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1

Organic iodine removal from simulated dissolver off-gas streams using silver-exchanged mordenite  

SciTech Connect

The removal of methyl iodide by absorption onto silver mordenite was studied using a simulated off-gas from the fuel dissolution step of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The methyl iodide absorption of silver mordenite was examined for the effects of NO/sub x/, humidity, iodine concentration, filter temperature, and filter pretreatment. The highest iodine loading achieved in these tests has been 34 mg CH/sub 3/I per g of substrate, approximately five times less than the elemental iodine loadings. Results indicate that a filter operating at a temperature of 150/sup 0/C obtained higher iodine loadings than a similar filter operating at 100/sup 0/C. Pretreatment of the sorbent bed with hydrogen, rather than dry air, at a temperature of 200/sup 0/C also improved the loading. Variations in the methyl iodide concentration had minimal effects on the overall loading. Filters exposed to moist air streams attained higher loadings than those in contact with dry air. A study of the regeneration characteristics of silver mordenite indicates limited adsorbent capacity after complete removal of the iodine with 4% hydrogen in the regeneration gas stream at 500/sup 0/C. 9 figures.

Jubin, R.T.

1980-01-01

2

Organic iodine removal from simulated dissolver off-gas systems utilizing silver-exchanged mordenite  

SciTech Connect

The removal of methyl iodide by adsorption onto silver mordenite was studied using a simulated off-gas from the fuel dissolution step of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The adsorption of methyl iodide on silver mordenite was examined for the effect of NO/sub x/, humidity, iodine concentration, filter temperature, silver loadings and filter pretreatment. The highest iodine loading achieved in these tests was 142 mg CH/sub 3/I per g of substrate on fully exchanged zeolite, approximately the same as elemental iodine loadings. A filter using fully exchanged silver mordenite operating at 200/sup 0/C obtained higher iodine loadings than a similar filter operating at 150/sup 0/C. Pretreatment of the sorbent bed with hydrogen rather than dry air, at a temperature of 200/sup 0/C, also improved the loading. Variations in the methyl iodide concentration had minimal effects on the overall loading. Filters exposed to moist air streams attained higher loadings than those in contact with dry air. Partially exchanged silver mordenite achieved higher silver utilizations than the fully exchanged material. The partially exchanged mordenite also achieved higher loadings at 200/sup 0/C than at 250/sup 0/C. The iodine loaded onto these beds was not stripped at 500/sup 0/C by either 4.5% hydrogen or 100% hydrogen; however, the iodine could be removed by air at 500/sup 0/C, and the bed could be reloaded. A study of the regeneration characteristics of fully exchanged silver mordenite indicates limited adsorbent capacity after complete removal of the iodine with 4.5% hydrogen in the regeneration gas stream at 500/sup 0/C. The loss of adsorbent capacity is much higher for silver mordenite regenerated in a stainless steel filter housing than in a glass filter housing.

Jubin, R.T.

1981-01-01

3

A study of mineral zeolite as a nitrogen oxides adsorbent for dissolver off-gas treatment  

SciTech Connect

In the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, dissolver off-gas (DOG) is supposed to include nitrogen oxides (NOX) during the operation. An adsorption process by mineral zeolite has been studied for DOG treatment that follows a dehydration and iodine removal process. According to the results, the characteristics of the mineral zeolite hydrogenated by 1 N HCl are very favorable for this purpose. As for the actual operation, a small fraction of iodine is supposed to penetrate the I/sub 2/ removal process to the NOX adsorption process. No degradation has been observed for the NOX adsorption of mineral zeolite by the presence of I/sub 2/.

Fumoto, H.; Sato, S.; Ito, W.; Tamura, T.; Yoshiki, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

1986-10-01

4

Laboratory Evaporation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this strea...

C. A. Nash C. L. Crawford D. J. Adamson D. J. McCabe W. R. Wilmarth

2014-01-01

5

Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz  

SciTech Connect

The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2008-03-15

6

Cement solidification of simulated off-gas condensates from vitrification of low-level nuclear waste solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solidification in a cementitious matrix is a viable alternative for low-level nuclear waste management; it is therefore important to understand the behavior and properties of such wasteforms. We have examined the cementitious solidification of simulated off-gas waste streams resulting from the vitrification of low-level nuclear waste. Different possible methods for scrubbing the off-gasses from a vitrifier give rise to three

A Katz; A. R Brough; R. J Kirkpatrick; L. J Struble; G. K Sun; J. F Young

2001-01-01

7

A system of miniaturized stirred bioreactors for parallel continuous cultivation of yeast with online measurement of dissolved oxygen and off-gas.  

PubMed

Chemostat cultivation is a powerful tool for physiological studies of microorganisms. We report the construction and application of a set of eight parallel small-scale bioreactors with a working volume of 10?mL for continuous cultivation. Hungate tubes were used as culture vessels connected to multichannel-peristaltic pumps for feeding fresh media and removal of culture broth and off-gas. Water saturated air is sucked into the bioreactors by applying negative pressure, and small stirrer bars inside the culture vessels allow sufficient mixing and oxygen transfer. Optical sensors are used for non-invasive online measurement of dissolved oxygen, which proved to be a powerful indicator of the physiological state of the cultures, particularly of steady-state conditions. Analysis of culture exhaust-gas by means of mass spectrometry enables balancing of carbon. The capacity of the developed small-scale bioreactor system was validated using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, focusing on the metabolic shift from respiratory to respiro-fermentative metabolism, as well as studies on consumption of different substrates such as glucose, fructose, and gluconate. In all cases, an almost completely closed carbon balance was obtained proving the reliability of the experimental setup. PMID:22887039

Klein, Tobias; Schneider, Konstantin; Heinzle, Elmar

2013-02-01

8

Cement solidification of simulated off-gas condensates from vitrification of low-level nuclear waste solutions.  

PubMed

Solidification in a cementitious matrix is a viable alternative for low-level nuclear waste management; it is therefore important to understand the behavior and properties of such wasteforms. We have examined the cementitious solidification of simulated off-gas waste streams resulting from the vitrification of low-level nuclear waste. Different possible methods for scrubbing the off-gasses from a vitrifier give rise to three possible types of waste compositions: acidic (from aqueous dissolution of volatile NOx and POx carried over from the vitrifier), basic (from neutralizing the former with sodium hydroxide), and fully carbonated (arising from a direct-combustion vitrifier). Six binder compositions were tested in which ordinary Portland cement was replaced at different proportions by fly ash and/or ground granulated blast furnace slag. A high solution to binder ratio of 1l/1 kg was used to minimize the volume of the wasteform and 10% attapulgite clay was added to all mixes to ensure that the fresh mix did not segregate prior to setting. The 28-day compressive strengths decreased when a high proportion of cement was replaced with fly ash, but were increased significantly when the cement was replaced with slag. The heats of hydration at early age for the various solids compositions decreased when cement was replaced with either fly ash or slag; however, for the fly ash mix the low heat was also associated with a significant decrease in compressive strength. High curing temperature (60 degrees C) or the use of extra-fine slag did not significantly affect the compressive strength. Recommendations for choice of binder formulations and treatment of off-gas condensates are discussed. PMID:11478621

Katz, A; Brough, A R; Kirkpatrick, R J; Struble, L J; Sun, G K; Young, J F

2001-01-01

9

Surface decontamination of simulated chemical warfare agents using a nonequilibrium plasma with off-gas monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

InnovaTek, Inc., Richland, WA, is developing a surface decontamination technology that utilizes active species generated in a nonequilibrium corona plasma. The plasma technology was tested against dimethyl-methyl phosphonate (DMMP), a simulant for the chemical agent Sarin. Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry analysis showed that a greater than four log10 destruction of the DMMP on an aluminum surface was achieved in a

Trevor M. Moeller; M. Lizabeth Alexander; Mark H. Engelhard; Daniel J. Gaspar; Maria L. Luna; Patricia M. Irving

2002-01-01

10

Performance of a large-scale melter off-gas system utilizing simulated SRP DWPF waste  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy and the DuPont Company have begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive waste now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of the process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, two large-scale glass melter systems have been designed and operated with simulated waste. Experimental data from these operations show that process requirements will be met. 6 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

Kessler, J L; Randall, C T

1984-03-01

11

Surface Decontamination of Simulated Chemical Warfare Agents Using a Nonequilibrium Plasma with Off-Gas Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

InnovaTek is developing a surface decontamination technology that utilizes active species generated in a nonequilibrium corona plasma. The plasma technology was tested against DMMP, a simulant for the chemical agent Sarin. GC-MS analysis showed that a greater than four log10 destruction of the DMMP on an aluminum surface was achieved in a 10 minute treatment. An ion-trap mass spectrometer was utilized to collect time-resolved data on the treatment off-gases. These data indicate that only non-toxic fragments of the broken down DMMP molecule were present in the gas phase. The technology is being further refined to develop a product that will not only decontaminate surfaces but will also sense when decontamination is complete

Moeller, Trevor M.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Engelhard, Mark H.; Gaspar, Dan J.; Luna, Maria L.; Irving, Patricia M.

2002-08-01

12

Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation  

SciTech Connect

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2011-03-01

13

Test Plan to Demonstrate Removal of Iodine and Tritium from Simulated Nuclear Fuel Recycle Plant Off-gas Streams using Adsorption Processes  

SciTech Connect

This letter documents the completion of the FCR&D Level 4 milestone for the Sigma Team – Off-Gas - ORNL work package (FT-14OR031202), “Co-absorption studies - Design system complete/test plan complete” (M4FT-14OR0312022), due November 15, 2013. The objective of this test plan is to describe research that will determine the effectiveness of silver mordenite and molecular sieve beds to remove iodine and water (tritium) from off-gas streams arising from used nuclear fuel recycling processes, and to demonstrate that the iodine and water can be recovered separately from one another.

Bruffey, Stephanie H. [ORNL] [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B. [ORNL] [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-12-11

14

FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05  

SciTech Connect

The operational requirements for the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) melter systems, together with the feed constituents, impose a number of challenges to the off-gas treatment system. The system must be robust from the standpoints of operational reliability and minimization of maintenance. The system must effectively control and remove a wide range of solid particulate matter, acid mists and gases, and organic constituents (including those arising from products of incomplete combustion of sugar and organics in the feed) to concentration levels below those imposed by regulatory requirements. The baseline design for the RPP-WTP LAW primary off-gas system includes a submerged bed scrubber (SBS), a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed (AC-S), a thermal catalytic oxidizer (TCO), a single-stage selective catalytic reduction NOx treatment system (SCR), and a packed-bed caustic scrubber (PBS). The baseline design for the RPP-WTP HLW primary off-gas system includes an SBS, a WESP, a high efficiency mist eliminator (HEME), and a HEPA filter. The HLW secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed, a silver mordenite bed, a TCO, and a single-stage SCR. The one-third scale HLW DM1200 Pilot Melter installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was equipped with a prototypical off-gas train to meet the needs for testing and confirmation of the performance of the baseline off-gas system design. Various modifications have been made to the DM1200 system as the details of the WTP design have evolved, including the installation of a silver mordenite column and an AC-S column for testing on a slipstream of the off-gas flow; the installation of a full-flow AC-S bed for the present tests was completed prior to initiation of testing. The DM1200 system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the test conditions in response to attainable plenum temperatures as well as temperature increases in the sulfur impr

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29

15

Krypton Absorption in Liquid CO sub 2 (Kalc): Campaign II in the Experimental Engineering Section off-Gas Decontamination Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are presented for the second major campaign for quantifying krypton removal from simulated High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor reprocessing off-gas by the KALC process. The Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility used in ...

R. W. Glass H. W. R. Beaujean V. L. Fowler T. M. Gilliam D. J. Inman

1976-01-01

16

Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

Pence, Dallas T. (San Diego, CA); Chou, Chun-Chao (San Diego, CA)

1984-01-01

17

Technology of off-gas treatment for liquid-fed ceramic melters  

SciTech Connect

The technology for treating off gas from liquid-fed ceramic melters (LFCMs) has been under development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1977. This report presents the off-gas technology as developed at PNL and by others to establish a benchmark of development and to identify technical issues. Tests conducted on simulated (nonradioactive) wastes have provided data that allow estimation of melter off-gas composition for a given waste. Mechanisms controlling volatilization of radionuclides and noxious gases are postulated, and correlations between melter operation and emissions are presented. This report is directed to those familiar with LFCM operation. Off-gas treatment systems always require primary quench scrubbers, aerosol scrubbers, and final particulate filters. Depending on the composition of the off gas, equipment for removal of ruthenium, iodine, tritium, and noxious gases may also be needed. Nitrogen oxides are the most common noxious gases requiring treatment, and can be controlled by aqueous absorption or catalytic conversion with ammonia. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters should be used for final filtration. The design criteria needed for an off-gas system can be derived from emission regulations and composition of the melter feed. Conservative values for melter off-gas composition can be specified by statistical treatment of reported off-gas data. Statistical evaluation can also be used to predict the frequency and magnitude of normal surge events that occur in the melter. 44 refs., 28 figs., 17 tabs.

Scott, P.A.; Goles, R.W.; Peters, R.D.

1985-05-01

18

Dynamic Absorption Model for Off-Gas Separation  

SciTech Connect

Modeling and simulations will aid in the future design of U.S. advanced reprocessing plants for the recovery and recycle of actinides in used nuclear fuel. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, a rate based, dynamic absorption model is being developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include liquid and gas stream constituents, column properties, liquid and gas phase reactions, number of stages, and inlet conditions. It simulates multiple component absorption with countercurrent flow and accounts for absorption by mass transfer and chemical reaction. The assumption of each stage being a discrete well-mixed entity was made. Therefore, the model is solved stagewise. The simulation outputs component concentrations in both phases as a function of time from which the rate of absorption is determined. Temperature of both phases is output as a function of time also. The model will be used able to be used as a standalone model in addition to in series with other off-gas separation unit operations. The current model is being generated based on NOx absorption; however, a future goal is to develop a CO2 specific model. The model will have the capability to be modified for additional absorption systems. The off-gas models, both adsorption and absorption, will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2011-07-01

19

Biological nitrification process simulation in groundwater with dissolved oxygen controller  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays groundwater contamination by nitrogenous fertilizer is a globally growing problem, but groundwater always serves as an important water source, especially in rural area. In order to tackle this problem, biological nitrification and denitrification process has been widely used for removal of nitrogenous pollutants from polluted water. To improve removal efficiency, the dissolved oxygen (DO) controller is presented. And the control strategies for the activated sludge process have been developed and evaluated by simulation. The results also showed that the DO controller will be applied widely in the control and management of the decentralization water treatment.

Zuo, Jinlong

2009-07-01

20

Treatment of nitrous off-gas from dissolution of sludges  

SciTech Connect

Several configurations have been reviewed for the NO{sub x} removal of dissolver off-gas. A predesign has been performed and operating conditions have been optimized. Simple absorption columns seems to be sufficient. NHC is in charge of the treatment of sludges containing mainly uranium dioxide and metallic uranium. The process is based on the following processing steps a dissolution step to oxidize the pyrophoric materials and to dissolve radionuclides (uranium, plutonium, americium and fission products), a solid/liquid separation to get rid of the insoluble solids (to be disposed at ERDF), an adjustment of the acid liquor with neutronic poisons, and neutralization of the acid liquor with caustic soda. The dissolution step generates a flow of nitrous fumes which was evaluated in a previous study. This NO{sub x} flow has to be treated. The purpose of this report is to study the treatment process of the nitrous vapors and to 0482 perform a preliminary design. Several treatment configurations are studied and the most effective process option with respect to the authorized level of discharge into atmosphere is discussed. As a conclusion, recommendations concerning the unit preliminary design are given.

Flament, T.A.

1998-08-25

21

Method and apparatus for off-gas composition sensing  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method for non-intrusive collection of off-gas data in a steelmaking furnace includes structure and steps for transmitting a laser beam through the off-gas produced by a steelmaking furnace, for controlling the transmitting to repeatedly scan the laser beam through a plurality of wavelengths in its tuning range, and for detecting the laser beam transmitted through the off-gas and converting the detected laser beam to an electrical signal. The electrical signal is processed to determine characteristics of the off-gas that are used to analyze and/or control the steelmaking process.

Ottesen, David Keith (Livermore, CA); Allendorf, Sarah Williams (Fremont, CA); Hubbard, Gary Lee (Richmond, CA); Rosenberg, David Ezechiel (Columbia, MD)

1999-01-01

22

Heat exchangers and thermal energy storage concepts for the off-gas heat of steelmaking devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fluctuating thermal emissions of electric arc furnaces require energy storage systems to provide downstream consumers with a continuous amount of thermal energy or electricity. Heat recovery systems based on thermal energy storage are presented. A comparison of different thermal energy storage systems has been performed. For the purpose, suitable heat exchangers for the off-gas heat have been developed. Dynamic process simulations of the heat recovery plants were necessary to check the feasibility of the systems and consider the non-steady-state off-gas emissions of the steelmaking devices. The implementation of a pilot plant into an existing off-gas duct of an electric arc furnace was required to check the real behavior of the heat exchanger and determine suitable materials in view of corrosion issues. The pilot plant is presented in this paper.

Steinparzer, T.; Haider, M.; Fleischanderl, A.; Hampel, A.; Enickl, G.; Zauner, F.

2012-11-01

23

Numerical simulation of dissolved oxygen in Jakarta Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, an ecosystem model is proposed to study interaction between ecosystem compartment such as nutrient, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus on dissolved oxygen (DO) in Jakarta Bay. Three-Dimensional NPZD model with adding DO compartment is applied in this region. The average of current circulation in west and east season is used as input in the model. It is assumed that the nutrients are discharged into water body with constant rates. The analysis of the model shows that the concentration of dissolved oxygen was distributed with range value 3 - 4 ppm in the bay. The air-sea interaction plays important role in decrease of dissolved oxygen than the nutrient discharge from the river. Over all the decrease of dissolved oxygen mainly due to decrease of saturated dissolved oxygen which is caused by high water temperature. There is no significant variation of dissolved oxygen concentration in west and east seasons.

Nurdjaman, Susanna; Radjawane, Ivonne M.; Jamelina, Sripardi

2014-03-01

24

Krypton absorption in liquid CO (KALC): Campaign II in the Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented for the second major campaign for quantifying ; krypton removal from simulated High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor reprocessing ; off-gas by the KALC process. The Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas ; Decontamination Facility used in the campaign provides engineering-scale ; experiments with nominal gas and liquid flows of 5 scfm and 0.5 gpm respectively. ; Equilibrium and nonequilibrium mass transfer

R. W. Glass; H. W. R. Beaujean; V. L. Fowler; T. M. Gilliam; D. J. Inman; D. M. Levins

1976-01-01

25

Krypton absorption in liquid COâ (KALC): Campaign III in the Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented for the third major campaign for quantifying krypton removal from simulated High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor reprocessing off-gas by the KALC process. The Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility used in the campaign provides engineering-scale experiments with nominal gas and liquid flows of 5 scfm and 0.5 gpm, respectively. Mass transfer experiments for the COâ--Oâ--Kr system are described for

T. M. Gilliam; V. L. Fowler; D. J. Inman

1977-01-01

26

Krypton absorption in liquid CO (KALC): Campaign II in the Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented for the second major campaign for quantifying krypton removal from simulated High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor reprocessing off-gas by the KALC process. The Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility used in the campaign provides engineering-scale experiments with nominal gas and liquid flows of 5 scfm and 0.5 gpm respectively. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium mass transfer experiments for the CO--O--Kr system

R. W. Glass; H. W. R. Beaujean; V. L. Fowler; T. M. Gilliam; D. J. Inman; D. M. Levins

1976-01-01

27

Molecular simulation of a model of dissolved organic matter  

SciTech Connect

A series of atomistic simulations was performed to assess the ability of the Schulten dissolved organic matter (DOM) molecule, a well-established model humic molecule, to reproduce the physical and chemical behavior of natural humic substances. The unhydrated DOM molecule had a bulk density value appropriate to humic matter, but its Hildebrand solubility parameter was lower than the range of current experimental estimates. Under hydrated conditions, the DOM molecule went through conformational adjustments that resulted in disruption of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), although few water molecules penetrated the organic interior. The radius of gyration of the hydrated DOM molecule was similar to those measured for aquatic humic substances. To simulate humic materials under aqueous conditions with varying pH levels, carboxyl groups were deprotonated, and hydrated Na{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+} were added to balance the resulting negative charge. Because of intrusion of the cation hydrates, the model metal- humic structures were more porous, had greater solvent-accessible surface areas, and formed more H-bonds with water than the protonated, hydrated DOM molecule. Relative to Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} was both more strongly bound to carboxylate groups and more fully hydrated. This difference was attributed to the higher charge of the divalent cation. The Ca-DOM hydrate, however, featured fewer H-bonds than the Na-DOM hydrate, perhaps because of the reduced orientational freedom of organic moieties and water molecules imposed by Ca{sup 2+}. The present work is, to our knowledge, the first rigorous computational exploration regarding the behavior of a model humic molecule under a range of physical conditions typical of soil and water systems.

Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Schulten,Hans-Rolf

2004-11-08

28

COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION  

EPA Science Inventory

The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM)have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS....

29

Technology survey for real-time monitoring of plutonium in a vitrifier off-gas system  

SciTech Connect

We surveyed several promising measurement technologies for the real-time monitoring of plutonium in a vitrifier off-gas system. The vitrifier is being developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Corp. and will be used to demonstrate vitrification of plutonium dissolved in nitric acid for fissile material disposition. The risk of developing a criticality hazard in the off-gas processing equipment can be managed by using available measurement technologies. We identified several potential technologies and methods for detecting plutonium that are sensitive enough to detect the accumulation of a mass sufficient to form a criticality hazard. We recommend gross alpha-monitoring technologies as the most promising option for Westinghouse Savannah River Corp. to consider because that option appears to require the least additional development. We also recommend further consideration for several other technologies because they offer specific advantages and because gross alpha-monitoring could prove unsuitable when tested for this specific application.

Berg, J.M.; Veirs, D.K.

1996-01-01

30

Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

2013-09-01

31

Simulation Analysis for HB-Line Dissolver Mixing  

SciTech Connect

In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 90{sup o} apart and helical pitch agitator submerged in a flat tank containing dissolver baskets. The work is intended to determine maximum agitator speed to keep the dissolver baskets from contacting the agitator for the nominal tank liquid level. The analysis model was based on one dissolver basket located on the bottom surface of the flat tank for a conservative estimate. The modeling results will help determine acceptable agitator speeds and tank liquid levels to ensure that the dissolver basket is kept from contacting the agitator blade during HB-Line dissolver tank operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with four 90{sup o} pitched blades or three flat blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 1 x 10{sup 5}). A standard two-equation turbulence model ({kappa},{var_epsilon}), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [5], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. The nominal calculations and a series of sensitivity runs were made to investigate the impact of flow patterns on the lifting behavior of the dissolver basket. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, local turbulent flow reaches the critical condition for the dissolver basket to be picked up from the tank floor and to touch the agitator blades during the tank mixing operations. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The modeling results demonstrate that the flow patterns driven by the agitators considered here are not strong enough to lift up the dissolver basket for the agitator speeds up to 2500 rpm. The results also show that local velocity magnitudes for the three-blade flat plate agitator are at maximum three times smaller than the helical fourblade one. Table 5 and Table 6 summarize the results.

Lee, S

2006-03-22

32

SIMULATION OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN PROFILES IN A TRANSPARENT, DIMICTIC LAKE  

EPA Science Inventory

Thrush Lake is a small, highly transparent lake in northeastern Minnesota. rom 1986 to 1991, vertical profiles of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a concentration, underwater light irradiance, and Secchi depths were measured at monthly intervals during the ice-fre...

33

HC-21C off-gas test procedure. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Stabilization of plutonium bearing scrap material occurs in furnaces, FUR-21C-1 and FUR-21C-2, located in glovebox HC-21C. During previous testing and processing operations, water has been observed forming in the off-gas rotameters, FI-21C-1 and FI-21C-2. The off-gas is filtered through a 2 micron ceramic filter, F-21C-1 or F-21C-2, before discharge into the 26 inch vacuum system. The goal of this test plan is to determine the cause and location of water formation in the sludge stabilization off-gas system. The results should help determine what design improvements or processing steps will be implemented to prevent this phenomena from occurring in the future.

Cunningham, L.T.

1995-02-02

34

COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION  

EPA Science Inventory

The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM) (Weaver et al., 1994) have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2005). The linkage pro...

35

Simulation of the Diffusion of Dissolved Salts in Aquifers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Digital simulation tools for the study of hydrologic surface water and ground water systems have been developed. The partial differential equation language PDEL was expanded and extended to facilitate the treatment of these problem areas. PDEL is a higher...

J. A. Dracup W. J. Karplus

1974-01-01

36

Concept of off-Gas Purification in Reprocessing Plants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Concepts and individual processes for the off-gas purification in reprocessing plants are described which are suited to achieve a better retention of the gaseous and volatile radionuclides sup 129 I, sup 85 Kr, sup 14 C, and tritium. Improved and new proc...

E. Henrich R. von Ammon

1986-01-01

37

High-level waste vitrification off-gas cleanup technology  

SciTech Connect

This brief overview is intended to be a basis for discussion of needs and problems existing in the off-gas clean-up technology. A variety of types of waste form and processes are being developed in the United States and abroad. A description of many of the processes can be found in the Technical Alternative Documents (TAD). Concurrently, off-gas processing systems are being developed with most of the processes. An extensive review of methodology as well as decontamination factors can be found in the literature. Since it is generally agreed that the most advanced solidification process is vitrification, discussion here centers about the off-gas problems related to vitrification. With a number of waste soldification facilities around the world in operation, it can be shown that present technology can satisfy the present requirement for off-gas control. However, a number of areas within the technology base show potential for improvement. Fundamental as well as verification studies are needed to obtain the improvements.

Hanson, M.S.

1980-01-01

38

RELIABLE OZONE DISINFECTION USING OFF-GAS CONTROL  

EPA Science Inventory

The electrical energy used in manufacturing ozone constitutes a major part of the operating cost of disinfection. The paper presents a control strategy that combines use of off-gas measurement and contact time to achieve reliable disinfection throughout the day with minimum energ...

39

Hanford Low-Activity Waste Processing: Demonstration of the Off-Gas Recycle Flowsheet - 13443  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification of Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW) is nominally the thermal conversion and incorporation of sodium salts and radionuclides into borosilicate glass. One key radionuclide present in LAW is technetium-99. Technetium-99 is a low energy, long-lived beta emitting radionuclide present in the waste feed in concentrations on the order of 1-10 ppm. The long half-life combined with a high solubility in groundwater results in technetium-99 having considerable impact on performance modeling (as potential release to the environment) of both the waste glass and associated secondary waste products. The current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flowsheet calls for the recycle of vitrification process off-gas condensates to maximize the portion of technetium ultimately immobilized in the waste glass. This is required as technetium acts as a semi-volatile specie, i.e. considerable loss of the radionuclide to the process off-gas stream can occur during the vitrification process. To test the process flowsheet assumptions, a prototypic off-gas system with recycle capability was added to a laboratory melter (on the order of 1/200 scale) and testing performed. Key test goals included determination of the process mass balance for technetium, a non-radioactive surrogate (rhenium), and other soluble species (sulfate, halides, etc.) which are concentrated by recycling off-gas condensates. The studies performed are the initial demonstrations of process recycle for this type of liquid-fed melter system. This paper describes the process recycle system, the waste feeds processed, and experimental results. Comparisons between data gathered using process recycle and previous single pass melter testing as well as mathematical modeling simulations are also provided. (authors)

Ramsey, William G.; Esparza, Brian P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99532 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99532 (United States)

2013-07-01

40

DIEL FLUX OF DISSOLVED CARBOHYDRATE IN A SALT MARSH AND A SIMULATED ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The concentrations of total dissolved carbohydrate (TCHO), monosaccharide (MCHO) and polysaccharide (PCHO) were followed over a total of ten diel cycles in a salt marsh and a 13 cu m seawater tank simulating an estuarine ecosystem. Their patterns are compared to those for total d...

41

SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON DISSOLVED OXYGEN CHARACTERISTICS IN ICE-COVERED LAKES. (R824801)  

EPA Science Inventory

A deterministic, one-dimensional model is presented which simulates daily dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles and associated water temperatures, ice covers and snow covers for dimictic and polymictic lakes of the temperate zone. The lake parameters required as model input are surface ...

42

In-place testing of off-gas iodine filters  

SciTech Connect

At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, both charcoal and silver zeolite (AgX) filters are used for radioactive iodine off-gas cleanup of reactor systems. These filters are used in facilities which are conducting research in the areas of reactor fuel failure, reactor fuel inspection, and loss of fluids from reactor vessels. Iodine retention efficiency testing of these filters is dictated by prudent safety practices and regulatory guidelines. A procedure for determining iodine off-gas filter efficiency in-place has been developed and tested on both AgX and charcoal filters. The procedure involves establishing sample points upstream and downstream of the filter to be tested. A step-by-step approach for filter efficiency testing is presented.

Duce, S.W.; Tkachyk, J.W.; Motes, B.G.

1980-01-01

43

FY-2001 Accomplishments in Off-gas Treatment Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the efforts funded by the Tank Focus Area to investigate nitrogen oxide (NOx) destruction (a.k.a. deNOx) technologies and off-gas scrubber system designs. The primary deNOx technologies that were considered are staged combustion (a.k.a. NOx reburning), selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, and steam reformation. After engineering studies and a team evaluation were completed, selective catalytic reduction and staged combustion were considered the most likely candidate technologies to be deployed in a sodium-bearing waste vitrification facility. The outcome of the team evaluation factored heavily in the establishing a baseline configuration for off-gas and secondary waste treatment systems.

Marshall, Douglas William

2001-09-01

44

Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process  

DOEpatents

The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

2003-01-01

45

Simulations of underwater plumes of dissolved oil in the Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple model of the temperature-dependent biological decay of dissolved oil is embedded in an ocean-climate model and used to simulate underwater plumes of dissolved and suspended oil originating from a point source in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with an upper-bound supply rate estimated from the contemporary analysis of the Deepwater Horizon blowout. The behavior of plumes at different depths is found to be determined by the combination of sheared current strength and the vertical profile of decay rate. For all plume scenarios, toxic levels of dissolved oil remain confined to the northern Gulf of Mexico, and abate within weeks after the spill stops. An estimate of oxygen consumption due to microbial oxidation of hydrocarbons suggests that a deep plume of hydrocarbons could lead to localized regions of prolonged hypoxia near the source, but only when oxidation of methane is included.

Adcroft, Alistair; Hallberg, Robert; Dunne, John P.; Samuels, Bonita L.; Galt, J. A.; Barker, Christopher H.; Payton, Debra

2010-09-01

46

Mathematical modelling of heat transfer in dedusting plants and comparison to off-gas measurements at electric arc furnaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical simulation tool is presented in order to model enthalpy flow rates of off-gas and heat transfer of cooling systems at dedusting plants in electric steel making sites. The flexibility of the simulation tool is based on a user-defined series of modular units that describe elementary units of industrial dedusting systems, e.g. water-cooled hot gas duct, air injector, drop-out

Marcus Kirschen; Viktor Velikorodov; Herbert Pfeifer

2006-01-01

47

Simulated effects of surface coal mining and agriculture on dissolved solids in the Redwater River, east-central Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dissolved solids concentrations in five reaches of the Redwater River in east-central Montana were simulated to evaluate the effects of surface coal mining and agriculture. A mass-balance model of streamflow and dissolved solids load developed for the Tongue River in southeastern Montana was modified and applied to the Redwater River. Mined acreages, dissolved solids concentrations in mined spoils, and irrigated acreage can be varied in the model to study relative changes in the dissolved solids concentration in consecutive reaches of the river. Because of extreme variability and a limited amount of data, the model was not consecutively validated. Simulated mean and median monthly mean streamflows and consistently larger than those calculated from streamflow records. Simulated mean and median monthly mean dissolved solids loads also are consistently larger than regression-derived values. These discrepancies probably result from extremely variable streamflow, overestimates of streamflow from ungaged tributaries, and weak correlations between streamflow and dissolved solids concentrations. The largest increases in simulated dissolved solids concentrations from mining and agriculture occur from September through January because of smaller streamflows and dissolved solids loads. Different combinations of agriculture and mining under mean flow conditions resulted in cumulative percentage increases of dissolved solids concentrations of less than 5% for mining and less than 2% for agriculture. (USGS)

Ferreira, R. F.; Lambing, J. H.

1985-01-01

48

Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

Carl, D.E.

1997-10-21

49

Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack  

DOEpatents

An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

Wright, George T. (15 Cherry Hills Dr., Aiken, SC 29803) [15 Cherry Hills Dr., Aiken, SC 29803

1992-01-01

50

Numerical simulation of the transport and diffusion of dissolved pollutants in the changjiang (Yangtze) river estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model for regional and shelf seas (COHERENS), a three-dimensional baroclinic model for the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary and the adjacent sea area was established using the sigma-coordinate in the vertical direction and spherical coordinate in the horizontal direction. In the study, changing-grid technology and the “dry-wet” method were designed to deal with the moving boundary. The minimum water depth limit condition was introduced for numerical simulation stability and to avoid producing negative depths in the shallow water areas. Using the Eulerian transport approaches included in COHERENS for the advection and dispersion of dissolved pollutants, numerical simulation of dissolved pollutant transport and diffusion in the Changjiang River estuary were carried out. The mass centre track of dissolved pollutants released from outlets in the south branch of the Changjiang River estuary water course has the characteristic of reverse current motion in the inner water course and clockwise motion offshore. In the transition area, water transport is a combination of the two types of motion. In a sewage-discharge numerical experiment, it is found that there are mainly two kinds of pollution distribution forms: one is a single nuclear structure and the other is a double nuclear (dinuclear) structure in the turbid zone of the Changjiang River estuary. The rate of expansion of the dissolved pollutant distribution decreased gradually. The results of the numerical experiment indicate that the maximum turbid zone of the Changjiang River estuary is also the zone enriched with pollutants. Backward pollutant flow occurs in the north branch of the estuary, which is similar to the backward salt water flow, and the backward flow of pollutants released upstream is more obvious.

Wu, De'an; Yan, Yixin

2010-05-01

51

Glass melter off-gas system pluggages: Cause, significance, and remediation  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) where the glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Experimental glass melters used to develop the vitrification process for immobilization of the waste have experienced problems with pluggage of the off-gas line with solid deposits. Off-gas deposits from the DWPF 1/2 Scale Glass Melter (SGM) and the 1/10th scale Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) were determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, spinel, and frit particles. The distribution and location of the alkali deposits throughout the off-gas system indicate that the deposits form by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cement the entrained particulates causing off-gas system pluggages. The identification of vapor phase transport as the operational mechanism causing off-gas system pluggage indicates that deposition can be effectively eliminated by increasing the off-gas velocity. Scale glass melter operating experience indicates that a velocity of >50 fps is necessary in order to transport the volatile species to the quencher to prevent having condensation occur in the off-gas line. Hotter off-gas line temperatures would retain the alkali compounds as vapors so that they would remain volatile until they reach the quencher. However, hotter off-gas temperatures can only be achieved by using less air/steam flow at the off-gas entrance, e.g. at the off-gas film cooler (OGFC). This would result in lower off-gas velocities. Maintaining a high velocity is, therefore, considered to be a more important criterion for controlling off-gas pluggage than temperature control. 40 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-03-01

52

Numerical simulation of dissolved oxygen concentration in water flow over stepped spillways.  

PubMed

This study developed an improved Eulerian model for the simulation of an air-water flow field over stepped spillways. The improved drag model applied different drag coefficients for bubbles and for free surface flows or gas cavities. Void fraction and turbulence correction were used in determining the bubble drag coefficient. The calculated air entrainment and air-water velocity could be adapted using these parameters. With the improved drag model, the Eulerian simulations predicted the location of the inception point, the distributions of air void fraction, velocity distributions, and pressure distributions. The change in the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration from upstream of the stepped spillways, to downstream, was simulated based on the improved computational fluid dynamics model and the transport equation for DO transferring. The numerical DO concentration coincided with the experimental results. Therefore, the improved CFD model and the numerical methods presented here can provide possible optimization tools for strong air entrainment flows. PMID:23789573

Cheng, Xiangju; Chen, Xuewei

2013-05-01

53

One-dimensional simulation of stratification and dissolved oxygen in McCook Reservoir, Illinois  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the Chicagoland Underflow Plan/Tunnel and Reservoir Plan, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, plans to build McCook Reservoir.a flood-control reservoir to store combined stormwater and raw sewage (combined sewage). To prevent the combined sewage in the reservoir from becoming anoxic and producing hydrogen sulfide gas, a coarse-bubble aeration system will be designed and installed on the basis of results from CUP 0-D, a zero-dimensional model, and MAC3D, a three-dimensional model. Two inherent assumptions in the application of MAC3D are that density stratification in the simulated water body is minimal or not present and that surface heat transfers are unimportant and, therefore, may be neglected. To test these assumptions, the previously tested, one-dimensional Dynamic Lake Model (DLM) was used to simulate changes in temperature and dissolved oxygen in the reservoir after a 1-in-100-year event. Results from model simulations indicate that the assumptions made in MAC3D application are valid as long as the aeration system, with an air-flow rate of 1.2 cubic meters per second or more, is operated while the combined sewage is stored in the reservoir. Results also indicate that the high biochemical oxygen demand of the combined sewage will quickly consume the dissolved oxygen stored in the reservoir and the dissolved oxygen transferred through the surface of the reservoir; therefore, oxygen must be supplied by either the rising bubbles of the aeration system (a process not incorporated in DLM) or some other technique to prevent anoxia.

Robertson, Dale M.

2000-01-01

54

Simulating the effects of fluctuating dissolved oxygen on growth, reproduction, and survival of fish and shrimp.  

PubMed

Individuals are commonly exposed to fluctuating levels of stressors, while most laboratory experiments focus on constant exposures. We develop and test a mathematical model for predicting the effects of low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) on growth, reproduction, and survival using laboratory experiments on fish and shrimp. The exposure-effects model simulates the hourly reductions in growth and survival, and the reduction in reproduction (fecundity) at times of spawning, of an individual as it is exposed to constant or hourly fluctuating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was applied to seven experiments involving fish and shrimp that included constant and fluctuating DO exposures, with constant exposures used for parameter estimation and the model then used to simulate the growth, reproduction, and survival in the fluctuating treatments. Cumulative effects on growth, reproduction, and survival were predicted well by the model, but the model did not replay the observed episodic low survival days. Further investigation should involve the role of acclimation, possible inclusion of repair effects in reproduction and survival, and the sensitivity of model predictions to the shape of the immediate effects function. Additional testing of the model with other taxa, different patterns of fluctuating exposures, and different stressors is needed to determine the model's generality and robustness. PMID:24269807

Miller Neilan, Rachael; Rose, Kenneth

2014-02-21

55

ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect

AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated periodically on-demand. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was operated with a target melt temperature of either 1,250oC or 1,300oC, and with either a partial or complete cold cap of unmelted feed on top of the molten glass. Samples of all input and output streams including the starting glass, the simulant feed, the off-gas particulate matter, product glass, and deposits removed from the crucible and off-gas pipe after the test were collected for analysis.

Nick Soelberg

2009-04-01

56

Discrete-element model for simulating hydrodynamic conditions and absorbed and dissolved radioisotope concentrations in estuaries  

SciTech Connect

A model has been developed to simulate one-dimensional model for simulating hydrodynamic and thermal conditions and dissolved radionuclide concentrations in tidal estuaries was merged with an improved version of the SEDTRN model, a multisediment-size class model of bedload and suspended sediment transport. The improved SEDTRN model, which employs a velocity-based rather than an energy-based sediment transport rate calculation and accounts for nonzero channel bed slope, is given credibility by comparing its results in stand-alone form to those obtained using the parent model. Results of the latter model have been shown to compare favorably to field measurements. The combined model is called HOTSED. The HOTSED model has been applied to the Hudson River under tidal-transient conditions and the transport of tagged or radioisotope-bearing sediment simulated. The code is designed specifically for applications with dominant tidal cycling. It requires, for a 76-element channel system, 270 thousand bytes of storage, and for a simulation of 25 hours, has an execution time of approximately five minutes on an IBM System 360/91 computer. 10 references, 7 figures.

Fields, D.E.

1984-01-01

57

Off-Gas System Data Summary for the Ninth Run of the Large Slurry Fed Melter.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ninth melter campaign successfully demonstrated extended operation of both melter and off-gas systems. Two critical problem areas associated with the handling of melter off-gases were resolved leading to firm definition of the DWPF Off-Gas Treatment S...

W. P. Colven

1983-01-01

58

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, W. E.

2013-02-13

59

Numerical Simulation of Gas Hydrate Crystallization from Dissolved Methane in Marine Sediments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane hydrate can only form under low temperature and high pressure when dissolved methane concentration exceeds that in equilibrium with gas hydrate. There are two types of methane sources in marine gas hydrate systems: in-situ biogenic methane produced by microbial breakdown of organic matter and dissolved methane from deep sediment (Davie and Buffett, 2003, J. Geophys. Res., 108(B10), 2495). Thus, the occurrence of gas hydrate from dissolved methane mainly depends on the production rate of biogenetic methane and fluid flux that also influences chlorinity and sulfate profile. A numerical model was developed to simulate gas hydrate accumulation at IODP site 1327. The hydrate crystallization rate was determined by the amount of methane that exceeds the methane solubility: Rh=k?X Sw?, where Rh [kg/m3/year] is the hydrate formation rate, k is the rate constant (k =2000 kg/m3/year), ? is the porosity of the sediment, and Sw is volume fraction of the pore space filled with water. ?X [mol/kg] is the difference between the dissolved methane concentration and the local solubility of methane hydrate (Chen et al., 2006, Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., 17(4): 723-737). The chlorinity vs. depth profile shows a continuous freshening trend with depth and the depth of sulfate/methane interface (SMI) is 9.5 mbsf at IODP site 1327 (Riedel et al., 2006, IODP, doi:10.2204/iodp.proc.311.2006). The measured chlorinity at IODP site 1327 is used to obtain fluid flux (qw=0.2 kg/m2/year). To best fit the measured sulfate profile, the biogenetic methane production rate is adjusted to 4×10-6 mole/m3/year. Using water flux, in-situ biogenic methane production rate and the methane concentration derived from our simulation, we estimate the rates of methane supplied by fluid advection, diffusion and in situ production of methane, respectively. The methane supplied by water advection from BHSZ is 0.0292 mole/m2/year (77.7%), which is obtained based on the water flux and methane concentration at base of the hydrate stable zone (BHSZ). A supply of methane due to diffusion is calculated to 8×10-3 mole/m2/year (20.2%) from the gradient of methane concentration at BHSZ. On the basis of the biogenetic methane production rate, the in situ source methane between SMI and BHSZ is 8×10-4 mole/m2/year (2.1%). Thus, the supply rate of methane to HSZ is 0.038 mole/m2/year. The deep methane source beneath hydrate stable zone (HSZ) serves as main contributor. Those dissolved methane could crystallize as gas hydrate at HSZ or consumed at SMI. The results show that the rate of gas hydrate formation at IODP site 1327 is 0.019 mole/m2/year which occupies 50% of the whole methane supplied to HSZ. The other 50% of the methane is transported to shallow depth by advection and/or diffusion, and further was consumed through anaerobic methane oxidation at SMI.

