Sample records for silty fine sand

  1. Quantification of time-dependent microstructural change of a silty sand under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusa, M.; Bowman, E. T.

    2013-06-01

    Imaging technology may be used in geotechnical engineering to enhance our understanding of microscopic characteristics and micro-mechanical behaviour of sands. In this study, silty sand samples loaded uniaxially under K0 condition for ageing times of one hour and one week were preserved using low viscosity epoxy resin. High quality images were captured by scanning electron microscope utilizing a backscattered electron detector to give excellent contrast between the grains and the voids. Change in microstructure due to ageing is investigated statistically using particle orientation and distribution of spatial distance between particles in horizontal and vertical directions. It was found that although mean distance between particles only slightly reduces, overall ageing causes larger sand particles to rotate. It is suggested that only few fine particles (silt) rotate during ageing because the majority of them are not in the strongly loaded force chains, so that they just float within the voids.

  2. Liquefaction Potential Assessment Of Silty And Silty-Sand Deposits: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Presti, Diego C. F.; Squeglia, Nunziante [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2--56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    The paper shows a case study concerning the liquefaction potential assessment of deposits which mainly consist of non plastic silts and sands (FC>35 %,I{sub p}<10%, CF negligible). The site under study has been characterized by means of in situ tests (CPTU, SPT and DPSH), boreholes and laboratory tests on undisturbed and remolded samples. More specifically, classification tests, cyclic undrained stress-controlled triaxial tests and resonant column tests have been performed. Liquefaction susceptibility has been evaluated by means of several procedures prescribed by codes or available in technical literature. The evaluation of liquefaction potential has been carried out by means of three different procedure based on in situ and laboratory tests.

  3. A critical state interpretation for the cyclic liquefaction resistance of silty sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George D. Bouckovalas; Konstantinos I. Andrianopoulos; Achilleas G. Papadimitriou

    2003-01-01

    Contrary to many laboratory investigations, common empirical correlations from in situ tests consider that the increase in the percentage of fines leads to an increase of the cyclic liquefaction resistance of sands. This paper draws upon the integrated Critical State Soil Mechanics framework in order to study this seemingly not univocal effect. Firstly the effect of fines on the Critical

  4. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  5. CONE PENETRATION TESTING AND SITE EXPLORATION IN EVALUATING THE LIQUEFACTION RESISTANCE OF SANDS AND SILTY SANDS

    E-print Network

    CONE PENETRATION TESTING AND SITE EXPLORATION IN EVALUATING THE LIQUEFACTION RESISTANCE OF SANDS penetration tip resistance and liquefaction resistance of sandy soils are presented to facilitate use of the cone penetration test (CPT) in liquefaction studies. The proposed relationships are based on a database

  6. Food-chain relationships in subtidal silty sand marine sediments and the role of meiofauna in stimulating bacterial productivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian A. Gerlach

    1978-01-01

    From bibliographic data the biomass correlations (organic dry weight) are constructed for the subsurface layer of a hypothetical 30 m deep silty sand station: 200 µg\\/ml macrofauna (including 120 µg\\/ml subsurface deposit feeders), 50 µg\\/ml meiofauna, 20 µg\\/ml Foraminifera, 1 µg\\/ml Ciliata and Flagellata, and 100 µg\\/ml bacteria. ATP-biomass is discussed.

  7. Transport and transformation of sulfadiazine in soil columns packed with a silty loam and a loamy sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unold, M.; Kasteel, R.; Groeneweg, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-01-01

    Concerning the transport of the veterinary antibiotic sulfadiazine (SDZ) little is known about its possible degradation during transport. Also its sorption behaviour is not yet completely understood. We investigated the transport of SDZ in soil columns with a special emphasis on the detection of transformation products in the outflow of the soil columns and on modelling of the concentration distribution in the soil columns afterwards. We used disturbed soil columns near saturation, packed with a loamy sand and a silty loam. SDZ was applied as a 0.57 mg L - 1 solution at a constant flow rate of 0.25 cm h - 1 for 68 h. Breakthrough curves (BTC) of SDZ and its transformation products 4-(2-iminopyrimidin-1(2 H)-yl)aniline and 4-hydroxy-SDZ were measured for both soils. For the silty loam we additionally measured a BTC for an unknown transformation product which we only detected in the outflow samples of this soil. After the leaching experiments the 14C-concentration was quantified in different layers of the soil columns. The transformation rates were low with mean SDZ mass fractions in the outflow samples of 95% for the loamy sand compared to 97% for the silty loam. The formation of 4-(2-iminopyrimidin-1(2 H)-yl)aniline appears to be light dependent and did probably not occur in the soils, but afterwards. In the soil columns most of the 14C was found near the soil surface. The BTCs in both soils were described well by a model with one reversible (kinetic) and one irreversible sorption site. Sorption kinetics played a more prominent role than sorption capacity. The prediction of the 14C -concentration profiles was improved by applying two empirical models other than first order to predict irreversible sorption, but also these models were not able to describe the 14C concentration profiles correctly. Irreversible sorption of sulfadiazine still is not well understood.

  8. Numerical evaluation of seismic response of shallow foundation on loose silt and silty sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Ali; Golshani, Aliakbar; Bagheri, Mohsen

    2014-03-01

    This study includes the results of a set of numerical simulations carried out for sands containing plastic/non-plastic fines, and silts with relative densities of approximately 30-40% under different surcharges on the shallow foundation using FLAC 2D. Each model was subjected to three ground motion events, obtained by scaling the amplitude of the El Centro (1940), Kobe (1995) and Kocaeli (1999) Q12earthquakes. Dynamic behaviour of loose deposits underlying shallow foundations is evaluated through fully coupled nonlinear effective stress dynamic analyses. Effects of nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) were also considered by using interface elements. This parametric study evaluates the effects of soil type, structure weight, liquefiable soil layer thickness, event parameters (e.g., moment magnitude of earthquake ( M w ), peak ground acceleration PGA, PGV/PGA ratio and the duration of strong motion ( D 5-95) and their interactions on the seismic responses. Investigation on the effects of these parameters and their complex interactions can be a valuable tool to gain new insights for improved seismic design and construction.

  9. Undrained Cyclic Pore Pressure Response of Sand–Silt Mixtures: Effect of Nonplastic Fines and Other Parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. K. Dash; T. G. Sitharam

    2009-01-01

    Literature regarding the pore pressure generation characteristics and in turn the cyclic resistance behaviour of silty sand\\u000a deposits is confusing. In an attempt to clarify the effect of nonplastic fines on undrained cyclic pore pressure response\\u000a of sand–silt mixtures, an experimental programme utilising around 289 stress-controlled cyclic triaxial tests on specimens\\u000a of size 50 mm diameter and 100 mm height was carried

  10. Behavior of Nonplastic Silty Soils under Cyclic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Nazile; Gunduz, Zeki

    2014-01-01

    The engineering behavior of nonplastic silts is more difficult to characterize than is the behavior of clay or sand. Especially, behavior of silty soils is important in view of the seismicity of several regions of alluvial deposits in the world, such as the United States, China, and Turkey. In several hazards substantial ground deformation, reduced bearing capacity, and liquefaction of silty soils have been attributed to excess pore pressure generation during dynamic loading. In this paper, an experimental study of the pore water pressure generation of silty soils was conducted by cyclic triaxial tests on samples of reconstituted soils by the slurry deposition method. In all tests silty samples which have different clay percentages were studied under different cyclic stress ratios. The results have showed that in soils having clay content equal to and less than 10%, the excess pore pressure ratio buildup was quicker with an increase in different cyclic stress ratios. When fine and clay content increases, excess pore water pressure decreases constant cyclic stress ratio in nonplastic silty soils. In addition, the applicability of the used criteria for the assessment of liquefaction susceptibility of fine grained soils is examined using laboratory test results. PMID:24672343

  11. The effect of fines upon the compaction characteristics of a well graded sand

    E-print Network

    Long, Robert Eugene

    1954-01-01

    and Compaction of the Material VII . Laboratory Compaction Characteristics of the Materials A +46 A. General Information . 46 B. The Well Graded Sand . 46 C. The Well Graded Sand Plus 2 Percent Sand Fines ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . 47 D. The Well Graded Sand Plus 4..., 6 and 8 Percent Sand Fines F 4& E. The Well Graded Sand Plus 10 and 12 Percent Sand Fincsse 50 F. The Well Graded Sand Plus Silt and Clay Fires ~ 61 G. Sand, Silt and Clay Fines VIII. Influence of Fine Soil Additives on Compaction Charaoteristics...

  12. Efficiency of Micro-fine Cement Grouting in Liquefiable Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Mirjalili, Mojtaba [Dept. of Civil and Earth Resources Eng., Graduate School of Eng., Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Mirdamadi, Alireza; Ahmadi, Alireza [Faculty of Civil Eng, University College of Eng, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-08

    In the presence of strong ground motion, liquefaction hazards are likely to occur in saturated cohesion-less soils. The risk of liquefaction and subsequent deformation can be reduced by various ground improvement methods including the cement grouting technique. The grouting method was proposed for non-disruptive mitigation of liquefaction risk at developed sites susceptible to liquefaction. In this research, a large-scale experiment was developed for assessment of micro-fine cement grouting effect on strength behavior and liquefaction potential of loose sand. Loose sand samples treated with micro-fine grout in multidirectional experimental model, were tested under cyclic and monotonic triaxial loading to investigate the influence of micro-fine grout on the deformation properties and pore pressure response. The behavior of pure sand was compared with the behavior of sand grouted with a micro-fine cement grout. The test results were shown that cement grouting with low concentrations significantly decreased the liquefaction potential of loose sand and related ground deformation.

  13. Liquefaction characteristics of a fine sand

    E-print Network

    Brandon, Donald Timothy

    1974-01-01

    during monotonic loading. During cyclic loading, from the limited results obtained, it appears that partially saturated samples are more susceptible to unlind. ted flow than saturated samples. iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author gratefully acknowledges... on Soils CHAPTER III ? MATERIAL PROPERTIES AND TEST APPARATUS. Potter's Flint Ottawa Sand Test Apparatus 16 16 18 20 CHAPTER IV - TRIAXIAL TEST PROCEDURE. Sample Preparation Compaction Procedure Saturation and Consolidation Desaturation Axial...

  14. The effect of fines upon the compaction characteristics of a well graded sand 

    E-print Network

    Long, Robert Eugene

    1954-01-01

    ~ 31 VIII. Soil material ready for compaction in the Harvard Apparatus' - ~ ~ 32 IX. Compacted soil samples ready for the drying operation . . . . . . . . . 32 Mechanical shaker used in the mechanics. l analysis of the sand and silt materials... percent clay fines ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ . , ~ 66 XXIII. Compaction charactoristics of the sand, silt and clay fines68 LIST OF TASLSS Table I. Soil Constants' ?25 II. Sieve Analysis of the 'Bell Graded Sand at Various Percentages of Fines ~ 25 III. Dry...

  15. Liquefaction resistance of sand–silt mixtures: an experimental investigation of the effect of fines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. C. Xenaki; G. A. Athanasopoulos

    2003-01-01

    The liquefaction resistance of a saturated fine to medium sand mixed with varying amounts of non-plastic fines was evaluated by laboratory cyclic triaxial tests. The test results were used to draw conclusions on the effect of fines content on the liquefaction potential of the mixtures in relation to the global void ratio as well as to the intergranular and the

  16. Parametric modeling with beamspread compensation and MIMO frequency domain inversion applied to fine saturated sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Vandenplas; Abdellatif Bey Temsamani; Mikaya L. D. Lumori; Zobeida Cisneros; Leo Van Biesen

    2001-01-01

    A system identification technique is applied to estimate the intrinsic absorption and dispersion of two fine sands. The method is based on the parametric modeling of the wave propagation through a Plexiglas tank filled with the sediment under investigation. The applicability of various porous models is discussed. The viscoelastic constant Q model and viscoelastic rational form model are applied and

  17. Fine structure of sperm tail differentiation in the sand skink, Scincus mitranus (Anderson, 1871) (Squamata, Reptilia)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Othman A. Al-Dokhi

    1997-01-01

    Some aspects of the fine structure of the sperm tail during differentiation in the sand skink,Scincus mitranus, have been described. These include the development of the neck piece, the middle piece and associated mitochondrial sheath, together with the main piece and the axoneme.

  18. Fine-scale volume heterogeneity measurements in sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dajun Tang; Kevin B. Briggs; Kevin L. Williams; Darrell R. Jackson; Eric I. Thorsos; Donald B. Percival

    2002-01-01

    As part of the effort to characterize the acoustic environment during the high frequency sediment acoustics experiment (SAX99), fine-scale variability of sediment density was measured by an in situ technique and by core analysis. The in situ measurement was accomplished by a newly developed instrument that measures sediment conductivity. The conductivity measurements were conducted on a three-dimensional (3-D) grid, hence

  19. Chloride migration through clayey silt underlain by fine sand or silt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Kerry Rowe; Kazem Badv

    1996-01-01

    Chloride diffusion coefficients of 5.7 à 10⁻¹° m²\\/s, 9.0 à 10⁻¹° m²\\/s, and 9.8 à 10⁻¹° m²\\/s were obtained from diffusion tests conducted on a single isolated layer of clayey silt, silt, or sand, respectively. The advective-diffusive movement of chloride through a two-layer soil system consisting of a compacted clayey silt underlain by either a fine sand or silt was

  20. Oil sands fine tailings - a resource material for potentially marketable products

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.; Sparks, B.D.; Coleman, R.D. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Oil sands fine tailings is a complex mixture of components each having specific physical or chemical characteristics. Studies on the fundamental properties of fine tailings have resulted in the development of methods to fractionate the tailings into products with market potential. These include: bitumen, for production of synthetic crude oil or as an ancillary fuel; clean kaolin for fine paper coating; a gelling agent for drilling mud formulation; emulsifying solids, for surfactant replacement; and a mineral fraction, for heavy metal recovery. In this investigation we have attempted to evaluate the economic potential of fine tailings as a resource material by determining the amount and value of these products; the prime objective was to determine the economic feasibility of a tailings treatment scheme.

  1. Chloride migration through clayey silt underlain by fine sand or silt

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, R.K.; Badv, K. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)] [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-01-01

    Chloride diffusion coefficients of 5.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} m{sup 2}/s, 9.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} m{sup 2}/s, and 9.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} m{sup 2}/s were obtained from diffusion tests conducted on a single isolated layer of clayey silt, silt, or sand, respectively. The advective-diffusive movement of chloride through a two-layer soil system consisting of a compacted clayey silt underlain by either a fine sand or silt was also examined. The agreement between the experimental results and model predictions suggests that existing solute-transport theory can adequately predict chloride migration through a compacted clay layer and underlying sand or silt layer at near-saturated conditions for Darcy velocities at least up to the maximum value examined (0.0183 m/yr or 500 L/ha/d). Chloride transport was dominated by diffusion in these tests.

  2. AGING EFFECT ON RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LIQUEFACTION STRENGTH AND CONE RESISTANCE OF SAND CONTAINING NON-PLASTIC FINES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiki; Kokusho, Takaji; Nagao, Yota

    In order to simulate aging effect on the relationship between penetration resistance qt and liquefaction strength RL in a short time, miniature cone penetration tests and subsequent cyclic triaxial tests are carried out in sand specimens containing fines added with a small amount of cement to make an accelerated test. In contrast to a unique cone resistance (qt) versus liquefaction strength (RL) relationship for specimens without cement despite large difference in relative density and fines content, higher fines content results in higher liquefaction strength for the same cone resistance for sand with cement, which is consistent with the trend found in the field investigation. Thus, it is revealed that the reason why higher fines content leads to higher liquefaction strength does not depend on fines content itself but aging (bonding) effect by fines, which tends to be pronounced as fines increase.

  3. Dry mature fine tailings as oil sands reclamation substrates for three native grasses.

    PubMed

    Luna Wolter, Gabriela L; Naeth, M Anne

    2014-07-01

    Mature fine tailings (MFT) are a by-product of oil sands mining that must be reclaimed through capping or use as a reclamation substrate. Some chemical and physical properties of MFT make it inhospitable for plant growth, such as high concentrations of sodium, sulfate, chloride, and hydrocarbons. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various mixes of dry MFT, overburden sand, and peat mineral soil mix (PMM) and caps of forest floor organic material (LFH) and PMM would support the emergence and growth of three native grass species commonly used in land reclamation. Select vegetation properties were monitored for 16 wk in the greenhouse; select chemical and physical substrate properties were determined in the laboratory. was more tolerant of dry MFT than and . Mean aboveground and belowground biomass were more than twice as high on substrates with <60% MFT than on 100% MFT. Aboveground biomass was two to four times greater with capping than without and 30% greater on LFH than PMM caps. Cover and density followed similar trends. Belowground biomass on capped substrates was at least double that on uncapped substrates. Aboveground biomass was almost doubled with the use of fertilizer. High concentrations of hydrocarbons and exchangeable ions were associated with reduced plant growth and health. Results from this study show that capping, amendments, and fertilizer may improve the reclamation potential of dry MFT. PMID:25603099

  4. Phytotoxicity and naphthenic acid dissipation from oil sands fine tailings treatments planted with the emergent macrophyte Phragmites australis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah A. Armstrong; John V. Headley; Kerry M. Peru; Randy J. Mikula; James J. Germida

    2010-01-01

    During reclamation the water associated with the runoff or groundwater flushing from dry stackable tailings technologies may become available to the reclaimed environment within an oil sands lease. Here we evaluate the performance of the emergent macrophyte, common reed (Phragmites australis), grown in chemically amended mature fine tailings (MFT) and simulated runoff\\/seepage water from different MFT drying treatments. The present

  5. The fine sand Abra alba community of the bay of morlaix twenty years after the Amoco Cadiz oil spill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J-C Dauvin

    1998-01-01

    The fine sand Abra alba community from the Bay of Morlaix (western English Channel) was strongly affected by the Amoco Cadiz oil spill of April 1978. The long term changes in the community (1977–1996) show that reconstitution of this community is slow (over 10 yr). A progressive recolonization by amphipod Ampelisca populations constituting the dominant species is observed. The results

  6. Compression and Creep of Venice Lagoon Sands

    E-print Network

    Sanzeni, Alex

    A laboratory test program was conducted to evaluate the one-dimensional (1D) compression and creep properties of intact sand (and silty-sand) samples from a deep borehole at the Malamocco Inlet to the Venice Lagoon. The ...

  7. Variation in grain shape and surface textures of fine guartz sands in the South Texas Eolian Sand Sheet 

    E-print Network

    Sims, Donald Ralph

    1984-01-01

    . Inspection of the grains from the downwind samples revealed extensive pitting and chipping of these same features by mechanical abrasion. Grain shape analysis of the STESS showed an increase in rounding as the sands were transported by eolian action... sands by mechanical abrasion can result from both small scale edge-rounding and larger scale chipping and gouging as the result of intergranular impacts 28 during transport. These collisions of the grains would produce pits and scratches of various...

  8. Effect of Salt on the Flocculation Behavior of Nano Particles in Oil Sands Fine Tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. S. Kotylar; B. D. SPARKS; R. SCHUTFE

    1996-01-01

    Currently, two commercial plants, operating in the Athabasca region of Alberta, produce approximately 20 percent of Canada's petroleum requirements from oil sands. Surface mined oil sand is treated in a water based separation process that yields large volumes of clay tailings with poor settling and compaction characteristics. Clay particles, suspended in the pond water, interact with salts, dissolved from the

  9. Pore pressure generation in silty sands during cyclic loading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. G. Sitharam; L. Govindaraju

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in studies of soil response to earthquake loadings have made it possible to incorporate the rates of pore water pressure build-up in soils in to nonlinear response analyses of the grounds. Such pore pressure changes help in computing the changes in stress-strain behaviour of soils in the deposit progressively as the earthquake progresses. The rate and magnitude of

  10. Effects of blowing sand fine particles on plasma membrane permeability and fluidity, and intracellular calcium levels of rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong; Meng, Ziqiang; Zhang, Quanxi

    2005-06-17

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5, particulates with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) can suppress alveolar macrophage (AM) functions, but the data concerning the effects of blowing sand PM2.5 on AMs remain limited. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influences of blowing sand PM2.5 on AM plasma membranes and intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), and explore the mechanisms of the observed toxicological effects. The samples of normal PM2.5 (collected on sunshiny and non-blowing sand days) and blowing sand PM2.5 were collected in Wuwei city, Gansu Province, China. After AMs from rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were treated in vitro for 4 h with the suspensions of these samples, the cell viability, plasma membrane permeability and fluidity, cytosolic free Ca2+ levels, and oxidative stress were examined. It was observed a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability, plasma membrane Ca2+Mg2+-dependent adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca2+Mg2+-ATPase) and Na+K+-dependent adenosinetriphosphatase (Na+K+-ATPase) activities, cellular glutathione (GSH) levels, fluorescence intensities of lipid probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) and fluorescence polarization of lipid probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) combined with cell membranes in the treatment groups of normal and blowing sand PM2.5 as compared to the control (saline group); and also observed a dose-dependent increase in the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP), and intracellular [Ca2+]i and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. These observations indicate blowing sand PM2.5, as similar to urban normal ones, could induce oxidative stress on AMs, enlarge plasma membrane permeability and membrane lipid fluidity, and elevate intracellular [Ca2+]i levels, resulting in cytotoxicity. A two-way ANOVA showed the toxic effects of normal and blowing sand PM2.5 on AMs were only relative to treatment dosages but not to dust types, suggesting the blowing sand PM2.5 whose airborne mass concentrations were much higher should be more harmful. PMID:15837000

  11. Fine dust emissions in sandy and silty agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust emissions from strong winds are common in arid and semi-arid regions and occur under both natural and managed land systems. A portable field wind tunnel has been developed to allow measurements of dust emissions from soil surfaces to test the premise that dust concentrations are highly correlat...

  12. Total sand inputFine nose Non-equilibrium tail Equilibrium tail

    E-print Network

    Watson, Andrew

    . This poster presents one of a series of flume experiments undertaken to understand sediment transport through on this poster flow is left to right. Sedimentation under a hydraulic jump Figure 1: Line drawing of a sand in part drives a recirculating roller. In this region, all vortices have anticlockwise sense. The incident

  13. Characterization of sol–gel-derived nano-particles separated from oil sands fine tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Majid; S. Argue; V. Boyko; G. Pleizier; P. L'Ecuyer; J. Tunney; S. Lang

    2003-01-01

    Methodology has been developed to separate nano-particles of amorphous material from Syncrude fine tailings. Both, separated finer solids and residual coarser solids, were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, XPS, SEM, infrared spectroscopy, solid-state NMR, density, and surface area measurements. Based on the results of infrared and X-ray diffraction, the amorphous minerals identified in finer solids included allophanes, halloysite,

  14. Coal-sand attrition system and its' importance in fine coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Schultz, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is geared toward the substitution of steel media by fracturing silica sand as a grinding media for ultraline coal grinding. The project has been divided into four subgroups for bookkeeping purposes and possible ease of execution. Some of the tasks would be executed simultaneously as overlapping is inevitable. The grouping is as follows: (1) sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; (2) batch grinding tests; (3) continuous grinding tests; and, (4) fracture mechanics. The hardgrove indices for the four coals employed in this work have finally been determined by the personnel at the R and D Center of Drummond Coal Company using 14 [times] 28 mesh feed size materials. The values obtained for the respective coals are given in Table 1.

  15. Provenance and glacial history of very fine quartz sand from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Caryn Hallett

    1988-01-01

    (central Weddell Basin) was to determine continental erosion during glacial and pre-glacial periods and obtain a record of bottom-water production. The major lithologies that were recovered include (1) Pliocene to Pleistocene clay and clayey mud...PROVENANCE AND GLACIAL Hl S1ORY OF VERY FINE QUARTZ SA;Kl FR(Ivi 1HE ~ SEA, ANfARCTICA A Thesis by Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A%M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of STER OF SCIENCE...

  16. Growth and reproduction assessment of fathead minnows inhabiting an oil-sands fine tailings pond

    SciTech Connect

    Siwik, P.; Paszkowski, C. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Boerger, H.; Meer, T. van; McKinnon, M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to assess the relative success of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in Syncrude`s Large Scale Wet Option Fine Tailings Demonstration Pond (DP). The DP is a 4-ha pond, constructed in 1993, containing 69,000 m{sup 3} of fine tailings capped with 73,790 m{sup 3} of natural water. Endpoints associated with growth and reproduction, including total length, weight, body condition factor, number of eggs laid, and % hatch were monitored in DP and other ponds, in 1995 and 1996. Relative exposure to PAHs were estimated using the biochemical indicators 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and bile PAH metabolites. Data were collected through regular sampling, and the introduction and monitoring of breeding boards. The length frequency distribution of the minnows in DP was significantly different from other sites and age suggested that larval recruitment during the 1994 breeding season was low or absent. Spawning was delayed in DP. Liver EROD activity in the DP fish was slightly induced during the spring but not during the fall, indicating negligible exposure to EROD inducing compounds. Reproductive endpoints and bile PAH metabolite results will be discussed.

  17. REVISION OF RELATIVE DENSITY AND ESTIMATION OF LIQUEFACTION STRENGTH OF SANDY SOIL WITH FINE CONTENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi; Haradah, Kenji

    It is generally known that liquefaction strength obtained from undrained cyclic triaxial test is influenced by various factors such as relative densities, fine content, grain size distributions and plasticity indexes. However, It is difficult to estimate liquefaction strength for various soil types from same physical properties. In order to estimate the liquefaction strength of various soil types such as silt, silty sands and clean sands, this study showed a method to revice relative density of sandy soil including more than 15% of fine content and the correlation between reviced relative density and void ratio ranges obtaind from maximum and minimum void ratio. Then, the relationships between void ratio ranges and liquefaction strengths from other studies was considered. As a result, the defference of liquefaction strength between reconstituted and undisturbed samples was recognized from the correlations revised relative density using void ratio ranges and fine content.

  18. Benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients in sublittoral fine sands in a north-western Mediterranean coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sospedra, J.; Falco, S.; Morata, T.; Gadea, I.; Rodilla, M.

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally, benthic metabolism in sublittoral permeable sands have not been widely studied, although these sands can have a direct and transcendental impact in coastal ecosystems. This study aims to determine oxygen and nutrient fluxes at the sediment-water interface and the study of possible interactions among environmental variables and the benthic metabolism in well-sorted fine sands. Eight sampling campaigns were carried out over the annual cycle in the eastern coast of Spain (NW Mediterranean) at 9 m depth station with permeable bottoms. Water column and sediment samples were collected in order to determine physico-chemical and biological variables. Moreover, in situ incubations were performed to estimate the exchange of dissolved solutes in the sediment-water interface using dark and light benthic chambers. Biochemical compounds at the sediment surface ranged between 160 and 744 ?g g-1 for proteins, 296 and 702 ?g g-1 for carbohydrates, and between 327 and 1224 ?g C g-1 for biopolymeric carbon. Chloroplastic pigment equivalents in sediments were mainly composed by chlorophyll a (1.81-2.89 ?g g-1). These sedimentary organic descriptors indicated oligotrophic conditions according to the biochemical approach used. In this sense, the most abundant species in the macrobenthic community were sensitive to organic enrichment. In dark conditions, benthic fluxes behaved as a sink of oxygen and a source of nutrients. Oxygen fluxes (between -26,610 and -10,635 ?mol m-2 d-1) were related with labile organic fraction (r=-0.86, p<0.01 with biopolymeric carbon; r=-0.91, p<0.01 with chloroplastic pigment equivalents). Daily fluxes of dissolved oxygen, that were obtained by adding light and dark fluxes, were only positive in spring campaigns (6966 ?mol m-2 d-1) owing to the highest incident irradiance levels (r=0.98, p<0.01) that stimulate microphytobenthic primary production. Microphytobenthos played an important role on benthic metabolism and was the main primary producer in this coastal ecosystem. However, an average annual uptake of 31 mmol m-2 d-1 of oxygen and a release of DIN and Si(OH)4 (329 and 68 mmol m-2 d-1 respectively) were estimated in these bottoms, which means heterotrophic conditions.

  19. Sand resistance of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Michael; Wood, Caryl; Martinez, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Like water resistance in sunscreens, sand resistance in sunscreens is the ability of the sunscreen to retain its effectiveness while undergoing sand treatment. The influence of the type of sand on the sand resistance of sunscreens has not been described. The sand resistance of a control standard sunscreen, P2, and data on three grades of Quickrete commercial grade sand, #1961, #1962, and #1152, are described. These sands represent a fine sand, a medium sand, and an all-purpose sand. Using the methodology described in the 2007 proposed amendment of the Final Monograph (1) with one exception, we obtained an SPF of 16.5 (1.6) for the control standard, compared to the expected SPF of 16.3 (3.4). After a five-minute treatment of sand #1961, #1962, or #1151, the SPF of the control standard was 18.3 (1.6), 18.4 (2.0), and 17.5 (2.2), respectively. Thus, all three sands exhibited a similar sand-resistance response. Thus, there was no significant difference in the average SPF with and without sand. The medium grade sand, Quickrete commercial grade #1962, was preferred for sand-resistance testing because the fine sand was difficult to remove from the subject's backs and the coarse sand was unpleasant to the subjects. PMID:23193889

  20. Reservoir characteristics of two minter oil sands based on continuous core, E-logs, and geochemical data: Bee Brake field, East-Central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Echols, J.B.; Goddard, D.A.; Bouma, A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The Bee Brake field area, located in township 4N/6E and 4N/7E in Concordia Parish, has been one of the more prolific oil-producing areas in east-central Louisiana. Production decline in various fields, however, has sparked interest in the economic feasibility of locating and producing the remaining bypassed oil in the lower Wilcox. For this purpose, the Angelina BBF No. 1 well was drilled, and a 500-ft conventional core and a complete suite of state-of-the-are wireline logs were recovered. Production tests were run on the Minter interval of interest. The 16-ft Minter interval (6742-6758 ft depth), bounded at its top and base by lignite seams, consists of an upper 4-ft oil sand (Bee Brake) and a lower 3-ft oil sand (Angelina). The oil sands are separated by approximately 5 ft of thinly laminated silty shale and 4 ft of very fine-grained silty sandstone. Detailed sedimentologic and petrographic descriptions of the Minter interval provide accurate facies determinations of this lower delta-plain sequence. Petrophysical evaluation, combining core plug and modern electric-log data show differences between reservoir quality of the Bee Brake and Angelina sands. This data will also be useful for correlating and interpolating old electric logs. Organic geochemistry of the oil, lignites, and shales provides insight as to the source of the Minter oils and the sourcing potential of the lignites.

  1. Coal-sand attrition system and its` importance in fine coal cleaning. Quarterly report, May 31, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Schultz, C.W.

    1992-12-01

    The primary objective of this project is geared toward the substitution of steel media by fracturing silica sand as a grinding media for ultraline coal grinding. The project has been divided into four subgroups for bookkeeping purposes and possible ease of execution. Some of the tasks would be executed simultaneously as overlapping is inevitable. The grouping is as follows: (1) sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; (2) batch grinding tests; (3) continuous grinding tests; and, (4) fracture mechanics. The hardgrove indices for the four coals employed in this work have finally been determined by the personnel at the R and D Center of Drummond Coal Company using 14 {times} 28 mesh feed size materials. The values obtained for the respective coals are given in Table 1.

  2. Permeability of Silty Claystone and Turbidite Samples from IODP Expedition 348, Hole C0002P, Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Underwood, M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main objectives of IODP Expedition 348 was to characterize the variations of lithology and structure with depth in the interior of the Nankai Trough accretionary complex beneath the Kumano forearc basin (offshore SW Japan). Six cores were recovered from Hole C0002P between 2163 and 2218 mbsf. Four whole-round (WR) specimens from depths of 2174.98 to 2209.64 mbsf were tested for constant-flow permeability with a focus on thin interbeds of silty claystone and fine-grained turbidites. Samples are from lithostratigraphic Unit V (accreted trench or Shikoku Basin hemipelagic deposits). Coarser interbeds are important for assessing the prospects of flow through stratigraphic conduits. Our primary objective is to better understand how hydrogeologic properties of different lithologies respond to deformation within the accretionary prism. Equipment for permeability tests consists of a withdrawal-infuse syringe pump to simultaneously inject and extract pore fluid from the top and bottom of the specimen to generate hydraulic head difference. Specimens were trimmed for tests in both vertical direction (along-core) and horizontal direction (cross-core) with the diameter of 3.8 cm (1.5 in). The isotropic effective stress is set at 0.55 MPa. The WR specimens are heterogeneous. The major lithology is silty claystone to fine-grained silty claystone. Some intervals contain thin (~1.3 cm) oblique sandy layers and black organic bands. Bedding is steep to vertical (~70-80?). One goal is to determine how this lithologic variability affects the anisotropy of permeability. Environmental SEM was used to image the cores (in multiple directions) to evaluate the relation between sediment microstructure and anisotropy of permeability.

  3. Upper Cretaceous bioturbated fine-to-medium sands: A problem for deep-water exploration in Campos Basin, Offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Carminatti, M.; Zimmermann, L.; Jahnert, R.; Pontes, C.

    1996-08-01

    The presence of bioturbation in oil-prone turbidite deposits has detained a better exploration of upper Cretaceous siliciclastic reservoirs in Campos Basin. Bioturbated sandstones have degraded their permo-porosity with impact in oil production. They occur associated to unbioturbated sandstones with similar seismic amplitude, becoming difficult to separate them in seismic mapping. A comprehensive study in order to reduce the exploratory risk must consider firstly the recognition of genetic facies association through cores, and secondly the calibration of sonic well-logs and seismic velocity sections with rock data. This study deals with sedimentary facies association. The range of main facies in such reservoirs includes: (1) medium-to-coarse siliciclastic sandstone with cross stratification; (2) fine-to-medium massive sandstone with thin traction carpets, bioturbated by opportunistic ichnofabrics and, (3) bioturbated, muddy, fine-to-medium, quartz-feldspatic and glauconitic sandstone over 60 in thick. The genetic facies associations suggest that the sandwich reservoirs were formed by high density turbidite currents deposited en masse or by thin traction carpets. The bioturbated sandstone was originated by reworking of bottom currents rich in nutrients and oxygen. Detritic and biogenic glauconite covered and/or filled bioturbations indicate a basinward movement of the bottom currents. The successive alternation of high-energy with low-energy ichnofabrics reflects cyclic variations in current velocities.

  4. Hydraulic Fracturing Sand

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Fine-grained silica sand is mixed with chemicals and water before being pumped into rock formations to prevent the newly created artificial fractures from closing after hydraulic fracturing is completed....

  5. Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

    2004-09-30

    clastic sediment down a slope and onto a basin floor (Stelting et al., 2000). These systems are called submarine fans when referring to a modern deepwater accumulation exposed on the present-day sea floor (Menard, 1955), or even in some cases to any... created a sequence showing the ideal turbidite divisions (figure 3). When stacked, turbidite (fan) systems and their bounding basinal shales are defined as a turbidite (submarine fan) complex. If the shales or silty mudstones are about the same thickness...

  6. Assessment of the Mechanical Properties of Sisal Fiber-Reinforced Silty Clay Using Triaxial Shear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10?mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment. PMID:24982951

  7. Geosynthetics reinforcement application for tsunami reconstruction: Evaluation of interface parameters with silty sand and weathered clay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Long; D. T. Bergado; H. M. Abuel-Naga

    2007-01-01

    Great attention is directed to rebuild livelihoods and rehabilitate coastal communities affected by the Tsunami in the Indian Ocean in South Asia. It takes years of effort of different engineering disciplines to recover from recent devastations caused by the Tsunami. Geosynthetics can play important and vital roles in the protection, mitigation and rehabilitation efforts in affected coastal areas. Geosynthetics can

  8. CYCLIC STRESS-STRAIN AND LIQUEFACTION CHARACTERISTICS OF SANDS. (VOLUMES I AND II)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ADOLFO ALARCON-GUZMAN

    1986-01-01

    Liquefaction of saturated sand and silty sand deposits has been recognized as a major cause of damage during earthquakes. However, in spite of many research studies during the past two decades, there are still conflicting opinions on critical aspects of the phenomenon of soil liquefaction, including the definition of the term \\

  9. A TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION OF SILTY MARINE HARBOR SEDIMENTS TO CHARACTERIZE PERSISTENT AND NON-PERSISTENT CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment toxicity in silty marine harbor sediments is frequently dominated by ammonia or sulfide, leaving the adverse effects of persistent toxic substances unnoticed. To investigate the latter, we subjected interstitial water from three contaminated silty sediments to toxicity i...

  10. SAND REPORT SAND2002xxxx

    E-print Network

    Newman, Alantha

    SAND REPORT SAND2002­xxxx Unlimited Release August 2002 Discrete Optimization Models for Protein://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm DEPARTMENTOF ENERGY . . UNITED STATES OF AMERICA #12; SAND2002-xxxx Unlimited Release Printed August 2002

  11. Coal-sand attrition system and its` importance in fine coal cleaning. Eighth quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Schultz, C.W.

    1993-08-26

    The research efforts on the importance of a coal-sand attrition continued with work in four categories: Continuous grinding tests using steel media; fracture tests on coal samples compacted at different pressure; SEM-Image analysis of feed and ground product coal samples; zeta potential measurements of coal samples ground by different media, and flotation test of coal samples ground by different media. Results are described.

  12. Sources and distribution of fine quartz sand in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: a paleogeographic reconstruction using fourier grain shape analysis 

    E-print Network

    Bates, Charles Arthur

    1985-01-01

    sory Committee: Dr. James Mazzullo Fourier grain shape and S. E. M. analyses were conducted on the sands of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (from the Mississippi Delta east to the Apalachico', a Delta) to determine the1r sources and distribution... represent Mississippi Province samples and dots represent Eastern Gulf Provfnce samples. . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Relat1ve entropy plot ind1cating that most of the information is contained 1n the fourteenth and f1fteenth harmonics...

  13. CALIBRATION OF CAPACITANCE PROBE SENSORS IN A SALINE SILTY CLAY SOIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capacitance probe sensors are a popular electromagnetic method of measuring soil water content. However, there is concern about the influence of soil salinity on the sensor readings. In this study capacitance sensors are calibrated for a saline silty clay soil. The calibration procedure incorpora...

  14. Original article Mechanical behaviour of silty clay loam/peat mixtures

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Mechanical behaviour of silty clay loam/peat mixtures: cyclic compression or amended with 20 or 40 % by volume of spagh- num peat, were studied at different values of water contentPa is increased to about 55 and 115 % for 20 and 40 % peat contents, respectively. A comparison of the cyclic test

  15. Benthic Bacterial Production and Protozoan Predation in a Silty Freshwater Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Wieltschnig; U. R. Fischer; A. K. T. Kirschner; B. Velimirov

    2003-01-01

    The interrelation of heterotrophic bacteria with bacterivorous protists has been widely studied in pelagic environments, but data on benthic habitats, especially in freshwater systems, are still scarce. We present a seasonal study focusing on bacterivory by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and ciliates in the silty sediment of a temperate macrophyte-dominated oxbow lake. From January 2001 to February 2002 we monitored the

  16. Effects of repetitive stressing on the strength and deformation of an angular, coarse sand 

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Larry Albert

    1962-01-01

    and Rupture Envelopes Dynamic Seoant Modulus of Elasticity Degradation VI SUMMARY AHD CONCLUSIONS VI I RECOMMENDATIONS B IBL IO GRAPHY APPENDIX A. DEFLECTION OP 6 INCH TRIAXIAL CELL APPEHDIX B. RUBBER MEMBRANE CORRECTIOH TO AXIAL STRAIN 10 14 14... from Shear Tests on Sand b. Results of Shear Tests on Sand 2. Effect of Repeated Ioading on Stress Versus Deformation Relationship of Silty Clay 3. Typical Stress Versus Strain Relationship fox Repeated Application of Compressive Load to Soil...

