of a polydimethylsiloxane microwell array facilitates the positioning of the measurement solution on every spot of the microarray. Also, it ensures the liquid tightness and isolation from the surrounding ones during the microarray readout process, thereby avoiding evaporation and chemical cross-talk effects that were shown to affect the sensitivity and reliability of the system. The performance of the system is demonstrated by carrying out the readout of a microarray for boldenone anabolic androgenic steroid hormone. Analytical results are comparable to those obtained by fluorescent scanner detection approaches. The estimated detection limit is 4.0 ng mL(-1), this being below the threshold value set by the World Anti-Doping Agency and the European Community. PMID:24890693

  19. Toward a comparison of microelectrodes for acute and chronic recordings.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew P; Rajdev, Pooja; Ellison, Casey; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2009-07-28

    Several variations of microelectrode arrays are used to record and stimulate intracortical neuronal activity. Bypassing the immune response to maintain a stable recording interface remains a challenge. Companies and researchers are continuously altering the material compositions and geometries of the arrays in order to discover a combination that allows for a chronic and stable electrode-tissue interface. From this interface, they wish to obtain consistent quality recordings and a stable, low impedance pathway for charge injection over extended periods of time. Despite numerous efforts, no microelectrode array design has managed to evade the host immune response and remain fully functional. This study is an initial effort comparing several microelectrode arrays with fundamentally different configurations for use in an implantable epilepsy prosthesis. Specifically, NeuroNexus (Michigan) probes, Cyberkinetics (Utah) Silicon and Iridium Oxide arrays, ceramic-based thin-film microelectrode arrays (Drexel), and Tucker-Davis Technologies (TDT) microwire arrays are evaluated over a 31-day period in an animal model. Microelectrodes are compared in implanted rats through impedance, charge capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, recording stability, and elicited immune response. Results suggest significant variability within and between microelectrode types with no clear superior array. Some applications for the microelectrode arrays are suggested based on data collected throughout the longitudinal study. Additionally, specific limitations of assaying biological phenomena and comparing fundamentally different microelectrode arrays in a highly variable system are discussed with suggestions on how to improve the reliability of observed results and steps needed to develop a more standardized microelectrode design. PMID:19486899

  20. Evaluation of multi-well microelectrode arrays for neurotoxicity screening using a chemical training set☆

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Emma R.; McClain, Maxine A.; Ross, James; LeFew, William R.; Shafer, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically excitable cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemicals or particles. However, conventional single well-MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screening large numbers of uncharacterized compounds. Recently, multi-well MEA (mwMEA) formats have become available to address the need for increased throughput. The current experiments examined the effects of a training set of 30 chemicals on spontaneous activity in networks of cortical neurons grown on mwMEA plates. Each plate contained 12 wells with 64 microelectrodes/well, for a total of 768 channels. Of the 30 chemicals evaluated, 23 were known to alter neuronal function in vivo (“positives”), including 6 GABAergic and 3 glutamatergic antagonists/agonists, 4 pyrethroids, 3 metals, 2 cholinesterase inhibitors, 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, valproic acid, verapamil, and fluoxetine. Seven compounds expected to have no effect on neuronal function were tested as “negatives” (glyphosate, acetaminophen, salicylic acid, paraquat, saccharin, d-sorbitol and amoxicillin). Following collection of 33 min of baseline activity, chemical effects (50 µM or highest soluble concentration) were recorded for 33 min. Twenty of the positives altered the mean network spike rate by more than the 14% threshold (two standard deviations from the mean for DMSO control). The three positives without effect were bifenthrin, nicotine and imidacloprid. None of the negative compounds caused a change in activity beyond the threshold. Based on these results, the mwMEA assay has both high sensitivity (87% identification of positive compounds) and specificity (100% identification of negative compounds). These experiments demonstrate the capacity of mwMEAs to screen compounds for neurotoxic effects mediated by a broad variety of mechanisms. PMID:22652317

  1. Toward on-chip, in-cell recordings from cultured cardiomyocytes by arrays of gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Fendyur, Anna; Spira, Micha E.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiological research greatly rely on the use of cultured primary cardiomyocytes (CMs). The prime methodology to assess CM network electrophysiology is based on the use of extracellular recordings by substrate-integrated planar Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs). Whereas this methodology permits simultaneous, long-term monitoring of the CM electrical activity, it limits the information to extracellular field potentials (FPs). The alternative method of intracellular action potentials (APs) recordings by sharp- or patch-microelectrodes is limited to a single cell at a time. Here, we began to merge the advantages of planar MEA and intracellular microelectrodes. To that end we cultured rat CM on micrometer size protruding gold mushroom-shaped microelectrode (gMμEs) arrays. Cultured CMs engulf the gMμE permitting FPs recordings from individual cells. Local electroporation of a CM converts the extracellular recording configuration to attenuated intracellular APs with shape and duration similar to those recorded intracellularly. The procedure enables to simultaneously record APs from an unlimited number of CMs. The electroporated membrane spontaneously recovers. This allows for repeated recordings from the same CM a number of times (>8) for over 10 days. The further development of CM-gMμE configuration opens up new venues for basic and applied biomedical research. PMID:22936913

  2. An implantable integrated low-power amplifier-microelectrode array for Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Erin; Sankar, Viswanath; Rowe, William; Sanchez, Justin C; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    One of the important challenges in designing Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMI) is to build implantable systems that have the ability to reliably process the activity of large ensembles of cortical neurons. In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and testing of a polyimide-based microelectrode array integrated with a low-power amplifier as part of the Florida Wireless Integrated Recording Electrode (FWIRE) project at the University of Florida developing a fully implantable neural recording system for BMI applications. The electrode array was fabricated using planar micromachining MEMS processes and hybrid packaged with the amplifier die using a flip-chip bonding technique. The system was tested both on bench and in-vivo. Acute and chronic neural recordings were obtained from a rodent for a period of 42 days. The electrode-amplifier performance was analyzed over the chronic recording period with the observation of a noise floor of 4.5 microVrms, and an average signal-to-noise ratio of 3.8. PMID:21095940

  3. Spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation during chronic implantation of a microelectrode array in a behaving macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Parker, R. A.; House, P. A.; Bagley, E.; Wendelken, S.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2012-12-01

    Objective. It has been hypothesized that a vision prosthesis capable of evoking useful visual percepts can be based upon electrically stimulating the primary visual cortex (V1) of a blind human subject via penetrating microelectrode arrays. As a continuation of earlier work, we examined several spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation. Approach. An array of 100 penetrating microelectrodes was chronically implanted in V1 of a behaving macaque monkey. Microstimulation thresholds were measured using a two-alternative forced choice detection task. Relative locations of electrically-evoked percepts were measured using a memory saccade-to-target task. Main results. The principal finding was that two years after implantation we were able to evoke behavioural responses to electric stimulation across the spatial extent of the array using groups of contiguous electrodes. Consistent responses to stimulation were evoked at an average threshold current per electrode of 204 ± 49 µA (mean ± std) for groups of four electrodes and 91 ± 25 µA for groups of nine electrodes. Saccades to electrically-evoked percepts using groups of nine electrodes showed that the animal could discriminate spatially distinct percepts with groups having an average separation of 1.6 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± std) in cortex and 1.0° ± 0.2° in visual space. Significance. These results demonstrate chronic perceptual functionality and provide evidence for the feasibility of a cortically-based vision prosthesis for the blind using penetrating microelectrodes.

  4. Long-term stimulation of mouse hippocampal slice culture on microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, A; Papanikolaou, T; Schuker, A; Möller, A; Schlosshauer, B

    2003-05-01

    To understand mechanisms of information processing, development and degeneration of the central nervous system, simultaneous multisite recording and stimulation have become extremely helpful. We have further developed the innovative approach to record from intact neural networks using planar microelectrode arrays (MEAs) with 60 substrate-integrated nano-columnar electrodes. To allow for long-term stimulation, mouse hippocampal tissue slices were immobilized onto MEAs and permanently moved between the gas and medium phase in a specifically designed tilting incubator that made it possible to electrically contact up to 90 MEAs with 5400 electrodes. After 2-3 weeks in vitro, histochemical staining, the intracellular microinjection of the fluorescent dye Alexa and the recording of spontaneous activity revealed in vivo-like characteristics of the organotypically cultured tissue. The feasibility of long-term stimulation during culturing was demonstrated with a low frequency paradigm. 0.003 Hz stimulation over a 16 h period resulted in a significant decline of field potentials and population spikes in two identified hippocampal subregions. Control experiments revealed that this effect was not due to tissue detachment or to induced cell death. In summary, the novel technology promises to open a new avenue for analyzing regulatory interactions of neuronal activity, cell differentiation and gene expression during development and in diseases. PMID:12738008

  5. Modulation of cultured neural networks using neurotrophin release from hydrogel-coated microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Sang Beom; Hynd, Matthew R.; Dowell-Mesfin, Natalie M.; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Roysam, Badrinath; Shain, William; Kim, Sung June

    2008-06-01

    Polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels were synthesized and characterized for use as drug release and substrates for neuron cell culture. Protein release kinetics was determined by incorporating bovine serum albumin (BSA) into hydrogels during polymerization. To determine if hydrogel incorporation and release affect bioactivity, alkaline phosphatase was incorporated into hydrogels and a released enzyme activity determined using the fluorescence-based ELF-97 assay. Hydrogels were then used to deliver a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from hydrogels polymerized over planar microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Primary hippocampal neurons were cultured on both control and neurotrophin-containing hydrogel-coated MEAs. The effect of released BDNF on neurite length and process arborization was investigated using automated image analysis. An increased spontaneous activity as a response to the released BDNF was recorded from the neurons cultured on the top of hydrogel layers. These results demonstrate that proteins of biological interest can be incorporated into hydrogels to modulate development and function of cultured neural networks. These results also set the stage for development of hydrogel-coated neural prosthetic devices for local delivery of various biologically active molecules.

  6. Cryopreserved rat cortical cells develop functional neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Otto, Frauke; Görtz, Philipp; Fleischer, Wiebke; Siebler, Mario

    2003-09-30

    Neurons growing on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are promising tools to investigate principal neuronal network mechanisms and network responses to pharmaceutical substances. However, broad application of these tools, e.g. in pharmaceutical substance screening, requires neuronal cells that provide stable activity on MEAs. Cryopreserved cortical neurons (CCx) from embryonic rats were cultured on MEAs and their immunocytochemical and electrophysiological properties were compared with acutely dissociated neurons (Cx). Both cell types formed neuritic networks and expressed the neuron-specific markers microtubule associated protein 2, synaptophysin, neurofilament and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Spontaneous spike activity (SSA) was recorded after 9 up to 74 days in vitro (DIV) in CCx and from 5 to 30 DIV in Cx, respectively. Cx and CCx exhibited synchronized burst activity with similar spiking characteristics. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished the SSA of both cell types reversibly. In CCx SSA-inhibition occurred with an IC50 of 1.1 nM for TTX, 161 microM for magnesium, 18 microM for D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) and 1 microM for GABA. CCx cells were easy to handle and developed long living, stable and active neuronal networks on MEAs with similar characteristics as Cx. Thus, these neurochips seem to be suitable for studying neuronal network properties and screening in pharmaceutical research. PMID:12948560

  7. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Boninger, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning. PMID:26113812

  8. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    PubMed Central

    Cotterill, Ellese; Hall, Diana; Wallace, Kathleen; Mundy, William R.; Eglen, Stephen J.; Shafer, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined neural network ontogeny using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multiwell MEA (mwMEA) plates over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures, action potential spiking activity developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking was sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time, with bursting parameters, synchrony, and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity; principal components analysis using these features demonstrated segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using random forest classifiers and support vector machines, we demonstrated that four features (coefficient of variation [CV] of within-burst interspike interval, CV of interburst interval, network spike rate, and burst rate) could predict the age of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification to a binary decision, accuracy improved to as high as 95%. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells needed for comparing different treatments. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to development in single-well MEAs. The increased throughput of mwMEAs will facilitate screening drugs, chemicals, or disease states for effects on neurodevelopment. PMID:27028607

  9. Relationship between microelectrode array impedance and chronic recording quality of single units and local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, JingLe; Willett, Francis R; Taylor, Dawn M

    2014-01-01

    Practical application of intracortical microelectrode technology is currently hindered by the inability to reliably record neuronal signals chronically. The precise mechanism of device failure is still under debate, but most likely includes some combination of tissue reaction, mechanical failure, and chronic material degradation. Impedance is a measure of the ease with which current flows through a working electrode under a driving voltage. Impedance has been hypothesized to provide information about an electrode's surrounding tissue reaction as well as chronic insulation degradation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between an electrode's impedance and its chronic recording performance as measured by the number of isolatable single units and the quality of local field potential recordings. Two 64-channel electrode arrays implanted in separate monkeys were assessed. We found no simple relationship between impedance and recording quality that held for both animals across all time periods. This suggests that future investigations on the topic should adopt a more fine-grained within-day and within-animal analysis. We also found new evidence from local field potential spatial correlation supporting the theory that insulation degradation is an important contributor to electrode failure. PMID:25570633

  10. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Ellese; Hall, Diana; Wallace, Kathleen; Mundy, William R; Eglen, Stephen J; Shafer, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    We examined neural network ontogeny using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multiwell MEA (mwMEA) plates over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures, action potential spiking activity developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking was sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time, with bursting parameters, synchrony, and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity; principal components analysis using these features demonstrated segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using random forest classifiers and support vector machines, we demonstrated that four features (coefficient of variation [CV] of within-burst interspike interval, CV of interburst interval, network spike rate, and burst rate) could predict the age of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification to a binary decision, accuracy improved to as high as 95%. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells needed for comparing different treatments. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to development in single-well MEAs. The increased throughput of mwMEAs will facilitate screening drugs, chemicals, or disease states for effects on neurodevelopment. PMID:27028607

  11. Microelectrode Array-evaluation of Neurotoxic Effects of Magnesium as an Implantable Biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ting; Wang, Zhonghai; Wei, Lina; Kindy, Mark; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg)-based biomaterials have shown great potential in clinical applications. However, the cytotoxic effects of excessive Mg2+ and the corrosion products from Mg-based biomaterials, particularly their effects on neurons, have been little studied. Although viability tests are most commonly used, a functional evaluation is critically needed. Here, both methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were used to test the effect of Mg2+ and Mg-extract solution on neuronal viability. Microelectrode arrays (MEAs), which provide long-term, real-time recording of extracellular electrophysiological signals of in vitro neuronal networks, were used to test for toxic effects. The minimum effective concentrations (ECmin) of Mg2+ from the MTT and LDH assays were 3 mmol/L and 100 mmol/L, respectively, while the ECmin obtained from the MEA assay was 0.1 mmol/L. MEA data revealed significant loss of neuronal network activity when the culture was exposed to 25% Mg-extract solution, a concentration that did not affect neuronal viability. For evaluating the biocompatibility of Mg-based biomaterials with neurons, MEA electrophysiological testing is a more precise method than basic cell-viability testing. PMID:27110081

  12. Leptin counteracts the hypoxia-induced inhibition of spontaneously firing hippocampal neurons: a microelectrode array study.

    PubMed

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O(2)). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  13. Leptin Counteracts the Hypoxia-Induced Inhibition of Spontaneously Firing Hippocampal Neurons: A Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O2). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  14. Extracellular Recording from Neuronal Networks Cultured on Hydrogel-coated Microelectrode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Miho; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Yuzo; Saito, Aki; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Microelectrode array (MEA) has been widely used for ensemble recording. One of the advantages of MEA recording is its capability of studying correlation between network structures and the ensemble activity-patterns. Simple neuronal networks, from which activities of individual cells can be identified, are promising for this purpose. We have developed a mask-free cell-patterning method named “micropipette drawing”. In this method, a thin hydrogel layer is formed on the surface of MEA substrates, which acts as the support for growth-guidance patterns. Here in this work, we tested whether electrical signals could be detected through this gel layer. Rat cortical neurons were cultured on substrates with guiding patterns. Electrical activities could be detected after 7 days in vitro (DIV) in both patterned and normal cell cultures, though the signal to noise ratio in the normal culture was clearly higher than that in the patterned culture. Frequency analysis demonstrated that the difference of the power spectra between these cultures was particularly significant in high frequency regions. Decreases in high-frequency components were more prominent in the signals obtained from the patterned cultures. This result suggested that the hydrogel layer acted as low-pass filters probably due to its capacitive properties. The next step is to establish a method to form hydrogel layers, which maintain growth-guidance properties and have better frequency characteristics.

  15. Low-Density Neuronal Networks Cultured using Patterned Poly-L-Lysine on Microelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sang Beom; Hynd, Matthew R.; Dowell-Mesfin, Natalie; Smith, Karen L.; Turner, James N.; Shain, William; Kim, Sung June

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic activity recorded from low-density networks of cultured rat hippocampal neurons was monitored using microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Neuronal networks were patterned with poly-L-lysine (PLL) using microcontact printing (µCP). Polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) stamps were fabricated with relief structures resulting in patterns of 2 µm-wide lines for directing process growth and 20 µm-diameter circles for cell soma attachment. These circles were aligned to electrode sites. Different densities of neurons were plated in order to assess the minimal neuron density required for development of an active network. Spontaneous activity was observed at 10–14 days in networks using neuron densities as low as 200 cells/mm2. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the distribution of dendrites along the lines and the location of foci of the presynaptic protein, synaptophysin, on neuron somas and dendrites. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that single fluorescent tracks contained multiple processes. Evoked responses of selected portions of the networks were produced by stimulation of specific electrode sites. In addition, the neuronal excitability of the network was increased by the bath application of high K+ (10–12 mM). Application of DNQX, an AMPA antagonist, blocked all spontaneous activity, suggesting that the activity is excitatory and mediated through glutamate receptors. PMID:17049614

  16. High-density stretchable microelectrode arrays: An integrated technology platform for neural and muscular surface interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Numerous applications in neuroscience research and neural prosthetics, such as retinal prostheses, spinal-cord surface stimulation for prosthetics, electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording for epilepsy detection, etc., involve electrical interaction with soft excitable tissues using a surface stimulation and/or recording approach. These applications require an interface that is able to set up electrical communications with a high throughput between electronics and the excitable tissue and that can dynamically conform to the shape of the soft tissue. Being a compliant and biocompatible material with mechanical impedance close to that of soft tissues, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) offers excellent potential as the substrate material for such neural interfaces. However, fabrication of electrical functionalities on PDMS has long been very challenging. This thesis work has successfully overcome many challenges associated with PDMS-based microfabrication and achieved an integrated technology platform for PDMS-based stretchable microelectrode arrays (sMEAs). This platform features a set of technological advances: (1) we have fabricated uniform current density profile microelectrodes as small as 10 mum in diameter; (2) we have patterned high-resolution (feature as small as 10 mum), high-density (pitch as small as 20 mum) thin-film gold interconnects on PDMS substrate; (3) we have developed a multilayer wiring interconnect technology within the PDMS substrate to further boost the achievable integration density of such sMEA; and (4) we have invented a bonding technology---via-bonding---to facilitate high-resolution, high-density integration of the sMEA with integrated circuits (ICs) to form a compact implant. Taken together, this platform provides a high-resolution, high-density integrated system solution for neural and muscular surface interfacing. sMEAs of example designs are evaluated through in vitro and in vivo experimentations on their biocompatibility, surface conformability

  17. Improved Focalization of Electrical Microstimulation Using Microelectrode Arrays: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular electrical stimulation (EES) of the central nervous system (CNS) has been used empirically for decades, with both fundamental and clinical goals. Currently, microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer new possibilities for CNS microstimulation. However, although focal CNS activation is of critical importance to achieve efficient stimulation strategies, the precise spatial extent of EES remains poorly understood. The aim of the present work is twofold. First, we validate a finite element model to compute accurately the electrical potential field generated throughout the extracellular medium by an EES delivered with MEAs. This model uses Robin boundary conditions that take into account the surface conductance of electrode/medium interfaces. Using this model, we determine how the potential field is influenced by the stimulation and ground electrode impedances, and by the electrical conductivity of the neural tissue. We confirm that current-controlled stimulations should be preferred to voltage-controlled stimulations in order to control the amplitude of the potential field. Second, we evaluate the focality of the potential field and threshold-distance curves for different electrode configurations. We propose a new configuration to improve the focality, using a ground surface surrounding all the electrodes of the array. We show that the lower the impedance of this surface, the more focal the stimulation. In conclusion, this study proposes new boundary conditions for the design of precise computational models of extracellular stimulation, and a new electrode configuration that can be easily incorporated into future MEA devices, either in vitro or in vivo, for a better spatial control of CNS microstimulation. PMID:19279677

  18. Fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an awake cat using a chronic microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Rousche, Patrick J.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2007-06-01

    We investigated fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an alert cat using a chronically implanted microelectrode array. A custom, real-time imaging template exhibited wave dynamics within the 33-microwire array (3 mm2) during ten recording sessions spanning 1 month post implant. Images were based on the spatial arrangement of peri-stimulus time histograms at each recording site in response to auditory stimuli consisting of tone pips between 1 and 10 kHz at 75 dB SPL. Functional images portray stimulus-locked spiking activity and exhibit waves of excitation and inhibition that evolve during the onset, sustained and offset period of the tones. In response to 5 kHz, for example, peak excitation occurred at 27 ms after onset and again at 15 ms following tone offset. Variability of the position of the centroid of excitation during ten recording sessions reached a minimum at 31 ms post onset (σ = 125 µm) and 18 ms post offset (σ = 145 µm), suggesting a fine place/time representation of the stimulus in the cortex. The dynamics of these fast waves also depended on stimulus frequency, likely reflecting the tonotopicity in auditory cortex projected from the cochlea. Peak wave velocities of 0.2 m s-1 were also consistent with those purported across horizontal layers of cat visual cortex. The fine resolution offered by microimaging may be critical for delivering optimal coding strategies used with an auditory prosthesis. Based on the initial results, future studies seek to determine the relevance of these waves to sensory perception and behavior. The work was performed at Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, ECG 334 MS-9709 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-9709, USA.