Cao, Y.; Chen, D.

2011-12-01

60

Remediation on off-gas system deposits in a radioactive waste glass melter  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1980's, research glass melters have been used at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to develop the reference vitrification process for immobilization of high level radioactive waste. One of the operating concerns for these melters has been the pluggage of the off-gas system with solid deposits. Samples of these deposits were analyzed to be mixture of alkali-rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spinel, and frit particles. The spatial distribution of these deposits throughout the off-gas system indicates that they form by vapor-phase transport and subsequently condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cements entrained particulates causing the off-gas line to plug. It is concluded that off-gas system pluggage can be effectively controlled by maintaining the off-gas velocity above 16 m/s, while maintaining the off-gas temperature as high as practical below the glass softening point. This paper summarizes the results of chemical and physical analyses of off-gas deposit samples from various melters at SRL. Recent design changes made to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to alleviate the pluggage problem are also discussed.

Jantzen, C.M.; Choi, A.S.; Randall, C.T.

1991-01-01

61

Remediation on off-gas system deposits in a radioactive waste glass melter  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1980`s, research glass melters have been used at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to develop the reference vitrification process for immobilization of high level radioactive waste. One of the operating concerns for these melters has been the pluggage of the off-gas system with solid deposits. Samples of these deposits were analyzed to be mixture of alkali-rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spinel, and frit particles. The spatial distribution of these deposits throughout the off-gas system indicates that they form by vapor-phase transport and subsequently condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cements entrained particulates causing the off-gas line to plug. It is concluded that off-gas system pluggage can be effectively controlled by maintaining the off-gas velocity above 16 m/s, while maintaining the off-gas temperature as high as practical below the glass softening point. This paper summarizes the results of chemical and physical analyses of off-gas deposit samples from various melters at SRL. Recent design changes made to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to alleviate the pluggage problem are also discussed.

Jantzen, C.M.; Choi, A.S.; Randall, C.T.

1991-12-31

62

Numerical simulations of aquaculture dissolved waste transport in a coastal embayment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present study focuses on understanding the transport and fate of dissolved wastes from aquaculture pens in near-coastal environments using the hydrodynamics code SUNTANS (Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier- Stokes Simulator), which employs unstructured grids to compute flows in the coastal ocean at very high resolution. Simulations of a pollutant concentration field (in time and space) as a function of the local environment (bathymetry, rotation), flow conditions (tides, wind-induced currents and wind stress), and the location of the pens were performed to study their effects on the evolution of the waste plume. The presence of the fish farm pens causes partial blockage of the flow, leading to the deceleration of the approaching flow and formation of downstream wakes. Results of both the near-field area (area within 10 to 20 pen diameters of the fish-pen site) as well as far-field behavior of the pollutant field are presented. These results highlight for the first time the importance of the wake vortex dynamics on the evolution of the near-field plume as well as the rotation of the earth on the far-field plume. The results provide an understanding of the impact of aquaculture fish-pens on coastal water quality.

Venayagamoorthy, Subhas; Fringer, Oliver; Koseff, Jeffrey; Naylor, Rosamond

2008-11-01

63

Tributyl Phosphate Removal from Reprocessing off-Gas Streams Using a Selected Sorbent.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory experiments used small laboratory-scale columns packed with selected sorbent materials to remove tributyl phosphate (TBP) and iodine at conditions approaching those in actual reprocessing off-gas streams. The sorbent materials for TBP removal w...

G. B. Parker

1980-01-01

64

Estimation of Fluorine and Sulfur Behaviors Affected by Converter Off-Gas Dusts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Converter steelmaking produces a large amount of high-temperature flue, which contains pollutant gases (SO2, HF, etc.) and entrains fine dusts (Fe, FeO, Fe2O3, CaO, etc.), and fluorine and sulfur behaviors that were affected by dusts in off-gas are estimated by chemical equilibrium method. The behaviors of fluorine and sulfur in off-gas are very different at reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. At

Sen Li; Xiaolin Wei

2011-01-01

65

On The Impact of Borescope Camera Air Purge on DWPF Melter Off-Gas Flammability  

Microsoft Academic Search

DWPF Engineering personnel requested that a new minimum backup film cooler air flow rate, which will meet the off-gas safety basis limits for both normal and seismic sludge-only operations, be calculated when the air purge to the borescope cameras is isolated from the melter. Specifically, it was requested that the latest calculations which were used to set the off-gas flammability

2004-01-01

66

Simulation of Temperature, Nutrients, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, and Dissolved Oxygen in the Catawba River, South Carolina, 1996-97  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Time-series plots of dissolved-oxygen concentrations were determined for various simulated hydrologic and point-source loading conditions along a free-flowing section of the Catawba River from Lake Wylie Dam to the headwaters of Fishing Creek Reservoir in South Carolina. The U.S. Geological Survey one-dimensional dynamic-flow model, BRANCH, was used to simulate hydrodynamic data for the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. Waterquality data were used to calibrate the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model and included concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll a, and biochemical oxygen demand in water samples collected during two synoptic sampling surveys at 10 sites along the main stem of the Catawba River and at 3 tributaries; and continuous water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations measured at 5 locations along the main stem of the Catawba River. A sensitivity analysis of the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations to model coefficients and data inputs indicated that the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations were most sensitive to watertemperature boundary data due to the effect of temperature on reaction kinetics and the solubility of dissolved oxygen. Of the model coefficients, the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentration was most sensitive to the biological oxidation rate of nitrite to nitrate. To demonstrate the utility of the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model for the Catawba River, the model was used to simulate several water-quality scenarios to evaluate the effect on the 24-hour mean dissolved-oxygen concentrations at selected sites for August 24, 1996, as simulated during the model calibration period of August 23 27, 1996. The first scenario included three loading conditions of the major effluent discharges along the main stem of the Catawba River (1) current load (as sampled in August 1996); (2) no load (all point-source loads were removed from the main stem of the Catawba River; loads from the main tributaries were not removed); and (3) fully loaded (in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control National Discharge Elimination System permits). Results indicate that the 24-hour mean and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentrations for August 24, 1996, changed from the no-load condition within a range of - 0.33 to 0.02 milligram per liter and - 0.48 to 0.00 milligram per liter, respectively. Fully permitted loading conditions changed the 24-hour mean and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentrations from - 0.88 to 0.04 milligram per liter and - 1.04 to 0.00 milligram per liter, respectively. A second scenario included the addition of a point-source discharge of 25 million gallons per day to the August 1996 calibration conditions. The discharge was added at S.C. Highway 5 or at a location near Culp Island (about 4 miles downstream from S.C. Highway 5) and had no significant effect on the daily mean and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentration. A third scenario evaluated the phosphorus loading into Fishing Creek Reservoir; four loading conditions of phosphorus into Catawba River were simulated. The four conditions included fully permitted and actual loading conditions, removal of all point sources from the Catawba River, and removal of all point and nonpoint sources from Sugar Creek. Removing the point-source inputs on the Catawba River and the point and nonpoint sources in Sugar Creek reduced the organic phosphorus and orthophosphate loadings to Fishing Creek Reservoir by 78 and 85 percent, respectively.

Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Sanders, Curtis L., Jr.; Bales, Jerad D.

2003-01-01

67

Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

2014-03-01

68

Cesium determination for the DWPF off-gas system performance test  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to determine the cesium decontamination factors (DF`s) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter off-gas system at the Savannah River Site, the system was verified during an off-gas performance test. The off-gas performance test occurred during the DWPF waste Qualification Campaigns, WP-16 and WP-17. The verification of the off-gas system, which eliminated the need for a startup test involving a radioactive cesium addition, was based on the analysis of nonradioactive cesium across the first and second stage High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. The amount of cesium on the first and second stage HEPA filters was determined by leaching samples from each HEPA filter with nitric acid and analyzing the leachate using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS method has been demonstrated to be sufficiently sensitive to measure small quantities of cesium on filters. Based on the cesium results of the HEPA filter, cesium DF`s were calculated. The DF`s indicated that the DWPF HEPA filters performed better than the design basis. In addition to the HEPA filters, a determination of the cesium concentration in the melter feed, the canister glass and the off-gas condensate was made. These analyses provided information on cesium flow through the DWPF. This paper will focus on the methods used in the determination of nonradioactive cesium and the calculation of the DF`s for the DWPF melter off-gas system.

Andrews, M.K.; Elder, H.H.; Boyce, W.T.

1996-04-11

69

Glass melter off-gas system pluggages: Cause, significance, and remediation  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. Experimental glass melters, used to develop the vitrification process, have occasionally experienced problems with pluggage of the off-gas line with solid deposits. The deposits were determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained insoluble particles of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spinel, and frit. The distribution and location of the alkali deposits throughout the off-gas system indicate that the deposits form by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cements the entrained particulates causing the off-gas system pluggages. The identification of vapor phase transport as the operational mechanism causing off-gas system pluggages indicates that deposition can be effectively eliminated by increasing the off-gas velocity. The cementitious alkali borates, halides, and sulfates comprising the off-gas line deposits were determined to be water soluble. Thus pluggage can be effectively removed with water and/or steam.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-01-01

70

Glass melter off-gas system pluggages: Cause, significance, and remediation  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. Experimental glass melters, used to develop the vitrification process, have occasionally experienced problems with pluggage of the off-gas line with solid deposits. The deposits were determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained insoluble particles of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spinel, and frit. The distribution and location of the alkali deposits throughout the off-gas system indicate that the deposits form by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cements the entrained particulates causing the off-gas system pluggages. The identification of vapor phase transport as the operational mechanism causing off-gas system pluggages indicates that deposition can be effectively eliminated by increasing the off-gas velocity. The cementitious alkali borates, halides, and sulfates comprising the off-gas line deposits were determined to be water soluble. Thus pluggage can be effectively removed with water and/or steam.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-12-31

71

Off-gas system data summary for the ninth run of the large slurry fed melter  

SciTech Connect

The ninth melter campaign successfully demonstrated extended operation of both melter and off-gas systems. Two critical problem areas associated with the handling of melter off-gases were resolved leading to firm definition of the DWPF Off-Gas Treatment System. These two concerns, wet scrubber decontamination efficiency and the reduction of solids deposition at the off-gas line entrance, were the primary focus of off-gas system studies during the 63-day run (LSFM-9). The Hydro-Sonic Scrubber was confirmed to be the superior candidate for wet scrubbing by outperforming all other scrubbers tested at the Equipment Test Facility (ETF). The two stage, steam-driven scrubber achieved consistent decontamination factors for cesium exceeding the required DWPF flowsheet DF of 50. As a result, the device was selected as the reference wet scrubber for the DWPF. The Off-Gas Film Cooling device continued to show promising results for reducing three accumulation of solid deposits at the entrance to the off-gas line. In addition, a rotating wire brush cleaning device provided easy and efficient removal of deposits which had accumulated. The combination of the two has adequately resolved the deposit accumulation problem and both devices have been incorporated in the DWPF design.

Colven, W.P.

1983-09-08

72

Cationic complexation with dissolved organic matter: Insights from molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in soil and surface water and plays many important geochemical and environmental roles acting as a proton donor/acceptor and pH buffer and interacting with metal ions, minerals and organic species to form water-soluble and water-insoluble complexes of widely differing chemical and biological stabilities. There are strong correlations among the concentration of DOM and the speciation, solubility and toxicity of many trace metals in soil and water due to metal-DOM interaction. DOM can also significantly negatively affect the performance of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used industrially for water purification and desalination, being one of the major causes of a so-called `membrane bio- fouling'. The molecular scale mechanisms and dynamics of the DOM interactions with metals and membranes are, however, quite poorly understood. Methods of computational molecular modeling, combined with element- specific nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, can serve as highly effective tools to probe and quantify on a fundamental molecular level the DOM interactions with metal cations in aqueous solutions, and to develop predictive models of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the metal-DOM complexation in the environment. This paper presents the results of molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of the interaction of DOM with dissolved Na+, Cs+, Mg2+, and Ca2+. Na+ forms only very weak outer-sphere complexes with DOM. These results and the results of other recent molecular modeling efforts (e.g., Sutton et al., Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 24, 1902-1911, 2005), clearly indicate that both the structural and dynamic aspects of the cation-DOM complexation follow a simple trend in terms of the charge/size ratio for the ions. Due to the competition between ion hydration in bulk aqueous solution and adsorption of these cations by the negatively charged DOM functional groups (primarily carboxylate), larger ions of the same charge (Cs+ vs Na+, or Ca2+ vs Mg2+) have a stronger tendency for DOM association. However, for ions of approximately the same size, higher charge results in a stronger association with DOM. Thus, in contrast to Mg2+, Ca2+ forms strong inner-sphere complexes with DOM carboxylate groups, whereas the association of Na+ with DOM is even weaker than the outer-sphere metal- DOM complexing observed for Cs+. Taken together, these results support the idea of supramolecular, Ca- mediated DOM aggregation in aqueous environment. Cation-DOM binding occurs principally with carboxylate groups, and to a lesser extent with phenolic and other R-OH groups. The contributions of other DOM functional groups are minimal. The diffusional mobility of DOM-bound cations can decrease from ~20% (DOM- Na+ outer-sphere complex) to ~2000% (DOM-Ca2+ inner-sphere complex) compared with neat aqueous solutions (without DOM). The MD simulation results are in good agreement with NMR spectroscopic measurements for Cs-DOM solutions. The case of Cs+ complexation is particularly interesting, because Cs+ readily occurs as inner-sphere complexes on the surfaces of silica gel and many common soil minerals, including illite, kaolinite, and boehmite. The weaker interaction with DOM may be due to the occurence of relatively isolated carboxylic and phenolic groups on the DOM compared to densely packed structural oxygens and hydroxyl groups on the mineral surfaces.

Kalinichev, A. G.; Xu, X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

2006-12-01

73

R and D for an off-gas treatment system for a slagging pyrolysis radioactive waste incinerator. Final report for Phase III  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of engineering-scale tests to obtain sintered metal filter particulate removal performance data with fly ash to simulate the expected incinerator particulate are reported. Efficiencies of greater than 99.9999% were obtained at the conditions of the tests. An evaluation of expected spray dryer performance indicated that a commercial unit should provide the desired removal for HCL and SOâ. An off-gas

B. E. Kirstein; W. J. Paplawsky; D. T. Pence; B. D. Snow; M. E. Spaeth

1979-01-01

74

Development of density plumes of dissolved CO2: Comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The long-term trapping of CO2 within deep geological storage reservoirs will be dependent upon CO2-water-rock geochemical reactions. The first, and most important, steps in this process will be dissolution of CO2 into the reservoir porewater and the transport of this dissolved CO2 through the reservoir. As part of the CO2CARE project we have investigated these via laboratory tests using a water-filled porous medium. Key experimental parameters were measured to determine system permeability, so that a high-resolution numerical model could be built in an attempt to reproduce the observed system behaviour. The Hele-Shaw cell comprised two glass sheets 65 cm wide and 36 cm high, separated by a spacing of 1.1 mm, and filled with closely-packed glass beads 0.4-0.6 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass was treated to prevent the formation of a higher permeability zone along this interface. A pH-sensitive dye was added to the pore-filling water to show where it had been acidified due to the presence of CO2. CO2 gas was introduced to a space at the top of the cell, which created a thin, diffusion-controlled boundary layer of CO2-rich water below the CO2-water interface. CO2 dissolution increased water density, resulting in gravitational instabilities and the formation of many small, downward-migrating plumes. Time-lapse photography was used to track the formation and progress of these plumes. As the plumes grew they increased in length relative to their width, and decreased in number over time. They also became more complex with time, splitting and forming several lobes, whose outer edges became more diffuse as they mixed with the CO2-poor water. The onset time of plume development and the horizontal wavelength (spacing) of the descending plumes are diagnostic measures of the system properties, notably permeability. They were analysed from the time-lapse images and expressed as probability density functions based on histograms of the observations. The derived permeability of the system was calculated to be 2.2-2.5 x 10-9 m2, and this used for modelling work. Having experimentally reproduced the transition from diffusion-dissolution to convection-dissolution, and from this determined the system properties, we simulated the process in a numerical flow model. A high resolution model of the Hele-Shaw cell was built using the TOUGH2 flow simulator with the ECO 2N fluid property module, with a permeability of 2.5 x 10-9 m2, and applying laboratory pressure and temperature conditions. Plume development in terms of onset time, sinking rate and wavelength statistics are closely comparable between experiment and model. This suggests therefore that the numerical flow simulator was able to reproduce the critical process of transition from diffusion-dominated to convection-dominated processes in a realistic way. This further increases our confidence in the suitability of numerical models in making predictions of system evolution within CO2 storage schemes.

Kirk, Karen; Vosper, Hayley; Rochelle, Chris; Noy, Dave; Chadwick, Andy

2014-05-01

75

Impact Of Melter Internal Design On Off-Gas Flammability  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify the more dominant design parameters that can serve as the quantitative measure of how prototypic a given melter is, (2) run the existing DWPF models to simulate the data collected using both DWPF and non-DWPF melter configurations, (3) confirm the validity of the selected design parameters by determining if the agreement between the model predictions and data is reasonably good in light of the design and operating conditions employed in each data set, and (4) run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain new insights into how fluid mixing is affected by the configuration of melter internals and to further apply the new insights to explaining, for example, why the agreement is not good.

Choi, A. S.; Lee, S. Y.

2012-05-30

76

Cyclonic combustor for low-heating value off-gas incineration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The combustion characteristics of a low-Btu off-gas and the operating performance of a 3 x 10⁶ Btu\\/h pilot-scale cyclonic combustor were investigated to evaluate the incineration and heat recovery potential. The average composition of the off-gas was 8.5% Hâ, 1.5% CO, 22% COâ, 56% Nâ, 3.4% CHâ and higher hydrocarbons, 7.3% HâO, 0.5% NHâ, and 0.15% HâS with a higher

H. A. Abbasi; M. J. Khinkis; R. T. Waibel; S. R. Meder

1984-01-01

77

Defining Dissolving  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this introductory activity, learners discover that sugar and food coloring dissolve in water but neither dissolves in oil. Based on their observations, learners can conclude that both solids and liquids can dissolve, but they don't necessarily dissolve in all liquids. Through this activity, learners will refine their definition of dissolve.

Kessler, James H.; Galvan, Patricia M.

2007-01-01

78

Cationic complexation with dissolved organic matter: Insights from molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in soil and surface water and plays many important geochemical and environmental roles acting as a proton donor\\/acceptor and pH buffer and interacting with metal ions, minerals and organic species to form water-soluble and water-insoluble complexes of widely differing chemical and biological stabilities. There are strong correlations among the concentration of DOM and the

A. G. Kalinichev; X. Xu; R. Kirkpatrick

2006-01-01

79

Photostability and photolability of dissolved organic matter upon irradiation of natural water samples under simulated sunlight  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  In this study the photostability\\/photolability of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) was assessed in both lake and groundwater.\\u000a DOM in groundwater can undergo significant irradiation when drawn to the surface for agricultural purposes. DOM was generally\\u000a photostable in lake and photolabile in groundwater, with a more elevated rate constant of DOM disappearance in groundwater\\u000a samples with higher Non-Purgeable Organic Carbon (NPOC).

Davide Vione; Vittorio Lauri; Claudio Minero; Valter Maurino; Mery Malandrino; Maria Eugenia Carlotti; Romeo-Iulian Olariu; Cecilia Arsene

2009-01-01

80

Model predictive control of an electric arc furnace off-gas process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shows that an electric arc furnace off-gas system can provide valuable manipulated variables for feedback control which can improve furnace efficiency and contribute to safety in the workplace. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to illustrate this concept using practically motivated control objectives. An initial verification of a non-linear furnace model with plant data is shown. The design

J. G Bekker; I. K Craig; P. C Pistorius

2000-01-01

81

Model predictive control of an electric arc furnace off-gas procedure combined with temperature control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Model predictive control (MPC) of an electric arc furnace (EAF) off-gas process combined with temperature control is investigated. A more predictable process, safer working environment, cleaner emission gases and reduced energy wastage are some of the advantages obtained by controlling relative furnace pressure, CO-emission and temperature

D. J. Oosthuizen; I. K. Craig; P. C. Pistorius

1999-01-01

82

Photochemical degradation of chromophoric-dissolved organic matter exposed to simulated UV-B and natural solar radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photochemical degradation of chromophoric-dissolved organic matter (CDOM) by UV-B radiation decreases CDOM absorption in the\\u000a UV region and fluorescence intensity, and alters CDOM composition. CDOM absorption, fluorescence, and the spectral slope indicating\\u000a the CDOM composition were studied using 0.22-?m-filtered samples of Meiliang Bay water from Lake Taihu that were exposed to\\u000a short-term (0–12 h) simulated UV-B radiation and long-term (0–12 days)

Yunlin Zhang; Mingliang Liu; Boqiang Qin; Sheng Feng

2009-01-01

83

Ambient conditions and fate and transport simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 2006--10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beaver Lake is a large, deep-storage reservoir located in the upper White River Basin in northwestern Arkansas, and was completed in 1963 for the purposes of flood control, hydroelectric power, and water supply. Beaver Lake is affected by point and nonpoint sources of minerals, nutrients, and sediments. The City of Fayetteville discharges about half of its sewage effluent into the White River immediately upstream from the backwater of the reservoir. The City of West Fork discharges its sewage effluent into the West Fork of the White River, and the City of Huntsville discharges its sewage effluent into a tributary of War Eagle Creek. A study was conducted to describe the ambient conditions and fate and transport of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in Beaver Lake. Dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate are components of wastewater discharged into Beaver Lake and a major concern of the drinking water utilities that use Beaver Lake as their source. A two-dimensional model of hydrodynamics and water quality was calibrated to include simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate for the period January 2006 through December 2010. Estimated daily dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate loads were increased in the White River and War Eagle Creek tributaries, individually and the two tributaries together, by 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 times the baseline conditions to examine fate and transport of these constituents through time at seven locations (segments) in the reservoir, from upstream to downstream in Beaver Lake. Fifteen dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate fate and transport scenarios were compared to the baseline simulation at each of the seven downstream locations in the reservoir, both 2 meters (m) below the surface and 2 m above the bottom. Concentrations were greater in the reservoir at model segments closer to where the tributaries entered the reservoir. Concentrations resulting from the increase in loading became more diluted farther downstream from the source. Differences in concentrations between the baseline condition and the 1.2, 1.5, and 2.0 times baseline concentration scenarios were smaller than the differences in the 5.0 and 10.0 times baseline concentration scenarios. The results for both the 2 m below the surface and 2 m above the bottom were similar, with the exception of concentrations resulting from the increased loading factors (5.0 and 10.0 times), where concentrations 2 m above the bottom were consistently greater than those 2 m below the surface at most segments.

Green, W. Reed

2013-01-01

84

Off-gas treatment system Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) k-t evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The scope of work for this task involves a systems' evaluation, using the Kepner-Tregoe (K-T) decision analysis methodology, of off-gas treatment alternatives for a Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP). Two basic systems were evaluated: (1) a wet treatment system using a quencher and scrubber system; and (2) a dry treatment system using a spray dryer and baghouse arrangement. Both systems

T. G. Hedahl; C. H. Cargo; A. L. Ayers

1982-01-01

85

Effects of Headspace and Oxygen Level on Off-gas Emissions from Wood Pellets in Storage  

SciTech Connect

Few papers have been published in the open literature on the emissions from biomass fuels, including wood pellets, during the storage and transportation and their potential health impacts. The purpose of this study is to provide data on the concentrations, emission factors, and emission rate factors of CO2, CO, and CH4 from wood pellets stored with different headspace to container volume ratios with different initial oxygen levels, in order to develop methods to reduce the toxic off-gas emissions and accumulation in storage spaces. Metal containers (45 l, 305 mm diameter by 610 mm long) were used to study the effect of headspace and oxygen levels on the off-gas emissions from wood pellets. Concentrations of CO2, CO, and CH4 in the headspace were measured using a gas chromatograph as a function of storage time. The results showed that the ratio of the headspace ratios and initial oxygen levels in the storage space significantly affected the off-gas emissions from wood pellets stored in a sealed container. Higher peak emission factors and higher emission rates are associated with higher headspace ratios. Lower emissions of CO2 and CO were generated at room temperature under lower oxygen levels, whereas CH4 emission is insensitive to the oxygen level. Replacing oxygen with inert gases in the storage space is thus a potentially effective method to reduce the biomass degradation and toxic off-gas emissions. The proper ventilation of the storage space can also be used to maintain a high oxygen level and low concentrations of toxic off-gassing compounds in the storage space, which is especially useful during the loading and unloading operations to control the hazards associated with the storage and transportation of wood pellets.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Kuang, Xingya [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Shankar, T.S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lim, C. Jim [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2009-10-01

86

High-temperature corrosion in the off-gas system of a radioactive waste incinerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corrosion in a low-level radioactive waste incinerator off-gas system at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant is discussed. Severe corrosive attack and failure of an Alloy 600 part exposed to high-temperature (>1000°C) gases was observed. Rapid attack of carbon steel components, and cracking of austenitic stainless steel parts also occurred at locations where lower gas temperatures and periodic condensate

C. F. Jenkins; J. J. Peters

1987-01-01

87

Corrosion in the off-gas system of a radioactive-waste incinerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corrosion in a low-level radioactive-waste incinerator off-gas system at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant is discussed. Severe corrosive attack and failure of an alloy 600 part exposed to high-temperature (>1000°C) gases was observed. Rapid attack of carbon steel components, and cracking of austenitic stainless steel parts also occurred at locations where lower gas temperatures and periodic condensate exposure

C. F. Jenkins; J. J. Peters

1987-01-01

88

Selective Trapping of Volatile Fission Products with an Off-Gas Treatment System  

Microsoft Academic Search

An off-gas treatment system is being developed for the collection of volatile fission products during a head-end processing step. The head-end processing step employs high temperatures to oxidize UO2 to U3O8 resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding and the removal of volatile fission products. Three volatile fission products have been targeted for trapping on distinct zones of the

B. R. Westphal; J. J. Park; J. M. Shin; G. I. Park; K. J. Bateman; D. L. Wahlquist

2008-01-01

89

OFF-GAS MERCURY CONTROL USING SULFUR-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON – TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Several laboratory and pilot-scale tests since the year 2000 have included demonstrations of off-gas mercury control using fixed bed, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. These demonstrations have included operation of carbon beds with gas streams containing a wide range of mercury and other gas species concentrations representing off-gas from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste treatment processes including electrical resistance heated (joule-heated) glass melters, fluidized bed calciners, and fluidized bed steam reformers. Surrogates of various DOE mixed waste streams (or surrogates of offgas from DOE mixed waste streams) including INL “sodium bearing waste” (SBW), liquid “low activity waste” (LAW) from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and liquid waste from Savannah River National Laboratory (“Tank 48H waste”) have been tested. Test results demonstrate mercury control efficiencies up to 99.999%, high enough to comply with the Hazardous Waste (HWC) Combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards even when the uncontrolled off-gas mercury concentrations exceed 400,000 ug/dscm (at 7% O2), and confirm carbon bed design parameters for such high efficiencies. Results of several different pilot-scale and engineering-scale test programs performed over several years are presented and compared.

Nick Soelberg

2007-05-01

90

Simulating streamflow and dissolved organic matter export from a forested watershed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stream water concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exhibit large temporal variations during precipitation on forested, headwater catchments. We present a modeling framework appropriate for describing streamflow and event-driven export of DOM from small, forested watersheds. Our model links parametrically simple formulations for rainfall-runoff generation and soil water carbon dynamics. The rainfall-runoff formulation is developed by modifying the catchment model of Kirchner (2009) to account for hysteresis in the relationship between stream discharge and catchment water storage. Time series computations of catchment water storage are used by the soil carbon model to approximate the effects of leaching, adsorption, and mineralization on soil water DOM concentrations and the export of DOM from the terrestrial reservoir to the stream. Our findings show that this model is capable of reproducing hourly variations of stream discharge (ranging from 0.01 to 0.38 mm h-1) and stream water DOM concentrations (ranging from 1.8 to 14 mg C L-1) measured in a forested headwater stream in north central Massachusetts. Our analysis highlights the strong linkage between soil carbon dynamics and hydrological processes that govern catchment water storage and flow paths connecting the terrestrial system to the stream.

Xu, Na; Saiers, James E.; Wilson, Henry F.; Raymond, Peter A.

2012-05-01

91

Off-gas chemistry study of melter feed by Springborn Laboratories. [Sludge-only and sludge-precipitate feed samples  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the off-gas chemistry study of melter feed samples was to support and help substantiate glass melter thermochemistry models developed for the DWPF. Both sludge-only and sludge-precipitate feed samples were analyzed. Each slurry sample was pyrolyzed at temperatures from 150 to 1000/sup 0/C in air and inert atmospheres, and the head space products were analyzed by chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods. Thermogravimetric, differential scanning calorimetric and Fourier transform infrared analyses were also performed on each sample. There were no unusually high exothermic reactions that would be cause for concern in the DWPF melter. Results for two types of sludge-precipitate feed were compared. One type contained simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) product as fed to the SCM-2 melter. The second type contained PHA from the lab-scale acid hydrolysis reactor in 677-T. A major difference between the two types was a small, but distinct, presence of higher aromatics in gas from feed with reactor-produced PHA. This feed also evolved more CO and CO/sub 2/ than feed with simulated PHA at high pyrolytic temperatures (>750/sup 0/C). Recent analyses have identified the higher boiling aromatics in reactor-produced PHA as primarily diphenylamine and p-terphenyl. These compounds will be included in future PHA simulations that are fed to research melters. Under an inert atmosphere, benzene and phenol were the two most abundant organics evolved during pyrolysis of sludge-precipitate feed.

Crow, K.R.

1985-06-05

92

Formation rate of ammonium nitrate in the off-gas line of SRAT and SME in DWPF  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model for the formation rate of ammonium nitrate in the off-gas line of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mixed Evaporator (SME) in DWPF has been developed. The formation rate of ammonium nitrate in the off-gas line depends on pH, temperature, volume and total concentration of ammonia and ammonium ion. Based on a typical SRAT and SME cycle in DWPF, this model predicts the SRAT contributes about 50 lbs of ammonium nitrate while SME contributes about 60 lbs of ammonium nitrate to the off-gas line.

Lee, L.

1992-02-25

93

Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

Goddard, William

2012-11-30

94

Ground water flow in a desert basin: challenges of simulating transport of dissolved chromium.  

PubMed

A large chromium plume that evolved from chromium releases in a valley near the Mojave River was studied to understand the processes controlling fate and migration of chromium in ground water and used as a tracer to study the dynamics of a basin and range ground water system. The valley that was studied is naturally arid with high evapotranspiration such that essentially no precipitation infiltrates to the water table. The dominant natural hydrogeologic processes are recharge to the ground water system from the Mojave River during the infrequent episodes when there is flow in the river, and ground water flow toward a playa lake where the ground water evaporates. Agricultural pumping in the valley from the mid-1930s to the 1970s significantly altered ground water flow conditions by decreasing water levels in the valley by more than 20 m. This pumping declined significantly as a result of dewatering of the aquifer, and water levels have since recovered modestly. The ground water system was modeled using MODFLOW, and chromium transport was simulated using MT3D. Several innovative modifications were made to these modeling programs to simulate important processes in this ground water system. Modifications to MODFLOW include developing a new well package that estimates pumping rates from irrigation wells at each time step based on available drawdown. MT3D was modified to account for mass trapped above the water table when the water table declines beneath nonirrigated areas and to redistribute mass to the system when water levels rise. PMID:12656288

Andrews, Charles B; Neville, Christopher J

2003-01-01

95

Mechanical biological treatment of organic fraction of MSW affected dissolved organic matter evolution in simulated landfill.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to study the evolution of DOM during 1 year of observation in simulated landfill, of aerobically treated vs. untreated organic fraction of MSW. Results obtained indicated that aerobic treatment of organic fraction of MSW permitted getting good biological stability so that, successive incubation under anaerobic condition in landfill allowed biological process to continue getting a strong reduction of soluble organic matter (DOM) that showed, also, an aromatic character. Incubation of untreated waste gave similar trend, but in this case DOM decreasing was only apparent as inhibition of biological process in landfill did not allow replacing degraded/leached DOM with new material coming from hydrolysis of fresh OM. PMID:23743423

Salati, Silvia; Scaglia, Barbara; di Gregorio, Alessandra; Carrera, Alberto; Adani, Fabrizio

2013-08-01

96

FY-12 INL KR CAPTURE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE OFF-GAS SIGMA TEAM  

SciTech Connect

Tasks performed this year by INL Kr capture off-gas team members can be segregated into three separate task sub-sections which include: 1) The development and testing of a new engineered form sorbent, 2) An initial NDA gamma scan effort performed on the drum containing the Legacy Kr-85 sample materials, and 3) Collaborative research efforts with PNNL involving the testing of the Ni-DOBDC MOF and an initial attempt to make powdered chalcogel material into an engineered form using our binding process. This document describes the routes to success for the three task sub-sections.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D Law

2012-08-01

97

Critique of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant off-gas sampling requirements  

SciTech Connect

Off-gas sampling and monitoring activities needed to support operations safety, process control, waste form qualification, and environmental protection requirements of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) have been evaluated. The locations of necessary sampling sites have been identified on the basis of plant requirements, and the applicability of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference sampling equipment to these HWVP requirements has been assessed for all sampling sites. Equipment deficiencies, if present, have been described and the bases for modifications and/or alternative approaches have been developed.

Goles, R.W.

1996-03-01

98

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids.  

PubMed

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires, were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closestto exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. PMID:16245854

Twining, John; McGlinn, Peter; Loi, Elaine; Smith, Kath; Gieré, Reto

2005-10-01

99

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids  

SciTech Connect

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

2005-10-01

100

Respiratory response to formaldehyde and off-gas of urea formaldehyde foam insulation.  

PubMed

In 18 subjects, 9 of whom had previously complained of various nonrespiratory adverse effects from the urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) in their homes, pulmonary function was assessed before and after exposure in a laboratory. On separate occasions formaldehyde, 1 part per million (ppm), and UFFI off-gas yielding a formaldehyde concentration of 1.2 ppm, were delivered to each subject in an environmental chamber for 90 minutes and a fume hood for 30 minutes respectively. None of the measures of pulmonary function used (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second or maximal midexpiratory flow rate) showed any clinically or statistically significant response to the exposure either immediately after or 8 hours after its beginning. There were no statistically significant differences between the responses of the group that had previously complained of adverse effects and of the group that had not. There was no evidence that either formaldehyde or UFFI off-gas operates as a lower airway allergen or important bronchospastic irritant in this heterogeneous population. PMID:6388780

Day, J H; Lees, R E; Clark, R H; Pattee, P L

1984-11-01

101

Respiratory response to formaldehyde and off-gas of urea formaldehyde foam insulation.  

PubMed Central

In 18 subjects, 9 of whom had previously complained of various nonrespiratory adverse effects from the urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) in their homes, pulmonary function was assessed before and after exposure in a laboratory. On separate occasions formaldehyde, 1 part per million (ppm), and UFFI off-gas yielding a formaldehyde concentration of 1.2 ppm, were delivered to each subject in an environmental chamber for 90 minutes and a fume hood for 30 minutes respectively. None of the measures of pulmonary function used (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second or maximal midexpiratory flow rate) showed any clinically or statistically significant response to the exposure either immediately after or 8 hours after its beginning. There were no statistically significant differences between the responses of the group that had previously complained of adverse effects and of the group that had not. There was no evidence that either formaldehyde or UFFI off-gas operates as a lower airway allergen or important bronchospastic irritant in this heterogeneous population. Images Fig. 1

Day, J H; Lees, R E; Clark, R H; Pattee, P L

1984-01-01

102

Selection among aqueous and off-gas treatment technologies for synthetic organic chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for selecting the least-cost treatment technology for waters contaminated by organic wastes was developed using performance and cost models. This methodology simplifies the selection of the least expensive treatment process(es) for a given set of conditions. Two aqueous-phase treatment options were considered: air stripping and liquid-phase adsorption (granular activated carbon). When the off-gases from air stripping must be treated, four off-gas treatment options were considered: gas-phase adsorption (with both on- and off-site regeneration of the granular activated carbon), thermal incineration, and catalytic oxidation. Methodologies were developed for rapidly selecting the least-cost off-gas treatment option [for volatile organic compound (VOC) sources such as an air stripping tower], for selecting the least-cost overall (liquid and gas phase treatment) system, and for selecting the least-cost overall system for a multicomponent mixture. The comparison methodology is based on physical parameters of the target chemical: Henry`s constant and the solute distribution parameter. The results are a set of diagrams and heuristics for rapid identification of cases for which one treatment option is significantly less expensive than the other.

Dvorak, B.I. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Herbeck, C.J. [County Sanitation District of Los Angeles County, Whittier, CA (United States); Meurer, C.P. [Bee County Coll., Beeville, TX (United States); Lawler, D.F.; Speitel, G.E. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-07-01

103

ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF TOA PARTITIONING ON DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of increasing the amount of TOA in the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon of the current solvent limit (150 ppm) in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would be about 7% higher and the nonvolatile hydrogen would be 2% higher than the actual current solvent (126 ppm) with an addition of up to 3 ppm of TOA when the concentration of Isopar? L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm and the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle. Therefore, the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 3 ppm of TOA in the effluent based on these assumptions. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, G.

2013-06-18

104

Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS): A particle-based model of juvenile salmonid movement and dissolved gas exposure history in the Columbia River Basin  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a numerical model of juvenile salmonid migration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, employs a discrete, particle-based approach to simulate the migration and history of exposure to dissolved gases of individual fish. FINS is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories can be input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. Therefore, FINS serves as a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological impacts. FINS was parameterized and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. A quasi-inverse approach was used to decouple fish swimming movements from advection with the local water velocity, allowing inference of time series of non-advective displacements of individual fish from the radiotelemetry data. Statistical analyses of these displacements are presented, and confirm that strong temporal correlation of fish swimming behavior persists in some cases over several hours. A correlated random-walk model was employed to simulate the observed migration behavior, and parameters of the model were estimated that lead to close correspondence between predictions and observations.

Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2002-01-30

105

Interim report on testing of off-gas treatment technologies for abatement of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to briefly summarize the results to date of the off-gas treatment program for atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program is part of the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development`s Integrated Demonstration for Treatment of Organics in Soil and Water at a Non-Arid Site. The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed. That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment program would complement the Integrated Demonstration not only because off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the US to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate systematic and unbiased evaluation of the emerging technologies.

Haselow, J.S.; Jarosch, T.R.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.; Lombard, K.

1993-12-01

106

CALCULATION OF DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM MELTER INLEAKAGE AND OFF-GAS GENERATION RATE  

SciTech Connect

The River Protection Project (RPP) mission is to safely store, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of the Hanford Site tank waste. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is a research and development project whose objective is to demonstrate the suitability of Bulk Vitrification treatment technology waste form for disposing of low-activity waste from the Tank Farms. The objective of this calculation is to determine the DBVS melter inleakage and off-gas generation rate based on full scale testing data from 38D. This calculation estimates the DBVS melter in leakage and gas generation rate based on test data. Inleakage is estimated before the melt was initiated, at one point during the melt, and at the end of the melt. Maximum gas generation rate is also estimated.

MAY TH

2008-04-16

107

Effects of simulated natural and massive resuspension on benthic oxygen, nutrient and dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes in Loch Creran, Scotland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of repeated natural resuspension on benthic oxygen consumption and the effect of natural and massive resuspension on oxygen consumption and fluxes of phosphate, silicate, ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were studied at two stations (S1 and S2) in a Scottish sea loch. Station S11 had organically enriched sediment and station S1 had lower organic content in the sediment. The fluxes were measured in situ using the Göteborg benthic lander. Natural resuspension, simulating resuspension events due to strong wind, waves or currents, and massive resuspension, simulating resuspension due to e.g. trawling or dredging, were created inside the incubation chambers by regulating the stirring of the incubated overlying water or by retracting and shaking the incubated sediment. Natural resuspension showed clear effects on the oxygen consumption at station S11, where it increased with an average of 12.8 (standard error (s.e.) 0.17) and 7.7 (s.e. 0.12) mmol m- 2 d- 1 during the first and second incubations, respectively. At station S1 there was no clear effect of natural resuspension on the oxygen consumption. Massive resuspension increased the oxygen consumption on S1 with an average of 608 (standard deviation (sd) 366) mmol m- 2 d- 1 and on S11 with an average of 2396 (sd 2265) mmol m- 2 d- 1. The fluxes of ammonium, phosphate and silicate were affected by the massive resuspension in 50, 14 and 33% of the chambers, respectively, on station S11. However, in the majority of the cases there were no effects on the nutrient and DIC fluxes of massive resuspension. The absolute concentrations of DIC, ammonium and silicate did however instantly increase with an average of 419 (sd 297), 48 (sd 27) and 6.9 (sd 3.7) ?M, respectively, at S11 upon massive resuspension. The concentrations of phosphate decreased instantly with an average of 0.2 (sd 0.1) ?M. On station S1 there were effects only on the ammonium and silicate concentrations, which increased with 0.8 (sd 0.3) and 1.13 (sd 0.36) ?M, respectively. The large increase in oxygen consumption due to massive resuspension indicates that activities like e.g. trawling and dredging that take place in areas where water exchange occurs infrequently may lead to oxygen depletion in bottom water, which in turn might affect the ecological balance. Silicate, ammonium and DIC can be released due to massive resuspension and contribute to increased algal blooms in surface waters.

Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Tengberg, Anders; Andersson, Sara; Apler, Anna; Hall, Per O. J.

2012-08-01

108

Materials evaluation in the WERF (Waste Experimental Reduction Facility) low-level radioactive waste incinerator off-gas system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Performances of alloys in a low-level radioactive, combustible waste incinerator were evaluated. Test coupons and an extracted heat exchanger tube were examined to provide information on alloy behavior in the off-gas system of this facility. Type 316 stainless steel, the alloy of which the heat exchanger is constructed, was most extensively examined. Coupons exposed upstream of the heat exchanger exhibited

G. R. Smolik; J. D. Dalton

1988-01-01

109

Simulated effects of anticipated coal mining on dissolved solids in selected tributaries of the Yampa River, northwestern Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Identifying cumulative effects of coal mining on dissolved solids downstream from multipe coal-mining operations is particularly important in western basins. The problem of identifying cumulative effects is evident in the Trout Creek drainage, a tributary to the Yampa River in northwestern Colorado, where a number of mines are active and mine expansions are planned. As an evaluation tool, a model was developed and calibrated for the Trout Creek drainage and a reach of the Yampa River main stem. This model uses a series of nodes on the stream network to sum water quantity and quality through the network. The model operates on a monthly basis and uses data from water years 1976 to 1981. Output is mean monthly discharge, dissolved-solids concentration, and dissolved-solids load. Observed data are needed to initiate the model and for model calibration. Some data were extrapolated from records of nearby streamflow-gaging stations. Some nodes within the stream network were for inputs from anticipated mining and were inactive during calibrations. After calibration, these nodes were used to input water discharge at a given dissolved-solids concentration to reflect various future mine configurations. (USGS)

Parker, R. S.; Norris, J. M.

