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Sample records for simulating early rheumatoid

  1. [Early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic joint disease which if untreated leads to permanent structural damage and disability. Early diagnosis and therapy are the main requests for good clinical practice. Early diagnosis tools include specific clinical assesment, serological, immunogenetic and radiological evaluation. Disease activity score is cornerstone in clinical assesment, rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are very specific serological parameters. The shared epitope containing HLA-DRB1* alleles represent the most significant genetic risk for RA. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging are very sensitive methods in early phase of disease. PMID:19024271

  2. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  3. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms < 2 years) without respiratory symptoms, who were included in a screening program for lung disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of <80% of predicted, without a significant reduction in the forced vital capacity. The HRCT detected abnormalities in 11 of the 18 patients. Diffuse bronchiectasis was the main finding. An inverse correlation between the anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) levels and DLCO was found. Asymptomatic lung disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels. PMID:26846584

  4. Study: Smoking Hikes Chances of Early Death for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158127.html Study: Smoking Hikes Chances of Early Death for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients But risk declines after ... HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases the chances of early death in people with rheumatoid arthritis, but quitting smoking ...

  5. Biomarkers of early stage osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and musculoskeletal health

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Usman; Anwar, Attia; Savage, Richard S.; Costa, Matthew L.; Mackay, Nicola; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Watts, Richard A.; Winyard, Paul G.; Tarr, Joanna; Haigh, Richard C.; Thornalley, Paul J.; Rabbani, Naila

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no biochemical test for detection of early-stage osteoarthritis (eOA). Tests for early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies require refinement to improve clinical utility. We developed robust mass spectrometric methods to quantify citrullinated protein (CP) and free hydroxyproline in body fluids. We detected CP in the plasma of healthy subjects and surprisingly found that CP was increased in both patients with eOA and eRA whereas anti–CCP antibodies were predominantly present in eRA. A 4-class diagnostic algorithm combining plasma/serum CP, anti-CCP antibody and hydroxyproline applied to a cohort gave specific and sensitive detection and discrimination of eOA, eRA, other non-RA inflammatory joint diseases and good skeletal health. This provides a first-in-class plasma/serum-based biochemical assay for diagnosis and type discrimination of early-stage arthritis to facilitate improved treatment and patient outcomes, exploiting citrullinated protein and related differential autoimmunity. PMID:25788417

  6. Managing early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Systematic overview.

    PubMed Central

    Glazier, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe evidence-based management of patients presenting to family physicians with typical signs and symptoms of recent onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). STUDY SELECTION: Articles for critical review were included if relevant to primary care management of early RA (less than 1 year duration). Sources included MEDLINE from 1966 to December 1995, the reference library of the Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, and conference abstracts. FINDINGS: Evidence from randomized, controlled trials supports the short-term benefit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying agents for rheumatic diseases, intravenous pulse corticosteroid therapy, intra-articular therapy, aerobic exercise, patient education, psychologic intervention, home physiotherapy, home occupational therapy, and rehabilitation programs. Some evidence favours acetaminophen for analgesia, low-dose oral corticosteroids for symptom control, and referral to a rheumatologist. Evidence for rest, ice, and heat for symptom control is conflicting and based on low-quality studies. CONCLUSION: Family physicians play an important role in establishing early and accurate diagnosis of RA, coordinating therapy, and providing ongoing support, education, and monitoring to patients and their families. PMID:8688694

  7. Aggressive treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Jaarsveld, C H M; Jacobs, J; van der Veen, M J; Blaauw, A; Kruize, A; Hofman, D; Brus, H; van Albada-Kuiper..., G A; Heurkens, A; ter Borg, E J; Haanen, H; van Booma-Frankfo..., C; Schenk, Y; Bijlsma, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To compare three therapeutic strategies using slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), for their disease modifying properties, toxicity, and lag time until treatment effect.
METHODS—Patients with recent onset RA from six hospitals were randomly assigned to immediate initiation of one of three treatment strategies: (I) a "mild SAARD with a long lag time" (hydroxychloroquine, if necessary replaced by auranofin); (II) a "potent SAARD with a long lag time" (intramuscular gold, if necessary replaced by D-penicillamine); (III) a "potent SAARD with a short lag time" (methotrexate, if necessary replaced by sulfasalazine). Comparisons included two years of follow up.
RESULTS—All SAARD strategies reduced mean disease activity. A greater percentage of patients improved clinically with strategies II and III than with strategy I: percentages of patients improved on joint score with strategies II and III (79% and 82%, respectively), which was statistically different from strategy I (66%). The same was true for remission percentages: 31% and 24% v 16%, respectively). Longitudinal analysis showed significantly less disability with strategy III, and a lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate with strategy II than with strategy I. In addition, radiological damage after one and two years, was significantly lower in strategies II and III (at two years median scores were 11 and 10 v 14 in strategy I, p<0.05). Toxicity was increased in strategy II compared with the other strategies.
CONCLUSION—Strategy III, comprising methotrexate or sulfasalazine, produced the best results weighing effectiveness and toxicity. Strategy I (hydroxychloroquine or auranofin) was slightly less effective, and strategy II (intramuscular gold or D-penicillamine) was associated with increased toxicity.

 PMID:10834865

  8. Outcomes of early rheumatoid arthritis--the WHO ICF framework.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2013-08-01

    With the establishment of the new American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) 2010 criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to diagnose patients earlier and with the introduction of early and aggressive treatment, the current aim is remission resulting in less functional disability, halting of radiographic damage, less pain, less fatigue and no loss of employment. These outcomes can be related to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (the WHO ICF framework). This framework includes the component body functions, body structures, activities and participation related to the disease. These components are related to each other in a bidirectional way and can be influenced by contextual factors including environmental and personal factors. This framework can be used to describe trends in RA outcomes and the impact of contextual factors on these outcomes. Despite aggressive treatment strategies, patients with RA still experience loss of function, pain and fatigue, and a relatively high proportion of patients have to take sick leave or become work disabled within the first few years of the disease. There is evidence that more stringent definitions of remission lead to greater improvement of outcomes and that the aim should be sustained remission and not just remission. There is, however, a need for a better understanding of the relation between contextual factors and activity and participation outcomes to better guide therapy decisions by rheumatologists and provide information to patients, families and policymakers about the impact of RA on their lives and to the society. The overall aim of this overview is to highlight the important contextual factors and consequences that relate to outcomes typically measured in RA studies and to demonstrate the additional benefits that can be achieved with remission and sustained remission. PMID:24315054

  9. Predictors of functional status in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, L; van Schaardenburg, D; van der Horst-Bru..., I E; Bezemer, P; Dijkmans, B

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To find disease parameters that can predict the functional capacity of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at the first visit to the rheumatologist and one year after entry.
METHODS—Patients referred to the outpatients clinic between 1995 and 1996, with a symptom duration of less than three years and fulfilling the American Rheumatism Association 1987 revised criteria for RA within one year after entry were included. Assessments of the duration of morning stiffness, the Disease Activity Score (DAS: a composite score based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), number of painful and swollen joints and patient global assessment), pain (Visual Analogue Scale), the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) were performed every three months. Possible predictors of the HAQ at entry and after one year were analysed by logistic regression.
RESULTS—133 patients were included in the study. The median duration of complaints was three months (range 0-35) and the median HAQ score at entry was 1.12 (range 0-3). There was no correlation between duration of complaints and the HAQ at entry (r = 0.01). An HAQ score under the 50th percentile at entry could be predicted correctly for 74% of the patients by entry DAS and C reactive protein concentration, and at one year could be predicted correctly for 73% of the patients by entry HAQ and pain score.
CONCLUSION—Disease activity is strongly correlated with a lower functional capacity at entry, whereas disease duration is not. The functional status at entry is a good predictor for functional status at one year. Severity rather than duration of arthritis prompts referral in this cohort.

 PMID:10700432

  10. Sulfasalazine in early rheumatoid arthritis. The Australian Multicentre Clinical Trial Group.

    PubMed

    1992-11-01

    One hundred and five patients with a diagnosis of early nonerosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were randomized to receive enteric coated sulfasalazine as Salazopyrin En-tabs or placebo for 6 months. Sixty-five patients completed this 6 month treatment period. Patients taking sulfasalazine were significantly better than those taking placebo in terms of Ritchie articular index, number of swollen and tender joints and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The sulfasalazine group also demonstrated a significant fall in serum hyaluronic acid, IgM rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein concentration. Side effects leading to withdrawal from treatment occurred in 14 of the sulfasalazine group and 4 of the placebo group. The most common side effects of patients taking sulfasalazine were rashes, liver function test abnormalities and gastrointestinal upsets. Our study demonstrates the efficacy of sulfasalazine in early RA. PMID:1362778

  11. Could Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Resolve After Periodontitis Treatment Only?

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Simonetta; Biondo, Michela I.; Fiorentino, Chiara; Argento, Giuseppe; Paolantonio, Michele; Di Murro, Carlo; Malagnino, Vito A.; Canzoni, Marco; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D’Amelio, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated polyarthritis; currently no pathogenic agent has been identified as a disease trigger. A patient with RA, presumably caused by periodontal infection, whose remission has been observed after periodontitis treatment in absence of specific RA therapy, is reported here for the first time, to our knowledge. A 61-year-old male patient presented migrant arthritis associated with antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens positivity. The clinical features allowed to make RA diagnosis according to the 2010 European League against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology RA classification criteria. X-ray of the second upper molar showed chronic apical periodontitis. After its treatment, arthritis remission has been observed in the absence of specific RA therapy. It has been suggested that periodontitis may have a trigger role in RA pathogenesis. This could be explained by the enzymatic action of Porphyromonas gingivalis, probably leading to break tolerance to collagen. The identification and subsequent treatment of periodontitis should therefore be considered pivotal in RA prophylaxis and management. PMID:25501069

  12. Management of the early and late presentations of rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of Ontario primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Glazier, R H; Dalby, D M; Badley, E M; Hawker, G A; Bell, M J; Buchbinder, R; Lineker, S C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine primary care physicians' management of rheumatoid arthritis, ascertain the determinants of management and compare management with that recommended by a current practice panel. DESIGN: Mail survey (self-administered questionnaire). SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A stratified computer-generated random sample of 798 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of respondents who chose various items in the management of two hypothetical patients, one with early rheumatoid arthritis and one with late rheumatoid arthritis. Scores for investigations, interventions and referrals for each scenario were generated by summing the recommended items chosen by respondents and then dividing by the total number of items recommended in that category. The scores were examined for their association with physician and practice characteristics and physician attitudes. RESULTS: The response rate was 68.3% (529/775 eligible physicians). Recommended investigations were chosen by more than two thirds of the respondents for both scenarios. Referrals to physiotherapy, occupational therapy and rheumatology, all recommended by the panel, were chosen by 206 (38.9%), 72 (13.6%) and 309 (58.4%) physicians respectively for early rheumatoid arthritis. These proportions were significantly higher for late rheumatoid arthritis (p < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis, for early rheumatoid arthritis, internship or residency training in rheumatology was associated with higher investigation and intervention scores, for late rheumatoid arthritis, older physicians had higher intervention scores and female physicians had higher referral scores. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians' investigation of rheumatoid arthritis was in accord with panel recommendations. However, rates of referral to rheumatologists and other health care professionals were very low, especially for the early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. More exposure to

  13. Approaches to the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Lyudmila

    2008-08-01

    This paper reviews recent approaches to treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The literature on treatment the early RA published between 1995 and 2007 was accessed through the PubMed database from the National Library of Medicine. Keywords were 'early rheumatoid arthritis', 'disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs', 'biologic agents' and 'combination therapy'. Only results of trials on human subjects that directly measured the effects of DMARDs or biological agents on clinical, laboratory parameters and radiological progression of early RA were selected. Combination therapy suppresses RA activity and radiological progression more effectively than monotherapy. If better control of RA is evident after 3-6 months of treatment with the combination of DMARDs, one must still decide whether to stop the first DMARD, stop the second, or continue with the combination. Combination therapy biological agents (infliximab, adalimumab) with methotrexate and etanercept therapy alone may induce remission in many patients with early RA. It is a method of choice in patients with an adverse prognosis. The main indications for combination therapy 'standard' DMARDs or combination 1 DMARDs with a biological agent are such variables as detection of a shared epitope, increase of concentration of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, rheumatoid factor, C-reactive protein, 28-joint disease activity score, Sharp score and presence of erosion in joints. The majority of rheumatologists believe that patients with RA should be treated with DMARDs earlier rather than later in the disease process. Further trials should establish the optimal approaches to early RA therapy. PMID:18537958

  14. Intensive treatment with methotrexate in early rheumatoid arthritis: aiming for remission. Computer Assisted Management in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (CAMERA, an open‐label strategy trial)

    PubMed Central

    Verstappen, S M M; Jacobs, J W G; van der Veen, M J; Heurkens, A H M; Schenk, Y; ter Borg, E J; Blaauw, A A M; Bijlsma, J W J

    2007-01-01

    Background To investigate whether intensive treatment with methotrexate (MTX) according to a strict protocol and a computerised decision program is more beneficial compared to conventional treatment with MTX in early rheumatoid arthritis. Methods In a two‐year multicentre open label strategy trial, 299 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis were randomly assigned to the intensive strategy group or the conventional strategy group. Patients in both groups received MTX, the aim of treatment being remission. Patients in the intensive treatment group came to the outpatient clinic once every month; adjustment of the MTX dosage was tailored to the individual patient on the basis of predefined response criteria, using a computerised decision program. Patients of the conventional strategy group came to the outpatient clinic once every three months; they were treated according to common practice. Cyclosporine was added if patients had an inadequate response to maximal tolerated MTX doses. Results Seventy six (50%) patients in the intensive strategy group achieved at least one period of remission during the two year trial, versus 55 patients (37%) in the conventional strategy group (p = 0.03). Areas under the curve for nearly all clinical variables were significantly lower—that is, there was a better clinical effect for the intensive treatment group compared with the conventional treatment group. Conclusion The results of this study show that it is possible to substantially enhance the clinical efficacy early in the course of the disease by intensifying treatment with MTX, aiming for remission, tailored to the individual patient. Furthermore, participating rheumatologists indicated that the computerised decision program could be a helpful tool in their daily clinical practice. PMID:17519278

  15. Remission-induction therapies for early rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Francisco; Fabre, Sylvie; Pers, Yves-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Recent guidelines on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) point to the importance of achieving remission as soon as possible during the course of the disease. The appropriate use of antirheumatic drugs is critical, particularly in early RA patients, before 24 weeks, since this is a ‘window of opportunity’ for treatment to modify disease progression. A treat-to-target strategy added to an aggressive therapeutic approach increases the chance of early remission, particularly in early RA patients. We conducted an overview of current therapeutic strategies leading to remission in early RA patients. We also provide interesting predictive factors that can guide the RA management strategy with regard to disease-modifying treatment and/or drug-free remission. PMID:27493689