  19. Fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an awake cat using a chronic microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Witte, Russell S; Rousche, Patrick J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2007-06-01

    We investigated fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an alert cat using a chronically implanted microelectrode array. A custom, real-time imaging template exhibited wave dynamics within the 33-microwire array (3 mm(2)) during ten recording sessions spanning 1 month post implant. Images were based on the spatial arrangement of peri-stimulus time histograms at each recording site in response to auditory stimuli consisting of tone pips between 1 and 10 kHz at 75 dB SPL. Functional images portray stimulus-locked spiking activity and exhibit waves of excitation and inhibition that evolve during the onset, sustained and offset period of the tones. In response to 5 kHz, for example, peak excitation occurred at 27 ms after onset and again at 15 ms following tone offset. Variability of the position of the centroid of excitation during ten recording sessions reached a minimum at 31 ms post onset (sigma = 125 microm) and 18 ms post offset (sigma = 145 microm), suggesting a fine place/time representation of the stimulus in the cortex. The dynamics of these fast waves also depended on stimulus frequency, likely reflecting the tonotopicity in auditory cortex projected from the cochlea. Peak wave velocities of 0.2 m s(-1) were also consistent with those purported across horizontal layers of cat visual cortex. The fine resolution offered by microimaging may be critical for delivering optimal coding strategies used with an auditory prosthesis. Based on the initial results, future studies seek to determine the relevance of these waves to sensory perception and behavior. PMID:17409481

  20. Modelling and Analysis of Electrical Potentials Recorded in Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs).

    PubMed

    Ness, Torbjørn V; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Potworowski, Jan; Łęski, Szymon; Głąbska, Helena; Wójcik, Daniel K; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs), substrate-integrated planar arrays of up to thousands of closely spaced metal electrode contacts, have long been used to record neuronal activity in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the analysis of the MEA potentials has generally been mainly qualitative. Here we use a biophysical forward-modelling formalism based on the finite element method (FEM) to establish quantitatively accurate links between neural activity in the slice and potentials recorded in the MEA set-up. Then we develop a simpler approach based on the method of images (MoI) from electrostatics, which allows for computation of MEA potentials by simple formulas similar to what is used for homogeneous volume conductors. As we find MoI to give accurate results in most situations of practical interest, including anisotropic slices covered with highly conductive saline and MEA-electrode contacts of sizable physical extensions, a Python software package (ViMEAPy) has been developed to facilitate forward-modelling of MEA potentials generated by biophysically detailed multicompartmental neurons. We apply our scheme to investigate the influence of the MEA set-up on single-neuron spikes as well as on potentials generated by a cortical network comprising more than 3000 model neurons. The generated MEA potentials are substantially affected by both the saline bath covering the brain slice and a (putative) inadvertent saline layer at the interface between the MEA chip and the brain slice. We further explore methods for estimation of current-source density (CSD) from MEA potentials, and find the results to be much less sensitive to the experimental set-up. PMID:25822810

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  2. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  3. Optimization of microelectrode design for cortical recording based on thermal noise considerations.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; Johnson, Matthew D; Barnett, David W; Moffitt, Michael A; Otto, Kevin J; Kipke, Daryl R; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-01-01

    Intracortical microelectrode recordings of neural activity show great promise as control signals for neuroprosthetic applications. However, faithful, consistent recording of single unit spiking activity with chronically implanted silicon-substrate microelectrode arrays has proven difficult. Many approaches seek to enhance the long-term performance of microelectrode arrays by, for example, increasing electrode biocompatibility, decreasing electrode impedance, or improving electrode interface properties through application of small voltage pulses. The purpose of this study was to use computational models to optimize the design of microelectrodes. We coupled detailed models of the neural source signal, silicon-substrate microelectrodes, and thermal noise to define the electrode contact size that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Model analysis combined a multi-compartment cable model of a layer V cortical pyramidal neuron with a 3D finite element model of the head and microelectrode to define the amplitude and time course of the recorded signal. A spatially-lumped impedance model was parameterized with in vitro and in vivo spectroscopy data and used to define thermal noise as a function of electrode contact size. Our results suggest that intracortical microelectrodes with a contact size of ~380 microm2 will provide an increased SNR in vivo and improve the long-term recording capabilities of silicon-substrate microelectrode arrays. PMID:17947023

  4. Abiotic-biotic characterization of Pt/Ir microelectrode arrays in chronic implants.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Abhishek; Xue, Qing-Shan; Dieme, Robert; Sankar, Viswanath; Mayrand, Roxanne C; Nishida, Toshikazu; Streit, Wolfgang J; Sanchez, Justin C

    2014-01-01

    Pt/Ir electrodes have been extensively used in neurophysiology research in recent years as they provide a more inert recording surface as compared to tungsten or stainless steel. While floating microelectrode arrays (FMA) consisting of Pt/Ir electrodes are an option for neuroprosthetic applications, long-term in vivo functional performance characterization of these FMAs is lacking. In this study, we have performed comprehensive abiotic-biotic characterization of Pt/Ir arrays in 12 rats with implant periods ranging from 1 week up to 6 months. Each of the FMAs consisted of 16-channel, 1.5 mm long, and 75 μm diameter microwires with tapered tips that were implanted into the somatosensory cortex. Abiotic characterization included (1) pre-implant and post-explant scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study recording site changes, insulation delamination and cracking, and (2) chronic in vivo electrode impedance spectroscopy. Biotic characterization included study of microglial responses using a panel of antibodies, such as Iba1, ED1, and anti-ferritin, the latter being indicative of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Significant structural variation was observed pre-implantation among the arrays in the form of irregular insulation, cracks in insulation/recording surface, and insulation delamination. We observed delamination and cracking of insulation in almost all electrodes post-implantation. These changes altered the electrochemical surface area of the electrodes and resulted in declining impedance over the long-term due to formation of electrical leakage pathways. In general, the decline in impedance corresponded with poor electrode functional performance, which was quantified via electrode yield. Our abiotic results suggest that manufacturing variability and insulation material as an important factor contributing to electrode failure. Biotic results show that electrode performance was not correlated with microglial activation (neuroinflammation) as we were able

  5. Abiotic-biotic characterization of Pt/Ir microelectrode arrays in chronic implants

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Abhishek; Xue, Qing-Shan; Dieme, Robert; Sankar, Viswanath; Mayrand, Roxanne C.; Nishida, Toshikazu; Streit, Wolfgang J.; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Pt/Ir electrodes have been extensively used in neurophysiology research in recent years as they provide a more inert recording surface as compared to tungsten or stainless steel. While floating microelectrode arrays (FMA) consisting of Pt/Ir electrodes are an option for neuroprosthetic applications, long-term in vivo functional performance characterization of these FMAs is lacking. In this study, we have performed comprehensive abiotic-biotic characterization of Pt/Ir arrays in 12 rats with implant periods ranging from 1 week up to 6 months. Each of the FMAs consisted of 16-channel, 1.5 mm long, and 75 μm diameter microwires with tapered tips that were implanted into the somatosensory cortex. Abiotic characterization included (1) pre-implant and post-explant scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study recording site changes, insulation delamination and cracking, and (2) chronic in vivo electrode impedance spectroscopy. Biotic characterization included study of microglial responses using a panel of antibodies, such as Iba1, ED1, and anti-ferritin, the latter being indicative of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Significant structural variation was observed pre-implantation among the arrays in the form of irregular insulation, cracks in insulation/recording surface, and insulation delamination. We observed delamination and cracking of insulation in almost all electrodes post-implantation. These changes altered the electrochemical surface area of the electrodes and resulted in declining impedance over the long-term due to formation of electrical leakage pathways. In general, the decline in impedance corresponded with poor electrode functional performance, which was quantified via electrode yield. Our abiotic results suggest that manufacturing variability and insulation material as an important factor contributing to electrode failure. Biotic results show that electrode performance was not correlated with microglial activation (neuroinflammation) as we were able

  6. Chronic intracortical microelectrode arrays induce non-uniform, depth-related tissue responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Andrew J.; Desai, Himanshi A.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-implanted microelectrode arrays show promise as future clinical devices. However, biological responses to various designs, compositions and locations of these implants have not been fully characterized, and may impact the long-term functionality of these devices. In order to improve our understanding of the tissue conditions at the interface of chronic brain-implanted microdevices, we proposed utilizing advanced histology and microscopy techniques to image implanted devices and surrounding tissue intact within brain slices. We then proposed utilizing these methods to examine whether depth within the cerebral cortex affected tissue conditions around implants. Approach. Histological data was collected from rodent brain slices containing intact, intracortical microdevices four weeks after implantation surgery. Thick tissue sections containing the chronic implants were processed with fluorescent antibody labels, and imaged in an optical clearing solution using laser confocal microscopy. Main Results. Tissue surrounding microdevices exhibited two major depth-related phenomena: a non-uniform microglial coating along the device length and a dense mass of cells surrounding the implant in cerebral cortical layers I and II. Detailed views of the monocyte-derived immune cells improve our understanding of the close and complex association that immune cells have with chronic brain implants, and illuminated a possible relationship between cortical depth and the intensity of a chronic monocyte response around penetrating microdevices. The dense mass of cells contained vimentin, a protein not typically expressed highly in CNS cells, evidence that non-CNS cells likely descended down the face of the penetrating devices from the pial surface. Significance. Image data of highly non-uniform and depth-dependent biological responses along a device provides novel insight into the complexity of the tissue response to penetrating brain-implanted microdevices. The presented

  7. Stimulus-evoked high frequency oscillations are present in neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Chadwick M.; Zeller-Townson, Riley; Newman, Jonathan P.; Shoemaker, James T.; Killian, Nathan J.; Potter, Steve M.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (250–600 Hz) are present in the brains of epileptic animals and humans. The etiology of these oscillations and how they contribute to the diseased state remains unclear. This work identifies the presence of microstimulation-evoked high frequency oscillations (250–400 Hz) in dissociated neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Oscillations are more apparent with higher stimulus voltages. As with in vivo studies, activity is isolated to a single electrode, however, the MEA provides improved spatial resolution with no spread of the oscillation to adjacent electrodes 200 μm away. Oscillations develop across four weeks in vitro. Oscillations still occur in the presence of tetrodotoxin and synaptic blockers, and they cause no apparent disruption in the ability of oscillation-presenting electrodes to elicit directly evoked action potentials (dAPs) or promote the spread of synaptic activity throughout the culture. Chelating calcium with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) causes a temporal prolongation of the oscillation. Finally, carbenoxolone significantly reduces or eliminates the high frequency oscillations. Gap junctions may play a significant role in maintaining the oscillation given the inhibitory effect of carbenoxolone, the propagating effect of reduced calcium conditions and the isolated nature of the activity as demonstrated in previous studies. This is the first demonstration of stimulus-evoked high frequency oscillations in dissociated cultures. Unlike current models that rely on complex in vivo recording conditions, this work presents a simple controllable model in neuronal cultures on MEAs to further investigate how the oscillations occur at the molecular level and how they may contribute to the pathophysiology of disease. PMID:22615686

  8. Microelectrode array recordings of cardiac action potentials as a high throughput method to evaluate pesticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A; Molnar, P; Sieverdes, K; Jamshidi, A; Hickman, J J

    2006-04-01

    The threat of environmental pollution, biological warfare agent dissemination and new diseases in recent decades has increased research into cell-based biosensors. The creation of this class of sensors could specifically aid the detection of toxic chemicals and their effects in the environment, such as pyrethroid pesticides. Pyrethroids are synthetic pesticides that have been used increasingly over the last decade to replace other pesticides like DDT. In this study we used a high-throughput method to detect pyrethroids by using multielectrode extracellular recordings from cardiac cells. The data from this cell-electrode hybrid system was compared to published results obtained with patch-clamp electrophysiology and also used as an alternative method to further understand pyrethroid effects. Our biosensor consisted of a confluent monolayer of cardiac myocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEA) composed of 60 substrate-integrated electrodes. Spontaneous activity of these beating cells produced extracellular field potentials in the range of 100 microV to nearly 1200 microV with a beating frequency of 0.5-4 Hz. All of the tested pyrethroids; alpha-Cypermethrin, Tetramethrin and Tefluthrin, produced similar changes in the electrophysiological properties of the cardiac myocytes, namely reduced beating frequency and amplitude. The sensitivity of our toxin detection method was comparable to earlier patch-clamp studies, which indicates that, in specific applications, high-throughput extracellular methods can replace single-cell studies. Moreover, the similar effect of all three pyrethroids on the measured parameters suggests, that not only detection of the toxins but, their classification might also be possible with this method. Overall our results support the idea that whole cell biosensors might be viable alternatives when compared to current toxin detection methods. PMID:16198528

  9. Real-time monitoring of extracellular adenosine using enzyme-linked microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hinzman, Jason M; Gibson, Justin L; Tackla, Ryan D; Costello, Mark S; Burmeister, Jason J; Quintero, Jorge E; Gerhardt, Greg A; Hartings, Jed A

    2015-12-15

    Throughout the central nervous system extracellular adenosine serves important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory functions. However, current understanding of the in vivo regulation and effects of adenosine is limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of available measurement techniques. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked microelectrode array (MEA) with high spatial (7500 µm(2)) and temporal (4 Hz) resolution that can selectively measure extracellular adenosine through the use of self-referenced coating scheme that accounts for interfering substances and the enzymatic breakdown products of adenosine. In vitro, the MEAs selectively measured adenosine in a linear fashion (r(2)=0.98±0.01, concentration range=0-15 µM, limit of detection =0.96±0.5 µM). In vivo the limit of detection was 0.04±0.02 µM, which permitted real-time monitoring of the basal extracellular concentration in rat cerebral cortex (4.3±1.5 µM). Local cortical injection of adenosine through a micropipette produced dose-dependent transient increases in the measured extracellular concentration (200 nL: 6.8±1.8 µM; 400 nL: 19.4±5.3 µM) [P<0.001]. Lastly, local injection of dipyridamole, which inhibits transport of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporter, raised the measured extracellular concentration of adenosine by 120% (5.6→12.3 µM) [P<0.001]. These studies demonstrate that MEAs can selectively measure adenosine on temporal and spatial scales relevant to adenosine signaling and regulation in normal and pathologic states. PMID:26183072

  10. Magnetic resonance compatibility of multichannel silicon microelectrode systems for neural recording and stimulation: design criteria, tests, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Martínez Santiesteban, Francisco M; Swanson, Scott D; Noll, Douglas C; Anderson, David J

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of biomedical implants and devices represents a challenge for designers and potential risks for users. This paper addresses these problems and presents the first MR-compatible multichannel silicon chronic microelectrode system, used for recording and electrical stimulation of the central nervous system for animal models. A standard chronic assembly, from the Center for Neural Communication Technology at the University of Michigan, was tested on a 2 Tesla magnet to detect forces, heating, and image distortions, and modified to minimize or eliminate susceptibility artifacts, tissue damage, and electrode displacement, maintaining good image quality and safety to the animals. Multiple commercial connectors were tested for MR compatibility and several options for the reference electrode were also tested to minimize image artifacts and provide a stable biocompatible reference for shortand long-term neural recordings. Different holding screws were tested to anchor the microelectrode assembly on the top of the skull. The final selection of this part was based on MR-compatibility, biocompatibility, durability, and mechanical and chemical stability. The required adaptor to interconnect the MR-compatible microelectrode with standard data acquisition systems was also designed and fabricated. The final design is fully MR-compatible and has been successfully tested on guinea pigs. PMID:16532782

  11. Brain machine interfaces combining microelectrode arrays with nanostructured optical biochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Gonzalez, Timothy; Ghafer-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam; Andrews, Mark

    2009-02-01

    Neural microelectrodes are an important component of neural prosthetic systems which assist paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. These microelectrodes are also used in clinical settings to localize the locus of seizure initiation in epilepsy or to stimulate sub-cortical structures in patients with Parkinson's disease. In neural prosthetic systems, implanted microelectrodes record the electrical potential generated by specific thoughts and relay the signals to algorithms trained to interpret these thoughts. In this paper, we describe novel elongated multi-site neural electrodes that can record electrical signals and specific neural biomarkers and that can reach depths greater than 8mm in the sulcus of non-human primates (monkeys). We hypothesize that additional signals recorded by the multimodal probes will increase the information yield when compared to standard probes that record just electropotentials. We describe integration of optical biochemical sensors with neural microelectrodes. The sensors are made using sol-gel derived xerogel thin films that encapsulate specific biomarker responsive luminophores in their nanostructured pores. The desired neural biomarkers are O2, pH, K+, and Na+ ions. As a prototype, we demonstrate direct-write patterning to create oxygen-responsive xerogel waveguide structures on the neural microelectrodes. The recording of neural biomarkers along with electrical activity could help the development of intelligent and more userfriendly neural prosthesis/brain machine interfaces as well as aid in providing answers to complex brain diseases and disorders.