  17. Sand Storage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sand storage silo at Steamtown National Historic Site. Sand was stored in a dome on top of the engine and, as the train traveled the tracks, the sand would be sprinkled down pipes to land on the tracks in front of the wheels. This would aid the wheels in gripping the tracks, especially when the ra...

  18. Sand Stories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hilary Christensen

    The objective of this project is to use a sample of sand from a give are to tell its geologic history. Each student is given a 50 mL tube of sand labeled with the latitude and longitude of where it was found. They must then use this information along with analysis of the sand itself to tell the story of its formation.

  19. SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION

    E-print Network

    SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION:: Timeless Technology and Recent Advances SYSTEMTREATMENT SYSTEM Source Water Collection/ Protection Filtration Treatment Distribution/ Storage PretreatmentSmall Systems Packaged Coagulation TreatmentPackaged Coagulation Treatment SystemsSystems Pressure Filtration

  20. Discovering Sand and Sand Paintings

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Eichinger

    2009-05-30

    This activity blends social studies and art with math and science. First, students will explore the visible characteristics of sand, and then they will make Navajo-style sand paintings with paper, glue, and colored sand. In the process, they will hone the

  1. Monitoring analysis of internal forces and deformation of the retaining structure for deep subway station foundation pit in silty sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Zhong-miao; Fang Kai; Wu Zu-fu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the horizontal displacements of diaphragm wall, axial forces of steel struts and surface settlements for different stages in different zones are compared by analyzing the monitoring data of a deep subway station foundation pit support structure in Hangzhou. The results shows that the rate of deformation of the diaphragm wall increases during the excavation near the bottom

  2. Elastic properties of unconsolidated porous sand reservoirs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. N. Domenico

    1977-01-01

    The effect of compressive stress and pore fluid properties on elastic properties of unconsolidated sand reservoirs was determined by laboratory velocity and pore volume measurements on two specimens. These consisted of a naturally occurring very fine grained sand and glass beads, each with a porosity of approximately 38 percent. Compressional- and shear-wave velocities and pore compressibility were measured in the

  3. Elevated gas hydrate saturation within silt and silty clay sediments in the Shenhu area, South China Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, X.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Wu, S.; Yang, S.; Guo, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate saturations were estimated using five different methods in silt and silty clay foraminiferous sediments from drill hole SH2 in the South China Sea. Gas hydrate saturations derived from observed pore water chloride values in core samples range from 10 to 45% of the pore space at 190-221 m below seafloor (mbsf). Gas hydrate saturations estimated from resistivity (Rt) using wireline logging results are similar and range from 10 to 40.5% in the pore space. Gas hydrate saturations were also estimated by P wave velocity obtained during wireline logging by using a simplified three-phase equation (STPE) and effective medium theory (EMT) models. Gas hydrate saturations obtained from the STPE velocity model (41.0% maximum) are slightly higher than those calculated with the EMT velocity model (38.5% maximum). Methane analysis from a 69 cm long depressurized core from the hydrate-bearing sediment zone indicates that gas hydrate saturation is about 27.08% of the pore space at 197.5 mbsf. Results from the five methods show similar values and nearly identical trends in gas hydrate saturations above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone at depths of 190 to 221 mbsf. Gas hydrate occurs within units of clayey slit and silt containing abundant calcareous nannofossils and foraminifer, which increase the porosities of the fine-grained sediments and provide space for enhanced gas hydrate formation. In addition, gas chimneys, faults, and fractures identified from three-dimensional (3-D) and high-resolution two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data provide pathways for fluids migrating into the gas hydrate stability zone which transport methane for the formation of gas hydrate. Sedimentation and local canyon migration may contribute to higher gas hydrate saturations near the base of the stability zone. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Sands-on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandervoort, Frances S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides information for the development of a lesson which teaches students about sand, discusses facts about sands, sand studies, life in the sands, and sand activities. Includes diagrams showing the range in sand grain shape, formation of sand ripples, and sand samples from around the world. (RT)

  5. Booming Sands

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-04-19

    This video segment, adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, presents basic concepts of physics behind booming sand dunes. See how surface tension affects potential and kinetic energy and how it all works together to create sound.

  6. Lithostratigraphic analysis of sand and silt facies from NGHP 01 gas hydrate accumulations in the Krishna-Godavari Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, K. K.; Boswell, R. M.; Johnson, J.; Nghp 01, S.

    2008-12-01

    In 2006, an international effort led by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted the first large-scale exploration of gas hydrate accumulations. Seven sites were drilled within the Krishna-Godavari (KG) basin, a large syn-tectonic rift basin off the eastern shore of India, with the deepest hole penetrating ~300 mbsf. The sedimentary section in the KG basin includes up to 7 kilometers of Late Carboniferous to Holocene sediments from which commercial oil and natural gas production has been established. Detailed lithologic descriptions and physical properties measurements obtained from cores were combined with electrical log data to characterize the sedimentology and stratigraphy at each site. Our analyses indicate that sediments within the Gas Hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) in the KG basin record a Quaternary (<2MYA) history of deposition dominated by dark grey to black colored nannofossil bearing to rich clay and silty clay sourced from the nearby Krishna and Godavari Rivers. Relatively minor amounts of silt to fine sand beds and lamina (1-5 cm thick) were also observed as well as visible terrestrial organic material. The most pervasive mode of gas hydrate occurrence observed during NGHP-01 in the KG basin sites were disseminated hydrates in low-permeability silt-clay facies. Secondary gas hydrate accumulations were recovered in fracture fill, nodular and lens-like occurrences, or as pore-filling cement in the more permeable sand-silt beds and lamina. Thin sand beds and lamina were recovered at 6 of the 7 sites in the KG basin. ~330 sand beds were reported for all 6 sites with a typical bed thickness of ~3 cm. Net sand to gross sediment ratios ranged from 0.026 to 0.405. No major sand beds (>1 m thick) were recovered at any of the sites. Underlying the GHSZ in the KG basin are Pliocene and Pleistocene age sediments deposited during low-stand conditions. However, rising sea-level from the late Pleistocene to the present resulted in a gradual decrease in the volume of coarse grained material transported across the shelf, and slope related deposition during the Holocene has largely been controlled by episodic failure of shelf-edge deltaic deposits via turbidity flows in slope channels. At two KG sites, significantly greater net sand to gross sediment ratios were observed, perhaps indicating a closer proximity of those sites to turbidite channel-levee systems. While the channels may contain sand facies, given the slope dominant location of the NGHP well locations, it is likely that transported sand bypassed the well sites and was deposited in base-of-slope fans in deeper water to the east. Therefore, exploration for gas hydrate-bearing sands in the KG region should focus on the identification and location of the slope levee sand deposits or toe of slope sand rich fans within the GHSZ. gas/FutureSupply/MethaneHydrates/projects/DOEProjects/NETL-

  7. Coupled changes in sand grain size and sand transport driven by changes in the upstream supply of sand in the Colorado River: relative importance of changes in bed-sand grain size and bed-sand area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, D.J.; Rubin, D.M.; Melis, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    Sand transport in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand canyons was naturally limited by the upstream supply of sand. Prior to the 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam, the river exhibited the following four effects of sand supply limitation: (1) hysteresis in sediment concentration, (2) hysteresis in sediment grain size coupled to the hysteresis in sediment concentration, (3) production of inversely graded flood deposits, and (4) development or modification of a lag between the time of a flood peak and the time of either maximum or minimum (depending on reach geometry) bed elevation. Construction and operation of the dam has enhanced the degree to which the first two of these four effects are evident, and has not affected the degree to which the last two effects of sand supply limitation are evident in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand canyons. The first three of the effects involve coupled changes in suspended-sand concentration and grain size that are controlled by changes in the upstream supply of sand. During tributary floods, sand on the bed of the Colorado River fines; this causes the suspended sand to fine and the suspended-sand concentration to increase, even when the discharge of water remains constant. Subsequently, the bed is winnowed of finer sand, the suspended sand coarsens, and the suspended-sand concentration decreases independently of discharge. Also associated with these changes in sand supply are changes in the fraction of the bed that is covered by sand. Thus, suspended-sand concentration in the Colorado River is likely regulated by both changes in the bed-sand grain size and changes in the bed-sand area. A physically based flow and suspended-sediment transport model is developed, tested, and applied to data from the Colorado River to evaluate the relative importance of changes in the bed-sand grain size and changes in the bed-sand area in regulating suspended-sand concentration. Although the model was developed using approximations for steady, uniform flow, and other simplifications that are not met in the Colorado River, the results nevertheless support the idea that changes in bed-sand grain size are much more important than changes in bed-sand area in regulating the concentration of suspended sand.

  8. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack; Arvidson, Raymond; Grin, Edmond; Li, Ronxing; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, Barbara; Bell, James F.; Aileen Yingst, R.

    2014-05-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  9. Defrosting Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    2 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a patch of frost-covered, dark sand that, at the time the picture was acquired in June 2005, had begun to defrost. The frost is carbon dioxide. Dunes and other patches of sand are usually the first polar features to develop dark spots as the frost begins to sublime away.

    Location near: 78.9oS, 80.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  10. Bromide transport in a sandy and a silty soil - a comparative lysimeter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, L.; Iden, S. C.; Durner, W.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was a comparison of bromide leaching through a silty and a sandy soil and the characterization of systematic differences in solute transport in these undisturbed soils of differing texture. The amount of seepage water and bromide concentrations in the water were measured in 5 lysimeters for each soil type for a period of 460 days. Additionally, meteorological data were measured next to the lysimeter station for this period. The water transport regime of the lysimeters was simulated by means of a numerical solution of the Richards equation using the software package HYDRUS 1D. The observed bromide transport was simulated by steady-state approximation, applying the simulation tool CXTFIT, which is implemented in the software package STANMOD, version 2.0. Analysis of the measured data showed that a correct reproduction of the water balance was possible, but required the adaptation of soil-dependent crop coefficients for the potential transpiration of Phacelia and Winter Rape. The mean bromide transport through the sandy soil could be approximately reproduced assuming a bromide uptake by plants. Observed double peaks of some of the individual breakthrough curves, however, indicated that the actual transport regime in the lysimeters was subject to local heterogeneity which cannot be covered by the effective one-dimensional transport model. Bromide transport through the silty soil showed an unexplained mass deficit of nearly 90 % of the applied bromide and the detection of a mean distinct bromide peak in seepage water after percolation of only 0.5 pore volumes. It was not possible to simulate this behaviour with an effective 1D equilibrium or nonequilibrium convection-dispersion model.

  11. SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799

    E-print Network

    Ho, Cliff

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799 Unlimited Release Printed March 2003 Field Demonstrations://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2003-0799 Unlimited Release Printed March 2003 Field Demonstrations

  12. Paleobiology of the Sand Beneath the Valders Diamicton at Valders, Wisconsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis J. Maher; Norton G. Miller; Richard G. Baker; B. Brandon Curry; David M. Mickelson

    1998-01-01

    Previously undescribed pollen, plant macrofossils, molluscs, and ostracodes were recovered from a 2.5-m-thick glaciolacustrine unit of silty sand and clay at Valders, Wisconsin. The interstadial sediment was deposited about 12,20014C yr B.P. after retreat of the Green Bay lobe that deposited diamicton of the Horicon Formation, and before advance of the Lake Michigan lobe that deposited the red-brown diamicton of

  13. Liquefaction characteristics of a fine sand 

    E-print Network

    Brandon, Donald Timothy

    1974-01-01

    , there are other cases of flow failure, particularly the banks along the lower reaches of the Mississippi River, where monotonic loading has been observed as the cause of failure (13). Recently, an area off the Mississippi delta in the Gulf of Mexico has... expedition off the Mississippi delta. When the sediments were sampled and brought to the surface, the natural structures of the samples were severely disturbed when the gas expanded upon release of the hydrostatic pressure and caused the samples to "grow...

  14. Beach Sand

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

  15. Tar sands development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1973-01-01

    Tar sands (also known as oil sands and bituminous sands) are sand deposits which are impregnated with dense viscous petroleum. Ultimate world reserves of bitumen in tar sands are about equal to ultimate reserves of crude oil in the U.S. However, the only tar-sand deposit of present commercial importance is in the Athabasca area of Alberta, Canada. The pioneer venture

  16. Transport of fine sediment over a coarse, immobile riverbed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment transport in cobble-boulder rivers consists mostly of fine sediment moving over a coarse, immobile bed. Transport rate depends on several interrelated factors: boundary shear stress, the grain size and volume of fine sediment, and the configuration of fine sediment into interstitial deposits and bed forms. Existing models do not incorporate all of these factors. Approaches that partition stress face a daunting challenge because most of the boundary shear is exerted on immobile grains. We present an alternative approach that divides the bed into sand patches and interstitial deposits and is well constrained by two clear end-member cases: full sand cover and absence of sand. Entrainment from sand patches is a function of their aerial coverage. Entrainment from interstices among immobile grains is a function of sand elevation relative to the size of the immobile grains. The bed-sand coverage function is used to predict the ratio of the rate of entrainment from a partially covered bed to the rate of entrainment from a completely sand-covered bed, which is determined using a standard sand transport model. We implement the bed-sand coverage function in a morphodynamic routing model and test it against observations of sand bed elevation and suspended sand concentration for conditions of nonuniform fine sediment transport in a large flume with steady uniform flow over immobile hemispheres. The results suggest that this approach may provide a simple and robust method for predicting the transport and migration of fine sediment through rivers with coarse, immobile beds.

  17. Defrosting Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    19 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark spots formed in carbon dioxide frost that covers the surfaces of patches of sand in the south polar region. As spring arrived this year in the martian southern hemisphere, so began the annual defrosting process. The fact that sand dunes begin to defrost earlier than other surfaces, and that the defrosting process involves the formation of spots like these, has been known since the earliest days of the MGS mission.

    Location near: 66.8oS, 15.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  18. Experience in using sands of different grain size for concretes of the Sayano-Shushenskoe hydroelectric station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. K. Bugaeva; L. M. Deryugin

    1986-01-01

    Conclusions 1.For preparing hydrotechnical concretes it is permissibleto use fine sands, provided the correct assignment of the content. Relatively low contents of fine sands require reliable operation of the proportioning devices and efficient control of the technology of preparing the concrete mix.2.The relation between the content and size of sand in concrete is nonlinear, which must be taken into account

  19. Laboratory and field evaluation of an underwater sand height gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. J. P.; Mcgrath, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    An underwater sand height gage was investigated. This instrument consisted of two transducers, one screened and one unscreened. Laboratory experimentation included static and dynamic tests with three test sands--fine, medium, and coarse. Field tests were conducted at Rudee Inlet, Virginia Beach, Virginia. Test results showed a linear response to up to 10 inches of sand loading. Deviation observed in identical tests appeared to be due to variation in the density of sand. Density differences reflected varying packing styles which, in turn, were a consequence of grain size and flow regime. Further evaluations of the sand height gage reflect this instrument's potential.

  20. Effects of Deposit-Feeding Macrofauna on Benthic Bacteria, Viruses, and Protozoa in a Silty Freshwater Sediment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudia Wieltschnig; Ulrike R. Fischer; Branko Velimirov; Alexander K. T. Kirschner

    2008-01-01

    In microcosm experiments, we simultaneously tested the effects of increased numbers of deposit-feeding macrofauna (chironomids,\\u000a oligochaetes and cladocerans) on the standing stock, activities and interactions of heterotrophic bacteria, viruses, and bacterivorous\\u000a protozoa (heterotrophic nanoflagellates and ciliates) in the aerobic layer of a silty littoral freshwater sediment. On average,\\u000a bacterial secondary production was stimulated between 11 and 29% by all macrofaunal

  1. An experimental study on the wave-induced pore water pressure change and relative influencing factors in the silty seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Anlong; Luo, Xiaoqiao; Lin, Lin; Ye, Qing; Le, Chunyu

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a flume experiment was designed to investigate the characteristics of wave-induced pore water pressure in the soil of a silty seabed with different clay contents, soil layer buried depths and wave heights respectively. The study showed that water waves propagating over silty seabed can induce significant change of pore water pressure, and the amplitude of pore pressure depends on depth of buried soil layer, clay content and wave height, which are considered as the three influencing factors for pore water pressure change. The pressure will attenuate according to exponential law with increase of soil layer buried depth, and the attenuation being more rapid in those soil layers with higher clay content and greater wave height. The pore pressure in silty seabed increases rapidly in the initial stage of wave action, then decreases gradually to a stable value, depending on the depth of buried soil layer, clay content and wave height. The peak value of pore pressure will increase if clay content or depth of buried soil layer decreases, or wave height increases. The analysis indicated that these soils with 5% clay content and waves with higher wave height produce instability in bed easier, and that the wave energy is mostly dissipated near the surface of soils and 5% clay content in soils can prevent pore pressure from dissipating immediately.

  2. Risk assessment of gas oil and kerosene contamination on some properties of silty clay soil.

    PubMed

    Fallah, M; Shabanpor, M; Zakerinia, M; Ebrahimi, S

    2015-07-01

    Soil and ground water resource pollution by petroleum compounds and chemical solvents has multiple negative environmental impacts. The aim of this research was to investigate the impacts of kerosene and gas oil pollutants on some physical and chemical properties, breakthrough curve (BTC), and water retention curve (SWRC) of silty clay soil during a 3-month period. Therefore, some water-saturated soils were artificially contaminated in the pulse condition inside some glassy cylinders by applying half and one pore volume of these pollutants, and then parametric investigations of the SWRC were performed using RETC software for Van Genukhten and Brooks-Corey equations in the various suctions and the soil properties were determined before and after pollution during 3 months. The results showed that gas oil and kerosene had a slight effect on soil pH and caused the cumulative enhancement in the soil respiration, increase in the bulk density and organic matter, and reduction in the soil porosity and electrical and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, gas oil retention was significantly more than kerosene (almost 40 %) in the soil. The survey of SWRC indicated that the contaminated soil samples had a little higher amount of moisture retention (just under 15 % in most cases) compared to the unpolluted ones during this 3-month period. The parametric analysis of SWRC demonstrated an increase in the saturated water content, ? s, from nearly 49 % in the control sample to just under 53 % in the polluted ones. Contaminants not only decreased the residual water content, ? r, but also reduced the SWRC gradient, n, and amount of ? parameter. The evaluation of both equations revealed more accurate prediction of SWRC's parameters by Van Genukhten compared to those of Brooks and Corey. PMID:26085279

  3. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  4. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  5. SAND REPORT SAND2005-7937

    E-print Network

    SAND REPORT SAND2005-7937 Unlimited Release Printed January 2006 Agent-Based Control of Distributed@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2005-7937 Unlimited

  6. SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112

    E-print Network

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112 Unlimited Release Printed January 2003 Cold War Context Statement Sandia://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2003-0112 Unlimited Release Printed January 2003 Cold War Context Statement

  7. Sand particle dislodgement in windblown sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Tian-Li; Li, Zheng; Zheng, Xiao-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The incipient motion of sand particle from sand bed plays a very important role in the prediction of windblown sand. In this paper, we proposed a new method for predicting the incipient motion of sand particle based on wind speed fluctuation as follows, when the wind speed is larger than the critical wind speed, if the total impulse on sand particle is larger than the critical impulse, incipient motion of sand particle would take place, otherwise if not. Furthermore, from the analysis of entrainment in the rolling and lifting modes, we come to the following conclusion. When the average wind speed is smaller than the critical wind speed, if the average wind speed is used to judge the incipient motion of sand particle, one will underestimate the number of sand particles jumping from the bed, if the instantaneous wind speed is used to judge incipient motion of sand particle, one will overestimate the number of sand particles jumping from the bed; When the average wind speed is larger than the critical wind speed, either the average or the instantaneous wind speeds is used to judge the incipient motion of sand particles, one will overestimate the number of sand particles jumping from the bed.

  8. The effects of oil sands wetlands on wood frogs (Rana sylvatica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blair D. Hersikorn; Jan J. C. Ciborowski; Judit E. G. Smits

    2010-01-01

    Extraction of crude oil from oil sand produces solid (sand) and liquid (water with suspended fine particles) tailings materials, called oil sands process-affected materials (OSPM). These waste materials are stored on the mine site due to a “zero discharge” policy and must be reclaimed when operations end. The liquid tailings materials are known to contain naphthenic acids and polycyclic aromatic

  9. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ray Boswell; Dianna Shelander; Myung Lee; Tom Latham; Tim Collett; Gilles Guerin; George Moridis; Matthew Reagan; Dave Goldberg

    2009-01-01

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of

  10. Index test for the degradation potential of carbonate sands during hydraulic transportation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominique Ngan-Tillard; Johan Haan; David Laughton; Arno Mulder; Art Nooy van der Kolff

    2009-01-01

    Carbonate sands undergo degradation when transported hydraulically from a dredging vessel to the reclamation site. Risks involved in the production of fines during hydraulic transport are a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the fill in certain areas of the reclamation area where these fines concentrate. In order to assess sand degradation in the concrete and road construction industry, the

  11. Rheological and mechanical properties of mortars prepared with natural and manufactured sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. D. Cortes; H.-K. Kim; A. M. Palomino; J. C. Santamarina

    2008-01-01

    The conventional assessment methods for fine aggregate used in Portland cement concrete are mostly based on round natural sand performance in spite of the increasing use of angular manufactured sands. Two natural and two manufactured sands were selected and tested at different water–cement ratios and fine aggregate-to-cement ratios for the same standard gradation to identify shape-related differences on the mechanical

  12. Wet sand flows better than dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Wet sand that does not contain too much water is known to be stiff enough to build sand castles or in physical words has a significant yield stress. However, we could recently show that there are quite a few conditions under which such wet sand opposes less resistant to flow than its dry counterpart. This effect might have been already known to the old Egyptians: The Ancient painting of El Bersheh at the tomb of Tehutihetep shows that there was liquid poured in front of the sledge that was used to transport heavy weight stones and statues. While archeologist have attributed this to a sacral ceremony, our data clearly show that wetting the sand ground drastically decreases the effective sliding friction coefficient. We first study the stress-strain behavior of sand with and without small amounts of liquid under steady and oscillatory shear. Using a technique to quasistatically push the sand through a tube with an enforced parabolic (Poiseuille-like) profile, we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We observe that the resistance against deformation of the wet (partially saturated) sand is much smaller than that of the dry sand, and that the latter dissipates more energy under flow. Second we show experimentally that the sliding friction on sand is greatly reduced by the addition of some--but not too much--water. The formation of capillary water bridges increases the shear modulus of the sand, which facilitates the sliding.

  13. Critical state of sand matrix soils.

    PubMed

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, ?, and ?. The range of the value of M, ?, and ? is 0.803-0.998, 0.144-0.248, and 1.727-2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated. PMID:24757417

  14. Critical State of Sand Matrix Soils

    PubMed Central

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, ?, and ?. The range of the value of M, ?, and ? is 0.803–0.998, 0.144–0.248, and 1.727–2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated. PMID:24757417

  15. Electrokinetic retention, migration and remediation of nitrates in silty loam soil under hydraulic gradients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krishnapillai Manokararajah; Ramanathan Sri Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by nitrates leaching from intensive agricultural and livestock operations have become a major concern for surrounding communities that use groundwater as their water supply. High levels of nitrate in drinking water poses a significant risk to human health, i.e., methaemoglobinaemia (“blue baby” syndrome).The traditional pump-and-treat method is ineffective in medium to fine-textured agricultural soils due to the

  16. Evolution of radiative sand ridge field of the South Yellow Sea and its sedimentary characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying Wang; Dakui Zhu; Kunyuan You; Shaoming Pan; Xiaodong Zhu; Xinqing Zou; Yongzhan Zhang

    1999-01-01

    A sand ridge field of 22 470 km2 consists of fine sands and silts originally from the old Changjiang River sediment during the late Pleistocene period. Late\\u000a Holocene sand stratum with its well-preserved larmnary bedding of more clay particles reflects the influence from the Yellow\\u000a River. There are three genetic types of morphology of sand ridge field as follows: (i)

  17. Wet Sand flows better than dry sand

    E-print Network

    Jorge E. Fiscina; Christian Wagner

    2007-11-19

    We investigated the yield stress and the apparent viscosity of sand with and without small amounts of liquid. By pushing the sand through a tube with an enforced Poiseuille like profile we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We find that the system starts to flow when a critical shear of the order of one particle diameter is exceeded. In contrast to common believe, we observe that the resistance against the flow of wet sand is much smaller than that of dry sand. For the dissipative flow we propose a non-equilibrium state equation for granular fluids.

  18. Laboratory studies of dune sand for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali; Wijesuriya, Roshan; Abayaweera, Gayan; Viduranga, Tharaka

    2015-04-01

    With the increase of the annual sand demand for the construction industry the excessive excavation of river sand is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the possibility for an alternative to stop or at least to minimize river sand mining activities. Dune sand is one of the available alternative materials to be considered instead of river sand in the country. Large quantities of sand dunes occur mainly along the NW and SE coastal belt which belong to very low rainfall Dry Zone coasts. The height of dune deposits, vary from 1m to about 30 meters above sea level. The objective of this paper is to indicate some studies and facts on the dune sand deposits of Sri Lanka. Laboratory studies were carried out for visual observations and physical properties at the initial stage and then a number of tests were carried out according to ASTM standards to obtain the compressive strength of concrete cylinders and mortar cubes mixing dune sand and river sand in different percentages keeping a constant water cement ratio. Next the water cement ratio was changed for constant dune sand and river sand proportion. Microscopic analysis shows that the dune sand consist of 95 % of quartz and 5 % of garnet, feldspar, illmenite and other heavy minerals with clay, fine dust, fine shell fragments and organic matters. Grains are sub-rounded to angular and tabular shapes. The grain sizes vary from fine to medium size of sand with silt. The degree of sorting and particle size observed with dune sands are more suited with the requirement of fine aggregates in the construction industry. The test result indicates that dune sand could be effectively used in construction work without sieving and it is ideal for wall plastering due to its'-uniformity. It could also be effectively used in concrete and in mortars mixing with river sand. The best mixing ratio is 75% dune sand and 25% river sand as the fine aggregate of concrete. For mortar the mixing percentage is 50%. The best water cement ratio for mix proportion is 0.45. It was observed that the available amount of dune sand can be extracted to meet the demand for sand in construction industry. However, the extraction of dune sand from the areas close to the sea will cause several social, environmental and legal problems. Therefore sand mining from dunes must be commenced after making a detailed Environmental Impact Assessment.

  19. Particle-Size Fractionation of Eolian Sand Along the Sinai-Negev Erg of Egypt and Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, J.; Katra, I.; Blumberg, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines changes in the eolian sand fractions along the west - east transport path of the northern Sinai Peninsula - northwestern (NW) Negev erg of Egypt and Israel. This erg is composed of active linear (seif) dunes in northern Sinai (its western part), and stabilized vegetated linear dunes (VLDs) in the NW Negev dunefield (its eastern part). Sand samples were analyzed for sand grain morphology, particle-size distribution and optically stimulated luminescence ages. Linear seif dunes differ from VLDs in their vegetation cover, linearity, and dynamics. Although both are continuous landforms with similar orientations and sand-grain roundness values, the linear dunes of Sinai are coarser-grained than the Negev VLDs. The VLDs have a significantly higher proportion of very fine sand (125-50 ?m) content and a varying but lower sand fining ratio defined as the ratio of fine sand percentage to very fine sand percentage. From these observations we infer that fractionation of sand occurred along the studied eolian transport path. Very fine sands are suggested to have been winnowed by saltation and low suspension from source deposits and sand sheets. We suggest that the very fine sand fraction of Nile Delta and Sinai sands has been transported downwind since the late middle Pleistocene. In the late Pleistocene, linear dunes reached the NW Negev due to last-glacial period windiness of intensities unprecedented today and probably larger sediment supply. Generally decreasing wind velocities and increasing precipitation along the west - east dune transport path enhanced vegetative cover in the northern Negev and enabled deposition of the very fine sand component that was also transported by low suspension. We hypothesize that these very find sands also probably compose a partial fraction of the northern Negev loess deposits, still farther downwind. Our results suggest that particle-size distribution can elucidate much about erg and dunefield history over timescales of a glacial-interglacial cycle.

  20. China Dust and Sand

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Dust and Sand Sweep Over Northeast China     View Larger Image ... these views of the dust and sand that swept over northeast China on March 10, 2004. Information on the height of the dust and an ...

  1. Mineral Sands Down Under

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource describes what mineral sands are, and discusses the heavy, dark-colored minerals that they contain (rutile, ilmenite, zircon, monazite). A map shows locations of mineral sands deposits in Australia.

  2. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariaenrica Frigione; Mariaenrica

    2010-01-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water\\/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete

  3. Sand for Traction

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Steam engines used high-grade silica sand for traction on the rails. Sand was stored in a dome on top of the engine and, as the train traveled the tracks, the sand would be sprinkled down pipes to land on the tracks in front of the wheels. This would aid the wheels in gripping the tracks, especially...

  4. Particle-size fractionation of aeolian sand along a climatic and geomorphic gradient of the Sinai-Negev erg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Katra, Itzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2015-04-01

    This study examines changes in the aeolian sand fractions along the west-east aeolian transport path of the northern Sinai Peninsula - northwestern (NW) Negev erg of Egypt and Israel. This erg originates from the Nile Delta and is composed of currently active linear (seif) dunes in northern Sinai (its western part), and currently stabilized vegetated linear dunes (VLDs) in the NW Negev dunefield (its eastern part). Sand samples from the Nile Delta, northern Sinai and NW Negev were analyzed for particle-size distribution and sand grain morphology in accordance to their Eastern Mediterranean INQUA Dunes Atlas luminescence and radiocarbon chronologies. Linear seif dunes differ from VLDs in their vegetation cover, linearity, and dynamics. Although both are continuous landforms with similar orientations and sand-grain roundness values, the linear dunes of Sinai are coarser-grained than the Negev VLDs. The VLDs have a significantly higher proportion of very fine sand (125-50 ?m) content and a varying but lower sand fining ratio defined as the ratio of fine sand percentage to very fine sand percentage. Very fine sands are suggested to have been winnowed by saltation and low suspension from source deposits and sand sheets. Detailed semi-quantitative examinations of sand grains by a SEM of a Negev VLD shows that most grains do not exhibit features that can be attributed to aeolian abrasion by sand grain-grain collisions. From these observations we infer that fractionation of sand was a major process leading to downwind fining along the studied aeolian transport path. We suggest that the very fine sand fraction of Nile Delta and Sinai sands has been transported downwind since the late middle Pleistocene. In the late Pleistocene, sand reached the NW Negev in the form of VLDs due to last-glacial period windiness of intensities unprecedented today and probably larger sediment supply. Generally current and inferred past decreasing wind velocities and increasing precipitation along the dune transport path enhanced vegetative and biogenic soil crust cover in the NE Sinai and NW Negev and enabled deposition of the very fine sand component within VLDs that was probably transported by low suspension. We hypothesize that very fine sands also probably compose a partial coarse fraction of the late Pleistocene northern Negev loess deposits, adjacently downwind of the NW Negev dunefield. Our results suggest that particle-size distribution can elucidate much about erg and dunefield history especially where a climatic gradient exists, over timescales of a glacial-interglacial cycle.

  5. Mechanical behaviour of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Evangelista; J. de Brito

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns the use of fine recycled concrete aggregates to partially or globally replace natural fine aggregates (sand) in the production of structural concrete. To evaluate the viability of this process, an experimental campaign was implemented in order to monitor the mechanical behaviour of such concrete. The results of the following tests are reported: compressive strength, split tensile strength,

  6. Comparison of natural and manufactured fine aggregates in cement mortars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Gonçalves; L. M. Tavares; R. D. Toledo Filho; E. M. R. Fairbairn; E. R. Cunha

    2007-01-01

    The performance of cement mortars using manufactured fine aggregates produced by cone crushing or impact crushing has been compared to that of mortars prepared from a natural sand control-sample. Samples from both crusher products have been additionally subjected to classification for partial removal of fines, being also used in preparing mortars. Particle shape analyses indicated that material produced by impact

  7. Fine Travel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    FineTravel Magazine, produced by Louis Bignami and Big-Ray Publications, is a webzine aimed "at the traveler, not the tourist." It contains first person account feature articles about interesting nooks and crannies of various travel destinations in the US and around the world. Updated weekly, it features a searchable and browsable archive of past FineTravel articles, as well as pointers to airline information, books and videos, and resorts. It is an informative and entertaining site for the Internaut interested in travel.

  8. Process and apparatus for recovery of oil from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.C.

    1982-11-30

    A crude oil product is extracted from a tar sand by first crushing the tar sand as mined and then fine grinding the crushed material in a grinding mill in the presence of a cleansing liquid, such as an aqueous solution of a caustic. The resulting slurry is passed into suitable extractor-classifier equipment, such as that shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,814,336, in which a body of cleansing liquid is maintained. Agitation of the slurry in such maintained body of cleansing liquid substantially completes removal of the bituminous matter from the sand, and the resulting crude oil and cleansing liquid phase is discharged separately from the sand solid phase. The liquid phase is treated for the removal of residual sand particles and for the separation of residual cleansing liquid from the crude oil. The cleansing liquid so recovered is recycled and the crude oil is passed to further processing or for use as such.

  9. Controls on the abruptness of gravel-sand transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.; Lamb, M. P.; Domarad, N.; Rennie, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    As gravel-bedded rivers fine downstream, they characteristically exhibit an abrupt transition from gravel- to sand-bed. This is the only abrupt transition in grain-size that occurs in the fluvial system and has attracted considerable attention. A number of competing theories have been proposed to account for the abruptness of the transition, including base-level control, attrition of ~10mm gravel to produce sand, and sediment sorting processes. The prevailing theory for the emergence of abrupt transitions is size selective sorting of bimodal sediment wherein gravel deposits due to downstream declining shear stress, fining the bedload until a sand-bed emerges. We explored this hypothesis by examining grain-size, shear stress, gravel mobility and sand suspension thresholds through the gravel-sand transition (GST) of the Fraser River, British Columbia. The Fraser GST is an arrested gravel wedge with patches of gravel downstream of the wedge forming a diffuse extension. There is an abrupt change in bed slope through the transition that leads to an abrupt change in shear stress. The GST, bed-slope change and backwater caused by the ocean are all coincident spatially, which enhances the sharpness of the GST. Interestingly, the bimodal reach of the river occurs downstream of the GST and exhibits no downstream gradients in shear stress, suspended sediment flux, gravel mobility or sand suspension thresholds. This calls into question the prevailing theory for the emergence of an abrupt GST by size selective sorting. We provide evidence, both empirical and theoretical, that suggests the emergence of an abrupt GST is caused by rapid deposition of sand when fine gravel deposits. We argue that the emergence of gravel-sand transitions is a consequence of gravel-bedded rivers adopting a steeper slope than sand-bedded rivers. The abruptness arises because the bed slope required to convey the gravel load fixes the distal location of a terminal gravel wedge, and once the river has lost the capacity to carry the gravel mixture, the river adopts the lower slope required to pass the sand load. Progressive downstream fining of a gravel-sand mixture is not a necessary condition for the emergence of a gravel-sand transition.

  10. Paleoenvironment and depositional environment of Miocene Olcese Sand, Bakersfield, California

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.C.

    1986-04-01

    The Olcese Sand near Bakersfield, California, contains evidence of a range of paleoenvironments including nonmarine, estuarine, and outer shelf depositional settings. Foraminifera from surface and subsurface samples place the Olcese in the Saucesian and Relizian of the California benthic stages. A pumice bed in the Olcese has been dated by fission track methods at 15.5 Ma. The Olcese Sand interfingers with the underlying Freeman Silt and the overlying Round Mountain Silt. In the type area, in Round Mountain oil field, the Olcese is 300-360 m thick. The Olcese is subdivided into three environmental facies. In the Knob Hill Quadrangle, the lower Olcese consists of (1) thinly bedded to blocky white tuffaceous silt and sand, or (2) planar cross-bedded fine to coarse-grained sand with pumice pebbles lining the bedding surfaces. Fossil mollusks and skate teeth indicate a shallow marine environment for the lower Olcese. Although the Olcese is predominantly a marine unit, the middle Olcese is nonmarine, with lenses of marine deposition. The middle Olcese is well exposed in the Knob Hill, Oil Center, and Rio Bravo Ranch Quadrangles, and is characterized by fine to coarse sand with occasional gravel lenses, strong cross-bedding, and a blue-gray color. The upper Olcese is a very fine to medium-grained, marine sand that fines upward into a sandy siltstone southward toward the Kern River. Foraminifera and mollusks from outcrops in the Rio Bravo Ranch Quadrangle indicate outer shelf to estuarine environments for the upper Olcese. The varying environments in the Olcese Sand reflect slight but frequent fluctuations in water depth and can be used to interpret the basin-margin history.

  11. Reinforced sand cores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Zoldan

    2005-01-01

    Engine blocks and cylinder heads (castings) are made of aluminum or cast iron. Molten metal, poured into molds, forms the shape of engine blocks and cylinder heads. Molds create the outside of the casting and sand cores create cavities within the casting. ^ Typically, sand cores must maintain small aspect ratios to preserve structural integrity during the casting process. The

  12. Sand dunes on the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Charles Storrow; Owens, James Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Inconspicuous ancient sand dunes are present in parts of the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. Many dunes are roughly V-shaped, built by northwest winds, especially on the east sides of some of the large rivers. On the uplands, the form and spacing of the dunes are variable. A surficial blanket composed mainly of medium and fine-grained sand-the Parsonsburg Sand-forms both the ancient dunes and the broad plains between the dunes. The sand that forms the dunes is massive and intensely burrowed in the upper part; traces of horizontal or slightly inclined bedding appear near the base. Quartz is the dominant mineral constituent of the sand. Microline is abundant in the very fine to fine sand fraction. The heavy-mineral assemblages (high zircon, tourmaline, rutile) are more mature than in most of the possible source rocks. The most abundant minerals in the clay-sized fraction are dioctahedral vermiculite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and gibbsite. The first four minerals are common in deposits of late Wisconsin and Holocene age. The gibbsite may be detrital, coming from weathered rocks of Tertiary age. The soil profile in the dune sand is weakly to moderately developed. At or near the base of the Parsonsburg Sand are peaty beds that range in age from about 30,000 to about 13,000 radiocarbon years B.P. Microfloral assemblages in the peaty beds suggest that the dunes on the uplands formed in a spruce parkland during the late Wisconsin glacial maximum. The river dunes may also be of late Wisconsin age, but could be Holocene.

  13. The application of triaxial compression tests to the design of sand-asphalt paving mixtures 

    E-print Network

    Ritter, Leo J

    1940-01-01

    Used'. Vernation oi' Sand. -Asphalt Paving Mixtures , 5, - -3 2g' ~ &) 27 Test Results ', Conclusions 53 Recommendations for Pnture Investigations . . . . . . . . . . . g5 Blbli ograplg LIST OP TABLES 1'able I. , Sand. Qradings II. Xffect... 4. Schematic Diagram of Triaxial Assembly . . . , . . . '. . . , '. , ~" 7 l0 5. Compression Chamber -- Triaxial Shear Machine . . . 6. Trpicsl Stress-Strain Curve for Fine Sand . 12 7. Plastio Flow Failure and. Sank-Asphalt Paving Sample...

  14. Solids-liquid separation of swine manure with polymer treatment and sand filtration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small particles typical of liquid swine manure often clog sand filter beds and fine filters. We evaluated the effectiveness of polymer flocculants to improve drainage and filtration performance of sand filter beds by increasing the effective particle size. A pilot unit was evaluated at the Swine U...