1983-01-01

110

Parametric studies of off-gas release during in situ vitrification  

SciTech Connect

Off-gases are released from underground sources during the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. Most of these gases will be generated beyond the melt front where advancing high temperatures will cause pyrolysis and vaporization of organic and volatile materials. Some of these gases will enter the bottom of the melt pool and propagate upwards to the surface where they will enter the ISV confinement hood. A computer code called OGRE (Off-Gas RElease) has been written to model bubble-rise physics in the melt pool for given volumetric gas flux rates into the bottom of the pool. The models incorporated into OGRE have previously been reported. The purpose of the present document is to report the results of a series of parametric studies performed with OGRE. The numerical studies involve the variation of seventeen parameters for each of the two different inlet bubble-size models. Results indicate that while predictions appear qualitatively reasonable, additional development of the agglomeration and drift flux models is needed. This development will require experimental data for bubble formation and terminal velocity. 5 refs., 36 figs., 2 tabs.

Mousseau, V.A.; Johnson, R.W.; MacKinnon, R.J.

1990-09-01

111

Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

1992-03-01

112

Advanced online monitoring of cell culture off-gas using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Mass spectrometry has been frequently applied to monitor the O? and CO? content in the off-gas of animal cell culture fermentations. In contrast to classical mass spectrometry the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) provides additional information of volatile organic compounds by application of a soft ionization technology. Hence, the spectra show less fragments and can more accurately assigned to particular compounds. In order to discriminate between compounds of non-metabolic and metabolic origin cell free experiments and fed-batch cultivations with a recombinant CHO cell line were conducted. As a result, in total eight volatiles showing high relevance to individual cultivation or cultivation conditions could be identified. Among the detected compounds methanethiol, with a mass-to-charge ratio of 49, qualifies as a key candidate in process monitoring due to its strong connectivity to lactate formation. Moreover, the versatile and complex data sets acquired by PTR MS provide a valuable resource for statistical modeling to predict non direct measurable parameters. Hence, partial least square regression was applied to the complete spectra of volatiles measured and important cell culture parameters such as viable cell density estimated (R² ?=?0.86). As a whole, the results of this study clearly show that PTR-MS provides a powerful tool to improve bioprocess-monitoring for mammalian cell culture. Thus, specific volatiles emitted by cells and measured online by the PTR-MS and complex variables gained through statistical modeling will contribute to a deeper process understanding in the future and open promising perspectives to bioprocess control. PMID:24376199

Schmidberger, Timo; Gutmann, Rene; Bayer, Karl; Kronthaler, Jennifer; Huber, Robert

2014-01-01

113

Systematic selection of off-gas treatment at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), from 1958--1985, effluent waste from the reactor fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was discharged to a settling basin. In 1981, monitoring wells detected groundwater contamination, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, in the immediate vicinity of the basin. Under the auspices of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) the M-Area contamination must be addressed by a corrective action program until the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations reach Drinking Water Standards. This was initiated in 1985 with startup of a full-scale pump-and-treat air stripper system. Recently, remediation efforts have focused on vacuum extraction to treat vadose zone contamination not addressed by the original recovery wells, and additional pump-and-treat systems to achieve hydraulic control of the plume. Regulatory requirements allowed for discharge of VOCs to the atmosphere when the original remediation system was installed; however, 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act will eventually require treatment of VOC contaminated air prior to discharge. This has ramifications to systems currently being design, as well as the existing systems. In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, SRS initiated a study to assess commercially available off-gas treatment technologies. These included carbon adsorption, thermal incineration, catalytic oxidation, absorption, condensation, and UV/peroxide destruction, and xenon flashlamp. Criteria used to evaluate the technologies were the thirty (30) year life cycle cost, permitting considerations, and manpower requirements. The study concluded that catalytic oxidation provided the most desirable combination of these elements.

McKillip, S.T.; Rehder, T.E.

1992-05-01

114

Systematic selection of off-gas treatment at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), from 1958--1985, effluent waste from the reactor fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was discharged to a settling basin. In 1981, monitoring wells detected groundwater contamination, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, in the immediate vicinity of the basin. Under the auspices of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) the M-Area contamination must be addressed by a corrective action program until the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations reach Drinking Water Standards. This was initiated in 1985 with startup of a full-scale pump-and-treat air stripper system. Recently, remediation efforts have focused on vacuum extraction to treat vadose zone contamination not addressed by the original recovery wells, and additional pump-and-treat systems to achieve hydraulic control of the plume. Regulatory requirements allowed for discharge of VOCs to the atmosphere when the original remediation system was installed; however, 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act will eventually require treatment of VOC contaminated air prior to discharge. This has ramifications to systems currently being design, as well as the existing systems. In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, SRS initiated a study to assess commercially available off-gas treatment technologies. These included carbon adsorption, thermal incineration, catalytic oxidation, absorption, condensation, and UV/peroxide destruction, and xenon flashlamp. Criteria used to evaluate the technologies were the thirty (30) year life cycle cost, permitting considerations, and manpower requirements. The study concluded that catalytic oxidation provided the most desirable combination of these elements.

McKillip, S.T.; Rehder, T.E.

1992-01-01

115

Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems  

SciTech Connect

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2011-05-01

116

OGRE/MOD1: A computer model for predicting off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melts  

SciTech Connect

The OGRE program is designed to compute off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melt pools. This document describes the theoretical basis and computational algorithms used in the program. An outline of the computer program is described including presentation of an example user input deck. Two model problems are examined to verify the program and an example problem is given to demonstrate program usage.

MacKinnon, R.J.; Mousseau, V.A.

1990-07-01

117

Investigation of the combined adsorption of krypton, xenon, and water vapor of the off-gas of atomic power stations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radiochromatogra phic system of purifying the off-gas from the short-lived krypton, xenon, and iodine nuclides is presently used in Russian atomic power stations and in foreign atomic power stations equipped with the aid of the USSR. The basic elements of the system are filter-adsorbers filled with activated carbon and a drying unit [1-3]. Dynamic adsorption and radioactive decay in

I. E. Nakhutin; D. V. Ochkin; S. A. Tret'yak

1980-01-01

118

FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

2012-10-30

119

Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

1996-03-01

120

On structural features of fullerene C60 dissolved in carbon disulfide: complementary study by small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamic simulations.  

PubMed

The parameters of fullerene C(60) dissolved in carbon disulfide CS(2) are analyzed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in a wide interval of momentum transfer. To exclude the influence of nonequilibrium conditions, the solutions are prepared without applying shaking, stirring or ultrasound. No indication of the equilibrium cluster state of C(60) (with the cluster size below 60 nm) in the final solutions is revealed. Molecular dynamic simulations are complementary used to find out the partial volume of C(60) in CS(2) and the scattering contribution of the solvent organization at the interface with the fullerene molecule, which is shown to be small. Among several approaches for describing SANS data the preference is given to the model, which takes into account the presence of stable C(60) dimers (comprising 10% of the total particle number density) in the solution. PMID:20441296

Avdeev, M V; Tropin, T V; Bodnarchuk, I A; Yaradaikin, S P; Rosta, L; Aksenov, V L; Bulavin, L A

2010-04-28

121

Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The

P. Szymczak; A. J. C. Ladd

2009-01-01

122

Simulation of carbon cycling, including dissolved organic carbon transport, in forest soil locally enriched with 14 C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DyDOC model was used to simulate the soil carbon cycle of a deciduous forest at the Oak Ridge Reservation (Tennessee,\\u000a USA). The model application relied on extensive data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS), which exploited a\\u000a short-term local atmospheric enrichment of radiocarbon to establish a large-scale manipulation experiment with different inputs\\u000a of 14C from both above-ground and

Ed Tipping; Paul M. Chamberlain; M. Fröberg; Paul J Hanson; Philip M Jardine

2012-01-01

123

Testing and evaluation of off-gas filters for bioreactors by a new bacterial aerosol challenge test method (TBAC).  

PubMed

A TNO bacterial aerosol challenge (TBAC) filter test rig was developed for direct assessment of the effectiveness of bioreactor off-gas filters as an alternative to routinely applied indirect wet integrity testing (IT). This TBAC test rig is based on bacterial aerosol challenging with Pseudomonas diminuta and dual monitoring by laser particle counting (LPC) and Andersen microbial sampling (AMS) of viable cells. The TBAC filter test rig is able to reproduce the various conditions encountered in fermentation processes. In experiments with several filters from one class, it was demonstrated that some filters were actually penetrated by up to 3,000 viable cells per test, despite their approval by commercially available IT test equipment. Repetitive filter use, prolonged use, and autoclaving of filters resulted in an increase in pressure drop over the filter but improved the performance of leaking/deviant filters due to building up of a filter cake (this phenomenon was identified by electron microscopy). The integrity tests used were found inadequate for accurate assessment of filter quality. Certification of filter lots by random tests of commercially available off-gas filters using sensitive direct methods such as those presented here might be advisable, as not all filters purchased were of appropriate quality. PMID:1368427

Kastelein, J; Logtenberg, M T; Hesselink, P G

1992-07-01

124

Oxygen-induced dynamics of nitrous oxide in water and off-gas during the treatment of digester supernatant.  

PubMed

Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is a potent greenhouse gas and of special concern in wastewater treatment. It is formed in biological wastewater treatment under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A major reason for high N(2)O emissions is low oxygen concentration during nitrification. In this full-scale study of N(2)O emissions from a sequencing batch reactor for treating digester supernatant, the oxygen concentration was reduced stepwise to investigate how N(2)O emissions were influenced. N(2)O concentrations were measured online in water and off-gas. A distinct relationship was found between low oxygen concentration and high N(2)O emissions. N(2)O was formed in water during both nitrification and denitrification. Decreased oxygen concentration during nitrification led to increased nitrite concentration, which in turn led to increased N(2)O concentration in the subsequent denitrification phase. When the nitrification resumed, accumulated N(2)O was stripped off to the atmosphere. Very high concentrations of N(2)O, over 56,000 ppmv, were measured in the off-gas. Furthermore, the maximum amount of N(2)O emitted during one cycle corresponded to 107.6% of the total nitrogen load (21.9% of total nitrogen present in the bulk liquid at the beginning of the cycle). This is among the highest emission levels ever measured from a full-scale municipal plant for digester supernatant. PMID:24434972

Stenström, F; Tjus, K; la Cour Jansen, J

2014-01-01

125

Development of mathematical model for simulating biosorption of dissolved metals on Bacillus drentensis immobilized in biocarrier beads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biocarrier beads with dead biomass, Bacillus drentensis, immobilized in polymer polysulfone were synthesized to remove heavy metals from wastewater. To identify the sorption mechanisms and theoretical nature of underlying processes, a series of batch experiments were carried out and a mathematical model was developed to quantify the biosorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) by the biocarrier beads. A series of mass balance equations for representing mass transfer of metal sorbents in a biocarrier beads and surrounding solution were established and solved using a finite difference method. Major model parameters such as external mass transfer coefficient and maximum sorption capacity, etc. were determined from pseudo-first and second-order kinetic models and Langmuir isotherm model based on kinetic and equilibrium experimental measurements. The model simulation displays reasonable representations of experimental data and implied that the proposed model can be applied to quantitative analysis on biosorption mechanisms by porous granular beads. The simulation results also confirms that the biosorption of heavy metal by the biocarrier beads largely depended on surface adsorption.

Nam, J.; Wang, S.; Lee, M.

2012-12-01

126

Semiconducting behavior and bandgap energies of oxide films grown on alloy 600 under PWR simulated primary water conditions with different dissolved hydrogen contents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alloy 600 samples were oxidized under different simulated PWR primary water conditions, with varying contents of dissolved hydrogen. The photoelectrochemical techniques, used to characterize the semiconducting behavior and bandgap energies of oxide films have shown that the scale has several components. The first ones, exhibiting photocurrents at photon energies lower than 2.5 eV behave as n-type semiconductors, whereas the analyze of the photocurrents measured at higher energies suggests that other components are either n-type or insulating, depending on the hydrogen partial pressure tested: <0.01, 0.3 and 6.5 bar (<1, 30 and 658 kPa). Furthermore, a novel approach developed recently by our group allowed us determination of the number of semiconducting components in the scales and assessment of the bandgap energy for each of them. These results revealed that the composition, as well as the semiconducting properties of the scales, were influenced by the hydrogen partial pressure used in the corrosion test.

Loucif, A.; Petit, J.-P.; Wouters, Y.

2013-11-01

127

Chemistry Review: Dissolving  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource clearly defines and summarizes all the aspects of the dissolving of liquids, with detailed examples of different substances dissolving together. There are videos that show dissolving examples, as well as models that show substances at their molecular level. The chemical make-up of substances such as water and oil are included to better understand the dissolving process and to learn which substances dissolve and which ones do not.

Kessler, James; Galvan, Patti

2010-01-01

128

Low-Level waste phase 1 melter testing off gas and mass balance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994-95 as part of a multiphase program to test candidate technologies for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes were also tested. Various feed material samples, product glass samples, and process offgas streams were characterized to provide data for evaluation of process decontamination factors and material mass balances for each vitrification technology. This report describes the melter mass balance evaluations and results for six of the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor demonstration tests.

Wilson, C.N.

1996-06-28

129

Laboratory Evaluation of Zeolite Molecular Sieve 3A for Adsorption of Tritiated Water Vapor from HTGR Fuel Reprocessing off-Gas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Zeolite molecular sieve 3A, a commercial adsorbent, was evaluated for removing water vapor from a CO sub 2 gas stream. The technology was developed for tritium oxide recovery from the primary and secondary burner off-gas from High Temperature Gas-Cooled R...

J. A. DelDebbio

1978-01-01

130

TREATMENT TANK OFF-GAS TESTING FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate of the volume of hydrogen gas generated during Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) of residual sludge remaining in a Type I or Type II treatment tank as well as to provide results independent of the sludge volume in the waste tank to be cleaned. Previous testing to support Chemical Cleaning was based on a 20:1 oxalic acid to sludge ratio. Hydrogen gas evolution is the primary safety concern. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. These values were quantified based on a small scale methodology similar to the one described in WSRC-STI-2007-00209, Rev. 0. The measured rates support identified Safety Class functions. The tests were performed with ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound confidence limit for the hydrogen generation rate is represented by the following equation. ln (G{sub v}) = -8.22-0.0584 t + 0.0002 t{sup 2}. This equation should be utilized to estimate the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate per unit surface area, G{sub v}, at a given time, t. The units for G{sub v} and t are ft{sup 3}/ft{sup 2}/min and hours, respectively. The total volume of hydrogen gas generated during the test was calculated from the model equation. An upper bound on the total gas generated was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound limit on the total hydrogen generated during the 163 hour test was 0.332 ft{sup 3}/ft{sup 2}. The maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate for this scenario is greater than that previously measured in the 8 wt.% oxalic acid tests due to both the absence of sludge in the test (i.e., greater than 20:1 ratio of acid to sludge) and the use of polished coupons (vs. mill scale coupons). However, due to passivation of the carbon steel surface, the corrosion rate decays by an order of magnitude within the first three days of exposure such that the instantaneous hydrogen generation rates are less than that previously measure in the 8 wt.% oxalic acid tests. While the results of these tests are bounding, the conditions used in this study may not be representative of the ECC flowsheet, and the applicability of these results to the flowsheet should be evaluated for the following reasons: (1) The absence of sludge results in higher instantaneous hydrogen generation rates than when the sludge is present; and (2) Polished coupons do not represent the condition of the carbon steel interior of the tank, which are covered with mill scale. Based on lower instantaneous corrosion rates measured on mill scale coupons exposed to oxalic acid, lower instantaneous hydrogen generation rates are expected for the tank interior than measured on the polished coupons. Corrosion rates were determined from the coupon tests and also calculated from the measured hydrogen generation rates. Excellent agreement was achieved between the time averaged corrosion rate calculated from the hydrogen generation rates and the corrosion rates determined from the coupon tests. The corrosion rates were on the order of 18 to 28 mpy. Good agreement was also observed between the maximum instantaneo

Wiersma, B.

2011-08-29

131

Removal of methyl parathion from artificial off-gas using a bioreactor containing a constructed microbial consortium.  

PubMed

Methyl parathion (MP), a highly toxic organophosphorus pesticide, was widely used for agriculture crop protection. During the production of MP and the process of MP-containing wastewater treatment, MP can release into the atmosphere and will do great harm to adjacent communities. A consortium comprised of an engineered microorganism and a natural p-nitrophenol (PNP) degrader was assembled for complete mineralization of MP. We genetically engineered Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) enabling the overexpression of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH). In addition, we isolated Ochrobactrum sp. strain LL-1 that utilized PNP, a product of MP hydrolysis, as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. The coculture effectively hydrolyzed 0.2 mM MP and prevented the accumulation of PNP in suspended culture. A laboratory-scale bioreactor containing the dual-species consortium was developed for the treatment of artificial off-gas containing MP. The bioreactor maintained over 98% of average MP removal efficiency over a 75 day period, and PNP produced from hydrolysis of MP was degraded completely, indicating that complete mineralization of MP was achieved. The strategy of linking degrading consortium to a bioreactor may provide an alternative to physicochemical abatement technologies for the treatment of waste-gas streams containing MP as well as other PNP-substituted organophosphates. PMID:18409649

Li, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lan, Wensheng; Xie, Shan; Qiao, Chuanling; Liu, Junxin

2008-03-15

132

Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams  

SciTech Connect

The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

2013-10-01

133

Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams  

SciTech Connect

The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

2013-09-01

134

Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The effects of flow rate, mineral dissolution rate, and geometrical properties of the fracture were investigated, and the optimal conditions for wormhole formation were determined.

Szymczak, P.; Ladd, A. J. C.

2009-06-01

135

Flooding and mass transfer in Goodloe-packed columns. [For Kr absorption in liquid CO in HTGR off-gas systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flooding and mass transfer experiments were performed with a CO-air\\/water system to examine mass transfer characteristics in Goodloe-packed columns of 6.4 and 15.2-cm ID for removal of radioactive Kr from HTGR off-gas. The flooding experiments verified previous correlations for the packing. The plug flow model was selected for calculation of the overall mass transfer coefficient, K\\/sub L\\/a. The correlation for

E. I. Chao; R. J. Bertolami; J. L. P. Varlet; G. R. Wilkes

1976-01-01

136

AFCI Coupled End-to-End Research,Development and Demonstration Project: Integrated Off-gas Treatment System Design and Initial Performance - 9226  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a complete, coupled end-to-end (CETE) demonstration of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. This small-scale reprocessing operation provides a unique opportunity to test integrated off-gas treatment systems designed to recover the primary volatile fission and activation products (H-3, C-14, Kr-85, and I-139) released from the spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The CETE project will demonstrate an advanced head-end process, referred to as voloxidation, designed to condition the SNF, separate the SNF from the cladding, and release tritium contained in the fuel matrix. The off-gas from the dry voloxidation process as well as from the more traditional fuel dissolution process will be treated separately and the volatile components recovered. This paper provides descriptions of the off-gas treatment systems for both the voloxidation process and for the fuel dissolution process and provides preliminary results from the initial CETE processing runs. Impacts of processing parameters on the relative quantities of volatile components released and recovery efficiencies are evaluated.

Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL] [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramey, Dan W [ORNL] [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL] [ORNL

2009-01-01

137

Photobleaching of humic rich dissolved organic matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humic rich dissolved organic matter (DOM) from a bog lake in the Northern Black Forest was treated with simulated solar UV-light. The effects of irradiation time, initial pH values, and dissolved iron and copper on photobleaching were investigated. The DOC concentration and the UV\\/VIS absorption decreased with increasing amounts of absorbed light energy. The wavelengths of the maximum bleaching effect

Thomas Brinkmann; Daniel Sartorius; Fritz H. Frimmel

2003-01-01

138

Synergistic effects of local strain-hardening and dissolved oxygen on stress corrosion cracking of 316NG weld heat-affected zones in simulated BWR environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stress corrosion cracking growth during long-term test in high temperature water was monitored in two 316NG weld heat-affected zones representing highly hardened and medially hardened regions. Cracking near the weld fusion line exhibited both macroscopic bifurcation and extensive microscopic branching, which was faster than that in the medially hardened region where crack kinking was observed. There is an interaction between material hardening and dissolved oxygen on crack growth. The effect of a single overloading on crack growth in 316NG heat-affected zones is less significant than that in a cold worked 316NG stainless steel.

Lu, Zhanpeng; Shoji, Tetsuo; Xue, He; Meng, Fanjiang; Fu, Chaoyang; Takeda, Yoichi; Negishi, Koji

2012-04-01

139

Pill Dissolving Demo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In a class demonstration, the teacher places different pill types ("chalk" pill, gel pill, and gel tablet) into separate glass beakers of vinegar, representing human stomach acid. After 20-30 minutes, the pills dissolve. Students observe which dissolve the fastest, and discuss the remnants of the various pills. What they learn contributes to their ongoing objective to answer the challenge question presented in lesson 1 of this unit.

Vu Bioengineering Ret Program

140

Sequence and transcriptional analysis of the genes responsible for curdlan biosynthesis in Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 under simulated dissolved oxygen gradients conditions.  

PubMed

Expression at the mRNA level of ten selected genes in Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 under various dissolved oxygen (DO) levels during curdlan fermentation related to electron transfer chain (ETC), tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, peptidoglycan/lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose biosynthesis were determined by qRT-PCR. Experiments were performed at DO levels of 30%, 50%, and 75%, as well as under low-oxygen conditions. The effect of high cell density on transcriptional response of the above genes under low oxygen was also studied. Besides cytochrome d (cyd A), the transcription levels of all the other genes were increased at higher DO and reached maximum at 50% DO. Under 75% DO, the transcriptional levels of all the genes were repressed. In addition, transcription levels of icd, sdh, cyo A, and fix N genes did not exhibit significant fluctuation with high cell density culture under low oxygen. These results suggested a mechanism for DO regulation of curdlan synthesis through regulation of transcriptional levels of ETCs, TCA, and UDP-glucose synthesis genes during curdlan fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report that DO concentration apparently regulates curdlan biosynthesis in Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 providing essential lead for the optimization of the fermentation at the industrial scale. PMID:21472535

Zhang, Hong-Tao; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jian-Rong; Yu, Xiao-Bin; Jiang, Yun; Lin, Chi-Chung

2011-07-01

141

ADDING REALISM TO NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLVING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Two new criticality modeling approaches have greatly increased the efficiency of dissolver operations in H-Canyon. The first new approach takes credit for the linear, physical distribution of the mass throughout the entire length of the fuel assembly. This distribution of mass is referred to as the linear density. Crediting the linear density of the fuel bundles results in using lower fissile concentrations, which allows higher masses to be charged to the dissolver. Also, this approach takes credit for the fact that only part of the fissile mass is wetted at a time. There are multiple assemblies stacked on top of each other in a bundle. On average, only 50-75% of the mass (the bottom two or three assemblies) is wetted at a time. This means that only 50-75% (depending on operating level) of the mass is moderated and is contributing to the reactivity of the system. The second new approach takes credit for the progression of the dissolving process. Previously, dissolving analysis looked at a snapshot in time where the same fissile material existed both in the wells and in the bulk solution at the same time. The second new approach models multiple consecutive phases that simulate the fissile material moving from a high concentration in the wells to a low concentration in the bulk solution. This approach is more realistic and allows higher fissile masses to be charged to the dissolver.

Williamson, B.

2011-08-15

142

A Dissolving Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students add objects and substances to carbonated water to discover that added objects also increase the rate dissolved gas comes out of solution. Students are then challenged to make a lemon soda that retains as much carbonation as possible by using carbonated water, sugar, and lemon juice. There is a downloadable activity sheet that will be very helpful to educators, and will help students stay on track. An assessment sheet is also available on the activity page to keep track of students progress. There is also a step by step guide as to how to perform the experiment, and how to introduce it t the students.

Kessler, James; Galvan, Patti

2010-01-01

143

Predicting Diel Dissolved Oxygen Dynamics in the Carson River, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Carson River originates in eastern Alpine County California, flows northeast into western Nevada through Carson City, and terminates in the Carson Sink. Elevated nutrient levels from agricultural return flows allow for excess attached algal (periphyton) growth. Periods of low flow, coupled with an abundance of periphyton, harbor an environment capable of producing dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 5 mg L-1. Algal biomass sampling, water quality constituent sampling, and YSI Sonde deployments were performed during low flow months of 2003 and 2004 to investigate dissolved oxygen dynamics and relative amounts of periphyton present in a 33 kilometer reach of the Carson River. A significantly augmented version of the Water Quality Analysis and Simulation Program (WASP5) was calibrated and verified. Preliminary results from this version of WASP5 track observed periphyton biomass and dissolved oxygen data fairly consistently throughout both the temporal and spatial model domains. Dissolved oxygen calibration was constrained through the use of observed periphyton biomass, water quality constituents, and temperature data. Finally, the calibrated input file will also be used as an input file for an updated version of the EPA water quality model, WASP7, and a comparison of the simulated periphyton biomass and dissolved oxygen dynamics from these models will be accomplished. The uniqueness of this study stems from the coupling of algal biomass, water quality constituents, temperature, dissolved oxygen field data and the comparison of results from two water quality simulation models, in order to understand the underlying reasons for observed dissolved oxygen variations.

Latham, Z. B.; Warwick, J. J.; Fritsen, C. H.

2005-12-01

144

ICPP custom dissolver explosion recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report discusses the recovery from the February 9, 1991 small scale explosion in a custom processing dissolver at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Custom processing is a small scale dissolution facility which processes nuclear material in an economical fashion. The material dissolved in this facility was uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranium\\/fissium alloy in nitric acid. The paper explained

R. Demmer; R. Hawk

1992-01-01

145

METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic ; uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric ; acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved ; greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use ; of about 1 or 2 percent

Slotin

1958-01-01

146

Middle School Chemistry: The Water Molecule and Dissolving  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of multimedia lessons, developed by the American Chemical Society, examines the process of dissolving materials in water. Videos, interactive simulations, hands-on labs, and demonstrations are all integrated into a 9-part unit of instruction that includes assessments and background information. Students will explore why water dissolves salt and sugar, conduct solubility tests, investigate how temperature affects dissolving, and more. Editor's Note: The authors designed this curriculum to help students understand basic chemistry within a framework of molecular interactions. The molecular models and related animations provide a foundation for understanding states of matter, atomic models and bonding, charge interactions, and chemical change.

Galvan, Patti; Kessler, Jim

2011-06-27

147

Off gas film cooler cleaner  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for cleaning depositions of particulate matter from the inside of tubular piping while the piping is in use. The apparatus is remote controlled in order to operate in hazardous environments. A housing containing brush and shaft assemblies is mounted on top of the tubular piping. Pneumatic cylinders provide linear motion. A roller nut bearing provides rotary motion. The combined motion causes the brush assembly to rotate as it travels along the tube dislodging particulate matter.

Dhingra, Hardip S. (Williamsville, NY); Koch, William C. (Gowanda, NY); Burns, David C. (Trafford, PA)

1997-01-01

148

Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on sludge settleability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This laboratory study presents a detailed evaluation of the effects of dissolved oxygen concentration and accumulation of storage polymers on sludge settleability in activated sludge systems with an aerobic selector. The oxygen and substrate availability regime were simulated in laboratory sequencing batch reactor systems. The experiments showed that low dissolved oxygen concentration (=1.1 mg O 2 l -1) had a strong negative effect

A. M. P. Martins; J. J. Heijnen; M. C. M. van Loosdrecht

2003-01-01

149

The Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment in environmental chemistry which serves to determine the dissolved oxygen concentration in both fresh and saline water. Applications of the method at the undergraduate and secondary school levels are recommended. (CC)

Thistlethwayte, D.; And Others

1974-01-01

150

The decomposition of vegetation and soil in marginal peat-forming landscapes: climate simulations to quantify gaseous and dissolved carbon fluxes and the effects on peat accumulation and drinking water treatment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peatlands in the UK represent a large proportion of the soil carbon store, however there is concern that some systems may be switching from sinks to sources of carbon. The accumulation of organic material in peatlands results from the slow rates of decomposition typically occurring in these regions. Climate change may lead to faster decomposition which, if not matched by an equivalent increase in net primary productivity and litter fall, may tip the balance between source and sink. Recent trends have seen a greater flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from peatlands to surface waters and a change in DOM character, presenting challenges to water treatment, for example in terms of increased production of disinfectant by-products (DBPs). Peat systems border a large proportion of reservoirs in the UK so uncertainty regarding DOM quantity and quality is a concern for water utilities. This study considered five peatland vegetation types (Sphagnum spp., Calluna vulgaris, Molinea caerulea, peat soil and mixed litter) collected from the Exmoor National Park, UK where it is hypothesised that peat formation may be strongly affected by future changes to climate. A factorial experiment design to simulate climate was used, considering vegetation type, temperature and rainfall amount using a current baseline and predictions from the UKCP09 model. Gaseous fluxes of carbon were monitored over a two month period to quantify the effect on carbon mineralisation rates while 13C NMR analysis was employed to track which classes of compounds decayed preferentially. The DOM collected was characterised using UV and fluorescence techniques before being subject to standard drinking water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation followed by chlorination). The effect of the experimental factors on DOM amenability to removal and propensity to form DBPs was then considered, with both trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetonitrile (HAN) DBP classes monitored. Initial results have shown a statistically significant (Mann-Whitney U) difference in THM formation (p<0.05) as well as the amount of DOM produced and specific UV absorption at 254nm (p<0.01) between vegetation classes.

Ritson, J.; Bell, M.; Clark, J. M.; Graham, N.; Templeton, M.; Brazier, R.; Verhoef, A.; Freeman, C.

2013-12-01

151

Behavior of mercury and iodine during vitrification of simulated alkaline Purex waste  

SciTech Connect

Current plans indicate that the high-level wastes stored at the Savannah River Plant will be solidified by vitrification. The behavior of mercury and iodine during the vitrification process is of concern because: mercury is present in the waste in high concentrations (0.1 to 2.8 wt%); mercury will react with iodine and the other halogens present in the waste during vitrification and; the mercury compounds formed will be volatilized from the vitrification process placing a high particulate load in the vitrification system off-gas. Twelve experiments were completed to study the behavior of mercury during vitrification of simulated SRP Purex waste. The mercury was completely volatized from the vitrification system in all experiments. The mercury reacted with iodine, chlorine and oxygen to form a fine particulate solid. Quantitative recovery of mercury compounds formed in the vitrification system off-gas was not possible due to high (37 to 90%) deposition of solids in the off-gas piping. The behavior of mercury and iodine was most strongly influenced by the vitrification system atmosphere. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was low (< 1 vol%); iodine retention in the glass product was 27 to 55%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 75 to 85 wt%, and a small quantity of metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was high (20 vol%), iodide retention in the glass product was 3 to 15%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 60 to 80 wt%, and very little metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution.

Holton, L.K.

1981-09-01

152

Science Shorts: The Dynamics of Dissolving  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dissolving is as much about the substance doing the dissolving (the solvent) as it is about the substance being dissolved (the solute). Dissolving depends on the interaction between the molecules of solvents and solutes. This article looks at the molecular structure of water, the universal solvent and includes a corresponding activity.

Kessler, James; Galvan, Patti

2006-02-01

153

Interactions Among Dissolved Nitrogen, Phosphate, and Dissolved Oxygen at Several Sites in Chesapeake Bay in 2000  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We looked at the correlation between dissolved oxygen and two water quality variables: dissolved nitrogen and dissolved phosphorus. We thought that, if dissolved oxygen were highly correlated with dissolved nitrogen (for example), then that would imply that dissolved nitrogen was limiting or otherwise important at that site. Likewise for dissolved phosphorus. We found that different sites in the bay had different levels of correlation, but there was no spatial pattern to the data.

Charlie Hunter (Southwestern College;); Sarah Kenick (University of New Hampshire;); Brian White (University of Massachusettes ;); ;

2006-06-18

154

ICPP custom dissolver explosion recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the recovery from the February 9, 1991, small scale explosion in a custom processing dissolver at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) a Department of Energy facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The custom processing facility is a limited production area designed to recover unirradiated uranium fuel. A small amount of the nuclear material received and

R. Demmer; R. Hawk

1992-01-01

155

DISSOLVED OXYGEN DIURNAL FLUX STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Stream monitoring study of a 24 Western Corn Belt Plains streams designed to assess any correlation of nutrient loads and the level of dissolved oxygen in wadeable streams and any subsequent affect on aquatic life. Study currently being conducted under a cooperative agreement be...

156

Manual for Dissolved Oxygen Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three methods covering the determination of dissolved oxygen in seawater are given. Depending upon the method used, accuracies on the order of 0.5 ppb to 5 ppb are possible. Seawater samples are analyzed by an optimized Winkler procedure. Reagents used, t...

H. C. Edgington

1971-01-01

157

Optimization of Dissolved Oxygen Measurements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the work that was carried out in the optimization of dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the various parameters affecting the precision and accuracy of the Winkler method and to develop an opt...

H. C. Edgington

1971-01-01

158

Release of biodegradable dissolved organic matter from ancient sedimentary rocks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sedimentary rocks contain the largest mass of organic carbon on Earth, yet these reservoirs are not well integrated into modern carbon budgets. Here we describe the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from OM-rich sedimentary rocks under simulated weathering conditions. Results from column experiments demonstrate slow, sustained release of DOM from ancient sedimentary rocks under simulated weathering conditions. 1H-NMR analysis

Sarah Schillawski; Steven Petsch

2008-01-01

159

Effect of dissolved gas on bubble nucleation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments studying the extinction of a gas bubble in a liquid droplet and the possibility of bubble formation in a droplet containing dissolved gas are used to investigate the effect of dissolved gas on liquid-gas phase transitions (boiling, caviation, etc.). The superheat limit of the liquid was studied using a technique in which a droplet containing a dissolved gas was

Y. Mori; K. Hijikata; T. Nagatani

1976-01-01

160

Dissolved aluminum in the Mediterranean  

SciTech Connect

Three vertical profiles of dissolved Al and nutrients are reported from the eastern basin of the Mediterranean. Profiles of Al concentrations resemble those of the nutrient elements, except that a proportionally higher residual concentration remains in the surface layer. Concentrations of Al in the surface water inflow from the North Atlantic, which contains between 10 and 20 nM around Gibraltar, are elevated to 55, 59 and 75 nM at the stations occupied. Calculations indicate that these concentrations are probably produced by dissolution Al from aeolian dust and advective mixing of Al-rich deep waters into the surface layer, balance by a biologically-associated removal process. The Al removed from the surface layer redissolves in the deep water to raise Al concentrations to about 160 nM. Samples were also recovered from anoxic deep brines in the Tyro and Bannock basins. In the brines, Al concentrations fall to about 15 nM while Si concentrations approach 270 nM.

Hydes, D.J. (Institute of Oceanographic Sciences Deacon Lab., Surrey (England)); De Lange, G.J.; De Baar, H.J.W. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

1988-08-01

161

Photochemical and microbial consumption of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved oxygen in the Amazon River system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial and photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic matter were investigated in the Amazon River system. Dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and bacterial growth were measured during incubations conducted under natural sunlight and in the dark. Substrate addition experiments indicated that the relatively low rates of bacterial activity in Amazon River water were caused by C limitation. Experiments to determine

R. M. W. Amon; R. Benner

1996-01-01

162

Fast Dissolving Tablets of Aloe Vera Gel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose : The objective of this work was to prepare and evaluate fast dissolving tablets of the nutraceutical, freeze dried Aloe vera gel. Methods: Fast dissolving tablets of the nutraceutical, freeze-dried Aloe vera gel, were prepared by dry granulation method. The tablets were evaluated for crushing strength, disintegration time, wetting time, friability, drug content and drug release. A 3 2

Jyotsana Madan; AK Sharma; Ramnik Singh

163

Impact of circulation on export production, dissolved organic matter, and dissolved oxygen in the ocean: Results from Phase II of the Ocean Carbon-cycle Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP-2)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented of export production, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and dissolved oxygen simulated by 12 global ocean models participating in the second phase of the Ocean Carbon-cycle Model Intercomparison Project. A common, simple biogeochemical model is utilized in different coarse-resolution ocean circulation models. The model mean (+\\/-1sigma) downward flux of organic matter across 75 m depth is 17 +\\/-

R. G. Najjar; X. Jin; F. Louanchi; O. Aumont; K. Caldeira; S. C. Doney; J.-C. Dutay; M. Follows; N. Gruber; F. Joos; K. Lindsay; E. Maier-Reimer; R. J. Matear; K. Matsumoto; P. Monfray; A. Mouchet; J. C. Orr; G.-K. Plattner; J. L. Sarmiento; R. Schlitzer; R. D. Slater; M.-F. Weirig; Y. Yamanaka; A. Yool

2007-01-01

164

Impact of circulation on export production, dissolved organic matter, and dissolved oxygen in the ocean: Results from Phase II of the Ocean Carbon-cycle Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP-2)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented of export production, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and dissolved oxygen simulated by 12 global ocean models participating in the second phase of the Ocean Carbon-cycle Model Intercomparison Project. A common, simple biogeochemical model is utilized in different coarse-resolution ocean circulation models. The model mean (±1?) downward flux of organic matter across 75 m depth is 17 ±

R. G. Najjar; X. Jin; F. Louanchi; O. Aumont; K. Caldeira; S. C. Doney; J.-C. Dutay; M. Follows; N. Gruber; F. Joos; K. Lindsay; E. Maier-Reimer; R. J. Matear; K. Matsumoto; P. Monfray; A. Mouchet; J. C. Orr; G.-K. Plattner; J. L. Sarmiento; R. Schlitzer; R. D. Slater; M.-F. Weirig; Y. Yamanaka; A. Yool

2007-01-01

165

Use of combined air sparging and soil vacuum extraction (AS/SVE) and groundwater recovery and treatment as remedial alternatives for dissolved DNAPL recovery  

SciTech Connect

Corrective action has been implemented to address a dissolved dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) plume in the vicinity of a former waste impoundment at the Paxon Polymer Company facility, located north of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Assessment activities focused on the characterization of the geologic and hydrologic properties of the sediments underlying the area of investigation and the impact of the dissolved DNAPL plume to the soils and groundwater. Geologic characterization revealed that the facility is underlain by Quaternary age sediments consisting of mixtures of fine-grained sands, silt, and clay. Two hydrologic units were identified within the shallow sediments which are referred to as the Upper Permeable Zone and Second Permeable Zone. The investigation focused on the impacted soils and groundwater of the Upper and Second Permeable Zones. The Upper and Second Permeable Zones were characterized hydrologically to determine the most applicable remedial alternative for addressing the dissolved DNAPL plume. Pilot tests consisting of soil vacuum extraction (SVE), combined air sparging with SVE (AS/SVE), and groundwater recovery were performed. Evaluation of these remedial technology alternatives resulted in the selection of the combined AS/SVE system alternative for the Upper Permeable Zone and the groundwater recovery alternative for the Second Permeable Zone. Recovered off-gas from the combined AS/SVE treatment system from the Upper Permeable Zone is treated through use of a granular activated carbon unit, while recovered groundwater form the Second Permeable Zone is treated by use of a low-profile air stripper.

Sturdivant, R. Jr.; Fulton, G.A. Jr. [C-K Associates, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Bains, F.E. [Paxon Polymer Co., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1995-10-01

166

Open cluster evolutions in binary system: How they dissolved  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Binarity among stellar clusters in galaxy is such a reality which has been realized for a long time, but still hides several questions and problems to be solved. Some of binary star clusters are formed by close encounter, but the others are formed together from similar womb. Some of them undergo separation process, while the others are in the middle of merger toward common future. The products of merger binary star cluster have typical characteristics which differ from solo clusters, especially in their spatial distribution and their stellar members kinematics. On the other hand, these merger products still have to face dissolving processes triggered by both internal and external factors. In this study, we performed N-body simulations of merger binary clusters with different initial conditions. After merging, these clusters dissolve with greater mass-loss rate because of their angular momentum. These rotating clusters also experience more deceleration caused by external tidal field.

Priyatikanto, R.; Arifyanto, M. I.; Wulandari, H. R. T.

2014-03-01

167

Design and simulation of a distillation column for separation of dichloropropane from a multicomponent mixture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the paper is presented the design of a separation column for recovery of 1,2-dichloropropane (DCP) from the off-gas released during propylenechlorhydrine (PCH) synthesis. The aim of this separation is to recover DCP with a purity of 99.99 mass%. The simulation of the separation column is performed by means of the professional simulation program HYSYS. The design of the rectification

M Šoóš; E Graczová; J Markoš; A Molnár; P Steltenpohl

2003-01-01

168

Thermodynamic simulations of lignite-fired IGCC with in situ desulfurization and CO 2 capture  

Microsoft Academic Search

IGCC cycles running on Greek lignite with in situ desulfurization and CO2 capture were simulated using the ASPEN PLUS process simulator and compared with other power cycles. Dolomite was chosen as the material for in situ desulfurization. Considering the power produced and residual sulfur content of the off-gas, an oxygen-blown gasifier operated at 1.8 MPa and 950°C, having a thermal

Wim F. Elseviers; Tania Van Mierlo; Martine J. F. Van de Voorde; Harry Verelst

1996-01-01

169

Transient Dissolved Organic Carbon Through Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important constituent of soil solution that plays a role in many chemical and biological processes in soils; it is also an important energy source for bacteria in the soil ecosystem. Hydrology has a significant control on the transport and fate of dissolved organic carbon in the soil but mechanisms that affect said transport are not well understood. In particular, dynamic information on DOC transport through forest soils on short time scales (one or two precipitation event) is lacking at present. DOC is a very complex mix of organic compounds. A key to quantifying DOC dynamics is to establish useful approximations for behavior of this complex mixture. Biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) is an important part of DOC. It is reported that between 12 and 44% of DOC released from the forest floor can be decomposed in solutions by indigenous microbes. In our study, we considered how DOC, BDOC, and flow interact in soil columns. In-situ soil cores with two different lengths were installed under a mixed deciduous canopy. The effects of artificial rain on DOC and BDOC transport were examined by dripping nano pure water amended with bromide on the top of soil cores and sampling the water collected at the bottom of the cores for DOC and BDOC. We used plug-flow biofilm reactors to measure the BDOC concentration. It is likely that reduced rates of decomposition in dry soils will cause microbial products of DOC to accumulate; hence DOC concentration should be high at the first flush of rain and decline as the event proceeds. The experimental results show the expected pattern, that is, the first samples we collected always had the highest DOC and BDOC concentrations. The concentrations tend to decline through the simulated precipitation event. Application of a second “storm” forty minutes after the cessation of the first application of water resulted in effluent DOC concentration increasing a small amount initially and then declining with time. A model based on a one-dimensional Richards’ equation coupled with reactive convection-dispersion equations and a heat transport model to characterize the temperature pattern along the core was developed to explore the experimental results mechanistically. Parameters for both the flow and transport models were selected using trial and error calibration first, and then refined using UCODE (USGS). The results show that the model can match the main features of the observed DOC and BDOC patterns under transient soil water flux conditions. These results indicate that future work to extend the model to two and three dimensions to describe hillslope and catchment processes is a reasonable goal, although additional processes (e.g. bacterial growth) will have to be incorporated to achieve an appropriate degree of realism.