  16. Bone turnover in early rheumatoid arthritis. 2. Longitudinal bone density studies.

    PubMed Central

    Sambrook, P N; Ansell, B M; Foster, S; Gumpel, J M; Hesp, R; Reeve, J

    1985-01-01

    Serial measurements of bone mineral in 17 ambulant female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of recent onset and 19 age matched female controls were made in the radius by computed tomography and in the vertebrae by dual photon absorptiometry. Loss of trabecular bone from the distal radius was more rapid in RA (p = 0.0014), but there was no difference in the rate of loss of bone mineral from the radial midshaft or lumbar spine compared with the controls. This study is consistent with the hypothesis that the predominant form of bone loss early in the disease is the vicinity of affected joints. PMID:3876077

  17. [The ultrasonography of the capsular ligamentous apparatus of the knee joint in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Huzhevs'kyĭ, I V; Vovchenko, H Ia; Babko, A N

    1999-07-01

    With the purpose of finding out informative value of the ultrasound investigation designed to study the capsular and ligamentous apparatus of the knee joint in its instability during the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis and correlating clinical symptoms with ultrasonographic findings an examination was done of twenty joints of patients in early stages of rheumatoid arthritis presenting with clinical signs of anterior-medial instability. Sonography confirmed the presence of instability and permitted the qualitative assessment of its degree to be done. The method allows us to disclose relative incompetence of the anterior-medial sector of the knee joint in those patients presenting with early stages of rheumatoid arthritis, which is one of causes of instability, with the cruciate and lateral ligaments remaining uninjured. Ultrasonography makes it possible to perform a quantitative assessment of the degree of instability of the joint irrespective of the clinical test used and experience of the orthopedist. PMID:10822686

  18. Genetic Variants Associated with Methotrexate Efficacy and Toxicity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Redden, David T.; Morgan, Sarah; Baggott, Joseph; Sha, Jin; Moreland, Larry W.; O’Dell, James R.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Mikuls, Ted R.; Bridges, S. Louis; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has emerged as first-line therapy for early moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but individual variation in treatment response remains unexplained. We tested the associations between 863 known pharmacogenetic variants and MTX response in 471 TEAR Trial participants with early RA. Efficacy and toxicity were modeled using multiple regression, adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Penalized regression models were used to test joint associations of markers and/or covariates with the outcomes. The strongest genetic associations with efficacy were in CHST11 (five markers with P <0.003), encoding carbohydrate (chondroitin 4) sulfotransferase 11. Top markers associated with MTX toxicity were in the cytochrome p450 genes CYP20A1 and CYP39A1, solute carrier genes SLC22A2 and SLC7A7, and the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALDH2. The selected markers explained a consistently higher proportion of variation in toxicity than efficacy. These findings could inform future development of personalized therapeutic approaches. PMID:23545897

  19. A historical perspective concerning population-based and clinical studies of early arthritis and early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sokka, T; Pincus, T

    2003-01-01

    Research concerning early arthritis and early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be considered to have begun with population-based studies in the United Kingdom, the United States and Scandinavia, from the late 1950s to the late 1960s. These studies indicated that the majority of people with clinical findings of RA had no evidence of disease 3-5 years later, and that only about 25% to 30% of people in a population who met the criteria for RA had rheumatoid factor. These findings may have contributed to an underestimation of RA until the severity of long-term outcomes of clinical RA were recognized in the 1980s on the basis of clinical cohorts. The first major early RA clinical cohort was established in 1957-1963 in Bath, England. Although results at 3 and even 11 years were not overly unfavorable, by 15 and 20 years most patients had severe outcomes of functional declines and premature mortality. The Middle-sex (UK) early RA cohort established in 1966-1971 indicated that radiographic abnormalities were observed in about 70% of patients by 2 years of disease, and were seen in most patients initially in the feet. The Memphis (Tennessee, USA) early RA cohort established in 1967-1971 suggested that a progressive course of RA is predicted by a higher number of involved joints at baseline. The Lund (Sweden) early RA cohort established in 1985-1989 indicated rather severe long-term outcomes in patients treated according to traditional conservative approaches to use of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The early RA study (ERAS) involving nine National Health Service trusts in the UK was established in 1987-93, and showed associations of education level and socioeconomic status with clinical status. The movement towards early arthritis clinics was given great impetus following the work by Emery in the early 1990s. These studies and others described elsewhere in this supplement have contributed to the foundations for the clinical approach to early arthritis in the

  20. Only high disease activity and positive rheumatoid factor indicate poor prognosis in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis treated with "sawtooth" strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mottonen, T; Paimela, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Kautiainen, H; Ilonen, J; Hannonen, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the prognostic significance of clinical and genetic markers on the outcome of patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated actively with slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs).
METHODS—A total of 142 consecutive patients with early RA (median disease duration of 7 months) were treated according to the "sawtooth" strategy and prospectively followed up for an average of 6.2 years. Several clinical parameters at start as well as genetic markers were related to the functional outcome (ARA Functional class and HAQ disability score) and radiographic joint damage (Larsen's score) at the latest visit.
RESULTS—In logistic regression analysis only Mallya score (including morning stiffness, pain scale, grip strength, Ritchie's articular index, haemoglobin, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) at baseline, and Mallya score and rheumatoid factor (RF) positivity at one year were found to be of significance with respect to the radiographic outcome of the patients. Furthermore, at the latest visit HAQ score was related to radiographic score. At baseline the mean ages of the DR4 positive patients and the patients with RA associated DR alleles were statistically significantly lower than those without the above mentioned risk factors (44 v 49, p=0.03 and 41 v 53, p=0.04, respectively). However, these genetic markers had no prognostic significance on the functional or radiographic outcome of the patients.
CONCLUSION—High clinical disease activity at baseline and RF positivity especially at one year after the institution of SAARD treatment are the best predictors of poor prognosis in early RA. However, from the clinical point of view, the disease outcome of an individual patient with early RA, cannot be predicted accurately enough by present means.

 Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; prognosis; outcome; prediction PMID:9849312

  1. Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Abdul Hadi; Raghavendra Rao, Nidagurthi Guggilla; Avanapu, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of present research was to develop matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam filled in capsule for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam were prepared by direct compression method using microsomal enzyme dependent and pH-sensitive polymers which were further filled into an empty HPMC capsule. To assess the compatibility, FT-IR and DSC studies for pure drug, polymers and their physical mixture were performed. The formulated batches were subjected to physicochemical studies, estimation of drug content, in vitro drug release, drug release kinetics, and stability studies. Results: When FTIR and DSC studies were performed it was found that there was no interaction between lornoxicam and polymers which used. All the physicochemical properties of prepared matrix-mini-tablets were found to be in normal limits. The percentage of drug content was found to be 99.60±0.07%. Our optimized matrix mini-tablets-filled-capsule formulation F30 released lornoxicam after a lag time of 5.02±0.92 hr, 95.48±0.65 % at the end of 8 hr and 99.90±0.83 % at the end of 12 hr. Stability was also found for this formulation as per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Conclusion: A novel colon targeted delivery system of lornoxicam was successfully developed by filling matrix-mini-tablets into an empty HPMC capsule shell for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24967065

  2. Response of early active rheumatoid arthritis to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Wataru; Nishikawa, Kenichiro; Hirose, Masuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory changes (synovitis and bone marrow edema) and destructive changes (bone erosion) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and their relations with disease activity were assessed during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Ten patients with early active RA underwent MRI at 0 and 16 weeks of TNF-inhibitor treatment. The carpal bones of the dominant hand were evaluated by the outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials MRI score for RA. After 16 weeks, the mean disease activity score (DAS 28) decreased significantly from 5.54 to 2.70, while the number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, and inflammatory parameters were also significantly improved. The mean synovitis and marrow edema scores determined by MRI showed a significant decrease from 6.1 to 2.2 and 12.8 to 6.2, respectively, while the annual bone-erosion progression score decreased from 12.6 to 2.0. Although synovitis persisted in some patients, imaging remission was achieved in two patients. In conclusion, TNF-inhibitor therapy achieved an early decrease of disease activity and MRI revealed amelioration of joint destruction. The MRI score for RA is useful for assessing the early response to TNF inhibitors. PMID:18762862

  3. Efficacy of tofacitinib monotherapy in methotrexate-naive patients with early or established rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Roy M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kavanaugh, Arthur F; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Kwok, Kenneth; DeMasi, Ryan; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib monotherapy was previously shown to inhibit structural damage, reduce clinical signs and symptoms of RA, and improve physical functioning over 24 months in methotrexate (MTX)-naive adult patients with RA. In this post hoc analysis, we compared efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in patients with early (disease duration <1 year) versus established (≥1 year) RA. Methods MTX-naive patients ≥18 years with active RA received tofacitinib monotherapy (5 or 10 mg two times a day, or MTX monotherapy, in a 24-month Phase 3 trial. Results Of 956 patients (tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day, n=373; tofacitinib 10 mg two times a day, n=397; MTX, n=186), 54% had early RA. Baseline disease activity and functional disability were similar in both groups; radiographic damage was greater in patients with established RA. At month 24, clinical response rates were significantly greater in patients with early versus established RA in the tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day group. Both tofacitinib doses had greater effects on clinical, functional and radiographic improvements at 1 and 2 years compared with MTX, independent of disease duration. No new safety signals were observed. Conclusions Treatment response was generally similar in early and established RA; significantly greater improvements were observed at month 24 with tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day in early versus established RA. Tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg two times a day demonstrated greater efficacy versus MTX irrespective of disease duration. No difference in safety profiles was observed between patients with early or established RA. Trial registration number NCT01039688; Results. PMID:27493790

  4. Mining Disease Risk Patterns from Nationwide Clinical Databases for the Assessment of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997–2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease. PMID:25875441

  5. Structural and Functional Changes of the Invariant NKT Clonal Repertoire in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Salah; Tocheva, Anna S; Sanderson, Joseph P; Goulston, Lyndsey M; Platten, Helen; Serhal, Lina; Parsons, Camille; Edwards, Mark H; Woelk, Christopher H; Elkington, Paul T; Elliott, Tim; Cooper, Cyrus; Edwards, Christopher J; Gadola, Stephan D

    2015-12-15

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) are potent immunoregulatory T cells that recognize CD1d via a semi-invariant TCR (iNKT-TCR). Despite the knowledge of a defective iNKT pool in several autoimmune conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a clear understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms, including qualitative and structural changes of the human iNKT repertoire at the earlier stages of autoimmune disease, is lacking. In this study, we compared the structure and function of the iNKT repertoire in early RA patients with age- and gender-matched controls. We analyzed the phenotype and function of the ex vivo iNKT repertoire as well as CD1d Ag presentation, combined with analyses of a large panel of ex vivo sorted iNKT clones. We show that circulating iNKTs were reduced in early RA, and their frequency was inversely correlated to disease activity score 28. Proliferative iNKT responses were defective in early RA, independent of CD1d function. Functional iNKT alterations were associated with a skewed iNKT-TCR repertoire with a selective reduction of high-affinity iNKT clones in early RA. Furthermore, high-affinity iNKTs in early RA exhibited an altered functional Th profile with Th1- or Th2-like phenotype, in treatment-naive and treated patients, respectively, compared with Th0-like Th profiles exhibited by high-affinity iNKTs in controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide a mechanism for the intrinsic qualitative defects of the circulating iNKT clonal repertoire in early RA, demonstrating defects of iNKTs bearing high-affinity TCRs. These defects may contribute to immune dysregulation, and our findings could be exploited for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26553073

  6. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA' released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. PMID:27037326

  7. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    PubMed Central

    Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. PMID:27037326

  8. Factors related to radiological damage in 61 Spaniards with early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Richi, P; Balsa, A; Munoz-Fernandez, S; Villaverde, V; Fernandez-Prada, M; Vicario, J; Martin-Mola, E

    2002-01-01

    Methods: Sixty one patients with early RA (<6 months of evolution) were studied. Clinical evaluation and serological, radiological, and genetic studies were performed at disease onset and after one year. Results: Forty one (67%) patients showed erosions in their hands or in their feet, or in both. Subjects with erosive RA had a higher number of swollen joints (SJN; 9 (SD 6) v 6 (3), p=0.008), and rheumatoid factor (RF) positivity was more common (80% v 50%, p<0.02) than those without erosions. Seven (17%) of the 41 patients in the group with erosions had erosions only in their feet. This group had a longer duration of morning stiffness (120 (60) v 72 (52) min, p<0.005), better patient's global assessment of general health (34 (22) v 57 (25), p< 0.05), and lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate (32 (22) v 60 (30) mm/1st h, p <0.05) than the rest of the subjects with erosions, and none of them was in remission after one year. Remission after one year was related to a lack of cortical damage at onset and RF negativity. Conclusions: Radiological damage at disease onset is associated with a worse clinical presentation and RF positivity, which are markers of poor outcome. There is a subgroup of patients, with erosions only in their feet, whose clinical presentation is less aggressive. To identify these cases of early erosive RA, radiographs of the feet should be obtained routinely. PMID:11830438

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  10. A prospective study of renal disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Y; Terai, C; Moriguchi, M; Uesato, M; Kamatani, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—This prospective study was designed to clarify the frequency, causes, and clinical course of renal disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—235 patients (185 women, mean age 49.4 years) with early RA of less than one year's duration were enrolled and assessed monthly. Proteinuria was defined as a positive dipstick result and microscopic haematuria was defined as the presence of ⩾5 red blood cells per high power field. Urinary abnormalities lasting three months or longer were defined as persistent abnormalities.
RESULTS—At entry, 40 patients exhibited haematuria, two had a raised serum creatinine concentration, and none had proteinuria. During the observation period (average 42 months), persistent haematuria was found in 43, persistent proteinuria in 17, and a raised serum creatinine concentration in 14 patients. Persistent proteinuria was caused by drugs in 14 of 17 patients and disappeared in most cases. Risk factors for drug induced proteinuria included a raised C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and age over 50 at entry. Drugs resulted in a raised serum creatinine concentration in eight of 14 patients. The incidence of haematuria at entry did not differ among patients who had been treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, or no drugs. In some patients with isolated haematuria, the haematuria appeared when the activity of RA was high and resolved when it was low.
CONCLUSIONS—This study suggests that a raised serum creatinine concentration or persistent proteinuria in patients with early RA is predominantly drug related whereas, in contrast, isolated haematuria is more directly associated with the activity of the disease process.