  12. Nanocrystalline diamond microelectrode arrays fabricated on sapphire technology for high-time resolution of quantal catecholamine secretion from chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, V; Gosso, S; Marcantoni, A; Xu, Y; Colombo, E; Gao, Z; Vittone, E; Kohn, E; Pasquarelli, A; Carbone, E

    2010-09-15

    The quantal release of oxidizable molecules can be successfully monitored by means of polarized carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) positioned in close proximity to the cell membrane. To partially overcome certain CFE limitations, mainly related to their low spatial resolution and lack of optical transparency, we developed a planar boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) prototype, grown on a transparent sapphire wafer. Responsiveness to applied catecholamines as well as the electrochemical and optical properties of the NCD-based device were first characterized by cyclic voltammetry and optical transmittance measurements. By stimulating chromaffin cells positioned on the device with external KCl, well-resolved quantal exocytotic events could be detected either from one NCD microelectrode, or simultaneously from an array of four microelectrodes, indicating that the chip is able to monitor secretory events (amperometric spikes) from a number of isolated chromaffin cells. Spikes detected by the planar NCD device had comparable amplitudes, kinetics and vesicle diameter distributions as those measured by conventional CFEs from the same chromaffin cell. PMID:20570501

  13. Heterogeneous distribution of exocytotic microdomains in adrenal chromaffin cells resolved by high-density diamond ultra-microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gosso, Sara; Turturici, Marco; Franchino, Claudio; Colombo, Elisabetta; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the ability of a high-density diamond microelectrode array targeted to resolve multi-site detection of fast exocytotic events from single cells. The array consists of nine boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond ultra-microelectrodes (9-Ch NCD-UMEA) radially distributed within a circular area of the dimensions of a single cell. The device can be operated in voltammetric or chronoamperometric configuration. Sensitivity to catecholamines, tested by dose–response calibrations, set the lowest detectable concentration of adrenaline to ∼5 μm. Catecholamine release from bovine or mouse chromaffin cells could be triggered by electrical stimulation or external KCl-enriched solutions. Spikes detected from the cell apex using carbon fibre microelectrodes showed an excellent correspondence with events measured at the bottom of the cell by the 9-Ch NCD-UMEA, confirming the ability of the array to resolve single quantal secretory events. Subcellular localization of exocytosis was provided by assigning each quantal event to one of the nine channels based on its location. The resulting mapping highlights the heterogeneous distribution of secretory activity in cell microdomains of 12–27 μm2. In bovine chromaffin cells, secretion was highly heterogeneous with zones of high and medium activity in 54% of the cell surface and zones of low or no activity in the remainder. The ‘non-active’ (‘silent’) zones covered 24% of the total and persisted for 6–8 min, indicating stable location. The 9-Ch NCD-UMEA therefore appears suitable for investigating the microdomain organization of neurosecretion with high spatial resolution. PMID:24879870

  14. Heterogeneous distribution of exocytotic microdomains in adrenal chromaffin cells resolved by high-density diamond ultra-microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Gosso, Sara; Turturici, Marco; Franchino, Claudio; Colombo, Elisabetta; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe the ability of a high-density diamond microelectrode array targeted to resolve multi-site detection of fast exocytotic events from single cells. The array consists of nine boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond ultra-microelectrodes (9-Ch NCD-UMEA) radially distributed within a circular area of the dimensions of a single cell. The device can be operated in voltammetric or chronoamperometric configuration. Sensitivity to catecholamines, tested by dose-response calibrations, set the lowest detectable concentration of adrenaline to ∼5 μm. Catecholamine release from bovine or mouse chromaffin cells could be triggered by electrical stimulation or external KCl-enriched solutions. Spikes detected from the cell apex using carbon fibre microelectrodes showed an excellent correspondence with events measured at the bottom of the cell by the 9-Ch NCD-UMEA, confirming the ability of the array to resolve single quantal secretory events. Subcellular localization of exocytosis was provided by assigning each quantal event to one of the nine channels based on its location. The resulting mapping highlights the heterogeneous distribution of secretory activity in cell microdomains of 12-27 μm2. In bovine chromaffin cells, secretion was highly heterogeneous with zones of high and medium activity in 54% of the cell surface and zones of low or no activity in the remainder. The 'non-active' ('silent') zones covered 24% of the total and persisted for 6-8 min, indicating stable location. The 9-Ch NCD-UMEA therefore appears suitable for investigating the microdomain organization of neurosecretion with high spatial resolution. PMID:24879870

  15. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  16. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  17. Creation of defined single cell resolution neuronal circuits on microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirlo, Russell Kirk

    2009-12-01

    The way cell-cell organization of neuronal networks influences activity and facilitates function is not well understood. Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) and advancing cell patterning technologies have enabled access to and control of in vitro neuronal networks spawning much new research in neuroscience and neuroengineering. We propose that small, simple networks of neurons with defined circuitry may serve as valuable research models where every connection can be analyzed, controlled and manipulated. Towards the goal of creating such neuronal networks we have applied microfabricated elastomeric membranes, surface modification and our unique laser cell patterning system to create defined neuronal circuits with single-cell precision on MEAs. Definition of synaptic connectivity was imposed by the 3D physical constraints of polydimethylsiloxane elastomeric membranes. The membranes had 20mum clear-through holes and 2-3mum deep channels which when applied to the surface of the MEA formed microwells to confine neurons to electrodes connected via shallow tunnels to direct neurite outgrowth. Tapering and turning of channels was used to influence neurite polarity. Biocompatibility of the membranes was increased by vacuum baking, oligomer extraction, and autoclaving. Membranes were bound to the MEA by oxygen plasma treatment and heated pressure. The MEA/membrane surface was treated with oxygen plasma, poly-D-lysine and laminin to improve neuron attachment, survival and neurite outgrowth. Prior to cell patterning the outer edge of culture area was seeded with 5x10 5 cells per cm and incubated for 2 days. Single embryonic day 7 chick forebrain neurons were then patterned into the microwells and onto the electrodes using our laser cell patterning system. Patterned neurons successfully attached to and were confined to the electrodes. Neurites extended through the interconnecting channels and connected with adjacent neurons. These results demonstrate that neuronal circuits can be

  18. Multi-well microelectrode array recordings detect neuroactivity of ToxCast compounds.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Pablo; Martin, Matt; LeFew, William R; Ross, James; Houck, Keith A; Shafer, Timothy J

    2014-09-01

    Spontaneous activity in neuronal cultures on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) is sensitive to effects of drugs, chemicals, and particles. Multi-well MEA (mwMEA) systems have increased throughput of MEAs, enabling their use for chemical screening. The present experiments examined a subset of EPA's ToxCast compounds for effects on spontaneous neuronal activity in primary cortical cultures using 48-well MEA plates. A first cohort of 68 compounds was selected from the ToxCast Phase I and II libraries; 37 were positive in one or more of 20 individual ToxCast Novascreen assays related to ion channels (NVS_IC), with the remainder selected based on known neuroactivity. A second cohort of 25 compounds was then tested with 20 originating from the ToxCast Phase I and II libraries (not hits in NVS_IC assays) and 5 known negatives from commercial vendors. Baseline activity (1h) was recorded prior to exposing the networks to compounds for 1h, and the weighted mean firing rate (wMFR) was determined in the absence and presence of each compound. Compounds that altered activity by greater than the weighted change of DMSO-treated wells plus 2SD were considered "hits". Of the first set of 68 compounds, 54 altered wMFR by more than the threshold, while in the second set, 13/25 compounds were hits. MEAs detected 30 of 37 (81.1%) compounds that were hits in NVS_IC assays, as well as detected known neurotoxicants that were negative in NVS_IC assays, primarily pyrethroids and GABAA receptor antagonists. Conversely, wMFR of cortical neuronal networks on MEAs was insensitive to nicotinic compounds, as only one neonicotinoid was detected by MEAs; this accounts for the bulk of non-concordant compounds between MEA and NVS_IC assays. These data demonstrate that mwMEAs can be used to screen chemicals efficiently for potential neurotoxicity, and that the results are concordant with predictions from ToxCast NVS_IC assays for interactions with ion channels. PMID:24997244

  19. Characterizing the Material Properties of Polymer-Based Microelectrode Arrays for Retinal Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C S; Maghribi, M

    2003-05-10

    The Retinal Prosthesis project is a three year project conducted in part at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and funded by the Department of Energy to create an epiretinal microelectrode array for stimulating retinal cells. The implant must be flexible to conform to the retina, robust to sustain handling during fabrication and implantation, and biocompatible to withstand physiological conditions within the eye. Using poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), LLNL aims to use microfabrication techniques to increase the number of electrodes and integrate electronics. After the initial designs were fabricated and tested in acute implantation, it became obvious that there was a need to characterize and understand the mechanical and electrical properties of these new structures. This knowledge would be imperative in gaining credibility for polymer microfabrication and optimizing the designs. Thin composite microfabricated devices are challenging to characterize because they are difficult to handle, and exhibit non-linear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic properties. The objective of this research is to device experiments and protocols, develop an analytical model to represent the composite behavior, design and fabricate test structures, and conduct experimental testing to determine the mechanical and electrical properties of PDMS-metal composites. Previous uniaxial stretch tests show an average of 7% strain before failure on resistive heaters of similar dimensions deposited on PDMS. Lack of background information and questionable human accuracy demands a more sophisticated and thorough testing method. An Instron tensile testing machine was set up to interface with a digital multiplexor and computer interface to simultaneously record and graph position, load, and resistance across devices. With a compliant load cell for testing polymers and electrical interconnect grips designed and fabricated to interface the sample to the electronics, real-time resistance measurements

  20. Neurotoxicity screening of (illicit) drugs using novel methods for analysis of microelectrode array (MEA) recordings.

    PubMed

    Hondebrink, L; Verboven, A H A; Drega, W S; Schmeink, S; de Groot, M W G D M; van Kleef, R G D M; Wijnolts, F M J; de Groot, A; Meulenbelt, J; Westerink, R H S

    2016-07-01

    Annual prevalence of the use of common illicit drugs and new psychoactive substances (NPS) is high, despite the often limited knowledge on the health risks of these substances. Recently, cortical cultures grown on multi-well microelectrode arrays (mwMEAs) have been used for neurotoxicity screening of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and toxins with a high sensitivity and specificity. However, the use of mwMEAs to investigate the effects of illicit drugs on neuronal activity is largely unexplored. We therefore first characterised the cortical cultures using immunocytochemistry and show the presence of astrocytes, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Neuronal activity is concentration-dependently affected following exposure to six neurotransmitters (glutamate, GABA, serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine and nicotine). Most neurotransmitters inhibit neuronal activity, although glutamate and acetylcholine transiently increase activity at specific concentrations. These transient effects are not detected when activity is determined during the entire 30min exposure window, potentially resulting in false-negative results. As expected, exposure to the GABAA-receptor antagonist bicuculline increases neuronal activity. Exposure to a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA-receptor (diazepam) or to glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX and MK-801) reduces neuronal activity. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to common drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and amphetamine) and NPS (1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP), 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) and methoxetamine (MXE)) decreases neuronal activity. MXE most potently inhibits neuronal activity with an IC50 of 0.5μM, whereas 4-FA is least potent with an IC50 of 113μM. Our data demonstrate the importance of analysing neuronal activity within different time windows during exposure to prevent false-negative results. We also show that cortical cultures grown on mwMEAs can successfully be applied to investigate the effects of

  1. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Serreze, H. B.; Bates, H. E.; Morrison, A. D.; Jewett, D. N.; Ho, J. C. T.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Kran, A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous growth methodology for silicon solar cell ribbons deals with capillary effects, die effects, thermal effects and crystal shape effects. Emphasis centers on the shape of the meniscus at the ribbon edge as a factor contributing to ribbon quality with respect to defect densities. Structural and electrical characteristics of edge defined, film-fed grown silicon ribbons are elaborated. Ribbon crystal solar cells produce AMO efficiencies of 6 to 10%.

  2. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project, directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulation system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials, are reported. Results of the following are discussed: (1) weather-ometer stressing vs. weathering history of silicon and silicon modified materials; (2) humidity/temperature cycling exposure; (3) exposure at high humidity/high temperature; (4) outdoor exposure stress; (5) thermal cycling stress; and (6) UV screening agents. The plans for the next quarter are outlined.

  3. Low cost silicon solar cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, F. T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The technological options available for producing low cost silicon solar cell arrays were examined. A project value of approximately $250/sq m and $2/watt is projected, based on mass production capacity demand. Recommendations are included for the most promising cost reduction options.

  4. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  5. Advancements in fabrication process of microelectrode array for a retinal prosthesis using Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonsoo; Shin, Soowon; Lee, Geun Jae; Gwon, Tae Mok; Park, Jeong Hoan; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) has been considered as an alternative biomaterial for implantable biomedical devices primarily for its low moisture absorption rate compared with conventional polymers such as polyimide, parylene and silicone elastomers. A novel retinal prosthetic device based on monolithic encapsulation of LCP is being developed in which entire neural stimulation circuitries are integrated into a thin and eye-conformable structure. Micromachining techniques for fabrication of a LCP retinal electrode array have been previously reported. In this research, however, for being used as a part of the LCP-based retinal implant, we developed advanced fabrication process of LCP retinal electrode through new approaches such as electroplating and laser-machining in order to achieve higher mechanical robustness, long-term reliability and flexibility. Thickened metal tracks could contribute to higher mechanical strength as well as higher long-term reliability when combined with laser-ablation process by allowing high-pressure lamination. Laser-thinning technique could improve the flexibility of LCP electrode. PMID:24110931

  6. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of spontaneous network activity in cortical networks grown on multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) plates.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used...

  7. Precaution for volume conduction in rodent cortical electroencephalography using high-density polyimide-based microelectrode arrays on the skull.

    PubMed

    Stienen, P J; Venzi, M; Poppendieck, W; Hoffmann, K P; Åberg, E

    2016-04-01

    In humans, significant progress has been made to link spatial changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral density, connectivity strength, and phase-amplitude modulation to neurological, physiological, and psychological correlates. In contrast, standard rodent EEG techniques employ only few electrodes, which results in poor spatial resolution. Recently, a technique was developed to overcome this limitation in mice. This technique was based on a polyimide-based microelectrode (PBM) array applied on the mouse skull, maintaining a significant number of electrodes with consistent contact, electrode impedance, and mechanical stability. The present study built on this technique by extending it to rats. Therefore, a similar PBM array, but adapted to rats, was designed and fabricated. In addition, this array was connected to a wireless EEG headstage, allowing recording in untethered, freely moving rats. The advantage of a high-density array relies on the assumption that the signal recorded from the different electrodes is generated from distinct sources, i.e., not volume-conducted. Therefore, the utility and validity of the array were evaluated by determining the level of synchrony between channels due to true synchrony or volume conduction during basal vigilance states and following a subanesthetic dose of ketamine. Although the PBM array allowed recording with high signal quality, under both drug and drug-free conditions, high synchronization existed due to volume conduction between the electrodes even in the higher spectral frequency range. Discrimination existed only between frontally and centrally/distally grouped electrode pairs. Therefore, caution should be used in interpreting spatial data obtained from high-density PBM arrays in rodents. PMID:26864767

  8. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  9. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  10. Development of the ORRUBA Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Johnson, M. S.; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest due to the proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new high solid-angular coverage array, composed of two rings of silicon detectors, optimized for measuring (d,p) reactions. A partial implementation has been used to measure (d,p) reactions on nuclei around the N = 82 shell closure.

  11. Integrated Arrays on Silicon at Terahertz Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhayay, Goutam; Lee, Choonsup; Jung, Cecil; Lin, Robert; Peralta, Alessandro; Mehdi, Imran; Llombert, Nuria; Thomas, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore various receiver font-end and antenna architecture for use in integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies. Development of wafer-level integrated terahertz receiver front-end by using advanced semiconductor fabrication technologies and use of novel integrated antennas with silicon micromachining are reported. We report novel stacking of micromachined silicon wafers which allows for the 3-dimensional integration of various terahertz receiver components in extremely small packages which easily leads to the development of 2- dimensioanl multi-pixel receiver front-ends in the terahertz frequency range. We also report an integrated micro-lens antenna that goes with the silicon micro-machined front-end. The micro-lens antenna is fed by a waveguide that excites a silicon lens antenna through a leaky-wave or electromagnetic band gap (EBG) resonant cavity. We utilized advanced semiconductor nanofabrication techniques to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a super-compact, low-mass submillimeter-wave heterodyne frontend. When the micro-lens antenna is integrated with the receiver front-end we will be able to assemble integrated heterodyne array receivers for various applications such as multi-pixel high resolution spectrometer and imaging radar at terahertz frequencies.

  12. Pacemaker phase shift in the absence of neural activity in guinea-pig stomach: a microelectrode array study

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Shimono, Ken; Liu, Hong-Nian; Jiko, Hideyasu; Katayama, Noburu; Tomita, Tadao; Goto, Kazunori

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility is well organized. GI muscles act as a functional syncytium to achieve physiological functions under the control of neurones and pacemaker cells, which generate basal spontaneous pacemaker electrical activity. To date, it is unclear how spontaneous electrical activities are coupled, especially within a micrometre range. Here, using a microelectrode array, we show a spatio-temporal analysis of GI spontaneous electrical activity. The muscle preparations were isolated from guinea-pig stomach, and fixed in a chamber with an array of 8 × 8 planar multielectrodes (with 300 μm in interpolar distance). The electrical activities (field potentials) were simultaneously recorded through a multichannel amplifier system after high-pass filtering at 0.1 Hz. Dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonists are known to differentiate the electrical pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) by suppressing smooth muscle activity. In the presence of nifedipine, we observed spontaneous electrical activities that were well synchronized over the array area, but had a clear phase shift depending on the distance. The additional application of tetrodotoxin (TTX) had little effect on the properties of the electrical activity. Furthermore, by constructing field potential images, we visualized the synchronization of pacemaker electrical activities resolving phase shifts that were measurable over several hundred micrometres. The results imply a phase modulation mechanism other than neural activity, and we postulate that this mechanism enables smooth GI motility. In addition, some preparations clearly showed plasticity of the pacemaker phase shift. PMID:16990400

  13. In Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandagor, Vincent; Cela, Carlos J.; Sanders, Charlene A.; Greenbaum, Elias; Lazzi, Gianluca; Zhou, David D.; Castro, Richard; Gaikwad, Sanjay; Little, Jim

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model "eye," beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  14. Enhancing the Bipolar Redox Cycling Efficiency of Plane-Recessed Microelectrode Arrays by Adding a Chemically Irreversible Interferent.