Mei, Y.; Hornberger, G. M.; Kaplan, L. A.; Newbold, J. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Tsang, Y.

2009-12-01

170

Modeled impacts of surface coal mining on dissolved solids in the Tongue River, southeastern Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A computer model has been developed for spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved solids in the Tongue River from the Tongue River Dam to Miles City, Montana. User-defined plans of surface coal mining and agricultural development permit evaluation of potential changes in dissolved solids resulting from leaching of overburden material used to backfill mine pits and from withdrawal and return flow of irrigation water. Provision is made for simulation runs using increased streamflow from a proposed larger reservoir intended to replace the present Tongue River Reservoir. Simulations at mean streamflow indicated that mining 119,600 acres of federally leased coal tracts may increase by 4.8 percent the present annual dissolved-solids concentration in the Tongue River at Miles City. Simulations using the proposed Tongue River reservoir show substantial reductions in dissolved-solids concentration when paired with similar simulations using the present Tongue River Reservoir. When compared on a per-acre basis for the study area, the dewatering caused by irrigation increases dissolved-solids concentration more than the input of leachates from surface coal-mining operations. (USGS)

Woods, Paul F.

1981-01-01

171

Documentation of a dissolved-solids model of the Tongue River, southeastern Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A model has been developed for assessing potential increases in dissolved solids of the Tongue River as a result of leaching of overburden materials used to backfill pits in surface coal-mining operations. The model allows spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved-solids loads and concentrations under user-defined scenarios of surface coal mining and agricultural development. The model routes an input quantity of streamflow and dissolved solids from the upstream end to the downstream end of a stream reach while algebraically accounting for gains and losses of streamflow and dissolved solids within the stream reach. Input data needed to operate the model include the following: simulation number, designation of hydrologic conditions for each simulated month, either user-defined or regression-defined concentrations of dissolved solids input by the Tongue River Reservoir, number of irrigated acres, number of mined acres, dissolved-solids concentration of mine leachates and quantity of other water losses. A listing of the Fortran computer program, definitions of all variables in the model, and an example output permit use of the model by interested persons. (USGS)

Woods, Paul F.

1981-01-01

172

Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"  

SciTech Connect

Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface pressure for a 48-hour post exposure observation period. No fall chinook salmon died during or after exposure to the horizontal bulb turbine passage pressures, and no injuries were observed during the 48-hour post exposure observation period. As with the previous test series, it cannot be determined whether fall chinook salmon acclimated to the greater water pressure during the pretest holding period. For bluegill sunfish exposed to the horizontal bulb turbine turbine-passage pressures, only one fish died and injuries were less severe and less common than for bluegills subjected to either the"worst case" pressure or modified Kaplan turbine pressure conditions in previous tests. Injury rates for bluegills were higher at 0.7 atm nadir than for the 0.95 atm nadir. However, injuries were limited to minor internal hemorrhaging. Bluegills did not suffer swim bladder rupture in any tested scenarios. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

Abernethy, Cary S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Amidan, Brett G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Cada, G F. (ORNL)

2003-07-31

173

The Influence of Physical Forcing on Bottom-water Dissolved Oxygen within the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), salinity, temperature, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), and chlorophyll a in the Caloosahatchee Riv...

174

Progress in dissolving modified LEU Cintichem targets  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process is under development to use low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal targets for production of ⁹⁹Mo. The first step is to dissolve the irradiated foil. In past work, this has been done by heating a closed (sealed) vessel containing the foil and a solution of nitric and sulfuric acids. In this work, the authors have demonstrated that (1) the dissolver

R. A. Leonard; L. Chen; C. J. Mertz; G. F. Vandegrift

1996-01-01

175

Ratiometric sensor for dissolved oxygen in seawater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A dissolved oxygen sensor for marine application is reported which is based on a ratiometric approach to the fluorescence intensity quenching of the ruthenium dye [Ru(II)-tris(4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline)]2+. Both the ruthenium complex and the coumarin derivative dye have been entrapped in a porous sol-gel film. The membrane shows good optical response on exposure to low levels of dissolved oxygen in seawater. The design and limitations of such an optode membrane are discussed.

Poteau, Xavier; MacCraith, Brian D.

2003-03-01

176

Rheology of molten polystyrene with dissolved gases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved gases in polymers behave as excellent plasticizers, reducing viscosity significantly through the chain dilution effect and the addition of free volume. Rheological measurements and theoretical modeling are presented for molten polystyrene with dissolved gases, including carbon dioxide, 1,1-difluoroethane (R152a), and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a), which are considered to be environmentally acceptable for replacing previous ozone-depleting hydrochlorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants.^ A modified pressurized

Choongyong Kwag

1998-01-01

177

Chromophoric dissolved organic matter and dissolved organic carbon in Chesapeake Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the light absorbing fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The optical properties of CDOM potentially permit remote sensing of DOC and CDOM, and correction for CDOM absorption is essential for remote sensing of chlorophyll a (chl a) in coastal and estuarine waters. To provide data for this purpose, we report the distributions of CDOM,

E. J. Rochelle-Newall; T. R. Fisher

2002-01-01

178

Method for dissolving hard-to-dissolve thorium and/or plutonium oxides  

SciTech Connect

Method for dissolving hard-to-dissolve thorium and/or plutonium oxides, especially dioxides such as ThO2, PuO2 or (U/Pu)O2 mixed oxides by heating the oxides in a hermetically sealed vessel in fluoride-free nitric acid. The use of a gas atmosphere containing oxygen in the sealed vessel is advantageous.

Ledebrink, F.-W.; Rosenkranz, W.; Stoll, W.

1985-07-09

179

Chemical and Isotopic Characterization of Rainwater Dissolved Organic Carbon and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a ubiquitous, integral component of atmospheric waters which comprises a significant fraction of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in the condensed phase. The presence of significant quantities of highly chromophoric DOM in atmospheric waters has profound ramifications with respect to a wide variety of fundamental processes in atmospheric chemistry because of its impact

G. B. Avery; R. J. Kieber; J. D. Willey; P. J. Seaton

2007-01-01

180

Photochemical degradation of dissolved organic matter and dissolved lignin phenols from the Congo River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photochemical degradation of Congo River dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated to examine the fate of terrigenous DOM derived from tropical ecosystems. Tropical riverine DOM receives greater exposure to solar radiation, particularly in large river plumes discharging directly into the open ocean. Initial Congo River DOM exhibited dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and compositional characteristics typical of organic rich blackwater

Robert G. M. Spencer; Aron Stubbins; Peter J. Hernes; Andy Baker; Kenneth Mopper; Anthony K. Aufdenkampe; Rachael Y. Dyda; Vincent L. Mwamba; Arthur M. Mangangu; Jose N. Wabakanghanzi; Johan Six

2009-01-01

181

Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers  

DOEpatents

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA)

1983-01-01

182

Release of biodegradable dissolved organic matter from ancient sedimentary rocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sedimentary rocks contain the largest mass of organic carbon on Earth, yet these reservoirs are not well integrated into modern carbon budgets. Here we describe the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from OM-rich sedimentary rocks under simulated weathering conditions. Results from column experiments demonstrate slow, sustained release of DOM from ancient sedimentary rocks under simulated weathering conditions. 1H-NMR analysis of shale-derived DOM reveals a highly aliphatic, carbohydrate-poor material distinct from other natural DOM pools. Shale-derived DOM is rapidly assimilated and biodegraded by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Consequently, no compositional signature of shale-derived DOM other than 14C-depletion is likely to persist in rivers or other surface reservoirs. Combined, these efforts show that dissolution provides a mechanism for the conversion of refractory kerogen into labile biomass, linking rock weathering with sedimentary OM oxidation and the delivery of aged OM to rivers and ocean margins.

Schillawski, Sarah; Petsch, Steven

2008-09-01

183

Sediment–dissolved organic matter equilibrium partitioning of pentachlorophenol  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dissolved humic matter (HM) has an essential influence on the release of the bound pentachlorophenol (PCP) from the solid sediment. It was studied how the increase of the dissolved HM concentration affects the equilibrium partitioning of PCP between the solid sediment matter and dissolved HM. The lake sedimentary and dissolved HM were isolated and their structural compositions were compared

Nina Paaso; Juhani Peuravuori; Tero Lehtonen; Kalevi Pihlaja

2002-01-01

184

Using 18O as a Tracer of Oxygen in the Photochemical Alteration of Dissolved Organic Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biogeochemical cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters is affected by numerous processes, including photochemical alteration. Photochemical processes result in the net oxidation and mineralization of DOM concomitant with dissolved oxygen consumption and production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; principally CO2). The photochemical oxygen budget is not well constrained while DIC production accounts for nearly all the dissolved oxygen consumed, conflicting data suggests that more than half of the oxygen consumed is required to account for observed DOM oxidation and hydrogen peroxide production. An alternate source of oxygen is required to balance this budget; water itself may provide the answer. In order to determine the source of oxygen, a number of time series irradiations were performed using Great Dismal Swamp water (southeast Virginia) with 18O enrichments as either dissolved oxygen or water. Early results, upon irradiation in a UV solar simulator, show significant incorporation of 18O-enriched oxygen into high molecular weight (HMW) DOM from both sources. While the majority of the incorporated oxygen originated from the dissolved oxygen, at least 5 percent originated from water. Data will be presented showing the rate and degree of incorporation of 18O-enriched oxygen from both sources as well as the production of 18O-enriched carbon dioxide. The movement of 18O label will be discussed in relation to shifts in spectral qualities, including photobleaching and spectral slope, of the irradiated samples and selective incorporation as detailed by FT-ICRMS.

Davis, J. A.; Stubbins, A.; Helms, J.; Dias, R. F.; Mopper, K.

2006-12-01

185

Internal R and D Task Summary Report: Large-Scale Dissolver Cold-Flow Modeling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Cold-flow simulation of the SRC-I dissolvers has been performed on three columns with different height-to-diameter ratios to provide a better understanding of the fluid dynamics and operation of a three-phase gas/liquid/solid system. The experiments were ...

S. F. Moujaes

1984-01-01

186

Dissolved oxygen control of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process using stable adaptive fuzzy control  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the operation of wastewater treatment plants a key variable is dissolved oxygen (DO) content in the bioreactors. The paper describes the development of an adaptive fuzzy control strategy for tracking the DO reference trajectory applied to the Benchmark Simulation Model n.1. The design methodology of this data-driven controller uses the Lyapunov synthesis approach with a parameter projection algorithm to

Carlos Alberto Coelho Belchior; Rui Alexandre Matos Araújo; Jorge Afonso Cardoso Landeck

187

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY TO EVALUATE CORROSION OF THE F-CANYON DISSOLVER DURING THEUNIRRADIATED MARK-42 CAMPAIGN  

SciTech Connect

Unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes are to be dissolved in an upcoming campaign in F-canyon. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC)/Chemical & Hydrogen Technology Section (CHTS) identified a flow sheet for the dissolution of these Mark 42 fuel tubes which required a more aggressive dissolver solution than previously required for irradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Subsequently, SRTC/MTS was requested to develop and perform a corrosion testing program to assess the impact of new flow sheets on corrosion of the dissolver wall. The two primary variables evaluated were the fluoride and aluminum concentrations of the dissolver solution. Fluoride was added as Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) while the aluminum was added either as metallic aluminum, which was subsequently dissolved, or as the chemical aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}). The dissolved aluminum metal was used to simulate the dissolution of the aluminum from the Mark 42 cladding and fuel matrix. Solution composition for the corrosion tests bracketed the flow sheet for the Mark 42. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni. The corrosion rates, which ranged between 2.7 and 32.5 mpy, were calculated from both the one day and the one week weight losses. These corrosion rates indicated a relatively mild corrosion on the dissolver vessel. The welded coupons consistently had a higher corrosion rate than the non-welded coupons. The difference between the two decreased as the solution aggressiveness decreased. In these test solutions, aggressiveness corresponded with the fluoride concentration. Based on the results of this study, any corrosion occurring during the Mark 42 Campaign is not expected to have a deleterious effect on the dissolver vessel.

Mickalonis, J; Kerry Dunn, K

1999-08-01

188

Developing Standards for Dissolved Iron in Seawater  

Microsoft Academic Search

In nearly a dozen open-ocean fertilization experiments conducted by more than 100 researchers from nearly 20 countries, adding iron at the sea surface has led to distinct increases in photosynthesis rates and biomass. These experiments confirmed the hypothesis proposed by the late John Martin that dissolved iron concentration is a key variable that controls phytoplankton processes in ocean surface waters.

Kenneth S. Johnson; Edward Boyle; Kenneth Bruland; Kenneth Coale; Chris Measures; James Moffett; Ana Aguilar-Islas; Katherine Barbeau; Bridget Bergquist; Andrew Bowie; Kristen Buck; Yihua Cai; Zanna Chase; Jay Cullen; Takashi Doi; Virginia Elrod; Steve Fitzwater; Michael Gordon; Andrew King; Patrick Laan; Luis Laglera-Baquer; William Landing; Maeve Lohan; Jeffrey Mendez; Angela Milne; Hajime Obata; Lia Ossiander; Joshua Plant; Geraldine Sarthou; Peter Sedwick; Geoffrey J. Smith; Bettina Sohst; Sara Tanner; Stan Van den Berg; Jingfeng Wu

2007-01-01

189

Studies of TPB dissolved in Toluene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scintillation light in liquid argon calorimeters is produced at 128 nm. This must be shifted to the visible so that the light can be observed by phototubes. A traditional method for accomplishing this is to dissolve Tetraphenyl butadiene and plastic into toluene, and then use this mixture to coat surfaces. After the toluene evaporates, the TPB in the thin plastic

Ruel Jerry; Lindley Winslow; Janet Conrad

2010-01-01

190

Rapid dissolving polymer compositions and uses therefor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a method for imparting anti-misting properties to a fuel suitable for use on turbine and diesel engines comprising: adding to the fuel a rapid dissolving particulate polymer composition in an amount sufficient to substantially eliminate that population of fuel droplets having a diameter of less than about 50 micrometers normally produced when pure fuel is subjected to

D. P. OMara; A. F. Hadermann; J. C. Trippe

1988-01-01

191

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a process for dissolving plutonium metal, the process. It comprises: heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate and potassium fluoride; and immersing the plutonium in the mixture; the nitric acid having a concentration of not more than 2M, the hydroxylammonium nitrate having a concentration of between approximately 0.33 M and 1 M, and the potassium fluoride

Karraker

1992-01-01

192

Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

Neilan, Rachael Miller

2013-01-01

193

REMOVING DISSOLVED INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Dissolved inorganic contaminants in water can be cationic, anionic, or neutral forms of ions, atoms, or molecules of any element in the periodic table. The article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants fr...

194

Scaling properties of the dissolving channels in a fractured rock  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During dissolution in porous or fractured rock, a positive feedback between fluid transport and mineral erosion leads to the spontaneous formation of wormhole-like channels. An important ingredient in the evolution of such a system is the competition between the growing channels which leads to the appearance of a scale-invariant distribution of channel lengths. A simplified model of the dissolving medium is studied, in which the channels are considered to be one-dimensional needles, growing only at the tip [1]. It is shown that the needle model posseses analogous scaling properties to the full system [2]. In particular, a limit of small permeability ratio, r=k_0/k, between the undissolved and dissolved medium is studied. This limit is shown to be singular: the scaling properties for r=0 are fundamentaly different form those obtained for small but finite r. [1] P. Szymczak and A.J.C. Ladd. A Network model of channel competition in fracture dissolution Geophys. Rev. Lett., 33:L05401, 2006. [2] P. Szymczak and A.J.C. Ladd. Microscopic simulations of fracture dissolution. Geophys. Res. Lett., 31:L23606, 2004.

Szymczak, P.; Ladd, T.

2006-12-01

195

Dissolving polymer microneedle patches for influenza vaccination.  

PubMed

Influenza prophylaxis would benefit from a vaccination method enabling simplified logistics and improved immunogenicity without the dangers posed by hypodermic needles. Here we introduce dissolving microneedle patches for influenza vaccination using a simple patch-based system that targets delivery to skin's antigen-presenting cells. Microneedles were fabricated using a biocompatible polymer encapsulating inactivated influenza virus vaccine for insertion and dissolution in the skin within minutes. Microneedle vaccination generated robust antibody and cellular immune responses in mice that provided complete protection against lethal challenge. Compared to conventional intramuscular injection, microneedle vaccination resulted in more efficient lung virus clearance and enhanced cellular recall responses after challenge. These results suggest that dissolving microneedle patches can provide a new technology for simpler and safer vaccination with improved immunogenicity that could facilitate increased vaccination coverage. PMID:20639891

Sullivan, Sean P; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Del Pilar Martin, Maria; Lee, Jeong Woo; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Choi, Seong-O; Murthy, Niren; Compans, Richard W; Skountzou, Ioanna; Prausnitz, Mark R

2010-08-01

196

Method of dissolving organic filter cake  

SciTech Connect

A method of dissolving a polysaccharide-containing filter cake present in a subterranean formation is described, comprising: injecting an effective amount of a treatment fluid comprising a water soluble source of fluoride ions present in an amount sufficient to provide a molar concentration of from about 0.01 to about 0.5 and a source of hydrogen ions present in an amount sufficient to produce a pH in the treatment fluid in the range of from about 2 to about 4 into a subterranean formation wherein a filter cake is present; and maintaining the treatment fluid within the subterranean formation and in contact with the filter cake for a sufficient time to dissolve at least a portion of the filter cake.

Hollenbeck, K.H.; Norman, L.R.

1989-03-07

197

Upper ocean model of dissolved atmospheric gases  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to estimate the rate of biological oxygen production at Hawaiian Ocean Time-series station ALOHA in the central North Pacific ocean. Our approach is to use an upper ocean model together with measurements to interpret an annual cycle of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, argon, nitrogen, and the stable isotope ratio of oxygen at station ALOHA. This project represents the first upper ocean geochemical study in which model predictions are verifiable by independent measurements. Using the model, we will be able to assess the relative roles played by physical processes (air-sea gas exchange, air injection by bubbles, temperature-induced changes in gas solubility, trapping below the mixed layer, and diffusion) and biological processes (photosynthesis, respiration, and nutrient recycling) in producing the observed distribution of dissolved atmospheric gases. The long term goal of this project is to understand the utility of chemical tracers for quantifying biological processes in the ocean.

Schudlich, R.; Emerson, S.

1992-01-01

198

Microbial degradation of dissolved proteins in seawater  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental protocol using radiolabeled proteins was developed to investigate the rates and mechanisms whereby dissolved proteins are degraded in natural marine plankton communities. The results of field observations and laboratory experiments indicate that proteins are degraded by a particle-bound, thermolabile system, presumably bacteria-associated enzymes, with an apparent half-saturation constant of ca. 25 ..mu..g bovine serum albumin (BSA) per liter.

J. T. Hollibaugh; F. Azam

1983-01-01

199

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for dissolving plutonium metal, the process. It comprises: heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate and potassium fluoride; and immersing the plutonium in the mixture; the nitric acid having a concentration of not more than 2M, the hydroxylammonium nitrate having a concentration of between approximately 0.33 M and 1 M, and the potassium fluoride having a concentration between approximately 0.05 M approximately 0.1 M.

Karraker, D.G.

1992-08-04

200

Fast dissolving films made of maltodextrins  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work aimed to study maltodextrins (MDX) with a low dextrose equivalent as film forming material and their application in the design of oral fast-dissolving films. The suitable plasticizer and its concentration were selected on the basis of flexibility, tensile strength and stickiness of MDX films, and the MDX\\/plasticizer interactions were investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Flexible films were obtained by

Francesco Cilurzo; Irma E. Cupone; Paola Minghetti; Francesca Selmin; Luisa Montanari

2008-01-01

201

Method of dissolving organic filter cake  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of dissolving a polysaccharide-containing filter cake present in a subterranean formation is described, comprising: injecting an effective amount of a treatment fluid comprising a water soluble source of fluoride ions present in an amount sufficient to provide a molar concentration of from about 0.01 to about 0.5 and a source of hydrogen ions present in an amount sufficient

K. H. Hollenbeck; L. R. Norman

1989-01-01

202

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate and potassium fluoride (HAN) to a temperature between 40 and 70 C, then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not ore than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride

Karraker

1992-01-01

203

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and potassium fluoride to a temperature between 40.degree. and 70.degree. C., then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not more than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride

Karraker; David G

1992-01-01

204

An Introduction to Chemistry: Dissolving Sodium Chloride  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What happens at the molecular level when a compound dissolves in water? This interactive animation explores how negative and positive ions in sodium chloride (table salt) collide with water molecules and become separated from each other to become a solution. The model does an effective job of depicting how the water molecules disrupt the attraction between the positive sodium ions and the negative chloride ions, and then become stabilized by attractions to the atoms in the water molecule.

Bishop, Mark

2011-05-02

205

Dissolved gases in seawater and sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Certainly the most controversial results derived from the study of any dissolved gas concerned oxygen utilization rates in the North Atlantic. Jenkins (1982) estimated a net oxy- gen utilization rate (OUR) for the Beta triangle region of the North Atlantic (apices 26.5°N x 38.5°W, 32.5°N x 30.0°W, and 22.5°N x 28.5°W) of 5.7 moles of oxygen consumed m?2 yr?1 for

R. M. Key

1987-01-01

206

Dissolved organic nitrogen measurement using dialysis pretreatment.  

PubMed

Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is important for ecological and engineering researches. Quantification of low DON concentrations in waters with elevated dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) using existing methods is inaccurate. In this study, a dialysis-based pretreatment technique was optimized and adopted to reduce the interference from DIN to the quantification of DON in natural water. A cellulose ester dialysis tube (nominal molecular weight cutoff = 100 Da) was used in batch and continuous-flow dialysis steps with model compounds, natural organic matter isolates, and bulk waters to develop a dialysis pretreatment approach that selectively reduces DIN from solutions containing DON. By reducing DIN concentrations, propagation of analytical variance in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and DIN species concentrations allows more accurate determination of DON (DON = TDN - NO3 - NO2- - NH3/NH4+). Dialysis for 24 h against continuously flowing distilled water reduced DIN species by 70%. With dialysis pretreatment, DON recoveries of more than 95% were obtained for surface water and finished drinking water, but wastewater experienced a slight loss (approximately 10%) of DON possibly due to the adsorption of organics onto the dialysis membrane, permeation of low molecular weight fractions, or biodegradation. Dialysis experiments using surface water spiked with different DIN/TDN ratios concluded that dialysis pretreatment leads to more accurate DON determination than no dialysis when DIN/TDN ratios exceed 0.6 mg of N/mg of N. PMID:15757353

Lee, Wontae; Westerhoff, Paul

2005-02-01

207

Investigating Students' Understanding of the Dissolving Process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a previous study, the authors identified several student misconceptions regarding the process of dissolving ionic compounds in water. The present study used multiple-choice questions whose distractors were derived from these misconceptions to assess students' understanding of the dissolving process at the symbolic and particulate levels. The symbolic-level questions were based on balanced equations, and the particulate-level questions used multiple-choice questions involving dynamic animations or static pictures. This paper analyzes students' responses to these questions to look for associations among four variables—Answer (the correct answer and three misconceptions), Representation (symbolic or particulate question), Visualization (static or animated pictures), and Representation Order (symbolic questions before or after the particulate questions). The results indicate that the correct answer and the acid-base misconception were more popular than the ion-pair or subscript error misconceptions, the ion-pair misconception was more popular for the particulate questions than the symbolic questions, and that participants were more likely to select the correct answer when viewing static particulate questions compared to animated particulate questions, especially if the particulate questions are seen first. These results suggest that the animated motion of dissolving these compounds in water may be distracting for students.

Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

2013-04-01

208

Photochemistry of Dissolved Organic Matter in Arctic Surface Waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown that persistent organic pollutants (POPs), transported to the Arctic by long-range processes, can potentially contaminate Arctic surface waters and affect both local ecosystems and human health. Once deposited, the behavior of these pollutants is poorly understood; particularly the processes that govern their lifetime and concentrations within the water column. Here, we discuss the photochemical degradation of several halogenated organic pollutants (e.g., lindane, hexachlorobenzene) as mediated by natural dissolved organic matter (DOM). These experiments were conducted both in a controlled laboratory setting using an artificial sunlight simulator, as well as in situ in Alaskan surface waters near Toolik Lake. Our findings to date show high variability in the photodegradation rates of the target POPs and can be correlated to both their structure and the type of DOM present.

Grannas, A. M.; Chin, Y.; Miller, P. L.

2003-12-01

209

Dissolved Core Alginate Microspheres as "Smart-Tattoo" Glucose Sensors  

PubMed Central

The feasibility of multilayer thin film coated dissolved-core alginate-templated microsphere sensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and competitive binding, was explored in simulated interstitial fluid, using glucose as a model analyte. The glucose sensitivity was observed to be 0.89%/mM glucose with a linear response in the range of 0–50mM glucose. The sensor response was observed to be completely reversible in nature with a response time of 120 seconds. The system was further demonstrated to respond similarly using near-infrared dyes (Alexa Fluor-647-labeled dextran as donor and QSY-21-conjugated apo-GOx as acceptor) which exhibited a sensitivity of 0.94%/mM glucose with a linear response in range of 0–50mM glucose, making the sensor more amenable to in vivo use, when implanted in scattering tissue.

Chaudhary, Ayesha; Raina, Monica; McShane, Michael J.; Srivastava, Rohit

2013-01-01

210

SUSPENDED AND DISSOLVED SOLIDS EFFECTS ON FRESHWATER BIOTA: A REVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

It is widely recognized that suspended and dissolved solids in lakes, rivers, streams, and reservoirs affect water quality. In this report the research needs appropriate to setting freshwater quality criteria or standards for suspended solids (not including bedload) and dissolved...

211

Analytical Method for Dissolved-Organic Carbon Fractionation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A standard procedure for analytical-scale dissolved organic carbon fractionation is presented, whereby dissolved organic carbon in water is first fractionated by a nonionic macroreticular resin into acid, base, and neutral hydrophobic organic solute fract...

J. A. Leenheer E. W. D. Huffman

1979-01-01

212

How is dissolved iron produced and transported in the Amur River basin?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research showed that iron limits phytoplankton growth in the western subarctic Pacific and that significant part of it comes from the Amur River, which forms the boundary of China and Russia and finally flows into the Sea of Okhotsk. Our research group confirmed that the crucial processes of producing dissolved iron are reductive release of ferrous iron and formation of iron complex with organic compound in wetland. However, drastic conversion of wetland into cultivated land in China part during the last half of 20th century may have great impact on iron production in the future. To assess the land conversion impact on dissolved iron production, we constructed a semi-distributed hydrological model incorporating dissolved iron production mechanism. The model consists of two modules; one for dealing with the physical process that calculates runoff (TOP- RUNOFF), and the other for dissolved iron production process (TOP-FE). Performance level of TOP- RUNOFF without any calibration assessed by Nash and Sutcliff criteria against observed discharge at several points are fairly well except for catchments affected by anthropogenic impact such as dam. On the basis of TOP-RUNOFF, TOP-FE was formulated as a function of water content, organic compound, air temperature, and one parameter representing the degree of redox condition. Calculated values were compared with observed value at the several tens of points. The result shows that the model reached the level which can predict seasonal trend of dissolved iron concentration. However, the present model can not simulate abrupt increase of dissolved iron concentration which was observed at many points during the late 1990s. Possible reasons of this anomaly are now under consideration. At present, promising reasons are climate change and anthropogenic impact such as agricultural activity, but not yet resolved. Thus, to clarify unknown mechanism which governs the long-term trend of dissolved iron concentration is needed to improve predictability of our model.

Onishi, T.; Yoh, M.; Shibata, H.; Nagao, S.; Kawahigashi, M.

2008-12-01

213

Dynamics of dissolved polymer chains in isotropic turbulence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polymers are remarkable molecules that have relaxation times that can span 15 orders of magnitude. The very longest of the relaxation times for high molecular weight polymers are sufficiently long to overlap with fluid mechanical times scales; under those circumstances, polymers can influence the flow. A well-known example that is still not fully understood is polymer drag reduction. It has been known since Toms (1949 Proc. 1st Int. Congress on Rheology 2 135 41) that parts per million (mass basis) concentrations of polymers can reduce the drag on a solid surface by as much as 80%. Understanding the mechanism of drag reduction requires an understanding of the dynamics of the dissolved polymer chain in response to local fluctuations in the turbulent flow field. We investigate this by using Brownian dynamics simulations of bead-spring models of polymers immersed in a turbulent solvent that is separately computed using direct numerical simulations. We observe that polymer chains with parameters that are effective for drag reduction generally remain stretched for long periods of time and only occasionally relax. The relatively restricted configuration space they sample makes it reasonable to represent their behavior with simpler dumbbell models. We also study the spatial structure of the polymer stresses using a Lagrangian strategy. The results explain the need for relatively high spatial resolution for numerical simulations of polymer flows.

Jin, Shi; Collins, Lance R.

2007-10-01

214

Detecting oil dissolved gases using carbon nanotubes sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detection and analysis of dissolved gases in oil is an important means to determine the early latent faults of oil-immersed power transformer. A dissolved gases in oil detection method is presented based on carbon nanotubes sensor. A kind of MWNTs (Multi-wall carbon nanotubes) gas sensor modified by mixed acid was developed based on printed circuit board to detect dissolved

Tao Chang; Xiaoxing Zhang; Wangting Liu; Caixin Sun

2010-01-01

215

The marine geochemistry of dissolved gallium: A comparison with dissolved aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Dissolved Ga concentrations in the pacific Ocean range from 2 to 30 picomolar: they are low in surface waters (2-12 pM), with a subsurface maximum at 150-300 m (6-17 pM), a mid-depth minimum from 500 to 1,000 m (4-10 pM) and increasing values with depth to a maximum in the bottom waters (12-30 pM). The highest concentrations are in the central gyre, with lower values toward the north and east where productivity and particle scavenging increase. Dissolved Ga concentrations in the surface waters of the northwest Atlantic are nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the central North pacific, with higher values in the Gulf Stream than in the continental slope boundary region. The vertical distributions and horizontal transects indicate three sources of dissolved Ga to the oceans. The surface distribution reflects an eolian source with no net fluvial input to the open ocean; the subsurface maximum (a feature not seen for North Pacific dissolved Al) is attributed to vertical exchange processes; the source for the deep waters of the North Pacific is from a sediment surface remineralization process or a pore water flux. Scavenging removal throughout the water column is evident in the vertical profiles for both dissolved Ga and Al, with intensified removal in the boundary regions where productivity and particle scavenging are at a maximum. Residence times of dissolved Ga in surface waters are nearly an order of magnitude longer than the corresponding values for Al.

Orians, K.J.; Bruland, K.W. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA))

1988-12-01

216

Analysis of mercury in simulated nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, Hg, is a non-radioactive component in the High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Thus, it is a component of the Defense Waste Processing Facility`s (DWPF) process streams. It is present because mercuric nitrate (Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) is used to dissolve spent fuel rods. Since mercury halides are extremely corrosive, especially at elevated temperatures such as those seen in a melter (1150{degrees}C), its concentration throughout the process needs to be monitored so that it is at an acceptable level prior to reaching the melter off-gas system. The Hg can be found in condensates and sludge feeds and throughout the process and process lines, i.e., at any sampling point. The different samples types that require Hg determinations in the process streams are: (1) sludges, which may be basic or acidic and may or may not include aromatic organics, (2) slurries, which are sludges with frit and will always contain organics (formate and aromatics), and (3) condensates, from feed prep and melter off-gas locations. The condensates are aqueous and the mercury may exist as a complex mixture of halides, oxides, and metal, with levels between 10 and 100 ppm. The mercury in the sludges and slurries can be Hg{sup 0}, Hg{sup +1}, or Hg{sup +2}, with levels between 200 and 3000 ppm, depending upon the location, both time and position, of sampling. For DWPF, both total and soluble Hg concentrations need to be determined. The text below describes how these determinations are being made by the Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory at the Savannah River Site. Both flame atomic absorption (FAA) and cold vapor atomic (CVAA) measurements are discussed. Also, the problems encountered in the steps toward measuring HG in these samples types of condensates and sludges are discussed along with their solutions.

Policke, T.A.; Johnson, L.C.; Best, D.R.

1991-12-31

217

Analysis of mercury in simulated nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, Hg, is a non-radioactive component in the High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Thus, it is a component of the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) process streams. It is present because mercuric nitrate (Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) is used to dissolve spent fuel rods. Since mercury halides are extremely corrosive, especially at elevated temperatures such as those seen in a melter (1150{degrees}C), its concentration throughout the process needs to be monitored so that it is at an acceptable level prior to reaching the melter off-gas system. The Hg can be found in condensates and sludge feeds and throughout the process and process lines, i.e., at any sampling point. The different samples types that require Hg determinations in the process streams are: (1) sludges, which may be basic or acidic and may or may not include aromatic organics, (2) slurries, which are sludges with frit and will always contain organics (formate and aromatics), and (3) condensates, from feed prep and melter off-gas locations. The condensates are aqueous and the mercury may exist as a complex mixture of halides, oxides, and metal, with levels between 10 and 100 ppm. The mercury in the sludges and slurries can be Hg{sup 0}, Hg{sup +1}, or Hg{sup +2}, with levels between 200 and 3000 ppm, depending upon the location, both time and position, of sampling. For DWPF, both total and soluble Hg concentrations need to be determined. The text below describes how these determinations are being made by the Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory at the Savannah River Site. Both flame atomic absorption (FAA) and cold vapor atomic (CVAA) measurements are discussed. Also, the problems encountered in the steps toward measuring HG in these samples types of condensates and sludges are discussed along with their solutions.

Policke, T.A.; Johnson, L.C.; Best, D.R.

1991-01-01

218

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22

219

Reduced water density at hydrophobic surfaces: Effect of dissolved gases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here, direct noninvasive neutron reflectivity measurements reveal the presence of a reduced (deuterated) water density region, with a sigmoidal density profile at the hydrophobic silane-water interface that depends on the type and concentration of dissolved gases in the water. Removal of dissolved gases decreases the width of the reduced water density region, and their reintroduction leads to its increase. When compared with recent computer simulations, a locally fluctuating density profile is proposed, whereas preexisting nanobubbles are excluded. The presence of a fluctuating reduced water density region between two hydrophobic surfaces and the attractive “depletion force” to which it leads may help explain the hydrophobic force and its reported diminution in deaerated water. Our results are also quantitatively consistent with recent dynamic surface force apparatus results that drastically revise previous estimates of the slip length of water flowing past hydrophobic surfaces from microns to ?20 nm. Our observations, therefore, go a long way toward reconciling three quite different types of experiments and phenomena: water depletion at hydrophobic surfaces, water slip at hydrophobic surfaces, and the hydrophobic interaction. Author contributions: D.A.D., E.B.W., J.N.I., and J.M. designed research; D.A.D., E.B.W., and J.M. performed research; D.A.D. and E.B.W. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; D.A.D. and E.B.W. analyzed data; and D.A.D., E.B.W., J.N.I., and J.M. wrote the paper.Abbreviations: AFM, atomic force microscopy; D2O, deuterated water; NR, neutron reflectivity; OTS, octadecyl-tricholorosilane; SLD, scattering length density.

Doshi, Dhaval A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Majewski, Jaroslaw

2005-07-01

220

Contribution ratio of freely to total dissolved concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in natural river waters.  

PubMed

The bioavailability and ecological risk of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in aquatic environments largely depends on their freely dissolved concentrations. In this work, the freely dissolved concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene were determined for the Yellow River, Haihe River and Yongding River of China using polyethylene devices (PEDs). The results indicated that the order of ratios of freely to total dissolved concentrations of the three PAHs was phenanthrene (66.8±20.1%)>pyrene (48.8±26.4%)>chrysene (5.5±3.3%) for the three rivers. The ratios were significantly negatively correlated with the logK(ow) values of the PAHs. In addition, the ratios were negatively correlated with the suspended sediment (SPS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the river water, and the characteristics of the SPS and DOC were also important factors. Simulation experiments showed that the ratio of freely to total dissolved concentrations of pyrene in the aqueous phase decreased with increasing SPS concentration; when the sediment concentration increased from 2 g L(-1) to 10 g L(-1), the ratio decreased from 67.6% to 38.4% for Yellow River sediment and decreased from 50.4% to 33.6% for Haihe River sediment. This was because with increasing SPS concentration, more and more DOC, small particles and colloids (<0.45 ?m) would enter the aqueous phase. Because high SPS and DOC concentrations exist in many rivers, their effect on the freely dissolved concentrations of HOCs should be considered when conducting an ecological risk assessment. PMID:22963877

Xia, Xinghui; Zhai, Yawei; Dong, Jianwei

2013-02-01

221

Internal R and D task summary report: large-scale dissolver cold-flow modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cold-flow simulation of the SRC-I dissolvers has been performed on three columns with different height-to-diameter ratios to provide a better understanding of the fluid dynamics and operation of a three-phase gas\\/liquid\\/solid system. The experiments were conducted in 5-in.-, 12-in.-, and 6-ft-diameter columns. The effects of various parameters on gas holdup, liquid axial dispersion coefficients, solids axial distribution, and gas\\/liquid mass-transfer

Moujaes

1984-01-01

222

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium  

DOEpatents

A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and potassium fluoride to a temperature between 40.degree. and 70.degree. C., then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not more than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 0.1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.

Karraker, David G. (1600 Sherwood Pl., SE., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01

223

Removal of dissolved metals by plant tissue  

SciTech Connect

Various types of microbial biomass have been shown to adsorb metals dissolved in aqueous media. It has now been demonstrated that certain plant tissues are also effective for this type of adsorption process. In particular, tomato and tobacco roots harvested from field-grown plants were shown to adsorb Sr from an aqueous solution of SrCl[sub 2]. Distribution coefficients in excess of 550 were measured and the adsorption isotherms at 25 C could be fitted to Langmuir-type expressions. The bioadsorbent could be regenerated and metals recovered by either a reduction in the pH to less than 2.0 or by use of a concentrated chloride salt solution.

Scott, C.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-04-25

224

Fast-response sensors for dissolved oxygen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we have been developing fast response optical sensors for dissolved oxygen determination based on measuring the luminescence lifetime of a metalloporphyrin polymer. The sensor is produced by electropolymerization of the metalloporphyrin monomer units of platinum tetraphenylporphyrin (Pt-TPP), platinum octaethylporphyrin (Pt-OEP), palladium tetraphenylporphyrin (Pd-TPP) or palladium octaethylporphyrin (Pd-OEP). The polymerization process results in films which are in the region of micrometers thick. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants as determined from luminescence lifetime measurements for these sensors range from 0.90 (mg 1-1)-1) for Pt-TPP to 1.83 (mg 1-1)-1) for Pd-OEP. The response time of these sensors to a step change from an oxygen free to an oxygen saturated solution is in the millisecond region.

Smith, Sheila; Hamill, Alan; Uttamlal, Mahesh; Campbell, Michael; Bailly, David

1999-12-01

225

Method to Estimate the Dissolved Air Content in Hydraulic Fluid  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to verify the air content in hydraulic fluid, an instrument was needed to measure the dissolved air content before the fluid was loaded into the system. The instrument also needed to measure the dissolved air content in situ and in real time during the de-aeration process. The current methods used to measure the dissolved air content require the fluid to be drawn from the hydraulic system, and additional offline laboratory processing time is involved. During laboratory processing, there is a potential for contamination to occur, especially when subsaturated fluid is to be analyzed. A new method measures the amount of dissolved air in hydraulic fluid through the use of a dissolved oxygen meter. The device measures the dissolved air content through an in situ, real-time process that requires no additional offline laboratory processing time. The method utilizes an instrument that measures the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. By using a standardized calculation procedure that relates the oxygen partial pressure to the volume of dissolved air in solution, the dissolved air content is estimated. The technique employs luminescent quenching technology to determine the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. An estimated Henry s law coefficient for oxygen and nitrogen in hydraulic fluid is calculated using a standard method to estimate the solubility of gases in lubricants. The amount of dissolved oxygen in the hydraulic fluid is estimated using the Henry s solubility coefficient and the measured partial pressure of oxygen in solution. The amount of dissolved nitrogen that is in solution is estimated by assuming that the ratio of dissolved nitrogen to dissolved oxygen is equal to the ratio of the gas solubility of nitrogen to oxygen at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The technique was performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The technique could be theoretically carried out at higher pressures and elevated temperatures.

Hauser, Daniel M.

2011-01-01

226

Numerical modeling of dissolved oxygen in an ultra-urban best management practice.  

PubMed

Stormvault (Jensen Precast, Sparks, Nevada) is a retention-type ultra-urban best management practice, which has been tested extensively for pollutant reduction. As the first step to understand the internal water quality change during a dry-weather condition, dissolved oxygen was monitored in a Stormvault system. A diffusion-reaction model was developed to diagnose the contributions of organic materials floating on the water surface, in the water column, and in the sediment, to dissolved oxygen decrease. The mathematical model was calibrated using the observed dissolved oxygen data recorded at a 0.15-m interval along the water column depth. Three scenarios were simulated, and the results confirmed that sediment oxygen demand (SOD) is the governing factor controlling a dissolved oxygen decrease in the system. The SOD rate reaches 0.8 g m(-2) d(-1) at 20 degrees C, with an average sediment accumulation depth of 0.05 m, which is lower than the recommended cleanup depth of 0.15 m. PMID:19445326

Bai, Sen

2009-04-01

227

Neural network approach to separate the non-algal absorption coefficient into dissolved and particulate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method for the separation of the non-algal absorption coefficient into its independent components of dissolved species and non-algal particulate absorptions from remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) measurements in the visible part of the spectrum. This separation is problematic due to the similar absorption spectra of these substances. Due to this complication, we approach the problem by constructing a neural network which relates the remote sensing reflectance at the available MODIS visible wavelengths (412, 443, 488, 531, 547 and 667nm) with the ratio of the absorption coefficient of non-algal particulates to the absorption coefficient of dissolved species, thereby permitting analytical separation of the total non-algal absorption into particulate and dissolved components. The resulting synthetically trained algorithm is tested on simulated data as well as independently on the NASA Bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Data set (NOMAD). Very good agreement is obtained, with R2 values of 87% and 78% for the non-algal particulate and dissolved absorption components, respectively for the NOMAD. Finally, we apply the algorithm to MODIS data and present global distributions for these parameters.