 PMID:11247860

  11. How early in the course of rheumatoid arthritis does the excess cardiovascular risk appear?

    PubMed

    Kerola, Anne M; Kauppi, Markku J; Kerola, Tuomas; Nieminen, Tuomo V M

    2012-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which is associated with an increased cardiovascular (CV) burden. Whether the risk is already present at the time of RA diagnosis remains a key area of debate. The aim of this review was to evaluate the existence of both subclinical CV changes, including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, CV risk factors, as well as CV disease manifestations such as coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure and CV death prior to RA diagnosis and during the first few years of the disease. The state of the endothelial function remains controversial in patients with newly diagnosed RA. Studies with impaired brachial artery vasodilatory responses at baseline showed a reversal of the dysfunction after 6-12 months of anti-inflammatory therapy. Morphological evidence of arterial wall atherosclerosis, measured by carotid artery intima-media thickness or the prevalence of carotid plaques, was already present during the first year following RA diagnosis. The risk of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction is increased even prior to and, at the latest, within 1 year of the clinical onset of RA. The prevalence of hypertension was similar among patients with RA and controls. CV mortality may not increase within the first years of RA diagnosis. In conclusion, the CV risk seems to increase sooner after the RA diagnosis than previously thought. In addition to systematic CV risk assessment, patients with early RA might benefit from being targeted with stricter than conventional CV risk prevention and intervention. PMID:22736093

  12. Tocilizumab in early progressive rheumatoid arthritis: FUNCTION, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Burmester, Gerd R; Rigby, William F; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Kelman, Ariella; Dimonaco, Sophie; Mitchell, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ), an anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody, has not previously been evaluated in a population consisting exclusively of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In a double-blind randomised controlled trial (FUNCTION), 1162 methotrexate (MTX)-naive patients with early progressive RA were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to one of four treatment groups: 4 mg/kg TCZ+MTX, 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX, 8 mg/kg TCZ+placebo and placebo+MTX (comparator group). The primary outcome was remission according to Disease Activity Score using 28 joints (DAS28–erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) <2.6) at week 24. Radiographic and physical function outcomes were also evaluated. We report results through week 52. Results The intent-to-treat population included 1157 patients. Significantly more patients receiving 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX and 8 mg/kg TCZ+placebo than receiving placebo+MTX achieved DAS28-ESR remission at week 24 (45% and 39% vs 15%; p<0.0001). The 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX group also achieved significantly greater improvement in radiographic disease progression and physical function at week 52 than did patients treated with placebo+MTX (mean change from baseline in van der Heijde–modified total Sharp score, 0.08 vs 1.14 (p=0.0001); mean reduction in Health Assessment Disability Index, −0.81 vs −0.64 (p=0.0024)). In addition, the 8 mg/kg TCZ+placebo and 4 mg/kg TCZ+MTX groups demonstrated clinical efficacy that was at least as effective as MTX for these key secondary endpoints. Serious adverse events were similar among treatment groups. Adverse events resulting in premature withdrawal occurred in 20% of patients in the 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX group. Conclusions TCZ is effective in combination with MTX and as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with early RA. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01007435 PMID:26511996

  13. Responsiveness of the core set, response criteria, and utilities in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, A; Boers, M; van der Linden, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Validation of responsiveness and discriminative power of the World Health Organisation/International League of Associations for Rheumatology (WHO/ILAR) core set, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and European League for Rheumatology (EULAR) criteria for improvement/response, and other single and combined measures (indices) in a trial in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Ranking of measures by response (standardised response means and effect sizes) and between-group discrimination (unpaired t test and χ2 values) at two time points in the COBRA study. This study included 155 patients with early RA randomly allocated to two treatment groups with distinct levels of expected response: combined treatment, high response; sulfasalazine treatment, moderate response.
RESULTS—At week 16, standardised response means of core set measures ranged between 0.8 and 3.5 for combined treatment and between 0.4 and 1.2 for sulfasalazine treatment (95% confidence interval ±0.25). Performance of patient oriented measures (for example, pain, global assessment) was best when the questions were focused on the disease. The most responsive single measure was the patient's assessment of change in disease activity, at 3.5. Patient utility, a generic health status measure, was moderately (rating scale) to poorly (standard gamble) responsive. Response means of most indices (combined measures) exceeded 2.0, the simple count of core set measures improved by 20% was most responsive at 4.1. Discrimination performance yielded similar but not identical results: best discrimination between treatment groups was achieved by the EULAR response and ACR improvement criteria (at 20% and other percentage levels), the pooled index, and the disease activity score (DAS), but also by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and grip strength.
CONCLUSIONS—Responsiveness and discrimination between levels of response are not identical concepts, and

  14. Computerised versus conventional methodology of radiographic joint destruction assessment in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yinghe; De Hair, Maria J H; Shaib, Yasmin O; van der Heijde, Désirée; Kuchuk, Natalia O; Viergever, Max A; van Laar, Jacob M; Vincken, Koen L; Lafeber, Floris P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare computerised and conventional methodology of radiographic joint destruction assessment in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We investigated the contribution of the 3rd-to-5th carpometacarpal joints (CMC3-5, which are excluded in computerised assessment so far owing to bone overlapping) to total joint space narrowing (JSN) scores in two cohorts of patients with early RA (n=392). Next, we investigated agreement between JSN scoring using single time point individual joint-based method (individual joint of a single time point (IJSTP), reflecting computerised reading) and conventional JSN scoring using the Sharp-van der Heijde (SvdH) method in a cohort of patients with early RA (n=59). We used intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Bland and Altman plots, and linear mixed modelling to analyse differences in progression between two methods. Radiographs were available at baseline, and at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. Results Of all joints affected by JSN at baseline or JSN progression during 2 years of follow-up, 3.9% and 6.6% concerned CMC3-5. Exclusion of CMC3-5 resulted in a decrease of 1.9–4.6% in JSN progression scores during 2 years of follow-up. The ICCs for JSN progression scores using IJSTP with or without CMC3-5 compared with SvdH were 0.71–0.81 and 0.69–0.78 at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. Signal-to-noise ratios for IJSTP-based and SvdH scoring were 0.51 and 0.58, respectively. The progression rate for each year was not statistically significantly different between two scoring methods (p=0.59 and 0.89). Conclusions This study showed that excluding CMC3-5 has limited influence on JSN (progression) scores and showed the feasibility of using IJSTP-based reading for computerised scoring of JSN (progression) in RA. PMID:26688750

  15. The Relationship of Cytokines IL-13 and IL-17 with Autoantibodies Profile in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Cojocaru, Manole; Badea, Ramona Georgiana

    2016-01-01

    Aims. In the present study, we aimed to assess the concentrations of IL-13 and IL-17 in serum of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA), the investigation of correlation between the concentrations of these cytokines and disease activity score, and the concentration of some autoantibodies and the evaluation of the utility of IL-13 and -17 concentration measurements as markers of disease activity. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 30 patients and from 28 controls and analysed parameters. Results. The serum concentrations of IL-13, IL-17, anti-CCP, and IgM-RF were statistically significantly higher in patients with eRA, compared to the controls. IL-13 concentrations in the severe and moderate groups with eRA were statistically higher than in the mild and control groups. Also, in the case of IL-17, serum concentrations increased proportionally with the disease activity of eRA. We observe that concentrations of IL-13 and -17 did not correlate with autoantibodies. IL-17 concentration significantly positively correlated with CRP, while IL-13 concentration significantly negatively correlated with CRP. Disease activity score, DAS28, was strongly positively correlated with levels of ESR and weakly positively correlated with concentrations of anti-RA33 autoantibodies. IL-13 has a higher diagnostic utility than IL-17, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, and anti-CCP as markers of disease activity. Conclusions. The presence of higher IL-13 and IL-17 serum levels in patients, compared with those of controls, confirms that these markers, found with high specificity, might be involved in the pathogenesis of eRA. IL-13 and IL-17 might be of better usefulness in the prediction of eRA activity status than IgM-RF and anti-CCP. PMID:27579330

  16. The Relationship of Cytokines IL-13 and IL-17 with Autoantibodies Profile in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Cojocaru, Manole; Biciuşcă, Viorel; Pădureanu, Vlad; Bogdan, Maria; Badea, Ramona Georgiana; Avramescu, Carmen; Petrescu, Ileana Octavia; Petrescu, Florin; Siloşi, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    Aims. In the present study, we aimed to assess the concentrations of IL-13 and IL-17 in serum of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA), the investigation of correlation between the concentrations of these cytokines and disease activity score, and the concentration of some autoantibodies and the evaluation of the utility of IL-13 and -17 concentration measurements as markers of disease activity. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 30 patients and from 28 controls and analysed parameters. Results. The serum concentrations of IL-13, IL-17, anti-CCP, and IgM-RF were statistically significantly higher in patients with eRA, compared to the controls. IL-13 concentrations in the severe and moderate groups with eRA were statistically higher than in the mild and control groups. Also, in the case of IL-17, serum concentrations increased proportionally with the disease activity of eRA. We observe that concentrations of IL-13 and -17 did not correlate with autoantibodies. IL-17 concentration significantly positively correlated with CRP, while IL-13 concentration significantly negatively correlated with CRP. Disease activity score, DAS28, was strongly positively correlated with levels of ESR and weakly positively correlated with concentrations of anti-RA33 autoantibodies. IL-13 has a higher diagnostic utility than IL-17, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, and anti-CCP as markers of disease activity. Conclusions. The presence of higher IL-13 and IL-17 serum levels in patients, compared with those of controls, confirms that these markers, found with high specificity, might be involved in the pathogenesis of eRA. IL-13 and IL-17 might be of better usefulness in the prediction of eRA activity status than IgM-RF and anti-CCP. PMID:27579330

  17. Detection of bone erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis: 3D ultrasonography versus computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Peluso, G; Bosello, S L; Gremese, E; Mirone, L; Di Gregorio, F; Di Molfetta, V; Pirronti, T; Ferraccioli, G

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasonography (US) is an interesting tool that could improve the traditional approach to musculoskeletal US in rheumatology, due to its virtual operator independence and reduced examination time. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of 3DUS in the detection of bone erosions in hand and wrist joints of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients, with computed tomography (CT) as the reference method. Twenty ERA patients without erosions on standard radiography of hands and wrists underwent 3DUS and CT evaluation of eleven joints: radiocarpal, intercarpal, ulnocarpal, second to fifth metacarpo-phalangeal (MCP), and second to fifth proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of dominant hand. Eleven (55.0%) patients were erosive with CT and ten of them were erosive also at 3DUS evaluation. In five patients, 3DUS identified cortical breaks that were not erosions at CT evaluation. Considering CT as the gold standard to identify erosive patients, the 3DUS sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.9, 0.55, 0.71, and 0.83, respectively. A total of 32 erosions were detected with CT, 15 of them were also observed at the same sites with 3DUS, whereas 17 were not seen on 3DUS evaluation. The majority of these 3DUS false-negative erosions were in the wrist joints. Furthermore, 18 erosions recorded by 3DUS were false positive. The majority of these 3DUS false-positive erosions were located at PIP joints. This study underlines the limits of 3DUS in detecting individual bone erosion, mostly at the wrist, despite the good sensitivity in identifying erosive patients. PMID:26091903

  18. A simple algorithm to predict the development of radiological erosions in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, P.; Harrison, B.; Barrett, E.; Chakravarty, K.; Scott, D.; Silman, A.; Symmons, D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To produce a practical algorithm to predict which patients with early rheumatoid arthritis will develop radiological erosions. DESIGN: Primary care based prospective cohort study. SETTING: All general practices in the Norwich Health Authority, Norfolk. SUBJECTS: 175 patients notified to the Norfolk Arthritis Register were visited by a metrologist soon after they had presented to their general practitioners with inflammatory polyarthritis, and again after a further 12 months. All the patients satisfied the American Rheumatism Association's 1987 criteria for rheumatoid arthritis and were seen by a metrologist within six months of the onset of symptoms. The study population was randomly split into a prediction sample (n = 105) for generating the algorithm and a validation sample (n = 70) for testing it. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predictor variables measured at baseline included rheumatoid factor status, swelling of specific joint areas, duration of morning stiffness, nodules, disability score, age, sex, and disease duration when the patient first presented. The outcome variable was the presence of radiological erosions in the hands or feet, or both, after 12 months. RESULTS: A simple algorithm based on a combination of three variables--a positive rheumatoid factor test, swelling of at least two large joints, and a disease duration of more than three months--was best able to predict erosions. When the accuracy of this algorithm was tested with the validation sample, the erosion status of 79% of patients was predicted correctly. CONCLUSIONS: A simple algorithm based on three easily measured items of information can predict which patients are at high risk and which are at low risk of developing radiological erosions. PMID:8776318

  19. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... RV) is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis. The active vasculitis associated with rheumatoid disease occurs ... a manifestation of “extra-articular” (beyond the joint)rheumatoid arthritis and involves the small and medium-sized arteries ...

  20. Aggressive rheumatoid arthritis registry in Italy. Characteristics of the early rheumatoid arthritis subtype among patients classified according to the ACR criteria.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    The Italian Society of Rheumatology in the year 2000 decided to sponsor the creation of a data base (Registry) of consecutive patients who fulfilled the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. The registry is designed to collect data on the "aggressive" type of RA all over the country in order to determine the percentage of patients who satisfy the established criteria among incident cases of RA and to define the therapeutic approach according to the characteristics of the enrolled patients. Predefined criteria set up by eight recognized opinion leaders on the disease were used by all the centers to create the database. The GIARA registry (Gruppo Italiano Artrite Reumatoide Aggressiva) has now enrolled 706 patients who will be followed up for 24 months. They have been divided into two major subsets--patients with early (< 4 months' disease duration) and late (> 4 months) RA--with the aim of establishing whether differences in clinical, serological, radiographic and therapeutic (DMARDs: disease modifying antirheumatic drugs) parameters may distinguish the two subsets. The major conclusion of this preliminary analysis is that an overall tendency to undertreatment is discernable. PMID:14969064

  1. Timing the therapeutic window of opportunity in early rheumatoid arthritis: proposal for definitions of disease duration in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Raza, Karim; Saber, Tajvur P; Kvien, Tore K; Tak, Paul P; Gerlag, Danielle M

    2012-12-01

    The effects of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the consequences of delayed therapy represent important areas for research. The concept of a 'window of opportunity' is now well established and considerable attention has been paid to when it might close. However, in order to study how long the window of opportunity lasts, the timing of its opening must be precisely defined. An analysis of definitions of 'onset' in clinical studies reveals imprecision and heterogeneity, making accurate assessment of this important concept of the 'window of opportunity' very difficult. In this paper we propose that, in clinical trials in early RA, data on durations since onset of symptoms and onset of joint swelling as well as disease duration based on fulfilment of classification criteria should be routinely presented. PMID:22941769