  15. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete with Ground Waste Glass Sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Pereira de Oliveira; J. P. Castro-Gomes; P. Santos

    This paper examines the possibility of using finely ground waste glass as partial natural sand replacement in concrete. The reduction of waste glass particle size was accomplished in the laboratory by crushing and grinding the waste glass in a jar mill. The compressive strength at 7, 28 and 90 days, was determined for different ground waste glass sand percentage replacement

  16. SOLID-LIQUID SEPARATION OF SWINE MANURE WITH POLYMER TREATMENT AND SAND FILTRATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Vanotti; J. M. Rice; A. Q. Ellison; P. G. Hunt; F. J. Humenik; C. L. Baird

    Small particles typical of liquid swine manure often clog sand filter beds and fine filters. We evaluated the effec- tiveness of polymer flocculants to improve drainage and filtration performance of sand filter beds by increasing the particle size of manure. A pilot separation unit was evaluated at the Swine Unit of the NCSU Lake Wheeler Road Laboratory in Ra- leigh,

  17. Development of an Effective Method for Recovery of Viral Genomic RNA from Environmental Silty Sediments for Quantitative Molecular Detection ?

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Takayuki; Masago, Yoshifumi; Sano, Daisuke; Omura, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    Nine approaches to recover viral RNA from environmental silty sediments were newly developed and compared to quantify RNA viruses in sediments using molecular methods. Four of the nine approaches employed direct procedures for extracting RNA from sediments (direct methods), and the remaining five approaches used indirect methods wherein viral particles were recovered before RNA extraction. A direct method using an SDS buffer with EDTA to lyse viral capsids in sediments, phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol to extract RNA, isopropanol to concentrate RNA, and magnetic beads to purify RNA resulted in the highest rate of recovery (geometric mean of 11%, with a geometric standard deviation of 0.02; n = 7) of poliovirus 1 (PV1) inoculated in an environmental sediment sample. The direct method exhibiting the highest rate of PV1 recovery was applied to environmental sediment samples. One hundred eight sediment samples were collected from the Takagi River, Miyagi, Japan, and its estuary from November 2007 to April 2009, and the genomic RNAs of enterovirus and human norovirus in these samples were quantified by reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative PCR (qPCR). The human norovirus genome was detected in one sample collected at the bay, although its concentration was below the quantification limit. Meanwhile, the enterovirus genome was detected in two samples at the river mouth and river at concentrations of 8.6 × 102 and 2.4 × 102 copies/g (wet weight), respectively. This is the first report to obtain quantitative data for a human pathogenic virus in a river and in estuarine sediments using RT-qPCR. PMID:21515729

  18. Vent of Sand Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

  19. The Morwell interseam “sands”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Barton

    1971-01-01

    Interseam “sands” of Morwell form part of a sequence of brown?coal seams, sediments and volcanic rocks which, together, make up the Tertiary Latrobe Valley Coal Measures. A detailed investigation and computer analysis of the “sands” show that they are fluviatile deposits which accumulated within the tectonically stable Latrobe Valley Depression.On an inclusive?graphic comparative scale, particle?size analyses show that the sediments

  20. Rheological and mechanical properties of mortars prepared with natural and manufactured sands

    E-print Network

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    assessment methods for fine aggregate used in Portland cement concrete are mostly based on round natural sand in the loosely packed aggregate, i.e., just above the maximum void ratio emax of the fine aggregate. Given March 2008 Keywords: Aggregate Mortar Compressive strength Mixture proportioning The conventional

  1. Mineralogic and Petrologic Overview of Core Samples From the Dept. of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project Multiwell Experiment, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O. Eatough

    1983-01-01

    The Petrology Laboratory of Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) at Grand Junction, Colorado, is performing mineralogic and petrologic analyses on core samples from the Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) project for Sandia National Laboratories. The samples studied to date include some fluvial sands, transitional sands, and shoreline blanket sands. The sands are generally fine-grained feldspar and lithic-rich quartz sandstones, with minimal textural

  2. Sound-Producing Sand Avalanches

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bretz, Michael

    This site presents an analysis of the theories and experiments done so far on sound-producing (e.g., roaring, booming) sand avalanches. Several reference articles are cited, and a link to the summary of an article, "Booming Sand", in Scientific American volume 277, number 3, is provided. An on site version of another article, "Sound Producing Sand Avalanches", in Contemporary Physics, volume 38, number 5, is also presented in three different formats: PDF, HTML, and Postscript Preprint.The other main features of this site are sound recordings of booming sand, compressed squeaking sand, and croaking sand, as well as, and images and micrographs of booming dunes.

  3. Ganges Chasma Sand Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Today's sand sheet is located in the Ganges Chasma portion of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, note that the dune forms are seen only at the margin and that the interior of the sand sheet at this resolution appears to completely lack dune forms.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.4, Longitude 310.7 East (49.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Gas percolation through sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, W. G.

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has determined the shock properties of quartz sand. The effect of the physical processes occurring with varying moisture content and particle size were shock presented. In this study the same quartz sand, in a column is subjected to blast waves over a range of pressure. The diagnostics used are pressure sensors and high-speed photography. The effect of grain size on propagation time and the effect of moisture content are determined. Aspects of particle and liquid movement are also discussed. While the velocity of the percolation through the bed is primarily controlled by grain size the effect of moisture and liquids reveals a more complex dependence.

  5. Waste green sands as reactive media for the removal of zinc from water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taeyoon; Park, Jae-woo; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2004-08-01

    Waste green sands are industrial byproducts of the gray iron foundry industry. These green sands are composed of fine silica sand, clay binder, organic carbon, and residual iron particles. Because of their potential sorptive and reactive properties, tests were performed to determine the feasibility of using green sands as a low cost reactive medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). Serial batch kinetic tests and conventional batch sorption tests were conducted to determine the removal characteristics for zinc in aqueous solutions. Removal characteristics for zinc in the presence of green sands are comparable to those of Peerless iron, a common reactive medium used in PRBs. High removal capacities for zinc of green sands are attributed to clay, organic carbon, and residual iron particles, which are known sorptive media for heavy metals. Furthermore, high pH values in the presence of clay and residual iron particles enhanced sorption and precipitation of zinc. PMID:15212900

  6. Distribution of foraminifera in the barrier reef and lagoon of British Honduras

    E-print Network

    Cebulski, Donald Edward

    1961-01-01

    lagoon Mid lagoon Hear-reef lagoon b - b' o - o' d-d' e - e' f-f' silty clay clayey silt silty clay shelly silt silty sand shelly sand sandy clay silty clay silty clay silty sand clayey silt olayey silt clayey silt shelly clay shelly...

  7. Joaquim Sande Silva Francisco Rego

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Joaquim Sande Silva Francisco Rego Paulo Fernandes Eric Rigolot (editors) Towards Integrated Fire ­ Outcomes of the European Project Fire Paradox Joaquim Sande Silva, Francisco Rego, Paulo Fernandes and Eric

  8. Sand Hill Rd. Junipero Serra

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Alpine 280 101 Campus Drive Sand Hill Rd. University Palm StockFarm Junipero Serra Page Mill Oregon Floor, South Wing right next to Peet's Coffee. Directions from 280 North or South - Exit Sand Hill Rd

  9. The Chemical Composition of Some Texas Soils.

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1907-01-01

    or chocolate loam; Austin fine sandy loam, a productive yellow to reddish gray sandy loam known as "Shelly land." Some of these soils are well supplied with plant food. Phosphoric acid is low in the Norfolk sand, Norfolk silty loam, Orangeburg fine sand...

  10. Sand and sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Pettijohn, F.J.; Potter, P.E.; Siever, R.

    1987-01-01

    Here is a new, second edition of a classical textbook in sedimentology, petrology, and petrography of sand and sandstones. It has been extensively revised and updated, including: new techniques and their utility; new literature; new illustrations; new, explicitly stated problems for the student; and a wider scope.

  11. Building with Sand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  12. Introduction Sand sole, Psettichthys melanostictus,

    E-print Network

    67(4) 9 Introduction Sand sole, Psettichthys melanostictus, is a common nearshore pleuronectid flat- fish in the northeast Pacific Ocean.Also known as fringe sole, spotted flounder, or sand flounder catches (Kramer et al., 1995). Commercial landings of sand sole in California, Oregon, and Wash- ington

  13. Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball League

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball League Summer 2014 Intramural Sports Calendar of Events Summer_SCIM Sports@oregonstate.edu Free Agents Free Agent players without a teammate for the Summer Sand Volleyball Thursday, June 26th Monday, June 30th Sand Volleyball League Thursday, June 26th Tuesday, July 1st Futsal

  14. Special report: Athabasca tar sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Bachman; D. H. Stormont

    1967-01-01

    A synthetic crude oil is being produced from the Athabasca oil sands region of northeastern Alberta. The Athabasca operations are broken down into 3 divisions: mining, extraction of oil from the sand, and pipelining to market. The entire project, operated by Great Canadian Oil Sands, Ltd., an affiliate of Sun Oil Co., is self-sufficient except for the water supply. By-

  15. Oil sands fulfill their promise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaapel

    2009-01-01

    The Great Canadian Oil Sands plant, a $300 million investment for Sun Oil Co., is the first commercial facility to wrest oil from the Alberta tar sands. Energy companies are poised to invest more than $3 billion in oil sands development in the next several years. Construction already underway, planning for projects to come, and the widening scope of oil

  16. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Nakhla, George; Farooq, Shaukat

    2003-01-31

    While the ability of slow sand filters to remove total suspended solids (SS), turbidity, and organics from wastewaters is well known, this study has demonstrated that they can also achieve simultaneous nitrification-denitrification, producing effluent total Kjedahl nitrogen (TKN) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations as low as 0.6 and 1.5mg/l, respectively, utilizing particulate and slowly biodegradable COD in the process. The impact of filtration rates in the range of 0.15-0.38m/h, filter depth of 0.5-1.5m, and sand size 0.3-0.5mm on nitrogen removal processes at temperatures of 10-39 degrees C was assessed. Nitrification efficiency, denitrification efficiency, and total nitrogen removal efficiency correlated well with filtration rate and sand size only, with all three parameters inversely proportional to the square root of the aforementioned two process variables. Nitrification exhibited the most sensitivity to filtration rate and sand size. The filters produced effluent with turbidities of 0.1-0.5 NTU, SS concentrations of 3-6mg/l in the fine sand and 6-9mg/l in the coarse sand. Effluent BOD(5) and COD concentrations were mostly in the 0.8-2.6 and 15-34mg/l range, respectively. PMID:12493214

  17. Northern Sand Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 82 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. The image is completely dominated by dunes. In sand seas, it is very common for a single type of dune to occur, and for a single predominate wind to control the alignment of the dunes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.2, Longitude 152.5 East (207.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  19. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  20. Paleobiology of the Sand Beneath the Valders Diamicton at Valders, Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Louis J.; Miller, Norton G.; Baker, Richard G.; Curry, B. Brandon; Mickelson, David M.

    1998-03-01

    Previously undescribed pollen, plant macrofossils, molluscs, and ostracodes were recovered from a 2.5-m-thick glaciolacustrine unit of silty sand and clay at Valders, Wisconsin. The interstadial sediment was deposited about 12,200 14C yr B.P. after retreat of the Green Bay lobe that deposited diamicton of the Horicon Formation, and before advance of the Lake Michigan lobe that deposited the red-brown diamicton of the Valders Member of the Kewaunee Formation. Fluctuations of abundance of Candona subtriangulata, Cytherissa lacustris,and three other species define four ostracode biozones in the lower 1.7 m, suggesting an open lake environment that oscillated in depth and proximity to glacial ice. Pollen is dominated by Piceaand Artemisia,but the low percentages of many other types of long-distance origin suggest that the terrestrial vegetation was open and far from the forest border. The upper part of the sediment, a massive sand deposited in either a shallow pond or a sluggish stream, contains a local concentration of plant macrofossils. The interpretation of a cold open environment is supported by the plant macrofossils of more than 20 species, dominated by those of open mineral soils ( Arenaria rubella, Cerastium alpinumtype, Silene acaulis, Sibbaldia procumbens, Dryas integrifolia, Vaccinium uliginosumvar. alpinum, Armeria maritima,etc.) that in North America occur largely in the tundra and open tundra-forest ecotone of northern Canada. Ice-wedge casts occur in the sand.

  1. Properties of self-compacting concrete prepared with coarse and fine recycled concrete aggregates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C. Kou; C. S. Poon

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the fresh and hardened properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC) using recycled concrete aggregate as both coarse and fine aggregates were evaluated. Three series of SCC mixtures were prepared with 100% coarse recycled aggregates, and different levels of fine recycled aggregates were used to replace river sand. The cement content was kept constant for all concrete mixtures. The

  2. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S. [NDE Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  3. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J. S.

    2014-02-01

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  4. The settling dynamics of flocculating mud and sand mixtures: part 2—numerical modelling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy R. Spearman; Andrew J. Manning; Richard J. S. Whitehouse

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine and coastal sediment transport is characterised by the transport of both sand-sized particles (of diameter greater\\u000a than 63 ?m) and muddy fine-grained sediments (silt, diameter less than 63 ?m; clay, diameter less than 2 ?m). These fractions\\u000a are traditionally considered as non-cohesive and cohesive, respectively, because of the negligible physico-chemical attraction\\u000a that occurs between sand grains. However, the flocculation of sediment particles

  5. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete.

    PubMed

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility. PMID:20176466

  6. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Frigione, Mariaenrica, E-mail: mariaenrica.frigione@unisalento.i [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365 days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  7. Multiple dust sources in the Sahara Desert: The importance of sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan R.; Enzel, Yehouda

    2012-07-01

    We determine the current sources of dust in the Sahara Desert using quantitative correlation between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types and geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was found to be sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. In contrast to previous studies, only few dust storms originated from playas and dry lake beds. Land erodibility was estimated by regressing the NDS to the number of days with high-speed wind events, and was found to be high for sand dunes. Clay and fine-silt grains and aggregates are scarce in sand dunes, which most likely produce dust particles through aeolian abrasion of sand grains. Thus, saltating sand grains impacting clay aggregates on playa surfaces cannot be the sole process for generating dust in the Sahara.

  8. Laboratory singing sand avalanches.

    PubMed

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

    2010-02-01

    Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed. PMID:19880153

  9. Fluidization Characteristics of Sand and Chopped Switchgrass Sand Mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. N. Patil; T. J. Bowser; D. D. Bellmer; R. L. Huhnke

    A laboratory, fluidized-bed gasifier is being researched as a means to gasify feedstocks in a process to produce ethanol from biomass. Fluidization characteristics of the bed, especially minimum (Umf) and complete (Ucf) fluidization velocities, were measured because they are critical to the operation of the gasifier. Fluidization properties of sand and chopped switchgrass- sand mixtures of different particle sizes and

  10. ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA

    E-print Network

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA R. W. Rust1, L. !\\1. Hanks,l.2, and R. C. BechteJ3 ABsTRACT.- There were 198 species of aculeata Hymenoptera in 15 families on the acu leate Hymenoptera collected during the study. Over 2,000 specimens were obtained, representing 198

  11. Fine Arts Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanaimo School District #68 (British Columbia).

    The fine arts as defined by the Ministry of Education (British Columbia) include music, art, and drama with the curriculum focusing on two concepts: creation and appreciation. One of the aims of School District #68 (Nanaimo) is to provide students with the opportunity to gain exposure to, and experience in, fine arts. The Fine Arts Evaluation…

  12. Legged locomotion on sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Umbanhowar, Paul; Komsuoglu, Haldun; Koditschek, Daniel; Goldman, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    To understand how and why animals modulate foot kinematics to achieve effective locomotion on granular media, we study the speed of a six-legged robot with c-shaped legs, SandBot, moving on granular media for varying volume fraction, ?, limb frequency, f, and gait timing parametersfootnotetextLi et. al, PNAS, 106, 3029, 2009. Speed is determined by step length which in turn depends on limb penetration. At low f and high ? penetration is small, step length is large, and SandBot advances with a rotary walking gait in which c-legs rotate about their centers by slipping relative to stationary grains. In the opposite extreme, grains cannot support the robot; its underside always contacts the ground and it advances slowly via thrust generated as the c-legs translate through the grains. For varied gait parameters, high speeds are only observed in a small area of parameter space. A yield stress based model predicts the speed and reveals that performance is maximized when gait parameters minimize limb acceleration and interference, and limbs utilize the solidification properties of the media.

  13. Legged locomotion on sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Umbanhowar, Paul; Komsuoglu, Haldun; Koditschek, Daniel; Goldman, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    To understand how and why animals modulate foot kinematics to achieve effective locomotion on granular media, we study the speed of a six-legged robot with c-shaped legs, SandBot, moving on granular media for varying volume fraction, ?, limb frequency, f, and gait timing parameters.footnotetextLi et. al, PNAS, 106, 3029, 2009 Speed is determined by step length which in turn depends on limb penetration. At low f and high ? penetration is small, step length is large, and SandBot advances with a rotary walking gait in which c-legs rotate about their centers by slipping relative to stationary grains. In the opposite extreme, grains cannot support the robot; its underside always contacts the ground and it advances slowly via thrust generated as the c-legs translate through the grains. For varied gait parameters, high speeds are only observed in a small area of parameter space. A yield stress based model predicts the speed and reveals that performance is maximized when gait parameters minimize limb acceleration and interference, and limbs utilize the solidification properties of the media.

  14. Sand waves, bars, and wind-blown sands of the Rio Orinoco, Venezuela and Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, Carl F.; Perez-Hernandez, David

    1989-01-01

    During March 1982, a reconnaissance study was carried out along a reach of the Rio Orinoco between Puerto Ayacucho and Ciudad Bolivar. This was the low-flow season. Samples of bed material and suspended sediments were collected, sonic records of the bed were obtained at several locations, and the exposed bars and sand waves were studied at four locations. Sounding records were obtained at two of these locations during June and November when flow covered the bars, and additional studies were made on the ground at some of these same sites during March 1983. The bed of the river is mostly sand with small quantities, about 5 percent by weight on average, of gravel. Suspended- sediment concentrations were low, ranging between 20 milligrams per liter above Rio Apure to almost 40 milligrams per liter below its confluence with the Rio Orinoco. The annual sediment load is estimated to be 240x10 6 megagrams per year. During the dry season, 35 percent or more of the bed is exposed in the form of large bars composed of many sand waves. Trade winds blow upriver and there is substantial upriver transport of river sediments by the wind. If the bars contain very coarse sands and fine gravel, deflation forms a lag deposit that armors the bar surface and prevents further erosion. Theoretical calculations show that the lower limit for the fraction of the bed that needs to be covered with nonmoving particles to prevent further erosion and the smallest size of the armor particles depend only on wind speed. Calculations of bed-material transport were made for a typical wide and narrow section of the river; the annual load, excluding the wash load, is about 30 x 10 6 megagrams per year. A new definition for wash load is proposed; it is material that can be suspended as soon as its motion is initiated. For the Rio Orinoco, this is material finer than 0.1 millimeters.

  15. Science Learning in the Sand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to think about the Earth in a contextual manner and become familiar with constructive and destructive processes as they relate to sand - its origins, cyclical processes, and yielding of new products. Explores the bigger idea with a developmentally appropriate study of water, rocks, sand, physical phenomena,…

  16. WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

  17. Sand and Dust on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Haberle, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Mars is a planet of high scientific interest. Various studies are currently being made that involve vehicles that have landed on Mars. Because Mars is known to experience frequent wind storms, mission planners and engineers require knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of Martian windblown sand and dust, and the processes involved in the origin and evolution of sand and dust storms.

  18. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    E-print Network

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  19. Unchanging Desert Sand Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhiraju, S.; Banerjee, B.; Buddhiraju, K.; Shah, V.

    2013-12-01

    Deserts are one of the major landforms on earth. They occupy nearly 20% of the total land area but are relatively less studied. With the rise in human population, desert regions are being gradually occupied for settlement posing a management challenge to the concerned authorities. Unrestrained erosion is generally a feature of bare dunes. Stabilized dunes, on the other hand, do not undergo major changes in textures, and can thus facilitate the growth of vegetation. Keeping in view of the above factors, better mapping and monitoring of deserts and particularly of sand dunes is needed. Mapping dunes using field instruments is very arduous and they generate relatively sparse data. In this communication, we present a method of clustering and monitoring sand dunes through imagery captured by remote sensing sensors. Initially Radon spectrum of an area is obtained by decomposition of the image into various projections sampled at finer angular directions. Statistical features such as mode, entropy and standard deviation of Radon spectrum are used in delineation and clustering of regions with different dune orientations. These clustered boundaries are used to detect if there are any changes occurring in the dune regions. In the experiment's, remote sensing data covering various dune regions of the world are observed for possible changes in dune orientations. In all the cases, it is seen that there are no major changes in desert dune orientations. While these findings have implications for understanding of dune geomorphology and changes occurring in dune directions, they also highlight the importance of a wider study of dunes and their evolution both at regional and global scales. Results for Dataset 1 & Dataset 2 Results for Dataset 3

  20. Batch experiments characterizing the reduction of Cr(VI) using suboxic material from a mildly reducing sand and gravel aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, L.D.; Kent, D.B.; Davis, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted with sand collected from a shallow sand and gravel aquifer to identify the principal chemical reactions influencing the reduction of Cr(VI), so that field-observed Cr(VI) reduction could be described. The reduction appeared to be heterogeneous and occurred primarily on Fe(II)-bearing minerals. At only 1 wt %, the fine fraction (<64 ??m diameter) of the sediments dominated the amount of aqueous Cr(VI) reduction because of its greater reactivity and surface area. Although reduction of Cr(VI) increased with decreasing pH, small variations in the abundance of fine fraction among the replicate samples obscured pH trends in the batch experiments. Consistent results could only be obtained by separating the fine material from the sand and running parallel experiments on each fraction. As pH decreased (6.4 to 4.5), Cr(VI) reduction increased from 30 to 50 nmol/m2 for the sand fraction (64-1000 ??m) and from 130 to 200 nmol/m2 for the fine fraction. The amount of Cr(VI) reduced in both the sand-sized and fine material increased from 35 to 80 and from 130 to 1000 nmol/m2, respectively, for a 10-fold increase in Cr(VI)initial. A consistent description of the rate data was achieved by assuming that intraparticle diffusion limited the observed rate of reduction.

  1. Hydrogeology of sand and gravel deposits near Nepaug Reservoir, New Hartford and Burlington, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Janet Radway; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Morrison, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Sand and gravel deposits near the Nepaug Reservoir in New Hartford and Burlington, Connecticut, were studied to provide a basis for ongoing investigations that will evaluate water-quality conditions in the watershed and the effects of sand and gravel mining on the quality of water in the reservoir. In the Nepaug area, surficial glacial materials overlie crystalline bedrock that is predominantly schist and gneiss. Along the western side of Nepaug Reservoir, glacial stratified deposits were laid down as ice-marginal deltas in a series of small glacial lakes that formed sequentially as the ice margin retreated northeastward through the area. These deposits are as much as 250 feet thick and are subdivided into coarse-grained units (gravel, sand and gravel, and sand deposits) and fine-grained units (very fine sand, silt, and clay deposits). Approximately 954 million cubic feet of sand and gravel is contained in four delineated deposits in two areas near the reservoir. The sand and gravel deposits adjacent to the Nepaug Reservoir can affect the physical and chemical responses of the watershed. Removal of the sand and gravel would likely result in increased streamflow peaks associated with storms and decreased streamflow during low-flow periods. Streamflow during floods and droughts at Burlington Brook and Clear Brook, a tributary to the Nepaug Reservoir, were compared to determine how the volume of sand and gravel in a watershed affects ground-water storage and the way water is released from storage. Removal of unsaturated deposits also may affect chemical interactions between water and sediment and cause changes in the amount of dissolved constituents in the water.

  2. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of tidal sand ridges southwest Florida inner shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.A. Jr.; Klay, J.; Jewell, P. (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Detailed investigation of linear shelf sand ridges located off the southwest coast of Florida shows them to be tide-dominated sand bodies. These ridges are remarkably similar to the large sand ridges of the North Sea, and they have abundant apparent analogs in the stratigraphic record, many of which are important petroleum producers. The Florida ridges are asymmetric in profile, about 10 km long, 1 km wide, with relief of 3-4 m with the adjacent sea bed. Extensive tidal current monitoring, sediment distribution patterns and side scan sonar surveys permit characterizing their morphodynamics. Tidal currents show distinct bidirectional patterns with speeds up to 70 cm/s. There is slight flood-dominance, and currents show much higher velocities in the troughs as compared to the crests of the ridges. Megaripples and sand waves are widespread and migrate obliquely across the ridges at opposite directions on the gentle and steep side of the ridge. Shallow, high-resolution seismic data and 39 vibracores din the area of the ridges show a consistent sequence characterized by three ascending Holocene lithofacies: (1) muddy quartz sand with limestone clasts; (2) bioturbated muddy shelly quartz sand; and (3) well-sorted, cross-stratified quartz sand that characterizes the sand ridges themselves. Each of the tidal sand ridges displays a coarsening-upward sequence of fine, well-sorted sand. Small-scale, multidirectional, cross stratification dominates the stratigraphy of the cores in this facies, but megaripple cross stratification is also present. All data indicate that these tidal ridges are good modern analogs for many of the shelf sand bodies in the ancient record, especially the Mesozoic of the mid-continent area.

  3. Separability studies of construction and demolition waste recycled sand.

    PubMed

    Ulsen, Carina; Kahn, Henrique; Hawlitschek, Gustav; Masini, Eldon A; Angulo, Sérgio C

    2013-03-01

    The quality of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) is strictly related to the content of porous and low strength phases, and specifically to the patches of cement that remain attached to the surface of natural aggregates. This phase increases water absorption and compromises the consistency and strength of concrete made from recycled aggregates. Mineral processing has been applied to CDW recycling to remove the patches of adhered cement paste on coarse recycled aggregates. The recycled fine fraction is usually disregarded due to its high content of porous phases despite representing around 50% of the total waste. This paper focus on laboratory mineral separability studies for removing particles with a high content of cement paste from natural fine aggregate particles (quartz/feldspars). The procedure achieved processing of CDW by tertiary impact crushing to produce sand, followed by sieving and density and magnetic separability studies. The attained results confirmed that both methods were effective in reducing cement paste content and producing significant mass recovery (80% for density concentration and 60% for magnetic separation). The production of recycled sand contributes to the sustainability of the construction environment by reducing both the consumption of raw materials and disposal of CDW, particularly in large Brazilian centers with a low quantity of sand and increasing costs of this material due to long transportation distances. PMID:22835506

  4. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  5. On the critical salt concentrations for particle detachment in homogeneous sand and heterogeneous Hanford sediments

    E-print Network

    Selker, John

    On the critical salt concentrations for particle detachment in homogeneous sand and heterogeneous June 2004 Abstract One of the mechanisms for sudden particle release is a decrease in groundwater salt concentration to below the critical salt concentration (CSC), where repulsion forces between fine particles

  6. The application of power ultrasound to the surface cleaning of silica and heavy mineral sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Farmer; A. F. Collings; G. J. Jameson

    2000-01-01

    Power ultrasound may be used in the processing of minerals to clean their surfaces of oxidation products and fine coatings, mainly through the large, but very localised, forces produced by cavitation. Results of the application of power ultrasound to remove iron-rich coatings from the surfaces of silica sand used in glass making and to improve the electrostatic separation of mineral

  7. A new velocity model for clay-sand mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; White, R.E. [Birkbeck Coll., London (United Kingdom)]|[University Coll. London (United Kingdom)

    1995-01-01

    None of the standard porosity-velocity models (e.g., the time-average equation, Raymer`s equations) is satisfactory for interpreting well-logging data over a broad depth range. Clays in the section are the usual source of the difficulty through the bias and scatter that they introduce into the relationship between porosity and P-wave transit time. Because clays are composed of fine sheet-like particles, they normally form pores with much smaller aspect ratios than those associated with sand grains. This difference in pore geometry provides the key to obtaining more consistent resistivity and sonic log interpretations. A velocity model for clay-sand mixtures has been developed in terms of the Kuster and Toksoez, effective medium and Gassmann theories. In this model, the total pore space is assumed to consist of two parts: (1) pores associated with sand grains and (2) pores associated with clays (including bound water). The essential feature of the model is the assumption that the geometry of pores associated with sand grains is significantly different from that associated with clays. Because of this, porosity in shales affects elastic compliance differently from porosity in sandstones. The predictive power of the model is demonstrated by the agreement between its predictions and laboratory measurements and by its ability to predict sonic logs from other logs over large depth intervals where formations vary from unconsolidated to consolidated sandstones and shales.

  8. Characterization of Fine Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Matthew; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Jesse

    Fine powders are used in many applications and across many industries such as powdered paints and pigments, ceramics, petrochemicals, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and bulk and fine chemicals, to name a few. In addition, fine powders must often be handled as a waste by-product, such as ash generated in combustion and gasification processes. In order to correctly design a process and process equipment for application and handling of powders, especially fine powders, it is essential to understand how the powder would behave. Many characterization techniques are available for determining the flow properties of powders; however, care must be taken in selecting the most appropriate technique(s).

  9. Formation of aeolian ripples and sand sorting

    E-print Network

    Edgar Manukyan; Leonid Prigozhin

    2008-12-09

    We present a continuous model capable of demonstrating some salient features of aeolian sand ripples: the realistic asymmetric ripple shape, coarsening of ripple field at the nonlinear stage of ripple growth, saturation of ripple growth for homogeneous sand, typical size segregation of sand and formation of armoring layers of coarse particles on ripple crests and windward slopes if sand is inhomogeneous.

  10. Animating Sand as a Fluid Yongning Zhu

    E-print Network

    Bridson, Robert

    Animating Sand as a Fluid by Yongning Zhu B.Sc., Peking University, 2003 A THESIS SUBMITTED;Abstract My thesis presents a physics-based simulation method for animating sand. To allow for efficiently scaling up to large volumes of sand, we abstract away the individual grains and think of the sand

  11. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves an interaction between solar heating, thermal instability, atmospheric turbulence, wind strength, and surface threshold conditions. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convect...

  12. Steamflooding strategy for thin sands

    SciTech Connect

    Doscher, T.M.; El-Arabi, M.A.

    1983-03-01

    A description is presented of the design of a steam drive in the Chanac sand, which is only 15 to 20 feet in thickness, at a depth of approximately 1250 feet in the Edison Groves field (Kern County, California).

  13. Minimal Model for Sand Dunes

    E-print Network

    Klaus Kroy; Gerd Sauermann; Hans J. Herrmann

    2002-03-02

    We propose a minimal model for aeolian sand dunes. It combines an analytical description of the turbulent wind velocity field above the dune with a continuum saltation model that allows for saturation transients in the sand flux. The model provides a qualitative understanding of important features of real dunes, such as their longitudinal shape and aspect ratio, the formation of a slip face, the breaking of scale invariance, and the existence of a minimum dune size.

  14. Modern Graywacke-Type Sands.

    PubMed

    Hollister, C D; Heezen, B C

    1964-12-18

    A preliminary study of more than 100 deep-sea cores from abyssal plains has revealed two examples of recent muddy sands of the graywacke type which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution sands have a well-sorted framework of quartz, feldspar, and rock fragments which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution that is also typical of ancient graywackes. The matrix is considered to be primary. PMID:17775982

  15. Modern Graywacke-Type Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles D. Hollister; Bruce C. Heezen

    1964-01-01

    A preliminary study of more than 100 deep-sea cores from abyssal plains has revealed two examples of recent muddy sands of the graywacke type which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution sands have a well-sorted framework of quartz, feldspar, and rock fragments which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution that is also typical of

  16. Which fine-tuning arguments are fine?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexei Grinbaum

    2009-01-01

    The argument from naturalness is widely employed in contemporary quantum field theory. Essentially a formalized aesthetic criterion, it received a meaning in the debate on the Higgs mechanism, which goes beyond aesthetics. We follow the history of technical definitions of fine tuning at the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. It is argued that they give rise to a special interpretation

  17. Mississippi Fine Arts Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson.

    The Mississippi Fine Arts Framework is designed to develop K-12 students' interest and expertise in dance, music, theater arts, and visual arts. The introductory fine arts course, for secondary level students, explores the relationship and the function of the arts in both historical and contemporary culture through creative projects, performance,…

  18. Dewatering of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, R. [Mineral Processing Section, University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The factors which control the dewatering of fine coal by gravity/centrifugal drainage and by gas displacement (vacuum/hyperbaric filtration) are evaluated. A generalized model is presented and used to describe dewatering kinetics and to establish dewatering limits. Applications to the design of dewatering systems for fine coal dewatering are discussed.

  19. Sedimentary Framework of an Inner Continental Shelf Sand-Ridge System, West-Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locker, S. D.; Hine, A. C.; Wright, A. K.; Duncan, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    The west-central Florida inner continental shelf is a dynamic environment subject to current flows on a variety of temporal and spatial scales. A site survey program, undertaken in support of the Office of Naval Research's Mine Burial prediction program, is focused on the sedimentary framework and sediment accumulation patterns in 10-18 meters water depth. Our specific goals are to image the shallow subsurface and to monitor changes in bedform distribution patterns that coincide with physical processes studies ongoing in the area. Methods of study include side-scan sonar imaging, boomer and chirp subbottom profiling, and sedimentary facies analysis using surface sediment sampling and vibracoring. A well-defined sand-ridge system was imaged, trending oblique to the west-Florida coastline. The side-scan clearly shows that there is extensive three-dimensional structure within these large-scale NW-SE trending sedimentary bedforms. The sand ridges commonly are approximately 1 km wide and 4-8 km in length. The characteristics of these ridges are distinctly different than the sand ridges in < 8 m water that we have previously studied. Ridges in the offshore area tend to be thicker, have a flatter morphology, and exhibit fewer smaller-scale sand waves. Sand-ridge thickness ranges 2-3 meters, and typically consists of fining upward medium to fine quartz sand facies with occasional centimeter-scale coarser-grained carbonate-rich intervals. Time series investigations tracking the shift in position of the sand ridge margins have found undetectable net annual movement. However significant resuspension and bedform development accompanies high-energy events such as winter cold front passage. Thus the large-scale bedforms (sand ridges) are in a state of dynamic equilibrium with the average annual hydrodynamic regime. Repeated field surveys will focus on monitoring small-scale sedimentological and stratal framework changes that will be integrated with the quantitative process studies.

  20. Sedimentary processes associated with sand and boulder deposits formed by the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami at Sabusawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kazuhisa; Sugawara, Daisuke; Ikema, Satoko; Miyagi, Toyohiko

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on the sedimentary processes of sand and boulder deposition at Sabusawa Island, Japan as a result of the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami. Boulders were composed of tuffaceous rocks and sourced from an earthquake-triggered slope failure as well as concrete fragments of seawall. They were scattered over the ground surface and did not form boulder ridges, although there was some local imbrication. The boulders were deposited on top of a sand layer indicating that the latter, possibly deposited from bed load, covered the ground surface first. This sand layer probably reduced friction allowing boulders to be transported more easily than might be expected across a hard ground with a high bottom friction. Sand deposits showed landward thinning and fining features, while the boulders showed a landward coarsening (tuffaceous boulders) or a landward fining (concrete boulders), indicating that large clasts were not necessarily scattered randomly but rather might have a clast size gradient with distance inland. These features are explained by the local topographic setting that constrained the directions of incoming and returning tsunami flows. Some clasts at the inland extent of the boulder field were covered by an upward fining sand layer. This feature suggests that the boulders were deposited prior to the suspended sands, with the latter subsequently laid down before the water level dropped below the top of the boulders. Such modern investigations of the sedimentary features of various sizes of grains and clasts immediately after a tsunami provide invaluable data for the reconstruction of inundation processes.

  1. Nitrogen photoreduction on desert sands under sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schrauzer, Gerhard N.; Strampach, Norman; Hui, Liu Nan; Palmer, Miles R.; Salehi, Jahanshah

    1983-01-01

    Sands from various geographic locations reduce N2 from the air to NH3 and traces of N2H4 on exposure to sunlight. This N2 photofixation occurs under sterile conditions on the surface of finely dispersed titanium minerals such as rutile, utilizing reducing equivalents generated through the photolysis of chemisorbed H2O. Abiological N2 photofixation is suggested to be part of the nitrogen cycle in arid and semiarid regions. It is estimated that about 10 × 105 tons of N2 is photoreduced on the total surface of the earth's deserts per year. PMID:16593330

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  3. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  4. Loose sand habitat at the Mojave desert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton; Student. Biological Sciences)

    2007-01-06

    Loose sand soil lacks moisture but contains adequate moisture and nutrients for drought tolerant plants. Loose sand soil is insufficient for animals to find or make shelter. Organisms find shade and shelter under the large shrubs.

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BENTHIC ORGANIC MATTER AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SAND SUBSTRATES

    E-print Network

    Notre Dame, University of

    RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BENTHIC ORGANIC MATTER AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SAND SUBSTRATES OF NORTHERN #12;RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BENTHIC ORGANIC MATTER AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SAND SUBSTRATES OF NORTHERN studied in sand habitats, despite the abundance of sand in many streams. These relationships were

  6. Aqueous sand-control processes conserve fuels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bleakley

    1974-01-01

    The shortage of diesel fuel and organic solvents is responsible, in part, for the development of new sand-control processes that show promise in field tests. Halliburton Services now has 2 sand-control techniques that use water-based solutions for preflush, spacer, and catalyst. One of these, called Hydrofix, is a sand consolidation process. The other--Hydropac--is a method for controlling sand by placing

  7. NU Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    in either an unsportsmanlike penalty or an ejection depending on the severity of the action. Intramural. THE GAME AND FIELD: 1. As court conditions may change, the playing area may be revised to maintain fairness will be played at the Willis Hall Sand Volleyball Court. 3. Footwear: Players may play barefoot, in socks

  8. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves the interaction between the sun, wind, and earth. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the s...

  9. Sand and Water Table Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  10. Geology on a Sand Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    Earth science teachers know how frustrating it can be to spend hundreds of dollars on three-dimensional (3-D) models of Earth's geologic features, to use the models for only a few class periods. To avoid emptying an already limited science budget, the author states that teachers can use a simple alternative to the expensive 3-D models--sand. She…

  11. Optimum content of copper slag as a fine aggregate in high strength concrete

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Wu; Weide Zhang; Guowei Ma

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanical properties of high strength concrete incorporating copper slag as a fine aggregate and concluded that less than 40% copper slag as sand substitution can achieve a high strength concrete that comparable or better to the control mix, beyond which however its behaviors decreased significantly. The workability and strength characteristics were assessed through a series of

  12. Non-equilibrium flocculation characteristics of fine-grained sediments in grid-generated turbulent flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan J. S. Cuthbertson; Ping Dong; Peter A. Davies

    2010-01-01

    Results are presented from a series of settling column experiments investigating temporal variations in the flocculation characteristics of purely cohesive (kaolin clay) sediment suspensions and cohesive (kaolin) and non-cohesive (fine sand) sediment fraction mixtures. Experimental runs were conducted under controlled hydrodynamic conditions generated by a rigid array of in-phase oscillating grids. The results indicated that rapid initial floc aggregation occurred

  13. SLOW SAND FILTRATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in slow sand filtration has increased dramatically in the United States in the past ten years. esearch conducted to evaluate removal of Giardia cysts and bacteria, showed that slow sand filtration is very effective in removal of these contaminants. low sand filters are m...

  14. Sand Dome on a Steam Engine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Steam engines used high-grade silica sand for traction on the rails. Sand was stored in a dome on top of the engine and, as the train traveled the tracks, the sand would be sprinkled down pipes to land on the tracks in front of the wheels. This would aid the wheels in gripping the tracks, especially...