Ioannou, Ioannis; Foster, Robert; Gilerson, Alex; Ahmed, Sam

2013-08-01

228

Dissolved inorganic phosphorus, dissolved iron, and Trichodesmium in the oligotrophic South China Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in the oligotrophic surface waters of the South China Sea decrease from ~20 nM in March 2000 to ~5 nM in July 2000, in response to seasonal water column stratification. These minimum DIP concentrations are one order of magnitude higher than those in the P-limited, iron-replete stratified surface waters of the western North Atlantic, suggesting

Jingfeng Wu; Shi-Wei Chung; Liang-Saw Wen; Kon-Kee Liu; Yuh-ling Lee Chen; Houng-Yung Chen; David M. Karl

2003-01-01

229

Dissolved aluminium in the Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved aluminium (Al) occurs in a wide range of concentrations in the world oceans. The concentrations of Al in the Southern Ocean are among the lowest ever observed. An all-titanium CTD sampling system makes it possible to study complete deep ocean sections of Al and other trace elements with the same high vertical resolution of 24 depths as normal for traditional CTD/Rosette sampling. Overall, 470 new data points of Al are reported for 22 full depth stations and 24 surface sampling positions along one transect. This transect consisted of 18 stations on the zero meridian proper from 51°57' S until 69°24'S, and 4 stations somewhat to the northeast towards Cape Town from 42°20'S, 09°E to 50°17'S, 01°27'E. The actual concentrations of Al in the Southern Ocean were lower than previously reported. The concentration of Al in the upper 25 m was relatively elevated with an average concentration of 0.71 nM ( n=22; S.D.=0.43 nM), most likely due to atmospheric input by a suggested combination of direct atmospheric (wet and dry) input and indirect atmospheric input via melting sea ice. Below the surface waters there was a distinct Al minimum with an average concentration of 0.33 nM ( n=22; S.D.=0.13 nM) at an average depth of 120 m. In the deep southernmost Weddell Basin the concentration of Al increased with depth to ˜0.8 nM at 4000 m, and a higher concentration of ˜1.5 nM in the ˜4500-5200 m deep Weddell Sea Bottom Water. Over the Bouvet triple junction region, where three deep ocean ridges meet, the concentration of Al increased to ˜1.4 nM at about 2000 m depth over the ridge crest. In the deep basin north of the Bouvet region the concentration of Al increased to higher deep values of 4-6 nM due to influence of North Atlantic Deep Water. In general the intermediate and deep distribution of Al results from the mixing of water masses with different origins, the formation of deep water and additional input from sedimentary sources at sea floor elevations. No significant correlation between Al and silicate (Si) was observed. This is in contrast to some other ocean regions. In the Southern Ocean the supply of Al is extremely low and any signal from Al uptake and dissolution with biogenic silica is undetectable against the high dissolved Si and low dissolved Al concentrations. Here the Al-Si relation in the deep ocean is uncoupled. This is due to the scavenging and subsequent loss of the water column of Al, whereas the concentration of Si increases in the deep ocean due to its input from deep dissolution of biogenic diatom frustules settling from the surface layer.

Middag, R.; van Slooten, C.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Laan, P.

2011-12-01

230

Artificial neural network modeling of dissolved oxygen in reservoir.  

PubMed

The water quality of reservoirs is one of the key factors in the operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in water column is essential for microorganisms and a significant indicator of the state of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, two artificial neural network (ANN) models including back propagation neural network (BPNN) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approaches and multilinear regression (MLR) model were developed to estimate the DO concentration in the Feitsui Reservoir of northern Taiwan. The input variables of the neural network are determined as water temperature, pH, conductivity, turbidity, suspended solids, total hardness, total alkalinity, and ammonium nitrogen. The performance of the ANN models and MLR model was assessed through the mean absolute error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient computed from the measured and model-simulated DO values. The results reveal that ANN estimation performances were superior to those of MLR. Comparing to the BPNN and ANFIS models through the performance criteria, the ANFIS model is better than the BPNN model for predicting the DO values. Study results show that the neural network particularly using ANFIS model is able to predict the DO concentrations with reasonable accuracy, suggesting that the neural network is a valuable tool for reservoir management in Taiwan. PMID:24078053

Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng

2014-02-01

231

Determination of dissolved aluminum in water samples  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A technique has been modified for determination of a wide range of concentrations of dissolved aluminum (Al) in water and has been tested. In this technique, aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline at pH 8.3 to minimize interferences, then extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The extract is analyzed colorimetrically at 395 nm. This technique is used to analyze two forms of monomeric Al, nonlabile (organic complexes) and labile (free, Al, Al sulfate, fluoride and hydroxide complexes). A detection limit 2 ug/L is possible with 25-ml samples and 10-ml extracts. The detection limit can be decreased by increasing the volume of the sample and (or) decreasing the volume of the methyl isobutyl ketone extract. The analytical uncertainty of this method is approximately + or - 5 percent. The standard addition technique provides a recovery test for this technique and ensures precision in samples of low Al concentrations. The average percentage recovery of the added Al plus the amount originally present was 99 percent. Data obtained from analyses of filtered standard solutions indicated that Al is adsorbed on various types of filters. However, the relationship between Al concentrations and adsorption remains linear. A test on standard solutions also indicated that Al is not adsorbed on nitric acid-washed polyethylene and polypropylene bottle wells. (USGS)

Afifi, A. A.

1983-01-01

232

Dissolved Humic Matter in Arctic Estuaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the German-Russian bilateral SIRRO(Siberian River Runoff)-project we studied the distribution of dissolved humic matter isolated by XAD-8 in the estuarine waters of the Ob and Yenisei rivers. The relative contributions of humic matter carbon to total DOC decreased from 61-77 percent in the river freshwater endmember to 35-40 percent in the marine waters of the open Kara Sea at salinities 33 psu. Humic carbon mixed conservatively in the Yenisei and non-conservatively in the Ob, where partial removal was indicated in the low salinity range. Changes in the relative contribution of humic matter to different molecular weight classes of DOM (ultrafiltration cutoffs 150 KDa, 450 KDa, 800 KDa) were studied along the salinity gradient in the Yenisei. High molecular weight DOM is relatively enriched in humics in fresh-water compared to sea-water HMW-DOM. Low molecular weight DOM is realtively enriched in humics in sea-water compared to fresh-water LMW-DOM. Throughout the estuary humic matter is depleted in 13C and nitrogen compared to total DOM, reflecting a dominant soil source. We estimate an annual input of 5 Tg humic matter carbon by the two rivers into the Kara Sea.

Spitzy, A.; Koehler, H.; Ertl, S.

2002-12-01

233

Composition of dissolved organic matter in groundwater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater constitutes a globally important source of freshwater for drinking water and other agricultural and industrial purposes, and is a prominent source of freshwater flowing into the coastal ocean. Therefore, understanding the chemical components of groundwater is relevant to both coastal and inland communities. We used electrospray ionization coupled with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to examine dissolved organic compounds in groundwater prior to and after passage through a sediment-filled column containing microorganisms. The data revealed that an unexpectedly high proportion of organic compounds contained nitrogen and sulfur, possibly due to transport of surface waters from septic systems and rain events. We matched 292 chemical features, based on measured mass:charge ( m/z) values, to compounds stored in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). A subset of these compounds (88) had only one structural isomer in KEGG, thus supporting tentative identification. Most identified elemental formulas were linked with metabolic pathways that produce polyketides or with secondary metabolites produced by plants. The presence of polyketides in groundwater is notable because of their anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties. However, their relative abundance must be quantified with appropriate analyses to assess any implications for public health.

Longnecker, Krista; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

2011-05-01

234

Porewater oxidation, dissolved phosphate and the iron curtain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process of dissolved phosphate removal from aqueous solution, which occurs during oxidation of soluble ferrous compounds to insoluble ferric forms, was examined in soils of two tidal freshwater marshes. Sites of amorphous iron deposition and sorption or co-precipitation of phosphate were found to be in surface soils and along creekbanks, where both ion diffusion and porewater advection move dissolved

Randolph M. Chambers; William E. Odum

1990-01-01

235

Radiation aspects of the Redox multipurpose dissolver incident  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a record of the radiation and contamination effect of the Redox multipurpose dissolver incident and the steps taken after the incident to control the contamination. The new multipurpose dissolver was installed in R cell in March, 1960. It was used successfully until the evening of April 17, 1960, at which time some of the uranium metal ignited

Uebelacker

1960-01-01

236

Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter isolated from rainwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rainwater is a matrix containing extremely low concentrations (in the range of ?M C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and for its characterization, an efficient extraction procedure is essential. A recently developed procedure based on adsorption onto XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins in series was used in this work for the extraction and isolation of rainwater dissolved organic matter (DOM). Prior

Patrícia S. M. Santos; Marta Otero; Regina M. B. O. Duarte; Armando C. Duarte

2009-01-01

237

Dissolved humic substances of the Amazon River system1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aquatic humic and fulvic acids from nine mainstem and seven major tributary sites in the Amazon River Basin are characterized by their elemental and lignin phenol compositions. Com- bined humic substances represent 60% of the riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC), with fulvic to humic acid (FA : HA) ratios in the mainstem averaging 4.7 -t 1 .O. All dissolved humic

John R. Ertel; John I. Hedges; Allan H. Devol; Jefrey E. Richey

1986-01-01

238

CHECK-OUT OF BETTIS DISSOLVED OXYGEN ANALYZER, MODEL 3  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Bettis Dissolved Oxygen Analyzer was constructed, calibrated, tested ; on 100A-loop D, and installed at the HRT. The analyzer was sensitive to less ; than 10 parts per billion of oxygen dissolved in water circulating at 200 deg C ; in 100A-loop D, gave readings in the 0.1 to 30 parts per million range in ; agreement with chemical

R. S. Greeley; P. D. Neumann; S. E. Bolt; J. C. Griess

1960-01-01

239

Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen Data for Lake Ontario, 1972 (IFYGL).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continuous dissolved oxygen profiles taken in Lake Ontario in 1972 (IFYGL) have been edited, corrected, and averaged over 2-m intervals and over up and down traces to give temperature, dissolved oxygen, and oxygen percent saturation profiles at up to 27 d...

J. D. Boyd B. J. Eadie

1978-01-01

240

Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

2003-01-01

241

The release of dissolved nutrients and metals from coastal sediments due to resuspension  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal sediments in many regions are impacted by high levels of contaminants. Due to a combination of shallow water depths, waves, and currents, these sediments are subject to regular episodes of sediment resuspension. However, the influence of such disturbances on sediment chemistry and the release of solutes is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to quantify the release of dissolved metals (iron, manganese, silver, copper, and lead) and nutrients due to resuspension in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, USA. Using a laboratory-based erosion chamber, a range of typical shear stresses was applied to fine-grained Harbor sediments and the solute concentration at each shear stress was measured. At low shear stress, below the erosion threshold, limited solutes were released. Beyond the erosion threshold, a release of all solutes, except lead, was observed and the concentrations increased with shear stress. The release was greater than could be accounted for by conservative mixing of porewaters into the overlying water, suggesting that sediment resuspension enhances the release of nutrients and metals to the dissolved phase. To address the long-term fate of resuspended particles, samples from the erosion chamber were maintained in suspension for 90. h. Over this time, 5-7% of the particulate copper and silver was released to the dissolved phase, while manganese was removed from solution. Thus resuspension releases solutes both during erosion events and over a longer timescale due to reactions of suspended particles in the water column. The magnitude of the annual solute release during erosion events was estimated by coupling the erosion chamber results with a record of bottom shear stresses simulated by a hydrodynamic model. The release of dissolved copper, lead, and phosphate due to resuspension is between 2% and 10% of the total (dissolved plus particulate phase) known inputs to Boston Harbor. Sediment resuspension is responsible for transferring a significant quantity of solid phase metals to the more bioavailable and mobile dissolved phase. The relative importance of sediment resuspension as a source of dissolved metals to Boston Harbor is expected to increase as continuing pollutant control decreases the inputs from other sources. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Kalnejais, L. H.; Martin, W. R.; Bothner, M. H.

2010-01-01

242

Distributed hydrological modeling of total dissolved phosphorus transport in an agricultural landscape, part II: dissolved phosphorus transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reducing non-point source phosphorus (P) loss to drinking water reservoirs is a main concern for New York City watershed planners. A spatially distributed model of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) loading was developed using raster maps covering a watershed with 164-ha dairy farm. Transport of TDP was calculated separately for baseflow and for surface runoff from manure-covered and non-manure-covered areas. Soil test P, simulated rainfall application, and land use were used to predict concentrations of TDP in overland flow from non-manure covered areas. Concentrations in runoff for manure-covered areas were computed from predicted cumulative flow and elapsed time since manure application, using field-specific manure spreading data. Baseflow TDP was calibrated from observed concentrations using a temperature-dependent coefficient. An additional component estimated loading associated with manure deposition on impervious areas, such as barnyards and roadways. Daily baseflow and runoff volumes were predicted for each 10-m cell using the Soil Moisture Distribution and Routing Model (SMDR). For each cell, daily TDP loads were calculated as the product of predicted runoff and estimated TDP concentrations. Predicted loads agreed well with loads observed at the watershed outlet when hydrology was modeled accurately (R2 79% winter, 87% summer). Lack of fit in early spring was attributed to difficulty in predicting snowmelt. Overall, runoff from non-manured areas appeared to be the dominant TDP loading source factor.

Hively, W. D.; Gérard-Marchant, P.; Steenhuis, T. S.

2005-08-01

243

Distributed hydrological modeling of total dissolved phosphorus transport in an agricultural landscape, part II: dissolved phosphorus transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reducing non-point source phosphorus (P) loss to drinking water reservoirs is a main concern for New York City watershed planners, and modeling of P transport can assist in the evaluation of agricultural effects on nutrient dynamics. A spatially distributed model of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) loading was developed using raster maps covering a 164-ha dairy farm watershed. Transport of TDP was calculated separately for baseflow and for surface runoff from manure-covered and non-manure-covered areas. Soil test P, simulated rainfall application, and land use were used to predict concentrations of TDP in overland flow from non-manure covered areas. Concentrations in runoff for manure-covered areas were computed from predicted cumulative flow and elapsed time since manure application, using field-specific manure spreading data. Baseflow TDP was calibrated from observed concentrations using a temperature-dependent coefficient. An additional component estimated loading associated with manure deposition on impervious areas, such as barnyards and roadways. Daily baseflow and runoff volumes were predicted for each 10-m cell using the Soil Moisture Distribution and Routing Model (SMDR). For each cell, daily TDP loads were calculated as the product of predicted runoff and estimated TDP concentrations. Predicted loads agreed well with loads observed at the watershed outlet when hydrology was modeled accurately (R2 79% winter, 87% summer). Lack of fit in early spring was attributed to difficulty in predicting snowmelt. Overall, runoff from non-manured areas appeared to be the dominant TDP loading source factor.

Hively, W. D.; Gérard-Marchant, P.; Steenhuis, T. S.

2006-04-01

244

Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

2012-01-01

245

Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds) were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days) experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP) and net community production (NCP), however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr-1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr-1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

Barrón, C.; Apostolaki, E. T.; Duarte, C. M.

2012-02-01

246

Nordic Seas dissolved oxygen data in CARINA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water column data of carbon and carbon relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruises in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged into a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic). The data have been subject to rigorous quality control (QC) in order to ensure highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the parameters included were examined in order to quantify systematic biases in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Significant biases have been corrected for in the data products, i.e. the three merged files with measured, calculated, and interpolated values for each of the three CARINA regions; the Arctic Mediterranean Seas (AMS), the Atlantic (ATL), and the Southern Ocean (SO). With the adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with GLODAP (Key et al., 2004) and is suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates and for model validation. The Arctic Mediterranean Seas includes the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas (Greenland, Norwegian, and Iceland Seas), and the quality control was carried out separately in these two areas. This contribution presents an account of the quality control of the dissolved oxygen data from the Nordic Seas in CARINA. Out of the 35 cruises from the Nordic Seas included in CARINA, 32 had oxygen data. The data from 4 of these were found to be biased low and were subject to adjustment. Thus the final CARINA data product contains oxygen data from 32 cruises from the Nordic Seas, and these data appear consistent to ±1% (corresponds to ±3 ?mol kg-1 in the deep water).

Falck, E.; Olsen, A.

2009-10-01

247

Treatment of trichloroethene and hexavalent chromium by granular iron in the presence of dissolved CaCO3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Column experiments and numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate the effects of Cr(VI) and dissolved CaCO3 on the iron reactivity towards trichloroethene (TCE) and Cr(VI) reduction. Column experiments included measurements of iron corrosion potential and characterization of surface film composition using Raman spectroscopy. Three columns received different combinations of TCE (5 mg L- 1), Cr(VI) (10 mg L- 1) and dissolved CaCO3 (300 mg L- 1), after short periods of conditioning with Millipore water followed by 10 mg L- 1 TCE in Millipore water, for a total of 8 months. The results showed that co-existence with TCE did not affect Cr(VI) reduction kinetics, however, the presence of Cr(VI) reduced TCE degradation rates significantly. The formation of Fe(III)/Cr(III) products caused progressive passivation of the iron and was consistent with the increase in corrosion potential. The presence of dissolved CaCO3 resulted in a stable corrosion potential and faster degradation rates of TCE and Cr(VI). Over time, however, the accumulation of secondary carbonate minerals on the iron surface decreased the iron reactivity. Numerical simulation using a reactive transport model reproduced the observations from the column experiments reasonably well. The simulation can be valuable in the design of PRBs or in the development of effective maintenance procedures for PRBs treating groundwater co-contaminated with Cr(VI) and TCE in the presence of dissolved CaCO3.

Jeen, Sung-Wook; Yang, YanQi; Gui, Lai; Gillham, Robert W.

2013-01-01

248

Modeling the Temporal Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Carbon in a Headwater Stream, Southeastern Pennsylvania  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physically based, distributed models can provide much more detailed information about the mechanisms surrounding the fate and transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than can lumped models. We present such a model of soil and stream water DOC. The Penn State Integrated Hydrological Model (PIHM) was adopted as the framework and coupled with a convection-dispersion chemistry transport model to simulate the spatial and temporal dynamics of DOC within the White Clay Creek (WCC) watershed in southeastern Pennsylvania. Major hydrological processes such as snowmelt,transpiration, evaporation, overland flow, subsurface flow, stream flow, macropore-based infiltration and lateral stormflow are fully coupled using a semi-discrete finite-volume approach. The hydrological model was first calibrated using high resolution stream discharge data at WCC. Long term DOC data for WCC were then used to assess the model-simulated DOC in the stream. The biodegradable fraction of dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) was considered separately from the more refractory fraction of DOC (RDOC) in our model. A heat module was included within the BDOC model to represent the effect of temperature on the fate and transport of BDOC. The simulation results show that the model can replicate the temporal dynamics of stream discharge and DOC in the stream reasonably well. The simulated annual carbon load to the steam is consistent with the observed carbon load in 1997 when fairly complete storm DOC samples were taken.

Mei, Y.; Hornberger, G. M.; Kaplan, L. A.; Newbold, J. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.

2011-12-01

249

Dissolved inorganic phosphorus, dissolved iron, and Trichodesmium in the oligotrophic South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in the oligotrophic surface waters of the South China Sea decrease from ˜20 nM in March 2000 to ˜5 nM in July 2000, in response to seasonal water column stratification. These minimum DIP concentrations are one order of magnitude higher than those in the P-limited, iron-replete stratified surface waters of the western North Atlantic, suggesting that the ecosystem in the South China Sea may be limited by bioavailable nitrogen or some trace nutrient rather than DIP. Nutrient enrichment experiments using either nitrate, phosphate or both indicate that nitrogen limits the net growth of phytoplankton in the South China Sea, at least during March and July 2000. The fixed nitrogen limitation may result from the excess phosphate (N:P<16) transported into the South China Sea from the North Pacific relative to microbial population needs, or from iron control of nitrogen fixation. The iron-limited nitrogen fixation hypothesis is supported by the observation of low population densities of Trichodesmium spp. (<48 × 103 trichomes/m3), the putative N2 fixing cyanobacterium, and with low concentrations of dissolved iron (˜0.2-0.3 nM) in the South China Sea surface water. Our results suggest that nitrogen fixation can be limited by available iron even in regions with a high rate of atmospheric dust deposition such as in the South China Sea.

Wu, Jingfeng; Chung, Shi-Wei; Wen, Liang-Saw; Liu, Kon-Kee; Chen, Yuh-Ling Lee; Chen, Houng-Yung; Karl, David M.

2003-03-01

250

Chemical and optical phototransformation of dissolved organic matter.  

PubMed

Dissolved organic matter represents the main reservoir of organic carbon in most aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, we determined the optical changes and the quantum yields of transient species formation for chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) samples undergoing photodegradation. The results show that the triplet states (3)CDOM* are potentially key players in CDOM photodegradation and that such transformations are strongly influenced by small differences in CDOM sources and sinks. In contrast, ·OH radicals are very unlikely to play a key role in phototransformation. These results represent an important first step in combining optical and transient species analyses to understand photodegradation processes of dissolved organic matter. PMID:22503589

Loiselle, Steven; Vione, Davide; Minero, Claudio; Maurino, Valter; Tognazzi, Antonio; Dattilo, Arduino M; Rossi, Claudio; Bracchini, Luca

2012-06-15

251

GLOBE Videos: Hydrology Protocols - Dissolved Oxygen (12:06 min)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video introduces the measurement of dissolved oxygen in a water body as an important indicator of ecosystem health, and demonstrates students analyzing a water sample for dissolved oxygen. The resource includes a video and a written transcript, and is supported by the Dissolved Oxygen Protocol in the GLOBE Teacher's Guide. This is one of seven videos on hydrology in the 24-part instructional video series describing scientific protocols used by GLOBE (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment), a worldwide, hands-on, K-12 school-based science education program.

252

Utilization of Dissolved Organic Carbon by Heterotrophic Bacteria and Protozoa.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research has investigated in batch and continuous culture laboratory microcosms the relationships between level and turnover rate of dissolved organic carbon substrates and the interactions among microbial populations at three trophic levels in a hete...

J. M. Graham R. P. Canale S. L. Allen

1979-01-01

253

Suspended and Dissolved Solids Effects on Freshwater Biota: A Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is widely recognized that suspended and dissolved solids in lakes, rivers, streams, and reservoirs affect water quality. In this report the research needs appropriate to setting freshwater quality criteria or standards for suspended solids (not includi...

D. L. Sorenson M. M. McCarthy E. J. Middlebrooks D. B. Porcella

1977-01-01

254

INVESTIGATION OF A HONEYWELL DISSOLVED OXYGEN PARAMETRIC SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

A Honeywell dissolved oxygen parametric system was investigated for possible application in EPA's research on sewage treatment. Laboratory and field data were accumulated. Summaries on selected background and theoretical aspects of the measurement have been included for those unf...

255

Dynamics and environmental significance of dissolved organic matter in soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) comprises only a small part of soil organic matter; nevertheless, it affects many processes in soil and water including the most serious environmental problems like soil and water pollution and global warming\\

Nanthi S. Bolan; Domy C. Adriano

256

Dissolved Air Flotation Treatment of Gulf Shrimp Cannery Wastewater.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study reports on the operation of a plant scale dissolved air flotation system installed to define and evaluate attainable shrimp cannery wastewater treatment levels. The system was operated in all three modes of DAF pressurization. Destabilizing coa...

A. J. Szabo F. R. Wilson L. F. LaFleur

1979-01-01

257

Neptunium estimation in dissolver and high-level-waste solutions  

SciTech Connect

This papers deals with the optimization of the experimental conditions for the estimation of {sup 237}Np in spent-fuel dissolver/high-level waste solutions using thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the extractant. (authors)

Pathak, P.N.; Prabhu, D.R.; Kanekar, A.S.; Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

2008-07-01

258

Removal of Humic Substances and Algae by Dissolved Air Flotation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is used in place of conventional gravity settling as a means to separate low density floc particles from water. The following objectives were: (1) to compare DAF to conventional water treatment of coagulation-flocculation fol...

J. K. Edzwald J. P. Malley

1989-01-01

259

DOES DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON PLAY A ROLE IN ARSENIC MOBILIZATION?  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent experimental results provide evidence that dissolved inorganic carbon plays a direct role in mobilizing arsenic in anoxic aquatic environments. This hypothesis is partially supported by observed correlations between elevated levels of arsenic and alkalinity in a ground wa...

260

The effect of membrane filtration on dissolved trace element concentrations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The almost universally accepted operational definition for dissolved constituents is based on processing whole-water samples through a 0.45-??m membrane filter. Results from field and laboratory experiments indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size (e.g., diameter, manufacturer, volume of sample processed, amount of suspended sediment in the sample), can produce substantial variations in the 'dissolved' concentrations of such elements as Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, and Ni. These variations result from the inclusion/exclusion of colloidally- associated trace elements. Thus, 'dissolved' concentrations quantitated by analyzing filtrates generated by processing whole-water through similar pore- sized membrane filters may not be equal/comparable. As such, simple filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane filter may no longer represent an acceptable operational definition for dissolved chemical constituents. This conclusion may have important implications for environmental studies and regulatory agencies.

Horowitz, A. J.; Lum, K. R.; Garbarino, J. R.; Hall, G. E. M.; Lemieux, C.; Demas, C. R.

1996-01-01

261

DISSOLVED OXYGEN, TEMPERATURE, SURVIVAL OF YOUNG AT FISH SPAWNING SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

Fluctuations of dissolved oxygen concentrations and water temperatures in their natural spawning sites were measured during embryo through larva stages of northern pike (Esox lucius), and during embryo and sac larva stages of bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) and pumpkinseeds (Lepo...

262

Selective Isolation of Dissolved Organic Matter from Aquatic Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A chromatographic ion-exchange procedure for fractionation, isolation and concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters was developed and applied to samples from Illinois lakes. Recoveries of DOM from five humic-containing (colored) su...

J. R. Tuschall G. George

1984-01-01

263

EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE VARIATION ON CRITICAL STREAM DISSOLVED OXYGEN  

EPA Science Inventory

The classical assumption that the lowest dissolved oxygen (DO) occurs at the highest temperature may not always hold. The DO saturation concentration decreases monotonically with increasing temperature, lowering the DO, but the reaeration coefficient increases monotonically with ...

264

DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTROL OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESSES  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents design procedures and guidelines for the selection of aeration equipment and dissolved (DO) control systems for activated sludge treatment plants. Aeration methods, equipment and application techniques are examined and selection procedures offered. Various DO...

265

40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section...POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. The provisions...

2009-01-01

266

40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section...POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. The provisions...

2010-07-01

267

Voltammetric determination of dissolved iron and its speciation in freshwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analytical methods were developed to determine the concentration of total dissolved iron and its chemical speciation in freshwater using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) with 1-nitroso-2-naphthol (NN) at pH 8.1. The concentrations of total dissolved iron in river water that iron concentration was certified and in natural water samples from Lake Kasumigaura were determined successfully. The natural iron ligand concentration and

Takashi Nagai; Akio Imai; Kazuo Matsushige; Kunihiko Yokoi; Takehiko Fukushima

2004-01-01

268

Kinetics and equilibrium of dissolved oxygen adsorption on activated carbon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The macroscopic adsorption behavior of dissolved oxygen on a coconut shell-derived granular activated carbon has been studied in batch mode at 301 and 313K for initial dissolved oxygen concentrations of 10–30mg\\/l and oxygen\\/carbon ratios of 2–180mg\\/g. BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) surface area, micropore volume, and pore size distribution were determined from N2 isotherm data for fresh and used samples

Vassileios M. Matsis; Helen P. Grigoropoulou

2008-01-01

269

Microbial uptake of dissolved organic matter in Mcmurdo Sound, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution and activity of bacterioplankton, and the turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. On the eastern side of the Sound, bacteria averaged 6.5×108 l-1, and turnover rates of dissolved adenosine triphosphate, D-glucose and l-leucine averaged 16, 116 and 124 h, respecitvely. These molecules as well as thymidine were taken up maximally from 0°

R. E. Hodson; F. Azam; A. F. Carlucci; J. A. Fuhrman; D. M. Karl; O. Holm-Hansen

1981-01-01

270

[The general analytical methods for gases dissolved in liquids: sonoluminescence].  

PubMed

How to analyze the gases dissolved in water or organic liquids is a challenging problem in analytical chemistry. Till the present time, only the dissolved oxygen in water can be analyzed by chemical and instrumental methods, while other gases, e. g. CO2, N2, CH4, Ar, He, Ke, still can not be analyzed by chemical or instrumental methods. The present paper gives a review on using sonoluminescence for gas analysis in water or organic liquids. PMID:20038024

Deng, Jiu-Shuai; Liu, Yan

2009-10-01

271

High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5 h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O 2/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3 mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4 m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation.

Greer, K. D.; Molson, J. W.; Barker, J. F.; Thomson, N. R.; Donaldson, C. R.

2010-10-01

272

Characterization of a novel dissolved CO2 sensor for utilization in environmental monitoring and aquaculture industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel optical fiber sensor is presented for measuring dissolved CO2 for water quality monitoring applications, where the optical signal is based either on refractive index changes or on color change. The sensing chemistry is based on the acid-basic equilibrium of 4-nitrophenol, that is converted into the anionic form by addition quaternary ammonium hydroxide. The CO2 sensitive layer was characterized and tested by using simple absorbance/reflectance measurement setups where the sensor was connected to a fiber optic CCD spectrometer. A prototype simulating a real shallow raceway aquaculture system was developed and its hydraulic behavior characterized. A commercially available partial-pressure- NDIR sensor was used as a reference for dissolved CO2 tests with the new optical fiber sensor under development. Preliminary tests allowed verifying the suitability of the new optical sensor for accurately tracking the dissolved carbon dioxide concentration in a suitable operation range. Direct comparison of the new sensor and the reference sensor system allowed to demonstrate the suitability of the new technology but also to identify some fragilities there are presently being addressed.

Balogh, K.; Jesus, João. M.; Gouveia, C.; Domingues, Jorge O.; Markovics, A.; Baptista, J. M.; Kovacs, B.; Pereira, Carlos M.; Borges, Maria-Teresa; Jorge, P. A. S.

2013-11-01

273

Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model  

SciTech Connect

The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

2010-11-30

274

Dissolved Organic Matter in the Hudson River Plume  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the LATTE (Lagrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment) program, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured in the Hudson River Estuary and Plume. As revealed by high resolution measurements from the Integrated Coastal Observation System (ICOS), dissolved organic matter has several sources within the estuary including the Hudson and Raritan Rivers, and a yet unidentified anthropogenic source off Manhattan. The quantity of dissolved organic matter that is exported from the Hudson River Estuary is significantly greater than that which the Hudson River can supply by simply conservative mixing with coastal seawater. In May, 2004, rhodamine dye was injected at the surface as the plume flowed out onto the New York/New Jersey shelf, once as the plume turned north towards Long Island, and once as the plume flowed south along the New Jersey coast. The ECOShuttle (a towed-undulating vehicle) carrying a rhodamine fluorometer was able to track these dye patches. An examination of dissolved organic matter transformations that occurred over these two to two and one-half day Lagrangian experiments will be discussed. In addition seasonal distributions of dissolved organic matter distributions will be presented from cruises in June 2003, June 2004 and September 2004 under different river flow and wind conditions.

Chen, R. F.; Gardner, G. B.

2004-12-01

275

Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases  

PubMed Central

To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%–30.91%, 83.29%–90.51%, and 61.54–68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff.

Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

2013-01-01

276

On the losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving.  

PubMed

Pouring champagne into a glass is far from being consequenceless with regard to its dissolved CO(2) concentration. Measurements of losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving were done from a bottled Champagne wine initially holding 11.4 +/- 0.1 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2). Measurements were done at three champagne temperatures (i.e., 4, 12, and 18 degrees C) and for two different ways of serving (i.e., a champagne-like and a beer-like way of serving). The beer-like way of serving champagne was found to impact its concentration of dissolved CO(2) significantly less. Moreover, the higher the champagne temperature is, the higher its loss of dissolved CO(2) during the pouring process, which finally constitutes the first analytical proof that low temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps it to retain its effervescence during the pouring process. The diffusion coefficient of CO(2) molecules in champagne and champagne viscosity (both strongly temperature-dependent) are suspected to be the two main parameters responsible for such differences. Besides, a recently developed dynamic-tracking technique using IR thermography was also used in order to visualize the cloud of gaseous CO(2) which flows down from champagne during the pouring process, thus visually confirming the strong influence of champagne temperature on its loss of dissolved CO(2). PMID:20681665

Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Villaume, Sandra; Jeandet, Philippe; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume

2010-08-11

277

Chemical and Isotopic Characterization of Rainwater Dissolved Organic Carbon and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a ubiquitous, integral component of atmospheric waters which comprises a significant fraction of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in the condensed phase. The presence of significant quantities of highly chromophoric DOM in atmospheric waters has profound ramifications with respect to a wide variety of fundamental processes in atmospheric chemistry because of its impact on solar radiative transfer and its involvement in the oxidizing and acid generating capacity of the troposphere. Initial isotopic characterization (13C, 14C, 15N) of CDOM will be presented which provides information on origin as well as transport and cycling of CDOM though the atmosphere. We have determined 4-24 percent of DOC is of fossil fuel origin and that rain DOC can be terrestrial, marine or a combination of the two depending on air mass back trajectory. The C:N ratio as well as nuclear magnetic resonance 1H-NMR spectra of extracted CDOM from terrestrial and marine origin indicate a relatively continuous and broad distribution of signals, suggesting the presence of complex mixtures of compounds. The DOC concentration of rainwater has decreased approximately 50 percent since 1995. 13C and 14C signatures of rain DOC indicates that in 1997-1998 up to 24 percent of Wilmington rainwater DOC was from fossil fuel origin. Comparison of fossil fuel contributions of CDOM and DOC will help determine what fraction of the loss of rainwater DOC results from changing fossil fuel inputs and what role if any CDOM plays in these changes.

Avery, G. B.; Kieber, R. J.; Willey, J. D.; Seaton, P. J.

2007-05-01

278

Photochemical degradation of dissolved organic matter and dissolved lignin phenols from the Congo River  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photochemical degradation of Congo River dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated to examine the fate of terrigenous DOM derived from tropical ecosystems. Tropical riverine DOM receives greater exposure to solar radiation, particularly in large river plumes discharging directly into the open ocean. Initial Congo River DOM exhibited dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and compositional characteristics typical of organic rich blackwater systems. During a 57 day irradiation experiment, Congo River DOM was shown to be highly photoreactive with a decrease in DOC, chromophoric DOM (CDOM), lignin phenol concentrations (?8) and carbon-normalized yields (?8), equivalent to losses of ˜45, 85-95, >95 and >95% of initial values, respectively, and a +3.1 ‰ enrichment of the ?13C-DOC signature. The loss of ?8 and enrichment of ?13C-DOC during irradiation was strongly correlated (r = 0.99, p < 0.01) indicating tight coupling between these biomarkers. Furthermore, the loss of CDOM absorbance was correlated to the loss of ?8 (e.g., a355 versus ?8; r = 0.98, p < 0.01) and ?13C-DOC (e.g., a355 versus ?13C; r = 0.97, p < 0.01), highlighting the potential of CDOM absorbance measurements for delineating the photochemical degradation of lignin and thus terrigenous DOM. It is apparent that these commonly used measurements for examination of terrigenous DOM in the oceans have a higher rate of photochemical decay than the bulk DOC pool. Further process-based studies are required to determine the selective removal rates of these biomarkers for advancement of our understanding of the fate of this material in the ocean.

Spencer, Robert G. M.; Stubbins, Aron; Hernes, Peter J.; Baker, Andy; Mopper, Kenneth; Aufdenkampe, Anthony K.; Dyda, Rachael Y.; Mwamba, Vincent L.; Mangangu, Arthur M.; Wabakanghanzi, Jose N.; Six, Johan

2009-09-01

279

Assessment of water quality and factors affecting dissolved oxygen in the Sangamon River, Decatur to Riverton, Illinois, summer 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality and processes that affect the dissolved-oxygen concentration in a 45.9 mile reach of the Sangamon River from Decatur to Riverton, Illinois, were determined from data collected during low-flow periods in the summer of 1982. Relations among dissolved oxygen, water discharge, biochemical oxygen demand, ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate concentrations, and photosynthetic-oxygen production were simulated using a one-dimensional, steady-state computer model. Average dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 8.0 milligrams per liter at the upstream end of the study reach at Decatur to 5.2 milligrams per liter 12.2 miles downstream. Ammonia concentrations ranged from 45 milligrams per liter at the mouth of Stevens Creek (2.6 miles downstream from Decatur) to 0.03 milligram per liter at the downstream end of the study reach. Un-ionized ammonia concentrations exceeded the maximum concentration specified in the State water quality standard (0.04 milligram per liter) throughout most of the study reach. Model simulations indicated that oxidation of ammonia to form nitrite plus nitrate was the most significant process leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the river. (USGS)

Schmidt, A. R.; Stamer, J. K.

1987-01-01

280

Large-scale dissolver cold-flow modelling. SRC-I quarterly technical report, October-December 1981. Supplement  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Allentown Laboratories have been studying the hydrodynamic flow within a large-scale column, 6 ft in diameter by 25 ft tall with a 1-ft-diameter inlet, to simulate two-phase (air/water) and three-phase (air/water/solids) mass transfer and solids removal in the coal dissolver for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Evidence from experiments at the Wilsonville Pilot Plant and predictions developed from cold-flow-derived correlations suggest that hydrogen consumption will not be controlled by the rate of gas/liquid mass transfer. Studies began on gas/liquid contact during batch and continuous liquid flow after all project-related equipment had been fabricated and installed. The piping layout design simulates the interstage from the first dissolver to the second dissolver in series. Transparent transfer lines were installed in order to observe the patterns of gas/slurry flow. ICRC researchers also completed studies of the dissolver design without internal parts. Researchers filmed batch and continuous flow in the contact vessel to accurately record the full range of flow conditions during each mode of operation. Results indicate that vessel performance depends upon the size of inlet diameter. 2 references, 5 figures.

McDermott, W.T.; Ying, D.H.

1984-06-01

281

40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite...applicable to discharges resulting from the production of pulp at dissolving sulfite...

2013-07-01

282

Photochemical Degradation of Persistent Organic Pollutants: A Study of Ice Photochemistry Mediated by Dissolved Organic Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well established that ice is a reactive medium in the environment and that active photochemistry occurs in frozen systems. Snow and ice contain a number of absorbing species including nitrate, peroxide and organic matter. Upon irradiation, they can generate a variety of reactive intermediates such as hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. It has been shown that dissolved organic matter is a ubiquitous component of snow and ice and plays an important role in overall light absorption properties of the sample. Additionally, the reactive intermediates produced can further react with contaminants present and alter their fate in the environment. Unfortunately, the role of dissolved organic matter in ice photochemistry has received little attention. Here we present results from laboratory-based studies aimed at elucidating the role of dissolved organic matter photochemistry on contaminant degradation in ice. Aqueous samples of our target pollutant, aldrin (20 ?g/L), in liquid and frozen phases, were irradiated under Q-Panel 340 lamps to simulate the UV radiation profile of natural sunlight. Results indicated that frozen samples degraded more quickly than liquid samples and that the addition of dissolved organic matter increases the aldrin degradation rate significantly. Both terrestrial (Suwannee River, U.S.) and microbial sources (Pony Lake, Antarctica) of DOM were able to sensitize aldrin loss in ice. Scavengers of singlet oxygen, such as furfuryl alcohol and ?-carotene, were also added to DOM solutions. Based on the type of organic matter present, the scavengers had different effects on the photochemical degradation of aldrin. Our results indicate that natural organic matter present in ice is an important component of ice photochemical processes.

Bobby, R.; Pagano, L.; Grannas, A. M.

2012-12-01

283

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in recycled leachate of bioreactor landfill.  

PubMed

Landfill leachate needs sufficient treatment before safe disposal. Bioreactor landfill technology could effectively degrade the organic matters in recirculated leachate, hence leaving a leachate stream of low biodegradability. This study characterized the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the leachate from simulated bioreactor landfill columns with or without presence of trace oxygen. The removal efficiencies of this DOM using coagulation-sedimentation or electrolysis processes were demonstrated. Recirculated leachates were sampled from the simulated landfill columns applying conventional mode, intermittent-aeration mode, and natural aeration mode, whose DOM was fractionated into humic acids (HA), fulvic acids (FA) and hydrophilic fractions (HyI) by the XAD-8 resin combined with the cation exchange resin method. The recirculated leachate had low BOD/COD ratio, high humic substances contents, and high aromatic content. Their HA fraction comprised mainly large molecules (>10 k Da), while the FA and HyI were composed of smaller molecules (<50 k and <4 k Da, respectively). With the presence of oxygen, the TOC contents and the contents of HA, FA and HyI in leachate reduced, with FA and HyI fractions of molecular weight (MW) lower than 4 k Da more readily degraded. The organic matters left in leachates from intermittent-aeration mode and natural aeration mode were of low biodegradability. It was tested in the following sections the effects of coagulation-sedimentation process and of electrolysis process on the removal of residual DOM in recirculated leachate. Coagulation-sedimentation tests revealed that poly ferric sulphate (PFS) could remove more COD (58.1%) from leachate than polyaluminum chloride (PACl) (22.9%), particularly on the HA fraction with MW>10 k Da. Coagulation-sedimentation could not remove most of HyI in leachate. Furthermore, the corresponding BOD/COD ratio was not improved through coagulation. Electrolysis test could also effectively removed HA of MW>10 k Da. However, the biodegradability of treated effluent considerably was improved. The electrolysis could decompose high MW substances and increase biodegradability of recirculated leachate from bioreactor landfill. PMID:16546235

He, Pin-Jing; Xue, Jun-Feng; Shao, Li-Ming; Li, Guo-Jian; Lee, Duu-Jong

2006-04-01

284

Relative effect of temperature and pH on diel cycling of dissolved trace elements in prickly pear creek, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Diel (24 hr) cycles in dissolved metal and As concentrations have been documented in many northern Rocky Mountain streams in the U.S.A. The cause(s) of the cycles are unknown, although temperature- and pH-dependent sorption reactions have been cited as likely causes. A light/dark experiment was conducted to isolate temperature and pH as variables affecting diel metal cycles in Prickly Pear Creek, Montana. Light and dark chambers containing sediment and a strand of macrophyte were placed in the stream to simulate instream temperature oscillations. Photosynthesis-induced pH changes were allowed to proceed in the light chambers while photosynthesis was prevented in the dark chambers. Water samples were collected periodically for 22 hr in late July 2001 from all chambers and the stream. In the stream, dissolved Zn concentrations increased by 300% from late afternoon to early morning, while dissolved As concentrations exhibited the opposite pattern, increasing 33% between early morning and late afternoon. Zn and As concentrations in the light chambers showed similar, though less pronounced, diel variations. Conversely, Zn and As concentrations in the dark chambers had no obvious diel variation, indicating that light, or light-induced reactions, caused the variation. Temperature oscillations were nearly identical between light and dark chambers, strongly suggesting that temperature was not controlling the diel variations. As expected, pH was negatively correlated (P < 0.01) with dissolved Zn concentrations and positively correlated with dissolved As concentrations in both the light and dark chambers. From these experiments, photosynthesis-induced pH changes were determined to be the major cause of the diel dissolved Zn and As cycles in Prickly Pear Creek. Further research is necessary in other streams to verify that this finding is consistent among streams having large differences in trace-element concentrations and mineralogy of channel substrate. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Jones, C. A.; Nimick, D. A.; McCleskey, R. B.