  2. Sustained improvements in MRI outcomes with abatacept following the withdrawal of all treatments in patients with early, progressive rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Peterfy, Charles; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian P; Combe, Bernard G; DiCarlo, Julie C; Furst, Daniel E; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wong, Dennis A; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess structural damage progression with subcutaneous abatacept (ABA) in the Assessing Very Early Rheumatoid arthritis Treatment (AVERT) trial following abrupt withdrawal of all rheumatoid arthritis (RA) medication in patients achieving Disease Activity Score (DAS)-defined remission or low disease activity. Methods Patients with early, active RA were randomised to ABA plus methotrexate (ABA/MTX) 125 mg/week, ABA 125 mg/week or MTX for 12 months. All RA treatments were withdrawn after 12 months in patients with DAS28 (C reactive protein (CRP)) <3.2. Adjusted mean changes from baseline in MRI-based synovitis, osteitis and erosion were calculated for the intention-to-treat population. Results 351 patients were randomised and treated: ABA/MTX (n=119), ABA (n=116) or MTX (n=116). Synovitis and osteitis improved, and progression of erosion was statistically less with ABA/MTX versus MTX at month 12 (−2.35 vs −0.68, −2.58 vs −0.68, 0.19 vs 1.53, respectively; p<0.01 for each) and month 18 (−1.34 vs −0.49 −2.03 vs 0.34, 0.13 vs 2.0, respectively; p<0.01 for erosion); ABA benefits were numerically intermediate to those for ABA/MTX and MTX. Conclusions Structural benefits with ABA/MTX or ABA may be maintained 6 months after withdrawal of all treatments in patients who have achieved remission or low disease activity. Trial registration number NCT01142726; Results. PMID:26865601

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  4. Chronotherapeutic drug delivery from indomethacin compression coated tablets for early morning pain associated rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Songa Ambedkar; Srikanth, Meka Venkata; Rao, Nali Sreenivasa; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2013-02-01

    As the main intent of delivering maximum concentration of drug available from the dosage form, an oral compression coated tablet (CCT) was intended to develop with a predetermined lag time of 6 hrs before immediate release of drug to target circadian rhythms of rheumatoid arthritis. Solid dispersions are promising approach to enhance drug release, which later will be developed as core tablet formulation and compression coated with polyethylene oxide (PEO WSR 303). Solid dispersions were formulated with different ratio of drug and carrier (sucrose fatty acid esters 1811) using solvent evaporation and melt granulation technique, optimized solid dispersion was formulated as core tablet with different diluents. Optimized core tablet was compression coated with PEO WSR 303 along with a channeling agent (DCL 21, mannitol, HPMC 5 cps and starch 1500). Lag time before immediate release of drug was markedly dependent on weight ratios of polymer and channeling agent used, which ranged from 4 to 12 hrs. Optimized solid dispersion (S9) was used for formulating optimized core tablet formulation (C8). CCT (T8) prepared with core tablet (C8) along with mannitol provided a lag time of 6 hrs with minimum concentration of channeling agent used, which was also supported from the permeability study results. Incompatibility and characterization was confirmed from DSC, XRD, FTIR and SEM studies. Unaltered Cmax and AUC0-t but delayed Tmax following oral ingestion of optimized formulation (T8) to human volunteers indicated clear lag time before immediate release of drug, which is suitable for treating rheumatoid arthritis following circadian rhythm. PMID:22974284

  5. Rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nihat, Akin; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Bridges, Leslie; Johns, Paul; Sofat, Nidhi; Moynihan, Barry

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid meningitis is a rare, potentially treatable condition that can mimic a wide range of neurological conditions, including vascular syndromes and encephalopathies. Despite a concurrent history of rheumatoid arthritis, patients often have no active synovitis. Here we describe a patient with rheumatoid meningitis who presented to a hyperacute stroke unit with dysarthria on waking and transient facial droop. PMID:27029468

  6. The Features of the Synovium in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis According to the 2010 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, Marleen G. H.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Schuller, Yvonne; van de Sande, Gijs P. M.; Wijbrandts, Carla A.; Dinant, Huib J.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It has been shown in early arthritis cohorts that the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) enable an earlier diagnosis, perhaps at the cost of a somewhat more heterogeneous patient population. We describe the features of synovial inflammation in RA patients classified according to these new criteria. Methods At baseline, synovial tissue biopsy samples were obtained from disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naïve early RA patients (clinical signs and symptoms <1 year). Synovial tissue was analyzed for cell infiltration, vascularity, and expression of adhesion molecules. Stained sections were evaluated by digital image analysis. Patients were classified according to the two different sets of classification criteria, autoantibody status, and outcome. Findings Synovial tissue of 69 RA patients according to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria was analyzed: 56 patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA at baseline and 13 who were initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis but fulfilled criteria for RA upon follow up. The synovium at baseline was infiltrated by plasma cells, macrophages, and T cells as well as other cells, and findings were comparable to those when patients were selected based on the 1987 ACR criteria for RA. There was no clear cut difference in the characteristics of the synovium between RA patients initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis and those who already fulfilled classification criteria at baseline. Conclusion The features of synovial inflammation are similar when the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria are used compared to the 1987 ACR criteria. PMID:22574210

  7. Periarticular Osteoporosis Is a Prominent Feature in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Estimation Using Shaft to Periarticular Bone Mineral Density Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Su-Jin; Ahn, Inhye E.; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Park, Kyung-Su; Min, Jun-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to quantify periarticular osteoporosis and investigate its significance in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 106 controls. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine the ratio of shaft to periarticular bone mineral density (BMD) as an index of periarticular demineralization. Periarticular osteoporosis was measured by conventional radiography. The BMDs of shaft and periarticular regions in eight designated areas on proximal phalanges were quantified. Clinical variables were examined to identify risk factors for periarticular osteoporosis. The assessment of periarticular osteoporosis on X-ray images reached a moderate degree of interobserver agreement among four physicians (ĸ = 0.47). For BMD quantification, we designed three types of mathematical formulae: the ratio of shaft to periarticular BMD, the mean of the ratios, and the ratio of the sums. These ratios were significantly higher in the patients with early RA (disease duration ≤ 3 yr) than in controls (P < 0.01). The findings were not as distinctive in patients with established RA. Body mass index, cumulative dose of corticosteroid, and C-terminal telopeptide were correlated with BMD ratios. Conclusively, DXA-assisted localized quantification and BMD ratio calculations are feasible for assessing periarticular demineralization. Periarticular osteoporosis is a relatively distinctive feature of early RA. PMID:23399828

  8. Periarticular osteoporosis is a prominent feature in early rheumatoid arthritis: estimation using shaft to periarticular bone mineral density ratio.

    PubMed

    Moon, Su-Jin; Ahn, Inhye E; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Park, Kyung-Su; Min, Jun-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to quantify periarticular osteoporosis and investigate its significance in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 106 controls. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine the ratio of shaft to periarticular bone mineral density (BMD) as an index of periarticular demineralization. Periarticular osteoporosis was measured by conventional radiography. The BMDs of shaft and periarticular regions in eight designated areas on proximal phalanges were quantified. Clinical variables were examined to identify risk factors for periarticular osteoporosis. The assessment of periarticular osteoporosis on X-ray images reached a moderate degree of interobserver agreement among four physicians (ĸ = 0.47). For BMD quantification, we designed three types of mathematical formulae: the ratio of shaft to periarticular BMD, the mean of the ratios, and the ratio of the sums. These ratios were significantly higher in the patients with early RA (disease duration ≤ 3 yr) than in controls (P < 0.01). The findings were not as distinctive in patients with established RA. Body mass index, cumulative dose of corticosteroid, and C-terminal telopeptide were correlated with BMD ratios. Conclusively, DXA-assisted localized quantification and BMD ratio calculations are feasible for assessing periarticular demineralization. Periarticular osteoporosis is a relatively distinctive feature of early RA. PMID:23399828

  9. Current smoking status is a strong predictor of radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    PubMed Central

    Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Rezaei, Hamed; Geborek, Pierre; Petersson, Ingemar; Ernestam, Sofia; Albertsson, Kristina; Forslind, Kristina; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study clinical predictors for radiographic progression after 1 year in an early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) trial. Methods In the SWEFOT trial population, disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naïve RA patients started methotrexate; 3-month responders (DAS28 <3.2) continued (n=147), while non-responders were randomised to addition of sulfasalazine+hydroxychloroquine (n=130) or infliximab (n=128). X-rays were scored by the Sharp-van der Hejde score (SHS) method and radiographic progression was defined as a ≥5 increase after 1 year. Potential baseline predictors of radiographic progression were tested using multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Results 79 of 311 patients with available radiographs at baseline and follow-up had radiographic progression. The following baseline parameters were independent predictors of radiographic progression at 1 year: baseline erosions (adjusted OR=2.29, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.24), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (adjusted OR per tertile increase=1.72, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.65) and C-reactive protein (adjusted OR per tertile increase=1.52, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.26). Current smoking was an independent predictor of radiographic progression (adjusted OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.06 to 4.45). These results remained after further adjustment for treatment strategy. Three-dimensional matrix including current smoking status, erosions and C-reactive protein tertiles showed a 12–63% risk gradient from patients carrying none compared with all predictors. Rheumatoid factor (RF)/anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) positivity did not significantly predict radiographic progression using SHS increase ≥5 as cut-off. In a secondary exploratory analysis using cut-off >1, both RF and anti-CCP positivity were significant predictors in the unadjusted, but not the adjusted analyses. The other parameters also remained significant using this lower cut-off. Conclusions In addition to previously described

  10. Causal modeling using network ensemble simulations of genetic and gene expression data predicts genes involved in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Heming; McDonagh, Paul D; Bienkowska, Jadwiga; Cashorali, Tanya; Runge, Karl; Miller, Robert E; Decaprio, Dave; Church, Bruce; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Khalil, Iya G; Carulli, John

    2011-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is a key regulator of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNF-α blocker therapies can be very effective for a substantial number of patients, but fail to work in one third of patients who show no or minimal response. It is therefore necessary to discover new molecular intervention points involved in TNF-α blocker treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients. We describe a data analysis strategy for predicting gene expression measures that are critical for rheumatoid arthritis using a combination of comprehensive genotyping, whole blood gene expression profiles and the component clinical measures of the arthritis Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) score. Two separate network ensembles, each comprised of 1024 networks, were built from molecular measures from subjects before and 14 weeks after treatment with TNF-α blocker. The network ensemble built from pre-treated data captures TNF-α dependent mechanistic information, while the ensemble built from data collected under TNF-α blocker treatment captures TNF-α independent mechanisms. In silico simulations of targeted, personalized perturbations of gene expression measures from both network ensembles identify transcripts in three broad categories. Firstly, 22 transcripts are identified to have new roles in modulating the DAS28 score; secondly, there are 6 transcripts that could be alternative targets to TNF-α blocker therapies, including CD86--a component of the signaling axis targeted by Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), and finally, 59 transcripts that are predicted to modulate the count of tender or swollen joints but not sufficiently enough to have a significant impact on DAS28. PMID:21423713

  11. Causal Modeling Using Network Ensemble Simulations of Genetic and Gene Expression Data Predicts Genes Involved in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Heming; McDonagh, Paul D.; Bienkowska, Jadwiga; Cashorali, Tanya; Runge, Karl; Miller, Robert E.; DeCaprio, Dave; Church, Bruce; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Khalil, Iya G.; Carulli, John

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is a key regulator of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNF-α blocker therapies can be very effective for a substantial number of patients, but fail to work in one third of patients who show no or minimal response. It is therefore necessary to discover new molecular intervention points involved in TNF-α blocker treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients. We describe a data analysis strategy for predicting gene expression measures that are critical for rheumatoid arthritis using a combination of comprehensive genotyping, whole blood gene expression profiles and the component clinical measures of the arthritis Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) score. Two separate network ensembles, each comprised of 1024 networks, were built from molecular measures from subjects before and 14 weeks after treatment with TNF-α blocker. The network ensemble built from pre-treated data captures TNF-α dependent mechanistic information, while the ensemble built from data collected under TNF-α blocker treatment captures TNF-α independent mechanisms. In silico simulations of targeted, personalized perturbations of gene expression measures from both network ensembles identify transcripts in three broad categories. Firstly, 22 transcripts are identified to have new roles in modulating the DAS28 score; secondly, there are 6 transcripts that could be alternative targets to TNF-α blocker therapies, including CD86 - a component of the signaling axis targeted by Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), and finally, 59 transcripts that are predicted to modulate the count of tender or swollen joints but not sufficiently enough to have a significant impact on DAS28. PMID:21423713

  12. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  13. Validity of early MRI structural damage end points and potential impact on clinical trial design in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul; Baker, Daniel G; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the construct validity of the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) erosion evaluation as structural damage end point and to assess the potential impact of incorporation in clinical trials. Methods In a randomised trial of early methotrexate-naïve RA (GO-BEFORE), RAMRIS scores were determined from MRIs and van der Heijde-Sharp (vdHS) scores from radiographs, at baseline, week 12, week 24 and week 52. Progression in damage scores was defined as change >0.5. Associations of X-ray and MRI outcomes with clinical features were evaluated for convergent validity. Iterative Wilcoxon rank sum tests and tests of proportion estimated the sample size required to detect differences between combination therapy (methotrexate+golimumab) and methotrexate-monotherapy arms in (A) change in damage score and (B) proportion of patients progressing. Results Patients with early MRI progression had higher DAS28, C reactive protein (CRP) and vdHS at baseline, and higher 2-year HAQ. Associations were similar to those with 1-year vdHS progression. Differences in change in structural damage between treatment arms achieved significance with fewer subjects when 12-week or 24-week MRI erosion score was the outcome (150 patients; 100 among an enriched sample with baseline-synovitis >5) compared with the 52-week vdHS (275 patients). Differences in the proportion progressing could be detected in 234 total subjects with 12-week MRI in an enriched sample whereas 1-year X-ray required between 468 and 1160 subjects. Conclusions Early MRI erosion progression is a valid measure of structural damage that could substantially decrease sample size and study duration if used as structural damage end point in RA clinical trials. PMID:26091907

  14. Pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus disease in a patient receiving low-dose methotrexate for treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shunsuke; Imamura, Fumiya; Koga, Yukinori; Uramoto, Hideshi; Ezaki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Mineharu

    2013-12-01

    A 70-year-old woman with methotrexate (MTX)-refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was referred to our hospital for introduction of biological therapy. On high-resolution computed tomography scans, the patient exhibited abnormal findings such as bronchiectasis and centrilobular small nodules, which were highly suggestive of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease. Although mycobacterial cultures of sputum specimens yielded negative results, cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids grew Mycobacterium abscessus. Frequent follow-up chest radiographs indicated that the patient's pulmonary disease became rapidly worse in 1 month following dose escalation of MTX and administration of low-dose prednisolone. Oral clarithromycin and levofloxacin, chosen on the basis of in vitro susceptibility testing, led to a dramatic recovery from this potentially life-threatening complication. Through our experience with this case, we have learned that (1) pulmonary M. abscessus disease can progress rapidly, even during nonbiological anti-RA therapy; (2) regular follow-up chest radiographs are useful to ensure timely implementation of anti-NTM treatment; (3) bronchoscopic testing should be considered when patients are suspected of pulmonary NTM disease but do not meet the diagnostic criteria; and (4) early isolation, identification, and susceptibility testing of causative NTM species are critical for favorable outcomes. PMID:23430370