    PubMed

    He, Dingwen; Yan, Jiawei; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Yongliang; Mao, Bingwei; Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The individual electrochemical anodic responses of dopamine (DA), epinephrine (EP), and pyrocatechol (CT) were investigated at arrays of recessed gold disk-microelectrodes arrays (MEAs) covered by a gold plane electrode and compared to those of their binary mixture (CT and EP) when the top-plane electrode was operated as a bipolar electrode or as a collector. The interferent species (EP) displays a chemically irreversible wave over the same potential range as the chemically reversible ones of DA or CT. As expected, in the generator-collector (GC) mode, EP did not contribute to the redox cycling amplification that occurred only for DA or CT. Conversely, in the bipolar mode, the presence of EP drastically increased the bipolar redox cycling efficiency of DA and CT. This evidenced that the chemically irreversible oxidation of EP at the anodic poles of the top plane floating electrode provided additional electron fluxes that were used to more efficiently reduce the oxidized DA or CT species at the cathodic poles. This suggests an easy experimental strategy for enhancing the bipolar efficiency of MEAs up to reach a performance identical to that achieved when the same MEAs are operated in a GC mode. PMID:27490270

  15. PerFlexMEA: a thin microporous microelectrode array for in vitro cardiac electrophysiological studies on hetero-cellular bilayers with controlled gap junction communication.

    PubMed

    Mondal, A; Baker, B; Harvey, I R; Moreno, A P

    2015-05-01

    The new microelectrode array device presented is called PerFlexMEA and it enables controlled coupling between myocytes and nonmyocytes used in cardiovascular conduction studies. The device consists of an 8 μm thin parylene microporous membrane with a 4 × 5 microelectrode array patterned on one side. Myocytes and nonmyocytes can be plated on either side of the parylene membrane to create a tissue bilayer. The 3-3.5 μm diameter pores allow inter-layer dye and electrical coupling without transmembrane cell migration. Cell migration was found to vary with cell-type and micropore diameter. Pore density can be varied based on desired coupling ratio. The flexible parylene membrane is packaged between two rigid thermoplastic layers, such that the microelectrode array region is exposed, while the rest of the device remains insulated. The packaged PerFlexMEA fits in a 60 mm culture dish. Recording experiments are performed by simply plugging it into a commercially available multielectrode amplifier system. Recorded signals were processed and analysed using scripts generated in MATLAB. Our experimental results provide evidence of the reliability of this device, as conduction velocity was observed to decrease after inducing lateral hetero-cellular controlled coupling between myocytes and HeLa cells expressing connexin 43. PMID:25797476

  16. A new high-density (25 electrodes/mm2) penetrating microelectrode array for recording and stimulating sub-millimeter neuroanatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Sharma, R.; Mathews, K. S.; Fernandez, E.; Yoo, J.; Christensen, B.; Tresco, P.; Rieth, L.; Solzbacher, F.; Normann, R. A.; Tathireddy, P.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Among the currently available neural interface devices, there has been a need for a penetrating electrode array with a high electrode-count and high electrode-density (the number of electrodes/mm2) that can be used for electrophysiological studies of sub-millimeter neuroanatomical structures. We have developed such a penetrating microelectrode array with both a high electrode-density (25 electrodes/mm2) and high electrode-count (up to 96 electrodes) for small nervous system structures, based on the existing Utah Slanted Electrode Array (USEA). Such high electrode-density arrays are expected to provide greater access to nerve fibers than the conventionally spaced USEA especially in small diameter nerves. Approach. One concern for such high density microelectrode arrays is that they may cause a nerve crush-type injury upon implantation. We evaluated this possibility during acute (<10 h) in vivo experiments with electrode arrays implanted into small diameter peripheral nerves of anesthetized rats (sciatic nerve) and cats (pudendal nerve). Main results. Successful intrafascicular implantation and viable nerve function was demonstrated via microstimulation, single-unit recordings and histological analysis. Measurements of the electrode impedances and quantified electrode dimensions demonstrated fabrication quality. The results of these experiments show that such high density neural interfaces can be implanted acutely into neural tissue without causing a complete nerve crush injury, while mediating intrafascicular access to fibers in small diameter peripheral nerves. Significance. This new penetrating microelectrode array has characteristics un-matched by other neural interface devices currently available for peripheral nervous system neurophysiological research.

  17. High-throughput cardiac safety evaluation and multi-parameter arrhythmia profiling of cardiomyocytes using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Kristin H; Lewis, Gregory F; Gay, Elaine A; Sellgren, Katelyn L; Grego, Sonia

    2015-10-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) recording extracellular field potentials of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) provide a rich data set for functional assessment of drug response. The aim of this work is the development of a method for a systematic analysis of arrhythmia using MEAs, with emphasis on the development of six parameters accounting for different types of cardiomyocyte signal irregularities. We describe a software approach to carry out such analysis automatically including generation of a heat map that enables quick visualization of arrhythmic liability of compounds. We also implemented signal processing techniques for reliable extraction of the repolarization peak for field potential duration (FPD) measurement even from recordings with low signal to noise ratios. We measured hiPS-CM's on a 48 well MEA system with 5minute recordings at multiple time points (0.5, 1, 2 and 4h) after drug exposure. We evaluated concentration responses for seven compounds with a combination of hERG, QT and clinical proarrhythmia properties: Verapamil, Ranolazine, Flecainide, Amiodarone, Ouabain, Cisapride, and Terfenadine. The predictive utility of MEA parameters as surrogates of these clinical effects were examined. The beat rate and FPD results exhibited good correlations with previous MEA studies in stem cell derived cardiomyocytes and clinical data. The six-parameter arrhythmia assessment exhibited excellent predictive agreement with the known arrhythmogenic potential of the tested compounds, and holds promise as a new method to predict arrhythmic liability. PMID:26232523

  18. Femtomolar Detection of Silver Nanoparticles by Flow-Enhanced Direct-Impact Voltammetry at a Microelectrode Array.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Bartlett, Thomas R; Fair, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen; Compton, Richard G

    2016-09-01

    We report the femtomolar detection of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by direct-impact voltammetry. This is achieved through the use of a random array of microelectrodes (RAM) integrated into a purpose-built flow cell, allowing combined diffusion and convection to the electrode surface. A coupled RAM-flow cell system is implemented and is shown to give reproducible wall-jet type flow characteristics, using potassium ferrocyanide as a molecular redox species. The calibrated flow system is then used to detect and quantitatively size Ag nanoparticles at femtomolar concentrations. Under flow conditions, it is found the nanoparticle impact frequency increases linearly with the volumetric flow rate. The resulting limit of detection is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the previous detection limit for direct-impact voltammetry (900 fM) [J. Ellison et al. Sens. Actuators, B 2014, 200, 47], and is more than 30 times smaller than the previous detection limit for mediated-impact voltammetry (83 fM) [T. M. Alligrant et al. Langmuir 2014, 30, 13462]. PMID:27494652

  19. A PDMS-based integrated stretchable microelectrode array (isMEA) for neural and muscular surface interfacing.

    PubMed

    Liang Guo; Guvanasen, G S; Xi Liu; Tuthill, C; Nichols, T R; DeWeerth, S P

    2013-02-01

    Numerous applications in neuroscience research and neural prosthetics, such as electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording and retinal prosthesis, involve electrical interactions with soft excitable tissues using a surface recording and/or stimulation approach. These applications require an interface that is capable of setting up high-throughput communications between the electrical circuit and the excitable tissue and that can dynamically conform to the shape of the soft tissue. Being a compliant material with mechanical impedance close to that of soft tissues, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) offers excellent potential as a substrate material for such neural interfaces. This paper describes an integrated technology for fabrication of PDMS-based stretchable microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Specifically, as an integral part of the fabrication process, a stretchable MEA is directly fabricated with a rigid substrate, such as a thin printed circuit board (PCB), through an innovative bonding technology-via-bonding-for integrated packaging. This integrated strategy overcomes the conventional challenge of high-density packaging for this type of stretchable electronics. Combined with a high-density interconnect technology developed previously, this stretchable MEA technology facilitates a high-resolution, high-density integrated system solution for neural and muscular surface interfacing. In this paper, this PDMS-based integrated stretchable MEA (isMEA) technology is demonstrated by an example design that packages a stretchable MEA with a small PCB. The resulting isMEA is assessed for its biocompatibility, surface conformability, electrode impedance spectrum, and capability to record muscle fiber activity when applied epimysially. PMID:23853274

  20. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell – Fibroblasts Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549—human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5—human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  1. Femtomolar Detection of Silver Nanoparticles by Flow-Enhanced Direct-Impact Voltammetry at a Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the femtomolar detection of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by direct-impact voltammetry. This is achieved through the use of a random array of microelectrodes (RAM) integrated into a purpose-built flow cell, allowing combined diffusion and convection to the electrode surface. A coupled RAM-flow cell system is implemented and is shown to give reproducible wall-jet type flow characteristics, using potassium ferrocyanide as a molecular redox species. The calibrated flow system is then used to detect and quantitatively size Ag nanoparticles at femtomolar concentrations. Under flow conditions, it is found the nanoparticle impact frequency increases linearly with the volumetric flow rate. The resulting limit of detection is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the previous detection limit for direct-impact voltammetry (900 fM) [J. Ellison et al. Sens. Actuators, B2014, 200, 47], and is more than 30 times smaller than the previous detection limit for mediated-impact voltammetry (83 fM) [T. M. Alligrant et al. Langmuir2014, 30, 13462]. PMID:27494652

  2. On-line observation of cell growth in a three-dimensional matrix on surface-modified microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Kyriakides, Themis R; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2009-06-01

    Despite many successful applications of microelectrode arrays (MEAs), typical two-dimensional in-vitro cultures do not project the full scale of the cell growth environment in the three-dimensional (3D) in-vivo setting. This study aims to on-line monitor in-vitro cell growth in a 3D matrix on the surface-modified MEAs with a dynamic perfusion culture system. A 3D matrix consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel supplemented with poly-D-lysine was subsequently synthesized in situ on the self-assembled monolayer modified MEAs. FTIR spectrum analysis revealed a peak at 2100 cm(-1) due to the degradation of the structure of the 3D matrix. After 2 wks, microscopic examination revealed that the non-degraded area was around 1500 microm(2) and provided enough space for cell growth. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the degraded 3D matrix was non-cytotoxic allowing the growth of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and cortical neurons in vitro. Time-course changes of total impedance including resistance and reactance were recorded for 8 days to evaluate the cell growth in the 3D matrix on the MEA. A consistent trend reflecting changes of reactance and total impedance was observed. These in-vitro assays demonstrate that our 3D matrix can construct a biomimetic system for cell growth and analysis of cell surface interactions. PMID:19344948

  3. A Compact Microelectrode Array Chip with Multiple Measuring Sites for Electrochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dimaki, Maria; Vergani, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Kwasny, Dorota; Sasso, Luigi; Carminati, Marco; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Emneus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of a microchip with 12 identical but individually addressable electrochemical measuring sites, each consisting of a set of interdigitated electrodes acting as a working electrode as well as two circular electrodes functioning as a counter and reference electrode in close proximity. The electrodes are made of gold on a silicon oxide substrate and are passivated by a silicon nitride membrane. A method for avoiding the creation of high edges at the electrodes (known as lift-off ears) is presented. The microchip design is highly symmetric to accommodate easy electronic integration and provides space for microfluidic inlets and outlets for integrated custom-made microfluidic systems on top. PMID:24878592

  4. A compact microelectrode array chip with multiple measuring sites for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Dimaki, Maria; Vergani, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Kwasny, Dorota; Sasso, Luigi; Carminati, Marco; Gerrard, Juliet A; Emneus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of a microchip with 12 identical but individually addressable electrochemical measuring sites, each consisting of a set of interdigitated electrodes acting as a working electrode as well as two circular electrodes functioning as a counter and reference electrode in close proximity. The electrodes are made of gold on a silicon oxide substrate and are passivated by a silicon nitride membrane. A method for avoiding the creation of high edges at the electrodes (known as lift-off ears) is presented. The microchip design is highly symmetric to accommodate easy electronic integration and provides space for microfluidic inlets and outlets for integrated custom-made microfluidic systems on top. PMID:24878592

  5. Spatiotemporal norepinephrine mapping using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Wydallis, John B; Feeny, Rachel M; Wilson, William; Kern, Tucker; Chen, Tom; Tobet, Stuart; Reynolds, Melissa M; Henry, Charles S

    2015-10-21

    A high-density amperometric electrode array containing 8192 individually addressable platinum working electrodes with an integrated potentiostat fabricated using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) processes is reported. The array was designed to enable electrochemical imaging of chemical gradients with high spatiotemporal resolution. Electrodes are arranged over a 2 mm × 2 mm surface area into 64 subarrays consisting of 128 individual Pt working electrodes as well as Pt pseudo-reference and auxiliary electrodes. Amperometric measurements of norepinephrine in tissue culture media were used to demonstrate the ability of the array to measure concentration gradients in complex media. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidics were incorporated to control the chemical concentrations in time and space, and the electrochemical response at each electrode was monitored to generate electrochemical heat maps, demonstrating the array's imaging capabilities. A temporal resolution of 10 ms can be achieved by simultaneously monitoring a single subarray of 128 electrodes. The entire 2 mm × 2 mm area can be electrochemically imaged in 64 seconds by cycling through all subarrays at a rate of 1 Hz per subarray. Monitoring diffusional transport of norepinephrine is used to demonstrate the spatiotemporal resolution capabilities of the system. PMID:26333296

  6. LSSA (Low-cost Silicon Solar Array) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Conversion Program was established to find methods of economically generating enough electrical power to meet future requirements. Activities and progress in the following areas are discussed: silicon-refinement processes; silicon-sheet-growth techniques; encapsulants; manufacturing of off-the-shelf solar arrays; and procurement of semistandardized solar arrays.

  7. LSSA (Low-cost Silicon Solar Array) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Methods are explored for economically generating electrical power to meet future requirements. The Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established to reduce the price of solar arrays by improving manufacturing technology, adapting mass production techniques, and promoting user acceptance. The new manufacturing technology includes the consideration of new silicon refinement processes, silicon sheet growth techniques, encapsulants, and automated assembly production being developed under contract by industries and universities.

  8. 3-D flexible nano-textured high-density microelectrode arrays for high-performance neuro-monitoring and neuro-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gabran, S R I; Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Dian, Joshua; El-Hayek, Youssef; Perez Velazquez, J L; Genov, Roman; Carlen, Peter L; Salama, M M A; Mansour, Raafat R

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a new 3-D flexible microelectrode array for high performance electrographic neural signal recording and stimulation. The microelectrode architecture maximizes the number of channels on each shank and minimizes its footprint. The electrode was implemented on flexible polyimide substrate using microfabrication and thin-film processing. The electrode has a planar layout and comprises multiple shanks. Each shank is three mm in length and carries six gold pads representing the neuro-interfacing channels. The channels are used in recording important precursors with potential clinical relevance and consequent electrical stimulation to perturb the clinical condition. The polyimide structure satisfied the mechanical characteristics required for the proper electrode implantation and operation. Pad postprocessing technique was developed to improve the electrode electrical performance. The planar electrodes were used for creating 3-D "Waterloo Array" microelectrode with controlled gaps using custom designed stackers. Electrode characterization and benchmarking against commercial equivalents demonstrated the superiority of the Flex electrodes. The Flex and commercial electrodes were associated with low-power implantable responsive neuro-stimulation system. The electrodes performance in recording and stimulation application was quantified through in vitro and in vivo acute and chronic experiments on human brain slices and freely-moving rodents. The Flex electrodes exhibited remarkable drop in the electric impedance (100 times at 100 Hz), improved electrode-electrolyte interface noise (dropped by four times) and higher signal-to-noise ratio (3.3 times). PMID:24876130

  9. Biological application of micro-electro mechanical systems microelectrode array sensors for direct measurement of phosphate in the enhanced biological phosphorous removal process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Hyoung; Lee, Jin-Hwan; Bishop, Paul L; Papautsky, Ian

    2009-08-01

    The determination of phosphate has been of great importance in the fields of clinical, environmental, and horticultural analysis for over three decades. New cobalt-based micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) microelectrode array (MEA) sensors for direct measurement of phosphate in small environmental samples, such as microbial aggregates, has been introduced and applied here for in situ measurement of phosphate within activated sludge flocs in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The MEMS technologies offer the advantages of accurate fabrication methods, reduced complexity of the fabrication process, mass production, low cost, and increased reliability. Well-defined phosphate profiles across the flocs were observed under anaerobic conditions, during which, phosphate was released from the flocs, using the MEMS MEA sensor. The microprofiles were compared with the microprofiles measured using conventional phosphate microelectrodes. The developed MEMS MEA sensors were useful tools for the in situ measurement of phosphate in small aggregates. PMID:19774851

  10. Development of three-dimension microelectrode array for bioelectric measurement using the liquidmetal-micromolding technique

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran Yang, Xueyao; Chen, Weixing; Jin, Cuiyun; Fu, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-11-04

    A method of manufacturing three-dimension microneedle electrode arrays is presented in this paper using the micromolding technology with liquid metal at room temperature, based on the physical property of the Bi-In-Sn liquid metal alloy, being its melting point especially low. Observed under scanning electron microscopy, the needle body of the electrode chip manufactured using this method has a good consistency. Skin penetration test in-vitro indicates that the microneedle electrode can pierce the stratum corneum and cross the high-impedance layer to acquire electrical signals. Electrical impedance and polarization voltage experimental results show that the electrode chips have great electric characteristics and meet the practical application demands.

  11. Development of three-dimension microelectrode array for bioelectric measurement using the liquidmetal-micromolding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Yang, Xueyao; Jin, Cuiyun; Fu, Jingjing; Chen, Weixing; Liu, Jing

    2013-11-01

    A method of manufacturing three-dimension microneedle electrode arrays is presented in this paper using the micromolding technology with liquid metal at room temperature, based on the physical property of the Bi-In-Sn liquid metal alloy, being its melting point especially low. Observed under scanning electron microscopy, the needle body of the electrode chip manufactured using this method has a good consistency. Skin penetration test in-vitro indicates that the microneedle electrode can pierce the stratum corneum and cross the high-impedance layer to acquire electrical signals. Electrical impedance and polarization voltage experimental results show that the electrode chips have great electric characteristics and meet the practical application demands.

  12. Micro-electrode array recordings reveal reductions in both excitation and inhibition in cultured cortical neuron networks lacking Shank3.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Chen, Q; Zhou, T; Bozic, D; Fu, Z; Pan, J Q; Feng, G

    2016-02-01

    Numerous risk genes have recently been implicated in susceptibility to autism and schizophrenia. Translating such genetic findings into disease-relevant neurobiological mechanisms is challenging due to the lack of throughput assays that can be used to assess their functions on an appropriate scale. To address this issue, we explored the feasibility of using a micro-electrode array (MEA) as a potentially scalable assay to identify the electrical network phenotypes associated with risk genes. We first characterized local and global network firing in cortical neurons with MEAs, and then developed methods to analyze the alternation between the network active period (NAP) and the network inactive period (NIP), each of which lasts tens of seconds. We then evaluated the electric phenotypes of neurons derived from Shank3 knockout (KO) mice. Cortical neurons cultured on MEAs displayed a rich repertoire of spontaneous firing, and Shank3 deletion led to reduced firing activity. Enhancing excitation with CX546 rescued the deficit in the spike rate in the Shank3 KO network. In addition, the Shank3 KO network produced a shorter NIP, and this altered network firing pattern was normalized by clonazepam, a positive modulator of the GABAA receptor. MEA recordings revealed electric phenotypes that displayed altered excitation and inhibition in the network lacking Shank3. Thus, our study highlights MEAs as an experimental framework for measuring multiple robust neurobiological end points in dynamic networks and as an assay system that could be used to identify electric phenotypes in cultured neuronal networks and to analyze additional risk genes identified in psychiatric genetics. PMID:26598066

  13. Impedance biosensor for the rapid detection of Listeria spp. based on aptamer functionalized Pt-interdigitated microelectrodes array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, R.; Rong, Y.; Vanegas, D. C.; Claussen, J.; McLamore, E. S.; Gomes, C.