2004-01-01

285

Ocean metabolism and dissolved organic matter: How do small dissolved molecules persist in the ocean?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ocean reservoir of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest global reservoirs (~700 Pg C) of reactive organic carbon. Marine primary production (~50 Pg C/yr) by photosynthetic microalgae and cyanobacteria is the major source of organic matter to the ocean and the principal substrate supporting marine food webs. The direct release of DOM from phytoplankton and other organisms as well as a variety of other processes, such as predation and viral lysis, contribute to the ocean DOM reservoir. Continental runoff and atmospheric deposition are relatively minor sources of DOM to the ocean, but some components of this material appear to be resistant to decomposition and to have a long residence time in the ocean. Concentrations of DOM are highest in surface waters and decrease with depth, a pattern that reflects the sources and diagenesis of DOM in the upper ocean. Most (70-80%) marine DOM exists as small molecules of low molecular weight (<1 kDalton). Surprisingly, high-molecular-weight (>1 kDalton) DOM is relatively enriched in major biochemicals, such as combined neutral sugars and amino acids, and is more bioavailable than low-molecular-weight DOM. The observed relationships among the size, composition, and reactivity of DOM have led to the size-reactivity continuum model, which postulates that diagenetic processes lead to the production of smaller molecules that are structurally altered and resistant to microbial degradation. The radiocarbon content of these small dissolved molecules also indicates these are the most highly aged components of DOM. Chemical signatures of bacteria are abundant in DOM and increase during diagenesis, indicating bacteria are an important source of slowly cycling biochemicals. Recent analyses of DOM isolates by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry have revealed an incredibly diverse mixture of molecules. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules are abundant in DOM, and they appear to be derived from diagenetically-altered terpenoids, such as sterols and hopanoids. Thermally-altered molecules, including black carbon, also appear to be important components of DOM, but their origins are unclear. We are rapidly acquiring novel information about the composition and molecular identity of DOM, and novel insights about the origins, transformations and fates this vast reservoir of DOM are emerging. This presentation will review and synthesize this information for comparison with non-living organic matter in other systems.

Benner, Ronald

2010-05-01

286

Dissolving microneedle patch for transdermal delivery of human growth hormone.  

PubMed

The clinical impact of biotechnology has been constrained by the limitations of traditional hypodermic injection of biopharmaceuticals. Microneedle patches have been proposed as a minimally invasive alternative. In this study, the translation of a dissolving microneedle patch designed for simple, painless self-administration of biopharmacetucials that generates no sharp biohazardous waste is assessed. To study the pharmacokinetics and safety of this approach, human growth hormone (hGH) was encapsulated in 600 ?m-long dissolving microneedles composed of carboxymethylcellulose and trehalose using an aqueous, moderate-temperature process that maintained complete hGH activity after encapsulation and retained most activity after storage for up to 15 months at room temperature and humidity. After manual insertion into the skin of hairless rats, hGH pharmacokinetics were similar to conventional subcutaneous injection. After patch removal, the microneedles had almost completely dissolved, leaving behind only blunt stubs. The dissolving microneedle patch was well tolerated, causing only slight, transient erythema. This study suggests that a dissolving microneedle patch can deliver hGH and other biopharmaceuticals in a manner suitable for self-administration without sharp biohazardous waste. PMID:21360810

Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O; Felner, Eric I; Prausnitz, Mark R

2011-02-18

287

Quantification of dissolved iron sources to the North Atlantic Ocean.  

PubMed

Dissolved iron is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, and its availability controls patterns of primary productivity and carbon cycling throughout the oceans. The relative importance of different sources of iron to the oceans is not well known, however, and flux estimates from atmospheric dust, hydrothermal vents and oceanic sediments vary by orders of magnitude. Here we present a high-resolution transect of dissolved stable iron isotope ratios (?(56)Fe) and iron concentrations ([Fe]) along a section of the North Atlantic Ocean. The different iron sources can be identified by their unique ?(56)Fe signatures, which persist throughout the water column. This allows us to calculate the relative contribution from dust, hydrothermal venting and reductive and non-reductive sedimentary release to the dissolved phase. We find that Saharan dust aerosol is the dominant source of dissolved iron along the section, contributing 71-87 per cent of dissolved iron. Additional sources of iron are non-reductive release from oxygenated sediments on the North American margin (10-19 per cent), reductive sedimentary dissolution on the African margin (1-4 per cent) and hydrothermal venting at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (2-6 per cent). Our data also indicate that hydrothermal vents in the North Atlantic are a source of isotopically light iron, which travels thousands of kilometres from vent sites, potentially influencing surface productivity. Changes in the relative importance of the different iron sources through time may affect interactions between the carbon cycle and climate. PMID:25008528

Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G

2014-07-10

288

Effect of membrane filtration artifacts on dissolved trace element concentrations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Among environment scientists, the current and almost universally accepted definition of dissolved constituents is an operational one; only those materials which pass through a 0.45-??m membrane filter are considered to be dissolved. Detailed laboratory and field studies on Fe and Al indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size, can substantially alter 'dissolved' trace element concentrations; these include: filter type, filter diameter, filtration method, volume of sample processed, suspended sediment concentration, suspended sediment grain-size distribution, concentration of colloids and colloidally associated trace elements and concentration of organic matter. As such, reported filtered-water concentrations employing the same pore size filter may not be equal. Filtration artifacts may lead to the production of chemical data that indicate seasonal or annual 'dissolved' chemical trends which do not reflect actual environmental conditions. Further, the development of worldwide averages for various dissolved chemical constituents, the quantification of geochemical cycles, and the determination of short- or long-term environmental chemical trends may be subject to substantial errors, due to filtration artifacts, when data from the same or multiple sources are combined. Finally, filtration effects could have a substantial impact on various regulatory requirements.

Horowitz, Arthur, J.; Elrick, Kent, A.; Colberg, Mark, R.

1992-01-01

289

The Abiotic Formation of Hydrocarbons from Dissolved CO 2 Under Hydrothermal Conditions with Cobalt-Bearing Magnetite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conversion of CO2 to organic compounds in hydrothermal systems is important in understanding prebiotic chemical evolution leading to the origin\\u000a of life. However, organic compounds with carbon number of more than 3 have never been produced from dissolved CO2 in simulated hydrothermal experiments. In this paper, we report that not only CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, but also n-C4H10 and n-C5H12

Fuwu Ji; Huaiyang Zhou; Qunhui Yang

2008-01-01

290

Sources and ages of dissolved organic matter in peatland streams: evidence from chemistry mixture modelling and radiocarbon data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring data over the period 1994–2007 were analysed for three streams (Cottage Hill Sike, CHS; Rough Sike, RS; Trout Beck,\\u000a TB) draining blanket peat underlain by glacial clay and limestone-rich sub-strata at Moor House (Northern England). Dissolved\\u000a organic carbon concentration, [DOC], showed complex relationships with both discharge and calcium concentration, [Ca]. A model\\u000a based on [Ca] was constructed to simulate

E. Tipping; M. F. Billett; C. L. Bryant; S. Buckingham; S. A. Thacker

2010-01-01

291

Glucose response of dissolved-core alginate microspheres: towards a continuous glucose biosensor.  

PubMed

Microparticle optical sensors hold potential as implantable smart materials for in vivo analysis. In this work, the reversible response of dissolved-core alginate microspheres containing a homogeneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based competitive binding assay for glucose was evaluated. The layer-by-layer self assembly technique was used to deposit multilayered nanofilm coatings on the alginate microspheres containing the assay, thereby stabilizing the sensor system when the alginate was de-crosslinked. The response to glucose was then determined in DI water and simulated interstitial fluid (SIF) using a flow cell to establish controlled, dynamic flow conditions for demonstrating reversibility. The glucose sensitivity under dynamic conditions was estimated to be 0.52%/mM glucose in DI water and 0.6%/mM glucose in simulated interstitial fluid; in both cases, the analytical response range was 0-30 mM glucose, covering both physiological (normoglycemia) and pathophysiological range (hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia). The sensor demonstrated a repeatable and reproducible response when tested over a period of one month, under dynamic flow conditions. Finally, in vitro cytotoxicity assays performed with L929 mouse fibroblast cell lines suggested that the dissolved-core alginate microsphere sensor system with nanofilm coating has sufficient biocompatibility for use as implantable glucose biosensors. PMID:20689896

Chaudhary, Ayesha; McShane, Michael J; Srivastava, Rohit

2010-10-01

292

Modelling Dissolved Pollutants in Krishna River Using Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water quality models are used to describe the discharge concentration relationships in the river. Number of models exists to simulate the pollutant loads in a river, of which some of them are based on simple cause effect relationships and others on highly sophisticated physical and mathematical approaches that require extensive data inputs. Fuzzy rule based modeling extensively used in other disciplines, is attempted in the present study for modeling water quality with respect of dissolved pollutants in Krishna river flowing in Southern part of India. Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS), a recent development in the area of neuro-computing, based on the concept of fuzzy sets is used to model highly non-linear relationships and are capable of adaptive learning. This paper presents the results of the application of ANFIS for modeling dissolved pollutants in the Krishna River. The application and validation of the models is carried out using water quality and flow data obtained from the monitoring stations on the river. The results indicate that the models are quite successful in simulating the physical processes of the relationships between discharge and concentrations.

Matli, C. S.; Umamahesh, N. V.

2014-05-01

293

Formulation Development and Evaluation of Fast Dissolving Film of Telmisartan  

PubMed Central

Hypertension is a major cause of concern not just in the elderly but also in the youngsters. An effort was made to formulate a fast dissolving film containing telmisartan which is used in the treatment of hypertension with a view to improve the onset of action, therapeutic efficacy, patient compliance and convenience. The major challenge in formulation of oral films of telmisatran is that it shows very less solubility in the pH range of 3–9. Various film forming agents and polyhydric alcohols were evaluated for optimizing composition of fast dissolving films. Fast dissolving films using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, sorbitol, menthol and an alkalizer were formulated using solvent casting method. Optimized formulations were evaluated for their weight, thickness, folding endurance, appearance, tensile strength, disintegration time and dissolution profile.

Londhe, Vaishali Y.; Umalkar, Kashmira B.

2012-01-01

294

Dissolved mercury behaviour in the Saint Lawrence estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved mercury concentrations have been measured in the waters of the St Lawrence estuary. The typical concentration of the riverine end-member is 12·0±3·0 p M; the oceanic end-member samples exhibit a mean mercury concentration of 2·4 p M. The graphical pattern of the relationship between mercury concentration and salinity shows a departure from a dilution line. We suggest that a removal of mercury from the dissolved phase during the estuarine mixing is responsible for this observation. Based on the results, the actual input of dissolved mercury from the St Lawrence River to the Gulf is evaluated to be approximately 0·52 T a -1.

Cossa, Daniel; Gobeil, Charles; Courau, Philippe

1988-02-01

295

Dynamics of dissolved gas in a cavitating fluid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A strong acoustic field in a liquid separates the liquid and dissolved gases by the formation of bubbles (cavitation). Bubble growth and collapse is the result of active exchange of gas and vapor through the bubble walls with the surrounding liquid. This paper details a new approach to the study of cavitation, not as an evolution of discrete bubbles, but as the dynamics of molecules constituting both the bubbles and the fluid. We show, by direct, independent measurement of the liquid and the dissolved gas, that the motions of dissolved gas (freon-22, CHClF2 ) and liquid (water) can be quite different during acoustic cavitation and are strongly affected by filtration or previous cavitation of the solvent. Our observations suggest that bubbles can completely refresh their content within two acoustic cycles and that long-lived (˜minutes) microbubbles act as nucleation sites for cavitation. This technique is complementary to the traditional optical and acoustical techniques.

Mastikhin, Igor V.; Newling, Benedict

2008-12-01

296

Dynamics of dissolved gas in a cavitating fluid.  

PubMed

A strong acoustic field in a liquid separates the liquid and dissolved gases by the formation of bubbles (cavitation). Bubble growth and collapse is the result of active exchange of gas and vapor through the bubble walls with the surrounding liquid. This paper details a new approach to the study of cavitation, not as an evolution of discrete bubbles, but as the dynamics of molecules constituting both the bubbles and the fluid. We show, by direct, independent measurement of the liquid and the dissolved gas, that the motions of dissolved gas (freon-22, CHClF2 ) and liquid (water) can be quite different during acoustic cavitation and are strongly affected by filtration or previous cavitation of the solvent. Our observations suggest that bubbles can completely refresh their content within two acoustic cycles and that long-lived ( approximately minutes) microbubbles act as nucleation sites for cavitation. This technique is complementary to the traditional optical and acoustical techniques. PMID:19256954

Mastikhin, Igor V; Newling, Benedict

2008-12-01

297

The role of nitrogen in chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbial and photochemical processes affect chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) dynamics in the ocean. Some evidence suggests that dissolved nitrogen plays a role in CDOM formation, although this has received little systematic attention in marine ecosystems. Coastal seawater incubations were carried out in the presence of model dissolved organic nitrogen (DON: amino sugars and amino acids) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen

Erin J. Biers; Richard G. Zepp; Mary Ann Moran

2007-01-01

298

Photochemical and microbial degradation of dissolved lignin phenols: Implications for the fate of terrigenous dissolved organic matter in marine environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular level characterizations of dissolved lignin were conducted in Mississippi River plume waters to study the impact of various removal mechanisms (photooxidation, microbial degradation, and flocculation) on dissolved organic material (DOM) concentrations and compositions. Prior to analysis, dissolved (<0.2-?m pore size) samples were size fractionated by ultrafiltration into high molecular weight (HMW; >1 kDalton) and low molecular weight (LMW; <1 kDalton) components. At salinities <25 psu, flocculation and microbial degradation were the primary factors affecting lignin concentrations. At salinities >25 psu, photooxidation was a dominant factor influencing lignin compositions and concentrations. Diagnostic indicators of photooxidation include a sharp decrease in the percentage of lignin in the HMW size fraction, changes in ratios of syringyl to vanillyl phenols, and increases in LMW acid:aldehyde ratios for both vanillyl and syringyl phenols. A 10-day incubation experiment with plume water indicated rates of microbial degradation of dissolved lignin that were ˜30% of photooxidation rates in surface waters. These results highlight the importance of microbial as well as photochemical processes in the cycling of terrigenous DOM in coastal waters. Neither flocculation nor microbial degradation significantly altered lignin composition, suggesting that composition is primarily determined by source and photochemical transformation. Overall, high removal rates indicate the potential importance of terrigenous DOM as a carbon and nutrient source in the coastal ocean. Strong correlations between absorption coefficients at 350 nm and dissolved lignin demonstrate the potential for using absorption to trace terrigenous DOM in coastal environments with significant riverine input.

Hernes, Peter J.; Benner, Ronald

2003-09-01

299

Effects of dissolved organic matter from a eutrophic lake on the freely dissolved concentrations of emerging organic contaminants.  

PubMed

The authors studied the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioavailability of bisphenol A (BPA) and chloramphenicol by measuring the freely dissolved concentrations of the contaminants in solutions containing DOM that had been isolated from a mesocosm in a eutrophic lake. The abundance and aromaticity of the chromophoric DOM increased over the 25-d mesocosm experiment. The BPA freely dissolved concentration was 72.3% lower and the chloramphenicol freely dissolved concentration was 56.2% lower using DOM collected on day 25 than using DOM collected on day 1 of the mesocosm experiment. The freely dissolved concentrations negatively correlated with the ultraviolent absorption coefficient at 254?nm and positively correlated with the spectral slope of chromophoric DOM, suggesting that the bioavailability of these emerging organic contaminants depends on the characteristics of the DOM present. The DOM-water partition coefficients (log?KOC ) for the emerging organic contaminants positively correlated with the aromaticity of the DOM, measured as humic acid-like fluorescent components C1 (excitation/emission?=?250[313]/412?nm) and C2 (excitation/emission?=?268[379]/456?nm). The authors conclude that the bioavailability of emerging organic contaminants in eutrophic lakes can be affected by changes in the DOM. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:1739-1746. © 2014 SETAC. PMID:24839192

Xiao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Qing-Hui; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Li, Fei-Peng; Chen, Ling

2014-08-01

300

Dissolved gas concentrations of the geothermal fluids in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Taiwan, a geologically active island, is located on the boundary of the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian Plate. High heat flow and geothermal gradient generated by the complex collision and orogeny, warm up the meteoric water and/or the ground water. The heated water becomes geothermal fluids. In previous studies, researchers tried to categorize hot springs based on the appearance, chemical compositions and lithological areas. Because of the chemical inertness, the concentrations and isotopic composition of dissolved noble gases are good indicators of the mantle degassing, geothermal conditions, and so on. In this study, 55 hot springs were collected from different tectonic units. It is the first time to systematically study the hot springs in Taiwan in terms of dissolved gases. Hot spring water is sampled and stored in pre-evacuated glass bottles for analyzing gas compositions. The abundances of noble gases were determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer based on the isotope dilution technique. Samples with glass vials are introduced to RAD 7 and GC for dissolved Rn and major dissolved gases analyses. Furthermore, helium isotopic ratios and helium-neon ratios are measured on a conventional noble gas mass spectrometer. For hydrochemistry analysis, water samples are analyzed by IC, ICP-MS and titration. We can classify the hot springs samples into three major groups from main anion concentration data; and then, subdivide them into nine minor groups by cation concentration data. Moreover, according to major dissolved gases compositions, three major gas components: CH4, N2 and CO2, are identified. Dissolved noble gases provided more detailed clues about hot springs sources in Taiwan, such as the degree of mixing between meteoric water and deep-source water, which will be further discussed in this study.

Chen, Ai-Ti; Yang, Tsanyao Frank

2010-05-01

301

Aerobic sludge digestion under low dissolved oxygen concentrations.  

PubMed

Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations occur commonly in aerobic digesters treating thickened sludge, with benefits of smaller digester size, much reduced aeration cost, and higher digestion temperature (especially important for plants in colder areas). The effects of low DO concentrations on digestion kinetics were studied using the sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants in Akron, Ohio, and Los Lunas, New Mexico. The experiments were conducted in both batch digestion and a mixed mode of continuous, fed-batch, and batch operations. The low DO condition was clearly advantageous in eliminating the need for pH control because of the simultaneous occurrence of nitrification and denitrification. However, when compared with fully aerobic (high DO) systems under constant pH control (rare in full-scale plants), low DO concentrations and a higher solids loading had a negative effect on the specific volatile solids (VS) digestion kinetics. Nonetheless, the overall (volumetric) digestion performance depends not only on the specific digestion kinetics, but also the solids concentration, pH, and digester temperature. All of the latter factors favor the low DO digestion of thickened sludge. The significant effect of temperature on low DO digestion was confirmed in the mixed-mode study with the Akron sludge. When compared with the well-known empirical correlation between VS reduction and the product (temperature x solids retention time), the experimental data followed the same trend, but were lower than the correlation predictions. The latter was attributed to the lower digestible VS in the Akron sludge, the slower digestion at low DO concentrations, or both. Through model simulation, the first-order decay constant (kd) was estimated as 0.004 h(-1) in the mixed-mode operations, much lower than those (0.011 to 0.029 h(-1)) obtained in batch digestion. The findings suggested that the interactions among sludges with different treatment ages may have a substantially negative effect on digestion kinetics. The use of multistage digesters, especially with small front-end reactors, may be advantageous in both "process" kinetics and "biological reaction" kinetics for sludge digestion. PMID:15523791

Arunachalam, RaviSankar; Shah, Hemant K; Ju, Lu-Kwang

2004-01-01

302

Thermodynamic properties of gases dissolved in electrolyte solutions.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method based on perturbation theory for mixtures is applied to the prediction of thermodynamic properties of gases dissolved in electrolyte solutions. The theory is compared with experimental data for the dependence of the solute activity coefficient on concentration, temperature, and pressure; calculations are included for partial molal enthalpy and volume of the dissolved gas. The theory is also compared with previous theories for salt effects and found to be superior. The calculations are best for salting-out systems. The qualitative feature of salting-in is predicted by the theory, but quantitative predictions are not satisfactory for such systems; this is attributed to approximations made in evaluating the perturbation terms.

Tiepel, E. W.; Gubbins, K. E.

1973-01-01

303

Release of Dissolved Amino Acids by Marine Zooplankton.  

PubMed

Marine net zooplankton release dissolved amino acids into the water. Release rates are positively correlated with temperature and can be estimated by the equation: Release rate, (milligrams of alpha-amino nitrogen per gram dry weight of zooplankton per day) = 1.0 x temperature ( degrees C) -5.9. Release rates appeared to be independent of the taxonomic composition of the test samples, which were variously dominated by copepods, salps, chaetognaths, coelenterates, or radiolarians. These amino acids constitute an important source of dissolved organic matter in the sea. PMID:17829748

Johannes, R E; Webb, K L

1965-10-01

304

Modelling dissolved oxygen and benthic algae dynamics in a coastal ecosystem by exploiting real-time monitoring data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we propose a methodological approach for the detection and simulation of relevant changes in coastal ecosystems, i.e. oxygen depletion and proliferation of benthic algae. This approach is based on the integration of the data provided by real-time monitoring systems with the output of complex ecosystem models. We tested the method in a case study, where real-time Dissolved Oxygen (DO) data and a 2D Reaction-Transport model were used to simulate the growth of macroalgae and the daily dynamics of DO in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy). The spatiotemporal relationships among the macroalgae distribution and the DO observations were quantified by analysing and comparing the Dissolved Oxygen time series and model outputs. The outcomes were used for the inverse estimation of the initial, i.e. late winter, biomass of macroalgae. The model was then applied to simulate the growth of macroalgae and the daily dynamic of DO during the productive (i.e., spring and summer) seasons. The comparison between the model output and the real-time data indicates that the model had skill in simulating the short term (daily) DO dynamic at several lagoon sites impacted by macroalgae proliferation. The simulated intra-daily variability of Dissolved Oxygen is significantly correlated with the observations in half of the monitoring sites, as well the simulated algal growth, which resulted comparable with the field measurements. The estimated average value of macroalgae biomass was ˜1 kgfw m-2 in 2007, which is consistent with a good to moderate quality status of the Lagoon of Venice. The proposed methodology can be useful in the assessment of the environmental status of coastal ecosystems as required by recent national and international legislation.

Lovato, T.; Ciavatta, S.; Brigolin, D.; Rubino, A.; Pastres, R.

2013-03-01

305

Dissolved, Exsolved and Re-dissolved H2O in Volcanology: Rheology, Glass Transition, and Thermodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All natural magmas originate with dissolved H2O. All such magmas degas during transport and eruption. The presence, abundance, and state of H2O in magmas control phase relations and the transport properties of melts and magmas. For example, dissolved H2O lowers viscosity, lowers glass transition temperatures (Tg), and controls the temperature and nature of crystallization. The effects of exsolved water are also substantial in terms of modifying the bulk transport properties of the magma, facilitating egress of volatiles and, thus, promoting crystallization. Of great interest is the coupling this component (H2O) creates between the thermodynamic processes (i.e. cooling, crystallization, vesiculation) and the properties (i.e. density, viscosity) controlling the mechanical behaviour (i.e. flow and fracture) of magma during transport and eruption. The coupling allows for strong feedbacks between system variables. The component H2O also has a retrograde solubility in silicate melts wherein H2O solubility in the melt increases with decreasing T. Here, we explore some of the consequences of retrograde solubility of H2O for volcanic systems using a new preliminary experimental dataset. These data establish the 1-atmosphere solubility limits of H2O in silicic melt at volcanic temperatures and are complementary to the growing literature on the low pressure (<50 MPa) solubility of volatiles in silicate melts (e.g., Behrens et al. 2009; DiMatteo et al. 2004; Liu et al. 2005; Zhang 1999). We specifically look at the implications of these data, especially the retrograde solubility limits, for welding of pyroclastic deposits (e.g. ignimbrites, conduit fill, fall out). The cessation of welding and compaction processes in pyroclastic deposits is reached when deposits cool below Tg. However, the fact that H2O has a retrograde solubility means that inter- and intraclast water will be resorbed by vitric pyroclasts as the deposit cools (regardless of load). This has the immediate consequence of reducing the viscosity of the pyroclasts and, more importantly, reducing Tg. The reduction in pyroclast viscosity facilitates sintering, welding and compaction processes. The reduced Tg, due to resorbed H2O, extends the T-time window for porosity reduction via viscous flow. Variations in welding intensity can, therefore, be an expression of the competition between cooling of the deposit and the re-hydration of vitric pyroclasts during cooling driven by retrograde solubility of H2O. In essence, the temperature of the cooling deposit chases a descending Tg; once the deposit temperature catches and drops below Tg, viscous deformation processes are quenched. This allows for the H2O contents of vitric pyroclasts to preserve higher water contents that they had at the time they erupted. The analysis of the relationships between eruptive, emplacement and glass transition temperatures are discussed further. References Cited: Behrens H. et al. 2009: Am Min 94, 105-120. Di Matteo V. et al. 2004: Chemical Geology 213, 187-196. Liu Y et al. 2005: . J Volc Geotherm Res 143, 219-235. Zhang Y 1999: Rev Geophys 37, 493-516.

Russell, K.; kennedy, B.; Giordano, D.; Friedlander, E. A.

2012-12-01

306

Characterizing the release of different composition of dissolved organic matter in soil under acid rain leaching using three-dimensional excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM), there has no report that EEMS has been used to study the effects of acid rain on DOM and its composition in soil. In this work, we employed three-dimensional EEMS to characterize the compositions of DOM leached by simulated acid rain from red soil. The

Li Liu; Cunyi Song; Zengguang Yan; Fasheng Li

2009-01-01

307

Large fluctuations of dissolved oxygen in the Indian and Pacific oceans during Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations caused by variations of North Atlantic Deep Water subduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paleoclimate records from glacial Indian and Pacific oceans sediments document millennial-scale fluctuations of subsurface dissolved oxygen levels and denitrification coherent with North Atlantic temperature oscillations. Yet the mechanism of this teleconnection between the remote ocean basins remains elusive. Here we present model simulations of the oxygen and nitrogen cycles that explain how changes in deepwater subduction in the North Atlantic

Andreas Schmittner; Eric D. Galbraith; Steven W. Hostetler; Thomas F. Pedersen; Rong Zhang

2007-01-01

308

The mechanisms of dissolved solids transport in flysch drainage basins  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transformation of precipitation input into runoff is accompanied by a continuous change in the chemical properties of water involved in the water circulation cycle. These range from slightly acid precip­ itation water, through neutral stream water to alkaline underground waters. The relationship between discharge and total dissolved solids concentration conforms to a curved regression equation, in the form y

W. FROEHLICH

309

Water Quality Monitoring Using Total Dissolved Solids Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 Special Steel Complex, Physics laboratories, 9-11 Gaesti Ave., 130087, Targoviste, Romania Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) are used, together with other parameters, to classify the river water concerning their quality. The rapid increase of pollution in Dambovita County, due to the industrial processes, thermal power station and domestic sewage, modify the quality of Ialomita river along the county. So, it

CLAUDIA STIHI; ION V. POPESCU; SIMONA APOSTOL; GHEORGHE VLAICU

310

Total Dissolved Solids: Determination, Sources, Effects, and Removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many parameters may be used to measure the deterioration of water quality. One very important parameter is total dissolved solids (TDS). An increase in TDS beyond acceptable levels can have a significant impact on municipal, industrial, and agricultural use of water. In this review an overview of the problem of high TDS levels is given. Factors related to TDS which

Joseph H. Sherrard; Donald R. Moore; Theo A. Dillaha

1987-01-01

311

Climate Variability, Dissolved Organic Carbon, UV Exposure, and Amphibian Decline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing levels of UV radiation represent a potential threat to aquatic organisms in a wide range of environments, yet controls on in situ variability on UV exposure are relatively unknown. The primary control on the penetration of UV radiation in surface water environments is the amount of photoreactive dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Consequently, biogeochemical processes that control the cycling of

P. D. Brooks; C. M. O'Reilly; S. Diamond; S. Corn; E. Muths; K. Tonnessen; D. H. Campbell

2001-01-01

312

Separation of oil from water by dissolved air flotation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synthetic industrial effluent was prepared by stabilising low concentrations of oil (Catenex 11, Shell, UK) in aqueous dispersion with a non-ionic surfactant (Span 20) and dissolved air flotation (DAF) was used to clarify this wastewater. Operating parameters including saturator pressure, recycle ratio, and air to oil ratio, were investigated to find conditions that would enhance the efficiency of the DAF

A. A Al-Shamrani; A James; H Xiao

2002-01-01

313

Dissolved oxygen as a key parameter to aerobic granule formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much research has asserted that high shear forces are necessary for the formation of aerobic granular sludge in Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBRs). In order to distinguish the role of shear and dissolved oxygen on granule formation, two separate experiments were conducted with three bench-scale SBRs. In the first experiment, an SBR was operated with five sequentially decreasing superficial upflow gas

B. S. McSwain Sturm; R. L. Irvine

2008-01-01

314

CONDUCTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF DISSOLVED HUMIC MATERIALS. (R828158)  

EPA Science Inventory

Conductometric replacement titrations of humic and fulvic acids dissolved in a slight excess of hydroxide were carried out with standard acid. The slope of the titration curve corresponding to the protonation of humate/fulvate was related to the electrophoretic mobility of the...

315

REMOVAL OF HUMICSUBSTANCES AND ALGAE BY DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is used in place of conventional gravity settling as a means to separate low density floc particles from water. The following objectives were: (1) to compare DAF to conventional water treatment of coagulation-flocculation followed by gravity settling...

316

Microbial utilization of dissolved organic carbon leached from riparian litterfall  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aquatic systems is abundant and used within stream food webs, but DOC quality is rarely studied. DOC in the leachates from the litter of five tree species (red alder, Alnus rubra; vine maple, Acer circinatum; western red cedar, Thuja plicata; western hemlock, Tsuga hetrophylla; and Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii) were assessed for their chemistry and relative

Michael D. McArthur; John S. Richardson

2002-01-01

317

TOTAL DISSOLVED AND BIOAVAILABLE METALS AT LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS  

EPA Science Inventory

Dissolved metals in water and total metals in sediments have been measured at marina areas in Lake Texoma during June 1999 to October 2001, and October 2001, respectively. The metals most often found in the highest concentrations in marina water were Na and Ca, followed by Mg an...

318

Short time dissolved oxygen dynamics in shallow water ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved oxygen evolution over time holds information about the recent and past history of the physics, the chemistry and the biology of aquatic systems. On the daily time scale various phenomena seem to repeat with a sort of regularity, leaving a trace in the further trend of oxygen dynamics. These are the wind calm of nocturnal and early morning hours,

Roberto D’Autilia; Margherita Falcucci; Vincent Hull; Luisa Parrella

2004-01-01

319

Adaptive dissolved oxygen control based on dynamic structure neural network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activated sludge wastewater treatment processes (WWTPs) are difficult to control because of their complex nonlinear behavior. In this paper, an adaptive controller based on a dynamic structure neural network (ACDSNN) is proposed to control the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a wastewater treatment process (WWTP). The proposed ACDSNN incorporates a structure variable feedforward neural network (FNN), where the FNN can

Hong-Gui Han; Jun-Fei Qiao

2011-01-01

320

Dissolved Oxygen: Method Comparison with Potentiometric Stripping Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three methods for determination of dissolved oxygen in samples of natural water are compared; patentiometric stripping analysis, PSA compares well with oxygen selective electrodes. Although potentiometric stripping analysis and oxygen selective electrode methods are found to be simple, rapid and of higher reproducibility than the usual Dinkier procedure, the use of oxygen selective electrodes has many disadvantages.

M. Fayyad; M. Tutunji; R. S. Ramakrishna; Z. Taha

1987-01-01

321

Dissolving Carboxylic Acids and Primary Amines on the Overhead Projector  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Liquid carboxylic acids (or primary amines) with limited solubility in water are dissolved by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide (or hydrochloric acid) on the stage of an overhead projector using simple glassware and very small quantities of chemicals. This effective and colorful demonstration can be used to accompany discussions of the…

Solomon, Sally D.; Rutkowsky, Susan A.

2010-01-01

322

Modification of hardwood dissolving pulp with purified Trichoderma reesei cellulases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hardwood dissolving pulp was treated with purifiedTrichoderma reeseiendoglucanases and cellobiohydrolases. Endoglucanases were more efficient in hydrolysing pulp carbohydrates than were the cellobiohydrolases at the same protein dosage. Endoglucanases also lowered the viscosity and improved the alkaline solubility more dramatically. There was a clear correlation between the alkaline solubility and viscosity, and therefore the solubility could only be improved by lowering

Leena Rahkamo; Matti Siika-Aho; Marianna Vehviläinen; Matti Dolk; Liisa Viikari; Pertti Nousiainen; Johanna Buchert

1996-01-01

323

Enzymatic and alkaline treatments of hardwood dissolving pulp  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolving pulp was solubilized in 9% NaOH, resulting in 32% solubilization of the pulp. Most of the pulp hemicelluloses were solubilized during this treatment. During the alkaline treatment the cellulose crystalline form was converted from cellulose I to cellulose II. The alkaline insoluble residue was further treated with cellulases in order to render it more alkaline soluble (two-step process). The

L. RAHKAMO; L. VIIKARI; J. BUCHERT; T. PAAKKARI; T. SUORTTI

1998-01-01

324

The Placebo Effect: Dissolving the Expectancy Versus Conditioning Debate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors review the literature on the 2 main models of the placebo effect: expectancy theory and classical conditioning. A path is suggested to dissolving the theoretical impasse that has long plagued this issue. The key is to make a clear distinction between 2 questions: What factors shape placebo effects? and What learning mediates the…

Stewart-Williams, Steve; Podd, John

2004-01-01

325

Dissolved organic matter in Arizona reservoirs: assessment of carbonaceous sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most studies of freshwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) have been conducted in temperate climates where allochthonous organic material is abundant. Because climatic conditions of the Southwestern USA are different than temperate environments, DOM from three freshwater reservoirs (Saguaro Lake, Bartlett Lake and Lake Pleasant) was investigated to determine the importance of allochthonous and autochthonous organic material. Results from the study

Heath Mash; Paul K Westerhoff; Lawrence A Baker; Ronald A Nieman; My-Lihn Nguyen

2004-01-01

326

Production of Dissolved Organic Matter During Fungal Wood Rot Decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved organic matter mediates numerous biogeochemical processes in soil systems impacting subsurface microbial activity, redox chemistry, soil structure, and carbon and nitrogen sequestration. The structure and chemistry of DOM is a function of the inherited chemistry of the source material, the type of microbial action that has occurred, and selective interaction with mineral substrates. The type of fungal decomposition imparted

T. R. Filley; J. Jellison; B. Goodell; S. Kelley; M. Davis

2002-01-01

327

Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

Jantzen, Paul G.

1978-01-01

328

Scaling properties of the dissolving channels in a fractured rock  

Microsoft Academic Search

During dissolution in porous or fractured rock, a positive feedback between fluid transport and mineral erosion leads to the spontaneous formation of wormhole-like channels. An important ingredient in the evolution of such a system is the competition between the growing channels which leads to the appearance of a scale-invariant distribution of channel lengths. A simplified model of the dissolving medium

P. Szymczak; T. Ladd

2006-01-01

329

U-shaped plastic optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dissolved oxygen sensor based on U-shape plastic optical fiber (POF) was described. Analyte-sensitive fluorophore are entrapped into ormosil film by using Sol-gel method. Phase modulation technique is used to measure fluorescence lifetime. The influence of oxygen indictor concentration, annealing time and U-shaped POF curve radius on the systems sensitivity is studied.

Haiwen Cai; Fenghong Chu; Ronghui Qu; Zujie Fang

2008-01-01

330

Atmospheric inputs and river transport of dissolved substances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several different types of behaviour can be observed for elements between atmospheric input and river transport including very limited chemical or biological reactivity (CI-, in most cases), change of speciation (C, N, P), recycling to atmosphere (C, N, S, K), increase of dissolved contents through weathering (Si, Ca, Mg, Na), and build-up in soil or vegetation (C, N, P, Ca,

MICHEL MEYBECK

1983-01-01

331

Biological Uptake of Dissolved Silica in the Amazon River Estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 25 percent of the dissolved silica carried by the Amazon River is depleted through diatom production in the inner estuary. Annual production of opaline frustules is estimated to be 15 million tons. However, few diatoms accumulate in modern shelf sediments and chemical recycling appears to be slight. Instead, many frustules apparently are transported landward into the river system, where

John D. Milliman; Edward Boyle

1975-01-01

332

A polarographic method for measuring dissolved nitric oxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A polarographic method for measuring the concentration of authentic nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous solutions is described. When solutions of NO were injected into aqueous solutions containing dissolved oxygen, NO reacted with oxygen to give nitrite. The amount of nitrite formed in this reaction (analyzed by capillary electrophoresis) was compared with the amount of oxygen consumed (measured by polarography). We

B. O Jensen; J Skeidsvoll; H Holmsen

1997-01-01

333

PHOTOCHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A BLACKWATER RIVER  

EPA Science Inventory

We examined photochemical alterations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Satilla River, a high DOC (10-40 mg/liter) blackwater river of southeast Georgia. Water samples were filtered to remove most organisms, placed in quartz tubes, and incubated under natural sunlight a...

334

Dependence of riverine nitrous oxide emissions on dissolved oxygen levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas, and it destroys stratospheric ozone. Seventeen per cent of agricultural nitrous oxide emissions come from the production of nitrous oxide in streams, rivers and estuaries, in turn a result of inorganic nitrogen input through leaching, runoff and sewage. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and global nitrous oxide budgets assume that riverine nitrous oxide emissions increase linearly with dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads, but data are sparse and conflicting. Here we report measurements over two years of nitrous oxide emissions in the Grand River, Canada, a seventh-order temperate river that is affected by agricultural runoff and outflow from a waste-water treatment plant. Emissions were disproportionately high in urban areas and during nocturnal summer periods. Moreover, annual emission estimates that are based on dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads overestimated the measured emissions in a wet year and underestimated them in a dry year. We found no correlations of nitrous oxide emissions with nitrate or dissolved inorganic nitrogen, but detected negative correlations with dissolved oxygen, suggesting that nitrate concentrations did not limit emissions. We conclude that future increases in nitrate export to rivers will not necessarily lead to higher nitrous oxide emissions, but more widespread hypoxia most likely will.

Rosamond, Madeline S.; Thuss, Simon J.; Schiff, Sherry L.

2012-10-01

335

Removal properties of dissolved boron by glucomannan gel.  

PubMed

Boron ions have long been known to form complexes with the cis-diol group of a polysaccharide. Konjac glucomannan (KGM) which is one of polysaccharides was used to remove dissolved boron in this study. KGM forms a complex with boron, but does not remove boron from contaminated waters as well as other polysaccharides because of its high water solubility. Therefore, the removal efficiencies of dissolved boron were examined using both an insoluble KGM gel and KGM semi-gel. The former did not remove dissolved boron, but the latter did. The difference in the ability of boron removal was due to the presence of diol group inside. KGM loses free diol group during the process of gelation. On the other hand, the semi-gel gelated only surface layer in water has diol group inside. The boron removal capacity of the semi-gel was highest at pHs?11, when the boron species is present as B(OH)4(-). The capacity was slightly increased by the addition of Al, Ca and Mg under high pH conditions. This was due to co-precipitation of boron with Ca dissolved from the semi-gel. The boron adsorbed to the semi-gel easily was desorbed under low pH conditions and the hysteresis was not found. PMID:23260255

Oishi, Kyoko; Maehata, Yugo

2013-04-01

336

A Predictable Terrestrial Signature to Riverine Dissolved Organic Carbon?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In small mountainous watersheds, the majority of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is derived from terrigenous sources; however, there is much debate over the age and recalcitrance of these organic materials. To determine controls on the age and recalcitrance of DOC found in stream waters, we measured DOC composition in stream and soil water samples, using isotopic (13C and 14C) and

J. Sanderman; R. Amundson; J. A. Baldock

2007-01-01

337

DISSOLVED OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS IN INDIANA STREAMS DURING URBAN RUNOFF  

EPA Science Inventory

This short term research project was undertaken for the purpose of locating and identifying sites where potential dissolved oxygen (D.O.) impacts exist during periods of urban runoff, and providing the necessary information to justify more extensive D.O. model verification studie...

338

REDUCED DISSOLVED OXYGEN TEST SYSTEM FOR MARINE ORGANISMS  

EPA Science Inventory

A flow-through test system was designed to examine minimum dissolved oxygen (D.O.) requirements of marine animals. he system provides up to six treatment concentrations between 0.3 mg D.O./I and saturation. ea water is degassed in a vacuum-evacuated packed column and the treatmen...

339

Killing of Bacteria by Copper Surfaces Involves Dissolved Copper?  

PubMed Central

Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces. However, the mechanism of this process remains unclear. Using Enterococcus hirae, the effect of inactivation of copper homeostatic genes and of medium compositions on survival and copper dissolution was tested. The results support a role for dissolved copper ions in killing.

Molteni, Cristina; Abicht, Helge K.; Solioz, Marc

2010-01-01

340

Laser remote sensing of dissolved organic matter in natural water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorescent methods using Raman scattering signal as an internal standard are widely applied for environment remote control of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water. In this paper temperature variations, ultraviolet irradiation influence on exitation and emission spectra of water samples have been investigated. Photochemical processes in DOM under laser excitation and the effect of fluorescence saturation have been studied

V. V. Chubarov; V. V. Fadeev; E. M. Filippova

1993-01-01

341

ESTIMATING DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS  

EPA Science Inventory

A literature search was performed for dissolved organic carbon/water partition coefficients for nonionic chemicals (Kdoc) and Kdoc data was taken from more than sixty references. The Kdoc data were evaluated as a function of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow). A pre...