  15. ccsd00003208, Basic properties for sand automata

    E-print Network

    ccsd­00003208, version 1 ­ 4 Nov 2004 Basic properties for sand automata J. Cervelle #3; E injectivity and surjectivity for sand automata. Moreover, we begin the exploration of the dynamical behavior of sand automata proving that the property of nilpotency is undecidable. We believe that the proof

  16. Animating Sand as a Fluid Yongning Zhu

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    Animating Sand as a Fluid Yongning Zhu University of British Columbia Robert Bridson University of British Columbia Figure 1: The Stanford bunny is simulated as water and as sand. Abstract We present a physics-based simulation method for animating sand. To allow for efficiently scaling up to large volumes

  17. Sedimentary structures and textures of Rio Orinoco channel sands, Venezuela and Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin Dinwiddie

    1989-01-01

    Most sedimentary structures represented in sand bodies of the Rio Orinoco are tabular-planar cross-strata which, together with some wedge-planar cross-strata, are the products of sand-wave deposition. Locally, in areas of river meander where point bars characteristically form, trough structures forming festoon patterns are numerous. At a few localities, sets of nearly horizontal strata occur between tabular-planar sets and are interpreted to be the deposits of very fast currents of the upper flow regime; elsewhere, uncommon lenses and beds of silt, clay, or organic matter consisting of leaves and twigs, seem to be the result of quiet-water settling through gravity. By far the most common grain size represented in the tabular-planar and wedge-planar cross-strata of the sandwave deposits is medium sand (? - ? millimeter) as determined by screen analyses. Many samples, however, also contain moderate quantities of coarse or very coarse sand. Eolian dunes on top of the sand-wave deposits are dominantly fine grained. The river channel sands were determined to be largely moderately well sorted, although in some places they were mostly well sorted, and in others, mostly moderately sorted.

  18. Assessment of Constitutive and Stability Behavior of Sands Under Plane Strain Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Sture, Stein

    2000-01-01

    A series of biaxial (plane strain) experiments were conducted on three sands under low (15 kPa) and high (100 kPa) confining pressure conditions to investigate the effects of specimen density, confining pressure, and sand grains size and shape on the constitutive and stability behavior of granular materials. The three sands used in the experiments were fine, medium, and coarse-grained uniform silica sands with rounded, sub-angular, and angular grains, respectively. Specimen deformation was readily monitored and analyzed with the help of a grid pattern imprinted on the latex membrane. The overall stress-strain behavior is strongly dependent on the specimen density, confining pressure, sand grain texture, and the resulting failure mode(s). That became evident in different degrees of softening responses at various axial strains. The relationship between the constitutive behavior and the specimens' modes of instability is presented. The failure in all specimens was characterized by two distinct and opposite shear bands. It was found that the measured dilatancy angles increase as the sand grains' angularity and size increase. The measured shear band inclination angles are also presented and compared with classical Coulomb and Roscoe solutions.

  19. Identifying production zones with NUV\\/VIS\\/NIR spectra: Examples from the Caddo Limestone and Strawn Sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Deaton; W. L. Balsam

    1993-01-01

    Production zones in three conventional cores - two from wells in the Caddo Limestone, Breckenridge Field and one from the Strawn Sand, Hull-Silk Field - were analyzed with a total reflectance spectrophotometer. Samples were prepared at one foot intervals through production and non-production zones by grinding 0.5 grams of rock to a fine powder, making the powder into a slurry

  20. Tracing biogeochemical and microbial variability over a complete oil sand mining and recultivation process.

    PubMed

    Noah, Mareike; Lappé, Michael; Schneider, Beate; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilkes, Heinz; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2014-11-15

    Recultivation of disturbed oil sand mining areas is an issue of increasing importance. Nevertheless only little is known about the fate of organic matter, cell abundances and microbial community structures during oil sand processing, tailings management and initial soil development on reclamation sites. Thus the focus of this work is on biogeochemical changes of mined oil sands through the entire process chain until its use as substratum for newly developing soils on reclamation sites. Therefore, oil sand, mature fine tailings (MFTs) from tailings ponds and drying cells and tailings sand covered with peat-mineral mix (PMM) as part of land reclamation were analyzed. The sample set was selected to address the question whether changes in the above-mentioned biogeochemical parameters can be related to oil sand processing or biological processes and how these changes influence microbial activities and soil development. GC-MS analyses of oil-derived biomarkers reveal that these compounds remain unaffected by oil sand processing and biological activity. In contrast, changes in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and pattern can be observed along the process chain. Especially naphthalenes, phenanthrenes and chrysenes are altered or absent on reclamation sites. Furthermore, root-bearing horizons on reclamation sites exhibit cell abundances at least ten times higher (10(8) to 10(9) cells g(-1)) than in oil sand and MFT samples (10(7) cells g(-1)) and show a higher diversity in their microbial community structure. Nitrate in the pore water and roots derived from the PMM seem to be the most important stimulants for microbial growth. The combined data show that the observed compositional changes are mostly related to biological activity and the addition of exogenous organic components (PMM), whereas oil extraction, tailings dewatering and compaction do not have significant influences on the evaluated compounds. Microbial community composition remains relatively stable through the entire process chain. PMID:25201817

  1. Drag Reduction using Superhydrophobic Sanded Teflon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong; Daniello, Robert; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    In this talk, we present a series of microfluidic experiments designed to investigate drag reduction using series of roughened Teflon surfaces. The Teflon surfaces where made superhydrophobic by imparting surface texture through sanding with sand papers with a range of grit sizes. Our previous work showed that there exists an optimal sand paper grit (240 grit) for eliminating contact angle hysteresis. We will show that a Teflon surface roughened with the same sand paper grit also maximizes the drag reduction and the slip length observed in laminar flows. Increasing or decreasing the grit size was found to reduce the drag reduction and slip length. A number of different sanding protocols were investigated including sanding preferentially in the flow direction, normal to the flow direction and with a randomized circular pattern. Of these three techniques, sanding in the flow direction was found to maximize the slip length.

  2. Dewatering of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Fine coal dewatering is one of the most pressing problem facing the coal cleaning industry. This project was undertaken with the objective of improving the dewatering process with surface chemical activation by primarily understanding the fundamental and process engineering aspects of vacuum filtration. Specific tasks for this project included -- development of an experimental apparatus and procedure to yield highly reproducible results and extensive data from each test, detailed experimental investigation of the dewatering characteristics of coal fines with and without the addition of flocculants and surfactants, and under different operating conditions, and finally identification and establishment of the physical limits of mechanical dewatering. Following are the significant conclusions from the study: Fineness and size distribution of the coal fines have the most significant influence on the coal dewatering process; usage of flocculants and surfactants is almost essential in reducing the cake moisture and in increasing the filter throughputs; based on the experimental data and the literature information, the existence of an asymptotic limit for filter cake moisture correlatable with a capillary number of the filter cake was identified. 66 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Fine coal processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Mishra; R. R. Klimpel

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a survey of the current technology in fine coal processing, covering the major processing options available. The effective utilization of the nation's coal reserves depends on the production of a high quality, low cost product. As a result of overall efforts to curtail mining costs, modern trends toward intensive mechanization and non-selective mining have increased the quantities

  4. Morris. E. Fine symposium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. K. Liaw; H. L. Marcus; J. R. Weertman; J. S. Santer

    1990-01-01

    Professor Morris E. Fine is a pioneer in teaching the unifying concepts underlying all classes of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. He is a founder and the guiding genius of the first materials science department in the world. His research career at Northwestern University has spanned a broad range of topics, from physical chemistry to mechanical behavior, and

  5. Imaging: Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of imaging in the fine arts focuses on retrieval and display of surrogate images from a collection and activities to restore, preserve, or conserve original objects. Issues are examined that relate to capturing or digitizing the image, resolution and display, storage and compression, and image distribution. (31 references) (LRW)

  6. MAIZE FINE STREAK VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The report outlines the salient features of maize fine streak virus (MFSV) including a general description of the causal virus species, virion properties, genome description, the relationship of the virus to other taxa, biological properties of the disease and agronomic aspects of the disease. Maize...

  7. The chemistry of Saudi Arabian sand - A deposition problem on helicopter turbine airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.; Archer, Frances A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    Operations in the Persian Gulf have exposed military helicopter turbines to excessive amounts of ingested sand. Fine particles, less than 10 microns, are able to bypass the particle separators and enter the cooling and combustion systems. The initial sand chemistry varies by location, but is made up of a calcium aluminum silicate glass, SiO2 low quartz, (Ca,Mg)CO3 dolomite, CaCO3 calcite, and occasionally NaCl rocksalt. The sand reacts in the hot combustion gases and deposits onto the turbine vanes as CaSO4, glass, and various crystalline silicates. Deposits up to 5 mm thick have been collected. Although cooling hole plugging is a considerable problem, excessive corrosion is not commonly observed due to the high melting point of CaSO4.

  8. Sand stresses around a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Risnes, R.; Bratli, R.; Horsrud, P.

    1982-12-01

    The authors have studied theoretically the stresses in a poorly consolidated sand around a cylindrical well, assuming axial symmetry. Applying theories of elasticity and plasticity on this three-dimensional (3D) model, analytical solutions for all three stress components have been worked out. The existence of a plastic zone around an uncased wellbore is confirmed, and the size of the zone is determined. When allowing an incompressible fluid to flow radially into the wellbore, a stability criterion describing the failure of the sand is found to exist. This criterion relates fluid flow forces to rock strength properties. Consideration also has been given to the stress distribution around a cased hole. It is shown that a decrease in the size of the plastic zone relative to an uncased hole occurs.

  9. The four things you need to know about the GEOTECHNICAL PROPERTIES OF LUNAR SOIL

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    to fine silt: On average, 95% of the soil is finer than 1.37 mm by weight; and 5% is finer than 0.0033 mm. This size is very close to the boundary between sand and silt (0.074 mm), and the lunar soil is usually described as either silty sand or sandy silt. The sand-silt boundary is the limit of size that can

  10. Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands 

    E-print Network

    Delphia, John Girard

    1998-01-01

    laboratory compaction methods have focused on determining the maximum This thesis follows the style and format of the Canadian Geotechnical JournaL possible dry unit weight of the soil (i. e. vibrating table compaction test, modified vibrating table... on the effectiveness of laboratory compaction. 2) Determine the effect of three different laboratory compaction procedures (i. e. Standard Proctor, Modified Proctor and the Vibrating Hammer tests) on the compaction of cohesionless sands. 3 ) Correlate the various...

  11. The Holocene evolution of the beach and inland aeolian sand of the north-central Mediterranean coast of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Bookman, Revital; Shteinberg, Gilad

    2015-04-01

    Israel's coastal geomorphology, situated within a Mediterranean climate zone, is characterized by parallel Pleistocene aeolianite ridges, coastal cliffs of aeolianite, and sandy beaches. Lobe-like fields of predominantly stable transverse and parabolic quartz sand dunes protrude 2-7 km inland from the current Mediterranean Sea coastline. However, their migration and accumulation history is still not well-defined. This study focuses on the Holocene appearance, chronology and drivers of beach sand deposition and inland aeolian sand transport along the Caesarea-Hadera dunefield in the north-central coastal plain of Israel. In order to achieve these goals, a detailed field survey and sampling campaign was carried out along a west-east and southwest-northeast transect, loyal to the advancement orientations of the currently stable dunes and directions of dominant sand transporting winds. Beach sand, a foredune, a linear dune, and interdunes of parabolic and transverse dunes were sampled down to their aeolianite or red loam (locally named hamra) palaeosol substrate by drilling and analyzing exposed sections. The sampled sediments were sedimentologically analyzed and twenty-five were dated by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The results indicate that beach sand started to accumulate rapidly around 6 ka probably in response to global sea level stabilization. Until around 4 ka, thin sand sheets encroached 2-3 km inland. Sand ages in the range of 1.2-1.1 ka (8th-9th century CE -- Early Moslem period) were found throughout the study area, suggesting a major mobilization of sand, followed by stabilization around 0.6 ka and pedogenesis. By 1.2 ka, the sands had reached their current extent of 5-7 km inland, suggesting transport in a southwest-northeast orientation similar to the advancement orientation of the current transverse and parabolic dunes. The particle-size distributions of the fine to medium-sized aeolian sand showed minor variation linked to inland transport distance and age and did not significantly differ from the values of beach sand. The spatial distribution and temporal clustering of the 1.2-1.1 ka ages does not seem stochastic. However, this age range does not coincide with any local or regional climate change or anthropogenic anomaly that could explain the enhanced sand mobility. Assuming no late Holocene change in coastal sand supply and availability, sand transport may have been due to short term climate (multi-annual) episodes of increased windiness that may have followed short-term or cumulative removal of stabilizing dune vegetation by man, a hypothesis that requires further investigation.

  12. Entrainment threshold of sand- to granule-sized sediments under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    An improved method is presented to determine the threshold boundary velocity required to entrain sediments under waves, using the non-dimensional group settling velocity of sediments ranging from very fine sand to granules (0.1-3.3 mm), together with a dimensionless boundary velocity. In combination with a more accurate method to calculate the actual boundary velocity under linear as well as non-linear waves, this allows sediment entrainment to be predicted from deep water up to the breaker zone.

  13. Additive surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) adsorption onto quartz-sand dominated sediments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenming; Wan, Jiamin

    2014-06-17

    Many aquifers contaminated by U(VI)-containing acidic plumes are composed predominantly of quartz-sand sediments. The F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina (USA) is an example. To predict U(VI) mobility and natural attenuation, we conducted U(VI) adsorption experiments using the F-Area plume sediments and reference quartz, goethite, and kaolinite. The sediments are composed of ?96% quartz-sand and 3-4% fine fractions of kaolinite and goethite. We developed a new humic acid adsorption method for determining the relative surface area abundances of goethite and kaolinite in the fine fractions. This method is expected to be applicable to many other binary mineral pairs, and allows successful application of the component additivity (CA) approach based surface complexation modeling (SCM) at the SRS F-Area and other similar aquifers. Our experimental results indicate that quartz has stronger U(VI) adsorption ability per unit surface area than goethite and kaolinite at pH ? 4.0. Our modeling results indicate that the binary (goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM under-predicts U(VI) adsorption to the quartz-sand dominated sediments at pH ? 4.0. The new ternary (quartz/goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM provides excellent predictions. The contributions of quartz-sand, kaolinite, and goethite to U(VI) adsorption and the potential influences of dissolved Al, Si, and Fe are also discussed. PMID:24865372

  14. Basaltic sand ripples at Eagle Crater as indirect evidence for the hysteresis effect in martian saltation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizhaq, H.; Kok, J. F.; Katra, I.

    2014-02-01

    The rover Opportunity documented small basaltic sand ripples at the bottom of Eagle Crater, Meridiani Planum on Mars. These ripples are composed of fine basaltic sand (˜100 ?m diameter) and their average wavelength and height are 10 cm and 1 cm, respectively. Present theories on the transition between saltation and suspension predict that such light particles are suspended by turbulence at the fluid threshold, which is the minimum wind speed required to initiate saltation. Consequently, the existence of these ˜100 ?m ripples on Mars indicates that either current suspension theories are incorrect, or that saltation can take place at wind speeds substantially below the fluid threshold. Indeed, recent studies point to the occurrence of hysteresis in martian saltation. That is, once initiated, hysteresis can be maintained at much lower wind speeds than the fluid threshold. We investigated the possible role of hysteresis in the formation of fine-grained ripples on Mars by coupling, for the first time, a detailed numerical saltation model (COMSALT) with a dynamic model for sand ripple formation. The results from the coupled model indicate that ripples with properties similar to those observed at Eagle Crater can be developed by the impact mechanism at shear velocities far below the fluid threshold. These findings are consistent with the occurrence of hysteresis in martian saltation, and support the hypothesis that hysteresis plays a role in the surprisingly large sand mobility observed at several locations on Mars.

  15. Sand Sheet on Crater Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    As with yesterday's image, this dune field is located inside a crater, in this case an unnamed crater at 26 degrees North latitude. In this VIS image the dunes are coalescing into a sand sheet, note the lack of dune forms to the north of the small hills. The presence of ridges and hills in the area is affecting the dune shapes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 26.4, Longitude 62.7 East (297.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. [Environmental toxicity of waste foundry sand].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Wang, Yu-Jue; Wang, Jin-Lin; Huang, Tian-You; Xiong, Ying

    2013-03-01

    The metal leaching characteristics and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of five different types of waste foundry sands were analyzed with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and head space-gas chromatography (HS-GC). Microtox and soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) tests were then used to evaluate the bio-effects of these waste sands. The results showed that due to the different metals poured and casting materials used to make the sand molds, there was significant difference among the five waste foundry sands in the compositions and concentrations of metal and organic pollutants. The concentrations of Fe in the leachates of iron and steel casting waste foundry sand exceeded the maximal allowable concentrations specified in the National Standard of Drinking Water Quality, whereas the As concentration in the leachate of aluminum casting waste foundry sand exceeded the standard. The five waste foundry sands had quite different compositions and levels of VOCs, which resulted in different levels of inhibition effects on the luminescent bacteria (30% and 95%). Additionally, the soil DHA tests suggested that metal pollutants in waste foundry sands may inhibit the soil microbial activity, whereas organics in the sands may slightly promote the microbial activity. The results of this study indicated that the waste foundry sands may pose considerable threat to the environment when improperly disposed. PMID:23745431

  17. Variation in grain shape and surface textures of fine guartz sands in the South Texas Eolian Sand Sheet

    E-print Network

    Sims, Donald Ralph

    1984-01-01

    99. 8 99 95 90 80 70 60 50 IU 40 c( 30 ~ 20 o 10 0. 5 0. 2 0. 1 0. 05 0. 01 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 % ROUNDED 80 90 Figure 6. Cumulative frequency curves showing the variabil- ity in relative roundness values between samples...

  18. Fine Arts in Hungary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Krén, Emil.

    This Website, sponsored by KFKI Computers of Budapest, presents a virtual gallery of images of fine arts from Hungary (.jpeg, you choose view size.) This Central European nation, at times under the influence of the Romans, Turks and Austro-Hungarian Empire, houses a rich artistic tradition. Works of Hungarian fine artists as well as others that worked in Hungary are featured here in alphabetical order by artist. There's also a section of altarpieces, miniatures, carvings, etc. by anonymous artists. Visitors to the site will enjoy the collection, which includes fragments of Romanesque wall paintings and architectural sculpture, Gothic and Renaissance altarpieces and carvings, paintings from the baroque, classicist and romanticist periods, and modern art. The short biographies of the artists will aid in appreciation of the talented yet not all internationally-known artists of Hungary. You might even want to send a virtual postcard from the site.

  19. Reconstitution of Fine Coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. NICHOLAS CONKLE; J. K. RAGAVAN

    1992-01-01

    The production of fine coal in America's mines and coal preparation plants is increasing. A fraction of this coal can be blended with the larger-size clean coal and shipped to the user. However, a convenient means to handle, store, transport, and use the balance must be devised. Coal reconstitution, encompassing briquetting, disk pelleting, extrusion pelletization and roller-and-die pelletization, is a

  20. The Apollo 15 Coarse Fines

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    I The Apollo 15 Coarse Fines (4-10 mm) Graham Ryder Sarah Bean Sherman Lunar and Planetary. TX 77058-4399 REFERENCE copy PLEASf 00 NOtr REbOIE #12;( The Apollo 15 Coarse Fines (4-10 mm) Graham. Johnson Space Center Houstqn, Texas JSC# 24035 #12;( THE APOLLO 15 COARSE FINES (4-10 mm) Introduction

  1. Solvent extraction process for tar sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. W. Funk; W. G. May; J. C. Pirkle

    1982-01-01

    A solvent extraction process for tar sands is disclosed wherein a low boiling solvent having a normal boiling point of from 20* to 70* C. Is used to extract tar sands. The solvent is mixed with tar sands in a dissolution zone, the solvent:bitumen weight ratio being maintained at from about 0.5:1 to 2:1. This mixture is passed to a

  2. A branching process model for sand avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Pelayo, R.; Salazar, I.; Schieve, W.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1993-07-01

    An analytically solvable model for sand avalanches of noninteracting grains of sand, based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equations, is presented. For a single avalanche, distributions of lifetimes, sizes of overflows and avalanches, and correlation functions are calculated. Some of these are exponentials, some are power laws. Spatially homogeneous distributions of avalanches are also studied. Computer simulations of avalanches of interacting grains of sand are compared to the solutions to the Chapman-Kolmogorov equations. It is found that within the range of parameters explored in the simulation, the approximation of noninteracting grains of sand is a good one. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Biomass development in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Campos, L C; Su, M F J; Graham, N J D; Smith, S R

    2002-11-01

    Microbial biomass development in the sand and schmutzdecke layer was determined in two full-scale slow sand filters, operated with and without a light excluding cover. A standard chloroform fumigation-extraction technique was adapted to routinely measure microbial biomass concentrations in the sand beds. Sand was sampled to a depth of 10 cm and schmutzdecke was also collected at the same random positions on the uncovered filter. Interstitial microbial biomass in the uncovered sand bed increased with time and decreased with sampling depth. There was a small accumulation of sand biomass with time in the covered filter, but no relationship was apparent between biomass concentration and depth in this filter. Schmutzdecke did not develop on the covered filter and was spatially highly variable in the uncovered condition compared to the consistent patterns observed in interstitial biomass production. It is speculated that microbial biomass in the sand of uncovered filters is largely related to carbon inputs from photosynthetic activity in the schmutzdecke and involves mechanisms that spatially distribute carbon substrate from the schmutzdecke to the sand. However, total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon removals were similar in both filters suggesting that relatively small biomass populations in covered filters are sufficient to remove residual labile carbon during advanced water treatment and little further advantage to water purification and organic carbon removal is gained by the increased production of biomass in uncovered slow sand filter beds. PMID:12418657

  4. Acoustic velocity and attenuation of unconsolidated sands: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuping

    I have developed a sonic frequency apparatus (1--10 kHz) that utilizes resonance to measure the acoustic velocities and attenuation of both extensional and torsional waves in unconsolidated materials (e.g., sands, clays and sediments) under hydrostatic confinement. The basic equations and methodology for correcting these effects are given and applied to a dry Monterey sand to determine the shear and Young's moduli and attenuation over an effective pressure range of 0--9 MPa. Comparison of my measured data with theoretical granular contact models gives insight into the seismic wave propagation in unconsolidated sands. The effects of water saturation and pressure on the velocity and attenuation of seismic waves in unconsolidated sands are investigated using the newly-designed apparatus and methodology in the laboratory. Two kinds of pore fluid distribution are achieved with water injection and de-gassing methods, and an X-ray CT scanner is used to obtain the images of pore fluid distribution. There is not significant difference in velocities for the different pore fluid distributions. Measured velocities are in favorable agreement with theoretical predictions based on Gassmann's equations. At all effective pressures, V P of the fully-water-saturated sand is larger than that of the dry sand, implying that water in pore space stiffens the rock, causing an increase in the rock's bulk modulus. For the partially-saturated sand, the attenuation of compressional wave is larger than that of torsional wave, and both of them increase with water saturation. The effects of pore fluid saturation and distribution on seismic velocities are further studied based on numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. The calculated results indicate that numerical modeling based on Biot theory gives the same compressional velocity VP as Gassmann's equations if the pore fluids are mixed in such a fine scale that the induced pore pressure increments can equilibrate with each other. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Investigating Sand on the Coast of Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komar, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes factors affecting sand composition and distribution along coastlines. Uses variations in sand types along the Oregon coast to illustrate the influences of sand grain density, wave action, and headlands on sand movements. Describes the seasonal movement of sand across beaches. (DLH)

  6. technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage

    E-print Network

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat

  7. [Spatial distribution patterns of dry sand layer on windward slope of dunes in Horqin Sand Land].

    PubMed

    Zong, Qin; Lamusa, A; Luo, Yong-Ming; Niu, Cun-Yang; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wang, Hai-Yang

    2012-04-01

    An observation was conducted on the thickness of dry sand layer on the windward slope of mobile and fixed dunes in west Horqin Sand Land, with the spatial distribution of the dry sand layer analyzed. Most of the dry sand layer had a thickness of 5-15 cm, and 92.0% and 98.6% of the mobile and fixed dunes had the dry sand layer with this thickness, respectively. Sand-fixing plants affected the thickness and the spatial distribution of the dry sand layer. There was an obvious spatial difference in the thickness of the dry sand layer on mobile dunes, being much thicker in the upper west areas while much thinner in the lower east areas. The thickness of the dry sand layer varied from 0 to 40 cm, with an average of 9.58 +/- 3.95 cm, and the CV was 41%. The variogram of the spatial distribution of dry sand layer on mobile dunes was expressed as spherical model, with a moderate spatial correlation. In contrast, the thickness of dry sand layer on fixed dunes showed obvious homogeneity, and had less spatial difference. The thickness of the dry sand layer ranged from 0 to 20 cm, with an average of 10.91 +/- 1.70 cm, and the CV was only 16%. PMID:22803448

  8. Theoretical prediction of liftoff angular velocity distributions of sand particles in windblown sand flux

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaojing Zheng; Li Xie; Xue-Yong Zou

    2006-01-01

    The liftoff angular velocities, including the rebound ones and the ejected ones, of sand particles in a windblown sand flux have a significant influence on the saltation trajectories and the transport flux and so on. However, they are not easy to determine actually both in field and in a wind tunnel, especially when the sand particles are small and the

  9. Microwaves dry fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Chironis, N.P.

    1986-12-01

    Tests by the Bureau of Mines' Twin Research Center at Minneapolis, Minn., has shown that drying fine coal in the minus 1/4-in. range with microwave energy is not only feasible but also very efficient. The microwave technique, uses a custom-designed conveyorized microwave oven to dry three coal types: bituminous, subbituminous and lignite. Remarkable drying efficiencies of 97% for Colowyo coal of minus 1/4-in. plus 28 mesh, as well as for Illinois No. 6 coal of minus 28 mesh plus 100 mesh were obtained by the bureau using the pilot-scale continuous drying microwave system.

  10. Ottawa Sand for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    What appear to be boulders fresh from a tumble down a mountain are really grains of Ottawa sand, a standard material used in civil engineering tests and also used in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment. The craggy surface shows how sand grans have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even causing sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM uses the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. These images are from an Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) study conducted by Dr. Binayak Panda of IITRI for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). (Credit: NASA/MSFC)

  11. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy of Syncrude post-extraction oil sand.

    PubMed

    Michaelian, Kirk H; Hall, Robert H; Kenny, Kimberly I

    2006-06-01

    Rapid- and step-scan photoacoustic (PA) infrared spectra of three fractions of a Syncrude post-extraction oil sand were analyzed in detail in this work. The rapid-scan spectra showed that the samples were comprised primarily of kaolinite, quartz, silica, siderite, and residual hydrocarbons, and that the proportions of these constituents were different for each fraction. Depth profiling of the three post-extraction oil sands was accomplished using both rapid- and step-scan PA infrared spectroscopy. The results confirmed that kaolinite is more abundant in the near-surface region, whereas quartz and hydrocarbons are concentrated at greater depths. The modulation frequency dependence of the PA intensities for all three fractions was consistent with a model in which the samples are thermally thick; in other words, the thermal diffusion length (roughly equal to the sampling depth) was less than the particle sizes of all three samples. The results of this study are consistent with published reports on the PA infrared spectra of fine tailings generated during bitumen extraction and the spectroscopic and thermophysical characterization of clay soils and an appropriate model clay. PMID:16388979

  12. Downscaling Of SMOS Data Using NDVI, Elevation, and Sand Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, J. C.; Seo, D.; Lakhankar, T.

    2012-12-01

    Surface soil moisture information at high spatial resolution is necessary for better forecasting and understanding of various hydrological, meteorological and ecological models. Microwave remote sensing systems show great potential in retrieving soil moisture information on daily basis. However, major limitations using passive microwave system are due to lower spatial resolution. Accurate fine-scale soil moisture observations are needed at a consistent basis to be used for local and regional scale models. In the absence of consistent high resolution soil moisture datasets, downscaling procedures enable to convert coarse resolution surface soil moisture estimates to high and liable resolution soil moisture estimates. Surface soil moisture distributions and dynamics depend greatly on vegetation (NDVI), topographic (EL), and sand (SF) features. The downscaling algorithm is based on the understanding of each of these physical parameter (NDVI, EL, and SF) and coarse remote sensing data and how they impact soil moisture retrievals. Results suggest that not all physical parameter (NDVI, El, and SF) affect surface soil moisture equally, since every region has its own soil composition. Unhealthy vegetation can be due to high sand fraction or seasonal change, or vice versa.

  13. NEARSHORE SAND SOURCES FOR AMERICAN SAMOA: AN ALTERNATIVE TO USING BEACH SAND.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, John R.; Reiss, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    Using a combination of geophysical techniques, in situ observations, and sampling by scuba divers, we investigated along the south shore of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, for nearshore sand deposits. To minimize the impact of future sand dredging on the island's littoral sediments, the search took place in a narrow zone between the outside of the fringing reef and the 30-m bathymetric contour. Because the sand will be used by the Samoans in a variety of ways, an area high in siliciclastic sand - Nua-Se'etaga Bay - and two areas containing only carbonate sand - Faga'itua Bay and Nafanua Bank - were inspected in detail. Results of the exploration program are discussed.

  14. 13. SANDSORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  15. UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Netoff, Theoden

    UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota Public Comment Forum and Open ­ Steven Lott, Co-project manager, UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project 6:40 The UMore Park Sand

  16. Dinural patterns of blowing sand and dust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex interaction between the sun, the atmosphere, and the sand surface. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the surface la...

  17. DRINKING WATER TREATMENT USING SLOW SAND FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent re-interest in slow sand filtration was brought about by the needs for small communities to install treatment technologies that are effective, less costly, and easier to operate and maintain than the more sophisticated rapid sand filters. These simpler technologies for sma...

  18. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Kim

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused

  19. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  20. Sand Tray Group Counseling with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Kay; Ritter, Kelli B.; Willingham, Elizabeth U.

    2003-01-01

    Sand tray group counseling with adolescents is an activity-based intervention designed to help participants address specific intrapersonal concerns, learn important skills of socialization, and develop a caring community. The main focus of the group is building small worlds with miniature figures in individual trays of sand and having an…

  1. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596

    E-print Network

    Ho, Cliff

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596 Unlimited Release Printed September 2004 Sensors for Environmental@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online 2 #12;SAND2004-4596 Unlimited

  2. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16800

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16800 Unlimited Release Printed August 2014 A Comparison of Platform Options://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2014-16800 Unlimited Release Printed August 2014 A Comparison of Platform

  3. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17460

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17460 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Wave Energy Converter Effects@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2014-17460 Unlimited

  4. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-0383P

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-0383P Unlimited Release September 2007 Impacts of IPv6 on Infrastructure@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;SAND2007-0383P Unlimited

  5. SANDIA REPORT SAND 2012-4417

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND 2012-4417 Unlimited Release Printed June 2012 Site Environmental Report for 2011@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;3 SAND 2012-4417 Unlimited Release Printed June 2012

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3446

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011- 3446 Unlimited Release Printed October 2011 Phoenix: Complex Adaptive@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND 2011-3446 Unlimited

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0304

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0304 Unlimited Release Printed January 2012 A Retrospective of VAWT://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4- 0#online #12;-3- SAND2012-0304 Unlimited Release Printed January 2012 A Retrospective of VAWT

  8. RADIUM REMOVAL USING SORPTION TO FILTER SAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the use of a novel sand filtration process that exploits the natural capacity of filter sand to sorb radium through the use of a periodic dilute acid rinse to maintain its sorptive capacity. Batch studies were conducted to determine distribution coefficients s...

  9. Introduction to Exploring Sand and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early Childhood Today, 2006

    2006-01-01

    What happens when children pour water through a funnel? They begin to understand science and math concepts such as flow, force, gravity, and volume. What happens when children mold sand to create a tunnel? They develop skills in areas such as problem solving and predicting. They also gain knowledge about absorption and the properties of sand and…

  10. Liquefaction in Subsurface Layer of Sand

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and silt, which moved from right to left toward the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed "lateral spreading,

  11. Curious Spherical Masses in Ashdown Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geo. Abbott

    1923-01-01

    MR. HARRY E. BURNS, of Crowborough, this spring informed me of some remarkable spherical masses of sandstone in the Ashdown Sands at High Hurst Wood Quarry, and was good enough later to supply one about 10 inches in diameter to our Museum. He suggested that they might be sand casts of reptilian eggs like that of the Iguanodon. They consist

  12. Colonization patterns in Sand Martins Riparia riparia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gareth Jones

    1987-01-01

    Settlement patterns of Sand Martins at a sand quarry in central Scotland are described. Older birds returned to the colony before first-year individuals, and thus had the widest choice of subcolony in which to nest. A model of subcolony settlement was developed which assumed that individuals nested in subcolonies where their reproductive success was maximized. The colonization patterns observed fitted

  13. Medford Table 1 Interval (ft)

    E-print Network

    GY 3/1 Very dark greenish gray 25 26 Apr 150-160 10 8.5 85 Laminated silty fine sand and silt, trace greenish gray 30 26 Apr 200-210 10 9.6 96 Glauconitic very fine sandy clayey silt Wenonah 10Y 3/1 Very dark greenish gray 31 27 Apr 210-220 10 10 100 Glauconitic very fine sandy clayey silt Wenonah Marshalltown

  14. Surficial sediment distribution and net sediment transport pattern in ?zmir Bay, western Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muhammet Duman; Mert Avc?; ?ükriye Duman; Erkan Demirkurt; Musa Kaz?m Düzbast?lar

    2004-01-01

    ?zmir Bay, a microtidal bay in the eastern Aegean Sea, is an area of fine-grained sediment. The surficial sediments may be subdivided into seven zones based on their grain size. The western part of the outer bay is covered by silty and muddy sand, whilst the eastern part of the outer bay is covered with silt and mud. Most of

  15. Ecological release in White Sands lizards

    PubMed Central

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-01-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems. PMID:22393523

  16. 3D seismic, geochemical and biostratigraphical analysis of Paleogene remobilized sand in the Norwegian-Danish Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Katrine Juul; Rønø Clausen, Ole; Heilmann-Clausen, Claus; Friis, Henrik

    2013-04-01

    This study describes remobilized Paleogene sand occurring on the hanging-wall segment north of the major D-1 normal fault in the Norwegian-Danish Basin, eastern North Sea. The remobilized sand is observed on 3D seismic data in fine-grained Eocene host-strata as cross-cutting reflections with a typical tabular, V-shaped or wing-like geometry in the seismic cross-sections and a pronounced jack-up of the overlying succession onto which onlap can be observed. In map view the remobilized sand in certain areas have a channel-like appearance. The seismic observations indicate that the sand has a remobilized origin which may be partly depositional. Particularly the observed wings and jack-up on the seismic cross-sections indicate remobilization which potentially could be generated by two different processes: a) remobilization of depositional channel sand resulting in the formation of injected wings along the sides of the channel, or b) injection of remobilized sand from the deeper Paleocene strata causing jack-up and typically V-shaped intrusions. Injection of Paleocene sand into Eocene host strata is a well-known phenomenon from the nearby Paleogene Siri Canyon located c. 15 km north of the study area. In order to acquire more information about the intrusions a geochemical study and a detailed biostratigraphical dating of cuttings and sidewall core samples from the Floki-1 well was carried out. The Floki-1 well penetrates the remobilized sand and was drilled to test an apparent 4-way closure on prospect Eocene sand which by then was interpreted to be 100 % depositional. The geochemical study of the samples from the sand identified the Floki-sandstone as a very fine grained sand and silt with a matrix of very angular silt grains. The sand does not contain clays. The matrix appears to have formed by crushing of the sand grains. Thus, heavy minerals appear to have disintegrated by crushing but still most parts of the mineral grain is found together. Glauconite grains are strongly smeared. The sorting pattern, and the angular shape of silt sized matrix grains, and the intense shearing and deformation of glauconite grains indicates that the sand may have been injected under high pressure, resulting in massive crushing of detrital grains. The age dating mainly includes dinocysts analysis from seven sidewall core samples and nine cutting samples above, within and below the sand. It is expected that the sand should either be of Eocene age probably revealing a depositional origin with subsequent remobilization to the sides (process a), or a Paleocene age revealing injection from the deeper strata (process b). In order to address all observations, a potential model of generation may include elements of depositional sand combined with up-, downward and/or lateral injection which could have been facilitated by intense activity in the nearby D-1 fault. The study highlights the importance of interdisciplinary approaches in the interpretation of complex geological features formed by several geological processes and mechanisms.

  17. BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO SEPARATIONS SCREENS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Rotating drum tests of particle suspensions within a fines dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Gollin, Devis; Kaitna, Roland; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Natural flows like mudflows, debris flow, and hyperconcentrated flows are commonly composed by a matrix of particles suspended in a viscous fluid. The nature of the interactions between particles immersed in a fluid is related to its size. While coarse particles (sand, gravel, and boulders) interact with each other or with the surrounding fluid, a dispersion of fine particles interacts with each other through colloidal forces or Brownian motion effects (Coussot and Piau, 1995, and Ancey and Jorrot, 2001). The predominance of one of the previous interactions defines the rheology of the flow. On this sense, experimental insight is required to validate the limits where the rheology of a dispersion of fines is valid. For this purpose, an experimental program in a rotating drum is performed over samples of sand, loess, and kaolin. The solid concentration and angular velocity of the rotating drum are varied. Height and normal loads are measured during flow. High-speed videos are performed to obtain the flow patterns of the mixtures. The experiments provide new laboratory evidence of granular mixture behaviour within an increased viscous fluid phase and its characterization. The results show an apparent threshold in terms of solid concentration, in which the mixtures started to behave as a shear-dependent material.

  19. Compositional Variations of Rocknest Sand, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Walter; Madsen, Morten B.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Clark, Benton C.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Blaney, Diana L.; Bridges, Nathan; Fisk, Martin; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Kocurek, Gary; Lasue, Jeremie; Maurice, Sylvestre; Newsom, Horton; Renno, Nilton; Rubin, David M.; Sullivan, Robert; Wiens, Roger C.; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    The Curiosity rover spent over 40 sols at an aeolian deposit (termed Rocknest sand shadow deposit) that is several meters long (oriented north-south), 15-20 cm high (at crest) and about 50 cm wide. Material was scooped up from the subsurface to a depth of about 40 mm at five different locations on the deposit. Part of the sampled material was delivered to the analytical laboratories CheMin (x-ray diffraction) and SAM (pyrolysis, evolved gas analysis, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, tunable laser spectroscopy) in the rover body. Scoop troughs and walls were imaged extensively by cameras onboard the rover (Mastcam, Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), Remote Microscopic Imager (RMI)) and probed by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as provided by the ChemCam instrument. Images show that the top surface of the deposit is armored by a layer 1-3 grains thick of mm-sized, subrounded, dust-mantled grains. The bulk of the deposit is composed of particles smaller than 150 microns (fine and very fine sand and likely silt and dust). Furthermore, there are bright bands in the subsurface, a narrow one and a broad one at depths 2-4 mm and 20-30 mm, respectively. The images also provide evidence for crust formation and cementation as the scoop trough floors are littered by platy angular fragments and cemented clods. Many of the clods contain numerous sub-mm sized bright (sulfate rich?) inclusions. Chemical profiles (as provided by ChemCam data) do not clearly support the type of subsurface layering inferred from the images. However, chemical abundances (Li, Na, K, Mn, Fe, Ca, Mg, and Si) significantly deviating from average values are found at two different depths (respectively 15 and 25 mm). It is unclear when (and over which time scale) the Rocknest sand deposit in Gale Crater formed. In any case, mm-sized particles cannot be moved efficiently in the current aeolian regime. If the deposit has been immobile for an extended period of time, it is conceivable that Martian obliquity cycles (up to the near geologic past) caused ice deposition and partial melting of subsurface water ice which in turn may have sustained slow alteration of the uppermost part of the deposit (Arvidson et al., J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00F03, 2010); this hypothesis is consistent with the observed crust formation as well as the chemical variations in the near subsurface.

  20. Hematite Outlier and Sand Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 4 December 2003

    This image shows a crater just south of the edge of the famous hematite-bearing surface, which is visible in the context image as a smooth area to the north. The crater has two features of immediate note. The first is a layered mound in the north part of the crater floor. This mound contains hematite, and it is an outlying remnant of the greater deposits to the north that have otherwise completely disappeared in this crater. The second feature is a dune field in the center of the crater floor, with dark dunes indicating winds from the northwest. The dunes grade into a dark sand sheet with no coherent structure, indicating that the sand layer thins out to the south and east.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 357.3 East (2.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. The effect of limited availability of N or water on C allocation to fine roots and annual fine root turnover in Alnus incana and Salix viminalis.