    2016-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is one of the most common causes of food illness deaths worldwide, with multiple outbreaks in the United States alone. Current methods to detect foodborne pathogens are laborious and can take several hours to days to produce results. Thus, faster techniques are needed to detect bacteria within the same reliability level as traditional techniques. This study reports on a rapid, accurate, and sensitive aptamer biosensor device for Listeria spp. detection based on platinum interdigitated array microelectrodes (Pt-IDEs). Pt-IDEs with different geometric electrode gaps were fabricated by lithographic techniques and characterized by cyclic voltammetric (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potential amperometry (DCPA) measurements of reversible redox species. Based on these results, 50 μm Pt-IDE was chosen to further functionalize with a Listeria monocytogenes DNA aptamer selective to the cell surface protein internalin A, via metal-thiol self-assembly at the 5' end of the 47-mer's. EIS analysis was used to detect Listeria spp. without the need for label amplification and pre-concentration steps. The optimized aptamer concentration of 800 nM was selected to capture the bacteria through internalin A binding and the aptamer hairpin structure near the 3' end. The aptasensor was capable of detecting a wide range of bacteria concentration from 10 to 106 CFU/mL at lower detection limit of 5.39 +/- 0.21 CFU/mL with sensitivity of 268.1 +/- 25.40 (Ohms/log [CFU/mL]) in 17 min. The aptamer based biosensor offers a portable, rapid and sensitive alternative for food safety applications with one of the lowest detection limits reported to date.

  14. In vitro screening of metal oxide nanoparticles for effects on neural function using cortical networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Jenna D; Lefew, William R; Crooks, James; Hall, Diana; Ortenzio, Jayna Nr; Dreher, Kevin; Shafer, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) may translocate to the brain following inhalation or oral exposures, yet higher throughput methods to screen NPs for potential neurotoxicity are lacking. The present study examined effects of 5 CeO2 (5- 1288 nm), and 4 TiO2 (6-142 nm) NPs and microparticles (MP) on network function in primary cultures of rat cortex on 12 well microelectrode array (MEA) plates. Particles were without cytotoxicity at concentrations ≤50 µg/ml. After recording 1 h of baseline activity prior to particle (3-50 µg/ml) exposure, changes in the total number of spikes (TS) and # of active electrodes (#AEs) were assessed 1, 24, and 48 h later. Following the 48 h recording, the response to a challenge with the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC; 25 µM) was assessed. In all, particles effects were subtle, but 69 nm CeO2 and 25 nm TiO2 NPs caused concentration-related decreases in TS following 1 h exposure. At 48 h, 5 and 69 nm CeO2 and 25 and 31 nm TiO2 decreased #AE, while the two MPs increased #AEs. Following BIC, only 31 nm TiO2 produced concentration-related decreases in #AEs, while 1288 nm CeO2 caused concentration-related increases in both TS and #AE. The results indicate that some metal oxide particles cause subtle concentration-related changes in spontaneous and/or GABAA receptor-mediated neuronal activity in vitro at times when cytotoxicity is absent, and that MEAs can be used to screen and prioritize nanoparticles for neurotoxicity hazard. PMID:26593696

  15. QSpike tools: a generic framework for parallel batch preprocessing of extracellular neuronal signals recorded by substrate microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Mufti; Pulizzi, Rocco; Vasilaki, Eleni; Giugliano, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) have emerged as a mature technique to investigate brain (dys)functions in vivo and in in vitro animal models. Often referred to as “smart” Petri dishes, MEAs have demonstrated a great potential particularly for medium-throughput studies in vitro, both in academic and pharmaceutical industrial contexts. Enabling rapid comparison of ionic/pharmacological/genetic manipulations with control conditions, MEAs are employed to screen compounds by monitoring non-invasively the spontaneous and evoked neuronal electrical activity in longitudinal studies, with relatively inexpensive equipment. However, in order to acquire sufficient statistical significance, recordings last up to tens of minutes and generate large amount of raw data (e.g., 60 channels/MEA, 16 bits A/D conversion, 20 kHz sampling rate: approximately 8 GB/MEA,h uncompressed). Thus, when the experimental conditions to be tested are numerous, the availability of fast, standardized, and automated signal preprocessing becomes pivotal for any subsequent analysis and data archiving. To this aim, we developed an in-house cloud-computing system, named QSpike Tools, where CPU-intensive operations, required for preprocessing of each recorded channel (e.g., filtering, multi-unit activity detection, spike-sorting, etc.), are decomposed and batch-queued to a multi-core architecture or to a computers cluster. With the commercial availability of new and inexpensive high-density MEAs, we believe that disseminating QSpike Tools might facilitate its wide adoption and customization, and inspire the creation of community-supported cloud-computing facilities for MEAs users. PMID:24678297

  16. A method for electrophysiological characterization of hamster retinal ganglion cells using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian L.; Russell, Thomas L.; Farrow, Karl; Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Müller, Jan; Jäckel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of neuronal cell types in the mammalian retina is important for the understanding of human retinal disease and the advancement of sight-restoring technology, such as retinal prosthetic devices. A somewhat less utilized animal model for retinal research is the hamster, which has a visual system that is characterized by an area centralis and a wide visual field with a broad binocular component. The hamster retina is optimally suited for recording on the microelectrode array (MEA), because it intrinsically lies flat on the MEA surface and yields robust, large-amplitude signals. However, information in the literature about hamster retinal ganglion cell functional types is scarce. The goal of our work is to develop a method featuring a high-density (HD) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) MEA technology along with a sequence of standardized visual stimuli in order to categorize ganglion cells in isolated Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) retina. Since the HD-MEA is capable of recording at a higher spatial resolution than most MEA systems (17.5 μm electrode pitch), we were able to record from a large proportion of RGCs within a selected region. Secondly, we chose our stimuli so that they could be run during the experiment without intervention or computation steps. The visual stimulus set was designed to activate the receptive fields of most ganglion cells in parallel and to incorporate various visual features to which different cell types respond uniquely. Based on the ganglion cell responses, basic cell properties were determined: direction selectivity, speed tuning, width tuning, transience, and latency. These properties were clustered to identify ganglion cell types in the hamster retina. Ultimately, we recorded up to a cell density of 2780 cells/mm2 at 2 mm (42°) from the optic nerve head. Using five parameters extracted from the responses to visual stimuli, we obtained seven ganglion cell types. PMID:26528115

  17. QSpike tools: a generic framework for parallel batch preprocessing of extracellular neuronal signals recorded by substrate microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Mufti; Pulizzi, Rocco; Vasilaki, Eleni; Giugliano, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) have emerged as a mature technique to investigate brain (dys)functions in vivo and in in vitro animal models. Often referred to as "smart" Petri dishes, MEAs have demonstrated a great potential particularly for medium-throughput studies in vitro, both in academic and pharmaceutical industrial contexts. Enabling rapid comparison of ionic/pharmacological/genetic manipulations with control conditions, MEAs are employed to screen compounds by monitoring non-invasively the spontaneous and evoked neuronal electrical activity in longitudinal studies, with relatively inexpensive equipment. However, in order to acquire sufficient statistical significance, recordings last up to tens of minutes and generate large amount of raw data (e.g., 60 channels/MEA, 16 bits A/D conversion, 20 kHz sampling rate: approximately 8 GB/MEA,h uncompressed). Thus, when the experimental conditions to be tested are numerous, the availability of fast, standardized, and automated signal preprocessing becomes pivotal for any subsequent analysis and data archiving. To this aim, we developed an in-house cloud-computing system, named QSpike Tools, where CPU-intensive operations, required for preprocessing of each recorded channel (e.g., filtering, multi-unit activity detection, spike-sorting, etc.), are decomposed and batch-queued to a multi-core architecture or to a computers cluster. With the commercial availability of new and inexpensive high-density MEAs, we believe that disseminating QSpike Tools might facilitate its wide adoption and customization, and inspire the creation of community-supported cloud-computing facilities for MEAs users. PMID:24678297

  18. A 16 x 16 element extrinsic silicon detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two bismuth-doped silicon accumulation-mode charge-injection device (AMCID) infrared detector arrays are studied. The geometry and composition of the arrays, and a description of the cold and warm electronics components of the system are described. Instructions for setting up and operating the array system, plus results of a functional test, are included.

  19. Silicon-based wire electrode array for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Weihua; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shanshan; Fang, Xiaolei; Chen, Sanyuan; Gui, Qiang; Tang, Rongyu; Chen, Yuanfang; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongda

    2014-09-01

    Objectives. Metal-wire electrode arrays are widely used to record and stimulate neurons. Commonly, these devices are fabricated from a long insulated metal wire by cutting it into the proper length and using the cross-section as the electrode site. The assembly of a micro-wire electrode array with regular spacing is difficult. With the help of micro-machine technology, a silicon-based wire electrode array (SWEA) is proposed to simplify the assembling process and provide a wire-type electrode with tapered tips. Approach. Silicon wires with regular spacing coated with metal are generated from a silicon wafer through micro-fabrication and are ordered into a 3D array. A silicon wafer is cut into a comb-like structure with hexagonal teeth on both sides by anisotropic etching. To establish an array of silicon-based linear needles through isotropic wet etching, the diameters of these hexagonal teeth are reduced; their sharp edges are smoothed out and their tips are sharpened. The needle array is coated with a layer of parylene after metallization. The tips of the needles are then exposed to form an array of linear neural electrodes. With these linear electrode arrays, an array of area electrodes can be fabricated. Main results. A 6  ×  6 array of wire-type electrodes based on silicon is developed using this method. The time required to manually assemble the 3D array decreases significantly with the introduction of micro-fabricated 2D array. Meanwhile, the tip intervals in the 2D array are accurate and are controlled at no more than 1%. The SWEA is effective both in vitro and in vivo. Significance. Using this method, the SWEA can be batch-prepared in advance along with its parameters, such as spacing, length, and diameter. Thus, neural scientists can assemble proper electrode arrays in a short time.

  20. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  1. Development of 30 micrometers extrinsic silicon multiplexed infrared deterctor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orias, G.; Campbell, D.

    1986-01-01

    Two hybrid infrared (IR) detector arrays of antimony-doped silicon (Si:Sb) were produced and tested to evaluate their potential for use in low-background IR astronomy applications. The format of the arrays is 58 x 62 elements, with 76 micron-square pixels. A random-access, switched metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) silicon multiplexer is used to read out the array elements. Reduced-background tests of signal, noise, and noise equivalent power were conducted over the temperature range 3.2 to 12 K. The arrays were found to have good sensitivity and good uniformity.

  2. An inexpensive drivable cannulated microelectrode array for simultaneous unit recording and drug infusion in the same brain nucleus of behaving rats.

    PubMed

    du Hoffmann, Johann; Kim, James J; Nicola, Saleem M

    2011-08-01

    Neurons are functionally segregated into discrete populations that perform specific computations. These computations, mediated by neuron-neuron electrochemical signaling, form the neural basis of behavior. Thus fundamental to a brain-based understanding of behavior is the precise determination of the contribution made by specific neurotransmitters to behaviorally relevant neural activity. To facilitate this understanding, we have developed a cannulated microelectrode array for use in behaving rats that enables simultaneous neural ensemble recordings and local infusion of drugs in the same brain nucleus. The system is inexpensive, easy to use, and produces robust and quantitatively reproducible drug effects on recorded neurons. PMID:21613588

  3. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A development program was performed for evaluating, modifying, and optimizing the Lockheed formulated liquid transparent filmforming Spraylon fluorocarbon protective coating for silicon solar cells and modules. The program objectives were designed to meet the requirements of the low-cost automated solar cell array fabrication process. As part of the study, a computer program was used to establish the limits of the safe working stress in the coated silicon solar cell array system under severe thermal shock.

  4. Comparison of electrically evoked cortical potential thresholds generated with subretinal or suprachoroidal placement of a microelectrode array in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yasuyuki; Franco, Luisa M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Naber, John F.; Ofer Ziv, R.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Kaplan, Henry J.; Enzmann, Volker

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study was to directly compare the threshold electrical charge density of the retina (retinal threshold) in rabbits for the generation of electrical evoked potentials (EEP) by delivering electrical stimulation with a custom-made microelectrode array (MEA) implanted into either the subretinal or suprachoroidal space. Nine eyes of seven Dutch-belted rabbits were studied. The electroretinogram (ERG), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and EEP were recorded. Electrodes for the VEP and EEP were placed on the dura mater overlying the visual cortex. The EEP was recorded following electrical stimulation of the MEA placed either subretinally beneath the visual streak of the retina or in the suprachoroidal space in the rabbit eye. An ab externo approach was used for placement of the MEA. Liquid perfluorodecaline (PFCL; 0.4 ml) was placed within the vitreous cavity to flatten the neurosensory retina on the MEA after subretinal implantation. The retinal threshold for generation of an EEP was determined for each MEA placement by three consecutive measurements consisting of 100 computer-averaged recordings. Animals were sacrificed at the conclusion of the experiment and the eyes were enucleated for histological examination. The retinal threshold to generate an EEP was 9 ± 7 nC (0.023 ± 0.016 mC cm-2) within the subretinal space and 150 ± 122 nC (0.375 ± 0.306 mC cm-2) within the suprachoroidal space. Histology showed disruption of the outer retina with subretinal but not suprachoroidal placement. The retinal threshold to elicit an EEP is significantly lower with subretinal placement of the MEA compared to suprachoroidal placement (P < 0.05). The retinal threshold charge density with a subretinal MEA is well below the published charge limit of 1 mC cm-2, which is the level below which chronic stimulation of the retina is considered necessary to avoid tissue damage (Shannon 1992 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 39 424-6). Supported in part by The Charles D Kelman, MD

  5. Development of Micro-Electrode Array Based Tests for Neurotoxicity: Assessment of Interlaboratory Reproducibility with Neuroactive Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Novellino, A.; Scelfo, Bibiana; Palosaari, T.; Price, A.; Sobanski, Tomasz; Shafer, T. J.; Johnstone, A. F. M.; Gross, G. W.; Gramowski, A.; Schroeder, O.; Jügelt, K.; Chiappalone, M.; Benfenati, F.; Martinoia, S.; Tedesco, M. T.; Defranchi, E.; D’Angelo, P.; Whelan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal assemblies within the nervous system produce electrical activity that can be recorded in terms of action potential patterns. Such patterns provide a sensitive endpoint to detect effects of a variety of chemical and physical perturbations. They are a function of synaptic changes and do not necessarily involve structural alterations. In vitro neuronal networks (NNs) grown on micro-electrode arrays (MEAs) respond to neuroactive substances as well as the in vivo brain. As such, they constitute a valuable tool for investigating changes in the electrophysiological activity of the neurons in response to chemical exposures. However, the reproducibility of NN responses to chemical exposure has not been systematically documented. To this purpose six independent laboratories (in Europe and in USA) evaluated the response to the same pharmacological compounds (Fluoxetine, Muscimol, and Verapamil) in primary neuronal cultures. Common standardization principles and acceptance criteria for the quality of the cultures have been established to compare the obtained results. These studies involved more than 100 experiments before the final conclusions have been drawn that MEA technology has a potential for standard in vitro neurotoxicity/neuropharmacology evaluation. The obtained results show good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the responses. The consistent inhibitory effects of the compounds were observed in all the laboratories with the 50% Inhibiting Concentrations (IC50s) ranging from: (mean ± SEM, in μM) 1.53 ± 0.17 to 5.4 ± 0.7 (n = 35) for Fluoxetine, 0.16 ± 0.03 to 0.38 ± 0.16 μM (n = 35) for Muscimol, and 2.68 ± 0.32 to 5.23 ± 1.7 (n = 32) for Verapamil. The outcome of this study indicates that the MEA approach is a robust tool leading to reproducible results. The future direction will be to extend the set of testing compounds and to propose the MEA approach as a standard screen for identification and

  6. Neural control of cursor trajectory and click by a human with tetraplegia 1000 days after implant of an intracortical microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Simeral, J D; Kim, S-P; Black, M J; Donoghue, J P; Hochberg, L R

    2011-04-01

    The ongoing pilot clinical trial of the BrainGate neural interface system aims in part to assess the feasibility of using neural activity obtained from a small-scale, chronically implanted, intracortical microelectrode array to provide control signals for a neural prosthesis system. Critical questions include how long implanted microelectrodes will record useful neural signals, how reliably those signals can be acquired and decoded, and how effectively they can be used to control various assistive technologies such as computers and robotic assistive devices, or to enable functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles. Here we examined these questions by assessing neural cursor control and BrainGate system characteristics on five consecutive days 1000 days after implant of a 4 × 4 mm array of 100 microelectrodes in the motor cortex of a human with longstanding tetraplegia subsequent to a brainstem stroke. On each of five prospectively-selected days we performed time-amplitude sorting of neuronal spiking activity, trained a population-based Kalman velocity decoding filter combined with a linear discriminant click state classifier, and then assessed closed-loop point-and-click cursor control. The participant performed both an eight-target center-out task and a random target Fitts metric task which was adapted from a human-computer interaction ISO standard used to quantify performance of computer input devices. The neural interface system was further characterized by daily measurement of electrode impedances, unit waveforms and local field potentials. Across the five days, spiking signals were obtained from 41 of 96 electrodes and were successfully decoded to provide neural cursor point-and-click control with a mean task performance of 91.3% ± 0.1% (mean ± s.d.) correct target acquisition. Results across five consecutive days demonstrate that a neural interface system based on an intracortical microelectrode array can provide repeatable, accurate point

  7. Neural control of cursor trajectory and click by a human with tetraplegia 1000 days after implant of an intracortical microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeral, J. D.; Kim, S.-P.; Black, M. J.; Donoghue, J. P.; Hochberg, L. R.