342

DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING  

EPA Science Inventory

Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

343

Oil shale retorting and off-gas purification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disclosed is a process for removing acidic impurities from off-gases generated in the retorting of oil shale comprising contacting a rubblized mass of oil shale which has been substantially depleted in hydrocarbonaceous materials with water, so as to extract basic components from the mass; and contacting off-gases, which were generated during the retorting of oil shale and which contain acidic

Honaker

1978-01-01

344

Reprocessing off-Gas Treatment Research in Belgium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research project at the Belgian Nuclear Research Center (S.C.K./C.E.N.) is technologically oriented and aims at the development of industrially applicable techniques for capture of in the perspective of increasingly severe discharge authorizations at ...

L. H. Baetsle J. Broothaerts

1977-01-01

345

Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission produc...

R. J. Kirkham R. E. Lords

1993-01-01

346

Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOEpatents

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

1980-07-14

347

Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual {sup 129}I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the {sup 3}, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year.

Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

1993-03-01

348

Seasonal variability of total dissolved fluxes and origin of major dissolved elements within a large tropical river: The Orinoco, Venezuela  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seasonal variations of total dissolved fluxes of the lower Orinoco River were calculated taking into account four complete hydrological cycles during a five-year period (2005-2010). The modern concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) of the Orinoco surface waters were compared with data collected during the second half of the last century published in the literature. This comparison leads to the conclusion that chemical composition did not evolve significantly at least over the last thirty to forty years. Surface waters of the Orinoco at Ciudad Bolivar are between bicarbonated calcic and bicarbonated mixed. In comparison to mean values of concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) of world river surface waters (89.2 mg l-1), the Orinoco River at Ciudad Bolivar presents mainly low mineralized surface waters (2005-10: TDS 30 mg l-1). The TDS fluxes passing at this station in direction to the Atlantic Ocean between 2005 and 2010 were estimated at 30 × 106 t yr-1, i.e. 36 t km-2 yr-1. It was observed that the seasonal variations (dry season vs wet season) of total dissolved fluxes (TDS and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) are mainly controlled by discharge variations. Two groups of elements have been defined from dilution curves and molar ratio diagrams. Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Cl- and Na+ mainly come from the same geographic and lithologic area, the Andes. K+ and SiO2 essentially come from the Llanos and the Guayana Shield. These findings are important for understanding fundamental geochemical processes within the Orinoco River basin, but also as a baseline study in the perspective of the development of numerous mining activities related with aluminum and steel industries; and the plans of the Venezuelan government to construct new fluvial ports on the lower Orinoco for the transport of hydrocarbons.

Laraque, Alain; Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Alkattan, Rana; Steiger, Johannes; Mora, Abrahan; Adèle, Georges; Castellanos, Bartolo; Lagane, Christèle; Lopez, José Luis; Perez, Jesus; Rodriguez, Militza; Rosales, Judith

2013-07-01

349

Heat as a tracer to estimate dissolved organic carbon flux from a restored wetland  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Heat was used as a natural tracer to characterize shallow ground water flow beneath a complex wetland system. Hydrogeologic data were combined with measured vertical temperature profiles to constrain a series of two-dimensional, transient simulations of ground water flow and heat transport using the model code SUTRA (Voss 1990). The measured seasonal temperature signal reached depths of 2.7 m beneath the pond. Hydraulic conductivity was varied in each of the layers in the model in a systematic manual calibration of the two-dimensional model to obtain the best fit to the measured temperature and hydraulic head. Results of a series of representative best-fit simulations represent a range in hydraulic conductivity values that had the best agreement between simulated and observed temperatures and that resulted in simulated pond seepage values within 1 order of magnitude of pond seepage estimated from the water budget. Resulting estimates of ground water discharge to an adjacent agricultural drainage ditch were used to estimate potential dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads resulting from the restored wetland. Estimated DOC loads ranged from 45 to 1340 g C/(m2 year), which is higher than estimated DOC loads from surface water. In spite of the complexity in characterizing ground water flow in peat soils, using heat as a tracer provided a constrained estimate of subsurface flow from the pond to the agricultural drainage ditch. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

Burow, K. R.; Constantz, J.; Fujii, R.

2005-01-01

350

Characterization of the localized hydrodynamic shear forces and dissolved oxygen distribution in sparged bioreactors.  

PubMed

Detailed, high-resolution numerical simulations of the bubbly flows, used for oxygen delivery and mixing in mammalian cell suspensions, have been performed. The hydrodynamics, shear and normal forces, mass transfer and mass transport from and around individual bubbles and bubble clusters were resolved for different operating conditions, that is, Weber, Morton, and Schmidt numbers. Suspended animal (e.g., mammalian, insect) cells are known to be susceptible to damage potentially leading to cell death, caused by hydrodynamic stresses and oxygen deprivation. Better knowledge of the magnitude of the shear forces and the extent of mixing of the dissolved oxygen in sparged bioreactors can have a significant impact on their future design and optimization. Therefore, the computed liquid-phase velocity fields were used to calculate and compare the local shear in different types of single bubble wakes and in bubble clusters. Oxygen mass transfer and dissolved oxygen transport were resolved to examine oxygen supply to the cells in the different types of flows. PMID:17154313

Koynov, Athanas; Tryggvason, Grétar; Khinast, Johannes G

2007-06-01

351

Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gas phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds, however the significance of direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived Henry's law parameters, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will not have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations of atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds designed to estimate gas and aqueous phase extinction coefficients. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only three out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid, 3-oxobutanoic acid, and 3-oxopropanoic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking ?, ? conjugation, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected.

Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

2013-04-01

352

Measuring Total Dissolved Gas Pressure at a Petroleum Plume Site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater contamination from petroleum hydrocarbons is ubiquitous across the country, in both urban and rural settings. Natural attenuation of petroleum contaminants may result in the production of gases (e.g. methane, carbon dioxide), in dissolved and potentially gas-phase form, which may affect the extent, persistence and remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon groundwater plumes. Current monitoring practices for gases in groundwater generally involve collecting water samples from wells or gas from gas-water separators during pumping tests, and subsequent analysis in the laboratory. Another potential option is the use of total dissolved gas pressure (TDGP) sensors, which can provide valuable real-time information on dissolved gas conditions while minimizing analytical costs. However, these have not been adequately tested or optimized for use in monitoring petroleum-contaminated groundwater. Preliminary testing of TDGP sensor measurement was performed on a selection of existing wells at a site in Ontario with previously-monitored groundwater contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons. TDGP was measured using a PT4 Tracker (Point Four Systems Inc., B.C.). Other properties such as dissolved oxygen and pH were also measured, and samples were collected and analyzed for major ions, metals, and various petroleum hydrocarbons. Results showed that 3 of the wells had contaminants, as well as elevated methane and dissolved iron. They also had lower nitrate and sulphate concentrations, but so did one uncontaminated well. The TDGP for these wells was elevated compared to background groundwater and compared to that expected for equilibration with the atmosphere. These higher values likely result from the microbial generation of dissolved methane. This data set suggests that natural biodegradation processes are occurring in the petroleum plume. However, some other wells also had elevated TDGP. They could indicate a septic plume, but the relatively low electrical conductivity (EC) is not supportive of this. It was also noted that for some wells, but not all, TDGP increased substantially following pumping, which may indicate that degassed stagnant water in the well needs to be replaced by fresher groundwater prior to TDGP measurement. These preliminary findings suggest that TDGP has the potential to provide real-time insight into where gas-producing reactions (in this case, likely methanogenesis) may be occurring in groundwater, which may be useful in assessing or monitoring natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons. However, there are complicating factors that require further investigation.

Roy, J. W.; Spoelstra, J.; van Stempvoort, D.

2009-05-01

353

Greenhouse gases dissolved in soil solution - often ignored, but important?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flux measurements of climate-relevant trace gases from soils are frequently undertaken in contemporary ecosystem studies and substantially contribute to our understanding of greenhouse gas balances of the biosphere. While the great majority of such investigations builds on closed chamber and eddy covariance measurements, where upward gas fluxes to the atmosphere are measured, fewest concurrently consider greenhouse gas dissolution in the seepage and leaching of dissolved gases via the vadose zone to the groundwater. Here we present annual leaching losses of dissolved N2O and CO2 from arable, grassland, and forest lysimeter soils from three sites differing in altitude and climate. We aim to assess their importance in comparison to direct N2O emission, soil respiration, and further leaching parameters of the C- and N cycle. The lysimeters are part of the Germany-wide lysimeter network initiative TERENO-SoilCan, which investigates feedbacks of climate change to the pedosphere on a long-term scale. Soil water samples were collected weekly from different depths of the profiles by means of suction cups. A laboratory pre-experiment proved that no degassing occurred under those sampling conditions. We applied the headspace equilibration technique to determine dissolved gas concentrations by gas chromatography. The seepage water of all lysimeters was consistently supersaturated with N2O and CO2 compared to water equilibrated ambient air. In terms of N2O, leaching losses increased in the ascending order forest, grassland, and arable soils, respectively. In case of the latter soils, we observed a strong variability of N2O, with dissolved concentrations up to 23 ?g N L-1. However, since seepage discharge of the arable lysimeters was comparatively small and mostly limited to the hydrological winter season, leached N2O appeared to be less important than direct N2O emissions. In terms of dissolved CO2,our measurements revealed considerable leaching losses from the mountainous forest and grassland soils, based on concentrations up to 24 mg C L-1 and high seepage discharge. Such losses turned out to be similarly important like soil respiration, particularly during winter when temperature-dependent soil respiration declined. In conclusion, the results of the first year of our measurements provide evidence that dissolved greenhouse gases should be considered in studies which aim to assess full greenhouse gas balances, particularly in ecosystems where hydrological conditions favour microbial activity and high leaching losses.

Weymann, Daniel; Brueggemann, Nicolas; Puetz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

2014-05-01

354

Meridional fluxes of dissolved organic matter in the North Atlantic Ocean  

SciTech Connect

Using bio-optical estimates of gelbstoff and a few platinum measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC{sub pt}), a budget of the meridional flux of DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) across 36{degrees}25{prime}N in the North Atlantic is constructed from previous inverse models of water and element transport. Distinct southward subsurface fluxes of dissolved organic matter (DOM) within subducted shelf water, cabelled slope water, and overturned basin water are inferred. Within two cases of a positive gradient of DOC{sub pt} between terrestrial/shelf and offshore stocks, the net equatorward exports of O{sub 2} and DOC{sub pt} from the northern North Atlantic yield molar ratios of 2.1 to 9.1, compared to the expected Redfield O{sub 2}/C ratio of 1.3. In the first case, 63% of the apparent oxygen utilization demands of the water column may be met by DOC, instead of only 14% in the second scenario, preserving a role for falling particles in the sea. With a DOC/DON ratio of 10, the larger net southward export of DON across 36{degrees}25{prime}N balances the postulated net northward input of 1.7 x 10{sup 3} kg NO{sub 3} s{sup {minus}1} of unutilized nitrate within the Gulf Stream. Without an enhanced supply of DOM from the shelves, a zero seaward gradient of DOM in the third case suggests that none of the poleward nitrate flux is returned southward as DON, but instead a net poleward flux of DON prevails as well. The authors present estimates are confounded, however, by the seasonal and multiyear variability of sinking processes in the North Atlantic. Future active and passive remote sensors, field programs, and simulation models must now discriminate between particulate and dissolved components of surface color signals to verify the importance of both continental margins and DOM in global biogeochemical cycles. 98 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Walsh, J.J.; Carder, K.L.; Mueller-Karger, F.E. [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

1992-10-15

355

Turning hardwood dissolving pulp polysaccharide residual material into barrier packaging.  

PubMed

Birch chips were subjected to pilot-scale pre-hydrolysis under various sets of conditions to mimic a pre-hydrolysis step in a dissolving pulp process. The process generates residual process liquor, a wood hydrolysate, and the treated chips may be directly utilized in a dissolving process. The wood hydrolysates were rich in xylan and utilized in the production of fully renewable films that provide very good oxygen barrier function and mechanical integrity also at high relative humidity. Membrane filtration had an effect in enriching higher molecular weight fractions from the hydrolysates, but noteworthy, a hydrolysate used in the crude state without any membrane filtration performed just as well as upgraded fractions in forming films providing acceptable tensile properties and a good barrier against oxygen permeation. PMID:23862767

Saadatmand, Soheil; Edlund, Ulrica; Albertsson, Ann-Christine; Danielsson, Sverker; Dahlman, Olof; Karlström, Katarina

2013-08-12

356

Unimodal response of fish yield to dissolved organic carbon.  

PubMed

Here, we demonstrate a contrasting effect of terrestrial coloured dissolved organic material on the secondary production of boreal nutrient poor lakes. Using fish yield from standardised brown trout gill-net catches as a proxy, we show a unimodal response of lake secondary productivity to dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This suggests a trade-off between positive and negative effects, where the initial increase may hinge upon several factors such as energy subsidising, screening of UV-radiation or P and N load being associated with organic carbon. The subsequent decline in production with further increase in DOC is likely associated with light limitations of primary production. We also show that shallow lakes switch from positive to negative effects at higher carbon loads than deeper lakes. These results underpin the major role of organic carbon for structuring productivity of boreal lake ecosystems. PMID:24165396

Finstad, Anders G; Helland, Ingeborg P; Ugedal, Ola; Hesthagen, Trygve; Hessen, Dag O

2014-01-01

357

Identification of an alcoholic beverage in which methamphetamine was dissolved.  

PubMed

A man was arrested for violating the Stimulant Control Law. Twelve small plastic containers each containing 1-3 ml of reddish purple alcoholic beverage in which methamphetamine had been dissolved, and a bottle of blueberry liquor of a similar colour, were found in his house. He admitted that the blueberry liquor belonged to him, but strongly insisted that he had been asked to keep the containers by another person and that he had no knowledge of their contents. The alcoholic beverage and the blueberry liquor were analyzed in order to test whether he had dissolved methamphetamine in the blueberry liquor. The aroma components found in the alcoholic beverage in each of the plastic containers were identical, but differed from those found in the blueberry liquor. Based on these results and further police investigations, the suspect's allegation was supported and he was not prosecuted. PMID:12935514

Hida, Y; Kudo, K; Ikeda, N

1999-09-01

358

Dissolved organic matter enhances transport of PAHs to aquatic organisms.  

PubMed

In this study, the uptake of pyrene and benzo[b]fluoranthene by an aquatic worm (Lumbriculus variegatus) and a poly(dimethylsiloxane) coated glass fiber was studied at different humic acid concentrations. The accumulation of pyrene was not affected by the presence of the humic matrix. However, the accumulation rate of benzo[b]fluoranthene increased a factor of 3 for the fiber and a factor of 4 when 55 mg L(-1) dissolved organic carbon was added in the form of humic acid. The difference between the two chemicals can be explained by the higher affinity of benzo[b]fluoranthene for the dissolved humic material. A comparison of modeled transport enhancement of benzo[b]fluoranthene by humic acid and the experimental results suggested that the benzo[b]fluoranthene complexed with the humic phase was not completely labile. PMID:19848124

Ter Laak, Thomas L; Ter Bekke, Martin A; Hermens, Joop L M

2009-10-01

359

Electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids in urine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this paper is to study the relevance of electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS) in\\u000a early morning and random samples of urine of urinary stone patients; 2,000 urine samples were studied. The two parameters\\u000a were correlated with the extent of various urinary concrements. The early morning urine (EMU) and random samples of the patients\\u000a who

Y. M. Fazil Marickar

2010-01-01

360

Ecodynamics and Dissolved Gas Chemistry Routines for Ocean Circulation Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactions between oceanic nitrate ecology and circulation determine the marine distribution of dissolved, climate relevant trace gases such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), and a variety of hydrocarbons. Our group is constructing a suite of ecosystem\\/reaction\\/transport models, which link nitrate to the chemistry of volatiles near the sea–air interface. In this paper, we describe programs which will

Shaoping Chu; Laurie A. Mcnair; Scott Elliott; Chung-chieng A. Lai; Omar A. Hurricane; Richard P. Turco; Richard C. Dugdale

1999-01-01

361

Nicotine Fast Dissolving Films Made of Maltodextrins: A Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work aimed to develop a fast-dissolving film made of low dextrose equivalent maltodextrins (MDX) containing nicotine\\u000a hydrogen tartrate salt (NHT). Particular attention was given to the selection of the suitable taste-masking agent (TMA) and\\u000a the characterisation of the ductility and flexibility under different mechanical stresses. MDX with two different dextrose\\u000a equivalents (DEs), namely DE 6 and DE 12, were

Francesco Cilurzo; Irma E. Cupone; Paola Minghetti; Susanna Buratti; Francesca Selmin; Chiara G. M. Gennari; Luisa Montanari

2010-01-01

362

Flocculation and Air Requirements for Dissolved Air Flotation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bench-scale and pilot-plant studies were used to investigate the effects of flocculation time and floe size on the performance of dissolved air flotation and to determine air requirements for three different types of water supplies. The results show that long flocculation periods are not needed and suggest that floc particles of 10-30 ?m should be prepared for flotation. Two measures

James K. Edzwald; John P. Walsh; Gary S. Kaminski; Howard J. Dunn

1992-01-01

363

The measurement of dissolved organic and particulate carbon in seawater  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is dcscribcd for the rapid dctcrmination of dissolved organic carbon in seawater in concentrations bctwcen 0.1 and 20 mg\\/liter. The oxidation is carried out in sealed glass ampoules using K&Lox as an oxidizing agent after the sample has been freed of inorganic carbon. The resulting CO2 is passed through a nondispcrsive infrared analyzer using nitro- gen as a

DAVID W. MENZEL; RALPH F. VACCARO

1964-01-01

364

Investigating dissolved air flotation performance with cyanobacterial cells and filaments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved air flotation (DAF) performance with two different naturally occurring cyanobacterial morphologies was investigated with respect to the biomass removal efficiency, the toxin release to water and the coagulant demand by different water background natural organic matter (NOM). Coagulation (C)\\/Flocculation (F)\\/DAF bench-scale experiments (2 min coagulation at 380 s?1 with polyaluminium chloride (0.5–4 mg\\/L Al2O3, the dose depending on the water NOM content);

Margarida Ribau Teixeira; Vânia Sousa; Maria João Rosa

2010-01-01

365

Determination of total dissolved solids in water analysis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The figure for total dissolved solids, based on the weight of the residue on evaporation after heating for 1 hour at 180??C., is reasonably close to the sum of the determined constituents for most natural waters. Waters of the carbonate type that are high in magnesium may give residues that weigh less than the sum. Natural waters of the sulfate type usually give residues that are too high on account of incomplete drying.

Howard, C. S.

1933-01-01

366

Dissolved air flotation (DAF) performance at low saturation pressures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved Air (Pressure) Flotation-DAF, is a well-established solid and\\/or liquid\\/liquid separation process that uses micro-bubbles as a carrier phase. Bubbles are formed by a reduction of pressure of a water stream previously saturated with air (gas) at pressures usually higher than 3 atm. In industrial practice, the supersaturated water is forced trough needle valves, and clouds of bubbles having 0.02-0.15

L. A. Féris; J. Rubio

1999-01-01

367

Predicting Dissolved Organic Matter Transport In the Neponset River Watershed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The major source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to coastal waters is often terrestrial dissolved organic matter originating in coastal watersheds and delivered to the ocean by rivers or streams. While studies of carbon cycling in large rivers dominate the literature, small rivers deliver the bulk of the freshwater to coastal waters (~60%). However, the variability of organic matter fluxes in small rivers requires high spatial and temporal resolution measurements to adequately represent the processes controlling distributions and fluxes. In this study, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured monthly for two years at 15 sampling sites throughout a small, coastal, urban watershed (~300 km2), the Neponset River Watershed. CDOM and DOC variability was found to depend on land use type, discharge/precipitation, and growing degree days (temperature). In addition water flow estimated using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to improve estimates based on instantaneous flow measurements. Wetland areas provided the most DOC to the river, and impervious surfaces led to increased variability. Using the combination of geographical information systems (GIS) land use data, seasonal temperatures, rainfall, and modeled flow, DOC concentrations and transport could be estimated throughout the watershed and over the seasonal cycle. Simple statistical models of DOM endmember behavior could explain 40-70% of the observed seasonal variability. Using these simple relationships, trends in total DOM loading behavior can be predicted under various scenarios of land use change and global warming. Overall, detailed measurements of DOM throughout the Neponset River Watershed yield new insights into the watershed processes that affect terrestrial DOM delivery to coastal oceans.

Chen, R. F.; Huang, W.; Wang, D.; Tian, Y. Q.

2009-12-01

368

Chemical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in rainwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), UV absorbance and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy were used to define the chemical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in whole and C18 extracted rainwater. The average total recovery of fluorescence determined from the sum of extract and filtrate fractions relative to the whole was 86% suggesting that 14% of fluorescent CDOM in

Carrie Miller; Kelly G. Gordon; Robert J. Kieber; Joan D. Willey; Pamela J. Seaton

2009-01-01

369

Hydroxyl Radical Production from Irradiated Arctic Dissolved Organic Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydroxyl radical (OH·) plays an important role in the environmental chemistry and biogeochemistry of surface waters. OH·\\u000a acts as a strong oxidant within the irradiated water column, and affects the bioavailability, cycling, and mineralization\\u000a of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the speciation and redox state of important trace metals e.g., iron and copper, and the\\u000a fate of persistent organic pollutants

Amanda M. Grannas; Christopher B. Martin; Yu-Ping Chin; Matthew Platz

2006-01-01

370

The effects of dissolved salt on the Leidenfrost transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, Leidenfrost experiments were conducted for water, NaCl, and KCl aqueous solutions at atmospheric pressure. In our tests, a 1.1g test liquid was gently deposited on a horizontal heated aluminum surface. The evaporation time at various surface temperatures was recorded and plotted as evaporation curves. To examine the relationship between bubble coalescence, dissolved salt and the Leidenfrost transition,

Chen-Kang Huang; Van P. Carey

2007-01-01

371

Variability in dissolved oxygen off Eastern Luzon, Philippines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The eastern coast and shelf of Luzon is a unique area encompassed by the bifurcation of the western boundary North Equatorial Current (NEC) into the Kuroshio and Mindanao Currents. This region is also productive and has become a rich fishing ground. Of interest is how biogeochemistry in this area is influenced by variability in the bifurcation driven by ENSO events, as well as by production and remineralization processes. Results from 2011 and 2012 oceanographic cruises show changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) off Eastern Luzon in both spatial and temporal scales. Between 2011 and 2012, there was a southern shift of the bifurcation latitude. Water masses from the NEC and the Kuroshio Recirculation Gyre (KRG) east of Luzon have inherent low and higher DO concentrations, respectively. A subsurface oxygen minimum layer was seen at 150-200m. Waters with this low dissolved oxygen signature comes from a 400m-deep sill basin (Lamon Deep) off Eastern Luzon. Apart from low ventilation rates, organic matter decomposition contributes to depletion of DO. Proximity of the basin to the coast is evident in the high particulate organic carbon concentration that is delivered from land through run-off and the nearby river. The low DO water is advected offshore and contributes to the spatial variability of DO in the area. Linear regression of particulate organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, and nutrients with AOU strongly correlate organic matter remineralization to the change in DO with depth. The variability in DO off Eastern Luzon is analyzed with the large-scale variability offshore of source waters to determine the relative influence of biogeochemical cycling in the area.

San Diego-McGlone, M.; Escobar, M.; Jacinto, G.; Villanoy, C. L.

2013-12-01

372

Geochemistry and Reactivity of Exported Congo Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Congo River basin drains the second largest area of rainforest in the world and is also the second largest river in terms of catchment size (3,680,000 km2) and freshwater discharge (42,000 m3 s- 1). Congo riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export is estimated at 12.4 Tg DOC yr -1 or approximately 5 % of global riverine DOC export to

R. G. Spencer; A. P. Stubbins; P. J. Hernes; A. K. Aufdenkampe; P. Gulliver; K. Mopper; A. Baker; R. Y. Dyda; J. W. Six

2008-01-01

373

The effect of dissolved magnesium on diffusion creep in calcite  

Microsoft Academic Search

We experimentally tested a series of synthetic calcite marbles with varying amounts of dissolved magnesium in a standard triaxial deformation machine at 300 MPa confining pressure, temperatures between 700 and 850°C, stresses between 2 and 100 MPa, and strain rates between 10?7 and 10?3 s?1. The samples were fabricated by hot isostatic pressing of a mixture of calcite and dolomite

Marco Herwegh; Xiaohui Xiao; Brian Evans

2003-01-01

374

Fluorescent dissolved organic matter in marine sediment pore waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in sediment pore waters from contrasting sites in the Chesapeake Bay and along the mid-Atlantic shelf\\/slope break was studied using three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. Benthic fluxes of FDOM were also examined at the Chesapeake Bay sites. The major fluorescence peaks observed in these pore waters corresponded to those observed in the water column. These included peaks

David J. Burdige; Scott W. Kline; Wenhao Chen

2004-01-01

375

Transformations in dissolved organic carbon through constructed wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constructed wetlands have emerged as a viable option for addressing a wide range of water quality problems, especially in treating wastewater effluent. This paper presents longitudinal profiles in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and structural characteristics across a full-scale wastewater treatment wetland receiving lagoon-treated wastewater (DOC=15–25mg\\/L). DOC removal through the wetland varied seasonally, achieving a maximum net removal of 47%

Michael L. Pinney; Paul K. Westerhoff; Larry Baker

2000-01-01

376

Dissolved inorganic and organic selenium in the Orca Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vertical distributions of Se (IV), Se (VI) and dissolved organic Se have been determined in the oxic and non-sulfide-bearing anoxic zones of the Orca Basin. In the oxic waters, the concentration of Se (IV) increases with depth gradually from 0.25 nmole\\/kg at the surface to a maximum of 0.46 nmole\\/kg at 750 m and then decreases with depth to

Kazufumi Takayanagi; George T. F. Wong

1985-01-01

377

Estival Distribution of Dissolved Metal Concentrations in Liaodong Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstact  The temporal and spatial distributions of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd in surface water of the Liaodong Bay were studied based on samples\\u000a collected at 16 sites in June and August from 2001 to 2005. The temporal distribution showed decreasing trends. The concentrations\\u000a of dissolved metals in the Liaodong Bay were 4.34, 3.21, 31.54, and 0.995 ?g\\/L for Cu, Pb, Zn,

L. Wan; N. B. Wang; Q. B. Li; Z. C. Zhou; B. Sun; K. Xue; Z. Q. Ma; J. Tian; N. Du

2008-01-01

378

Dynamics of dissolved organic nitrogen in subalpine Castle Lake, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations were measured in meso-oligotrophic Castle Lake, California during the ice-free season in 1982, 1983 and 1984. No consistent relationships were found between DON and particulate-N, primary productivity rates or chlorophyll concentrations. However, increases in DON concentrations were observed in the early growing season of 1982 and 1984 when water temperature was rising and a diatom

J. P. Zehr; S. G. Paulsen; R. P. Axler; C. R. Goldman

1988-01-01

379

Mineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus from a shallow eutrophic lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

Release of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) from dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP), concentrated by reverse osmosis of water\\u000a samples from Lough Neagh Northern Ireland, was measured in the presence of enzymes and cultures of lake water bacteria in\\u000a a basal liquid medium adjusted to the pH of lake water (7.6). No hydrolysis of unfractionated DOP was observed in the presence\\u000a of

J. E. Cooper; J. Early; A. J. Holding

1991-01-01

380

Sequestration of Dissolved CO2 in the Oriskany Formation  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at temperatures of 22 and 75 °C and pressures between 100 and 450 bar. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (Chem. Geol. 2003, 193, 257-271). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated. The capacity for the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 was calculated using results of the solubility models, estimation of the density of CO2 saturated brine, and available geographic information system (GIS) information on the formation depth and thickness. Results indicate that the Oriskany formation can hold approximately 0.36 gigatonnes of dissolved CO2 if the full basin is considered. When only the region where supercritical CO2 can exist (temperatures greater than 31° C and pressures greater than 74 bar) is considered, the capacity of the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 is 0.31 gigatonnes. The capacity estimate considering the potential to sequester free-phase supercritical CO2 if brine were displaced from formation pore space is 8.8 gigatonnes in the Oriskany formation.

Dilmore, R.M.; Allen, D.E. (Salem State College, Salem, MA); McCarthy-Jones, J.R.; Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee

2008-04-15

381

A hand-held optical sensor for dissolved oxygen measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hand-held dissolved oxygen optical sensor based on solid-state electronics and highly oxygen-sensitive luminescence material has been developed. Oxygen-sensitive dye absorbed on silica gel particles was dispersed in a 0.2 mm homogenous silicone rubber film (optode membrane) and coated on a 580 nm long-pass filter. The O2-sensitive dye was excited by an ultra-bright blue light-emitting diode and the emission intensity was captured by a silicon photodiode. The long-pass filter efficiently reduced the scattered light from the light source. The emission signal of the optode membrane was converted to the voltage signal which was processed by a single-chip Micyoco controller, and the dissolved oxygen concentration was automatically displayed on a liquid crystal display unit. The developed hand-held optical sensor is a single-piece device which can provide instant and reliable dissolved oxygen measurement. The sensor showed good repeatability, photostability and long-term stability. Satisfactory results were obtained when its analytical performance was compared with that of a typical Clark-type amperometric oxygen electrode. The developed oxygen optical sensor possesses the advantages of portability, low cost and long lifetime.

Xiao, Dan; Mo, Yuanyao; Choi, Martin M. F.

2003-06-01

382

Use of Passive Samplers to Measure Dissolved Organic Contaminants in a Temperate Estuary  

EPA Science Inventory

Measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants can be challenging given their low solubilities and high particle association. However, to perform accurate risk assessments of these chemicals, knowing the dissolved concentration is critical since it is considered to b...

383

75 FR 13556 - Impact of Dissolvable Tobacco Use on Public Health; Request for Comments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Dissolvable Tobacco Use on Public Health; Request for Comments AGENCY...dissolvable tobacco products may impact public health, including such use among children...and can be easily concealed, public health officials have raised...

2010-03-22

384

40 CFR 430.10 - Applicability; description of the dissolving kraft subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Kraft Subcategory...apply to discharges resulting from the production of dissolving pulp at kraft...

2013-07-01

385

Concentration of Dissolved Gases in the Williamette, Cowlitz, and Boise Rivers, 1970-1972.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data on dissolved nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, total gas pressure, and water temperatures are presented for the Willamette, Cowlitz, and Boise rivers. Water samples were taken upstream and downstream of dams and over a wide range of river and dam discharge...

B. H. Monk E. Dawley K. Beiningen

1975-01-01

386

Dissolved Nitrogen Measurements at Clarks Hill Reservoir, Georgia-South Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several oxygen injection systems have been investigated to enhance the dissolved oxygen distribution in the withdrawal zone of a reservoir, thereby increasing the dissolved oxygen concentration in the downstream area. Additionally, oxygen injection could ...

D. H. Merritt D. Leggett

1981-01-01

387

Adsorption of Dissolved Organic Compounds from Seawater Onto Sediment and Manganese Nodule Particles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The removal of dissolved organic compounds from seawater by adsorption onto ferromanganese particles and red clay sediment was investigated. The compounds studied were chosen to represent typical classes of dissolved organic compounds in seawater and cons...

M. R. Petersen D. E. Robertson

1973-01-01

388

Influence of Dissolved Organic Substances in Groundwater on Sorption Behavior of Americium and Neptunium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwat...

M. G. Seitz S. Boggs

1984-01-01

389

Dissolved Oxygen Resources and Waste Assimilative Capacity of the la Grange Pool, Illinois River.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of the dissolved oxygen resources of the La Grange navigation pool in the Illinois River during 1965--1967 provides concepts which can be of assistance to regulatory agencies responsible for making decisions for water quality management. Dissolved...

T. A. Butts D. H. Schnepper R. L. Evans

1970-01-01

390

THE ROLE OF NITROGEN IN CHROMOPHORIC AND FLUORESCENT DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FORMATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Microbial and photochemical processes affect chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) dynamics in the ocean. Some evidence suggests that dissolved nitrogen plays a role in CDOM formation, although this has received little systematic attention in marine ecosystems. Coastal sea...

391

Dissolved Nutrient Retention Dynamics in River Networks: A Modeling Investigation of Transient Flow and Scale Effects  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we use a dynamic network flow model, coupled with a transient storage zone biogeochemical model, to simulate dissolved nutrient removal processes at the channel network scale. We have explored several scenarios in respect of the combination of rainfall variability, and the biological and geomorphic characteristics of the catchment, to understand the dominant controls on removal and delivery of dissolved nutrients (e.g., nitrate). These model-based theoretical analyses suggested that while nutrient removal efficiency is lower during flood events compared to during baseflow periods, flood events contribute significantly to bulk nutrient removal, whereas bulk removal during baseflow periods is less. This is due to the fact that nutrient supply is larger during flood events; this trend is even stronger in large rivers. However, the efficiency of removal during both periods decreases in larger rivers, however, due to (i) increasing flow velocities and thus decreasing residence time, and (ii) increasing flow depth, and thus decreasing nutrient uptake rates. Besides nutrient removal processes can be divided into two parts: in the main channel and in the hyporheic transient storage zone. When assessing their relative contributions the size of the transient storage zone is a dominant control, followed by uptake rates in the main channel and in the transient storage zone. Increasing size of the transient storage zone with downstream distance affects the relative contributions to nutrient removal of the water column and the transient storage zone, which also impacts the way nutrient removal rates scale with increasing size of rivers. Intra-annual hydrologic variability has a significant impact on removal rates at all scales: the more variable the streamflow is, compared to mean discharge, the less nutrient is removed in the channel network. A scale-independent first order uptake coefficient, ke, estimated from model simulations, is highly dependent on the relative size of the transient storage zone and how it changes in the downstream direction, as well as the nature of hydrologic variability.

Ye, Sheng; Covino, Timothy P.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Basu, Nandita; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Shaowen

2012-06-30

392

Variable C : N : P stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter cycling in the Community Earth System Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the ocean's biological carbon pump by providing an advective/mixing pathway for ~ 20% of export production. DOM is known to have a stoichiometry depleted in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compared to the particulate organic matter pool, a~fact that is often omitted from biogeochemical-ocean general circulation models. However the variable C : N : P stoichiometry of DOM becomes important when quantifying carbon export from the upper ocean and linking the nutrient cycles of N and P with that of carbon. Here we utilize recent advances in DOM observational data coverage and offline tracer-modeling techniques to objectively constrain the variable production and remineralization rates of the DOM C / N / P pools in a simple biogeochemical-ocean model of DOM cycling. The optimized DOM cycling parameters are then incorporated within the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC) component of the Community Earth System Model and validated against the compilation of marine DOM observations. The optimized BEC simulation including variable DOM C : N : P cycling was found to better reproduce the observed DOM spatial gradients than simulations that used the canonical Redfield ratio. Global annual average export of dissolved organic C, N, and P below 100 m was found to be 2.28 Pg C yr-1 (143 Tmol C yr-1), 16.4 Tmol N yr-1, and 1 Tmol P yr-1, respectively with an average export C : N : P stoichiometry of 225 : 19 : 1 for the semilabile (degradable) DOM pool. DOC export contributed ~ 25% of the combined organic C export to depths greater than 100 m.

Letscher, R. T.; Moore, J. K.; Teng, Y.-C.; Primeau, F.

2014-06-01

393

Temporal variations in dissolved selenium in Lake Kinneret (Israel)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Selenium is an essential micronutrient for the growth of the dinoflagellate Peridinium gatunense that dominates the spring algal bloom in Lake Kinneret (LK). The relationship between the levels of dissolved selenium species and the occurance of algal blooms in this lake was studied. During algal blooms of P. gatunense in spring and of the blue-green Aphanizomenon ovalisporum in fall (in 1994) the concentration of epilimnetic dissolved organic Se (Se(org)) increased whereas that of selenite (SeIV) decreased, to levels below the limit of detection: 5 ng/l. The disappearance of SeIV during these blooms is attributed to algal uptake and it is suggested that the growth of both algae may have depended on Se(org) regeneration. A budget performed for selenate (SeVI) suggests that this species is also consumed by algae but to a lesser extent than SeIV (in 1994 ~40% of the epilimnetic load). During the stratification period the hypolimnion of Lake Kinneret becomes anoxic, with high levels of dissolved sulfide. The affects of this environment on the distribution of Se oxy-anions, selenite (SeIV) and selenate(SeVI), were also studied. At the onset of thermal stratification (March) about 35% of the lake inventory of both Se oxidized species are entrapped in the hypolimnion. During stages of oxygen depletion and H2S accumulation, SeIV is completely and SeVI partially removed from this layer. The removal is attributed to reduction followed by formation of particulate reduced products, such as elemental selenium Se(o). The ratio between SeVI to total dissolved selenium (SE(T)) in water sources to the lake is ~0.84, about twice the corresponding ratio in the lake (~0.44, during holomixis). In the lake about 75% of annual SeVI inflow from external sources undergoes reduction to selenide (Se-II) and Se(o) through epilimnetic algal assimilation and hypolimnetic anoxic reduction, respectively. It is suggested that the latter oxidation of the dissolved organic selenide released from biogenic particles and of Se(o) only to the tetravalent species is the cause for the lower ratio of SeVI/Se(T) in the lake.

Nishri, A.; Brenner, I. B.; Hall, G. E. M.; Taylor, H. E.

1999-01-01

394

Fate of secondary effluent dissolved organic matter during soil-aquifer treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reduction of mass and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its fractions from\\u000a secondary effluent during laboratory-scale soil-aquifer treatment (SAT) soil columns were studied. Reduction in dissolved\\u000a organic carbon (DOC), absorbance of ultraviolet light at 254 nm (UV-254), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and\\u000a nonbiodegradable dissolved organic carbon (NBDOC) for the bulk DOM averaged 72.35%,

Shuang Xue; QingLiang Zhao; Liangliang Wei; Lina Wang; Zhigang Liu

2007-01-01

395

Dissolved Carbonate Species in Mixed-Volatile Rhyolitic melts: Carbon Speciation Correlates with Dissolved H2O Content  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solubility and speciation of volatiles (H2O, CO2) in silicate melts play an important role in determining magma behavior and properties (e.g. volcanic degassing, viscosity, density, glass transition temperature). Carbon dioxide is an important volatile component to consider because of its abundance in volcanic systems, its potential effect on melt behavior, and its low solubility (relative to H2O) that makes it the primary bubble former at high pressures. In previous volatile solubility and spectroscopic work, carbon dioxide has been observed to dissolve as a molecular CO2 unit in silicic melts (e.g. Blank and Holloway, 1994; Tamic et al, 2001), as a carbonate ion in mafic melts (Fine and Stolper, 1986), while intermediate magma compositions such as andesites contain both species (King et al, 2002). FTIR spectroscopic results from low pressure (400- 600 MPa) piston-cylinder experiments show that a calc-alkaline rhyolite melt saturated with a mixed (H2O + CO2) fluid of known composition, has both molecular CO2 and carbonate species present. Dissolved carbonate is not observed in glasses with less than ~2.5 wt% H2O, but its abundance increases linearly with increasing water content thereafter to ~80% carbonate (relative to total dissolved CO2) at ~6 wt% H2O. These results are consistent with H2O depolymerizing the rhyolite (i.e. making it more basalt-like), thereby favoring the formation of the carbonate species. We speculate that the reasons previous mixed volatile studies on rhyolites (e.g. Tamic et al, 2001; Liu et al, 2004) have not observed dissolved carbonate may include bulk compositional differences (i.e. more or less network modifiers present), different P-T conditions, and/or differing quench rates for the experimental apparatus used. These observations have significant implications for understanding the processes occuring during volatile degassing of explosive rhyolitic volcanic systems that contain both H2O and CO2.

Moore, G.; Roggensack, K.; Holloway, J.

2006-12-01

396

Fiber-optic dissolved oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide sensors using fluorophores encapsulated in sol gel matrices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved CO2 sensing using thin films of fluorophores encapsulated in sol-gel matrices were made and tested. The DO/O2 sensor used ruthenium(II) tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) perchlorate (Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2) as the oxygen sensitive fluorophore and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) sol-gel as the encapsulating matrix material. For the DCO2 sensor, 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) co-doped with sodium bicarbonate was used as the DCO2 sensitive fluorophore-chemical system and diisobutoxy-alumino triethoxysilane (ASE) sol-gel was used as the encapsulating matrix material. It was found that oxygen quenches the excited state Ru(Ph2Phen)Cl 2 by diffusing through the MTMS matrix. Continuous excitation of Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2 during MTMS drying resulted in long, single exponential lifetimes of the metal complex and increased sensor sensitivity. When the sensor was field tested, it was found to have an excellent match compared to conventional titration method for determining dissolved oxygen concentrations and had fast response times. It was determined that this sensor measured the vapor pressure of oxygen rather than the absolute concentration of dissolved oxygen. For DCO2 sensing, it was found that the dynamic response of the senor could be tuned by varying the HPTS to NaHCO3 ratios. The sensor had fast response times compared to other fiber optic DCO 2 sensors reported which typically have response times of minutes.

Kwon, Hyeog-Chan

397

Measurement of Relative Dissolved Gas Concentrations Using Underwater Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The deployment of underwater mass spectrometer (UMS) systems in marine and lacustrine environments has provided chemical data of exceptional temporal and spatial resolution. UMS instruments operate moored, tethered, remotely, or autonomously, allowing users to customize deployments to suit a wide variety of situations. The ability to collect and analyze real-time data enables prompt, intelligent sampling decisions based on observed analyte distributions. UMS systems can simultaneously detect a wide variety of analytes generated by biological, chemical, physical, geothermal and anthropogenic activities. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane separates the sample-stream from the spectrometer's vacuum chamber. This membrane is selective against water and charged species, yet highly permeable to volatile organic compounds (VOC) and simple gases. Current detection limits for dissolved gases and VOCs are on the order of ppm and ppb respectively. Semi-quantitative proof-of-concept applications have included horizontal mapping of gas gradients, characterization of geothermal vent water, and observation of dissolved gas profiles. Horizontal gradients in dissolved gas concentrations were determined in Lake Maggiore, St Petersburg, Florida. The UMS was positioned on a remotely-guided surface vehicle, and real-time gas concentration data were transmitted to shore via wireless ethernet. Real-time observations allowed intensive sampling of areas with strong gas gradients. Oxygen and CO2 exhibited patchy distributions and their concentrations varied inversely, presumably in response to biological activity. The UMS signal for methane depended on the instrument's proximity to organic rich sediments. Geothermal vent water was characterized while the UMS was deployed in Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, on a tethered Eastern Oceanics remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Observations of dissolved vent-gas compositions were obtained to depths of 30m. Distinct differences in dissolved vent-gas compositions at different sites point to diverse geothermal conditions beneath the lake. Oxygen concentrations were low at most vents, while hydrogen sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide concentrations were highly variable. Dissolved gas depth profiles were obtained using the UMS system in Saanich Inlet, Canada. Due to degradation of organic material, the inlet's deep water is typically anoxic, and rich in methane, carbon dioxide, and reduced sulfur compounds. Relative gas concentrations were obtained between the surface and 200m. A thermocline was detected as the instrument entered anoxic bottom water at 100m. Below this depth oxygen signal intensity declined sharply to background levels. In contrast, carbon dioxide increased sharply below 100m until a reproducible maximum was observed at 120m. Methane and hydrogen sulfide increased steadily with depth below 100 m, and exhibited no local maxima. Fully quantitative UMS measurements require characterization of the influence of salinity, and especially temperature and pressure, on the performance of the internal PDMS membrane. Temperature exerts a strong influence on gas diffusion across the PDMS membrane and the behavior of residual gases in the vacuum chamber; therefore, precise thermostating methods must be adopted. Other technical issues being examined in the laboratory include variations in UMS response attributable to pressure-induced membrane compression, and variable hydrodynamic conditions at the sample/membrane boundary. Experiments are being developed to address the issue of calibrating the ion signal intensity for dissolved gas concentrations.