  15. The Role of Genetic Variants in CRP in Radiographic Severity in African Americans with Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Danila, Maria I.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Raman, Krishnan; Chen, Lang; Reynolds, Richard J.; Hughes, Laura B.; Arnett, Donna K.; McGwin, Gerald; Szalai, Alexander J.; van der Heijde, Désirée M.; Conn, Doyt; Callahan, Leigh F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Bridges, S. Louis

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the association of CRP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with plasma CRP levels and radiographic severity in African Americans with early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using a cross-sectional case-only design, CRP SNPs were genotyped in two independent sets of African Americans with RA: Consortium for the Longitudinal Evaluation of African Americans with RA (CLEAR 1) and CLEAR 2. Radiographic data and CRP measurements were available in 294 individuals from CLEAR 1 [median (IQR 25-75) disease duration of 1 (0.6-1.6) year] and in 407 persons from CLEAR 2 [median (IQR 25-75) disease duration of 8.9 (3.5 – 17.7) years]. In CLEAR 1, in adjusted models, the minor allele of rs2808630 was associated with total radiographic score [incident rate ratio (IRR) 0.37 (95% CI 0.19-0.74), p value =0.0051]. In CLEAR 2, the minor allele of rs3093062 was associated with increased plasma CRP levels (p value =0.002). For each rs3093062 minor allele, the plasma CRP increased by 1.51 (95% CI 1.15-1.95) mg/dL when all the other covariates remained constant. These findings have important implications for assessment of the risk of joint damage in African Americans with RA. PMID:26226010

  16. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis reveals progression of erosions despite clinical improvement

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, F.; Stewart, N.; Crabbe, J.; Robinson, E.; Yeoman, S.; Tan, P.; McLean, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the progression of joint damage in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist and determine whether this technique can be used to predict prognosis.
METHODS—An inception cohort of 42 early patients has been followed up prospectively for one year. Gadolinium enhanced MRI scans of the dominant wrist were obtained at baseline and one year and scored for synovitis, tendonitis, bone marrow oedema, and erosions. Plain radiographs were performed concurrently and scored for erosions. Patients were assessed clinically for disease activity and HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed.
RESULTS—At one year, MRI erosions were found in 74% of patients (31 of 42) compared with 45% at baseline. Twelve patients (28.6%) had radiographic erosions at one year. The total MRI score and MRI erosion score increased significantly from baseline to one year despite falls in clinical measures of inflammation including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein (CRP), and swollen joint count (p < 0.01 for all). Baseline findings that predicted carpal MRI erosions at one year included a total MRI score of 6 or greater (sensitivity: 93.3%, specificity 81.8%, positive predictive value 93.3%, p = 0.000007), MRI bone oedema (OR = 6.47, p < 0.001), MRI synovitis (OR = 2.14, p = 0.003), and pain score (p = 0.01). Radiological erosions at one year were predicted by a total MRI score at baseline of greater than 13 (OR = 12.4, p = 0.002), the presence of MRI erosions (OR = 11.6, p = 0.005), and the ESR (p = 0.02). If MRI erosions were absent at baseline and the total MRI score was low, radiological erosions were highly unlikely to develop by one year (negative predictive value 0.91 and 0.92 respectively). No association was found between the shared epitope and erosions on MRI (p = 0.4) or radiography (p = 1.0) at one year.
CONCLUSIONS—MRI scans of the dominant wrist are useful

  18. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Tak, Paul Peter; Bay-Jensen, Anne Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP-degraded vimentin and MMP degraded C-reactive protein. We evaluated if biomarkers measuring serum levels of specific sequences of the mentioned fragments would provide further information of diagnostic and/or prognostic processes in early arthritis. Methods Ninety-two early arthritis patients (arthritis duration<1 year, DMARD naïve) were enrolled. Patients either fulfilled the ACR/EULAR2010 criteria for RA (n = 60) or had unclassified arthritis (UA) (n = 32). Patients fulfilling the RA criteria after 2 years follow-up were classified into non-erosive (n = 25), or erosive disease (n = 13). Concentrations of the biomarkers: C1M, C2M, C3M, VICM and CRPM were measured in baseline serum. Results C1M, C3M and CRPM were able to discriminate between the UA and RA baseline diagnosis in 92 patients with an AUROC of 0.64 (95%CI 0.517 to 0.762), 0.73 (95%CI 0.622 to 0.838) and 0.68 (95%CI 0.570 to 0.795). C2M showed a potential for discrimination between non-erosive and erosive disease in 38 patients with an AUROC of 0.75 (95%CI 0.597 to 0.910). All of the applied biomarkers correlated with one or more of the disease activity parameters: DAS28, ESR, CRP, SJC66, TJC68 and/or HAQ. Conclusion This is the first study evaluating the applied biomarkers at this early stage of arthritis. C1M, C3M, CRPM might be the best diagnostic marker, whereas high levels of C2M indicated progression of disease at follow-up in early RA patients. PMID:27019199

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis: early treatment with corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Gary

    2014-02-01

    The family physician plays several important roles in the management of patients with RA by early diagnosis of RA, with initiation of synthetic DMARD therapy, and in long-term follow-up to minimize complications of DMARD therapy and its impact on patient comorbidities. Three recently approved products offer some benefit as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24527481

  20. Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindars, David C.; Davies, Dewi

    1967-01-01

    The routine chest radiographs of more than 21,000 miners from 23 unselected collieries in the East Midlands have been used for a study of rheumatoid pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis (P.M.F.). A broadened radiological concept of rheumatoid pneumoconiosis was used in diagnosis. The prevalence of simple pneumoconiosis categories 1, 2, and 3 was 5·5%, and of P.M.F. 0·59%. There were 55 cases accepted as rheumatoid pneumoconiosis, a prevalence of 0·26%. Thirty-two of these had positive latex fixation or Rose-Waaler tests for rheumatoid factor. The prevalence of P.M.F. was found to increase with increasing simple pneumoconiosis prevalence. A slight correlation between rheumatoid pneumoconiosis and simple pneumoconiosis prevalence was also found, but the bulk of the increase in P.M.F. was due to non-rheumatoid cases. The latter was closely paralleled in incidence by that of category 3 simple pneumoconiosis. Grouped results showed that rheumatoid pneumoconiosis occurred in between 2·3% and 6·2% of all men affected by pneumoconiosis. When examined on a geographical basis all areas exhibited a similar prevalence of rheumatoid cases, with the exception of Mansfield, where there was a significant excess. This excess was not significant when serologically positive cases only were considered. The findings are discussed in the light of the auto-immune theory for the development of massive lesions in the lungs of coal miners. PMID:6076507

  1. Recurrence of cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis following previous fusion: can disease progression be prevented by early surgery?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Peppelman, W C; Kraus, D R; Pollock, B H; Stolzer, B L; Eisenbeis, C H; Donaldson, W F

    1992-09-01

    In a retrospective study, 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had cervical spine fusion were evaluated for recurrence of cervical spine instability and resultant need for further surgery. Recurrence of cervical instability was correlated with initial radiographic abnormality, primary surgical procedure and interval between the 2 surgeries. There were 55 patients who had atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) and required C1-C2 fusion as primary surgery. Three of these patients (5.5%) developed subaxial subluxation (SAS) and had a second procedure after a mean interval of 9 years. Twenty-two patients had AAS with superior migration of the odontoid (AAS-SMO) and had initial surgery of occiput-C3 fusion. Eight of these patients (36%) developed SAS and had a second surgery after a mean interval of 2.6 years. Of the 19 patients with primary radiographic deformity of SAS, one required further surgery for subluxation of an adjacent superior vertebra after a period of 6 years. Fourteen patients had combined deformity of AAS-SMO-SAS, and one required further surgery for SAS after an interval of 22 months. Recurrence of cervical instability following a previous fusion occurred in 15% of these 110 patients. It was seen in 5.5% of patients with initial deformity of AAS vs 36% of patients with AAS-SMO. No patients with C1-C2 fusion for AAS progressed to develop superior migration of the odontoid. We conclude that early C1-C2 fusion for AAS before development of SMO decreases the risk of further progression of cervical spine instability. The pattern of progression of cervical spine involvement, as discussed in the literature, is reviewed. PMID:1433002

  2. A good response to early DMARD treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the first year predicts remission during follow up

    PubMed Central

    Verstappen, S; van Albada-Kuiper..., G A; Bijlsma, J; Blaauw, A; Schenk, Y; Haanen, H; Jacobs, J; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency and duration of remission in the Utrecht rheumatoid arthritis cohort of patients followed since diagnosis, and the clinical and treatment characteristics of patients with remission v those without. Methods: In 1990 the Utrecht rheumatoid arthritis cohort study group started a clinical trial in which patients with recent onset of rheumatoid arthritis (<1 year) were randomised into four treatment groups: hydroxychloroquine (n = 169); intramuscular gold (n = 163); methotrexate (n = 166); and pyramid (n = 64). After two years, rheumatologists were allowed to prescribe any disease modifying antirheumatic drug. Remission was defined as: duration of morning stiffness ⩽15 min, mean VAS pain ⩽10 mm, Thompson joint score ⩽10, and ESR ⩽30 mm/h during at least six months. Cox regression analysis was used to determine baseline clinical, demographic, and treatment predictors of remission. Results: Mean follow up duration was 62 months. Thirty six per cent achieved at least one period of remission. Median duration between diagnosis and the first remission period was 15 months for the intramuscular gold group, 18 months for the methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine groups, and 24 months for the pyramid group (NS). Predictors of remission were early response to initial treatment, less pain, rheumatoid factor negativity, and lower joint score at baseline. Conclusions: After a mean follow up duration of 62 months, only 36% of the patients had fulfilled the remission criteria at least once. A good response to treatment during the first year seems to be independently associated with remission rather than initial treatment alone. PMID:15130899

  3. Reduction in Serum Uric Acid May Be Related to Methotrexate Efficacy in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Data from the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason J.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Dresser, George K.; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Thorne, Carter; Tin, Diane; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C.; Pope, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The mechanism of action of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex. It may increase adenosine levels by blocking its conversion to uric acid (UA). This study was done to determine if methotrexate lowers UA in early RA (ERA). METHODS Data were obtained from Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort, an incident ERA cohort. All ERA patients with serial UA measurements were included, comparing those with methotrexate use vs. no methotrexate exposure (controls). Analyses were exploratory. Patients with concomitant gout or taking UA-lowering therapies were excluded. RESULTS In total, 49 of the 2,524 ERA patients were identified with data available for both pre-methotrexate UA levels and post-methotrexate UA levels (300 µmol/L and 273 µmol/L, respectively; P = 0.035). The control group not taking methotrexate had a mean baseline UA level of 280 µmol/L and a follow-up level of 282 µmol/L (P = 0.448); mean change in UA with methotrexate was −26.8 µmol/L vs. 2.3 µmol/L in the no methotrexate group (P = 0.042). Methotrexate users with a decrease in UA had a disease activity score of 2.37 for 28 joints when compared with the controls (3.26) at 18 months (P = 0.042). Methotrexate users with decreased UA had a lower swollen joint count (SJC) of 0.9 at 18 months, whereas methotrexate users without lowering of UA had an SJC of 4.5 (P = 0.035). Other analyses were not significant. CONCLUSIONS Methotrexate response is associated with lowering of serum UA in ERA compared to nonusers. This may be due to changes in adenosine levels. Methotrexate response is associated with lower UA and fewer swollen joints compared to nonresponders. PMID:27081318

  4. Work disability and state benefit claims in early rheumatoid arthritis: the ERAN cohort

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Sneha; Young, Adam; Kiely, Patrick D.; Walsh, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. RA is an important cause of work disability. This study aimed to identify predictive factors for work disability and state benefit claims in a cohort with early RA. Methods. The Early RA Network (ERAN) inception cohort recruited from 22 centres. At baseline, and during each annual visit, participants (n = 1235) reported employment status and benefits claims and how both were influenced by RA. Survival analysis derived adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and 95% CIs to predict associations between baseline factors and time until loss of employment due to RA or a state benefits claim due to RA. Results. At baseline, 47% of participants were employed and 17% reported claiming benefits due to RA. During follow-up, loss of employment due to RA was reported by 10% (49/475) of the participants and 20% (179/905) began to claim benefits. Independent predictors of earlier work disability were bodily pain (aHR 2.45, 95% CI 1.47, 4.08, P = 0.001) and low vitality (aHR 1.84, 95% CI 1.18, 2.85, P = 0.007). Disability (aHR 1.28, 95% CI 1.02, 1.61, P = 0.033), DAS28 (aHR 1.48, 95% CI 1.05, 2.09, P = 0.026) and extra-articular disease (aHR 1.77, 95% CI 1.17, 2.70, P = 0.007) predicted earlier benefits claims. Conclusion. Work disability and benefits claims due to RA were predicted by different baseline factors. Pain and low vitality predicted work disability. Baseline disability, extra-articular disease manifestations and disease activity predicted new benefits claims due to RA. Future research on interventions targeting these factors could investigate job retention and financial independence. PMID:24241033

  5. Multifactorial intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Løgstrup, Brian Bridal; Giraldi, Annamaria; Graugaard, Christian; Blegvad, Jesper; Thygesen, Tina; Sheetal, Ekta; Svendsen, Lone; Emmertsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular morbidity is a major burden in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we compare the effect of a targeted, intensified, multifactorial intervention with that of conventional treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with early RA fulfilling the 2010 American College of Rheumatology European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria. Methods and analysis The study is a prospective, randomised, open label trial with blinded end point assessment and balanced randomisation (1:1) conducted in 10 outpatient clinics in Denmark. The primary end point after 5 years of follow-up is a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke and cardiac revascularisation. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of patients achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.5 mmol/L, glycated haemoglobin <48 mmol/mol, blood pressure <140/90 mm  Hg for patients without diabetes and <130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes and normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin creatinine ratio <30 mg/g) after 1 year of follow-up and the proportion of patients in each treatment group achieving low RA disease activity after 1 year, defined as a disease activity score C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) <3.2 and a DAS28-CRP score <2.6 after 12, 24 and 60 months. Furthermore, all hospitalisations for acute and elective reasons will be adjudicated by the event committee after 12, 24 and 60 months. Three hundred treatment-naive patients with early RA will be randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either conventional treatment administered and monitored by their general practitioner according to national guidelines (control group) or a stepwise implementation administered and monitored in a quarterly rheumatological nurse-administered set-up of behaviour modification and pharmacological therapy targeting (1) hyperlipidaemia, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycaemia

  6. [The development of a finger joint phantom for the optical simulation of early inflammatory rheumatic changes].