    2011-04-01

    The ongoing pilot clinical trial of the BrainGate neural interface system aims in part to assess the feasibility of using neural activity obtained from a small-scale, chronically implanted, intracortical microelectrode array to provide control signals for a neural prosthesis system. Critical questions include how long implanted microelectrodes will record useful neural signals, how reliably those signals can be acquired and decoded, and how effectively they can be used to control various assistive technologies such as computers and robotic assistive devices, or to enable functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles. Here we examined these questions by assessing neural cursor control and BrainGate system characteristics on five consecutive days 1000 days after implant of a 4 × 4 mm array of 100 microelectrodes in the motor cortex of a human with longstanding tetraplegia subsequent to a brainstem stroke. On each of five prospectively-selected days we performed time-amplitude sorting of neuronal spiking activity, trained a population-based Kalman velocity decoding filter combined with a linear discriminant click state classifier, and then assessed closed-loop point-and-click cursor control. The participant performed both an eight-target center-out task and a random target Fitts metric task which was adapted from a human-computer interaction ISO standard used to quantify performance of computer input devices. The neural interface system was further characterized by daily measurement of electrode impedances, unit waveforms and local field potentials. Across the five days, spiking signals were obtained from 41 of 96 electrodes and were successfully decoded to provide neural cursor point-and-click control with a mean task performance of 91.3% ± 0.1% (mean ± s.d.) correct target acquisition. Results across five consecutive days demonstrate that a neural interface system based on an intracortical microelectrode array can provide repeatable, accurate point

  8. Neural control of cursor trajectory and click by a human with tetraplegia 1000 days after implant of an intracortical microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Simeral, J D; Kim, S-P; Black, M J; Donoghue, J P; Hochberg, L R

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing pilot clinical trial of the BrainGate neural interface system aims in part to assess the feasibility of using neural activity obtained from a small-scale, chronically implanted, intracortical microelectrode array to provide control signals for a neural prosthesis system. Critical questions include how long implanted microelectrodes will record useful neural signals, how reliably those signals can be acquired and decoded, and how effectively they can be used to control various assistive technologies such as computers and robotic assistive devices, or to enable functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles. Here we examined these questions by assessing neural cursor control and BrainGate system characteristics on five consecutive days 1000 days after implant of a 4 × 4 mm array of 100 microelectrodes in the motor cortex of a human with longstanding tetraplegia subsequent to a brainstem stroke. On each of five prospectively-selected days we performed time-amplitude sorting of neuronal spiking activity, trained a population-based Kalman velocity decoding filter combined with a linear discriminant click state classifier, and then assessed closed-loop point-and-click cursor control. The participant performed both an eight-target center-out task and a random target Fitts metric task which was adapted from a human-computer interaction ISO standard used to quantify performance of computer input devices. The neural interface system was further characterized by daily measurement of electrode impedances, unit waveforms and local field potentials. Across the five days, spiking signals were obtained from 41 of 96 electrodes and were successfully decoded to provide neural cursor point-and-click control with a mean task performance of 91.3% ± 0.1% (mean ± s.d.) correct target acquisition. Results across five consecutive days demonstrate that a neural interface system based on an intracortical microelectrode array can provide repeatable, accurate point

  9. Real-time glutamate measurements in the putamen of awake rhesus monkeys using an enzyme-based human microelectrode array prototype

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Michelle L.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Zhang, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Commonly used for research studies in the central nervous system, microdialysis has revealed a link between dysregulation of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and ischemia and seizure, however limitations like slow temporal resolution have stalled the advancement of microdialysis as a diagnostic tool. We have developed and extensively characterized an enzyme-based microelectrode array technology for second-by-second in vivo amperometric measurements of glutamate in the mammalian CNS. The current studies demonstrated the ability of a human microelectrode array prototype (SG-2) to measure tonic and phasic glutamate neurotransmission in the putamen of unanesthetized non-human primates. We also showed that the SG-2 remains functional following sterilization. Ability to monitor dynamic changes in glutamate in real-time may assist in the development of clinical algorithms to potentially alert care-providers prior to onset of overt ischemia or seizure, or provide neurosurgeons with real-time measurements of rapid changes in extracellular glutamate which could help guide surgical procedures or aid in interventional strategies. PMID:19850078

  10. Research on silicon microchannel arrays oxide insulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke-xin; Duanmu, Qingduo; Wang, Guozheng; Yang, Ji-kai; Kou, Yang-qiang

    2015-03-01

    Silicon microchannel plates (Si-MCP) is widely used in the photomultiplier, night vision, X- ray intensifier and other areas. In order to meet the requirements of high voltage electron multiplier, Si-MCP need to prepare a layer of silicon dioxide in the microchannel to improve the insulating properties. There are many methods for preparing SiO2 layer, such as thermal growth, magnetron sputtering method and chemical vapor deposition etc. The thermal oxidation method is often used for preparation of insulating layer that it grows film thickness uniformity, compact structure, simple process and so on. There will be bending deformation phenomenon of silicon microchannel arrays in high temperature oxidation process. The warpage of Si-MCP has brought great for difficulties of subsequent processing. Silicon crystals has the properties of plastic deformation at high temperature, this article take full advantage of this properties by which the already bending deformation of silicon microchannel arrays can be restored to flat.

  11. Progress Toward Corrugated Feed Horn Arrays in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J.; Yoon, K. W.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Cho, H. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Niemack, M. D.; Irwin, K. D.

    2009-12-16

    We are developing monolithic arrays of corrugated feed horns fabricated in silicon for dual-polarization single-mode operation at 90, 145 and 220 GHz. The arrays consist of hundreds of platelet feed horns assembled from gold-coated stacks of micro-machined silicon wafers. As a first step, Au-coated Si waveguides with a circular, corrugated cross section were fabricated; their attenuation was measured to be less than 0.15 dB/cm from 80 to 110 GHz at room temperature. To ease the manufacture of horn arrays, electrolytic deposition of Au on degenerate Si without a metal seed layer was demonstrated. An apparatus for measuring the radiation pattern, optical efficiency, and spectral band-pass of prototype horns is described. Feed horn arrays made of silicon may find use in measurements of the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  12. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  13. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  14. Microelectrode Arrays of Diamond-Insulated Graphitic Channels for Real-Time Detection of Exocytotic Events from Cultured Chromaffin Cells and Slices of Adrenal Glands.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Bernardi, Ettore; Marcantoni, Andrea; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

    2016-08-01

    A microstructured graphitic 4 × 4 multielectrode array was embedded in a single-crystal diamond substrate (4 × 4 μG-SCD MEA) for real-time monitoring of exocytotic events from cultured chromaffin cells and adrenal slices. The current approach relies on the development of a parallel ion beam lithographic technique, which assures the time-effective fabrication of extended arrays with reproducible electrode dimensions. The reported device is suitable for performing amperometric and voltammetric recordings with high sensitivity and temporal resolution, by simultaneously acquiring data from 16 rectangularly shaped microelectrodes (20 × 3.5 μm(2)) separated by 200 μm gaps. Taking advantage of the array geometry we addressed the following specific issues: (i) detect both the spontaneous and KCl-evoked secretion simultaneously from several chromaffin cells directly cultured on the device surface, (ii) resolve the waveform of different subsets of exocytotic events, and (iii) monitoring quantal secretory events from thin slices of the adrenal gland. The frequency of spontaneous release was low (0.12 and 0.3 Hz, respectively, for adrenal slices and cultured cells) and increased up to 0.9 Hz after stimulation with 30 mM KCl in cultured cells. The spike amplitude as well as rise and decay time were comparable with those measured by carbon fiber microelectrodes and allowed to identify three different subsets of secretory events associated with "full fusion" events, "kiss-and-run" and "kiss-and-stay" exocytosis, confirming that the device has adequate sensitivity and time resolution for real-time recordings. The device offers the significant advantage of shortening the time to collect data by allowing simultaneous recordings from cell populations either in primary cell cultures or in intact tissues. PMID:27376596

  15. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-18

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology. PMID:26871752

  16. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology.

  17. Fabrication of two-layer poly(dimethyl siloxane) devices for hydrodynamic cell trapping and exocytosis measurement with integrated indium tin oxide microelectrodes arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Gillis, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    The design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic cell trapping device to measure single cell exocytosis were reported. Research on the patterning of double layer template based on repetitive standard photolithography of AZ photoresist was investigated. The replicated poly(dimethyl siloxane) devices with 2.5 μm deep channels were proved to be efficient for stopping cells. Quantal exocytosis measurement can be achieved by targeting single or small clumps of chromaffin cells on top of the 10 μm ×10 μm indium tin oxide microelectrodes arrays with the developed microdevice. And about 72% of the trapping sites can be occupied by cells with hydrodynamic trapping method and the recorded amperometric signals are comparable to the results with traditional carbon fiber microelectrodes. The method of manufacturing the microdevices is simple, low-cost and easy to perform. The manufactured device offers a platform for the high throughput detection of quantal catecholamine exocytosis from chromaffin cells with sufficient sensitivity and broad application. PMID:23329291

  18. Directional imbibition on a chemically patterned silicon micropillar array.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Ville

    2016-01-28

    Directional imbibition of oils (hexadecane, tetradecane, and dodecane) and water is demonstrated on a chemically patterned silicon micropillar array. Four different directional imbibition types are shown: unidirectional, two types of bidirectional and tridirectional imbibition. The surfaces consist of a silicon micropillar array with an overlaid surface chemistry pattern. This configuration leads to anisotropic wetting behaviour into various directions of the advancing meniscus. Due to the free energy landscape obtained, the advancing meniscus gets pinned in some directions (determined by the surface chemistry pattern) while it is free to move to the remaining directions. The conditions for directional imbibition and design criteria for the surfaces are derived and discussed. PMID:26576647

  19. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This work resulted in two basic accomplishments.The first was the identification of DOW CORNING Q1-2577 as a suitable encapsulation material for use in a cost effective encapsulation system. The second was the preparation of a silicon-acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent for the protection of photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers.

  20. Silicon PIN diode array hybrids for charged particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.L.; Dunwoodie, W.M.; Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G.; Gaalema, S.

    1988-09-01

    We report on the design of silicon PIN diode array hybrids for use as charged particle detectors. A brief summary of the need for vertex detectors is presented. Circuitry, block diagrams and device specifications are included. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Ordered arrays of patterned nanoporous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Schönherr, S.; Ji, R.; Herz, A.; Ronning, C.; Schaaf, P.

    2013-07-01

    The fabrication of ordered arrays of patterned nanoporous Si with two-level nanostructures using a combination of metal-assisted chemical etching and nanoimprint lithography is presented. One nanostructure is the periodic arrays of holes and pillars with a period of several hundred nanometers and another nanostructure is the nanoporosity with a pore size of about 10 nm. The etching rate of (1 0 0) oriented Si is clearly higher than that of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) oriented Si under the same conditions. More effective pore formation occurs in (1 1 1) oriented Si than in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) oriented Si. Cathodoluminescence was measured and the patterned array of nanoporous Si shows visible luminescence with an overlap of two red emission bands at room temperature.

  2. Stretchable microelectrode arrays--a tool for discovering mechanisms of functional deficits underlying traumatic brain injury and interfacing neurons with neuroprosthetics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhe; Tsay, Candice; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Wagner, Sigurd; Morrison, Barclay

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be caused by motor vehicle accidents, falls and firearms. TBI can result in major neurological dysfunction such as chronic seizures and memory disturbances. To discover mechanisms of functional deficits underlying TBI, we developed a stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA),which can be used for continuous recording of neuronal function, pre-, during, and post-stretch injury. TheSMEA was fabricated on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)substrate with stretchable, 100 pm wide, 25 nm thick gold electrodes patterned there on [1]. The electrodes were encapsulated with a 10-20 microm thick, photo-patternable PDMS insulation layer. Previous biocompatibility tests showed no overt necrosis or cell death caused by the SMEAs after 2 weeks in culture [2]. The electrical performance of the SMEAs was tested in electrophysiological saline solution before, during and after biaxial stretching. The results showed that the electrode impedance increased with the strain to reach 800 kL at 8.5% strain and then recovered to 10 kil after relaxation. The working noise level remained below 20 pV pp during the whole process. New methodologiesf or improving the patterning of the encapsulation layer were tested on gold electrode arrays supported on glass. With these prototype arrays, robust population spikes were recorded from organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of brain tissue. Additionally, seizure-like activity induced with 1 mM bicuculline was also recorded. Our results demonstrate that the prototype arrays have good electrical performance compatible with existing multielectrode array systems. They also indicate the ability to record neuronal activity from hippocampal slices. This novel technology will enable new studies to understand injury mechanisms leading to post-traumatic neuronal dysfunction. PMID:17959498

  3. Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Franz, David E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Jhabvala, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Snodgrass, Stephen; Costen, Nicholas; Zincke, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The silicon substrate carrier was created so that a large-area array (in this case 62,000+ elements of a microshutter array) and a variety of discrete passive and active devices could be mounted on a single board, similar to a printed circuit board. However, the density and number of interconnects far exceeds the capabilities of printed circuit board technology. To overcome this hurdle, a method was developed to fabricate this carrier out of silicon and implement silicon integrated circuit (IC) technology. This method achieves a large number of high-density metal interconnects; a 100-percent yield over a 6-in. (approximately equal to 15-cm) diameter wafer (one unit per wafer); a rigid, thermally compatible structure (all components and operating conditions) to cryogenic temperatures; re-workability and component replaceability, if required; and the ability to precisely cut large-area holes through the substrate. A method that would employ indium bump technology along with wafer-scale integration onto a silicon carrier was also developed. By establishing a silicon-based version of a printed circuit board, the objectives could be met with one solution. The silicon substrate would be 2 mm thick to survive the environmental loads of a launch. More than 2,300 metal traces and over 1,500 individual wire bonds are required. To mate the microshutter array to the silicon substrate, more than 10,000 indium bumps are required. A window was cut in the substrate to allow the light signal to pass through the substrate and reach the microshutter array. The substrate was also the receptacle for multiple unpackaged IC die wire-bonded directly to the substrate (thus conserving space over conventionally packaged die). Unique features of this technology include the implementation of a 2-mmthick silicon wafer to withstand extreme mechanical loads (from a rocket launch); integrated polysilicon resistor heaters directly on the substrate; the precise formation of an open aperture

  4. Arrays of ultrathin silicon solar microcells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A.; Rockett, Angus A.; Nuzzo, Ralph; Yoon, Jongseung; Baca, Alfred

    2015-08-11

    Provided are solar cells, photovoltaics and related methods for making solar cells, wherein the solar cell is made of ultrathin solar grade or low quality silicon. In an aspect, the invention is a method of making a solar cell by providing a solar cell substrate having a receiving surface and assembling a printable semiconductor element on the receiving surface of the substrate via contact printing. The semiconductor element has a thickness that is less than or equal to 100 .mu.m and, for example, is made from low grade Si.

  5. Arrays of ultrathin silicon solar microcells

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Rockett, Angus A; Nuzzo, Ralph; Yoon, Jongseung; Baca, Alfred

    2014-03-25

    Provided are solar cells, photovoltaics and related methods for making solar cells, wherein the solar cell is made of ultrathin solar grade or low quality silicon. In an aspect, the invention is a method of making a solar cell by providing a solar cell substrate having a receiving surface and assembling a printable semiconductor element on the receiving surface of the substrate via contact printing. The semiconductor element has a thickness that is less than or equal to 100 .mu.m and, for example, is made from low grade Si.

  6. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 2: Silicon material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the Silicon Material Task, a part of the Flat Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, was to develop and demonstate the technology for the low cost production of silicon of suitable purity to be used as the basic material for the manufacture of terrestrial photovoltaic solar cells. Summarized are 11 different processes for the production of silicon that were investigated and developed to varying extent by industrial, university, and Government researchers. The silane production section of the Union Carbide Corp. (UCC) silane process was developed completely in this program. Coupled with Siemens-type chemical vapor deposition reactors, the process was carried through the pilot stage. The overall UCC process involves the conversion of metallurgical-grade silicon to silane followed by decomposition of the silane to purified silicon. The other process developments are described to varying extents. Studies are reported on the effects of impurities in silicon on both silicon-material properties and on solar cell performance. These studies on the effects of impurities yielded extensive information and models for relating specific elemental concentrations to levels of deleterious effects.

  7. Multiple Exciton Generation in Silicon QD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryjevski, Andrei; Kilin, Dmitri

    2014-03-01

    We use Density Functional Theory (DFT) combined with the many body perturbation theory to calculate multiple exciton generation (MEG) in several semiconductor nanosystems. Hydrogen-passivated Si29H36 quantum dots (QDs) with crystalline and amorphous core structures, the quasi one dimensional (1-D) arrays constructed from these QDs, as well as crystalline and amorphous Si nanowires have been studied. Quantum efficiency, the average number of excitons created by a single photon, has been calculated in these nanoparticles to the leading order in the screened Coulomb interaction. Amorphous nanostructures are predicted to have more effective carrier multiplication.

  8. Effects of adsorbed proteins, an antifouling agent and long-duration DC voltage pulses on the impedance of silicon-based neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L; Otto, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    The successful use of implantable neural microelectrodes as neuroprosthetic devices depends on the mitigation of the reactive tissue response of the brain. One of the factors affecting the ultimate severity of the reactive tissue response and the in vivo electrical properties of the microelectrodes is the initial adsorption of proteins onto the surface of the implanted microelectrodes. In this study we quantify the increase in microelectrode impedance magnitude at physiological frequencies following electrode immersion in a 10% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. We also demonstrate the efficacy of a common antifouling molecule, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), in preventing a significant increase in microelectrode impedance. In addition, we show the feasibility of using long-duration DC voltage pulses to remove adsorbed proteins from the microelectrode surface. PMID:19963693

  9. Detector telescope array: silicon--CsI(Tl)--photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbeck, E.; Yang, L. B.; Pogodin, P.; Ingram, F. D.

    1999-10-01

    A closely packed array of 60 telescopes was developed for use at forward angles in the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The telescopes resolve isotopes and cover nearly 100% of the solid angle assigned to the array. These requirements and limitations of space and funding resulted in a number of novel features, some of which will be useful in other applications. These features include: photodiodes of arbitrary shape with no frame around the edge, replacement of aluminized Mylar with aluminum leaf, an inexpensive silicon diode leakage current monitor that presents a graph of leakage current vs detector number, and a low noise but inexpensive preamplifier chip. Experience with the array showed that compounds in the outer insulation layer of some types of coax cable can seriously contaminate a vacuum system. The use of computer aided design and computer controlled machine tools reduced the cost of the structural parts by orders of magnitude.

  10. Review of machine learning and signal processing techniques for automated electrode selection in high-density microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2014-08-01

    Recently developed CMOS-based microprobes contain hundreds of electrodes on a single shaft with interelectrode distances as small as 30 µm. So far, neuroscientists manually select a subset of those electrodes depending on their appraisal of the "usefulness" of the recorded signals, which makes the process subjective but more importantly too time consuming to be useable in practice. The ever-increasing number of recording electrodes on microelectrode probes calls for an automated selection of electrodes containing "good quality signals" or "signals of interest." This article reviews the different criteria for electrode selection as well as the basic signal processing steps to prepare the data to compute those criteria. We discuss three of them. The first two select the electrodes based on "signal quality." The first criterion computes the penalized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); the second criterion models the neuroscientist's appraisal of signal quality. Last, our most recent work allows the selection of electrodes that capture particular anatomical cell types. The discussed algorithms perform what is called in the literature "electronic depth control" in contrast to the mechanical repositioning of the electrode shafts in search of "good quality signals" or "signals of interest." PMID:24231119

  11. Highly Flexible Silicone Coated Neural Array for Intracochlear Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, P.; Van Beek-King, J.; Sharpe, A.; Crawford, J.; Tridandapani, S.; McKinnon, B.; Blake, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective method for tailoring the flexibility of a commercial thin-film polymer electrode array for intracochlear electrical stimulation. Using a pneumatically driven dispensing system, an average 232 ± 64 μm (mean ± SD) thickness layer of silicone adhesive coating was applied to stiffen the underside of polyimide multisite arrays. Additional silicone was applied to the tip to protect neural tissue during insertion and along the array to improve surgical handling. Each array supported 20 platinum sites (180 μm dia., 250 μm pitch), spanning nearly 28 mm in length and 400 μm in width. We report an average intracochlear stimulating current threshold of 170 ± 93 μA to evoke an auditory brainstem response in 7 acutely deafened felines. A total of 10 arrays were each inserted through a round window approach into the cochlea's basal turn of eight felines with one delamination occurring upon insertion (preliminary results of the in vivo data presented at the 48th Annual Meeting American Neurotology Society, Orlando, FL, April 2013, and reported in Van Beek-King 2014). Using microcomputed tomography imaging (50 μm resolution), distances ranging from 100 to 565 μm from the cochlea's central modiolus were measured. Our method combines the utility of readily available commercial devices with a straightforward postprocessing step on the order of 24 hours. PMID:26236714

  12. Large area, dense silicon nanowire array chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Talin, A. Alec; Hunter, Luke L.; Leonard, Francois; Rokad, Bhavin

    2006-10-09

    The authors present a simple top-down approach based on nanoimprint lithography to create dense arrays of silicon nanowires over large areas. Metallic contacts to the nanowires and a bottom gate allow the operation of the array as a field-effect transistor with very large on/off ratios. When exposed to ammonia gas or cyclohexane solutions containing nitrobenzene or phenol, the threshold voltage of the field-effect transistor is shifted, a signature of charge transfer between the analytes and the nanowires. The threshold voltage shift is proportional to the Hammett parameter and the concentration of the nitrobenzene and phenol analytes.