    PubMed

    Rytter, Rose-Marie

    2013-09-01

    The effect of limited nitrogen (N) or water availability on fine root growth and turnover was examined in two deciduous species, Alnus incana L. and Salix viminalis L., grown under three different regimes: (i) supply of N and water in amounts which would not hamper growth, (ii) limited N supply and (iii) limited water supply. Plants were grown outdoors during three seasons in covered and buried lysimeters placed in a stand structure and filled with quartz sand. Computer-controlled irrigation and fertilization were supplied through drip tubes. Production and turnover of fine roots were estimated by combining minirhizotron observations and core sampling, or by sequential core sampling. Annual turnover rates of fine roots <1 mm (5-6 year(-1)) and 1-2 mm (0.9-2.8 year(-1)) were not affected by changes in N or water availability. Fine root production (<1 mm) differed between Alnus and Salix, and between treatments in Salix; i.e., absolute length and biomass production increased in the order: water limited < unlimited < N limited. Few treatment effects were detected for fine roots 1-2 mm. Proportionally more C was allocated to fine roots (?2 mm) in N or water-limited Salix; 2.7 and 2.3 times the allocation to fine roots in the unlimited regime, respectively. Estimated input to soil organic carbon increased by ca. 20% at N limitation in Salix. However, future studies on fine root decomposition under various environmental conditions are required. Fine root growth responses to N or water limitation were less pronounced in Alnus, thus indicating species differences caused by N-fixing capacity and slower initial growth in Alnus, or higher fine root plasticity in Salix. A similar seasonal growth pattern across species and treatments suggested the influence of outer stimuli, such as temperature and light. PMID:23963409

  2. Genetic features of soils on marine sands and their windblown derivatives on the White Sea coast (the Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, V. N.; Kazakov, L. A.; Chamin, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Quaternary deposits on the Tersk coast of the White Sea are represented by marine deposits (the Tersk sands) enriched in the sea-sorted eluvium of the red Tersk sandstone. These deposits and the soils developed from them are characterized by the predominance of the fine sand fraction and the absence of gravel and the coarser fractions. The sediments derived from the red Tersk sandstone have an impoverished chemical composition (the silica content reaches 75-80%). The iron-illuvial podzols developed from them are characterized by the slightly pronounced differentiation of the main oxides and by the eluvial-illuvial redistribution of the amorphous Al and Fe compounds. Sandy soils—psammozems—with undifferentiated soil profiles are developed from windblown sands subjected to afforestation and from coastal marine sands under a relatively thin natural plant cover. Iron-illuvial podzols buried under a thin sand layer preserve the Al-Fe-humus type of the profile differentiation. In the recently deposited sand layer, the eluvial-illuvial redistribution of the chemical elements is absent.

  3. BachelorofFineArts Multidisciplinary

    E-print Network

    Morris, Joy

    an excellent preparation for students wanting to pursue professions in fine arts fields such as art therapy, art administration, performance, journalism, musical theatre, recreation, arts criticism, or design

  4. Continuous fine ash depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai (Birmingham, AL); Peng, Wan Wang (Birmingham, AL); Vimalchand, Pannalal (Birmingham, AL)

    2011-11-29

    A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for cooling the high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein and a pressure letdown device for depressurization by separating the cooled fine solid particles from a portion of the fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for disposal or handling by downstream equipment.

  5. Impacts of Fluvial Fine Sediments and Winter Storms on a Transgressive Shoal, off South-Central Louisiana, U.S.A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Kobashi; F. Jose; G. W. Stone

    2007-01-01

    KOBASHI, D., JOSE, F., AND STONE, G.W., 2007. Impacts of Fluvial Fine Sediments and Winter Storms on a Transgressive Shoal, off South-Central Louisiana, U.S.A. Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 858 - 862. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Ship Shoal, a transgressive sand shoal off South-Central Louisiana and one of the potential sand

  6. Pelletization of fine coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1991-09-01

    The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

  7. Fine-scale Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 May 2003

    This image shows fine-scale textures around a crater southwest of Athabasca Vallis. These fine scale ridges are most likely the remnants of older flood eroded layered rocks and not longitudinal grooves carved out of the landscape by flooding. These features are ridges and not grooves. Also note the layers visible on the southeast side of the island.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 9.6, Longitude 155.9 East (204.1). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Deposition and remaining productive capabilities of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw sands of East-Central Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, B.R. [Deepwell Co., Columbia, MS (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Nearing the close of the Cretaceous, there were several transgressions and regressions of the epicontinental seas. These rapid changes in sea level played a large part in the depositing and reworking of the Eutaw sands of East-Central Mississippi. The study area includes Jasper, Jones, Clarke and Wayne Counties. The Eutaw sands of this area are described as fine to very fine grained sand which are glauconitic, micaceous and sometimes fossiliferous. This indicates that the environment of deposition was in the neritic zone of the continental shelf. Its high porosities and permeabilities along with its prolific nature makes this formation one of the most sought after reservoirs of the state of Mississippi. All of the 18 Eutaw fields in the study area are closely reaching their economic limits for primary production. Four of these fields have undergone successful waterfloods which have greatly enhanced their ultimate recoveries. The remaining fields in the study area have the potential of yielding millions of barrels of oil from secondary and tertiary recovery methods.

  9. Influence of sand grain diameter and wind velocity on lift-off velocities of sand particles.

    PubMed

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Jing; Duan, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the velocities of sand particles near the sand bed in the saltation cloud were measured in a wind tunnel through an improved experimental scheme of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The influences of the diameter of sand particles in the saltation cloud and wind velocity on the probability distribution function (PDF) of lift-off velocities of sand particles were investigated. Results demonstrate that for the sand particles saltating above the sand bed with the mean grain diameter (d m = 0.3 mm), smaller and larger ones have the same velocity distribution, and wind velocity has no obvious influence on the distribution shape of the lift-off velocities, i.e., the PDFs of the horizontal and vertical lift-off velocities both follow a lognormal distribution, but the diameter of sand particles in the saltation cloud and wind velocity have an influence on the parameters of the PDF of horizontal and vertical lift-off velocities. Eventually, we present formulas to describe the PDF of lift-off velocities of sand particles with regard to the influence of wind velocity and the diameter of sand particles in the saltation cloud above the sand bed with d m = 0.3 mm. PMID:23695368

  10. Fecal indicators in sand, sand contact, and risk of enteric illness among beachgoers

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Sams, Elizabeth; Dufour, Alfred P.; Brenner, Kristen P.; Haugland, Richard A.; Chern, Eunice; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Stephen; Love, David C.; Serre, Marc; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Beach sand can harbor fecal indicator organisms and pathogens, but enteric illness risk associated with sand contact remains unclear. Methods In 2007, visitors at two recreational marine beaches were asked on the day of their visit about sand contact. Ten to 12 days later, participants answered questions about health symptoms since the visit. F+ coliphage, Enterococcus, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. in wet sand were measured using culture and molecular methods. Results We analyzed 144 wet sand samples and completed 4,999 interviews. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were computed, comparing those in the highest tertile of fecal indicator exposure with those who reported no sand contact. Among those digging in sand compared with those not digging in sand, a molecular measure of Enterococcus spp. (calibrator cell equivalents/g) in sand was positively associated with gastrointestinal (GI) illness (aOR = 2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–3.2]) and diarrhea (2.4 [1.4–4.2]). Among those buried in sand, point estimates were greater for GI illness (3.3 [1.3–7.9]) and diarrhea (4.9 [1.8–13]). Positive associations were also observed for culture-based Enterococcus (colony-forming units/g) with GI illness (aOR digging = 1.7 [1.1–2.7]) and diarrhea (2.1 [1.3–3.4]). Associations were not found among non-swimmers with sand exposure. Conclusions We observed a positive relationship between sand contact activities and enteric illness as a function of concentrations of fecal microbial pollution in beach sand. PMID:22157306

  11. Burrowing inhibition by fine textured beach fill: Implications for recovery of beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Sloane M.; Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Schooler, Nicholas K.

    2014-10-01

    Beach nourishment is often considered the most environmentally sound method of maintaining eroding shorelines. However, the ecological consequences are poorly understood. Fill activities cause intense disturbance and high mortality and have the potential to alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of intertidal macroinvertebrates for months to years. Ecological recovery following fill activities depends on successful recolonization and recruitment of the entire sandy intertidal community. The use of incompatible sediments as fill material can strongly affect ecosystem recovery. We hypothesized that burrowing inhibition of intertidal animals by incompatible fine fill sediments contributes to ecological impacts and limits recovery in beach ecosystems. We experimentally investigated the influence of intertidal zone and burrowing mode on responses of beach invertebrates to altered sediment texture (28-38% fines), and ultimately the potential for colonization and recovery of beaches disturbed by beach filling. Using experimental trials in fill material and natural beach sand, we found that the mismatched fine fill sediments significantly inhibited burrowing of characteristic species from all intertidal zones, including sand crabs, clams, polychaetes, isopods, and talitrid amphipods. Burrowing performance of all five species we tested was consistently reduced in the fill material and burrowing was completely inhibited for several species. The threshold for burrowing inhibition by fine sediment content in middle and lower beach macroinvertebrates varied by species, with highest sensitivity for the polychaete (4% fines, below the USA regulatory limit of 10% fines), followed by sand crabs and clams (20% fines). These results suggest broader investigation of thresholds for burrowing inhibition in fine fill material is needed for beach animals. Burrowing inhibition caused by mismatched fill sediments exposes beach macroinvertebrates to stresses, which could depress recruitment and survival at all intertidal zones. Our results suggest use of incompatible fine fill sediments from dredging projects creates unsuitable intertidal habitat that excludes burrowing macroinvertebrates and could delay beach ecosystem recovery. Through effects on beach invertebrates that are prey for shorebirds and fish, the ecological impacts of filling with mismatched fine sediments could influence higher trophic levels and extend beyond the beach itself.

  12. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic soils, and conservation of surrounding sand dune areas.

  13. Numerical modeling of basaltic sand ripples on Eagle crater as indirect evidence for the hysteresis effect in Martian saltation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizhaq, H.; Kok, J. F.; Michaels, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian ripples, which form regular patterns on sand beaches and desert floors and also on Mars, indicate the instability of flat sand surfaces under the wind-induced transport of sand grains. The opportunity rover documented small normal basaltic sand ripples at the bottom of Eagle crater in Meridinai planum. These ripples are composed of fine basaltic sand (100 micron) and their average wavelength and height are 10 cm and 1 cm respectively. Such light particles are thought to be easily suspended by turbulence at the fluid threshold, such that the wind speed at which these bedforms developed must be substantially below the fluid threshold. The occurrence of these bedforms on the Martian surface thus requires the impact threshold to be substantially smaller than the fluid threshold. Recently, it was suggested that saltation on Mars can be maintained at much lower wind speeds than the fluid threshold which is needed to initiate it (Kok, 2010). We used simulations of the steady state saltation model COMSALT together with a dynamic model for sand ripples (Yizhaq et al., 2004) to show that the small basaltic ripples can develop under wind speeds below the threshold for suspension. We used COMSALT to give the basic values of the parameters that used by the ripple model for saltation on Mars with and without cohesion: 1. The average number of reptating grains per impact of one saltating grain. 2. The number density of impact saltating grains on flat surface. 3. The probability distribution of reptation lengths. We used COMSALT results to calculate the sand flux on Mars for different shear velocities and used GCM models simulations for prediction of the sand flux under predicted wind regime and compare it with recent estimations (Bridges et al., 2012). Our numerical simulations (Fig. 1) show that ripples like the basaltic ripples on Eagle crater can be developed by shear velocity much below the fluid threshold by the impact mechanism. These findings can be regarded as an indirect proof of the unique saltation mechanism on Mars. References Bridges, N. T. et al. 2012. Earth-like sand fluxes on Mars. Nature 485, 339-342. Kok, J. F. 2010. Differences in the wind speeds required for initiation versus continuation of sand transport on Mars: Implications for dunes and sand storms. Physical Review Letters, 104, 074502. Yizhaq, H., Balmforth, N.J and Provenzale, A. 2004. Blown by wind: Nonlinear dynamics of aeolian sand ripples. Physica D, 195, 207-228. Model simulation of normal ripples on Mars with parameters computed by COMSALT for different shear velocities with and without cohesion after one hour. The inset shows the final ripples profile for u*=0.65 m/s.

  14. Skin friction for steel piles in sand 

    E-print Network

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01

    - The Arkansas Pile Test iv vii 12 Art. 2. 5 - Skin Friction, Soil Shear Strength, snd Pile Movement Chapter III, Laboratory Tests on Small Piles in Sand Az't. 3. 1 ? Soil Classification Art. 3. 2 - Testing Apparatus 23 25 Art. 3. 3 ? Preparation... 12. 13. Grain Size Distribution by Sieve Analysis Triaxial Cell Arranged for Loading 24 26 14. Skin Friction Versus Pile Movement for Firm Sand. Iaboratory Test, Data 33 15. Skin Friction Versus Pile Movement for Dense Sand. Laboratory Test...

  15. Skin friction for steel piles in sand

    E-print Network

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01

    SkiN FRICTION FOR STEZL PIIZS IN SAND A Theeia by I. H. Sulaiman Submittei io the graduate College of t, he Texan AAB Univen-ity in Ixantial fulfil. ment of bhe zequiremenbu for the degree of NASTZR 0F SCISNCZ May 196'7 bsrjor Subject...: Civil Engineering SKIN FRICTION FOR STEEL PILES IN SAND A Thesis by I. H. Sulaiman Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C mmittee Head of Department Memb Member 111 Skin Friction For Steel Piles in Sand (May 1967) Ibr shim Hikmat...

  16. Road Traffic and Efficient Fines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laszlo Goerke

    2003-01-01

    Road traffic is a typical example of an occupation with bilateral care and activity choices. In such a setting, common liability rules which simply divide damages cannot induce efficient outcomes. It is shown that fines for the violation of traffic regulations which depend on the occurrence of an accident can induce optimal behaviour. The properties of such efficient fines are

  17. Fine-Tuning Corrective Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of "fine-tuning" in connection with the corrective feedback process. Describes a longitudinal case study, conducted in the context of Norwegian as a second a language, that shows how fine-tuning and lack thereof in the provision of written corrective feedback differentially affects a second language learner's restructuring of…

  18. Treating fines containing earthen formations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Watkins; L. J. Kalfayan; R. K. Knight; D. C. Young

    1985-01-01

    Method for treating earthen formations which contain water-sensitive, finely divided particulate matter wherein there is injected into the formation steam or a mixture of steam and hot water containing an effective fines-stabilizing amount of a compound containing ammoniacal nitrogen selected from the group consisting of ammonium hydroxide, an ammonium salt of an inorganic acid, an ammonium salt of a carboxylic

  19. Hierarchical analysis of genetic structure in the habitat-specialist Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida).

    PubMed

    Ginson, Robert; Walter, Ryan P; Mandrak, Nicholas E; Beneteau, Courtney L; Heath, Daniel D

    2015-02-01

    Quantifying spatial genetic structure can reveal the relative influences of contemporary and historic factors underlying localized and regional patterns of genetic diversity and gene flow - important considerations for the development of effective conservation efforts. Using 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci, we characterize genetic variation among populations across the range of the Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida), a small riverine percid that is highly dependent on sandy substrate microhabitats. We tested for fine scale, regional, and historic patterns of genetic structure. As expected, significant differentiation was detected among rivers within drainages and among drainages. At finer scales, an unexpected lack of within-river genetic structure among fragmented sandy microhabitats suggests that stratified dispersal resulting from unstable sand bar habitat degradation (natural and anthropogenic) may preclude substantial genetic differentiation within rivers. Among-drainage genetic structure indicates that postglacial (14 kya) drainage connectivity continues to influence contemporary genetic structure among Eastern Sand Darter populations in southern Ontario. These results provide an unexpected contrast to other benthic riverine fish in the Great Lakes drainage and suggest that habitat-specific fishes, such as the Eastern Sand Darter, can evolve dispersal strategies that overcome fragmented and temporally unstable habitats. PMID:25691991

  20. Laser Sintering of Silica Sand – Mechanism and Application to Sand Casting Mould

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. H. Wang; J. Y. H. Fuh; Y. S. Wong; Y. X. Tang

    2003-01-01

    Silica sand is commonly used in the foundry industry. With a high melting point of 160° C, the silica sand is normally sintered in a high-temperature furnace. However, silica with contents of calcium, aluminium, magnesium, and chlorine, etc. can form low-melting point eutectics. Therefore, a relatively low-power laser can be used to sinter the silica sand directly. The investigation of

  1. Modeling the response of shoreface-connected sand ridges to sand extraction on an inner shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnafie, A.; de Swart, H. E.; Calvete, D.; Garnier, R.

    2014-05-01

    Shoreface-connected sand ridges are rhythmic bedforms that occur on many storm-dominated inner shelves. The ridges span several kilometers, are a few meters high, and they evolve on a timescale of centuries. A process-based model is used to gain a fundamental insight into the response of these ridges to extraction of sand. Different scenarios of sand extraction (depth, location, and geometry of the extraction area; multiple sand extractions) are imposed. For each scenario, the response timescale as well as the characteristics of the new equilibrium state are determined. Results show that ridges partially restore after extraction, i.e., the disturbed bathymetry recovers on decadal timescales. However, in the end, the ridge original sand volume is not recovered. Initially, most sand that accomplishes the infill of the pit originates from the area upstream of the extraction, as well as from the areas surrounding the pit. The contribution of the latter strongly decreases in the subsequent time period. Depending on the location of the pit, additional sand sources contribute: First, if the pit is located close to the downstream trough, the pit gains sand by reduction of sand transport from the ridge to this trough. Second, if the pit is located close to the adjacent outer shelf, the ridge recovery is stronger due to an import of sand from that area. Furthermore, pits that are located close to the nearshore zone have a weak recovery, deeper pits have longer recovery timescales, wide and shallow pits recover most sand, while multiple sand pits slow down the recovery process.

  2. 1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR (LOWER RIGHT) THAT EXTENDS TO THE SAND-SORTING BUILDING, AND REMAINS OF ORIGINAL (1917) WASHING, DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (LEFT), VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF SAND-SORTING BUILDING - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  3. Dynamical evolution of sand ripples under water Alexandre Stegner1

    E-print Network

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    Dynamical evolution of sand ripples under water Alexandre Stegner1 and Jose´ Eduardo Wesfreid2 1 an experimental study on the evolution of sand ripples formed under the action of an oscillatory flow. An annular sand-water cell was used in order to investigate a wide range of parameters. The sand ripples follow

  4. 1 INTRODUCTION Oil sand has unique properties exhibits performance

    E-print Network

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    1 INTRODUCTION Oil sand has unique properties exhibits performance akin to sandstone in winter seated on oil sand can sink after a number of cycles with ground softening oc- curring rapidly due true for unconsolidated sands such as oil sand. 2 ASSUMPTIONS Following the work of Sharif-Abadi (2006

  5. Retrieval of sand density from hyperspectral BRDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Charles M.; Abelev, Andrei; Philpot, William; Doctor, Katarina Z.; Montes, Marcos J.; Fusina, Robert; Li, Rong-Rong; van Roggen, Elena

    2014-06-01

    In past work, we have shown that density effects in hyperspectral bi-directional reflectance function (BRDF) data are consistent in laboratory goniometer data, field goniometer measurements with the NRL Goniometer for Portable Hyperspectral Earth Reflectance (GOPHER), and airborne CASI-1500 hyperspectral imagery. Density effects in granular materials have been described in radiative transfer models and are known, for example, to influence both the overall level of reflectance as well as the size of specific characteristics such as the width of the opposition effect in the BRDF. However, in mineralogically complex sands, such as coastal sands, the relative change in reflectance with density depends on the composite nature of the sand. This paper examines the use of laboratory and field hyperspectral goniometer data and their utility for retrieving sand density from airborne hyperspectral imagery. We focus on limitations of current models to describe density effects in BRDF data acquired in the field, laboratory setting, and from airborne systems.

  6. On the nature of Athabasca Oil Sands.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Jan; Radoev, Boryan; Schramm, Laurier L; Slavchev, Radomir

    2005-06-30

    The existence of a thin aqueous film, separating bitumen (a form of heavy oil) from inorganic solids in Athabasca Oil Sands, is analysed based on "first principles". There is a general consensus in the literature on the hydrophilic character of the solids in oil sands. However, a review of the references cited in support of the solids being encapsulated in thin water envelopes produced a surprising lack of evidence. A theoretical analysis indicates that a water film separating clean, hydrophilic quartz and bitumen is stable under most conditions, and unstable for acidic oil sand ores. The existence of water-wet solids in the Athabasca Oil Sands remains a reasonable yet unproven postulate. It could therefore be dangerous to accept the water-wet solids postulate and then use it to interpret other phenomena. PMID:15936283

  7. Synergistic use of RADARSAT-2 Ultra Fine and Fine Quad-Pol data to map oilsands infrastructure land: Object-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xianfeng; Zhang, Ying; Guindon, Bert

    2015-06-01

    The landscape of Alberta's oilsands regions is undergoing extensive change due to the creation of infrastructure associated with the exploration for and extraction of this resource. Since most oil sands mining activities take place in remote forests or wetlands, one of the challenges is to collect up-to date and reliable information about the current state of land. Compared to optical sensors, SAR sensors have the advantage of being able to routinely collect imagery for timely monitoring by regulatory agencies. This paper explores the capability of high resolution RADARSAT-2 Ultra Fine and Fine Quad-Pol imagery for mapping oilsands infrastructure land using an object-based classification approach. Texture measurements extracted from Ultra Fine data are used to support an Ultra Fine based classification. Moreover, a radar vegetation index (RVI) calculated from PolSAR data is introduced for improved classification performance. The RVI is helpful in reducing confusion between infrastructure land and low vegetation covered surfaces. When Ultra Fine and PolSAR data are used in combination, the kappa value of well pads and processing facilities detection reached 0.87. In this study, we also found that core hole sites can be identified from early spring Ultra Fine data. With single-date image, kappa value of core hole sites ranged from 0.61 to 0.69.

  8. Humate in coastal sands of northwest Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. E. Swanson; J. G. Palacas

    1965-01-01

    Layers of dune and beach sand along the north coast of the Gulf of Mexico are cemented or impregnated with a conspicuous dark-brown to black water-solute organic substance herein called humate. The humate-cemented sand, generally 6 inches to 3 feet thick but as much as 15 feet thick in some places, forms one or several irregular layers in the subsurfaces

  9. Tar sands leachate study. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Grosse; L. McGowan

    1984-01-01

    An inhouse research project was conducted by the EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (IERL) at the TandE Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, to provide information concerning the potential for release of contaminants to groundwater from in-situ and above-ground processed tar sands. This study examined the composition of the leachate that may be generated from raw tar sand cores and spent tar

  10. The application of power ultrasound to the surface cleaning of silica and heavy mineral sands.

    PubMed

    Farmer, A D; Collings, A F; Jameson, G J

    2000-10-01

    Power ultrasound may be used in the processing of minerals to clean their surfaces of oxidation products and fine coatings, mainly through the large, but very localised, forces produced by cavitation. Results of the application of power ultrasound to remove iron-rich coatings from the surfaces of silica sand used in glass making and to improve the electrostatic separation of mineral sand concentrates through lowering the resistivity of the conducting minerals (ilmenite and rutile) are presented. Parameters affecting ultrasonic cleaning, such as input power and levels of reagent addition, are discussed. In particular, we present data showing the relationship between power input and the particle size of surface coatings removed. This can be explained by the Derjaguin approximation for the energy of interaction between a sphere and a flat surface. PMID:11062883

  11. Applying NMR spin-echo logging to Shaly Sand Formation evaluation: Case studies of Rocky Mountain region gas wells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. Ladtkow; B. J. Stambaugh; D. Mardon

    1995-01-01

    Conventional wireline logs often fail to provide a reliable evaluation of reservoir quality and producibility in shaly mud formations, particularly in the shaly gas sand reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains which are characterized by low porosity (i.e., <15 pu), low permeability (0.1 to 1 md), very fine grain size, and high irreducible water saturations. A new-generation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

  12. Thermally Induced Wettability Change During SAGD for Oil Sand Extraction

    E-print Network

    Unal, Yasin

    2014-08-20

    appreciated. vi NOMENCLATURE 2D two-dimensional AOSTRA Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority BDNS barium dinonyl naphthalene sulfonate BIC Brookhaven Instruments Corporation CMG Computer Modelling Group Ltd. CSS cyclic steam....) is from oil sands. Most of these oil sands are located in Alberta. A typical oil sand is composed of approximately 83% sand, 14% bitumen, and 3% water by weight, and almost 90% of the solid matrix is quartz, with the rest being silt and clay (Nasr...

  13. Quantitative Measurements of Bedform Transport Rates and Sand Sheet Character in the Lower Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Allison, M. A.; Campanella, R.

    2005-05-01

    Channel sand volume and downstream flux in the Mississippi River have important implications for proposed mitigation projects (dredging and pipelines) that seek to utilize this resource for replenishing neighboring barrier islands and restoring Louisiana's deteriorating wetlands. This study quantifies bedform migration-induced sand flux through the lower river on daily and seasonal timescales, and evaluates the sedimentary character of the bedload component. Observations and measurements were conducted along three study grids (Audubon Park, English Turn and Venice) over a range of river discharges between April 2003 and January 2005. Two multibeam bathymetric profiles of the study grids were conducted 24 h apart to document bedform migration, and stratigraphy and thickness of the sand layer were confirmed by CHIRP seismic profiling. Downstream transport is evaluated from bed elevation changes for a 1 m grid after correcting for river stage, and utilized to calculate bedload sand fluxes for larger, averaged grid cells after visual examination confirmed dunes had migrated <1 wavelength. Algorithms were formulated to remove spurious grid cells created by vessel motion, navigation and swath-matching errors. Initial data analysis indicates flux rates conform to expected trends: values are proportional to river discharge and are higher in the channel thalweg of straight reaches relative to shallower water. Bedform size also increases with river discharge and spatial changes in flux rates; height ranges from <1 m to 10 m, and wavelength from 10 m to 100 m. Seasonal trends in sand sheet thickness are evident, particularly in deeper meander reaches, where aggradation occurs at low flow and scour is observed during high flow. At highest discharges observed (35,000 m3/sec), bedform troughs bottom out on exposed relict fluvio-deltaic strata that the river has incised (i.e., sediment starved). A spatially uniform grab sampling effort (250 samples) provided grain size data of the active sand sheet for the lower 135 km of the river. A downstream trend of decreasing grain size (2.6 to 2.0 ?) is likely due to the finest sand fraction leaving suspension and becoming bedload as river gradient and velocity progressively decrease. Locally, grain size increases in the deepest portions of the channel as a result of enhanced flow scouring the fine and medium sand fraction.

  14. Uprated fine guidance sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future orbital observatories will require star trackers of extremely high precision. These sensors must maintain high pointing accuracy and pointing stability simultaneously with a low light level signal from a guide star. To establish the fine guidance sensing requirements and to evaluate candidate fine guidance sensing concepts, the Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly was used as the reference optical system. The requirements review was separated into three areas: Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), Fine Guidance Sensing and astrometry. The results show that the detectors should be installed directly onto the focal surface presented by the optics. This would maximize throughput and minimize point stability error by not incoporating any additional optical elements.

  15. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910.35 Parks, Forests, and...Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts, including sculpture, paintings, decorative...

  16. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910.35 Parks, Forests, and...Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts, including sculpture, paintings, decorative...

  17. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910.35 Parks, Forests, and...Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts, including sculpture, paintings, decorative...

  18. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910.35 Parks, Forests, and...Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts, including sculpture, paintings, decorative...

  19. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910.35 Parks, Forests, and...Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts, including sculpture, paintings, decorative...

  20. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions. PMID:16719117

  1. MAHLI at the Rocknest sand shadow: Science and science-enabling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, M. E.; Kah, L. C.; Yingst, R. A.; Edgett, K. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Beegle, L. W.; Carsten, J. L.; Deen, R. G.; Goetz, W.; Hardgrove, C.; Harker, D. E.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Jandura, L.; Kennedy, M. R.; Kocurek, G.; Krezoski, G. M.; Kuhn, S. R.; Limonadi, D.; Lipkaman, L.; Madsen, M. B.; Olson, T. S.; Robinson, M. L.; Rowland, S. K.; Rubin, D. M.; Seybold, C.; Schieber, J.; Schmidt, M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Tompkins, V. V.; Van Beek, J. K.; Van Beek, T.

    2013-11-01

    Martian solar days 57-100, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover acquired and processed a solid (sediment) sample and analyzed its mineralogy and geochemistry with the Chemistry and Mineralogy and Sample Analysis at Mars instruments. An aeolian deposit—herein referred to as the Rocknest sand shadow—was inferred to represent a global average soil composition and selected for study to facilitate integration of analytical results with observations from earlier missions. During first-time activities, the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) was used to support both science and engineering activities related to sample assessment, collection, and delivery. Here we report on MAHLI activities that directly supported sample analysis and provide MAHLI observations regarding the grain-scale characteristics of the Rocknest sand shadow. MAHLI imaging confirms that the Rocknest sand shadow is one of a family of bimodal aeolian accumulations on Mars—similar to the coarse-grained ripples interrogated by the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity—in which a surface veneer of coarse-grained sediment stabilizes predominantly fine-grained sediment of the deposit interior. The similarity in grain size distribution of these geographically disparate deposits support the widespread occurrence of bimodal aeolian transport on Mars. We suggest that preservation of bimodal aeolian deposits may be characteristic of regions of active deflation, where winnowing of the fine-sediment fraction results in a relatively low sediment load and a preferential increase in the coarse-grained fraction of the sediment load. The compositional similarity of Martian aeolian deposits supports the potential for global redistribution of fine-grained components, combined with potential local contributions.

  2. Effect of sediment concentration on artificial well recharge in a fine sand aquifer 

    E-print Network

    Rahman, Mohammed Ataur

    1968-01-01

    of flocculating agents has also been tried, both by spreading the recharge water in a lake with a flocculent and by using a flocculating tank (9, 10). The maximum amount of sediment removed under these conditions was about 78 percent. Schiff (31) indicates a... were obtained from the influent and effluent. Two or 3 drops of MgC12 solution were added to each sample to flocculate the suspended clay. After complete flocculation, the samples were 55 Test No. 100-1 well screen 0---Initial piezometric surface...

  3. Provenance and glacial history of very fine quartz sand from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Smith, Caryn Hallett

    1988-01-01

    of Pacific Ocean floor beneath a continental margin during and following the break-up of Gondwana (Thompson, et al. , 1983). The basement of this arc is largely unknown and its outcrops consist mainly of metasedimentary rocks, gneisses and igneous plutons...

  4. Reservoir description of a sand-rich submarine fan complex for a steamflood project: upper Miocene Potter sandstone, North Midway Sunset field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.; Clayton, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    Nearly 650 m of cores from the upper Miocene Potter sandstone in Mobil's Alberta/Shale property, North Midway Sunset field, California, were examined to determine depositional facies, sand-body geometry, and reservoir quality for a proposed steamflood project. The Potter represents a sand-rich submarine fan complex with braided-channel, meandering-channel, levee, and crevasse-splay facies. The braided-channel facies (gravel and coarse sand) is thick (up to 100 m), sheetlike (> 500 m wide), and highly permeable (10,000 + md). The meandering-channel facies (coarse to medium sand) is up to 20 m thick, over 400 m long, lenticular in geometry, and exhibits an upward decrease in permeability (e.g., 9000 to 500 md) related to grain size that fines upward. The levee facies (in bioturbated sand) is up to 21 m thick, shows variable geometry, and is generally low in permeability (100-1500 md). The crevasse splay (medium sand) is up to 12 m thick, sheetlike (> 300 m wide), and shows moderately high permeability (2000-8000 md). The braided-channel facies was a product of density-modified grain flows, and the remaining three facies were deposited by turbidity currents. Steam flooding of the Potter reservoir should perform extremely well because the entire reservoir is composed of relatively clean sand and the reservoir lacks both horizontal and vertical permeability barriers.

  5. Simulation of ground-water flow in the lower sand unit of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ground-water flow in the lower sand unit of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in Philadelphia was simulated with a two-dimensional finite- difference ground-water model. The modeled 133-square-mile area also included parts of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, and Camden and Gloucester Counties, New Jersey. The lower sand unit is Cretaceous in age and consists of well- sorted coarse sand and fine gravel that grades upward into medium to fine sand containing a few thin beds of clay. The modeled aquifer consists of the lower sand unit in Philadelphia and the lowermost sand unit of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in New Jersey. Throughout most of the area, the lower sand unit is overlain by a clay confining unit. Where the clay is absent, the lower sand unit is unconfined. A hydraulic conductivity of 1.6 x 10-3 foot per second and a storage coefficient of 3.0 x 10-4 was assigned to the lower sand unit based on 15 aquifer tests, and a hydraulic conductivity of 4.0 x 10-8 foot per second was assigned to the upper confining unit based on transient-flow sensitivity analysis. Water levels were not sensitive to changes in the value for specific storage of the upper confining unit, indicating that most vertical leakage occurs as steady leakage. Changes in the potentiometric surface of the lower sand unit for 1904-78 simulated. Differences between simulated and observed head generally were less than 10 feet. Simulations were made to determine the effects on hydraulic head of increases in industrial pumpage of 5 and 10 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) and of an emergency 60 Mgal/d municipal water supply in Philadelphia. A 5- and 10-Mgal/d increase in industrial pumpage would lower heads in the lower sand unit by as much as 33 and 66 feet, respectively. Pumping 60 Mgal/d for 30 days for an emergency municipal supply would lower heads in the lower sand unit by as much as 121 feet.

  6. South America and a Few Grains of Sand. Part 1: Beach Sands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Paul Edwin

    1986-01-01

    Continental geology and tectonics are explored through this study of modern beach sands of South America. This report assesses how well petrographic studies of sandstones can recreate continental geography. Data on the petrography of 218 modern South American beach sands are presented and analyzed. The five major mineral associations of light…

  7. Recovery of Ilmenite and Other Heavy Minerals from Teri Sands (Red Sands) of Tamil Nadu, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Babu; N. Vasumathi; R. Bhima Rao

    The red sand which is known as Teri sand in Tamil Nadu consists of 5.5% Total Heavy Minerals (THM) out of which 3.7% is ilmenite. The other minerals, zircon, sillimanite and garnet are in the order of abundance identified. On processing this feed to recover ilmenite by using spirals followed by dry high intensity magnetic separator and high tension separator,

  8. Experimental Studies on the Saltating Sand Particle Transport and Wind-Sand Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon

    2009-11-01

    Saltation is the major transport mode of wind-blown sand particles, accounting for about 75% of total sand transport through saltation, suspension and surface creep. The complex interactions among the saltating sand particles, the particles on the surface and the turbulent flow have not been fully understood owing to lack of experimental data. Various state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques were applied to comprehensively examine three different types of natural sand in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer. Firstly, digital high-speed photography was used to capture images of the saltating sand particles at 2000 frames per second, which resolved the particle motion adjacent to the sand bed surface. Secondly, instantaneous velocities of the saltating sand particles were extracted from the high-speed particle images using the particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). The particle resultant velocity, concentration and the stream-wise mass flux were evaluated as a function of height. Finally, the velocity fields of wind and wind-blown sand particles were simultaneously measured by using the PTV and the particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), respectively. This experimental study shed new lights on the complicated saltation motion, and will be helpful in enhancing formulation of theoretical models and development of effective control measures of wind erosion.

  9. Development history of deep water Plio-Pleistocene sands in the East Breaks 165 field, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bernaski, G.; Guderjahn, C.G. (BP Exploration, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The stratigraphic complexity of the Plio-Pleistocene reservoir sands in the East Breaks 165 field (offshore Texas) is readily demonstrated after the completion of exploration and development involved: (1) prediction of turbidite sand facies distributions and thickness, and (2) identification of fault offsets in the high variable reservoir sands. The well control and a 3D seismic data set provide the basis for reservoir description and a deepwater sand depositional model in the East Breaks 165 area. Four main productive sand intervals are present in the Plio-Pleistocene section. All are characterized by rapid lateral thickness and facies and fining-upward channel levee/overbank facies. The channel systems developed within an intraslope basin. The main reservoir structure is a highly faulted anticline located downthrown to northeast-trending extensional faults with up to 2,500 feet of displacement. The faulting is result of structural collapse owing to salt withdrawal from a salt-cored anticlinal ridge. Numerous small-scale faults that juxtapose permeable and impermeable units have added further complexity to the field development. The refined turbidite channel and channel levee/overbank model has been important in delineating future recompletion and development targets in the East Breaks 165 field. This model should also prove to be a useful analog for future Gulf of Mexico deepwater exploration and development programs.

  10. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  11. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, R.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-01-01

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 #1 ("Tigershark") well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13??m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8??km2 and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  12. Palynofacies of lignites and associated sediments in the upper paleocene Tuscahoma sand of southwestern Alabama and eastern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.E. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The Tuscahoma Sand of the Wilcox Group is composed of fine-grained sand, laminated sandy clay, marl and lignite. The Tuscahoma forms a poorly exposed belt from southeastern Alabama and extends northwestward into western Alabama and eastern Mississippi. The sand is assigned to the late Paleocene planktonic foraminiferal Morozovella velascoensis interval zone. Lignites in the Tuscahoma Sand occur as parasequence deposits in the highstand systems tract of a type 2 depositional sequence near the top of the formation. Organic debris associated with these highstand-systems-tract deposits is dominated by land-derived plant tissues. Marine influence is evidenced by the rare occurrence of dinoflagellate cysts, microforminiferal test linings, and the presence of gray, amorphous organic matter. Three palynofacies are recognized within highstand-systems-tract deposits in the upper Tuscahoma Sand based on the occurrence of organic debris. These palynofacies represent freshwater swamp, brackish marsh and marginal- to shallow-water marine depositional environments. Lignites in the Tuscahoma Sand are dominated by an angiosperm pollen assemblage. Gymnosperm pollen is rare, and marine forms are absent. This assemblage reflects deposition under fresh-water swamp conditions. Carbonaceous clay samples vary in the composition of organic debris. However, many are characterized by the occurrence of herbaceous angiosperm pollen. Arborescent angiosperm pollen is common, as are fern spores. Bisaccate conifer pollen is common and dinoflagellate cysts are rare. Fungal elements are abundant and woody tissue commonly is more degraded than in lignite samples. This assemblage represents deposition in coastal, brackish marsh environments. Organic debris in laminated clays, silts, and sands typically have angiosperm and gymnosperm pollen, dinoflagellate cysts, degraded terrestrial plant material, and amorphous organic matter, and represent shallow-marine and marginal-marine deposits.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Concrete with Combined High alumina cement, Silica fume and M-Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Dona Maria; Devi, Manjula; Senthilkumar, S.

    2013-03-01

    Concrete is by far the most widely used construction material today. It is estimated that present consumption of concrete in the world is of the order of 10 billion tonnes every year. The cement industry is responsible for about 6% of all CO2 emissions. So nowadays there is a great interest in the development and implementation of various alternatives to Portland cement as a binder in concrete and also alternatives to fine and coarse aggregates in concrete to reduce the energy used in production of Portland cement clinker and the associated greenhouse gas emission and also for reducing resources consumption by proper recycling. This research work is carried out in order to explore the effect of various replacement percentages of cement by combined High alumina cement with silica fume and also the fine aggregate is fully replaced with manufacturing sand. Conclusion is made based on the comparison between the performance of blended cement concrete and conventional concrete.