    PubMed

    Prapavat, V; Runge, W; Mans, J; Krause, A; Beuthan, J; Müller, G

    1997-11-01

    In the field of rheumatology, conventional diagnostic methods permit the detection only of advanced stages of the disease, which is at odds with the current clinical demand for the early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Prompted by current needs, we developed a finger joint phantom that enables the optical and geometrical simulation of an early stage of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The results presented here form the experimental basis for an evaluation of new RA diagnostic systems based on near infrared light. The early stage of RA is characterised mainly by a vigorous proliferation of the synovial membrane and clouding of the synovial fluid. Using a double-integrating-sphere technique, the absorption and scattering coefficients (mua, mus') are experimentally determined for healthy and pathologically altered synovial fluid and capsule tissue. Using a variable mixture of Intralipid Indian ink and water as a scattering/absorption medium, the optical properties of skin, synovial fluid or capsule can be selected individually. Since the optical and geometrical properties of bone tissue remain constant in early-stage RA, a solid material is used for its simulation. Using the finger joint phantom described herein, the optical properties of joint regions can be adjusted specifically, enabling an evaluation of their effects on an optical signal--for example, during fluorography--and the investigation of these effects for diagnostically useful information. The experimental foundation for the development of a new optical system for the early diagnosis of RA has now been laid. PMID:9490122

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis drugs. However, because they are very expensive, insurance approval is generally required. Most of them ... rich in fish oils (omega-3 fatty acids). Smoking cigarettes should be stopped. Excessive alcohol should also ...

  8. Profile and course of early rheumatoid arthritis in Morocco: a two-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to establish the profile and the evolution of an early Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohort in the Moroccan population and also to search possible predictor factors of structural progression. Methods Patients with early RA (< 12 months) were enrolled in a 2-year follow-up study. Clinical, biological, immunogenetic, and radiographical data were analyzed at study entry and at 24 months. Presence of radiographic progression was retained when the total score was superior to the smallest detectable difference (SDD) calculated to be 5.4 according the Sharp/van der Heijde (SVDH) method. Results Fifty one patients (88.8% women, mean age of 46.9 [ 24-72 ] ± 10.8 years, mean disease duration of 24 [ 6-48 ] ± 13.9 weeks) were enrolled in this study. 68.6% were illiterate and 19.6% reported at least one comorbid condition. The mean delay in referral for specialist care was 140 [ 7-420 ] ± 43 days. Thirteen patients (62.5%) were IgM or IgA RF positive. HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04 alleles were present respectively in 11.8% and 45.1% of patients. At baseline, 35.3% patients were taking corticosteroids and 7.8% were under conventional DMARDs. At 24 months, 77.2% received a median dose of 5 mg/day of prednisone. Methotrexate (MTX) was the most frequently prescribed DMARD, being taken by 65.2% of patients. 13.6% of patients had stopped their DMARD because of socioeconomic difficulties. Comparison of clinical and biologic parameters between baseline and 24 months thereafter revealed a significant global improvement of the disease status including morning stiffness, pain score, swollen joint count, DAS 28 and HAQ scores, ESR and CRP. Sixteen patients (34.8%) were in remission at 2 years versus no patients at baseline; P < 0.001. Forteen patients (27.5%) had at least one erosion at baseline. Radiographic progression occurred in 33.3% of patients and was associated in univariate analysis to swollen joint count (p = 0.03), total SVDH score (P = 0.04) and joint

  9. Expression of Prostaglandin E2 Enzymes in the Synovium of Arthralgia Patients at Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Early Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Newsum, Elize C.; Maijer, Karen I.; van de Sande, Marleen G. H.; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; van Baarsen, Lisa G. M.; Korotkova, Marina; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul-Peter; Jakobsson, Per-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arthralgia may precede the development of synovial inflammation in autoantibody-positive individuals at risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A major pathway involved in pain is the prostaglandin (PG) E2 pathway. We investigated this pathway in the synovium of individuals with RA-specific autoantibodies and in early arthritis patients. Methods Nineteen autoantibody-positive individuals (IgM-rheumatoid factor and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies) with arthralgia (n=15) and/or a positive family history of RA (n=8), who had been prospectively followed for at least 2 years, were included. In addition, we included early arthritis patients (disease-modifying antirheumatic drug naïve) who after 2 years follow up fulfilled classification criteria for RA (n=63), spondyloarthritis (SpA; n=14), or had unclassified arthritis (UA; n=27). In all subjects we assessed pain and performed synovial biopsy sampling by mini-arthroscopy at baseline. Tissue sections were examined by immunohistochemistry to detect and quantify PGE2 pathway enzymes expression levels (mPGES-1; COX-1 and -2; 15-PGDH). Results In both study groups synovial expression of PGE2 enzymes was not clearly related to pain sensation. Expression levels at baseline were not associated with the development of arthritis after follow up (6 out of 19 autoantibody-positive individuals). However, in early SpA patients the expression levels of mPGES-1 and COX-1 were significantly increased compared to RA and UA patients. Conclusion Pain in autoantibody-positive individuals without synovial inflammation who are at risk of developing RA and in early arthritis patients may be regulated by pathways other than the PGE2 pathway or originate at sites other than the synovium. In contrast, in SpA, the PGE2 pathway may be inherently linked to the pathophysiology/etiology of the disease. PMID:26225917

  10. Motivations for inadequate persistence with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in early rheumatoid arthritis: the patient’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge of factors that contribute to non-persistence with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (NP) is essential to improve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) outcomes. Aims of the study were to investigate patient’s motivations and risk factors for NP in a cohort of early RA patients. Methods Up to September 2012, data from 149 patients, who had at least 1 year of follow-up, at least one drug indication, and at least 2 consecutive six-months-apart rheumatic evaluations that included assessment of compliance were reviewed. NP and patient’s motivations of NP were evaluated according to a questionnaire. NP was defined when patients referred that they had completely stop RA medication, “Sometimes”, “Almost always” or “Always”. Patients had to pay for their medication. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used. Statistical significance was set at a p value of less than 0.05. The study was approved by the internal review board. Results Up to cut-off, 715 questionnaires were applied to 149 patients, who had follow-up of 58.7 ± 27.9 months and were indicated 2.4 ± 0.7 DMARDs/patient/follow-up. Patients were most frequently female (88.6%), middle-aged ([mean ± SD] age of 38.5 ± 12.8 years) with lower-middle/lower socio-economic status (87.9%) and scholarship of 11 ± 3.9 years. Ninety-nine (66.4%) patients were NP and filled 330 questionnaires. Multivariate analysis showed that years of formal education (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.1-1.24, p = 0.03), perception of at least some difficulty to find arthritis medication (OR: 5.68, 95% CI: 2.48-13, p = 0.000) and perception that arthritis medication is expensive (OR: 5.27, 95% CI: 2.1-13.84, p = 0.001) at the first evaluation of patient’s compliance were all predictors of NP. Among the 99 NP patients, 25 (25.3%) were recurrent-NP and accumulated more disease activity. The combination of both reasons of NP (“Because it was not available at the

  11. Early changes in bone mineral density measured by digital X-ray radiogrammetry predict up to 20 years radiological outcome in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in the hand as evaluated by digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) of the second to fourth metacarpal bones has been suggested to predict future joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study's objective was to investigate whether DXR-BMD loss early in the course of the disease predicts the development of joint damage in RA patients followed for up to 20 years. Methods A total of 183 patients (115 women and 68 men) with early RA (mean disease duration, 11 months) included from 1985 to 1989 were followed prospectively (the Lund early RA cohort). Clinical and functional measures were assessed yearly. Joint damage was evaluated according to the Larsen score on radiographs of the hands and feet obtained in years 0 to 5 and years 10, 15 and 20. These radiographs were digitized, and BMD of the second to fourth metacarpal bones was evaluated by DXR. Early DXR-BMD change rate (that is, bone loss) per year calculated from the first two radiographs obtained on average 9 months apart (SD ± 4.8) were available for 135 patients. Mean values of the right and left hand were used. Results Mean early DXR-BMD loss during the first year calculated was -0.023 g/cm2 (SD ± 0.025). Patients with marked bone loss, that is, early DXR-BMD loss above the median for the group, had significantly worse progression of joint damage at all examinations during the 20-year period. Conclusions Early DXR-BMD progression rate predicted the development of joint damage evaluated according to Larsen score at year 1 and for up to 20 years in this cohort of early RA patients. PMID:21345204

  12. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    PubMed

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER)," found on pages 255-263, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Define the purpose of the Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER) study. Review the outcome of the STEER study. DISCLOSURE

  13. Trends in disease modifying antirheumatic drug prescription in early rheumatoid arthritis are influenced more by hospital setting than patient or disease characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Carli, C; Ehlin, A G C; Klareskog, L; Lindblad, S; Montgomery, S M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To characterise temporal trends and factors associated with the prescription of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at the initial consultation in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Data from 2584 patients with early RA at 19 hospitals were extracted from the Swedish Rheumatoid Arthritis Register for the period 1997–2001. Disease characteristics and DMARD prescription at first consultation with the rheumatologist were investigated using cross tabulation and logistic regression. Results DMARD prescriptions, particularly for methotrexate, increased from 1997 to 2001 independently of patient characteristics. Stratification by hospital type showed that patients in district hospitals were less likely to be prescribed DMARDs than those in university hospitals (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.40 to 0.69), p<0.001), independently of confounding factors. Association of the DAS28 with the likelihood of DMARD prescription was greater among patients attending district hospitals (OR = 1.65 (1.34 to 2.02), p<0.001) than those at university hospitals (OR = 1.23 (1.07 to 1.41), p = 0.003) and county hospitals (OR = 1.34 (1.01 to 1.63), p = 0.003). Interaction testing indicated that the difference was significant (p = 0.007). Conclusions Temporal trends in DMARD prescription indicate an increasingly aggressive approach to disease management among Swedish rheumatologists. However, the association of hospital type with DMARD prescription suggests that the adoption of research findings in clinical care varies considerably. PMID:16322085

  14. The Impact of Low-Dose Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatics Drugs (DMARDs) on Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan; Boshnjaku, Shkumbin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis and multisystemic involvement. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low dose of methotrexate on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and methods: This paper follows a retrospective study, which involves 60 female patients with early onset RA diagnosed according to the American Rheumatism Association Criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010). The patients were divided into two groups group I was composed of thirty patients treated with dose of 7.5 mg/weekly methotrexate (MTX), while group II included thirty patients treated with dose of 2 g/daily sulfasalazine (SSZ). The Disease Activity was measured by a combination of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Disease Activity Score (DAS-28). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (L2–4), and femoral neck, was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (Stratos 800). Laboratory findings included: In this study, we found no negative effect on BMD in RA patients treated with low dose MTX in comparison to patients treated with SSZ. There was not observed significant difference in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck or trochanter, of MTX and SSZ patients in the pretreatment phase, nor after 12 months of treatment. No significant change in the biochemical parameters of the both groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of our study, low dose of methotrexate has no negative effect on BMD in premenopausal RA patients. We believe that these results might provide new insights and that further longitudinal studies with larger groups of premenopausal RA patients are required. PMID:27147781

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis reveals a high prevalence of erosions at four months after symptom onset

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, F.; Stewart, N.; Crabbe, J.; Robinson, E.; Yeoman, S.; Tan, P.; McLean, L.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist in detecting early joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—MRI was performed on 42 patients with early RA (median symptom duration of four months). Scans were scored separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists using a newly devised scoring system, which was validated. MRI findings were compared with plain radiography, clinical measures, and HLA-DRB*01/04 genotyping.
RESULTS—Interobserver reliability for the overall MRI score was high (r = 0.81) as was intraobserver reliability (r = 0.94 for observer 1 and 0.81 for observer 2). There was more variation in scoring synovitis (interobserver reliability: r = 0.74). Erosions were detected in 45% of scans (19 of 42), compared with 15% of plain radiographs. The most common site for erosions was the capitate (39%), for synovitis the ulnar aspect of the radiocarpal joint, and for tendonitis, the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. The total MRI score and MRI synovitis score correlated most significantly with C reactive protein (r = 0.40 and 0.42 respectively, p<0.01). The MRI erosion score was highly correlated with MRI bone marrow oedema (r = 0.83) as well as the Ritchie score and disease activity score (r = 0.32, p<0.05). HLA-DRB1*04 or *01 (shared epitope +ve) was found in 76% of patients; 84% of those with MRI erosions and 69% of those without (NS, p = 0.3).
CONCLUSIONS—A high proportion of RA patients develop MRI erosions very early in their disease, when plain radiography is frequently normal. MRI of the dominant wrist may identify those requiring early aggressive treatment.

 Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; carpus; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9771209

  16. Performance of matrices developed to identify patients with early rheumatoid arthritis with rapid radiographic progression despite methotrexate therapy: an external validation study based on the ESPOIR cohort data

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Benjamin; Combe, Bernard; Le Loet, Xavier; Saraux, Alain; Guillemin, Francis; Fautrel, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Use of prediction matrices of risk or rapid radiographic progression (RRP) for early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice could help to better rationalise the first line of treatment. Before use, they must be validated in populations that have not participated in their construction. The main objective is to use the ESPOIR cohort to validate the performance of 3 matrices (ASPIRE, BEST and SONORA) to predict patients at high risk of RRP at 1 year of disease despite initial treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Methods We selected from the ESPOIR cohort 370 patients receiving MTX or leflunomide (LEF) for ≥3 months within the first year of follow-up. Patients were assessed clinically every 6 months, and structural damage progression seen on radiography was measured by the van der Heijde-modified Sharp score (vSHS) at 1 year. RRP was defined as an increase in the vSHS≥5 points during the first year. Results At 1 year, the mean vSHS score was 1.7±5.0 and 46 patients had RRP. The ASPIRE matrix had only moderate validity in the ESPOIR population, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) <0.7. The AUC for the BEST and SONORA matrices were 0.73 and 0.76. Presence of rheumatoid factor (RF)—or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) and initial structural damage were always predictive of RRP at 1 year. Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and C reactive protein (ASPIRE threshold) were not associated with RRP. Conclusions Matrices to identify patients at risk of RRP tested in the ESPOIR cohort seem to perform moderately. There is no matrix that shows clearly superior performance. PMID:27252898

  17. Early Metacarpal Bone Mineral Density Loss Using Digital X-Ray Radiogrammetry and 3-Tesla Wrist MRI in Established Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Longitudinal One-Year Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Algulin, Jakob; Mangat, Pamela; Lim, Adrian K. P.; Satchithananda, Keshthra; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Taylor, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Early change in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by periarticular osteopenia. We investigated the relationship of early metacarpal digital X-ray radiogrammetry bone mineral density (DXR-BMD) change rate (RC-BMD, mg/cm2/month) to longitudinal changes in hand and feet radiographic and wrist MRI scores over 1 year. Materials and Methods. 10 RA patients completed the study and had wrist 3T-MRI and hand and feet X-rays at various time points over 1 year. MRI was scored by RAMRIS, X-ray was done by van der Heijde modified Sharp scoring, and RC-BMD was analysed using dxr-online. Results. There was good correlation amongst the two scorers for MRI measures and ICC for erosions: 0.984, BME: 0.943, and synovitis: 0.657. Strong relationships were observed between RC-BMD at 12-week and 1-year change in wrist marrow oedema (BME) (r = 0.78, P = 0.035) but not with erosion, synovitis, or radiographic scores. Conclusion. Early RC-BMD correlates with 1-year wrist BME change, which is a known predictor of future erosion and joint damage. However, in our pilot study, early RC-BMD did not show relationships to MRI erosion or radiographic changes over 1 year. This may reflect a slower kinetic in the appearance of MRI/radiographic erosions, generating the hypothesis that RC-BMD may be a more sensitive and early structural prognostic marker in RA follow-up. PMID:25785197