  13. New methodology for through silicon via array macroinspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshihiko; Tsuto, Takashi; Kudo, Yuji; Inoue, Takeshi; Suwa, Kyoichi; Okamoto, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    A new methodology for inspection of through silicon via (TSV) process wafers is developed by utilizing an optical diffraction signal from the wafers. The optical system uses telecentric illumination and has a two-dimensional sensor for capturing the diffracted light from TSV arrays. The diffraction signal modulates the intensity of the wafer image. The optical configuration is optimized for TSV array inspection. The diffraction signal is sensitive to via-shape variations, and an area of deviation from a nominal via is analyzed using the signal. Using test wafers with deep via patterns on silicon wafers, the performance is evaluated and the sensitivities for various pattern profile changes are confirmed. This new methodology is available for high-volume manufacturing of future TSV three-dimensional complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices.

  14. The Surface Photovoltage Mechanism of a Silicon Nanoporous Pillar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhen-Gang; Tian, Yong-Tao; Li, Xin-Jian

    2013-08-01

    The surface photovoltage (SPV) mechanism of a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) is investigated by using SPV spectroscopy in different external electric fields. Through comparisons with the SPV spectrum of single crystal silicon (sc-Si), the silicon nano-crystallite (nc-Si)/SiOx nanostructure of Si-NPA is proved to be capable of producing obvious SPV in the wavelength range 300-580 nm. The SPV for the sc-Si layer and the nc-Si/SiOx nanostructure has shown certain contrary characters in different external electric fields. Through analysis, the localized states in the amorphous SiOx matrix are believed to dominate the SPV for the nc-Si/SiOx nanostructure.

  15. Properties of Retinal Precursor Cells Grown on Vertically Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Generated for the Modification of Retinal Implant-Embedded Microelectrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Johnen, Sandra; Meißner, Frank; Krug, Mario; Baltz, Thomas; Endler, Ingolf; Mokwa, Wilfried; Walter, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. To analyze the biocompatibility of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), used as nanomodification to optimize the properties of prostheses-embedded microelectrodes that induce electrical stimulation of surviving retinal cells. Methods. MWCNT were synthesized on silicon wafers. Their growth was achieved by iron particles (Fe) or mixtures of iron-platinum (Fe-Pt) and iron-titanium (Fe-Ti) acting as catalysts. Viability, growth, adhesion, and gene expression of L-929 and retinal precursor (R28) cells were analyzed after nondirect and direct contact. Results. Nondirect contact had almost no influence on cell growth, as measured in comparison to reference materials with defined levels of cytotoxicity. Both cell types exhibited good proliferation properties on each MWCNT-coated wafer. Viability ranged from 95.9 to 99.8%, in which better survival was observed for nonfunctionalized MWCNT generated with the Fe-Pt and Fe-Ti catalyst mixtures. R28 cells grown on the MWCNT-coated wafers showed a decreased gene expression associated with neural and glial properties. Expression of the cell cycle-related genes CCNC, MYC, and TP53 was slightly downregulated. Cultivation on plasma-treated MWCNT did not lead to additional changes. Conclusions. All tested MWCNT-covered slices showed good biocompatibility profiles, confirming that this nanotechnology is a promising tool to improve prostheses bearing electrodes which connect with retinal tissue. PMID:27200182

  16. Properties of Retinal Precursor Cells Grown on Vertically Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Generated for the Modification of Retinal Implant-Embedded Microelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Johnen, Sandra; Meißner, Frank; Krug, Mario; Baltz, Thomas; Endler, Ingolf; Mokwa, Wilfried; Walter, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. To analyze the biocompatibility of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), used as nanomodification to optimize the properties of prostheses-embedded microelectrodes that induce electrical stimulation of surviving retinal cells. Methods. MWCNT were synthesized on silicon wafers. Their growth was achieved by iron particles (Fe) or mixtures of iron-platinum (Fe-Pt) and iron-titanium (Fe-Ti) acting as catalysts. Viability, growth, adhesion, and gene expression of L-929 and retinal precursor (R28) cells were analyzed after nondirect and direct contact. Results. Nondirect contact had almost no influence on cell growth, as measured in comparison to reference materials with defined levels of cytotoxicity. Both cell types exhibited good proliferation properties on each MWCNT-coated wafer. Viability ranged from 95.9 to 99.8%, in which better survival was observed for nonfunctionalized MWCNT generated with the Fe-Pt and Fe-Ti catalyst mixtures. R28 cells grown on the MWCNT-coated wafers showed a decreased gene expression associated with neural and glial properties. Expression of the cell cycle-related genes CCNC, MYC, and TP53 was slightly downregulated. Cultivation on plasma-treated MWCNT did not lead to additional changes. Conclusions. All tested MWCNT-covered slices showed good biocompatibility profiles, confirming that this nanotechnology is a promising tool to improve prostheses bearing electrodes which connect with retinal tissue. PMID:27200182

  17. Enhanced Sensitivity for Electrochemical Detection Using Screen-Printed Diamond Electrodes via the Random Microelectrode Array Effect.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Udagawa, Ikuto; Aikawa, Tatsuo; Sakamoto, Hironori; Shitanda, Isao; Hoshi, Yoshinao; Itagaki, Masayuki; Yuasa, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical properties of screen-printed diamond electrodes with various insulating polyester (PES) resin binder/boron-doped diamond powder (BDDP) ratios were investigated for high sensitivity electrochemical detection. For PES/BDDP weight ratios in the range of 0.3-0.5, the BDDP-printed electrodes exhibited cyclic voltammetry (CV) characteristics for Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) that are typical of a planar electrode, whereas microelectrode-like characteristics with sigmoidal CV curves were observed for PES/BDDP ratios of 1.0-2.0. Cu elemental mapping images of copper-electrodeposited BDDP-printed electrodes indicated the formation of island structures with conductive BDDP domains surrounded by an insulating PES matrix for large PES/BDDP ratios. The electrochemical detection of ascorbic acid (AA) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was also investigated using polycrystalline BDD thin-film and BDDP-printed electrodes (PES/BDDP ratio = 0.3 and 1.0). As a result, the signal-to-background (S/B) ratios for the voltammetric detection of AA and 8-OHdG were in the order BDDP-printed electrode (PES/BDDP = 1.0) > BDDP-printed electrode (PES/BDDP = 0.3) > polycrystalline BDD thin film electrode, based on the large faradaic current with respect to the background current. Therefore, the BDDP-printed electrode with a large insulating binder/BDDP ratio has the potential for use as a disposable electrode for electrochemical detection. The electrode is cheaper, lighter and more sensitive than conventional BDD electrodes. PMID:26750090

  18. Silicon drift photodetector arrays for the HICAM gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Peloso, R.; Fiorini, C.; Gola, A.; Eckhardt, R.; Hermenau, K.; Lechner, P.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) have shown to be a competitive device for the readout of scintillators with respect to conventional photodetectors, thanks to their high quantum efficiency and low electronics noise. Recently, they have been successfully employed in first small prototypes of Anger cameras to achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution in gamma-ray imaging. To cover larger formats of Anger cameras, in particular in the framework of the HICAM project, specially focused on human imaging, we have developed new SDD arrays of larger active areas. To assemble photodetector planes of several cm 2, we have designed a basic unit composed by a linear array of 5 SDDs of 1 cm 2 active area each. In this work, we present the results of the experimental characterization of these photodetector arrays in direct X-ray detection to evaluate the electronics noise, as well as gamma-ray detection with a scintillator.

  19. A Low-Noise, Modular, and Versatile Analog Front-End Intended for Processing In Vitro Neuronal Signals Detected by Microelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Regalia, Giulia; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The collection of good quality extracellular neuronal spikes from neuronal cultures coupled to Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) is a binding requirement to gather reliable data. Due to physical constraints, low power requirement, or the need of customizability, commercial recording platforms are not fully adequate for the development of experimental setups integrating MEA technology with other equipment needed to perform experiments under climate controlled conditions, like environmental chambers or cell culture incubators. To address this issue, we developed a custom MEA interfacing system featuring low noise, low power, and the capability to be readily integrated inside an incubator-like environment. Two stages, a preamplifier and a filter amplifier, were designed, implemented on printed circuit boards, and tested. The system is characterized by a low input-referred noise (<1 μV RMS), a high channel separation (>70 dB), and signal-to-noise ratio values of neuronal recordings comparable to those obtained with the benchmark commercial MEA system. In addition, the system was successfully integrated with an environmental MEA chamber, without harming cell cultures during experiments and without being damaged by the high humidity level. The devised system is of practical value in the development of in vitro platforms to study temporally extended neuronal network dynamics by means of MEAs. PMID:25977683

  20. Incubator-independent cell-culture perfusion platform for continuous long-term microelectrode array electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging.

    PubMed

    Saalfrank, Dirk; Konduri, Anil Krishna; Latifi, Shahrzad; Habibey, Rouhollah; Golabchi, Asiyeh; Martiniuc, Aurel Vasile; Knoll, Alois; Ingebrandt, Sven; Blau, Axel

    2015-06-01

    Most in vitro electrophysiology studies extract information and draw conclusions from representative, temporally limited snapshot experiments. This approach bears the risk of missing decisive moments that may make a difference in our understanding of physiological events. This feasibility study presents a simple benchtop cell-culture perfusion system adapted to commercial microelectrode arrays (MEAs), multichannel electrophysiology equipment and common inverted microscopy stages for simultaneous and uninterrupted extracellular electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging at ambient CO2 levels. The concept relies on a transparent, replica-casted polydimethylsiloxane perfusion cap, gravity- or syringe-pump-driven perfusion and preconditioning of pH-buffered serum-free cell-culture medium to ambient CO2 levels at physiological temperatures. The low-cost microfluidic in vitro enabling platform, which allows us to image cultures immediately after cell plating, is easy to reproduce and is adaptable to the geometries of different cell-culture containers. It permits the continuous and simultaneous multimodal long-term acquisition or manipulation of optical and electrophysiological parameter sets, thereby considerably widening the range of experimental possibilities. Two exemplary proof-of-concept long-term MEA studies on hippocampal networks illustrate system performance. Continuous extracellular recordings over a period of up to 70 days revealed details on both sudden and gradual neural activity changes in maturing cell ensembles with large intra-day fluctuations. Correlated time-lapse imaging unveiled rather static macroscopic network architectures with previously unreported local morphological oscillations on the timescale of minutes. PMID:26543581

  1. Incubator-independent cell-culture perfusion platform for continuous long-term microelectrode array electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, Dirk; Konduri, Anil Krishna; Latifi, Shahrzad; Habibey, Rouhollah; Golabchi, Asiyeh; Martiniuc, Aurel Vasile; Knoll, Alois; Ingebrandt, Sven; Blau, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Most in vitro electrophysiology studies extract information and draw conclusions from representative, temporally limited snapshot experiments. This approach bears the risk of missing decisive moments that may make a difference in our understanding of physiological events. This feasibility study presents a simple benchtop cell-culture perfusion system adapted to commercial microelectrode arrays (MEAs), multichannel electrophysiology equipment and common inverted microscopy stages for simultaneous and uninterrupted extracellular electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging at ambient CO2 levels. The concept relies on a transparent, replica-casted polydimethylsiloxane perfusion cap, gravity- or syringe-pump-driven perfusion and preconditioning of pH-buffered serum-free cell-culture medium to ambient CO2 levels at physiological temperatures. The low-cost microfluidic in vitro enabling platform, which allows us to image cultures immediately after cell plating, is easy to reproduce and is adaptable to the geometries of different cell-culture containers. It permits the continuous and simultaneous multimodal long-term acquisition or manipulation of optical and electrophysiological parameter sets, thereby considerably widening the range of experimental possibilities. Two exemplary proof-of-concept long-term MEA studies on hippocampal networks illustrate system performance. Continuous extracellular recordings over a period of up to 70 days revealed details on both sudden and gradual neural activity changes in maturing cell ensembles with large intra-day fluctuations. Correlated time-lapse imaging unveiled rather static macroscopic network architectures with previously unreported local morphological oscillations on the timescale of minutes. PMID:26543581

  2. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Regalia, Giulia; Coelli, Stefania; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting "building blocks" into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis. PMID:27239191

  3. A low-noise, modular, and versatile analog front-end intended for processing in vitro neuronal signals detected by microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Regalia, Giulia; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The collection of good quality extracellular neuronal spikes from neuronal cultures coupled to Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) is a binding requirement to gather reliable data. Due to physical constraints, low power requirement, or the need of customizability, commercial recording platforms are not fully adequate for the development of experimental setups integrating MEA technology with other equipment needed to perform experiments under climate controlled conditions, like environmental chambers or cell culture incubators. To address this issue, we developed a custom MEA interfacing system featuring low noise, low power, and the capability to be readily integrated inside an incubator-like environment. Two stages, a preamplifier and a filter amplifier, were designed, implemented on printed circuit boards, and tested. The system is characterized by a low input-referred noise (<1 μV RMS), a high channel separation (>70 dB), and signal-to-noise ratio values of neuronal recordings comparable to those obtained with the benchmark commercial MEA system. In addition, the system was successfully integrated with an environmental MEA chamber, without harming cell cultures during experiments and without being damaged by the high humidity level. The devised system is of practical value in the development of in vitro platforms to study temporally extended neuronal network dynamics by means of MEAs. PMID:25977683

  4. In-Vivo Characterization of Glassy Carbon Micro-Electrode Arrays for Neural Applications and Histological Analysis of the Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vomero, Maria

    The aim of this work is to fabricate and characterize glassy carbon Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for sensing and stimulating neural activity, and conduct histological analysis of the brain tissue after the implant to determine long-term performance. Neural applications often require robust electrical and electrochemical response over a long period of time, and for those applications we propose to replace the commonly used noble metals like platinum, gold and iridium with glassy carbon. We submit that such material has the potential to improve the performances of traditional neural prostheses, thanks to better charge transfer capabilities and higher electrochemical stability. Great interest and attention is given in this work, in particular, to the investigation of tissue response after several weeks of implants in rodents' brain motor cortex and the associated materials degradation. As part of this work, a new set of devices for Electrocorticography (ECoG) has been designed and fabricated to improve durability and quality of the previous generation of devices, designed and manufactured by the same research group in 2014. In-vivo long-term impedance measurements and brain activity recordings were performed to test the functionality of the neural devices. In-vitro electrical characterization of the carbon electrodes, as well as the study of the adhesion mechanisms between glassy carbon and different substrates is also part of the research described in this book.

  5. Microelectrode arrays in combination with in vitro models of spinal cord injury as tools to investigate pathological changes in network activity: facts and promises

    PubMed Central

    Mladinic, Miranda; Nistri, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represent an important tool to study the basic characteristics of spinal networks that control locomotion in physiological conditions. Fundamental properties of this neuronal rhythmicity like burst origin, propagation, coordination, and resilience can, thus, be investigated at multiple sites within a certain spinal topography and neighboring circuits. A novel challenge will be to apply this technology to unveil the mechanisms underlying pathological processes evoked by spinal cord injury (SCI). To achieve this goal, it is necessary to fully identify spinal networks that make up the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) and to understand their operational rules. In this review, the use of isolated spinal cord preparations from rodents, or organotypic spinal slice cultures is discussed to study rhythmic activity. In particular, this review surveys our recently developed in vitro models of SCI by evoking excitotoxic (or even hypoxic/dysmetabolic) damage to spinal networks and assessing the impact on rhythmic activity and cell survival. These pathological processes which evolve via different cell death mechanisms are discussed as a paradigm to apply MEA recording for detailed mapping of the functional damage and its time-dependent evolution. PMID:23459694

  6. Microelectrode arrays in combination with in vitro models of spinal cord injury as tools to investigate pathological changes in network activity: facts and promises.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, Miranda; Nistri, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represent an important tool to study the basic characteristics of spinal networks that control locomotion in physiological conditions. Fundamental properties of this neuronal rhythmicity like burst origin, propagation, coordination, and resilience can, thus, be investigated at multiple sites within a certain spinal topography and neighboring circuits. A novel challenge will be to apply this technology to unveil the mechanisms underlying pathological processes evoked by spinal cord injury (SCI). To achieve this goal, it is necessary to fully identify spinal networks that make up the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) and to understand their operational rules. In this review, the use of isolated spinal cord preparations from rodents, or organotypic spinal slice cultures is discussed to study rhythmic activity. In particular, this review surveys our recently developed in vitro models of SCI by evoking excitotoxic (or even hypoxic/dysmetabolic) damage to spinal networks and assessing the impact on rhythmic activity and cell survival. These pathological processes which evolve via different cell death mechanisms are discussed as a paradigm to apply MEA recording for detailed mapping of the functional damage and its time-dependent evolution. PMID:23459694

  7. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting “building blocks” into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis. PMID:27239191

  8. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  9. Reliability of signals from a chronically implanted, silicon-based electrode array in non-human primate primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Suner, Selim; Fellows, Matthew R; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Nakata, Gordon Kenji; Donoghue, John P

    2005-12-01

    Multiple-electrode arrays are valuable both as a research tool and as a sensor for neuromotor prosthetic devices, which could potentially restore voluntary motion and functional independence to paralyzed humans. Long-term array reliability is an important requirement for these applications. Here, we demonstrate the reliability of a regular array of 100 microelectrodes to obtain neural recordings from primary motor cortex (MI) of monkeys for at least three months and up to 1.5 years. We implanted Bionic (Cyberkinetics, Inc., Foxboro, MA) silicon probe arrays in MI of three Macaque monkeys. Neural signals were recorded during performance of an eight-direction, push-button task. Recording reliability was evaluated for 18, 35, or 51 sessions distributed over 83, 179, and 569 days after implantation, respectively, using qualitative and quantitative measures. A four-point signal quality scale was defined based on the waveform amplitude relative to noise. A single observer applied this scale to score signal quality for each electrode. A mean of 120 (+/- 17.6 SD), 146 (+/- 7.3), and 119 (+/- 16.9) neural-like waveforms were observed from 65-85 electrodes across subjects for all recording sessions of which over 80% were of high quality. Quantitative measures demonstrated that waveforms had signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) up to 20 with maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of over 1200 microv with a mean SNR of 4.8 for signals ranked as high quality. Mean signal quality did not change over the duration of the evaluation period (slope 0.001, 0.0068 and 0.03; NS). By contrast, neural waveform shape varied between, but not within days in all animals, suggesting a shifting population of recorded neurons over time. Arm-movement related modulation was common and 66% of all recorded neurons were tuned to reach direction. The ability for the array to record neural signals from parietal cortex was also established. These results demonstrate that neural recordings that can provide movement