  14. Biogeochemical pathways that influence de-watering and consolidation of fluid fine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, T.; Foght, J.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 1 million m3 of fluid fine tailings are produced every day in northern Alberta, Canada from processing of surface-mined oil sands resources. The tailings, comprising an aqueous suspension of fines dominated by clay particles that remain dispersed for decades, are deposited into tailings ponds for containment, de-watering and consolidation. Slow consolidation of clays retained in tailings ponds hinders recovery and re-use of water, retards volume reduction and presents a technical challenge for effective tailings ponds management. Here, we reveal that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings ponds change the surface chemistry of clay particles and accelerate tailings consolidation by two biogeochemical pathways: one pathway shows that microorganisms metabolize organic substrates and produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in oil sands tailings. Dissolution of biogenic CO2 increases bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations in the pore water and reduces pore water pH, which dissolves carbonate minerals and releases cations from tailings minerals. The higher ionic strength of the pore water resulting from increased concentrations of ions shrinks the double diffuse layers of clay particles and hence increases consolidation. In addition, biogenic CH4 ebullition creates transient physical channels for recovery of pore water. The second pathway exerts a more direct microbial effect on consolidation through transformation of iron (Fe) minerals in oil sands tailings. Microbial reduction and dissolution of FeIII minerals forms amorphous FeII minerals that entrap and mask electronegative clay surfaces. These biogeochemical processes provide essential information for construction of geotechnical models to predict settling of clay particles for effective reclamation and management of fluid fine tailings.

  15. Yellow perch embryo-larval survival and growth in surface waters associated with oil-sands mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, L.E.; Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Power, M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Boerger, H.; MacKinnon, M.D.; Meer, T. Van [Syncrude Canada, Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    As part of their land reclamation strategy, Syncrude Canada Ltd. is currently developing environmentally acceptable tailings disposal methods. Fine tailings, a suspension of clay and residual bitumen, is the waste product from oil sands extraction. Fine-tailings contain naphthenic acids, a group of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids, which occur naturally in petroleum and are partly responsible for the toxicity of process water. The wet landscape method involves covering fine tails with a layer of water such that a self-sustaining ecosystem can be established. A 5 ha demonstration pond with a bottom of fine-tailings was constructed and stocked with yellow perch for experimental purposes. Two other reclaimed ponds formed with oil-sands overburden material were also stocked with perch. Adult perch sampled in the fall of 1995 from the experimental and reclaimed ponds exhibited a 2-fold induction of MFO activity compared to the source lake; indicating organic compound exposure. Perch from one of the reclaimed ponds showed significantly reduced circulating reproductive hormone levels, gonad size and smaller ovarian follicles. Reproductive parameters were not different between the source lake and the remaining ponds. Paired lab and field experiments were conducted to determine if contaminants present would be detrimental to egg viability and development of larvae either through direct exposure of spawned eggs or indirectly by effecting oogenesis. An early life stage toxicity test was also performed using commercially available naphthenic acid standard. Endpoints measured were percent fertilization, percent hatch, mortality, deformities, timing of developmental periods and larval growth.

  16. Minimal model for aeolian sand dunes

    E-print Network

    Klaus Kroy; Gerd Sauermann; Hans J. Herrmann

    2002-03-02

    We present a minimal model for the formation and migration of aeolian sand dunes. It combines a perturbative description of the turbulent wind velocity field above the dune with a continuum saltation model that allows for saturation transients in the sand flux. The latter are shown to provide the characteristic length scale. The model can explain the origin of important features of dunes, such as the formation of a slip face, the broken scale invariance, and the existence of a minimum dune size. It also predicts the longitudinal shape and aspect ratio of dunes and heaps, their migration velocity and shape relaxation dynamics. Although the minimal model employs non-local expressions for the wind shear stress as well as for the sand flux, it is simple enough to serve as a very efficient tool for analytical and numerical investigations and to open up the way to simulations of large scale desert topographies.

  17. Sliding friction on wet and dry sand.

    PubMed

    Fall, A; Weber, B; Pakpour, M; Lenoir, N; Shahidzadeh, N; Fiscina, J; Wagner, C; Bonn, D

    2014-05-01

    We show experimentally that the sliding friction on sand is greatly reduced by the addition of some-but not too much-water. The formation of capillary water bridges increases the shear modulus of the sand, which facilitates the sliding. Too much water, on the other hand, makes the capillary bridges coalesce, resulting in a decrease of the modulus; in this case, we observe that the friction coefficient increases again. Our results, therefore, show that the friction coefficient is directly related to the shear modulus; this has important repercussions for the transport of granular materials. In addition, the polydispersity of the sand is shown to also have a large effect on the friction coefficient. PMID:24836256

  18. UV disinfection for onsite sand filter effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, J.D.; Romatzick, S.

    1982-05-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using ultraviolet (uv) light as a viable alternative to chlorine as the required disinfectant for onsite sand filter effluents discharged to surface waters in Maine was determined. To obtain a reliable cross section of performance for sand filters in Maine, 74 filters were selected for an effluent characterization program. The effluent characterization study allowed general conclusions to be made with regard to the potential of uv disinfection. A simple suspended lamp uv disinfection unit was designed, constructed, and tested in the laboratory and in the field. The efficiency of the uv disinfection unit was determined through field testing at 10 of the 74 sand filter sites used in the effluent characterization program.

  19. Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, F; Avouac, J-P; Newman, C E; Richardson, M I; Lucas, A; Leprince, S; Bridges, N T

    2014-01-01

    Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100?km scale) of ?(s)=0.01±0.0015?N?m(-2). PMID:25268931

  20. The Fine-Tuning Argument

    E-print Network

    Landsman, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Our laws of nature and our cosmos appear to be delicately fine-tuned for life to emerge, in way that seems hard to attribute to chance. In view of this, some have taken the opportunity to revive the scholastic Argument from Design, whereas others have felt the need to explain this apparent fine-tuning of the clockwork of the Universe by proposing the existence of a `Multiverse'. We analyze this issue from a sober perspective. Having reviewed the literature and having added several observations of our own, we conclude that cosmic fine-tuning supports neither Design nor a Multiverse, since both of these fail at an explanatory level as well as in a more quantitative context of Bayesian confirmation theory (although there might be other reasons to believe in these ideas, to be found in religion and in inflation and/or string theory, respectively). In fact, fine-tuning and Design even seem to be at odds with each other, whereas the inference from fine-tuning to a Multiverse only works if the latter is underwritten...

  1. An analytical solution to river profile concavity and downstream fining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, A.; Chavarrias, V.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analytical solution to the steady state upward-concave bed profile, as well as downstream fining, for a river dominated by gravel and sand. The model is based on (i) the conservation equation of streamwise momentum of the flow, (ii) the conservation equation of the mass of each grain size fraction in the surface layer of the bed (the Hirano equation) yet including sediment abrasion, and (iii) the conservation equation of total sediment mass (the Exner equation). The model includes downstream fining induced by abrasion as well as by grainsize-selective transport of gravel and sand. In order to arrive at an analytical solution, the model is deliberately kept simple through assumptions such as a constant width and no tributaries. The model is then reduced to the case of steady state conditions, which means that all time derivatives in the equations are set to zero. We find a solution to the steady state streamwise profile of both the bed slope and the volume fraction of gravel in the surface layer of the bed. Like existing empirical predictors, the analytical solution is of an exponential type. The main variables that affect the solution are the total load at the upstream boundary, the gravel fraction in this upstream load, the abrasion coefficient, the grain sizes of the sediment, and the water discharge at the upstream boundary. The below image shows an example of how the gravel fraction in the upstream load affects the solution to the longitudinal profiles of, respectively, bed slope (S), the gravel fraction at the bed surface (Fg), and the mean grain size of the sediment at the bed surface (Dgs). We can see how an increase in the gravel fraction in the upstream load results in a larger overall slope and an increase in profile concavity. It also induces an increase of the gravel fraction at the bed surface.

  2. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX LOOKING SOUTH, SAND DRAINING & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX LOOKING SOUTH, SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (right) AND SAND-SORTING BUILDING (left) - Mill "C" Complex, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  3. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM SANDPIT LOOKING NORTHEAST, SAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM SANDPIT LOOKING NORTHEAST, SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (left) AND SAND-SORTING BUILDING (right) - Mill "C" Complex, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  4. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM SANDPIT LOOKING NORTHEAST, SAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM SANDPIT LOOKING NORTHEAST, SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (left) AND SAND-SORTING BUILDING (right) - Mill "C" Complex, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  5. Eolian sand deposition during th Medieval Climatic Anomaly in Playa San Bartolo, Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, B.; Schaaf, P. E.; Murray, A.; Caballero, M.; Lozano Garcia, S.; Ramirez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Records of past climatic changes in desert environments are scarce due to the poor preservation of biological proxies. To overcome this lack we consider the paleoenvironmental significance and age of a lunette dune in the eastern rim of the Playa San Bartolo (PSB) in Sonoran Desert (Mexico). Rock magnetism, mineralogical, and geochemical analysis (major, trace and REE) allow assessment of sediment provenance and changes in the composition of the PSB dune over time. Thermoluminiscence and optical stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) provide the chronology of lunette dune development. Dune sediments are composed by intercalated layers of sand beds and sandy silt strata. Variability in composition of dune sediments is attributed to changes in sediment sources. Mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data show clear differences between the sand and the sandy silt of the PSB dune deposits, which suggest different sediment sources. Sand sized deposits, characterized by coarse magnetite grains, are mainly eroded from granitoids from nearby outcrops. Sandy silt deposits, rich in fine grained magnetite and evaporative minerals, resulted after the erosion of volcanic rocks and their soils from sierras at the NE of PSB during heavy rainfall episodes, the flooding of PSB and later deflation and accumulation in the dune of both detritic and authigenic components. The upper 6 m of dune accumulation occurred largely during AD 500 to 1200, a period that correlates with the Medieval climatic anomaly (AD 300 to 1300). These findings suggest that main dune accretion occurred during regionally extended drought conditions, disrupted by sporadic heavy rainfall.

  6. Longitudinal variability in hydraulic geometry and substrate characteristics of a Great Plains sand-bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, Katie H.; Daniels, Melinda D.; Perkin, Joshuah S.; Gido, Keith B.

    2014-04-01

    Downstream trends in hydraulic geometry and substrate characteristics were investigated along a 200 km reach of the Ninnescah River in south central Kansas, USA. The Ninnescah River is a large sand-bed, perennial, braided river located in the Central Plains physiographic province and is a tributary of the Arkansas River. Hydraulic geometry characteristics were measured at eleven reaches and included slope, sinuosity, bankfull channel width, and bankfull channel depth. Results indicated that the Ninnescah River followed a predicted trend of decreasing slope and increasing depth and width downstream. There were localized divergences in the central tendency, most notability downstream of a substantial tributary that is impounded and at the end of the surveying reach where the Ninnescah River approaches the Arkansas River. Surface grain-size samples were taken from the top 10 cm of the bed at five points across the wetted cross-section within each of the 11 reaches. Sediment analyses demonstrated a significant trend in downstream fining of surface grain-sizes (D90 and D50) but unlike previous studies of sand-bedded rivers we observed coarsening of substrates downstream of the major tributary confluence. We propose that the overall low discharge from the tributary was the primary reason for coarsening of the bed downstream of the tributary. Results of this study provide valuable baseline information that can provide insight in to how Great Plains sand-bed systems may be conserved, managed, and restored in the future.

  7. Flowsheet modifications for dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues in the F-canyon dissolvers

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.; Karraker, D.G.; Graham, F.R.

    1997-12-01

    An initial flowsheet for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) was developed for the F- Canyon dissolvers as an alternative to dissolution in FB-Line. In that flowsheet, the sand fines were separated from the slag chunks and crucible fragments. Those two SS{ampersand}C streams were packaged separately in mild-steel cans for dissolution in the 6.4D dissolver. Nuclear safety constraints limited the dissolver charge to approximately 350 grams of plutonium in two of the three wells of the dissolver insert and required 0.23M (molar) boron as a soluble neutron poison in the 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M fluoride dissolver solution. During the first dissolution of SS{ampersand}C fines, it became apparent that a significant amount of the plutonium charged to the 6.4D dissolver did not dissolve in the time predicted by previous laboratory experiments. The extended dissolution time was attributed to fluoride complexation by boron. An extensive research and development (R{ampersand}D) program was initiated to investigate the dissolution chemistry and the physical configuration of the dissolver insert to understand what flowsheet modifications were needed to achieve a viable dissolution process.

  8. Hydrodynamic implications of textural trends in sand deposits of the 2004 tsunami in Sri Lanka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Goff, J.R.; Nichol, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Field observations and sediment samples at a coastal-plain setting in southeastern Sri Lanka were used to document the erosional and depositional impacts of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and to interpret the hydrodynamic processes that produced an extensive sand-sheet deposit. Tsunami deposit thicknesses ranged from 6 to 22??cm with thickness being controlled partly by antecedent topography. The deposit was composed of coarse to medium sand organized into plane-parallel laminae and a few laminasets. Vertical textural trends showed an overall but non-systematic upward fining and upward thinning of depositional units with an upward increase in heavy-mineral laminations at some locations. Repeated patterns in the vertical textural trends (upward fining, upward coarsening, uniform) were used to subdivide and correlate the deposit into five hydro-textural stratigraphic units. The depositional units were linked to hydrodynamic processes and upcurrent conditions, such as rates of sediment supply and composition of the sediment sources. Vertical changes in grain-size distributions recorded the depositional phases associated with flow acceleration, initial unsteady pulsating flow, relatively stable and uniform flow, flow deceleration, slack water, and return flow or flow redirection. Study results suggest that vertical textural trends from multiple cross-shore sections can be used to interpret complex tsunami flow histories, but at the location examined, interpretation of the lateral textural trends did not provide a basis for identifying the correct sediment transport pathways because flow near the landward boundary was multidirectional.

  9. High temperature thermal energy storage in moving sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Turner; H. I. Awaya

    1978-01-01

    Several high-temperature (to 500 C) heat-storage systems using sand as the storage medium are described. The advantages of sand as a storage medium include low cost for sand, widespread availability, non-toxicity, non-degradation characteristics, easy containment, and safety. The systems considered include: stationary sand with closely spaced tubes throughout the volume, the use of a fluidized bed, use of conveyor belt

  10. Tar sand and heavy oil resources and technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1972-01-01

    Tar-sand resources in the U.S. are not as concentrated as the Canadian Athabasca deposits, but they are significant; the amount recoverable is estimated to be 25 to 35 billion barrels. Some of the characteristics of tar sands and heavy oil sands and their occurrence are discussed. The single large-scale production of bitumen from tar sands is the operation of Great

  11. 22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL AND TEST LAB FOR UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC. SAND CASTING TECHNICIAN, ROY BATES, TESTS THE WEIGHT OF THE SAND, DRYS IT, AND WEIGHT IT AGAINST STANDARDS TO CALCULATE THE CORRECT MOISTURE NEEDED FOR DIFFERENT MOLDS. THE SAND MIX VARY WITH THE SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CASTING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. SANDIA REPORT SAND930731 s UC706

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    March 1993 Distribution Category UC-706 Spaceborne SAR Study: LDRD '92 Final Report D. L. Bickel RadarSANDIA REPORT SAND93­0731 s UC­706 Unlimited Release Printed March 1993 Spaceborne SAR Study: LDRD Development Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 C. T. Allen Radar & Antenna

  13. SANDIA REPORT SAND99-2953

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND99-2953 Unlimited Release Printed November 1999 a Shaped-Charge Parallel-2953 Unlimited Release Printed November 1999 The Optimization of a Shaped-Charge Design Using Parallel Computers of the modeled system. Using a shaped-charge jet design as an archetypal test case and the CTH parallel shock

  14. Western gas sands project. Status report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1978-01-01

    The progress during January, 1978 of the major government sponsored endeavors undertaken to increase gas production from the low permeability gas sands of the western United States is summarized. A core program meeting was held on January 25, 1978 at the CER Corporation office in Las Vegas, Nevada. The core tasks to be performed on the available core supply were

  15. The sands of time and tidal friction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie V. Morrison; F. Richard Stephenson

    1998-01-01

    Ancient Babylonian clay tablets buried for centuries beneath the sands of the desert are part of an extensive historical archive which contains vital information about the rotation of the Earth. Many are preserved, and using these seemingly crude ancient and medieval observations of eclipses, variations in the Earth's rotation can be traced back over the past 2500 years. The tidal

  16. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: TRANSPORT OF SAND AND GRAVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study of atmospheric emissions from the transport of sand and gravel on unpaved roads. The potential environmental effect of this emission source was evaluated using source severity, defined as the ratio of the time-averaged maximum ground level concentrat...

  17. The strength and dilatancy of sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Bolton

    1986-01-01

    Extensive data of the strength and dilatancy of 17 sands in axisymmetric or plane strain at different densities and confining pressures are collated. The critical state angle of shearing resistance of soil which is shearing at con- stant volume is principally a function of mineralogy and can readily be determined experimentally within a margin of about l\\

  18. TOXOPLASMOSIS IN SAND FOX (VULPUS RUEPPELLII)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatal toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a sand fox (Vulpes rueppelli) from United Arab Emirates. Toxoplasma gondii-like tachyzoites were found associated with necrosis in intestine, spleen, liver, pancreas, lungs, mesenteric lymph nodes, and the heart. Ttachyzoites reacted positively with T. gondii-spe...

  19. Steamflood experiment in a Utah tar sand

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.A. Jr.; Fahy, L.J.; Romanowski, L.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The first Laramie Energy Technology Center steamflood experiment in a Utah Tar Sand, LETC TS-1S, was conducted in the Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposit located near Vernal, Utah. Following completion of construction in April 1980, steam injection was initiated in the center well of two concentric inverted five spot patterns. 8 refs.

  20. Canada's First Commercial Tar Sand Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. D. Innes; V Fear

    1967-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the Great Canadian Oil Sands Limited project, the paper describes the specific technical problems faced in planning for commercial production. An overall plant flow sheet, material balance, and summary of energy requirements are presented. Topics discussed under the heading of mining and solids transport include the geological evaluation program, the overburden removal program, year-round-mining procedures,

  1. Progress report--Athabasca tar sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Breckenridge

    1966-01-01

    A complex now under construction by Great Canadian Oil Sands (GCOS) will produce 45,000 bbl per day of crude when it goes on stream in Sept. 1967. GCOS became the first company to receive permission to produce the giant Athabasca deposit in 1962. They also obtained a permit to construct a 266-mile long pipeline to Edmonton, where it tied into

  2. The Early Years: Building With Sand

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peggy Ashbrook

    2010-03-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approache

  3. NU Intramural Sports Sand Dodgeball Rules

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    NU Intramural Sports Sand Dodgeball Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid identification card. 2. Jewelry is not allowed to be worn by any participant during an Intramural event. Any with a band-aid. 3. GAME TIME IS FORFEIT TIME! The minimum number of players must have their Husky Cards

  4. Percolation of Blast Waves though Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, William

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has concentrated on the physical processes occurring when samples of sand, of varying moisture content, were shock compressed. In this study quartz sand samples are subjected to blast waves over a range of pressure and duration. Aspects of particle movement are discussed; the global movement of a bed hundreds of particles thick is a fraction of particle width. The main diagnostics used are pressure sensors and high-speed photography. Results are presented for a range of particle sizes, aspect ratio, density and moisture content. While the velocity of the percolation through the bed is primarily controlled by density and porosity the effect of moisture reveals a more complex dependence. Previous research has concentrated on the physical processes occurring when samples of sand, of varying moisture content, were shock compressed. In this study quartz sand samples are subjected to blast waves over a range of pressure and duration. Aspects of particle movement are discussed; the global movement of a bed hundreds of particles thick is a fraction of particle width. The main diagnostics used are pressure sensors and high-speed photography. Results are presented for a range of particle sizes, aspect ratio, density and moisture content. While the velocity of the percolation through the bed is primarily controlled by density and porosity the effect of moisture reveals a more complex dependence. The ISP acknowledges the support of the Atomic Weapons Establishment and Imperial College London.

  5. Wind-Blown Sand: Threshold of Motion 

    E-print Network

    Swann, Christy Michelle

    2014-11-12

    The fluid threshold for wind-blown sand is the minimum shear velocity required to initiate grain movement by the force of the wind alone, and is used to predict dust emission and landform change in sandy environments. R.A. ...

  6. An overview of Canadian oil sand mega projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Paes; M. Throckmorton

    2008-01-01

    There are currently a number of existing oil sand Mega-Projects as well as many other related projects planned and under construction in the Alberta oil sands region. There are many challenges facing the oil sands. The demanding climate conditions cost of extraction, environmental, energy constraints as well as the rising construction costs are examples. To develop this huge petroleum reserve,

  7. Plant Availability of Metals in Waste Foundry Sands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foundries in the United States generate several million tons of waste sand each year. These sands are no longer suitable for metalcasting processes, and about 90% are discarded in landfills. However, the majority of these waste foundry sands (WFSs) qualify as non-hazardous industrial waste and the...

  8. George Sand et les arts du XVIIIe Introduction

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    George Sand et les arts du XVIIIe siècle Introduction Olivier Bara (Université Lyon 2, UMR LIRE) Le présent numéro des Amis de George Sand est issu d'un séminaire organisé par l'université Lyon 2 et l'UMR LIRE, de 2008 à 2012, intitulé « George Sand et les arts du XVIIIe siècle ». Les articles ici réunis

  9. DRIVEN PIPE PILES IN DENSE SAND BYRON BYRNE

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Byron

    DRIVEN PIPE PILES IN DENSE SAND BYRON BYRNE GEOMECHANICS GROUP THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA #12;Driven Pipe Piles in Dense Sand Byron Byrne Geomechanics Group The University of Western Australia Page 1 ABSTRACT: Piles are often driven open ended into dense sand with the aim of increasing the ease

  10. Stable Dynamics of Sand Automata Alberto Dennunzio1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stable Dynamics of Sand Automata Alberto Dennunzio1 , Pierre Guillon2 , and Benoît Masson3 1.masson@lif.univ-mrs.fr Abstract. In this paper, we study different notions of stability of sand automata, dynamical systems systems [10]. In [3], the authors introduced sand automata as a generalization of sandpile models

  11. Modelling of reoxidation inclusion formation in steel sand casting

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Modelling of reoxidation inclusion formation in steel sand casting A. J. Melendez, K. D. Carlson pouring, as well as their final locations on the surface of steel sand castings. Inclusions originate by comparing the simulation results to measurements made on production steel sand castings. Good overall

  12. Biocalcification of Sand through Ureolysis Chiung-Wen Chou1

    E-print Network

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Biocalcification of Sand through Ureolysis Chiung-Wen Chou1 ; Eric A. Seagren, A.M.ASCE2 ; Ahmet H. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the changes in geomechanical properties of sand attributable. pasteurii). Specifically, direct shear and California Bearing Ratio (CBR) tests were conducted on sand

  13. BEHAVIOR OF A SAND RIDGE MODEL Juan Mario Restrepo

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    BEHAVIOR OF A SAND RIDGE MODEL Juan Mario Restrepo Mathematics Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095 Abstract. A model for the formation and evolution of longshore sand waves, which are represented by wave packets, and a sandy bottom topography, conspire to produce sand

  14. Texas Tech University Sand Volleyball Recreational Sports League

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    Texas Tech University Sand Volleyball Recreational Sports League T 806.742.2945 | www.recsports.ttu.edu | SRC Room 203 When: League Play starts on Monday, April 15 Where: Rec Sports Sand Volleyball Courts end at 13, so if tied at 12-12, next point wins) Shoes are not permitted for competition on sand

  15. Performance of Shallow Foundations on Sand B.W. Byrne.

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Byron

    Performance of Shallow Foundations on Sand B.W. Byrne. Department of Engineering Science hardening plasticity theory. The testing to date has mainly used high friction angle samples of sand to imitate typical offshore conditions (in the North Sea for example). Dry sand has been used so that long

  16. SHORT COMMUNICATION First Collection Records of Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera

    E-print Network

    SHORT COMMUNICATION First Collection Records of Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) From (2011); DOI: 10.1603/ME10170 ABSTRACT The phlebotomine sand Ã?ies Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Dyar for either species. KEY WORDS phlebotomine, sand Ã?y, leishmaniasis, Lutzomyia shannoni, Lutzomyia vexator

  17. Channel bed evolution and sediment transport under declining sand inputs

    E-print Network

    Montgomery, David R.

    Channel bed evolution and sediment transport under declining sand inputs Karen B. Gran,1,2 David R structure development and sediment transport as sand inputs decline. On the Pasig-Potrero River, we investigated channel recovery following emplacement of sand-rich pyroclastic deposits in the 1991 eruption

  18. Contact With Beach Sand Among Beachgoers and Risk of Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher D. Heaney; Elizabeth Sams; Steve Wing; Steve Marshall; Kristen Brenner; Alfred P. Dufour; Timothy J. Wade

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of beach sand fecal contamination have triggered interest among scientists and in the media. Although evidence shows that beach sand can harbor high concentrations of fecal indicator organisms, as well as fecal pathogens, illness risk associated with beach sand contact is not well understood. Beach visitors at 7 US beaches were enrolled in the National Epidemiological and Environmental

  19. BMM SEPARATION SCREEN PERMITS SAND TO PASS TO BELT CONVEYORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BMM SEPARATION SCREEN PERMITS SAND TO PASS TO BELT CONVEYORS BELOW THAT TRANSPORT THE SAND BACK TO STORAGE AND RECONDITIONING BINS WHILE CASTINGS ARE TRANSPORTED ON ADDITIONAL VIBRATING CONVEYORS TO DEGATING AREAS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Improving the method of preparation of molding sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Markov

    1985-01-01

    nology an improved method of preparation of molding sand has been developed and it has been introduced in Rakitnoe Fitting Plant. Means of mechanization providing the obtaining of the optimum stable properties and composition of the original materials and the finished sand have been designed and built. After shakeout from the casting molds the return (burnt) sand is fed by

  1. The 3-D spread of saltation sand over a flat bed surface in aeolian sand transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bin Yang; Yuan Wang; Yang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the 3-D motion of saltation sand by high-speed photography and stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV). By the high-speed camera, the sand particle trajectories in the transverse plane near bed surface have been obtained. It could be found that the collision between the particle and the bed surface would in principle cause the transverse motion of the particle

  2. Great Canadian Oil Sands experience in the commercial processing of Athabasca Tar Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Andrews; H. M. Lewis; E. W. Dobson

    1968-01-01

    A brief review is given of the history of the Great Canadian Oil Sands (G.C.O.S.) project to recover 45,000 bpd of synthetic crude oil from the Athabasca Tar Sands by open pit mining, hot water extraction, coking, and hydrorefining. This paper then discusses the startup and initial operation of the G.C.O.S. plant. Emphasis is directed toward actual vs. design performance

  3. Drag reduction using superhydrophobic sanded Teflon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong; Daniello, Robert J.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a series of experiments are presented which demonstrate drag reduction for the laminar flow of water through microchannels using superhydrophobic surfaces with random surface microstructure. These superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated with a simple, inexpensive technique of sanding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with sandpaper having grit sizes between 120- and 600-grit. A microfluidic device was used to measure the pressure drop as a function of the flow rate to determine the drag reduction and slip length of each surface. A maximum pressure drop reduction of 27 % and a maximum apparent slip length of b = 20 ?m were obtained for the superhydrophobic surfaces created by sanding PTFE with a 240-grit sandpaper. The pressure drop reduction and slip length were found to increase with increasing mean particle size of the sandpaper up to 240-grit. Beyond that grit size, increasing the pitch of the surface roughness was found to cause the interface to transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state. This transition was observed both as an increase in the contact angle hysteresis and simultaneously as a reduction in the pressure drop reduction. For these randomly rough surfaces, a correlation between the slip length and the contact angle hysteresis was found. The surfaces with the smallest contact angle hysteresis were found to also have the largest slip length. Finally, a number of sanding protocols were tested by sanding preferentially along the flow direction, across the flow direction and with a random circular pattern. In all cases, sanding in the flow direction was found to produce the largest pressure drop reduction.

  4. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  5. Brane Inflation and Fine Tuning

    E-print Network

    Enrico Pajer

    2007-09-14

    We argue about the importance of embedding the successful mechanism of Inflation in the context of a fundamental theory. We review some of the attempts in this direction made in the framework of String Theory. In particular we report on recent developments in Brane Inflation with emphasis on the fine tuning issue.

  6. Fine Particle Scrubbing: A Proceedings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, 1974

    1974-01-01

    These articles deal with the proceedings of a 1974 symposium on the use of wet scrubbers for the control of fine particle air pollutants. Various wet scrubbers, their engineering, performance, efficiency, and future are discussed. Tables, formulas, and models are included. (TK)

  7. Forum: Defining Fine Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Lyn

    1981-01-01

    The author offers these suggestions for increasing the creative component of elementary fine arts education: In art, encourage drawing, not just crafts; in music, use classical and folk music, as well as popular songs; for physical development, deemphasize team sports in favor of fitness and creative movement. (SJL)

  8. Fine Arts Education. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    What are the benefits of a Fine Arts education? With the advent of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2000, extreme pressure has been put on schools to concentrate the majority of their efforts and resources on reading, math and science skills. Yet, NCLB also states that every child should be well-versed in the arts. Some research has shown that when…

  9. Fine grinding of silicon wafers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. J Pei; Alan Strasbaugh

    2001-01-01

    Silicon wafers are used for the production of most microchips. Various processes are needed to transfer a silicon crystal ingot into wafers. As one of such processes, surface grinding of silicon wafers has attracted attention among various investigators and a limited number of articles can be found in the literature. However, no published articles are available regarding fine grinding of

  10. Coal fines consolidation. [269 references

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gunther

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to survey existing methods and techniques for consolidating coal fines into lump coal which would be suitable as feed to fixed bed gasifiers. Another objective was to characterize the properties of consolidated coal which would establish its suitability for use in such gasifiers. To accomplish these objectives, a search of the technical literature

  11. Investigation of the sand sea with the tallest dunes on Earth: China's Badain Jaran Sand Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqiang; Lv, Ping; Hu, Guangyin

    2013-05-01

    China's Badain Jaran Sand Sea features the tallest dunes on Earth and a unique mega-dune-lake landscape. It had been explored little until the 1990s, though early scientific explorations surrounding the sand sea had begun by the early 20th century. Heated debates now focus on the desert environment, and particularly how the mega-dunes and desert lakes develop and evolve. This paper reviews the status of these debates and summarizes the supporting evidences. The environmental research mainly concerns formation and evolution of the sand sea, and its relationship with climate change. The proposed formation time ranges from the Early Pleistocene to the Holocene. Opinions vary about climate change on different time scales. The reconstructed climate change history is shorter than the sand sea's history, with the longest record extending to the Late Pleistocene. The mega-dune research focuses on sediments, dune morphology, and formation processes. It remains unclear whether the mega-dunes result primarily from wind action, control by the underlying topography, or groundwater maintenance. The sources of lake water are also debated, but there are four main hypotheses: atmospheric precipitation, groundwater from nearby areas, precipitation and snowmelt in remote areas such as the Qilian Mountains and the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, or paleowater that formed during past periods of wet climate. We believe that the sand sea deserves further study in terms of its dune geomorphology, evolution, and hydrology, and their responses to climate change. Meteorological and hydrological observations and monitoring in the sand sea are particularly necessary.

  12. Experimental investigation of cephapirin adsorption to quartz filter sands and dune sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jonathan W.; O'Meara, Theresa A.; Seymour, Michael D.

    2008-08-01

    Batch experiments were performed to investigate cephapirin (a widely used veterinary antibiotic) adsorption on various size sands of low total organic carbon content (0.08-0.36 wt%). In the aqueous concentration range investigated (11-112 ?mol/L cephapirin), adsorption to nearly pure quartz filter sands (0.50-3.35 mm diameter) is low. Isotherms are S-shaped and most display a region of minimum adsorption, where decreased adsorption occurs with increasing solution concentration, followed by increased adsorption at higher concentrations. Cephapirin adsorption to quartz-rich, feldspar-bearing dune sands (0.06-0.35 mm diameter), and the smallest quartz filter sand investigated (0.43-0.50 mm), can be described by linear sorption isotherms over the range of concentrations investigated. Distribution coefficients ( K d) range from 0.94 to 3.45 L/kg. No systematic relationship exists between grain size and amount of adsorption for any of the sands investigated. Cephapirin adsorption is positively correlated to the feldspar ratio (K-feldspar/(albite + Ca-plagioclase). Feldspar-ratio normalization of distribution coefficients was more effective than organic carbon normalization at reducing variability of K d values in the dune sands investigated.

  13. Dynamics of sand ridges in coastal seas: the effect of storms, tides and grain sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgreen, M.

    2003-10-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the dynamics of shoreface-connected ridges and tidal sand ridges. These large-scale bedforms are observed on the inner and outer shelf of coastal seas in water depths of 10-20m. The motivation of this work is to improve the understanding of the mechanisms related to their formation and the processes that determine their main characteristics. This is done with the use of idealised morphodynamic models. The basic assumption underlying these models is that large-scale sand ridges can solely form as free instabilities on a flat sea bottom. Mathematical methods based on a stability analysis are applied, whereas analytical and numerical methods are used to solve the equations. Existing models are extended with new physical processes, in particular including the role of grain sorting. An important part of this thesis concerns the unresolved question about the origin of the observed mean grain size pattern over the ridges. It explores the hydrodynamic processes that can lead to sediment sorting and the formation of large-scale sand ridges. The model results indicate that the dynamics for different forcing conditions strongly differ. Shoreface-connected sand ridges mainly form during storm conditions, whereas if fair weather conditions prevail the more offshore located tidal sand ridges develop. A probabilistic formulation of these two realisation of the model is used to find conditions for which both types of large-scale bedforms occur simultaneously, as is the case in the southern North Sea. These conditions turn out to be a low storm fraction and the presence of both tidal and storm-driven currents. The transport of non-uniform sediment is described by formulations for both bed load and suspended load, both of which account for dynamic hiding effects. A one-layer model for the bed evolution is used and two grain size classes (fine and coarse sand) are considered. The results of the model for storm conditions indicate that the observed phase shift between bed topography and mean grain size for shoreface-connected ridges (finest sand on seaward flanks) is due to the selective transport via suspended load of grains with different sizes. Parameter values are based on the sand ridges along the Atlantic coast of North America. A net stabilising effect on the initial growth and an enhanced migration is predicted. A physical explanation for the model results is given. During fair weather or tidally dominated conditions, when bed load transport of sediment is dominant, the results indicate an increase in initial growth and migration rates of tidal sand ridges for a bimodal sediment mixture. A symmetrical tidal current results in a grain size distribution, with the coarsest sand found at the crest of the ridges. Results are compared with the tidal ridges on the Belgian coastal shelf. The investigation of the long-term evolution of shoreface-connected ridges focuses on storm-dominated micro-tidal shelves. It is shown that, starting from an initial state without bedforms, a pattern of ridges with a finite height develops. The evolution of the spatial patterns in the mean grain size and bottom topography are shown and discussed in terms of physical mechanisms.

  14. Interaction of oil sands tailings particles with polymers and microbial cells: First steps toward reclamation to soil.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Production of bitumen by surface mining of Alberta's oil sands has given rise to tailings ponds, containing large volumes of finely dispersed clays (10(8) m(3) ), which settle only slowly. The mature fine tailings (MFT) in these ponds are operationally defined as consisting of particles smaller than 44 ?m with a solids content in excess of 30% (w/w). Increasing the rate of densification of MFT is a rate-limiting step in tailings pond reclamation. Accelerated densification has been achieved through mixing of MFT with sand in the presence of calcium sulfate as a binding agent to generate consolidated tailings. Addition of negatively charged polymer, together with either calcium or magnesium ions, is similarly effective. Although toxic to higher aquatic life, tailings ponds harbour a wide variety of mainly anaerobic microbes. These convert residual hydrocarbon, causing methane emissions of up to 10(4) m(3) day(-1) . Interestingly, anaerobic microbial activity also accelerates tailings pond densification. Hence, many technologies designed to accelerate densification move tailings, at least conceptually, towards soil in which sand and clay particles are linked by large amounts of humic and fulvic acid polymers supporting large numbers of microbes in a mechanically stable structure. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 99: 257-262, 2013. PMID:23348673

  15. Use of recycled fine aggregate in concretes with durable requirements.

    PubMed

    Zega, Claudio Javier; Di Maio, Angel Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The use of construction waste materials as aggregates for concrete production is highly attractive compared to the use of non-renewable natural resources, promoting environmental protection and allowing the development of a new raw material. Several countries have recommendations for the use of recycled coarse aggregate in structural concrete, whereas the use of the fine fraction is limited because it may produce significant changes in some properties of concrete. However, during the last decade the use of recycled fine aggregates (RFA) has achieved a great international interest, mainly because of economic implications related to the shortage of natural sands suitable for the production of concrete, besides to allow an integral use of this type of waste. In this study, the durable behaviour of structural concretes made with different percentage of RFA (0%, 20%, and 30%) is evaluated. Different properties related to the durability of concretes such as absorption, sorptivity, water penetration under pressure, and carbonation are determined. In addition, the results of compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage are presented. The obtained results indicate that the recycled concretes have a suitable resistant and durable behaviour, according to the limits indicated by different international codes for structural concrete. PMID:21775123

  16. THE SIMULATION OF WIND-BLOWN SAND MOVEMENT AND PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTION OF LIFT-OFF VELOCITIES OF SAND GRAINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately describing the probability density function (PDF) of lift-off or initial velocities of wind-blown sand ejecting from a sand bed is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of wind-blown sand movement. Our objective was to investigate the efficacy of developing the PDF of lift-off veloc...

  17. Method for filtering solvent and tar sand mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kelterborn, J. C.; Stone, R. A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for filtering spent tar sands from a bitumen and organic solvent solution comprises separating the solution into two streams wherein the bulk of the coarser spent tar sand is in a first stream and has an average particle size of about 10 to about 100 mesh and the bulk of the finer spent tar sand is in a second stream; producing a filter cake by filtering the coarser spent tar sand from the first stream; and filtering the finer spent tar sand from the second stream with the filter cake. The method is particularly useful for filtering solutions of bitumen extracted from bitumen containing diatomite, spent diatomite and organic solvent.

  18. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust

    E-print Network

    Jasper F. Kok; Eric J. R. Parteli; Timothy I. Michaels; Diana Bou Karam

    2012-09-20

    The transport of sand and dust by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This article presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  19. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust

    E-print Network

    Kok, Jasper F; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-01-01

    The transport of dust and sand by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This article presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  20. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Michaels, Timothy I.; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-10-01

    The transport of sand and dust by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This paper presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  1. Root growth, mycorrhization and physiological effects of plants growing on oil tailing sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt-Burisch, Katja M.; Naeth, Anne M.; Schneider, Bernd Uwe; Hüttl, Reinhard F.

    2015-04-01

    Surface mining creates large, intense disturbances of soils and produces large volumes of by-products and waste materials. After mining processes these materials often provide the basis for land reclamation and ecosystem restoration. In the present study, tailing sands (TS) and processed mature fine tailings (pMFT) from Fort McMurray (Alberta, Canada) were used. They represent challenging material for ecosystem rebuilding because of very low nutrient contents of TS and oil residuals, high density of MFT material. In this context, little is known about the interactions of pure TS, respectively mixtures of TS and MFT and root growth, mycorrhization and plant physiological effects. Four herbaceous plant species (Elymus trachycaulus, Koeleria macrantha, Deschampsia cespitosa, Lotus corniculatus) were chosen to investigate root development, chlorophyll fluorescence and mycorrhization intensity with and without application of Glomus mosseae (arbuscular mycorrhizae) on mainly tailing sands. Surprisingly both, plants growing on pure TS and plants growing on TS with additional AM-application showed mycorrhization of roots. In general, the mycorrhization intensity was lower for plants growing on pure tailings sands, but it is an interesting fact that there is a potential for mycorrhization available in tailing sands. The mycorrhizal intensity strongly increased with application of G. mosseae for K. macrantha and L. corniculatus and even more for E. trachycaulus. For D. cespitosa similar high mycorrhiza infection frequency was found for both variants, with and without AM-application. By the application of G. mosseae, root growth of E. trachycaulus and K. macrantha was significantly positively influenced. Analysis of leaf chlorophyll fluorescence showed no significant differences for E. trachycaulus but significant positive influence of mycorrhizal application on the physiological status of L. corniculatus. However, this effect could not be detected when TS was mixed with MFT (1:1).