Bell, R. J.; Toler, S.; van Amerom, F. H.; Wenner, P.; Hall, M.; Edkins, J.; Gassig, S.; Short, R.; Byrne, R.

2004-12-01

398

Discoloration of the Wetted Surface in the 6.1D Dissolver.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During a camera inspection of a failed coil in the 6.1D dissolver, an orange discoloration was observed on a portion of the dissolver wall and coils. At the request of H-Canyon Engineering, the inspection video of the dissolver was reviewed by SRNL to ass...

J. I. Mickalonis K. P. Crapse T. S. Rudisill

2013-01-01

399

Using 18O as a Tracer of Oxygen in the Photochemical Alteration of Dissolved Organic Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biogeochemical cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters is affected by numerous processes, including photochemical alteration. Photochemical processes result in the net oxidation and mineralization of DOM concomitant with dissolved oxygen consumption and production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; principally CO2). The photochemical oxygen budget is not well constrained while DIC production accounts for nearly all the

J. A. Davis; A. Stubbins; J. Helms; R. F. Dias; K. Mopper

2006-01-01

400

UTILIZATION OF DISSOLVED NITROGEN BY HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIOPLANKTON: EFFECT OF SUBSTRATE C/N RATIO  

EPA Science Inventory

The significance of dissolved combined amino acids (DCAA), dissolved free amino acids (DFAA), and dissolved DNA (D-DNA) as sources of C and N for marine bacteria in batch cultures with variable substrate C/N ratios was studied. lucose, ammonium, alanine, and phosphate were added ...

401

Procedure for dissolving wolframite in order to determine trace elements by atomic absorption spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analytical procedure for dissolving wolframite in order to determine trace elements by atomic absorption is reported. After decomposition of the mineral by alkaline fusion, the cooled flux is dissolved by heating with aqua regia. The finely crystalline precipitate of tungstite, which forms on standing, is filtered and dissolved by heating with aqua regia. Tungstite forms again in the latter

Silvano Mignardi; Umberto Masi

1995-01-01

402

Dissolved trace elements in the Mississippi River: Seasonal, interannual, and decadal variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

A monthly trace element sampling of the lower Mississippi River, utilizing ultra-clean methods, was conducted from October 1991 to December 1993. Dissolved concentrations were determined for Fe, Mn, Zn, Ph, V, Mo, U, Cu, Ni, Cd, Rb, and Ba. The results show significant seasonal dissolved concentration changes for a number of elements. Specifically, dissolved Mn and Fe are found to

Alan M. Shiller

1997-01-01

403

Biodegradation modelling of a dissolved gasoline plume applying independent laboratory and field parameters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater is a microscale process which is often observed on scales of 100s of metres or larger. Unfortunately, there are no known equivalent parameters for characterizing the biodegradation process at the macroscale as there are, for example, in the case of hydrodynamic dispersion. Zero- and first-order degradation rates estimated at the laboratory scale by model fitting generally overpredict the rate of biodegradation when applied to the field scale because limited electron acceptor availability and microbial growth are not considered. On the other hand, field-estimated zero- and first-order rates are often not suitable for predicting plume development because they may oversimplify or neglect several key field scale processes, phenomena and characteristics. This study uses the numerical model BIO3D to link the laboratory and field scales by applying laboratory-derived Monod kinetic degradation parameters to simulate a dissolved gasoline field experiment at the Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden. All input parameters were derived from independent laboratory and field measurements or taken from the literature a priori to the simulations. The simulated results match the experimental results reasonably well without model calibration. A sensitivity analysis on the most uncertain input parameters showed only a minor influence on the simulation results. Furthermore, it is shown that the flow field, the amount of electron acceptor (oxygen) available, and the Monod kinetic parameters have a significant influence on the simulated results. It is concluded that laboratory-derived Monod kinetic parameters can adequately describe field scale degradation, provided all controlling factors are incorporated in the field scale model. These factors include advective-dispersive transport of multiple contaminants and electron acceptors and large-scale spatial heterogeneities.

Schirmer, Mario; Molson, John W.; Frind, Emil O.; Barker, James F.

2000-12-01

404

The impact of chromophoric dissolved organic matter on the photodegradation of 17?-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in natural waters.  

PubMed

17?-Ethinylestradiol (EE2), the potent estrogen which forms the basic constituent of the contraceptive pill, can undergo degradation in natural waters by sunlight and via secondary reactions initiated by photo-excited dissolved organic matter. The current paper presents the findings of an investigation into the irradiation process of EE2 when dissolved in natural waters. This investigation was carried out under simulated sunlight in samples of sea, river and distilled water at a 17?-ethinylestradiol concentration of 300ngL(-1). Several notes of significance may be made on the basis of these results. Firstly, an enhancement of the degradation, observed in the presence of co-absorbing dissolved organic matter, was shown to be proportional to the absorbance of the sample. Secondly, the kinetics of the process obtained during this investigation were within the range of previously reported findings, despite the fact that significantly higher concentrations of EE2 were used in earlier studies. Finally, the environmental half-life times for 17?-ethynyloestradiol, calculated from the results of the experiments, were found to be one and two days in the top layer of river and sea water respectively. PMID:24997894

Grzybowski, Waldemar; Szyd?owski, Jerzy

2014-09-01

405

Photochemical and microbial transformation of terrestrial dissolved organic matter - Lena River vs. rivers in mid and low latitudes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to assess the fate of riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) in coastal ocean. In that environment after the sedimentation of terrestrial particulate matter and the advective mixing of river water to optically clear marine water, the photochemical transformation of riverine DOM has a large potential for decomposing riverine DOM. For this study, we collected water samples from ten large rivers and carried out laboratory experiments with the river water samples. The potential for the photochemical decomposition of riverine dissolved organic matter was assessed by exposing sterile-filtered river waters to simulated solar radiation. Dark control samples we treated similarly but were not irradiated. The exposures were designed to decompose photochemically chromophoric dissolved organic matter, the major absorber of UV-vis radiation and the primary initiator of the direct photoreactions of DOM. In the end of irradiation, the difference in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon between the irradiated and the dark control sample corresponded to that portion of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decomposable through direct photoreactions to carbon dioxide. In order to assess the amount of DOC phototransformed into biologically available forms, the irradiated and the dark control water samples received indigenous inoculums of riverine microbes and were incubated in the darkness. After a month, the difference in the concentration of DOC between the irradiated and dark control sample was considered to represent the photoreactive portion of DOC, while the residual DOC made up the DOC resistant to photochemical reactions. The photoreactive portion of DOC varied among rivers and was related to the amount of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the water samples. The biological decomposition experiments were extended to last up to one year and predictions about the biodegradability of irradiated and dark control DOM were made by fitting a biodegradability model based on a reactivity continuum to the observed biodegradation of DOC. In the dark control samples, the biodegradation of DOC was moderate, but the irradiation speeded up the decomposition of DOC a lot. The potential photodecomposition of DOM can be realized with a few hundred kilometers from the mouth of those rivers discharging to the mid- or low-latitude ocean. For the DOM of Lena River, the potential photodegradation is realized only partially in the receiving Laptev Sea having seasons with no or little solar radiation and additionally covered by sea ice over most of year.

Vähätalo, A. V.; Aarnos, H.; Paolucci, E. M.; Musibono, D. E.; Khan, S. R.; Gelinas, Y.; Shantz, A.; Huang, Q.; Schneider, W.; Rezende, C. E.; Petrescu, E.; Reader, H. E.

2012-04-01

406

Dissolved Organic Matter Transformations: Implications for Catchment-Scale Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Particulate and dissolved phase lignin parameters are used to understand sources and dynamics of terrigenous organic matter (OM) in freshwater and marine systems. Impacts of catchment properties, such as soil type and mineralogy, vegetation distribution and hydrologic conditions on terrestrial dissolved and particulate biomarker compositions have not been addressed. Our experimental approach deciphers relative contributions of these parameters on bulk DOM compositions. Carbon-normalized lignin yields (?8) are one means to assess contributions of lignin phenols to bulk organic carbon. Ratios of syringyl (S), vanillyl (V) and cinnamyl (C) lignin phenols distinguish angiosperm and gymnosperm woody and nonwoody tissues. Ratios of acids:aldehydes (ad:ac) within vanillyl groups indicate diagenetic alteration of OM. Interpretation of these ratios relies on the fundamental assumption that each lignin compound behaves similarly, despite differences in solubility and sorption. Fractionation due to leaching impacts C:V, ac:al and (?8). C:V ranges from 1/2 to 4 times original plant compositions, increasing proportions of DOM ascribed to nonwoody tissues. Shifts in C:V and S:V due to leaching, suggest that source ratios from plant materials may not be appropriate endmembers for dissolved phases. An ~2-fold increase in ac:al ratios between litters and leachates suggest that dissolved phases are more diagenetically altered than litters, although this is simply due to solubilization. ?8 values, tracking lignin and bulk carbon solubility differences, indicate greater loss of bulk OM relative to lignin for most plant litters. During sorption of leachates to mineral soils, lignin compositional trends are more variable compared to leaching data. Sorption of angiosperm leachates resulted in significant enrichment of S phenols on soils, which would increase the inferred contribution of angiosperms obtained for mixtures. C:V fractionation during sorption decreased in 3 of 4 plant litters studied. In all cases, using lignin source parameters of sorbed material in endmember models would result in significant error without considering sorption. Ac:al ratios of supernatants increased even more suggesting that these are not reliable indicators of diagenetic state in riverine DOM. ?8 values, in this case, are used to indicate preferential uptake of lignin relative to bulk carbon by different soils. Comparisons between leachate and supernatant after sorption are used to trace evolution of lignin phenolic and DOM compositions as a function of their interactions with soils. For example, sequoia supernatant ?8 values were consistently lower than that of leachates, indicating preferential uptake of lignin relative to bulk carbon by soils and thus enrichment of DOM in non-lignin components. While some fractionation effects are consistent across all litter and soil types, modeling fractionation factors for accurate lignin biomarker interpretation will require site-specific information. Leaching and sorption will alter significantly the original plant geochemical signal in terms of source and diagenetic information. Considering the importance of soils as OM sources to rivers, these data will be invaluable toward modeling dissolved OM transformations and biomarker compositional variability in sediments. We demonstrate that careful consideration of catchment properties including vegetation type, soils, and hydrology is necessary to fully access their impact on dissolved and particulate OM compositions and fluxes at the catchment scale.

Robinson, A.; Hernes, P.; Montanez, I.; Eustis, B.

2006-12-01

407

Fluxes of Dissolved Trace Metals Evaluated Using Paired Thorium Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examines the distribution of the long-lived thorium isotopes 232Th and 230Th in the Atlantic Ocean. 232Th in the ocean is derived from the partial dissolution of lithogenic minerals. 230Th is produced at a predictable rate by the decay of uranium, and its subsequent removal by efficient reversible scavenging onto settling particles provides a method to quantify 232Th fluxes to the ocean, and eventually to the seafloor. As such, combining analysis of these two isotopes in seawater has the potential to improve our ability to calculate present and past detrital fluxes to the ocean. Challenges to using this approach are both analytical, for example 232Th contamination issues encountered by many labs during the international GEOTRACES intercalibration, and the lack of systematically collected sample sets. The GEOTRACES program is helping to overcome these issues, giving deeper insights into the processes controlling the sources, sinks and cycling of thorium isotopes in the ocean. In this study, dissolved 232Th was measured in the subtropical North Atlantic, in a region of high Saharan aerosol flux, along the U.S. GEOTRACES section occupied in 2010 and 2011. The section ran from Portugal to Mauritania, under the plume of Saharan dust, and from there via Bermuda to Woods Hole. High concentration of dissolved 232Th were observed in the upper parts of the stations closest to Saharan dust plume as expected for an aerosol supply of lithogenic material to the ocean. However, high dissolved 232Th concentrations were also observed on the western side of the Atlantic basin away from the direct effects of the dust plume indicative of additional surface water lithogenic input sources. Assumptions and prospects for future development will be discussed.

Robinson, L. F.; Huang, K.; Anderson, R. F.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.; Moran, S.

2012-12-01

408

Chemical speciation and transformation of dissolved nitrogen in Lake Michigan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Great Lakes have experienced significant ecological and environmental changes due to increasing anthropogenic influences and the introduction of invasive species. However, changes in nutrient cycling pathways in Lake Michigan remain elusive. Water samples were collected between December 2012 and July 2013 along a transect from the Milwaukee River to open Lake Michigan for the measurements of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, including NO3, NO2, and NH4), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and colloidal organic nitrogen (CON). Concentrations of DIN in river waters decreased from winter to spring, while in Lake Michigan, DIN increased from spring/summer to winter, showing a general decrease from river to lake waters, but homogeneous or slightly increase from surface to deep water in Lake Michigan. Within the DIN pool, NO3 is the predominant species comprising >84%. Concentrations of DON also decreased from river to open lake waters, but less variable or slightly decreased from surface to deep waters in Lake Michigan. These variation trends highlighted the importance of terrestrial contribution of DIN and DON to the lake and possible production of DIN in bottom waters. While DIN predominated the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) pool in both river and lake waters during winter, DON became dominant throughout the entire water column during spring/summer. The imbalance between DON production and DIN consumption during summer suggested that DON could also be derived from particulate nitrogen pool in the water column and other sources. Colloidal organic nitrogen contributed up to 22-56% of the DON pool or 12-32% of the TDN pool in river/coastal waters. Similar to DIN and DON, the abundance of CON also decreased from the Milwaukee River to Lake Michigan, indicating short turnover times of the colloidal N pool and increase the proportion of low-molecular-weight DON in lake waters.

Gao, L.; Guo, L.; Zhou, Z.; Cuhel, R. L.; Aguilar, C.

2013-12-01

409

In vitro determination of aceclofenac Mouth Dissolving Tablets.  

PubMed

In the present study, Mouth Dissolving Tablets (MDTs) of aceclofenac were formulated by direct compression technique. Sodium starch glycolate and crospovidone were employed as superdisintegrants in various concentrations like 2%, 3% and 4% w/w. All prepared tablets were evaluated for weight variation, hardness, drug content, friability, disintegration time, in vitro wetting time and percent drug release. MDTs containing 4% w/w concentration of crospovidone give best results and is therefore considered as the best formula. It has shown 30 s disintegration time, 25 s wetting time and 79.34% in vitro release of drug in 25 min. PMID:24596037

Shobhit, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish Kumar

2013-01-01

410

Carbon Cycle - CDOM Activity: Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this laboratory activity, students investigate chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) through gradual dilution of black, green and chamomile tea. Through this activity, students discover how CDOM can dominate the absorption of sunlight, how sunlight degrades CDOM through photochemical oxidation, and how CDOM levels are related to nutrient status, stratification and mixing of the ocean. Materials needed include coffee mugs, hot water, spoons, and tea. This resource is found in Rising Tides, a journal created for teachers and students reporting on current oceanography research conducted by NASA, NOAA, and university scientists, featuring articles, classroom activities, readings, teacher/student questions, and imagery for student investigation of marine science.

411

Obtaining fast dissolving disintegrating tablets with different doses of melatonin.  

PubMed

Fast dissolving disintegrating tablets (FDDTs) containing different dosages of melatonin have been manufactured for administration to a specific target population: pediatric patients, having potential difficulties taking other oral forms. The lower dosages (3 and 5mg) are intended for epileptic children, migraine prevention, neurodevelopmental disability, sleep disorders and blindness. Dosages of 10 and 60 mg are intended for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Two FDDT groups have been designed, one which has excipients for direct compression and others having direct compression and effervescent excipients. Tablets have been produced having disintegration times of less than 25s and with friability and hardness values that require no special storage or packaging conditions. PMID:24699354

Muñoz, H; Castan, H; Clares, B; Ruiz, M A

2014-06-01

412

Continuous measurement of dissolved sulfide in sewer systems.  

PubMed

Sulfides are particularly problematic in the sewage industry. Hydrogen sulfide causes corrosion of concrete infrastructure, is dangerous at high concentrations and is foul smelling at low concentrations. Despite the importance of sulfide monitoring there is no commercially available system to quantify sulfide in waste water. In this article we report on our use of an in situ spectrometer to quantify bisulfide in waste water and additional analysis with a pH probe to calculate total dissolved sulfide. Our results show it is possible to use existing commercially available and field proven sensors to measure sulfide to mg/l levels continuously with little operator intervention and no sample preparation. PMID:18309215

Sutherland-Stacey, L; Corrie, S; Neethling, A; Johnson, I; Gutierrez, O; Dexter, R; Yuan, Z; Keller, J; Hamilton, G

2008-01-01

413

Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers  

DOEpatents

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01

414

INFLUENCE OF PH, DISSOLVED OXYGEN, SUSPENDED SOLIDS OR DISSOLVED SOLIDS UPON VENTILATORY AND COUGH FREQUENCIES IN THE BLUEGILL 'LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS' AND BROOK TROUT 'SALVELINUS FONTINALIS'  

EPA Science Inventory

Conservative no-effect concentration ranges were estimated for ventilatory and coughing responses of bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis exposed to altered pH, or to changes in dissolved oxygen (DO), suspended solids, or dissolved solids con...

415

The relationship between chromophoric dissolved organic matter and dissolved organic carbon in the European Atlantic coastal area and in the West Mediterranean Sea (Gulf of Lions)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (aCDOM) has been found to be correlated with fluorescence emission (excitation at 355 nm). In the coastal European Atlantic area and in the Western Mediterranean Sea (Gulf of Lions), a significant statistical dependence has been found between aCDOM and fluorescence with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. The relationship shows that, in the

Giovanni M. Ferrari

2000-01-01

416

Relationship between the optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and total concentration of dissolved organic carbon in the southern Baltic Sea region  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absorption and fluorescence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements were performed during three oceanographic surveys in 1994 in the southern Baltic Sea (Polish area of the Baltic Proper). DOC was measured both by high-temperature catalytic oxidation (HTCO) and low-temperature oxidation (LTO) conventional persulphate methods. CDOM fluorescence was shown to be highly correlated with absorption,

Giovanni M. Ferrari; Mark D. Dowell; Stefania Grossi; Cristina Targa

1996-01-01

417

Production of Dissolved Organic Matter During Fungal Wood Rot Decay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved organic matter mediates numerous biogeochemical processes in soil systems impacting subsurface microbial activity, redox chemistry, soil structure, and carbon and nitrogen sequestration. The structure and chemistry of DOM is a function of the inherited chemistry of the source material, the type of microbial action that has occurred, and selective interaction with mineral substrates. The type of fungal decomposition imparted to woody tissue is a major factor in determining the nature of DOM in forest soils. In order to investigate the relationship between fungal decomposition and the nature of DOM in coniferous forest soils we conducted 32-week inoculation studies on spruce sapwood with basidiomycete brown-rot wood decay fungi where leachable dissolved and colloidal organic matter was separated from decayed residue. A detailed examination of the organic fractions was conducted using 13C-labeled tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis, solid-state 13C-NMR, and electrospray mass spectrometry. The progressive stages of microbial decay (cellulolytic and ligninolytic) were manifested in the chemical composition of the DOM which showed an evolution from a composition initially polysaccharide rich to one dominated by mildly oxidized and demethylated lignin. Upon removal of all polysaccharides at 16 weeks the DOM (up to 10% by weight of the original tissue) looked chemically distinct from the degraded residue

Filley, T. R.; Jellison, J.; Goodell, B.; Kelley, S.; Davis, M.

2002-12-01

418

Formulation development and evaluation of mouth dissolving film of domperidone  

PubMed Central

The present investigation was undertaken with the objective of formulating mouth dissolving film(s) of the antiemetic drug Domperidone to enhance the convenience and compliance by the elderly and pediatric patients. Domperidone is a drug of choice in case of nausea and vomiting produced by chemotherapy, migraine headaches, food poisoning and viral infections. It causes dopamine (D2 and D3) receptor blockage both at the chemoreceptor trigger zone and at the gastric level. It shows high first pass metabolism which results in poor bioavailability (10-15%). In view of high first pass metabolism and short plasma half-life it is an ideal candidate for rapid release drug delivery system. The solid dispersions of Domperidone were prepared with the use ?-cyclodextrin in various ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:3) and solubility study was performed to determine the ratio in which solubility of Domperidone was highest (1:3). The selected solid dispersions were then utilized for the preparation of film by solvent casting method utilizing HPMC E15 as a film forming agent and PEG-400 as plasticizer. Five formulae were prepared and were evaluated for their in vitro dissolution characteristics, in vitro disintegration time, and their physico-mechanical properties. The promising film (F1) showed the greatest drug dissolution (more than 75% within 15 min), satisfactory in vitro disintegration time (45 sec) and physico-mechanical properties that are suitable for mouth dissolving films.

Joshi, Pratikkumar; Patel, Harsha; Patel, Vishnu; Panchal, Rushi

2012-01-01

419

Photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic matter in Lake Skjervatjern  

SciTech Connect

Photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) of a moderately humic lake was studied in 0.1 or 0.2 [mu]m filtered water incubated in glass and quartz bottles. The direct measurement of mineralization as an increase of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) proved to be a very useful tool when the concentration of DIC is low. At the lake surface, photochemical mineralization was considerably higher in quartz than glass bottles indicating that UV light is the most important mineralizer of DOM. Because the glass bottles penetrated light well down to 340-350 nm wavelength, the photochemically most intensive part of solar radiation was in the range of UV-B. Higher photochemical mineralization of DOM in hypolimnetic than in the epilimnetic water, irrespective from the small difference in the concentration of DOM, and in water seeping to the lake suggested that photolabile DOM in the epilimnion may slowly become depleted. The results support the hypothesis that photochemical degradation of DOM is an important and predictable factor in the carbon cycling of humic lakes. In addition, photochemical production of low molecular weight substances probably further enhances the mineralization of DOM and deserves evaluation in humic lakes with a large pool of recalcitrant DOM. 22 refs., 6 figs.

Salonen, K.; Vaehaetalo, A. (Univ. of Helsinki, Lammi (Finland))

1994-01-01

420

Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter isolated from rainwater.  

PubMed

Rainwater is a matrix containing extremely low concentrations (in the range of muM C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and for its characterization, an efficient extraction procedure is essential. A recently developed procedure based on adsorption onto XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins in series was used in this work for the extraction and isolation of rainwater dissolved organic matter (DOM). Prior to the isolation and fractionation of DOM, and to obtain sufficient mass for the spectroscopic analyses, individual rainwater samples were batched together according to similar meteorological conditions on a total of three composed samples. The results of the isolation procedure indicated that the resin tandem procedure is not applicable for rainwater DOM since the XAD-4 resin caused samples contamination. On the other hand, the XAD-8 resin allowed DOM recoveries of 39.9-50.5% of the DOC of the original combined samples. This recovered organic fraction was characterized by UV-visible, molecular fluorescence, FTIR-ATR and 1H NMR spectroscopies. The chemical characterization of the rainwater DOM showed that the three samples consist mostly of hydroxylated and carboxylic acids with a predominantly aliphatic character, containing a minor component of aromatic structures. The obtained results suggest that the DOM in rainwater, and consequently in the precursor atmospheric particles, may have a secondary origin via the oxidation of volatile organic compounds from different origins. PMID:19091380

Santos, Patrícia S M; Otero, Marta; Duarte, Regina M B O; Duarte, Armando C

2009-02-01

421

Carbon isotopic characterisation of dissolved organic matter during water treatment.  

PubMed

Water treatment is a series of physio-chemical processes to aid organic matter (OM) removal, which helps to minimise the formation of potentially carcinogenic disinfection by-products and microbial regrowth. Changes in OM character through the treatment processes can provide insight into the treatment efficiency, but radiogenic isotopic characterisation techniques have yet to be applied. Here, we show for the first time that analysis of (13)C and (14)C of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) effectively characterises dissolved OM through a water treatment works. At the sites investigated: post-clarification, DOC becomes isotopically lighter, due to an increased proportion of relatively hydrophilic DOC. Filtration adds 'old' (14)C-DOC from abrasion of the filter media, whilst the use of activated carbon adds 'young' (14)C-DOC, most likely from the presence of biofilms. Overall, carbon isotopes provide clear evidence for the first time that new sources of organic carbon are added within the treatment processes, and that treated water is isotopically lighter and typically younger in (14)C-DOC age than untreated water. We anticipate our findings will precipitate real-time monitoring of treatment performance using stable carbon isotopes, with associated improvements in energy and carbon footprint (e.g. isotopic analysis used as triggers for filter washing and activated carbon regeneration) and public health benefits resulting from improved carbon removal. PMID:24075722

Bridgeman, John; Gulliver, Pauline; Roe, Jessie; Baker, Andy

2014-01-01

422

Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Iron in Different Oceanic Basins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The iron oceanic cycle is involved in the global carbon cycle, notably through primary production limitation in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) areas. As for other elements, the study of iron isotopes will help better understanding its oceanic cycle, including tracing its sources to the ocean and studying its speciation (redox, organic and physical). Although several studies reported isotopic data in the marine environment (plankton tows, pore waters, aerosols, seafloor or marginal seas; i.e. Bergquist and Boyle, 2006; Severmann et al., 2006; de Jong et al., 2007), no dissolved iron isotopic data in seawater in the open ocean has been published so far because of the analytical challenge of this measurement due to the very low iron content of seawater combined to a concentrated salt matrix. This work will present the first dissolved iron isotopic composition data from the Southern Ocean (Kerguelen area and Atlantic sector) and from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Preliminary data, from a deep profile (30 to 4000 m depth) in the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean, display small but significant variations around the crustal value (delta57Fe = -0.15 to +0.32 permil relative to IRMM-14). Complementary phases, such as suspended particles, phytoplankton, sediments, pore waters and aerosols will also be presented. These data will be discussed in terms of iron sources to the ocean and/or transfers between different iron reservoirs. Potential applications of this new tracer will be discussed.

Radic, A.; Lacan, F.; Jeandel, C.; Poitrasson, F.; Sarthou, G.

2008-12-01

423

Nicotine fast dissolving films made of maltodextrins: a feasibility study.  

PubMed

This work aimed to develop a fast-dissolving film made of low dextrose equivalent maltodextrins (MDX) containing nicotine hydrogen tartrate salt (NHT). Particular attention was given to the selection of the suitable taste-masking agent (TMA) and the characterisation of the ductility and flexibility under different mechanical stresses. MDX with two different dextrose equivalents (DEs), namely DE 6 and DE 12, were selected in order to evaluate the effect of polymer molecular weight on film tensile properties. The bitterness and astringency intensity of NHT and the suppression effect of several TMA were evaluated by a Taste-Sensing System. The films were characterised in term of NHT content, tensile properties, disintegration time and drug dissolution test. As expected, placebo films made of MDX DE 6 appeared stiffer and less ductile than film prepared using MDX DE 12. The films disintegrated within 10 s. Among the tested TMA, the milk and mint flavours resulted particularly suitable to mask the taste of NHT. The addition of NHT and taste-masking agents affected film tensile properties; however, the effect of the addition of these components can be counterweighted by modulating the glycerine content and/or the MDX molecular weight. The feasibility of NHT loaded fast-dissolving films was demonstrated. PMID:20936440

Cilurzo, Francesco; Cupone, Irma E; Minghetti, Paola; Buratti, Susanna; Selmin, Francesca; Gennari, Chiara G M; Montanari, Luisa

2010-12-01

424

Groundwater-transported dissolved organic nitrogen exports from coastal watersheds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We analyzed groundwater-transported nitrogen (N) exports from 41 watershed segments that comprised 10 Cape Cod, Massachusetts watersheds to test the hypotheses that chemical form of N exports is related to land use and to length of flow paths through watersheds. In the absence of human habitation, these glacial outwash-plain watersheds exported largely dissolved organic N (DON) but at relatively low annual rate. Addition of people to watersheds increased rates of both total dissolved N (TDN) and DON export through groundwater. Percent of TDN as DON in groundwater was negatively related to path length of groundwater through aquifers, but %DON was not significantly related to population density on the watersheds. DON was often the dominant form of N exported from the watersheds, even at high population densities. Our results suggest that natural sources are not entirely responsible for organic N exports from watersheds, but, instead, a substantial portion of anthropogenic N introduced to watersheds is exported as DON. This finding is in disagreement with previous results, which suggest that anthropogenic N is exported from watersheds largely as NO 3- and that DON exported from watersheds is from natural sources. ?? 2006, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

Kroeger, K. D.; Cole, M. L.; Valiela, I.

2006-01-01

425

Hydrology controls dissolved organic matter (DOM) quality and dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Headwater streams are major contributors to carbon cycling. It is therefore of utmost importance to understand the dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its drivers in these ecosystems. Here we present data from more than 4,000 individual DOM measurements from Oberer Seebach, a 3rd-order stream draining a largely pristine alpine catchment (Lunz am See, Austria). We determined the concentration of streamwater and hyporheic dissolved organic carbon and a suite of optical properties of DOM based on a diurnal sampling design over almost three years; we also monitored various hydrological and climate parameters over that same time. Optical properties were determined from absorbance measurements and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling of Excitation emission matrices. We also estimated DOM export fluxes from Oberer Seebach and the contributions of the various chromophoric and fluorescent components to these exports. Preliminary results suggest that DOM in Oberer Seebach was largely of terrigenous origin throughout the year. However during periods of low discharge autochthonous DOM export increased, indicating freshly produced DOM possibly from benthic algae. Hyphoreic and streamwater DOM composition and its dynamics were tightly coupled in time at baseflow, yet displaying higher variability as discharge increased. Our timeseries studies highlight the relevance of the flow regime on the dynamics, origin and composition of DOM in a headwater stream. We discuss these findings in the context of extreme hydrological events on carbon fluxes.

Fasching, Christina; Schelker, Jakob; Ulseth, Amber; Singer, Gabriel; Steniczka, Gertraud; Battin, Tom

2014-05-01

426

Variation in dissolved organic matter controls bacterial production and community composition.  

PubMed

An ongoing debate in ecology revolves around how species composition and ecosystem function are related. To address the mechanistic controls of this relationship, we manipulated the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fed to aquatic bacteria to determine effects on both bacterial activity and community composition. Sites along terrestrial to aquatic flow paths were chosen to simulate movement of DOM through catchments, and DOM was fed to downslope and control bacterial communities. Bacterial production was measured, and DOM chemistry and bacterial community composition (using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA genes) were characterized following incubations. Bacterial production, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-specific bacterial production, and DOC consumption were greatest in mesocosms fed soil water DOM; soil water DOM enhanced lake and stream bacterial production by 320-670% relative to lake and stream controls. Stream DOM added to lake bacteria depressed bacterial production relative to lake controls in the early season (-78%) but not the mid-season experiment. Addition of upslope DOM to stream and lake bacterial communities resulted in significant changes in bacterial community composition relative to controls. In four of five DOM treatments, the bacterial community composition converged to the DOM source community regardless of the initial inoculum. These results demonstrate that shifts in the supply of natural DOM were followed by changes in both bacterial production and community composition, suggesting that changes in function are likely predicated on at least an initial change in the community composition. The results indicate that variation in DOM composition of soil and surface waters influences bacterial community dynamics and controls rates of carbon processing in set patterns across the landscape. PMID:16937646

Judd, Kristin E; Crump, Byron C; Kling, George W

2006-08-01

427

Sources, bioavailability, and photoreactivity of dissolved organic carbon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We analyzed bioavailability, photoreactivity, fluorescence, and isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) collected at 13 stations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during various seasons to estimate the persistence of DOC from diverse shallow water habitat sources. Prospective large-scale wetland restorations in the Delta may change the amount of DOC available to the food web as well as change the quality of Delta water exported for municipal use. Our study indicates that DOC contributed by Delta sources is relatively refractory and likely mostly the dissolved remnants of vascular plant material from degrading soils and tidal marshes rather than phytoplankton production. Therefore, the prospective conversion of agricultural land into submerged, phytoplankton-dominated habitats may reduce the undesired export of DOC from the Delta to municipal users. A median of 10% of Delta DOC was rapidly utilizable by bacterioplankton. A moderate dose of simulated solar radiation (286 W m-2 for 4 h) decreased the DOC bioavailability by an average of 40%, with a larger relative decrease in samples with higher initial DOC bioavailability. Potentially, a DOC-based microbial food web could support ???0.6 ?? 109 g C of protist production in the Delta annually, compared to ???17 ?? 109 g C phytoplankton primary production. Thus, DOC utilization via the microbial food web is unlikely to play an important role in the nutrition of Delta zooplankton and fish, and the possible decrease in DOC concentration due to wetland restoration is unlikely to have a direct effect on Delta fish productivity. ?? Springer 2005.

Stepanauskas, R.; Moran, M. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hollibaugh, J. T.

2005-01-01

428

The Delivery Of Dissolved Organic Carbon From Forest Soils To A Head Water Stream  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The temporal variation of the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a complex mixture of compounds, from hillslopes to the adjacent streams is determined by hydrological and biogeochemical processes that have not been completely quantified. In particular, processes involving differences in the fate and transport of the easily biodegradable fraction of dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and the more recalcitrant fraction of DOC are of ecological importance. We conducted leaching experiments on two vertically oriented in-situ soil cores with different lengths to explore the dynamics of behavior of BDOC and DOC on a forested hillslope at White Clay Creek in southeastern Pennsylvania. A dual-permeability model based on a one-dimensional Richards’ equation coupled with reactive convection-dispersion equations and a heat transport model to characterize the temperature pattern along the core was developed, and used to interpret the experimental data. We also collected storm DOC samples from the stream and from piezometers and wells along a hillslope transect. A two dimensional saturated-unsaturated finite element flow model coupled with a two-dimensional reactive transport model was developed to describe the soil and groundwater flow and the DOC and BDOC responses to precipitation events. Parameters for both the flow and transport models were selected using trial and error calibration first, and then refined using UCODE (USGS). The results show that the models can match the main features of the observed DOC and BDOC patterns under transient soil water flux conditions. Both the simulation and experimental results from this work suggest that the DOC flux declines with depth in the soil profile. DOC, and particularly BDOC, transported from soils to the stream is predominantly from the riparian zone.

Mei, Y.; Hornberger, G. M.; Kaplan, L.; Newbold, J. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.

2010-12-01

429

Modeling the simultaneous transport of silver nanoparticles and dissolved silver ions in water-saturated sand columns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concerns over the potential adverse impacts of nanosilver particles (nAg) on human health and the environment have arisen based upon their widespread use in various commercial and biomedical products. In addition, in situ dissolution of deposited nAg could enhance its environmental impact through the formation of dissolved silver ion (Ag+) plumes. A hybrid mathematical model is presented that simulates the simultaneous reactive transport of nAg/Ag+ in porous media. The simulator couples a Lagrangian Random Walk-based Particle Tracking (RWPT) method for nAg transport with a conventional Eulerian Finite Differencing (FD) scheme for the reactive transport of dissolved solutes. In the absence of oxidants other than dissolved oxygen (DO), nAg is assumed to dissolve via a cooperative oxidation reaction with DO and proton ions (H+), and dissolution is modeled by a first-order kinetic expression. An existing empirical correlation is implemented for evaluation of the dissolution rate constant from physiochemical characteristics of the system and nanoparticles, including solution pH, particle specific surface area (SSA), and temperature. The hybrid modeling approach enables the consideration of different particle size classes and the associated particle-specific dissolution rates. The utility of simulator is demonstrated by modeling results obtained from nAg/ Ag+ transport studies performed in ca. 10.8-cm long borosilicate glass columns with an inside diameter of 2.5 cm. Three column experiments were performed at a constant flow rate, yielding a particle approach velocity of 7.68±0.04 m/day, at dissolved oxygen concentrations ranging from 1.65 mg/L to 8.99 mg/L. A 3 pore volume pulse of nAg suspension, containing 3.17±0.07 mg/L total Ag and 10mM NaNO3 at pH 7.07, was injected into water-saturated columns packed with washed 40-50 mesh Ottawa sand. Following nAg injection, the columns were flushed with nAg-free background solution for an additional 3 pore volumes, which resulted in the retention of ca. 20±2% of the introduced nAg mass. Finally, the columns were flushed for ca. 30 pore volumes with background solution at a lower pH (ca. 4.05) to assess the dissolution of retained nAg particles. Column effluent was sampled periodically and analyzed for both particulate and dissolved silver concentrations. Observed nAg effluent breakthrough data were used to fit a model attachment rate constant for nAg particles. Comparison of model predictions with experimental observations suggests that the hybrid simulator can capture the behavior of both the nAg and Ag+ effluent concentration profiles. A model sensitivity analysis was undertaken to gain additional insight into the potential influence of system physiochemical properties on the fate and transport of nAg and Ag+. Results suggest that an increase in the extent of Ag+ release is facilitated by decreasing flow rate and solution pH, and by increasing particle attachment rate constant, particle SSA and ambient temperature.

Taghavy, A.; Wang, Y.; Mittelman, A.; Becker, M. D.; Pennell, K. D.; Abriola, L. M.

2011-12-01

430

Effects of asynchronous snowmelt on flushing of dissolved organic carbon: A mixing model approach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In many snowmelt-dominated catchments, stream dissolved organic carbon (DOC) levels typically increase rapidly as spring melt commences, peak before maximum discharge, and decrease quickly as melting continues. We present data from Deer Creek (Summit County, CO) that shows this distinctive flushing response of DOC during snowmelt runoff, with DOC stored in landscape soils flushed to the stream in response to infiltrating melt waters. Our prior studies show that asynchronous melting of the snowpack across the landscape causes the spring DOC flush to be initiated at different times throughout the catchment. In this study we quantify characteristics of the asynchronous melt and its effect on DOC flushing. We investigated whether a simple mixing model can be used to capture the essentials of the asynchronous melting of a seasonal snowpack and its controls on DOC transport. We divided the catchment into zones of aspect and elevation, which largely determine spatial and temporal variations in the distribution of snow. TOPMODEL was used to simulate the hydrology in each zone, and the simulated flow paths were routed through a simple DOC mixing model to predict contributions of DOC to the stream. The zonal responses were aggregated to give a predicted response of hydrology and DOC fluxes for the entire catchment. Our results indicate that asynchronous melting-which determines the timing of contributions of discharge and DOC to streamflow from different areas of the landscape-can be quantified using a simple modeling approach. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Boyer, E. W.; Hornberger, G. M.; Bencala, K. E.; McKnight, D. M.

2000-01-01

431

Effectiveness of combined sewer overflow treatment for dissolved oxygen improvement in the Chicago waterways.  

PubMed

An Use Attainability Analysis (UAA) has been initiated to evaluate what water-quality standards can be achieved in the Chicago Waterway System (CWS). There are nearly 200 combined sewer overflow (CSO) locations discharging to the CWS by gravity. Three CSO pumping stations also drain approximately 140 km2. Because of the dynamic nature of the CWS the DUFLOW model that is capable of simulating hydraulics and water-quality processes under unsteady-flow conditions was used to evaluate the effectiveness of water-quality improvement techniques identified by the UAA including CSO treatment. Several CSO treatment levels were applied at gravity flow CSOs to evaluate improvement in dissolved oxygen (DO). The results show that pollutant removal at CSOs improves DO to a certain degree, but it still was not sufficient to bring DO concentrations to 5 mg/L or higher for 90% of the time during wet weather at most locations on the CWS. Flow from the pumping stations results in substantial stress on DO since a huge amount of un-treated water with a high pollution load is discharged into the CWS in a short period of time at a certain location. The simulation results indicate that CSO treatment does not effectively improve DO during wet-weather periods on the CWS. PMID:17711018

Alp, E; Melching, C S; Zhang, H; Lanyon, R

2007-01-01

432

Modeling dissolved organic carbon in temperate forest soils: TRIPLEX-DOC model development and validation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the most active carbon (C) cycling in soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, it receives little attention from the global C budget. DOC fluxes are critical to aquatic ecosystem inputs and contribute to the C balance of terrestrial ecosystems, but few ecosystem models have attempted to integrate DOC dynamics into terrestrial C cycling. This study introduces a new process-based model, TRIPLEX-DOC, that is capable of estimating DOC dynamics in forest soils by incorporating both ecological drivers and biogeochemical processes. TRIPLEX-DOC was developed from Forest-DNDC, a biogeochemical model simulating C and nitrogen (N) dynamics, coupled with a new DOC process module that predicts metabolic transformations, sorption/desorption, and DOC leaching in forest soils. The model was validated against field observations of DOC concentrations and fluxes at white pine forest stands located in southern Ontario, Canada. The model was able to simulate seasonal dynamics of DOC concentrations and the magnitudes observed within different soil layers, as well as DOC leaching in the age sequence of these forests. Additionally, TRIPLEX-DOC estimated the effect of forest harvesting on DOC leaching, with a significant increase following harvesting, illustrating that land use change is of critical importance in regulating DOC leaching in temperate forests as an important source of C input to aquatic ecosystems.

Wu, H.; Peng, C.; Moore, T. R.; Hua, D.; Li, C.; Zhu, Q.; Peichl, M.; Arain, M. A.; Guo, Z.

2014-05-01

433

CLOSE STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN YOUNG, SUBSTRUCTURED, DISSOLVING STAR CLUSTERS: STATISTICS AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-06-01

434

Modeling dissolved organic carbon in temperate forest soils: TRIPLEX-DOC model development and validation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the most active carbon (C) cycling that takes place in soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, it is missing from the global C budget. Fluxes in DOC are critical to aquatic ecosystem inputs and contribute to C balances of terrestrial ecosystems. Only a few ecosystem models have attempted to integrate DOC dynamics into terrestrial C cycling. This study introduces a new process-based model, TRIPLEX-DOC that is capable of estimating DOC dynamics in forest soils by incorporating both ecological drivers and biogeochemical processes. TRIPLEX-DOC was developed from Forest-DNDC, a biogeochemical model simulating C and nitrogen (N) dynamics, coupled with a new DOC process module that predicts metabolic transformations, sorption/desorption, and DOC leaching in forest soils. The model was validated against field observations of DOC concentrations and fluxes at white pine forest stands located in southern Ontario, Canada. The model was able to simulate seasonal dynamics of DOC concentrations and the magnitudes observed within different soil layers, as well as DOC leaching in th