  18. Epidemiological evaluation quality of life in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis: a pragmatic, prospective, randomized, blind allocation controlled of a modular program group intervention

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Epidemiology has taken on new roles in the management of health care services. In this study, we developed a non-pharmacological self-management modular program group intervention and evaluated its efficacy as an adjunct therapy in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients were randomized to either participate in a non-equivalent intervention group along with the standard of care or only receive standard-of-care treatment at a community rheumatology center. The outcomes measured were a pain visual analog scale (VAS), patient general health (GH) on a VAS, and the Short Form 36 Health Survey version 2 scale measuring quality of life. These parameters were evaluated in the first week to obtain baseline values, and at 20, 32, 48, and 60 weeks to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention group. RESULTS: The patients were randomized, with 100 patients in the intervention group and 106 in the control group. The intervention and control groups were similar with regard to the percentage of women (86% vs. 89.6%), tobacco usage (25% vs. 19.8%), mean age (42.6±13.2 years vs. 46.6±10.9 years), and disease duration (15.3±6.7 months vs. 14.5±6.6 months). The mean outcomes were significantly different between the two groups, and post-hoc pairwise analysis demonstrated significant deterioration in the control group in contrast to improvement in the intervention group at the second, third, fourth, and fifth evaluations. Improvements were often seen as early as the 12-week and 24-week follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiology contributes to the evaluation of how well specific therapies or other health interventions prevent or control health problems. The modular program group intervention implemented in this study appears to be a suitable and feasible method to facilitate much more comprehensive management of early RA in socioeconomically challenged communities. PMID:26552423

  19. Maintenance of remission following 2 years of standard treatment then dose reduction with abatacept in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Robles, Manuel; Ximenes, Antonio Carlos; Wollenhaupt, Jurgen; Durez, Patrick; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Grassi, Walter; Haraoui, Boulos; Shergy, William; Park, Sung-Hwan; Genant, Harry; Peterfy, Charles; Becker, Jean-Claude; Murthy, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate maintenance of response while reducing intravenous abatacept dose from ∼10 mg/kg to ∼5 mg/kg in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieved disease activity score (DAS)28 (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ESR) <2.6. Methods This 1-year, multinational, randomised, double-blind substudy evaluated the efficacy and safety of ∼10 mg/kg and ∼5 mg/kg abatacept in patients with early RA with poor prognosis who had reached DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 at year 2 of the AGREE study. The primary outcome was time to disease relapse (defined as additional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, ≥2 courses high-dose steroids, return to open-label abatacept ∼10 mg/kg, or DAS28 (C reactive protein) ≥3.2 at two consecutive visits). Results 108 patients were randomised (∼10 mg/kg, n=58; ∼5 mg/kg, n=50). Three and five patients, respectively, discontinued, and four per group returned to open-label abatacept. Relapse over time and the proportion of patients relapsing were similar in both groups (31% (∼10 mg/kg) vs 34% (∼5 mg/kg); HR: 0.87 (95% CI 0.45 to 1.69)). Mean steady-state trough serum concentration for the ∼10 mg/kg group was 20.3–24.1 µg/mL, compared with 8.8–12.0 µg/mL for the ∼5 mg/kg group. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that abatacept dose reduction may be an option in patients with poor prognosis early RA who achieve DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 after ≥1 year on abatacept (∼10 mg/kg). Trial registration number NCT00989235. PMID:25550337

  20. The Effect of Stopping Smoking on Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Data from BARFOT, a Multicenter Study of Early RA

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Maria LE; Bergman, Stefan; Söderlin, Maria K

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We studied the effect of stopping smoking on disease activity in patients with RA. Methods: Between 1992 and 2005, 2,800 adult patients were included in the BARFOT early RA study in Sweden. Disease Activity Score 28 joints (DAS28), C-reactive protein (CRP), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-CCP, general health and pain visual analog scales (VAS), EULAR response and treatment were registered at inclusion and at follow-up 2, 5 and 8 years. In 2010, a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to 2,102 patients, enquiring about lifestyle factors, including cessation of smoking. Results: A total of 1,460 adult RA patients with disease duration ≤2 years were included in this study. Seventeen percent smoked in 2010. In total, 127 patients stopped smoking after inclusion in the study. Smoking cessation after inclusion in the study was negatively associated with EULAR good outcome at 8 years (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.22–0.86, p=0.02), controlled for age, disease duration, sex, socioeconomic class, smoking status, RF, and DAS28 at inclusion. Conclusion: Seventeen percent of the RA patients smoked in 2010 in this large Swedish RA cohort. Stopping smoking after onset of RA did not change the poor prognosis of smokers with RA, but all RA patients need to stop smoking because of the high risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and the association of smoking with vasculitis and noduli in RA. PMID:23115602

  1. Medication persistence over 2 years of follow-up in a cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis patients: associated factors and relationship with disease activity and with disability

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Villa, Antonio R; Cabiedes, Javier; Rull-Gabayet, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) plays a major role in improving early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient outcomes. Persistence and adherence with medication occurs variably (20% to 70%). The objectives of the study were to determine medication persistence (MP) in early RA patients over 13 consecutive visits each 2 months apart, to investigate the relationship between MP and disease activity, disability and structural damage, and to identify baseline prognosticators. Methods Charts from 75 patients of an early RA cohort were reviewed. At each visit, a rheumatologist interviewed patients regarding therapy, scored disease activity with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and disability with the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), and recorded comorbidities and treatment. A complete medical history was obtained at baseline. MP was defined as the duration of time from initiation to discontinuation of at least one DMARD and/or corticosteroids for at least 1 week and was reported as a dichotomous variable at consecutive evaluations. Structural damage was defined by detection of new erosions on radiography. Descriptive statistics, Student's t test, the chi-squared test, and logistic regression analyses were used. Results The proportion of MP patients decreased from 98% at 2 months to 34% at 2 years. MP patients (n = 32) had similar DAS28 to non-MP patients (n = 53) at initial visits, lower DAS28 and greater DAS28 improvements at follow-ups (P ≤ 0.05 at visits 4, 6, 7 and 9) and reached sustained remission (≥ 3 consecutive visits with DAS28 < 2.6) more frequently (82.8% versus 46.5%, P = 0.003) and earlier (7.7 ± 4.6 versus 13.6 ± 5.7 months, P = 0.001) than non-MP patients. MP patients had similar baseline HAQ scores, but lower HAQ scores at follow-up (P ≤ 0.05 at visits 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 13). More non-MP patients developed erosive disease than MP patients (26.8% versus 17.9%, P = 0.56). Older age

  2. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C) and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del) variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP) and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38–0.97, p = 0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14–0.92, p = 0.034, CC versus GG), dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36–0.87, p = 0.011, GC + CC versus GG), and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41–0.84, p = 0.004, C versus G) inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population. PMID:27610404

  3. From Synovial Tissue to Peripheral Blood: Myeloid Related Protein 8/14 Is a Sensitive Biomarker for Effective Treatment in Early Drug Development in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ivy Y.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Holzinger, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Tak, Paul P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The change in number of CD68-positive sublining macrophages in serial synovial biopsies has been successfully used to discriminate on the group level between effective and ineffective treatment during early drug development in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Measurement of a soluble biomarker would clearly have practical advantages. Therefore, we investigated the sensitivity to change of myeloid related protein (MRP)8/14 in serum. Methods 139 RA patients who received known effective biologics (infliximab, adalimumab and rituximab) and 28 RA patients who received placebo/ineffective therapies were included. MRP8/14 levels were analyzed in baseline and follow-up serum samples and the standardized response mean (SRM) was calculated to determine the sensitivity to change of MRP8/14 in comparison to C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and the disease activity score evaluated in 28 joints (DAS28). Results In patients treated with effective treatment, the SRM for MRP8/14 was moderate (0.56), but in patients treated with placebo/ineffective treatment the SRM was 0.06, suggesting that this biomarker is perhaps not susceptible to placebo effects in proof-of-concept studies of relatively short duration. In contrast, the SRM for DAS28 was high for effective treatment (1.07), but also moderate for ineffective treatment (0.58), representing the placebo effect. The SRM for CRP was low in the effective (0.33) and ineffective (0.23) treatment groups. Conclusion These data support the notion that quantification of changes in MRP8/14 serum levels could be used to predict potential efficacy of novel antirheumatic drugs in an early stage of drug development. A positive result would support the rationale for larger, conventional clinical trials to determine whether the effects are clinically relevant. PMID:25166859

  4. Adalimumab, a human anti-TNF monoclonal antibody, outcome study for the prevention of joint damage in Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the HOPEFUL 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Mukai, Masaya; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Uchida, Shoji; Akama, Hideto; Kupper, Hartmut; Arora, Vipin; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adalimumab+methotrexate (MTX) in Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had not previously received MTX or biologics. Methods This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study evaluated adalimumab 40 mg every other week+MTX 6–8 mg every week versus MTX 6–8 mg every week alone for 26 weeks in patients with RA (≤2-year duration). The primary endpoint was inhibition of radiographic progression (change (Δ) from baseline in modified total Sharp score (mTSS)) at week 26. Results A total of 171 patients received adalimumab+MTX (mean dose, 6.2±0.8 mg/week) and 163 patients received MTX alone (mean dose, 6.6±0.6 mg/week, p<0.001). The mean RA duration was 0.3 years and 315 (94.3%) had high disease activity (DAS28>5.1). Adalimumab+MTX significantly inhibited radiographic progression at week 26 versus MTX alone (ΔmTSS, 1.5±6.1 vs 2.4±3.2, respectively; p<0.001). Significantly more patients in the adalimumab+MTX group (62.0%) did not show radiographic progression (ΔmTSS≤0.5) versus the MTX alone group (35.4%; p<0.001). Patients treated with adalimumab+MTX were significantly more likely to achieve American College of Rheumatology responses and achieve clinical remission, using various definitions, at 26 weeks versus MTX alone. Combination therapy was well tolerated, and no new safety signals were observed. Conclusions Adalimumab in combination with low-dose MTX was well tolerated and efficacious in suppressing radiographic progression and improving clinical outcomes in Japanese patients with early RA and high disease activity. PMID:23316080

  5. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam; Zakeri, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C) and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del) variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP) and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38-0.97, p = 0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14-0.92, p = 0.034, CC versus GG), dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36-0.87, p = 0.011, GC + CC versus GG), and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41-0.84, p = 0.004, C versus G) inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population. PMID:27610404

  6. Synovial membrane immunohistology in early-untreated rheumatoid arthritis reveals high expression of catabolic bone markers that is modulated by methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to investigate the expression and therapeutic modulation of the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand (RANKL) system in early-untreated rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this study, 15 patients with newly diagnosed RA (median symptom duration 7 months) were started on methotrexate (MTX) 20 mg weekly. Synovial biopsies were obtained by needle arthroscopy at baseline and 8 weeks after initiation of therapy. X-rays of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and 1 year after diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the synovial biopsies. The in vitro effect of MTX was tested on RA-derived primary fibroblasts and the osteoblasts-like osteosarcoma cell line (rtPCR, Western blot and ELISA) and in osteoclasts (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and dentine pit formation assay). Results MTX decreased synovial cellularity as well as RANK expression and the RANKL/OPG ratio. We confirmed this effect by a decrease of the mRNA and protein RANKL/OPG ratio in synovial-derived fibroblasts and osteoblasts-like tumoral cells exposed in vitro to methotrexate. Supernatants from MTX treated osteoblasts-like tumoral cells prevented pre-osteoclast formation in the absence of exogenous RANKL. Furthermore, MTX blocked osteoclastogenesis from peripheral blood mononuclear cells despite the presence of macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANKL, which indicates that MTX directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis. Conclusions The synovial membrane of early-untreated RA is characterized by a high RANKL/OPG ratio that can be reversed by methotrexate. PMID:24295447

  7. Early development of Xenopus embryos is affected by simulated gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Hiroki; Neff, Anton W.; Malacinski, George M.

    1994-01-01

    Early amphibian (Xenopus laevis) development under clinostat-simulated weightlessness and centrifuge-simulated hypergravity was studied. The results revealed significant effects on (i) 'morphological patterning' such as the cleavage furrow pattern in the vegetal hemisphere at the eight-cell stage and the shape of the dorsal lip in early gastrulae and (ii) 'the timing of embryonic events' such as the third cleavage furrow completion and the dorsal lip appearance. Substantial variations in sensitivity to simulated force fields were observed, which should be considered in interpreting spaceflight data.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  9. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  10. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  11. The rheumatoid forefoot.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Francis; Hariharan, Kartik

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) manifests itself in a variety of ways, with its effect being seen in around 90 % of sufferers' feet. The foot has been found to be the most common reason for incapacity in patients with RA, with the forefoot the most common area. The foot is second, behind only the hand, as the most common place for manifestation of RA. Pain in the foot is commonly the most debilitating condition, which causes the patient to seek specialist help. As well as pain, foot deformities such as hallux valgus and claw toes are common complaints. These symptoms often arise as a result of continued walking on an unstable foot, leading to painful callosities and dislocation of the metatarsophalangeal joints. Other conditions, such as pannus formation and Morton's neuroma, can be related to RA. This review sets out what we believe to be a successful approach to the rheumatoid forefoot, which aims at the relief of pain and the preservation of ambulation. Key to a successful outcome is appropriate medical control with a multidisciplinary approach that enables close liaison between orthopaedic surgeons, orthotists, and rheumatologists. Combined clinics provide this multidisciplinary care. Those treating RA need to be aware of the high incidence of foot involvement and how early intervention may benefit the patient. The aim of this article is to present current evidence to enable people to develop a treatment algorithm for this condition. PMID:23943297

  12. Predictors of remission, erosive disease and radiographic progression in a Colombian cohort of early onset rheumatoid arthritis: a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Duque, M A; Rondon-Herrera, F; Mantilla, R D; Calvo-Paramo, E; Yunis, J J; Varela-Nariño, A; Restrepo, J F; Iglesias-Gamarra, A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study is to find predictors of remission, radiographic progression (RP), and erosive disease in a cohort of patients with early onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) that followed a therapeutic protocol aiming at remission, in a real world tight-control setting. EORA patients were enrolled in a 3-year follow-up study. Clinical, biological, immunogenetic, and radiographical data were analyzed. Radiographs were scored according to Sharp-van der Heijde (SvdH) method. RP was defined by an increase of 3 units in 36 months. Remission was defined as DAS28 <2.6. A stepwise multiple logistic regression model was used to identify independent predictors of the three target outcomes. One hundred twenty-nine patients were included. Baseline disease activity was high. Significant overall improvement was observed, but only 33.3 % achieved remission. At 36 month, 50.4 % (65) of patients showed erosions. RP was observed in 62.7 % (81) of cases. Statistical analysis showed that baseline SvdH score was the only predictive factor associated with the three outcomes evaluated. Lower HAQ-DI and absence of autoantibodies were predictive of remission. Higher levels of ESR and presence of erosions at entry were predictive of RP. Independent baseline predictors of incident erosive disease were anti-CCP and RF positivity, symptom duration at baseline >3 months, and presence of HLA-DRB1 shared epitope. Radiographic damage at baseline was the main predictor of outcomes. Autoantibodies, HAQ and ESR at baseline, symptom duration before diagnosis, and HLA-DRB1 status had influence on clinical course and development of structural joint damage in Colombian RA patients. PMID:27041382