  2. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway I: changes in porewater chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Arkell, Nicholas; Young, Rozlyn; Li, Carmen; Guigard, Selma; Underwood, Eleisha; Foght, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed clay particles in mine tailings and soft sediments remain suspended for decades, hindering consolidation and challenging effective management of these aqueous slurries. Current geotechnical engineering models of self-weight consolidation of tailings do not consider microbial contribution to sediment behavior, however, here we show that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings change the porewater chemistry and accelerate consolidation of oil sands tailings. A companion paper describes the role of microbes in alteration of clay chemistry in tailings. Microbial metabolism in mature fine tailings (MFT) amended with an organic substrate (hydrolyzed canola meal) produced methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Dissolution of biogenic CO2 lowered the pH of amended MFT to pH 6.4 vs. unamended MFT (pH 7.7). About 12% more porewater was recovered from amended than unamended MFT during 2 months of active microbial metabolism, concomitant with consolidation of tailings. The lower pH in amended MFT dissolved carbonate minerals, thereby releasing divalent cations including calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) and increasing bicarbonate (HCO?3) in porewater. The higher concentrations increased the ionic strength of the porewater, in turn reducing the thickness of the diffuse double layer (DDL) of clay particles by reducing the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles. The combination of these processes accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. In addition, ebullition of biogenic gases created transient physical channels for release of porewater. In contrast, saturating the MFT with non-biogenic CO2 had little effect on consolidation. These results have significant implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds and broad importance in anaerobic environments such as contaminated harbors and estuaries containing soft sediments rich in clays and organics. PMID:24711805

  3. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway I: changes in porewater chemistry.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Arkell, Nicholas; Young, Rozlyn; Li, Carmen; Guigard, Selma; Underwood, Eleisha; Foght, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed clay particles in mine tailings and soft sediments remain suspended for decades, hindering consolidation and challenging effective management of these aqueous slurries. Current geotechnical engineering models of self-weight consolidation of tailings do not consider microbial contribution to sediment behavior, however, here we show that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings change the porewater chemistry and accelerate consolidation of oil sands tailings. A companion paper describes the role of microbes in alteration of clay chemistry in tailings. Microbial metabolism in mature fine tailings (MFT) amended with an organic substrate (hydrolyzed canola meal) produced methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Dissolution of biogenic CO2 lowered the pH of amended MFT to pH 6.4 vs. unamended MFT (pH 7.7). About 12% more porewater was recovered from amended than unamended MFT during 2 months of active microbial metabolism, concomitant with consolidation of tailings. The lower pH in amended MFT dissolved carbonate minerals, thereby releasing divalent cations including calcium (Ca(2+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)) and increasing bicarbonate (HCO(-) 3) in porewater. The higher concentrations increased the ionic strength of the porewater, in turn reducing the thickness of the diffuse double layer (DDL) of clay particles by reducing the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles. The combination of these processes accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. In addition, ebullition of biogenic gases created transient physical channels for release of porewater. In contrast, saturating the MFT with non-biogenic CO2 had little effect on consolidation. These results have significant implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds and broad importance in anaerobic environments such as contaminated harbors and estuaries containing soft sediments rich in clays and organics. PMID:24711805

  4. Determination of the Fine Structure Constant Using Helium Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Smiciklas, Marc; Shiner, David [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2010-09-17

    We measure 31 908 131.25(30) kHz for the 2{sup 3}P J=0 to 2 fine structure interval in helium. The difference between this and theory to order m{alpha}{sup 7} (20 Hz numerical uncertainty) implies 0.22(30) kHz for uncalculated terms. The measurement is performed by using atomic beam and electro-optic laser techniques. Various checks include a {sup 3}He 2{sup 3}S hyperfine measurement. We can obtain an independent value for the fine structure constant {alpha} with a 5 ppb experimental uncertainty. However, dominant m{alpha}{sup 8} terms (potentially 1.2 kHz) limit the overall uncertainty to a less competitive 20 ppb in {alpha}.

  5. Incorporation of CrusHed Sands and Tunisian Desert Sands in the Composition of Self Compacting Concretes Part I: Study of Formulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdelhamid Rmili; Mongi Ben Ouezdou; Mhamed Added; Elhem Ghorbel

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the incorporation of the crushed sand (CS) and desert sand (DS) in the formation of self compacting con- crete (SCC). These sands have been substituted for the rolled sand (RS), which is currently the only sand used in concretes and which is likely to run out in our country. DS, which comes from the Tunisian Sahara in

  6. [Application of minirhizotron in fine root studies].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwei; Yu, Lizhong; Yu, Shuiqiang; Han, Youzhi; Wang, Zhengquan; Guo, Dali

    2006-04-01

    Due to the production, death, and decomposition of fine root, its turnover plays an important role in carbon allocation and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Some methods such as sequential root coring, compartmental flow model, and ingrowth core have been widely used in collecting root biomass data and estimating fine root turnover, but failed in monitoring the dynamics of fine root due to its simultaneous production and death. Minirhizotron is a nondestructive in situ method for studying the dynamics of fine root, which allows the simultaneous measurement of fine root growth and mortality. This paper reviewed the application of minirhizotron in fine root studies, with the focus on minirhizotron tube installation, image collection, data extraction, and calculation parameters. In a case study, the total fine root length, fine root length density per unit volume, fine root length density per unit area, fine root biomass density, and fine root production and mortality of Fraxinus mandshurica and Larix gmelini were calculated, and the results showed that minirhizotron method was feasible in studying the processes of fine root development, eclipse, death, and decomposition. The factors affecting fine root measurement and its precision mainly included the quality and quantity of tube installation, sampling interval and quantity, and analysis technique of images, etc. Soil texture, tube material, and disturbance of light on root were also the factors affecting the precision of the method. How to improve the measurement precision of minirhizotron would be the critical problem in future study. PMID:16836108

  7. Analysis of wind-blown sand movement over transverse dunes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification. PMID:25434372

  8. Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification. PMID:25434372

  9. Event sand layers suggesting the possibility of tsunami deposits identified in the upper Holocene sequence nearby the Kuwana fault, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Y.; Sugai, T.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Kuwana fault is located on coastal area situated on inner part of the Ise Bay, central Japan, which opens to the Nankai Trough. This reverse fault displaces a late Pleistocene terrace surface with 1 to 2 mm/yr of average vertical slip rate, and a topset of delta at several meters, respectively. And, this fault is estimated to have generated two historical earthquakes (the AD 745 Tempyo and the AD 1586 Tensho earthquakes). We identified two event sand layers from upper Holocene sequence on the upthrown side of the Kuwana fault. Upper Holocene deposits in this study area show prograding delta sequence; prodelta mud, delta front sandy silt to sand, and flood plain sand/mud, respectively, from lower to upper. Two sand layers intervene in delta front sandy silt layer, respectively. Lower sand layer (S1) shows upward-coarsening succession, whereas upper sand layer (S2) upward-fining succession. These sand layers contain sharp contact, rip-up crust, and shell fragment, indicating strong stream flow. Radiocarbon ages show that these strong stream flow events occurred between 3000 and 1600 years ago. Decreasing of salinity is estimated from decreasing trend of electrical conductivity (EC) across S1. Based on the possibility that decreasing of salinity can be occurred by shallowing of water depth caused by coseismic uplift, and that S1 can be correlated with previously known faulting event on the Kuwana fault, S1 is considered to be tsunami deposits caused by faulting on the Kuwana fault. On the other hand, S2, which cannot be correlated with previously known faulting events on the Kuwana fault, may be tsunami deposits by ocean-trench earthquake or storm deposits. In the presentation, we will discuss more detail correlation of these sand deposits not only in the upthrown side of the Kuwana fault, but also downthrown side of the fault.

  10. Case history of Yakin Field: its development and sand control

    SciTech Connect

    Sawolo, N.; Krueger, R.F.; Maly, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    This study deals with the development of the Yakin Field in E. Kalimantan, Indonesia, with emphasis on the sand control methods used. Implementation of an effective sand control program insured the successful development of this field. Gravel packed wells had substantially lower production decline rates than the initial completions without gravel packs. Control of sand production also has been demonstrated by the lack of sand problems during the 4-1/2 yr since the sand control program was initiated. During this time there have been no failures of submersible pumps that were associated with sand production. The successful sand control program was achieved by a well coordinated and cooperative effort of drilling, reservoir engineering, production research, and service company personnel.

  11. Strength and sintering effects at ejection of explosively driven sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Weckert, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    A description of the response of sand to extreme loads is very important for the evaluation of the sand ejecta impact effects on various targets. Sand is a complex material to simulate because of its porosity where the inter-phase equilibrium is hard to achieve under transient shock wave loading. A previously developed two-phase model with strength has been implemented in CTH and applied to sand. The shock response of the sand, including the Hugoniot abnormality known from the literature for highly porous silica, is adequately described with the material model. The sand unloading effects appearing as the ejecta are observed in the present work using dynamic flash X-ray of an aluminium target plate loaded by limestone sand ejecta from the detonation of a buried high explosive charge. The CTH modelling results compared with the flash X-ray images have demonstrated good agreement, particularly, in the description of momentum transfer to the target.

  12. Different depth intermittent sand filters for laboratory treatment of synthetic wastewater with concentrations close to measured septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Walsh, G; Healy, M G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply hydraulic and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates at the upper limits of the design criteria for buried sand filters to test the sand filter depth design criteria. Over a 274-day study duration, synthetic effluent with a strength of domestic wastewater was intermittently dosed onto two sand filters of 0.2 m diameter, with depths of 0.3 and 0.4 m. Hydraulic and organic carbon loading rates of 105 L m(-2) d(-1) and 40 g COD m(-2) d(-1), respectively, were applied to the filters. The filters did not clog and had good effluent removal capabilities for 274 and 190 days, respectively. However, the 0.3 m-deep filter did experience a reduced performance towards the end of the study period. In the 0.3 and 0.4 m-deep filters, the effluent COD and SS concentrations were less than 86 and 31 mg L(-1), respectively, and nitrification was nearly complete in both these columns. Ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)-P) removal in fine sand and laterite 'upflow' filters, receiving effluent from the 0.3 m-deep filter, was 10% and 44%, respectively. PMID:21104498

  13. 47 CFR 76.943 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Regulation § 76.943 Fines. (a) A franchising authority may impose fines or monetary...at the cable operator, provided the franchising authority has such power under state...fails to comply with the terms of any franchising authority's order,...

  14. 47 CFR 76.943 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Regulation § 76.943 Fines. (a) A franchising authority may impose fines or monetary...at the cable operator, provided the franchising authority has such power under state...fails to comply with the terms of any franchising authority's order,...

  15. Urn model of separation of sand.

    PubMed

    Lipowski, Adam; Droz, Michel

    2002-03-01

    We introduce an urn model that describes spatial separation of sand. In this dynamical model, in a certain range of parameters spontaneous symmetry breaking takes place and equipartitioning of sand into two compartments is broken. The steady-state equation for an order parameter, a critical line, and the tricritical point on the phase diagram are found exactly. The master equation and the first-passage problem for the model are solved numerically and the results are used to locate first-order transitions. Exponential divergence of a certain characteristic time shows that the model can also exhibit very strong metastability. In certain cases characteristic time diverges as N(z), where N is the number of balls and z=1 / 2 (critical line), 2 / 3 (tricritical point), or 1 / 3 (limits of stability). PMID:11909046

  16. Three dimensional fabric evolution of sheared sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Alsidqi; Alshibli, Khalid (UWA)

    2012-10-24

    Granular particles undergo translation and rolling when they are sheared. This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) experimental assessment of fabric evolution of sheared sand at the particle level. F-75 Ottawa sand specimen was tested under an axisymmetric triaxial loading condition. It measured 9.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. The quantitative evaluation was conducted by analyzing 3D high-resolution x-ray synchrotron micro-tomography images of the specimen at eight axial strain levels. The analyses included visualization of particle translation and rotation, and quantification of fabric orientation as shearing continued. Representative individual particles were successfully tracked and visualized to assess the mode of interaction between them. This paper discusses fabric evolution and compares the evolution of particles within and outside the shear band as shearing continues. Changes in particle orientation distributions are presented using fabric histograms and fabric tensor.

  17. Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) Efforts and Observations at the Rocknest Eolian Sand Shadow in Curiosity's Gale Crater Field Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, K. S.; Yingst, R. A.; Minitti, M. E.; Goetz, W.; Kah, L. C.; Kennedy, M. R.; Lipkaman, L. J.; Jensen, E. H.; Anderson, R. C.; Beegle, L. W.; Carsten, J. L.; Cooper, B.; Deen, R. G.; Dromart, G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V. E.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Harker, D. E.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Herrera, P. N.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Jandura, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is focused on assessing the past or present habitability of Mars, through interrogation of environment and environmental records at the Curiosity rover field site in Gale crater. The MSL team has two methods available to collect, process and deliver samples to onboard analytical laboratories, the Chemistry and Mineralogy instrument (CheMin) and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite. One approach obtains samples by drilling into a rock, the other uses a scoop to collect loose regolith fines. Scooping was planned to be first method performed on Mars because materials could be readily scooped multiple times and used to remove any remaining, minute terrestrial contaminants from the sample processing system, the Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis (CHIMRA). Because of this cleaning effort, the ideal first material to be scooped would consist of fine to very fine sand, like the interior of the Serpent Dune studied by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit team in 2004 [1]. The MSL team selected a linear eolian deposit in the lee of a group of cobbles they named Rocknest (Fig. 1) as likely to be similar to Serpent Dune. Following the definitions in Chapter 13 of Bagnold [2], the deposit is termed a sand shadow. The scooping campaign occurred over approximately 6 weeks in October and November 2012. To support these activities, the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) acquired images for engineering support/assessment and scientific inquiry.

  18. Comparison of SAND-II and FERRET

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, D.W.; Schmittroth, F.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison was made of the advantages and disadvantages of two codes, SAND-II and FERRET, for determining the neutron flux spectrum and uncertainty from experimental dosimeter measurements as anticipated in the FFTF Reactor Characterization Program. This comparison involved an examination of the methodology and the operational performance of each code. The merits of each code were identified with respect to theoretical basis, directness of method, solution uniqueness, subjective influences, and sensitivity to various input parameters.

  19. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Western Gas Sands Project status report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1978-01-01

    The status of government sponsored projects undertaken to increase gas production from low-permeability gas sands of the western United States during August 1978 is summarized. Background information is given in the September 1977 Status Report, NVO\\/0655-100. One of the largest massive Hydraulic Fracture (MHF) treatment to date was performed on Gas Producing Enterprises Well No. CIGE 2-29. C.H. Atkinson, Western

  1. Flocculation settling characteristics of mud: sand mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Manning; John V. Baugh; Jeremy R. Spearman; Richard J. S. Whitehouse

    2010-01-01

    When natural muds become mixed with sandy sediments in estuaries, it has a direct effect on the flocculation process and resultant\\u000a sediment transport regime. Much research has been completed on the erosion and consolidation of mud\\/sand mixtures, but very\\u000a little is known quantitatively about how mixed sediments interact whilst in suspension, particularly in terms of flocculation.\\u000a This paper presents the

  2. Gravity and density dependences of sand avalanches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Evesque; D. Fargeix; P. Habib; M. P. Luong; P. Porion

    1992-01-01

    We demonstrate using centrifuge experiment (10 1000 m\\/s^2) on sand avalanches that: i) grain cohesion is negligible, ii) the avalanche size and the maximum angle of repose depend on the initial pile-density, iii) an internal friction angle may be defined and corresponds to that measured with triaxial cell as assumed in soil mechanics. These data are coherent with a dilatancy

  3. Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, T.K. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

  4. Sand Martin Riparia riparia ? male or female?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Cowley

    1999-01-01

    8,037 examinations were made of brood patches of Sand Martins from 1971 to 1992 in north Nottinghamshire and given one of 12 different descriptions. The 1,997 birds which were examined more than once (5,443 times in total) and identified as 1,061 females and 936 males from the types of patch\\/es they had carried were then used to test the accuracy

  5. The JWST fine guidance sensor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil Rowlands; David Aldridge; Richard Allen; Clinton Evans; Phil Gregory; Earl Hartwig; Brian Mackay; John Metcalfe; Gareth Richardson; Dwight Caldwell; Robert Deschambault; Terry Girard; John Hackett; Dennis Henry; John B. Hutchings; Chris Morbey; Richard Murowinski; Rene Doyon; Russ Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The science instrumentation for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has concluded its Phase A definition stage. We have developed a concept for the JWST Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), which will form the Canadian contribution to the mission. As part of the JWST re-plan in early 2003, the FGS design was recast to incorporate a narrow-band (R~100) science-imaging mode. This

  6. New production techniques for alberta oil sands.

    PubMed

    Carrigy, M A

    1986-12-19

    Low world oil prices represent a serious threat to expanded commercial development of the Canadian oil sands in the near term, as they do to all of the higher cost alternatives to crude oil such as oil shales and coal liquefaction. Nonetheless, research and field testing of new technology for production of oil from oil sands are being pursued by industry and government in Alberta. New production technology is being developed in Canada to produce synthetic oil from the vast resources of bitumen trapped in the oil sands and bituminous carbonates of northern Alberta. This technology includes improved methods of mining, extraction, and upgrading of bitumen from near-surface deposits as well as new drilling and production techniques for thermal production of bitumen from the more deeply buried reservoirs. Of particular interest are the cluster drilling methods designed to reduce surface disturbance and the techniques for horizontal drilling of wells from underground tunnels to increase the contact of injection fluids with the reservoir. PMID:17816505

  7. Recovery of hydrocarbons from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Dente, M.; Antonelli, L.; Gallazzi, C.

    1984-07-10

    The process for the substantially total recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands comprises: Preconditioning of the sands with diluent, possibly water (which may also be recycled from the process) and, preferably, with recycle extract; digestion of the homogeneous pulp, with (process) water; a first separation of the water-sand suspension from the hydrocarbon phase and from the digestion water; simultaneous washing and mixing of the solids separated from the bulk of the hydrocarbon phase in thick phase with overflowing water; a possible second separation of the dense solid mass from the excess liquid phase, the intermediate aqueous layer from the first separation (middlings) undergoing decantation and thickening and the solids so thickened undergoing centrifugation and stripping for the recovery of the limited proportions of diluent entrained with it. The equipment for this process consists of a preconditioner, a digestor, a first separator, a thick phase mixer, a possible second separator, a decanter-thickener, a centrifuge and a stripper, besides the possible apparatus for treating the diluted bitumen.

  8. Fine Art in Higher Education in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the status of fine arts in English higher education. Examines the relationship between fine arts and design education. States that fine arts education has professional relevance as a substantial number of graduates pursue careers which contribute to the wealth-producing sectors of the economy. (GEA)

  9. Considering Fine Art and Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2015-01-01

    There has been a close association between picturebook illustrations and works of fine art since the picturebook was first conceived, and many ways these associations among works of fine art and picturebook illustrations and design play out. To make sense of all the various ways picturebook illustrations are associated with works of fine art,…

  10. Fine pitch copper wire bonding — Why now?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd K. Appelt; Andy Tseng; Yi-Shao Lai

    2009-01-01

    Fine pitch Cu wire bonding is at the cusp of becoming main stream. Many challenges had to be overcome when making the transition from fine pitch Au wire bonding to fine pitch Cu wire bonding in a high volume manufacturing environment. The challenges for Cu wire bonding arise from the inherent properties of Cu: propensity to oxidize, increased hardness, slow

  11. Measurement of fine sediment infiltration and deposition rates within a gravel bed: a pilot study in the Geul River, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Perk, Marcel; Stoutjesdijk, Jedidja; van der Werf, Mirke

    2013-04-01

    Transient storage of fine sediments in the river bed determines the fine sediment residence time in gravel bed streams at intermediate time scales between days and a few years. We measured the sediment infiltration into the gravel bed at two locations in the Geul River, the Netherlands (mean discharge = 2 m3 s-1) using two methods: 1) a gravimetric method and 2) a metal concentration-based method. Both methods involved the placement of sediment traps, consisting of cylindrical mesh cages with a diameter of 15 cm and a height of 10 cm, in the gravel bed. In the first method, the cage was filled with clean gravel greater than 12.5 mm (the size of the mesh openings) collected from the local river bed (D50 ? 19 mm). In the second method, the sediment traps were filled with clean gravel and about 700 grams of fine sand. During the sampling period, this 'clean' sand was contaminated by deposition of metal-contaminated fine sediment from the Geul River. After four to eight days, the sediment traps were removed. A bag around the cage, which had been lowered during sampling, prevented the fine sediment to wash out from the sediment traps during removal. The fine sediment was washed from the sediment traps and subsequently dried and weighed. For the second method, the zinc concentrations of the fine sand and the fine sediment collected from the sediment traps were measured using a Thermo Fisher Scientific Niton® handheld XRF analyser. The sediment infiltration or deposition rates were then calculated from the differences between the zinc concentrations in the sediment samples and the 'clean' sand. The fine sediment deposition rates measured using the concentration-based method (0.49 ± 0.20 kg m-2 d-1 [mean ± 1 st. dev. ]) were consistent with those measured using the gravimetric method (0.54 ± 0.22 kg m-2 d-1). The mean and variation of the fine sediment deposition rates increased with stream discharge during the sampling period. The corresponding vertical mass fluxes in a 1 km long river reach are on the same order of magnitude as the longitudinal suspended sediment flux of the Geul River. This means that sediment infiltration into the gravel bed comprises a substantial portion of the sediment budget of the Geul River.

  12. Dynamics of deposited fly-ash and fine grained magnetite in sandy material of different porosity (column experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapicka, Ales; Kodesova, Radka; Petrovsky, Eduard; Grison, Hana

    2010-05-01

    Several studies confirm that soil magnetometry can serve as proxy of industrial immisions as well as heavy-metal contamination. The important assumption for magnetic mapping of contaminated soils is that atmospherically deposited particulate matter, including the ferrimagnetic phase, accumulates in the top soil horizons and remains there over long period. Only if this is true, large areas can be reliably mapped using soil magnetometry, and, moreover, this method can be used also for long-term monitoring. However, in soil types such as sandy soils with different porosity or soils with substantial variability of water regime, translocation of the deposited anthropogenic particles may result in biased (underestimated) values of the measured topsoil magnetic susceptibility. From the physical point of view, this process may be considered as colloid transport through porous medium. In our column experiments in laboratory we used three technical sands with different particle sizes (0,63 - 1.25mm, 0,315-0,80mm, 0,10-0,63mm). Sands in cylinders were contaminated on the surface by fly-ashes from coal-burning power plant (mean grain size 10?m) and fine grained Fe3O4 (grain size < 20 ?m). Soil moisture sensors were used to monitor water regime within the sand columns after controlled rain simulation and temperature distribution in sand column was measured as well. Vertical migration of ferrimagnetic particles-tracers presented in the fly-ash was measured by SM 400 Kappameter. By means of magnetic susceptibility distribution we studied two parameters: gradual shift of peak concentration of contaminants (relative to surface layer) and maximum penetration depth. Results indicated that after rain simulation (pulls infiltration of defined water volume) the positions of peak values moved downwards compared to the initial state and gradual decrease of susceptibility peak values were detected in all studied sand formations. Fly-ash migrated more or less freely in coarse sand material. In medium and fine sand the contaminants moved only to the depths of several cm due to the pore-space blocking and water flow decrease. Fine-grained magnetite shows different behavior. Position of peaks value is more or less stable and maximum depth of penetration is only a few cm in all cases. Higher grain size value is probably reason for higher stability of magnetite. Moreover, magnetic interaction between grains increase "effective" grain size value and restricts transport in material with given porosity. This research is supported by the Grant Agency ASCR under grant IAA300120701

  13. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-09-01

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  14. Effect of fines on mechanical properties of soil-tire chip mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tatlisoz, N. [International United Consultants, Inc., Istanbul (Turkey); Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Large quantities of waste tires can be beneficially used by incorporating them into structural fill employed in earthwork projects such as highway embankments and backfills for retaining structures. These applications require knowledge of the bulk mechanical properties of tire chips and soil-tire chip mixtures. The objective of the study described in this paper was to evaluate the mechanical properties and behavior of waste tire chips and their mixtures with fine- and coarse-grained soils. Large-scale laboratory testing equipment was used to conduct the study. Tests were conducted to evaluate shear strength, deformability, and compressibility. Mixtures made with typical backfill soils such as clean sand, sandy silt, and clay were tested. Results of the tests show that tire chips and soil-tire chip mixtures behave like soils, but are more compressible and also require more deformation to mobilize their ultimate shear strength. Incorporation of tire chips in the backfill results in a reduction in unit weight and, for mixtures containing sand or sandy silt, an increase in shear strength. In contrast, clay-tire chip mixtures have the same or lower shear strength as clay alone. Strength envelopes for sand-tire chip mixtures can be non-linear, and have virtually no cohesion intercept. Mixtures containing sandy silt behave similar to mixtures made with sand, except the shear strength envelope for the sandy silt-tire chip mixture is linear and has a cohesion intercept. Sand-tire chip and sandy silt-tire chip mixtures exhibit similar long-term compression behavior.

  15. A Biopersistence Study following Exposure to Chrysotile Asbestos Alone or in Combination with Fine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, D. M.; Donaldson, K.; Decker, U.; Gaering, S.; Kunzendorf, P.; Chevalier, J.; Holm, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    In designing a study to evaluate the inhalation biopersistence of a chrysotile asbestos that was used as a component of a joint-compound, a feasibility study was initiated to evaluate the short-term biopersistence of the chrysotile alone and of the chrysotile in combination witht the sanded reformulated joint-compound. Two groups of Wistar rats were exposed to either 7RF3 chrysotile (Group 2) or to 7RF3 chrysotile combined with aerosolized sanded joint-compound (Group 3). In addition, a control group was exposed to flltered-air. The chrysotile used in the Ready Mix joint compound is rapidly removed from the lung. The chrysotile alone exposure group had a clearance half-time of fibers L > 20 ?m of 2.2 days; in the chrysotile plus sanded exposure group the clearance half-time of fibers L > 20 ?m was 2.8 days. However, across all size ranges there was approximately an order of magnitude decrease in the mean number of fibers remaining in the lungs of Group 3 as compared to Group 2 despite similiar aerosol exposures. Histopathological examination showed that the chrysotile exposed lungs had the same appearance as the flltered-air controls. This study uniquely illustrates that additional concurrent exposure to an aerosol of the sanded joint-compound, with large numbers of fine-particles depositing in the lungs, accelerates the recruitment of macrophages, resulting in a tenfold decrease in the number of fibers remaining in the lung. The increased number of macrophages in the chrysotile/sanded joint exposure group was confirmed histologically, with this being the only exposure-related histological finding reported. PMID:18788018

  16. Provenance, areal distribution, and contemporary sedimentation of quartz sand and silt types on the mid-atlantic continental shelf

    E-print Network

    Prusak, Deanne

    1985-01-01

    ; the distribution pattern of the coastal plain sand overlies the coastal plain river systems and exposed cuestas. The coincidence of these paleogeographic features with the sediment types indicates that modern processes on the shelf have not been intense enough... of the major rivers of the eastern United States (Table 1), in which ebb and flood channels and shoals are present. In general, fine-grained, moderate- to poorly-sorted sediment is. confined to the estuaries and nearshore areas (Schlee, 1973; Demars et al...

  17. Provenance, areal distribution, and contemporary sedimentation of quartz sand and silt types on the mid-atlantic continental shelf 

    E-print Network

    Prusak, Deanne

    1985-01-01

    of the major rivers of the eastern United States (Table 1), in which ebb and flood channels and shoals are present. In general, fine-grained, moderate- to poorly-sorted sediment is. confined to the estuaries and nearshore areas (Schlee, 1973; Demars et al...; Mazzullo et al. , 1984) interpret this grain shape type as a mature sand that has been subjected to repeated prolonged periods of chemical weathering in soils. It is concluded that end member 1 grains are derived from unconsolidated to poorly...

  18. Coal fines consolidation. [269 references

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, A.

    1984-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to survey existing methods and techniques for consolidating coal fines into lump coal which would be suitable as feed to fixed bed gasifiers. Another objective was to characterize the properties of consolidated coal which would establish its suitability for use in such gasifiers. To accomplish these objectives, a search of the technical literature was conducted in the pertinent subject areas. In addition, a survey was made of industrial and research organizations which have been active in the field of coal consolidation. The literature search mainly covered the period from 1970 to the present, although certain basic references were dated in the early 1900's. Approximately 250 from a total of about 1500 references were identified as relevant to the scope of this study. Information on coal consolidation was solicited from about thirty organizations and a response of about 50% was obtained. A review and evaluation of the relevant technical literature was made and is summarized, along with information provided by the survey responses, in the body of this report. Three primary methods for mechanically consolidating coal fines were identified; briquetting, pelletizing, and extrusion. Based on the limited experience reported, it appears that the technical feasibility of consolidating coal fines as feed to fixed bed gasifiers has been demonstrated. Costs for producing coal agglomerates, as reported in the literature, vary over a wide range, from about 7 to about 30 dollars per ton of product. The low cost range might be acceptable in terms of an overall gasification project but further effort is required to determine if such costs are attainable in practice. 269 references.

  19. Long-term sand supply to Coachella Valley Fringe-toed Lizard Habitat in the Northern Coachella Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Lancaster, Nicholas; Kaehler, Charles A.; Lundstrom, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The Coachella Valley fringe-toed lizard (Uma inornata) is a federally listed threatened species that inhabits active sand dunes in the vicinity of Palm Springs, California. The Whitewater Floodplain and Willow Hole Reserves provide some of the primary remaining habitat for this species. The sediment-delivery system that creates these active sand dunes consists of fluvial depositional areas fed episodically by ephemeral streams. Finer fluvial sediments (typically sand size and finer) are mobilized in a largely unidirectional wind field associated with strong westerly winds through San Gorgonio Pass. The fluvial depositional areas are primarily associated with floodplains of the Whitewater?San Gorgonio Rivers and Mission Creek?Morongo Wash; other small drainages also contribute fluvial sediment to the eolian system. The eolian dunes are transitory as a result of unidirectional sand movement from the depositional areas, which are recharged with fine-grained sediment only during episodic floods that typically occur during El Ni?o years. Eolian sand moves primarily from west to east through the study area; the period of maximum eolian activity is April through June. Wind speed varies diurnally, with maximum velocities typically occurring during the afternoon. Development of alluvial fans, alteration of stream channels by channelization, in-stream gravel mining, and construction of infiltration galleries were thought to reduce the amount of fluvial sediment reaching the depositional areas upwind of Uma habitat. Also, the presence of roadways, railroads, and housing developments was thought to disrupt or redirect eolian sand movement. Most of the sediment yield to the fluvial system is generated in higher elevation areas with little or no development, and sediment yield is affected primarily by climatic fluctuations and rural land use, particularly livestock grazing and wildfire. Channelization benefits sediment delivery to the depositional plains upwind of the reserves by minimizing in-channel sediment storage on the alluvial fans. The post-development annual sediment yield to the Whitewater and Mission Creek?Morongo Wash depositional areas are 3.5 and 1.5 million ft3/yr, respectively, covering each depositional area to a depth of 0.2 to 0.4 in. Given existing sand-transport rates, this material could be depleted by eolian processes in 8 to 16 months, a rate consistent with the presence of persistent sand dunes. However, these depletion times are likely minimum estimates, as some eolian sand is seen to persist in the immediate vicinity of depositional areas for longer time periods. Transport rates may be reduced by the presence of vegetation and other windbreaks. Because they are perpendicular to prevailing winds, the infiltration galleries on Whitewater River trap fluvial and eolian sediment, reducing sediment availability. Also, the presence of the railroad and Interstate 10 redirect eolian sand movement to the southeast along their corridors,potentially eliminating the Whitewater depositional area as a sand source for the Willow Hole Reserve. Using directional wind data, we discuss the potential for eolian sand transport from the Mission Creek?Morongo Wash depositional area to Willow Hole.

  20. Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?

    E-print Network

    Norberto Sainz

    2012-01-23

    We work on the family of topologies for the Minkowski manifold M. We partially order this family by inclusion to form the lattice \\Sigma(M), and focus on the sublattice Z of topologies that induce the Euclidean metric space on every time axis and every space axis. We analyze the bounds of Z in the lattice \\Sigma(M), in search for its supremum. Our conclusion --that such a supremum does not belong in Z-- is compared with constructive proofs of existence of the fine topology, defined as the maximum of Z and conceived to play an essential role in contemporary physical theories. Essential mathematical and physical questions arise.

  1. Cytotoxicity of yellow sand in lung epithelial cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. H. Kim; K. S. Kim; N. J. Kwak; K. H. Lee; S. A. Kweon; Y. Lim

    2003-01-01

    The present study was carried out to observe the cytotoxicity of yellow sand in comparison with silica and titanium dioxide\\u000a in a rat alveolar type II cell line (RLE-6TN). Yellow sand (China Loess) was obtained from the loess layer in the Gunsu Province\\u000a of China. The mean particle diameter of yellow sand was about 0003 ± 0.001 mm. Major elements

  2. Water Conservation and Management with Hydrophobic Encapsulation of Sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed A. Salem; Wasef Al-Zayadneh; Abdul Jaleel Cheruth

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic sand (HS) is ordinary beach sand coated with tiny particles of pure silica, which have been exposed to a special\\u000a chemical treatment vapors of a silicon compound called trimethylhydroxysilane (CH3)3SiOH. The additive creates a capillary breaking hydrophobic encapsulation of the sand making it resistant to salts, particularly\\u000a sodium chloride salts. This can be serving as a pure water repellent

  3. Final report on Thermally Modified Sand demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-23

    The use of salt and salt/sand mixtures on icy roadway surfaces has dramatically increased during the past 30 years. Despite extensive documentation on salt related damage to the roadway improvements, vehicles and the environment, road maintenance departments have continued to rely on this practice. Road maintenance departments in northern climate areas have long recognized the safety benefits for public mobility on icy roadways from the use of sand. As an abrasive material, the sand improves the surface traction that results in more drivable and less hazardous road conditions during the winter months. Stockpiles of pure sand stored during the winter months oftentimes freeze into large unworkable, monolithic piles. To maintain a free-flowing condition, it has been found to be necessary to add salt to the sand. The addition of salt in amounts ranging from 5 to 10 percent to that of sand, is usually sufficient to provide relatively free-flowing abrasive material that could be stored in stockpiles and applied to icy road surfaces with conventional sand spreading trucks. Another alternative for winter storage of pure sand to maintain a free-flowing condition is in humidity-controlled, heated buildings. As would be expected, this method has high capital and operating costs. and not cost effective for general highway maintenance use. The invention demonstrated herein is a method of thermally modifying pure sand that will remain in a free-flowing state throughout the winter season without the need for the salt additive. The thermally modified sand provides an abrasive material that when applied to icy roads does not cause environmental and corrosive damage as done by the application of sand with salt. By employing a very simple process of freezing screened sand particles by forced air convection under subfreezing conditions, the invention creates a product that has significant value in terms of economic and environmental benefits.

  4. Testing the Delaware sand filter's effectiveness for treating stormwater runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynska, D.; Dzurik, A.

    1998-07-01

    The use of the Delaware Sand Filter for treatment of ultra-urban stormwater is investigated for Florida applications. An experimental Delaware filter is designed in conjunction with a typical sand filter as part of a street improvement project in Tallahassee, Florida. The design allows for testing of different filter media in an attempt to determine the suitability of the Delaware Sand Filter in hot climates with numerous heavy rainfall episodes.

  5. Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of beaches but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on beaches in a regional area and their relationship to beach management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida beaches in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida beach sands although their levels varied greatly both among the beaches and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each beach correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in beach water and sands throughout South Florida’s beaches and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting beach water quality. As a result, beaches with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to beaches with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating beach sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324

  6. Sand erosion performance of CVD boron carbide coated tungsten carbide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. K Wood; D. W Wheeler; D. C Lejeau; B. G Mellor

    1999-01-01

    The erosion performance and the interaction between the micro-mechanisms of erosion and the microstructure of a chemical vapour deposited boron carbide coating are presented. Samples were tested using both water–sand slurry and air–sand jet impingements at 90° incidence. Tests used angular quartz sand with a mean diameter between 135 and 235 ?m and jet impingement velocities between 16 and 268

  7. Distribution, chemical speciation, and mobility of lead and antimony originating from small arms ammunition in a coarse-grained unsaturated surface sand.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Sjöström, Jan; Skyllberg, Ulf; Hägglund, Lars

    2010-01-01

    This study quantified the heavy metal contamination caused by firing 500 high-velocity 7.62-mm jacketed Swedish military rounds. Contamination of solid and aqueous phases was studied, with Pb and Sb being the two contaminants of primary interest. The distribution of the Pb and Sb were measured in terms of depth of penetration in sand and grain size distribution of the bullet particles. The Pb- and Sb-contaminated sand was then used as a source material in two bench-scale unsaturated lysimeters to measure the transport of Pb and Sb through two coarse-grained sands, which were taken from the berms on two Swedish military small arms ranges. The lysimeters were subjected to an infiltration cycle that reproduced spring snowmelt, which is the most significant infiltration event of the year in northern climates. The levels of mobile Pb and Sb were monitored in the effluent from the lysimeters. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analysis was performed on the contaminated sands to determine Pb speciation before and after leaching. Ninety-three percent of the mass of bullets was found in the top 30 cm of sand. Lead oxide was the predominant species of Pb before and after leaching. Transport of Pb was small, with aqueous concentrations remaining stable at <2 microg L(-1). Antimony was far more mobile, with solute breakthrough occurring between 5 and 14 d and concentrations rising to over 125 microg L(-1) within 1 month. PMID:20400582

  8. Delineation of the distributions of sand bodies in the offshore Sado Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, T.; Saeki, T.; Takano, O.; Shimoda, N.

    2009-12-01

    The “Sadooki Nansei” 3D seismic survey was carried out in the deep water of the southwest offshore Sado Island in the Sea of Japan by the Ministry of Economics, Trade and Industry (METI). The bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) in the Pleistocene Haizume Formation on the seismic data indicate the existence of methane hydrates (MH) in the region, and MH nodules have been collected from mud layers beneath the sea floor. According to several recent researches that have been done in other areas around Japan, MH can concentrate within porous media such as turbidite sand layers, and the distributions of sand bodies within turbidite systems are successfully imaged by higher amplitude reflectors on 3D seismic data. In this study, the 3D seismic cube is mainly used to map the distributions of sand bodies, which leads to estimation of MH concentrations. The greater part of sediments in the Haizume Formation consists of mud or fine-grained sediments deposited in deep marine environment. The coarse-grained deposits generally yield acoustic impedance contrasts to their surrounding mud layers, and they should be shown as relatively higher amplitude reflectors, either peaks or troughs, on the 3D seismic data. Therefore, several high amplitude reflectors are tracked upon the assumptions that the high amplitude reflectors correspond to sand bodies. Numerous submarine fans and landslide deposits in the Haizume Formation are identified along the flanks of the northward-striking Umitaka Spur on the seismic data. The turbidites deposited in numerous submarine channels can be observed east of the spur. The reflectors of coarse-grained deposits in submarine fans or channels tend to have relatively higher amplitude values than their surroundings. The landslide deposits exhibit chaotic low amplitude reflectors overlain by high amplitude reflectors on the seismic cross sections. The depositional patterns can be estimated by images of seismic amplitude values draped onto interpreted horizons. Imaging and estimating the distributions of sand bodies within turbidite deposits using high amplitude reflectors will help the evaluation of the MH concentrations in the offshore Sado Island region. Acknowledgment: This study was carried out in the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium). The authors express their gratitude to MH21 Research Consortium for the permission to publish the result of this study.