  10. Fully Tunable Silicon Nanowire Arrays Fabricated by Soft Nanoparticle Templating.

    PubMed

    Rey, By Marcel; Elnathan, Roey; Ditcovski, Ran; Geisel, Karen; Zanini, Michele; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel-Angel; Naik, Vikrant V; Frutiger, Andreas; Richtering, Walter; Ellenbogen, Tal; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Isa, Lucio

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a fabrication breakthrough to produce large-area arrays of vertically aligned silicon nanowires (VA-SiNWs) with full tunability of the geometry of the single nanowires and of the whole array, paving the way toward advanced programmable designs of nanowire platforms. At the core of our fabrication route, termed "Soft Nanoparticle Templating", is the conversion of gradually compressed self-assembled monolayers of soft nanoparticles (microgels) at a water-oil interface into customized lithographical masks to create VA-SiNW arrays by means of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE). This combination of bottom-up and top-down techniques affords excellent control of nanowire etching site locations, enabling independent control of nanowire spacing, diameter and height in a single fabrication route. We demonstrate the fabrication of centimeter-scale two-dimensional gradient photonic crystals exhibiting continuously varying structural colors across the entire visible spectrum on a single silicon substrate, and the formation of tunable optical cavities supported by the VA-SiNWs, as unambiguously demonstrated through numerical simulations. Finally, Soft Nanoparticle Templating is combined with optical lithography to create hierarchical and programmable VA-SiNW patterns. PMID:26672801

  11. Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

  12. High-channel-count, high-density microelectrode array for closed-loop investigation of neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David; John, Esha; Chari, Tarun; Yuste, Rafael; Shepard, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    We present a system for large-scale electrophysiological recording and stimulation of neural tissue with a planar topology. The recording system has 65,536 electrodes arranged in a 256 × 256 grid, with 25.5 μm pitch, and covering an area approximately 42.6 mm(2). The recording chain has 8.66 μV rms input-referred noise over a 100 ~ 10k Hz bandwidth while providing up to 66 dB of voltage gain. When recording from all electrodes in the array, it is capable of 10-kHz sampling per electrode. All electrodes can also perform patterned electrical microstimulation. The system produces ~ 1 GB/s of data when recording from the full array. To handle, store, and perform nearly real-time analyses of this large data stream, we developed a framework based around Xilinx FPGAs, Intel x86 CPUs and the NVIDIA Streaming Multiprocessors to interface with the electrode array. PMID:26738029

  13. Array Automated Assembly Task Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, S. S.; Jones, G. T.; Allison, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of solar cells and module process steps for low-cost solar arrays is reported. Specific topics covered include: (1) a system to automatically measure solar cell electrical performance parameters; (2) automation of wafer surface preparation, printing, and plating; (3) laser inspection of mechanical defects of solar cells; and (4) a silicon antireflection coating system. Two solar cell process steps, laser trimming and holing automation and spray-on dopant junction formation, are described.

  14. Silicon nanowire arrays as learning chemical vapour classifiers.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, A O; Colli, A; White, R; Li, H W; Spigone, E; Kivioja, J M

    2011-07-22

    Nanowire field-effect transistors are a promising class of devices for various sensing applications. Apart from detecting individual chemical or biological analytes, it is especially interesting to use multiple selective sensors to look at their collective response in order to perform classification into predetermined categories. We show that non-functionalised silicon nanowire arrays can be used to robustly classify different chemical vapours using simple statistical machine learning methods. We were able to distinguish between acetone, ethanol and water with 100% accuracy while methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol were classified with 96% accuracy in ambient conditions. PMID:21673389

  15. Ordered silicon nanorod arrays with controllable geometry and robust hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi-Wen, Wang; Jia-Qi, Cai; Yi-Zhi, Wu; Hui-Jie, Wang; Xiao-Liang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Highly ordered silicon nanorod (SiNR) arrays with controllable geometry are fabricated via nanosphere lithography and metal-assisted chemical etching. It is demonstrated that the key to achieving a high-quality metal mask is to construct a non-close-packed template that can be removed with negligible damage to the mask. Hydrophobicity of SiNR arrays of different geometries is also studied. It is shown that the nanorod structures are effectively quasi-hydrophobic with a contact angle as high as 142°, which would be useful in self-cleaning nanorod-based device applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51272246) and the Scientific and Technological Research Foundation of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. 12010202035).

  16. Optimized antireflective silicon nanostructure arrays using nanosphere lithography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dohaeng; Bae, Jiwoong; Hong, Soonwook; Yang, Hwichul; Kim, Young-Beom

    2016-05-27

    Broadband optical antireflective arrays of sub-wavelength structures were fabricated on silicon substrates using colloidal nanosphere lithography in conjunction with reactive ion etching. The morphology of the nanostructures, including the shape, base diameter and height, was precisely controlled by modifying the conventional process of nanosphere lithography. We investigated their effects on the optical characteristics based on experimentally measured reflectance performance. The Si nanostructure arrays demonstrated optical antireflection performance with an average reflectance of about 1% across the spectral range from 300 to 800 nm, i.e. near-ultraviolet to visible wavelengths. This fabrication method can be used to create a large surface area and offers a promising approach for antireflective applications. PMID:27087196

  17. Optimized antireflective silicon nanostructure arrays using nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dohaeng; Bae, Jiwoong; Hong, Soonwook; Yang, Hwichul; Kim, Young-Beom

    2016-05-01

    Broadband optical antireflective arrays of sub-wavelength structures were fabricated on silicon substrates using colloidal nanosphere lithography in conjunction with reactive ion etching. The morphology of the nanostructures, including the shape, base diameter and height, was precisely controlled by modifying the conventional process of nanosphere lithography. We investigated their effects on the optical characteristics based on experimentally measured reflectance performance. The Si nanostructure arrays demonstrated optical antireflection performance with an average reflectance of about 1% across the spectral range from 300 to 800 nm, i.e. near-ultraviolet to visible wavelengths. This fabrication method can be used to create a large surface area and offers a promising approach for antireflective applications.

  18. Copper nanorod array assisted silicon waveguide polarization beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangsik; Qi, Minghao

    2014-04-21

    We present the design of a three-dimensional (3D) polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a copper nanorod array placed between two silicon waveguides. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of a metal nanorod array selectively cross-couples transverse electric (TE) mode to the coupler waveguide, while transverse magnetic (TM) mode passes through the original input waveguide without coupling. An ultra-compact and broadband PBS compared to all-dielectric devices is achieved with the LSPR. The output ports of waveguides are designed to support either TM or TE mode only to enhance the extinction ratios. Compared to silver, copper is fully compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. PMID:24787839

  19. Silicon nitride Micromesh Bolometer Array for Submillimeter Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Turner, A D; Bock, J J; Beeman, J W; Glenn, J; Hargrave, P C; Hristov, V V; Nguyen, H T; Rahman, F; Sethuraman, S; Woodcraft, A L

    2001-10-01

    We present the design and performance of a feedhorn-coupled bolometer array intended for a sensitive 350-mum photometer camera. Silicon nitride micromesh absorbers minimize the suspended mass and heat capacity of the bolometers. The temperature transducers, neutron-transmutation-doped Ge thermistors, are attached to the absorber with In bump bonds. Vapor-deposited electrical leads address the thermistors and determine the thermal conductance of the bolometers. The bolometer array demonstrates a dark noise-equivalent power of 2.9 x 10(-17) W/ radicalHz and a mean heat capacity of 1.3 pJ/K at 390 mK. We measure the optical efficiency of the bolometer and feedhorn to be 0.45-0.65 by comparing the response to blackbody calibration sources. The bolometer array demonstrates theoretical noise performance arising from the photon and the phonon and Johnson noise, with photon noise dominant under the design background conditions. We measure the ratio of total noise to photon noise to be 1.21 under an absorbed optical power of 2.4 pW. Excess noise is negligible for audio frequencies as low as 30 mHz. We summarize the trade-offs between bare and feedhorn-coupled detectors and discuss the estimated performance limits of micromesh bolometers. The bolometer array demonstrates the sensitivity required for photon noise-limited performance from a spaceborne, passively cooled telescope. PMID:18364768

  20. Non-invasive long-term and real-time analysis of endocrine cells on micro-electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Raoux, Matthieu; Bornat, Yannick; Quotb, Adam; Catargi, Bogdan; Renaud, Sylvie; Lang, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive high-throughput and long-term monitoring of endocrine cells is important for drug research, phenotyping, tissue engineering and pre-transplantation quality control. Here we report a novel approach to obtain simultaneous long-term electrical recordings of different islet cell types using multi-electrode arrays. We implemented wavelet transforms to resolve the low signal/noise ratio inherent to these measurements and extracted on-line a signature specific of cell activity. The architecture employed allows multiplexing a large number of electrodes for high-throughput screening. This method should be of considerable advantage in endocrine research and may be extended to other excitable cells previously not accessible to the technique. PMID:22199167

  1. Interdigitated array microelectrode based impedance biosensor coupled with magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugates for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in food samples.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Madhukar; Li, Yanbin

    2007-05-15

    An impedance biosensor based on interdigitated array microelectrode (IDAM) coupled with magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugates (MNAC) was developed and evaluated for rapid and specific detection of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef samples. MNAC were prepared by immobilizing biotin-labeled polyclonal goat anti-E. coli antibodies onto streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles, which were used to separate and concentrate E. coli O157:H7 from ground beef samples. Magnitude of impedance and phase angle were measured in a frequency range of 10 Hz to 1 MHz in the presence of 0.1M mannitol solution. The lowest detection limits of this biosensor for detection of E. coli O157:H7 in pure culture and ground beef samples were 7.4 x 10(4) and 8.0 x 10(5)CFU ml(-1), respectively. The regression equation for the normalized impedance change (NIC) versus E. coli O157:H7 concentration (N) in ground beef samples was NIC=15.55 N-71.04 with R(2)=0.95. Sensitivity of the impedance biosensor was improved by 35% by concentrating bacterial cells attached to MNAC in the active layer of IDAM above the surface of electrodes with the help of a magnetic field. Based on equivalent circuit analysis, it was observed that bulk resistance and double layer capacitance were responsible for the impedance change caused by the presence of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface of IDAM. Surface immobilization techniques, redox probes, or sample incubation were not used in this impedance biosensor. The total detection time from sampling to measurement was 35 min. PMID:17045791

  2. Selective Recognition of 5-Hydroxytryptamine and Dopamine on a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Chitosan Hybrid Film-Modified Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiren; Wang, Li; Luo, Jinping; Song, Yilin; Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to determine dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) accurately because of the interference of ascorbic acid (AA) in vitro, which has a high concentration and can be oxidized at a potential close to DA and 5-HT at a conventional electrode, combined with the overlapping voltammetric signal of DA and 5-HT at a bare electrode. Herein, chitosan (CS) was used as a stabilizing matrix by electrochemical reaction, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified onto the microelectrode array (MEA). The CS-MWCNT hybrid film-modified MEA was quite effective at simultaneously recognizing these species in a mixture and resolved the overlapping anodic peaks of AA, DA and 5-HT into three well-defined oxidation peaks in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at −80 mV, 105 mV and 300 mV (versus Ag|AgCl), respectively. The linear responses were obtained in the range of 5 × 10−6 M to 2 × 10−4 M for DA (r = 0.996) and in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for 5-HT (r = 0.999) using the DPV under the presence of a single substance. While DA coexisted with 5-HT in the interference of 3 × 10−4 M AA, the linear responses were obtained in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for selective molecular recognition of DA (r = 0.997) and 5-HT (r = 0.997) using the DPV. Therefore, this proposed MEA was successfully used for selective molecular recognition and determination of DA and 5-HT using the DPV, which has a potential application for real-time determination in vitro experiments. PMID:25580900

  3. Interdigitated design of a thermoelectric microgenerator based on silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, I.; Salleras, M.; Calaza, C.; Santos, J. D.; Gadea, G.; Morata, A.; Dávila, D.; Tarancón, A.; Fonseca, L.

    2015-05-01

    Silicon nanowires thermoelectric properties are much better than those of silicon bulk. Taking advantage of silicon microfabrication techniques and compatibilizing the device fabrication with the CVD-VLS silicon nanowire growth, we present a thermoelectric microgenerator based on silicon nanowire arrays with interdigitated structures which enhance the power density compared to previous designs presented by the authors. The proposed design features a thermally isolated silicon platform on the silicon device layer of an SOI silicon wafer. This silicon platform has vertical walls exposing <111< planes where gold nanoparticles are deposited by galvanic displacement. These gold nanoparticles act as seeds for the silicon nanowires. The growth takes place in a CVD with silane precursor, and uses the Vapor-Solid-Liquid synthesis. Once the silicon nanowires are grown, they connect the silicon platform with the silicon bulk. The proposed thermoelectric generator is unileg, which means that only one type of semiconductor is used, and the second connection is made through a metal. In addition, to improve the thermal isolation of the silicon platform, multiple trenches of silicon nanowire arrays are used, up to a maximum of nine. After packaging the device with nanowires, we are able to measure the Seebeck voltage and the power obtained with different operation modes: harvesting mode, where the bottom device is heated up, and the silicon platform is cooled down by natural or forced convection, and test mode, where a heater integrated on the silicon platform is used to produce a thermal gradient.

  4. Micropatterning of poly(dimethylsiloxane) using a photoresist lift-off technique for selective electrical insulation of microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaewon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Han, Arum

    2009-01-01

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patterning method based on a photoresist lift-off technique to make an electrical insulation layer with selective openings is presented. The method enables creating PDMS patterns with small features and various thicknesses without any limitation in the designs and without the need for complicated processes or expensive equipments. Patterned PDMS layers were created by spin-coating liquid phase PDMS on top of a substrate having sacrificial photoresist patterns, followed by a photoresist lift-off process. The thickness of the patterned PDMS layers could be accurately controlled (6.5–24 µm) by adjusting processing parameters such as PDMS spin-coating speeds, PDMS dilution ratios, and sacrificial photoresist thicknesses. PDMS features as small as 15 µm were successfully patterned and the effects of each processing parameter on the final patterns were investigated. Electrical resistance tests between adjacent electrodes with and without the insulation layer showed that the patterned PDMS layer functions properly as an electrical insulation layer. Biocompatibility of the patterned PDMS layer was confirmed by culturing primary neuron cells on top of the layer for up to two weeks. An extensive neuronal network was successfully formed, showing that this PDMS patterning method can be applied to various biosensing microdevices. The utility of this fabrication method was further demonstrated by successfully creating a patterned electrical insulation layer on flexible substrates containing multi-electrode arrays. PMID:19946385

  5. Smart integration of silicon nanowire arrays in all-silicon thermoelectric micro-nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Luis; Santos, Jose-Domingo; Roncaglia, Alberto; Narducci, Dario; Calaza, Carlos; Salleras, Marc; Donmez, Inci; Tarancon, Albert; Morata, Alex; Gadea, Gerard; Belsito, Luca; Zulian, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanotechnologies are called to play a key role in the fabrication of small and low cost sensors with excellent performance enabling new continuous monitoring scenarios and distributed intelligence paradigms (Internet of Things, Trillion Sensors). Harvesting devices providing energy autonomy to those large numbers of microsensors will be essential. In those scenarios where waste heat sources are present, thermoelectricity will be the obvious choice. However, miniaturization of state of the art thermoelectric modules is not easy with the current technologies used for their fabrication. Micro and nanotechnologies offer an interesting alternative considering that silicon in nanowire form is a material with a promising thermoelectric figure of merit. This paper presents two approaches for the integration of large numbers of silicon nanowires in a cost-effective and practical way using only micromachining and thin-film processes compatible with silicon technologies. Both approaches lead to automated physical and electrical integration of medium-high density stacked arrays of crystalline or polycrystalline silicon nanowires with arbitrary length (tens to hundreds microns) and diameters below 100 nm.

  6. Electrostatic microactuators for precise positioning of neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2005-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 microm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  7. Electrostatic Microactuators for Precise Positioning of Neural Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V™ (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 μm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  8. Voltage pulses change neural interface properties and improve unit recordings with chronically implanted microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Otto, Kevin J; Johnson, Matthew D; Kipke, Daryl R

    2006-02-01

    Current neuroprosthetic systems based on electro-physiological recording have an extended, yet finite working lifetime. Some posited lifetime-extension solutions involve improving device biocompatibility or suppressing host immune responses. Our objective was to test an alternative solution comprised of applying a voltage pulse to a microelectrode site, herein termed "rejuvenation." Previously, investigators have reported preliminary electrophysiological results by utilizing a similar voltage pulse. In this study we sought to further explore this phenomenon via two methods: 1) electrophysiology; 2) an equivalent circuit model applied to impedance spectroscopy data. The experiments were conducted via chronically implanted silicon-substrate iridium microelectrode arrays in the rat cortex. Rejuvenation voltages resulted in increased unit recording signal-to-noise ratios (10% +/- 2%), with a maximal increase of 195% from 3.74 to 11.02. Rejuvenation also reduced the electrode site impedances at 1 kHz (67% +/- 2%). Neither the impedance nor recording properties of the electrodes changed on neighboring microelectrode sites that were not rejuvenated. In the equivalent circuit model, we found a transient increase in conductivity, the majority of which corresponded to a decrease in the tissue resistance component (44% +/- 7%). These findings suggest that rejuvenation may be an intervention strategy to prolong the functional lifetime of chronically implanted microelectrodes. PMID:16485763

  9. Silicon technologies for arrays of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulinatti, Angelo; Ceccarelli, Francesco; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    In order to fulfill the requirements of many applications, we recently developed a new technology aimed at combining the advantages of traditional thin and thick silicon Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD). In particular we demonstrated single-pixel detectors with a remarkable improvement in the Photon Detection Efficiency in the red/nearinfrared spectrum (e.g. 40% at 800nm) while maintaining a timing jitter better than 100ps. In this paper we discuss the limitations of such Red-Enhanced (RE) technology from the point of view of the fabrication of small arrays of SPAD and we propose modifications to the structure aimed at overcoming these issues. We also report the first preliminary experimental results attained on devices fabricated adopting the improved structure.

  10. Microelectrodes in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Boots, S.

    1989-03-15

    Understanding the microenvironment of bacteria has presented many challenges for the microbial ecologist. Simple intracellular capillary electrodes have been used in neurophysiology since the 1950s to measure action potentials in ion transport over biological membranes, and ion-selective electrodes were developed soon thereafter for the determination of H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}. However, these analytical techniques did not receive much attention until 1978, when Niels Peter Revsbech and Bo Barker Joergensen at the Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark, began using oxygen microelectrodes in their studies of the ecology and biogeochemistry of marine sediments and other microbial environments. Today, Revsbech and Joergensen use five types of microelectrodes, two types of oxygen microelectrodes, a combined microelectrode for nitrous oxide and oxygen, a sulfide microelectrode, and a pH microelectrode. The first three microelectrodes have diameters of about 10 {mu}m and the last two of about 50 {mu}m. Some of the electrodes actually contain two or three cathodes plus a reference electrode, all situated behind a polymer membrane. In situ experiments have been done for several years at a water depth of several meters, where the micromanipulator is operated by a diver. Recently measurements were obtained in the deep sea with the microelectrodes mounted on a free-falling vehicle or operated from a submersible vessel.