  9. Lower Miocene (Upper Ottnangian) sands in the Lower Austrian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palzer, Markus; Knierzinger, Wolfgang; Wagreich, Michael; Gier, Susanne; Meszar, Maria Elisabeth; Soliman, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In the Early Miocene (late Ottnangian), a global sea level drop and the continuous rise of the Alps lead to the regression of the Parathethys sea, and to the sedimentation of the Upper Freshwater Molasse. In the Lower Austrian Molasse Basin, this event is represented by yellowish-brownish to greyish white mica-rich and carbonate-free sands and silts with clayish interlayers, formerly called Oncophora Beds (OB), which crop out between St. Pölten and Tulln. A new lithostratigraphy combines these sediments, now called Traisen-Formation (TF) together with the Dietersdorf Formation within the Pixendorf Group. Drill cores from OMV-wells predominantly from the NE show hundreds of meters thick sequences of pelites with intersections of sands interpreted as representing the OB. Contrary to the mainly brackish TF, a turbiditic marine deeper-water environment is inferred. An OMV-funded project investigates the relationship between these sediments, their stratigraphical and chronological range, provenance, facies and internal stratigraphy. First results from outcrops and several wells in the NE confirm large differences in grain size, structures and carbonate content. XRD-results indicate quartz, feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite and dolomite as the main minerals within the sands and pelites. Pyrite is frequent. Halite and kaolinite occur. Whole rock chemistry, carbonate content measurements and biostratigraphic investigations of samples from the Wildendürnbach K4 well indicate, that these turbiditic OB can be divided into two sections: A lower fossil-free, carbonate poor and probably brackish (indicated by B/Al* and TOC/S) section with only few turbiditic very fine sands, and an upper microfossil bearing, marine section with carbonate contents up to 30% and more and coarser turbiditic sands. Therefore we use the working terms Lower and Upper Wildendürnbach Member (LWM, UWM). The lower part is enriched in (redox sensitive) heavy minerals such as Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Gd, Ni, Pb, Sc, Zn and REE. It shows much lower constant Sr (about 140 ppm) values and B/Al* ratios (about 80) than the upper part (150 - 250 ppm; >120). The TOC/S ratio is much higher (17-23) in the LWM than in the UWM (>5). These two members can be correlated quite well by SP-logs over several wells. Therefore it can be concluded, that the lower part represents a period of salinity and carbonate crisis which may correspond to an (more or less) isolated deep basin probably poor in oxygen. At the beginning of the upper interval, a connection with the open sea was reestablished.

  10. Mars Rover Curiosity Traverses of Sand Ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, N.; Arvidson, R. E.; Zhou, F.; Heverly, M.; Maimone, M.; Hartman, F.; Bellutta, P.; Iagnemma, K.; Senatore, C.

    2014-12-01

    Martian sand ripples present a challenge for rover mobility, with drives over ripples often characterized by high wheel sinkage and slippage that can lead to incipient embedding. Since landing in Gale Crater, Curiosity has traversed multiple sand ripples, including the transverse aeolian ridge (TAR) straddling Dingo Gap on sols 533 and 535. On sol 672, Curiosity crossed backward over a series of sand ripples before ending its drive after high motor currents initiated visual odometry (VO) processing, which detected 77% slip, well in excess of the imposed 60% slip limit. At the end of the drive, the right front wheel was deeply embedded at the base of a ripple flank with >20 cm sinkage and the rear wheels were near a ripple crest. As Curiosity continues its approach to Mount Sharp it will have to cross multiple ripples, and thus it is important to understand Curiosity's performance on sol 672 and over similar ripples. To this end the sol 672 drive was simulated in ARTEMIS (Adams-Based Rover Terramechanics Interaction Simulator), a software tool consisting of realistic rover mechanical models, a wheel-terrain interaction module for deformable and non-deformable surfaces, and realistic terrain models. ARTEMIS results, Dumont Dunes tests performed in the Mojave Desert using the Scarecrow test rover, and single wheel tests performed at MIT indicate that the high slip encountered on sol 672 likely occurred due to a combination of rover attack angle, ripple geometry, and soil properties. When ripple wavelength approaches vehicle length, the rover can reach orientations in which the leading wheels carry minimal normal loads and the trailing wheels sink deeply, resulting in high slippage and insufficient thrust to propel the rover over ripples. Even on relatively benign (i.e. low tilt) terrains, local morphology can impose high sinkage, thus impeding rover motion. Work is underway to quantify Curiosity's drive performance over various ripple geometries to retrieve soil properties and to generate better driving practices across ripples.

  11. Borehole mining oil sands is compatible with environment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The US Bureau of Mines borehole mining system for oil sands is discussed. The object of the program was to develop an environmentally feasible method of mining shallow oil sands without removing the overburden. The method entails extracting oil sands through a single borehole by cutting into the sands around the borehole with a high pressure water jet, and pumping the resulting slurry to the surface. The system was successfully field tested at a site in the Midway-Sunset Oil Field near Taft, in Kern County, California. During the two-month period during and following mining operations, no significant ground surface subsidence of ground water pollution was detected. (JMT)

  12. Bioclogging and Biocementation in Construction of Water Pond in Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J.; Ivanov, V.; Stabnikov, V.; Li, B.

    2012-12-01

    Conventionally, compacted bentonite, geosynthetic clay liner or plastic liners are used to seal ponds, channels, and reservoirs in sand. Recently, a new approach to form a low permeability layer of several centimetres thick through the microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) process has been developed (Chu et al., 2012). This method has been adopted to build a laboratory scale water pond model in sand. Calcium solution for bioclogging and biocementation was supplied initially by spaying to form a layer of the clogged sand by precipitation in the pores and then by slow percolation from solution above sand surface, which formed a crust of calcite. This combination of bioclogging and biocementation formed a sand layer of 1 - 3 cm depth with low permeability. The permeability of sand after this treatment was reduced from the order of 10^-4 m/s to 10^-7 m/s when an average 2.1 kg of Ca per m^2 of sand surface was precipitated. The bending strengths of the walls and the base of the model pond were in the range of 90 to 256 kPa. The unconfined compressive strengths obtained from samples from the walls and the base were in the range of 215 to 932 kPa. The graded sand and uniform supply of calcium solution were used for the model pond construction but it was significant spatial three-dimensional heterogeneity of sand bioclogging and biocementation.

  13. Production and global transport of Titan's sand particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Hayes, Alexander G.; Arnold, Karl; Chandler, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Previous authors have suggested that Titan's individual sand particles form by either sintering or by lithification and erosion. We suggest two new mechanisms for the production of Titan's organic sand particles that would occur within bodies of liquid: flocculation and evaporitic precipitation. Such production mechanisms would suggest discrete sand sources in dry lakebeds. We search for such sources, but find no convincing candidates with the present Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer coverage. As a result we propose that Titan's equatorial dunes may represent a single, global sand sea with west-to-east transport providing sources and sinks for sand in each interconnected basin. The sand might then be transported around Xanadu by fast-moving Barchan dune chains and/or fluvial transport in transient riverbeds. A river at the Xanadu/Shangri-La border could explain the sharp edge of the sand sea there, much like the Kuiseb River stops the Namib Sand Sea in southwest Africa on Earth. Future missions could use the composition of Titan's sands to constrain the global hydrocarbon cycle.

  14. Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Kinast, Shai; Meron, Ehud; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2013-02-01

    Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in model studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power; and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a crossover between two different forms of desertification. PMID:23496449

  15. Application of Rule Based Expert System to Sand Control in Oil Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lai NanjunDong; Dong Wan; Wang Jie; Xiao Xia; Lai Junhui

    2012-01-01

    The rule based expert system model, structure and sand prevention method, sand control design, the evaluation of sand control in detail, and the expert system based on rule and sand control technology of combining rule based expert system, puts forward the comprehensive analysis and evaluation of sand control system, and successfully applied in some oil field.

  16. Effect of mould expansion on pattern allowances in sand casting of steel

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Effect of mould expansion on pattern allowances in sand casting of steel F. Peters1 , R. Voigt2 , S. Z. Ou3 and C. Beckermann*3 For steel castings produced in sand moulds, the expansion of the sand a cylindrical casting to study this effect for different sands (silica and zircon) and different sand binder

  17. Tar sands of Alberta, Canada. [Review on reserves, history, properties and composition, technology, and commercial ventures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1974-01-01

    The discussion is presented under the following section headings: occurrence and reserves; history of the Athabasca tar sands; properties and characteristics of Athabasca tar sands, including bulk properties, properties of tar sand minerals, bitumen properties, and properties of refined products; technology of the recovery of values from tar sands, including in-situ processes, mining, processing of mined tar sands for bitumen

  18. Tar sands of Alberta, Canada. [Review on reserves, history, properties and composition, technology, and commercial ventures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1976-01-01

    The discussion is presented under the following section headings: occurrence and reserves; history of the Athabasca tar sands; properties and characteristics of Athabasca tar sands, including bulk properties, properties of tar sand minerals, bitumen properties, and properties of refined products; technology of the recovery of values from tar sands, including in-situ processes, mining, processing of mined tar sands for bitumen

  19. The flux profile of a blowing sand cloud: a wind tunnel investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhibao Dong; Xiaoping Liu; Hongtao Wang; Aiguo Zhao; Xunming Wang

    2003-01-01

    The flux profile of a blowing sand cloud, or the variation of blown sand flux with height, is the reflection of blown sand particles that move in different trajectories, and also the basis for checking drifting sand. Here we report the wind tunnel results of systematic tests of the flux profiles of different sized sands at different free-stream wind velocities.

  20. TRANSPORT OF MACROMOLECULES AND HUMATE COLLOIDS THROUGH A SAND AND A CLAY AMENDED SAND LABORATORY COLUMN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if macromolecules or humate colloids would transport through sand columns and if they would exhibit any variations in their relative velocity based upon their molecular volumes and the pore size distribution of the column packing...

  1. Bacteria transport through goethite-coated sand: Effects of solution pH and coated sand content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Song-Bae Kim; Seong-Jik Park; Chang-Gu Lee; Nag-Choul Choi; Dong-Ju Kim

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the transport of bacteria through goethite-coated sand, focusing on the effects of solution pH and coated sand content on the transport of Escherichia coli ATCC 11105. The first set of column experiments was performed in columns (length 30cm, diameter 5cm) packed with quartz sand coated with goethite in solution having a pH in the range of 6–9.

  2. Curiosity at Gale crater, Mars: characterization and analysis of the Rocknest sand shadow.

    PubMed

    Blake, D F; Morris, R V; Kocurek, G; Morrison, S M; Downs, R T; Bish, D; Ming, D W; Edgett, K S; Rubin, D; Goetz, W; Madsen, M B; Sullivan, R; Gellert, R; Campbell, I; Treiman, A H; McLennan, S M; Yen, A S; Grotzinger, J; Vaniman, D T; Chipera, S J; Achilles, C N; Rampe, E B; Sumner, D; Meslin, P-Y; Maurice, S; Forni, O; Gasnault, O; Fisk, M; Schmidt, M; Mahaffy, P; Leshin, L A; Glavin, D; Steele, A; Freissinet, C; Navarro-González, R; Yingst, R A; Kah, L C; Bridges, N; Lewis, K W; Bristow, T F; Farmer, J D; Crisp, J A; Stolper, E M; Des Marais, D J; Sarrazin, P

    2013-09-27

    The Rocknest aeolian deposit is similar to aeolian features analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity. The fraction of sand <150 micrometers in size contains ~55% crystalline material consistent with a basaltic heritage and ~45% x-ray amorphous material. The amorphous component of Rocknest is iron-rich and silicon-poor and is the host of the volatiles (water, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and chlorine) detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument and of the fine-grained nanophase oxide component first described from basaltic soils analyzed by MERs. The similarity between soils and aeolian materials analyzed at Gusev Crater, Meridiani Planum, and Gale Crater implies locally sourced, globally similar basaltic materials or globally and regionally sourced basaltic components deposited locally at all three locations. PMID:24072928

  3. Faecal indicator bacteria enumeration in beach sand: A comparison study of extraction methods in medium to coarse sands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehm, A.B.; Griffith, J.; McGee, C.; Edge, T.A.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.; Whitman, R.; Cao, Y.; Getrich, M.; Jay, J.A.; Ferguson, D.; Goodwin, K.D.; Lee, C.M.; Madison, M.; Weisberg, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The absence of standardized methods for quantifying faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in sand hinders comparison of results across studies. The purpose of the study was to compare methods for extraction of faecal bacteria from sands and recommend a standardized extraction technique. Methods and Results: Twenty-two methods of extracting enterococci and Escherichia coli from sand were evaluated, including multiple permutations of hand shaking, mechanical shaking, blending, sonication, number of rinses, settling time, eluant-to-sand ratio, eluant composition, prefiltration and type of decantation. Tests were performed on sands from California, Florida and Lake Michigan. Most extraction parameters did not significantly affect bacterial enumeration. anova revealed significant effects of eluant composition and blending; with both sodium metaphosphate buffer and blending producing reduced counts. Conclusions: The simplest extraction method that produced the highest FIB recoveries consisted of 2 min of hand shaking in phosphate-buffered saline or deionized water, a 30-s settling time, one-rinse step and a 10 : 1 eluant volume to sand weight ratio. This result was consistent across the sand compositions tested in this study but could vary for other sand types. Significance and Impact of the Study: Method standardization will improve the understanding of how sands affect surface water quality. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Zebra processes of oil recovery using fireflood and waterflood in alternate sands in a multi-sand environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C. [Texaco, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a new process of oil recovery, namely, the zebra process, which is specifically advantageous to use in heavy oil reservoirs that exist in multiple sands. This process uses firefloods and waterfloods in alternate sands. The firefloods serve as formation preheaters which reduce the oil viscosities in the neighboring sands so that these sands, normally not amenable to waterfloods because of high viscosity, can be waterflooded with ease. The exciting news is that the air compression cost in firefloods can be reduced by a factor of three with a proper application of the zebra process. This great savings in air compression cost is possible because the heat that is normally lost to the overburden and underburden in firefloods is now being put to good use, by preheating the neighboring sands. Examples are given on zebraing several idealized sand-shale sequences involving three-, five-, six-, and seven-sand reservoirs, and also zebraing two actual sand-shale sequences, both involving five-sand reservoirs.

  5. Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand

    E-print Network

    Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

  6. Removal of microcystins by slow sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Grützmacher, Gesche; Böttcher, Gabriele; Chorus, Ingrid; Bartel, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    To assess the elimination potential of slow sand filters for cyanobacterial hepatotoxins (microcystins), two full-scale experiments were conducted using the German Federal Environment Agency's experimental field in Berlin, Germany. One experiment was carried out with dissolved microcystins extracted from a cyanobacterial bloom on one of Berlin's lakes, dosed as short-term, single-pulse application. The other experiment simulated natural conditions more closely, with a longer-term exposure of the filter to living cyanobacterial cells (collected from the same lake) so that most toxins were initially contained inside the cells. The microcystins were detected by ELISA and HPLC/photodiode array detector and subsequently identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The experiment with dissolved microcystins yielded very high elimination rates (>95%) inside the filter bed attributed to biodegradation, whereas retardation by adsorption was low. The obtained half-lives for the microcystins detected by ELISA were about 1 h. The second experiment, which was with mostly cell-bound microcystins, showed similar results during the first days after application of cyanobacteria (elimination >85%). As the population declined in late autumn, the proportion of extracellular to cell-bound microcystins increased. At the same time the elimination rates declined to values <60%. This decline is most likely attributable to retarded biodegradation at temperatures of <4 degrees C. Altogether the results of the experiments show that under moderate temperatures, with an intact schmutzdecke (biofilm) with previous contact with microcystins, slow sand filtration is an effective treatment for eliminating microcystins from drinking water. PMID:12203961

  7. Avalanches of Singing Sand in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain; Douady, Stéphane

    2011-03-01

    The song of dunes is a natural phenomenon that has arisen travellers' curiosity for a long time, from Marco Polo to R.A. Bagnold. Scientific observations in the XXth century have shown that the sound is emitted during a shear flow of these particular grains, the free surface of the flow having coherent vibrations like a loud speaker. The sound emission is also submitted to a threshold effect with many parameters like humidity, flow speed, surface of the grains. The sound has been reproduced in laboratory avalanche experiments close to the natural phenomenon on field, but set in a channel with a hard bottom and a few centimeters of sand flowing, which contradicts explanations of the sound that involve a sand dune under the avalanche flow. Flow rates measurements also show the presence of a plug region in the flow above the sheared band, with the same characteristic length as the coherence zones of the sound. Finally we show experimentally that the Froude number, once modified to take into account the height of this plug band, is the parameter that sets the amplitude of the sound, and produces a threshold that depends on the grain type.

  8. Reproductive development of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exposed to oil sands-affected waters.

    PubMed

    Heuvel, Michael R van den; Hogan, Natacha S; Roloson, Scott D; Kraak, Glen J Van Der

    2012-03-01

    In similar experiments conducted in 1996 and 2009, yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were stocked into two experimental systems: a demonstration lake where oil sands fine tailings were capped with natural water and a lake in a watershed containing bitumen-bearing sodic clays. In both experiments, yellow perch were captured in May from a nearby reservoir and released into the experimental ponds. Perch were recaptured in the experimental systems, the source lake, and two reference lakes in late September and lethally sampled to examine reproductive parameters. In the 1996 experiment, gonad size and steroid hormones were not affected in either pond environment. In the 2009 experiment, male perch in the water-capped tailings pond showed a significant reduction in the testicular development and reductions in circulating testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone, while no reductions were seen in the second experimental pond. No changes were observed in ovarian size or circulating steroid levels in female perch. In the pond containing tailings, the release of water from underlying tailings caused approximately a twofold increase in salinity, alkalinity, and naphthenic acids, and a pH increase from 8.4 to 9.4 over the 13-year period of the study. In the pond influenced by unextracted oil sands materials, total dissolved solids, major ions, and pH did not change substantially. However, naphthenic acids in this system dropped more than twofold post-watershed reclamation. Because the selective reproductive effect observed in male perch in the experimental end-pit lake were accompanied by increases in naphthenic acids, alkalinity, and pH, a specific cause cannot be determined. The present study adds to the evidence, suggesting the presence of endocrine-disrupting substances in oil sands. PMID:22189895

  9. Power generation and oil sands process-affected water treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongdong; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), a product of bitumen isolation in the oil sands industry, is a source of pollution if not properly treated. In present study, OSPW treatment and voltage generation were examined in a single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) under the effect of inoculated carbon source and temperature. OSPW treatment with an anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFC (AS-MFC) generated 0.55 ± 0.025 V, whereas an MFC inoculated with mature-fine tailings (MFT-MFC) generated 0.41 ± 0.01 V. An additional carbon source (acetate) significantly improved generated voltage. The voltage detected increased to 20-23% in MFCs when the condition was switched from ambient to mesophilic. The mesophilic condition increased OSPW treatment efficiency in terms of lowering the chemical oxygen demand and acid-extractable organics. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbial consortia revealed that Proteobacteria were the most abundant in MFCs and microbial communities in the AS-MFC were more diverse than those in the MFT-MFC. PMID:25103035

  10. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Li, Carmen; Young, Rozlyn; Arocena, Joselito M.; Foght, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT) during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae, and Desulfobulbaceae) and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta) transformed FeIII minerals in MFT to amorphous FeII minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O) and goethite (?-FeOOH) were the dominant FeIII minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS) and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators. PMID:24711806

  11. Coupling bioelectricity generation and oil sands tailings treatment using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaxin; Ulrich, Ania C; Liu, Yang

    2013-07-01

    In this study, four dual-chambered microbial fuel cells (MFC1-4) were constructed and filled with different ratios of mature fine tailings and oil sands process-affected water to test the feasibility of MFCs to simultaneously generate electricity and treat oil sands tailings. After 800 h of operation, the maximum voltage was observed in MFC4 at 0.726 V with 1.2k? external resistance loaded. The maximum power density reached 392 ± 15 mW/m(2) during the 1,700 h of MFC4 operation. With continuous electricity generation, MFC4 removed 27.8% of the total COD, 81.8% of the soluble COD and 32.9% of the total acid extractable organics. Moreover, effective removal of eight heavy metals, includes 97.8% of (78)Se, 96.8% of Ba, 94.7% of (88)Sr, 81.3% for (66)Zn, 77.1% of (95)Mo, 66.9% of (63)Cu, 44.9% of (53)Cr and 32.5% of Pb, was achieved. PMID:23669071

  12. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) is a state-supported, privately endowed educational institution created for the benefit of the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its purpose is "to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret art, to encourage the study of the arts, and thus to enrich the lives of all." The site�s homepage provides a variety of resources to experience the rich array of the VMFA's holdings and programs. In the Collections area, visitors can look through representative examples of their items from the ancient world, Africa, ancient American art, and twelve other areas. In the Learn area, visitors can take advantage of online art tutorials and learn about VMFA programs throughout Virginia. The Exhibitions area contains links to a range of images and printed materials that relate the stories of their current, past, and upcoming exhibits, such as "Indian Silver for the Raj" and "Say What? How Ancient Writing Began."

  13. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures. PMID:10859129

  14. FINE: fisher information nonparametric embedding.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin M; Raich, Raviv; Finn, William G; Hero, Alfred O

    2009-11-01

    We consider the problems of clustering, classification, and visualization of high-dimensional data when no straightforward euclidean representation exists. In this paper, we propose using the properties of information geometry and statistical manifolds in order to define similarities between data sets using the Fisher information distance. We will show that this metric can be approximated using entirely nonparametric methods, as the parameterization and geometry of the manifold is generally unknown. Furthermore, by using multidimensional scaling methods, we are able to reconstruct the statistical manifold in a low-dimensional euclidean space; enabling effective learning on the data. As a whole, we refer to our framework as Fisher Information Nonparametric Embedding (FINE) and illustrate its uses on practical problems, including a biomedical application and document classification. PMID:19762935

  15. 40 CFR 436.40 - Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. 436.40 Section 436...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Industrial Sand Subcategory § 436.40 Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. The provisions of...

  16. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The...

  17. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2 Prelease exploration...

  18. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  19. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2 Prelease exploration...

  20. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2 Prelease exploration...

  1. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The...

  2. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  3. 40 CFR 436.40 - Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. 436.40 Section 436...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Industrial Sand Subcategory § 436.40 Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. The provisions of...

  4. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  5. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2 Prelease exploration...

  6. 40 CFR 436.40 - Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. 436.40 Section 436...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Industrial Sand Subcategory § 436.40 Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. The provisions of...

  7. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  8. 40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory § 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The...

  9. 77 FR 60207 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Threatened Status for Coral Pink Sand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...Plants; Proposed Threatened Status for Coral Pink Sand Dunes Tiger Beetle and Designation...Plants; Proposed Threatened Status for Coral Pink Sand Dunes Tiger Beetle and Designation...Service (Service) propose to list the Coral Pink Sand Dunes tiger beetle,...

  10. Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic

    E-print Network

    Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

  11. 20. View of sand filtration bed. Wheelbarrow was used to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of sand filtration bed. Wheelbarrow was used to remove schmutzdeck (top, dirty sand layer containing particulate contamination, dead microorganisms and debris) for cleaning and or disposal. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. Sugarcane Genotype Selection for Sand Soils in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection of high yielding sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genotypes for organic (muck) soils in Florida has been more successful than for sand soils. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of 31 sugarcane genotypes on sand soils with and without mill mud added at the rate of 1510 cubic...

  13. Cotton seedling abrasion and recovery from wind blown sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of hectares of crops are exposed to wind blown sand abrasion each year and in many instances the damage is thought to be severe enough to require replanting. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of wind blown sand abrasion duration on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings...

  14. Reovirus removal and inactivation by slow-rate sand filtration.

    PubMed

    McConnell, L K; Sims, R C; Barnett, B B

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory column studies were conducted at the Utah Water Research Laboratory, Logan, Utah, to evaluate reovirus removal from drinking water supplies by slow-rate sand filtration (SSF). Columns, constructed to simulate a full-scale SSF field operation, were inoculated with reovirus at ca. 1,000-times-greater concentrations than those typically found in domestic sewage. Reovirus removal and inactivation were investigated as functions of filter maturity and other filter sand characteristics. Reovirus removal studies demonstrated that the SSF process is capable of reducing reovirus in influent water by a minimum of 4 log concentration units under certain conditions of water quality, flow rate, and sand bed construction. Infectious reovirus was not detected in effluent samples from any of the sand beds studied, after inoculation of the SSF columns; therefore, removal efficiencies were not affected significantly by characteristics, including age, of the two filter sands evaluated. Studies conducted with radioactively labeled reovirus demonstrated that reovirus removed from influent water was distributed throughout the entire length of the filter beds. Concentrations of reovirus in the filter sands decreased with increasing bed depth. The greatest removal occurred in the top few centimeters of all sand beds. No infectious reovirus could be detected in clean or mature sand bed media, indicating that reoviruses were inactivated in the filter. PMID:6508290

  15. 7. SAND FILTERS, CANAL TO LEFT. CONCRETE OVERFLOW AREA TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SAND FILTERS, CANAL TO LEFT. CONCRETE OVERFLOW AREA TO LEFT OF CANAL ORIGINALLY PLANNED AS A STORAGE LAKE. VIEW LOOKING DUE WEST OF HINDS COMPLEX IN BACKGROUND OF SAND FILTERS. - Hinds Pump Plant, East of Joshua Tree National Monument, 5 miles north of Route 10, Hayfield, Riverside County, CA

  16. 31. PETIBONE SAND THROWING MACHINE BOX FLOOR GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. PETIBONE SAND THROWING MACHINE BOX FLOOR GREY IRON FOUNDRY FORCES CONDITIONED MOLDING SAND, AT HIGH VELOCITY, INTO MOLDS TOO BIG TO BE MADE ON ONE OF THE CONVEYOR SYSTEMS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Sand Tray and Group Therapy: Helping Parents Cope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Linda; Martin, Don

    2002-01-01

    Sand tray with group therapy can be an effective treatment approach for parents coping with adolescent substance abuse and/or dependency. Excerpts of parent sand trays are presented to demonstrate pretreatment tasks that decrease denial, reduce reactive anger, stop enabling behaviors, and build support systems. Parent-child relational issues,…

  18. Spatial variability of flow parameters in a stratified sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie Smith

    1981-01-01

    The spatial variability in porosity, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and various grain size fractions is analyzed for several sets of samples from the Quadra Sand. This unit is a well-sorted, medium grained, horizontally stratified sand with relatively few silt or gravel interbeds. Both random and uniformly spaced sample plans are used. The heterogeneity of the flow parameters is characterized by frequency

  19. Study of properties of sand asphalt using a torsional rheometer

    E-print Network

    Kasula, Lavan Kumar Reddy

    2004-11-15

    . In this work we have used the same Torsional Rheometer with some minor modifications in the design to measure some general properties of Sand Asphalt mixtures. Sand Asphalt mixtures, due to their non-linear viscoelastic character, exhibit `normal stress effects...

  20. The recovery of backwash water from sand filters by ultrafiltration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Dotremont; Bart Molenberghs; Wim Doyen; Paul Bielen; Koen Huysman

    1999-01-01

    Groundwater is still one of the main sources for the production of drinking water. In the preparation of drinking water, the groundwater is first aerated and then filtered through a sand filter in order to remove Fe, Mn, NH4 and methane. After saturation, these sand filters have to be backwashed periodically. In the past, the backwash water was discharged in

  1. Hydraulic mining technique for recovering bitumen from tar sand deposit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Redford

    1976-01-01

    Viscous petroleum including bitumen may be recovered for subterranean petroleum containing unconsolidated said formations such as tar sand deposits by hydraulic mining. Hot water or steam is introduced into the subterranean deposit with sufficient velocity to dislodge bitumen and particles of sand therefrom. The process is a single wellbore operation using rotatable vertically moveable injection string with one or more

  2. TECHNICAL NOTE Centrifuge cone penetration tests in sand

    E-print Network

    Bolton, Malcolm

    TECHNICAL NOTE Centrifuge cone penetration tests in sand M. D. BOLTON,Ã M. W. GUI,Ã J. GARNIER,{ J. F. CORTE,{ G. BAGGE,{ J. LAUE} and R. RENZIk KEYWORDS: centrifuge modelling; in-situ testing; laboratory tests; piles; sands. INTRODUCTION Centrifuges have been widely adopted in modelling geotechnical

  3. Beach Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional beach monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with beach sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in beach sand and may constitute a risk to human h...

  4. Canadian oil sands development: a blueprint for synthetic fuels commercialization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sen

    1979-01-01

    Four major oil sands deposits in Alberta hold an estimated trillion barrels of oil, nearly 200 billion of which are thought to be recoverable by known technologies. Oil sands will help Canada meet its goals of reducing imports in the face of dwindling oil field reserves if in-situ recovery technology can be brought to commercialization. Major environmental, economic, and institutional

  5. Extraction of vanadium from athabasca tar sands fly ash

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. O. Gomez-Bueno; D. R. Spink; G. L. Rempel

    1981-01-01

    The production of refinery grade oil from the Alberta tar sands deposits as currently practiced by Suncor (formally Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.---GCOS) generates a substantial amount of petroleum coke fly ash which contains appreciable amounts of valuable metals such as vanadium, nickel and titanium. Although the recovery of vanadium from petroleum ash is a well established commercial practice, it

  6. Reclamation of disturbed land at Great Canadian Oil Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Shopik; W. L. Cary

    1977-01-01

    Practical application of reclamation methods developed over 6 yr at an operating oil-sands plant is described. The details of numerous successes and failures in developing this methodology for overburden and tailings sand dikes in a northern boreal forest ecology are given. Seed-bed preparations, seeding methods, and follow up treatments are described. Unique equipment problems were encountered on the slopes of

  7. Sand abrasion injury and biomass partitioning in cotton seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of acres of crops are exposed to wind blown sand abrasion injury each year and in many instances the damage is thought to be sufficiently severe to require replanting. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of wind blown sand abrasion duration on cotton seedlings. Seedlings of ...

  8. SLOW SAND FILTER MAINTENANCE COSTS AND EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine how slow sand filter effluent quality is affected by scraping and to quantify the labor required to operate and maintain a slow sand filter. The data were obtained by monitoring scraping and other maintenance operations at six full-size slow san...

  9. 12. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JAMES WILLIAMS REACHING FOR THE SAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JAMES WILLIAMS REACHING FOR THE SAND RELEASE LEVER WHICH WILL OPEN THE OVERHEAD STORAGE BIN AND PERMIT A SET AMOUNT OF SAND TO BE DEPOSITED INTO THE FLASK PRIOR TO COMPRESSION BY THE MOLDING MACHINE INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. The Unified Gravel-Sand (TUGS) Model: Simulating the Transport of Gravel-Sand Mixtures in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.

    2006-12-01

    TUGS Model was developed by employing the surface-based bedload equation of Wilcock and Crowe (2003) and linking grain size distributions in the bedload, surface layer, and subsurface sediment deposit with the gravel transfer function of Hoey and Ferguson (1994) and Toro-Escobar et al. (1996), and a hypothetical sand transfer function. The unmodified model was applied to simulate the sedimentation process in Marmot Reservoir, Sandy River, Oregon and produced similar stratified sediment deposit as observed through coring exercises. The model was also examined with three runs of large-scale flume experiments conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) by Seal et al. (1995). With a very minor modification to Wilcock and Crowe (2003) equation, the model excellently reproduced the longitudinal profiles, gravel grain size distributions and sand fractions in the deposits for all the three SAFL runs. Following its examination, TUGS model was applied to simulate the sediment transport dynamics in the Sandy River, Oregon under a few hypothetical scenarios, focusing on the dynamics of sand fractions in gravel-bedded channel deposits. Results of the exploratory runs on the Sandy River indicate that (a) surface and subsurface sand fractions generally increase in the downstream direction, similar to observed in the field; (b) sand fraction in the deposit is positively correlated with sand supply as expected; (c) extremely high sand supply under similar gravel supply and hydrologic conditions can transform the river into predominantly sand-bedded; (d) increased discharge under the same sand and gravel supply conditions results in decreased sand fraction in the deposit as expected; and (e) there can be significant increase in surface and subsurface sand fractions in the backwater zones near the mouth of the river as expected.

  11. The chemical behavior of estrone and 17beta-estradiol in the environment 

    E-print Network

    Ullman, Jeffrey Layton

    2007-09-17

    H. ..................................................................................... 27 Fig. 2.2. Estrone concentration profile at pH 4 during irradiation with UV-light. ........... 28 Fig. 3.1. Sorption isotherms for (a) estrone and (b) 17?-estradiol in Tremona loamy fine sand (?), Weswood silty clay loam (?) and Houston Black...., 2004). Affirmation that local cattle operations generated elevated 17?- estradiol concentrations in karst aquifers denotes potential estrogenic contamination of groundwater systems (Peterson et al., 2000). Treatment of agriculturally generated...

  12. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOEpatents

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1988-05-04

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Mapping sand and gravel pits in the Patuxent River watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, T. J.; Witt, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT data from July 1973 and June 1978 for the Patuxent River Watershed of Maryland were processed in an effort to devise an economical method of monitoring the reclamation of sand and gravel pits. ASTEP-II and IDIMS software were utilized to derive signatures for sand and gravel pits and other land use/land cover types. Both unsupervised and supervised classifications of the two data sets were produced. Resultant statistics and color output products were compared in order to determine the extent of reclamation and expansion of sand and gravel pits over the five-year time span and to check the locations of more recent sand and gravel pits. Preliminary results indicate that, for a selected northern sub-acre, signatures derived for sand and gravel pits were nearly 90 percent accurate.

  14. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOEpatents

    Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

  15. Aerodynamics and morphodynamics of sand fences: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bailiang; Sherman, Douglas J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews literature on the aerodynamics and morphodynamics of sand fences. We consider both wind fences for reducing wind erosion, and sand-trapping fences for controlling sand deposition. There has been substantial trial-and-error research based upon installations of sand fences, but only limited research on the fence and site attributes that provide the main aerodynamic and morphodynamic controls of interactions between aeolian systems and the fences. Such attributes include: fence porosity, height, length, width, opening size and geometry, porosity distribution, and external factors such as incoming flow characteristics, roughness length, atmospheric stability, grain size and local landform change. Considerations for the optimal design for both wind fences and sand-trapping fences are presented.

  16. Sand control in horizontal wells in heavy-oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M.R. (Nova Husky Research Corp. (CA)); George, A.E. (Energy, Mines, and Resources (CA))

    1991-07-01

    Recent advances in horizontal-well technology has greatly improved the potential for heavy oil recovery. Such recovery may be hampered, however, by sanding problems associated with most heavy-oil reservoirs. These reservoir sands are mostly unconsolidated and may lead to severe productivity-loss problems if produced freely. This paper offers recommendations for sand control in three Canadian heavy-oil reservoirs. Experimental evidence has shown that minimizing the annular space between the casing and the open hole is important, especially in the case of smaller wire space, lower oil viscosity, and thinner pay zone. Several types of wire-wrapped screens and flexible liners were tested for sand control. Only flexible liners reduced sand production to a negligible amount.

  17. Mathematics Written in Sand Version of 22 Nov. 1983 File MathSand.pdf January 9, 2001 8:40 am Page 1 /49

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    Mathematics Written in Sand Version of 22 Nov. 1983 File MathSand.pdf January 9, 2001 8:40 am Page 1 /49 MATHEMATICS WRITTEN IN SAND - the hp-15C, Intel 8087, etc. W. Kahan, University of California;Mathematics Written in Sand Version of 22 Nov. 1983 File MathSand.pdf January 9, 2001 8:40 am Page 2 /49 Three

  18. Sand waves on an epicontinental shelf: Northern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, M.E.; Nelson, C.H.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Sand waves and current ripples occupy the crests and flanks of a series of large linear sand ridges (20 km ?? 5 km ?? 10 m high) lying in an open-marine setting in the northern Bering Sea. The sand wave area, which lies west of Seward Peninsula and southeast of Bering Strait, is exposed to the strong continuous flow of coastal water northward toward Bering Strait. A hierarchy of three sizes of superimposed bedforms, all facing northward, was observed in successive cruises in 1976 and 1977. Large sand waves (height 2 m; spacing 200 m) have smaller sand waves (height 1 m; spacing 20 m) lying at a small oblique angle on their stoss slopes. The smaller sand waves in turn have linguoid ripples on their stoss slopes. Repeated studies of the sand wave fields were made both years with high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, side-scan sonographs, underwater photographs, current-meter stations, vibracores, and suspended-sediment samplers. Comparison of seismic and side-scan data collected along profile lines run both years showed changes in sand wave shape that indicate significant bedload transport within the year. Gouge marks made in sediment by keels of floating ice also showed significantly different patterns each year, further documenting modification to the bottom by sediment transport. During calm sea conditions in 1977, underwater video and camera observations showed formation and active migration of linguoid and straight-crested current ripples. Current speeds 1 m above the bottom were between 20 and 30 cm/s. Maximum current velocities and sand wave migration apparently occur when strong southwesterly winds enhance the steady northerly flow of coastal water. Many cross-stratified sand bodies in the geologic record are interpreted as having formed in a tidal- or storm-dominated setting. This study provides an example of formation and migration of large bedforms by the interaction of storms with strong uniform coastal currents in an open-marine setting. ?? 1981.

  19. 1 Fine Arts and Art History FINE ARTS AND ART HISTORY

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Fine Arts and Art History FINE ARTS AND ART HISTORY Through the making of art and the study grounded in related historical and theoretical issues. In the art history curriculum, students gain an in in art history (http:// bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/fine-arts-art-history/ba-art- history) · Bachelor

  20. Benzene and MTBE Sorption in Fine Grain Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Bautista, R. M.; Lenczewski, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    The practice of adding methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to gasoline started in the late 1970s and increased dramatically in the 1990s. MTBE first was added as a substitute for tetra-ethyl lead then later as a fuel oxygenate. Although the use of MTBE has resulted in significant reduction in air pollution, it has become a significant groundwater contaminant due to its high solubility in water, high environmental mobility, and low potential for biodegradation. A recent report (1999-2001) by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in collaboration with United State Geological Survey and the Oregon Health and Science University found that MTBE was the second most frequent detected volatile organic compound in groundwater. In Illinois, MTBE has been found in 26 of the 1,800 public water supplies. MTBE has also been blended in Mexico into two types of gasoline sold in the country by the state oil company (PEMEX) but is not monitored in groundwater at this time. Early research on MTBE considered it unable to adsorb to soils and sediments, however, by increasing the organic matter and decreasing the size of the grains (silts or clays) this may increase sorption. The objective of this study is to determine if fine grained materials have the potential for sorption of MTBE due to its high specific surface area (10-700 m 2/g) and potentially high organic matter (0.5-3.8%). The experiment consisted of sorption isotherms to glacial tills from DeKalb, Illinois and lacustrine clays from Chalco, Mexico. Experiments were performed with various concentrations of MTBE and benzene (10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 ug/L) at 10° C and 25° C. Results showed a range of values for the distribution coefficient (Kd, linear model). At 10° C the Kd value for MTBE was 0.187 mL/g for lacustrine clay while the glacial loess had a value of 0.009 mL/g. The highest Kd values with MTBE were 0.2859 mL/g for organic rich lacustrine clays and 0.014 mL/g for glacial loess at 25° C. The highest values with benzene were 0.323 mL/g for organic rich lacustrine clays and 0.119 mL/g for glacial loess at 10° C. At 25° C the organic rich lacustrine clays the Kd value was 0.332 mL/g, while Kd value for glacial loess was 0.114 mL/g. Sands with no organic matter (Ottawa sand) had a value of < 0.001 mL/g for both temperatures 25° C and 10° C and both organic compounds. The retardation factor (R) for MTBE was 1.559 at 10° C and 1.855 at 25° C for lacustrine clays; while the glacial tills R was 1.058 at 10° C and 1.095 at 25° C. The retardation factor for benzene was 1.967 at 10° C and 1.996 at 25° C for lacustrine clays; while the glacial tills R was 1.039 at 10° C and 1.037 at 25° C. These results indicate higher retardation values than previously determined for a clayey sand; therefore show that sorption can occur in fine grain materials especially with high organic matter. This study contributes to the understanding of the sorption of MTBE and improves the knowledge to implement the optimal remediation method for sites contaminated by MTBE.