  13. The Effect of Socioeconomic Class and Immigrant Status on Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Data from BARFOT, a Multi-Centre Study of Early RA

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Maria L.E.; Bergman, Stefan; Söderlin, Maria K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been no reports on the effect of immigrant status and socioeconomic status on outcome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden. Methods: Between 1992 and 2006, 2,800 patients were included in the BARFOT study on early RA in Sweden. Disease Activity Score 28 joints (DAS28), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), treatment and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria were registered. In 2010, 1,430 patients completed a questionnaire enquiring about demographics and lifestyle factors. Results: One hundred and thirty-nine of the 1,430 patients (9.7%) were immigrants. At baseline immigrants had higher mean HAQ (1.2 vs 0.97 for non-immigrants, p=0.001), DAS28 (5.6 vs 5.2, p=0.000), visual analog scale (VAS) pain (56 mm vs 45 mm, p=0.000), VAS global health (53 mm vs 44 mm, p=0.000) and tender joint count (TJC) (10 vs 8, p=0.000). These differences persisted for up to 2 years of follow-up (for HAQ, for up to 8 years of follow-up). Immigrant status did not have any effect on swollen joint count (SJC), ESR, CRP or EULAR response. Socioeconomic class did not have any effect on treatment or outcome. Conclusions: Immigrants scored worse in pain, function and TJC for up to 2 years of follow-up, but they did not differ from non-immigrants in objective measures of inflammation or EULAR outcome. This could be due to different perceptions of health and pain and/or the stress of immigration. Socioeconomic class had no effect on treatment or outcome, and this could be due to the relatively egalitarian society in Sweden. PMID:24358069

  14. Leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent synovitis, slow destruction of articular cartilage and bone, preserve function and control systemic manifestations of the disease. Recognition that irreversible joint damage often occurs early in RA has led to much prompter use of DMARDs, with sulfasalazine or methotrexate commonly considered the treatment of first choice. Leflunomide (Arava-Aventis) is a new DMARD, licensed for the treatment of adults with active RA. The manufacturer claims that leflunomide has "comparable efficacy to methotrexate and sulphasalazine", with a "faster onset of action", and an "acceptable tolerability profile". Here, we consider the place of leflunomide in the management of patients with RA. PMID:11027115

  15. Estimating the monetary value of the annual productivity gained in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis receiving etanercept plus methotrexate: interim results from the PRIZE study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure and value the impact of combined etanercept (ETN) and methotrexate (MTX) therapy on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 52 weeks. Methods MTX- and biological-naïve patients with RA (symptom onset ≤12 months; Disease Activity Score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28) >3.2) received open-label ETN50/MTX for 52 weeks. The Valuation of Lost Productivity (VOLP) questionnaire, measuring paid and unpaid work productivity impacts, was completed approximately every 13 weeks. Bootstrapping methods were used to test changes in VOLP outcomes over time. One-year productivity impacts were compared between responders (DAS28 ≤3.2) at week 13 and non-responders using zero-inflated models for time loss and two-part models for total costs of lost productivity. Results 196 patients were employed at baseline and had ≥1 follow-up with VOLP. Compared with baseline, at week 52, patients gained 33.4 h per 3 months in paid work and 4.2 h per week in unpaid work. Total monetary productivity gains were €1322 per 3 months. Over the 1-year period, responders gained paid (231 h) and unpaid work loss (122 h) compared with non-responders, which amounted to a gain of €3670 for responders. Conclusions This is the first clinical trial to measure and value the impact of biological treatment on all the labour input components that affect overall productivity. Combination therapy with ETN50/MTX was associated with a significant productivity gain for patients with early RA who were still observed at week 52. Over the 1-year treatment period, responders at week 13 suffered significantly less productivity loss than non-responders suggesting this gain was related to treatment response. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00913458 PMID:26535135

  16. Smoking in combination with antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides is associated with persistently high levels of survivin in early rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction High levels of the oncoprotein survivin may be detected in the majority of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Survivin is a sensitive predictor of joint damage and persistent disease activity. Survivin-positive patients are often poor responders to antirheumatic and biological treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of survivin status and its significance for clinical and immunological assessment of RA patients. Methods Survivin levels were measured in 339 patients from the Better Anti-Rheumatic FarmacOTherapy (BARFOT) cohort of early RA at baseline and after 24 months. The association of survivin status with joint damage (total Sharp-van der Heijde score), disease activity (Disease Activity Score based on evaluation of 28 joints (DAS28)), functional disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)), and pain perception (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)) was calculated in the groups positive and negative for survivin on both occasions, and for the positive-negative and negative-positive groups. Results In 268 patients (79%) the levels of survivin were similar at baseline and after 24 months, 15% converted from survivin-positive to survivin-negative, and 5% from survivin-negative to survivin-positive. A combination of smoking and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (aCCP) predicted persistently (baseline and 24 months) high levels of survivin (odds ratio 4.36 (95% CI: 2.64 to 7.20), P < 0.001), positive predictive value 0.66 and specificity 0.83). The independent nature of survivin and aCCP was demonstrated by statistical and laboratory analysis. Survivin positivity on both test occasions was associated with the progression of joint damage, significantly higher DAS28 and lower rate of remission at 24 and 60 months compared to negative-negative patients. Survivin status was less associated with changes in HAQ and VAS. Conclusions Survivin is a relevant and reproducible marker of severe RA

  17. Infliximab therapy increases body fat mass in early rheumatoid arthritis independently of changes in disease activity and levels of leptin and adiponectin: a randomised study over 21 months

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with changes in body composition and bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether anti-TNF treatment in early RA has an impact on body composition and BMD besides that which could be achieved by intensive disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) combination therapy. Methods Forty patients with early RA who failed treatment with methotrexate up to 20 mg/week for 3 months were randomised to addition of sulphasalazine and hydroxychloroquine (treatment A) or addition of infliximab (treatment B). At 3, 12 and 24 months, body composition and BMD were assessed by total-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. At the same time points, leptin, adiponectin, apolipoproteins, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and markers of bone remodelling were analysed. Compliance to treatment was considered in the analyses. Data were analysed with a mixed, linear model. Results Patients treated with anti-TNF had a significant increase in fat mass at 2 years, 3.8 (1.6 to 5.9) kg, in contrast to patients in treatment A, 0.4 (-1.5 to 2.2) kg (P = 0.040), despite similar reduction in disease activity. Both treatment strategies prevented loss of muscle mass and bone. Leptin concentrations increased significantly in both groups at 2 years and adiponectin increased significantly at 2 years in treatment A and at 1 year in treatment B. There were no significant changes in apolipoproteins or IGF-1. The markers of bone resorption decreased at 12 months in both treatment groups with no significant difference between the treatment groups. Conclusions Infliximab therapy increased body fat mass, an effect that was not achieved with the combination of DMARDs, despite a similar reduction in disease activity, and thus seemed to be drug specific. The increase of fat mass was not associated with an exacerbated atherogenic lipid profile. Leptin and adiponectin concentrations increased in both treatment groups. The

  18. Diagnosis and classification of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kourilovitch, Maria; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology that is manifested in by a progressive and destructive polyarthritis in association with serological evidence of autoreactivity. Its diagnosis is based on the classification criteria that involve four parameters: joint involvement, serology (rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide--anti-CCP), levels of acute phase reactants and the duration of the symptoms Aletaha, et al. [1]. This classification simplifies the categorization of the patients with early RA; however, the diagnosis requires highly trained specialists who are able to differentiate early symptoms of RA from other pathologies. PMID:24568777

  19. Disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug use and the risk of incident hyperlipidemia in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Rishi J; Eddings, Wesley; Liao, Katherine P; Solomon, Daniel H; Kim, Seoyoung C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk of incident hyperlipidemia in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients after initiation of various disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Methods We conducted a cohort study using insurance claims data (2001–2012) in ERA patients. ERA was defined by the absence of any RA diagnosis or DMARD prescriptions for 12 months. Four mutually exclusive groups were defined based on DMARD initiation, TNF-α inhibitors ± non-biologic (nb) DMARDs, methotrexate ± non-hydroxycholorquine nbDMARDs, hydroxychloroquine ± non-methotrexate nbDMARDs, and other nbDMARDs only. The primary outcome was incident hyperlipidemia, defined by a diagnosis and a prescription for a lipid-lowering agent. For the subgroup of patients with laboratory results available, change in lipid levels was assessed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and propensity score (PS) decile stratification with asymmetric trimming were used to control for confounding. Results Of the 17,145 ERA patients included in the study, 364 developed incident hyperlipidemia. The adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) for hyperlipidemia were 1.41 (0.99–2.00) for TNF-α inhibitors, 0.81 (0.63–1.04) for hydroxychloroquine, and 1.33 (0.95–1.84) for other nbDMARDs compared with methotrexate in the full cohort, while 1.18 (0.80–1.73), 0.75 (0.58–0.98) and 1.41 (1.01–1.98), respectively in the PS trimmed cohort. In the subgroup analysis, hydroxychloroquine use showed significant reduction in low density lipoprotein (−8.9 mg/dl, 95% CI −15.8, −2.0), total cholesterol (−12.3 mg/dl, 95% CI −19.8, −4.8) and triglyceride (−19.5 mg/dl, 95% CI −38.7, −0.3) levels from baseline compared with methotrexate. Conclusion Use of hydroxychloroquine may be associated with a lower risk of hyperlipidemia among ERA patients. PMID:25302481

  20. Cyclosporin A monotherapy versus cyclosporin A and methotrexate combination therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a double blind randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gerards, A; Landewe, R; Prins, A; Bruijn, G; Goei, T; Laan, R; Dijkmans, B

    2003-01-01

    Patients and methods: 120 patients with active RA, rheumatoid factor positive and/or erosive, were randomly allocated to receive CsA with MTX (n=60) or CsA with placebo (n=60). Treatment with CsA was started in all patients at 2.5 mg/kg/day and increased to a maximum of 5 mg/kg/day in 16 weeks. MTX was started at 7.5 mg/week and increased to a maximal dose of 15 mg/week at week 16. Primary outcomes were clinical remission (Pinals criteria) and radiological damage (Larsen score), at week 48. Results: Treatment was discontinued prematurely in 27 patients in the monotherapy group (21 because of inefficacy, and six because of toxicity) and in 26 patients in the combination therapy group (14 and 12, respectively). At week 48, clinical remission was achieved in four patients in the monotherapy group and in six patients in the combination therapy group (p=0.5). The median Larsen score increased to 10 (25th, 75th centiles: 3.5; 13.3) points in the monotherapy group and to 4 (1.0; 10.5) points in the combination therapy group (p=0.004). 28/60 (47%) of patients in the monotherapy group v 34/60 (57%) of patients in the combination therapy group had reached an American college of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response (p=0.36) at week 48; 15/60 (25%) v 29/60 (48%) of patients had reached an ACR50 response (p=0.013); and 7 (12%) v 12 (20%) of patients had reached an ACR70 response (p=0.11).Their was a tendency towards more toxicity in the combination therapy group. Conclusions: In patients with early RA, neither CsA plus MTX combination therapy nor CsA monotherapy is very effective in inducing clinical remission. Combination therapy is probably better at improving clinical disease activity, and definitely better at slowing radiological progression. Combination therapy should still be compared with methotrexate monotherapy. PMID:12634224

  1. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is most often used to help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis or Sjögren syndrome . Normal Results Results are usually ... result) most often means you do not have rheumatoid arthritis or Sjögren syndrome. However, some people who do ...

  2. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1995-03-01

    The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Amandeep; Naik, Shobha; Pai, Anuradha; Anuradha, Ardra

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT) in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease. PMID:25684928

  4. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161+Th1 Cells) to CD161+Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161+Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161+Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase. PMID:27123445

  5. Rheumatoid vasculitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Pecly, Inah Maria Drummond; Ocampo, Juan Felipe; Ramirez, Guillermo Pandales; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Guedes; Saud, Claudia Guerra Murad; Arantes, Milton Dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease and its main manifestation is persistent synovitis affecting peripheral joints symmetrically, In spite of its destructive potential, the evolution of RA is highly variable. Some patients may have only a short-term process oligoarticular with minimum lesion, while others suffers a polyarthritis evolving with progressive and continuous involvement of other organ systems such as skin, heart, lungs, muscles and blood vessels rarely leading to rheumatoid vasculitis. The aim of this study was to describe a case of rheumatoid vasculitis a rare and severe condition. PMID:25772654

  6. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  7. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) is a blood test that measures the amount of the RF antibody in the blood. ... these conditions still have a "normal" or low RF. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  8. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 65. Lake F, Proudman S. Rheumatoid arthritis and lung disease: from mechanisms to a practical approach. Semin Respir Crit Care Med . 2014;35:222-238. PMID: 24668537 www.ncbi.nlm.nih. ...

  9. The first double-blind, randomised, parallel-group certolizumab pegol study in methotrexate-naive early rheumatoid arthritis patients with poor prognostic factors, C-OPERA, shows inhibition of radiographic progression

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Eguchi, Katsumi; Watanabe, Akira; Origasa, Hideki; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Yamanishi, Yuji; Kita, Yasuhiko; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Shoji, Toshiharu; Okada, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate efficacy and safety of combination therapy using certolizumab pegol (CZP) and methotrexate (MTX) as first-line treatment for MTX-naive, early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with poor prognostic factors, compared with MTX alone. Methods MTX-naive, early RA patients with ≤12 months persistent disease, high anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, and either rheumatoid factor positive and/or presence of bone erosions were enrolled in this multicentre, double-blind, randomised placebo (PBO)-controlled study. Patients were randomised 1:1 to CZP+MTX or PBO+MTX for 52 weeks. Primary endpoint was inhibition of radiographic progression (change from baseline in modified Total Sharp Score (mTSS CFB)) at week 52. Secondary endpoints were mTSS CFB at week 24, and clinical remission rates at weeks 24 and 52. Results 316 patients randomised to CZP+MTX (n=159) or PBO+MTX (n=157) had comparable baseline characteristics reflecting features of early RA (mean disease duration: 4.0 vs 4.3 months; Disease Activity Score 28-joint assessment (DAS28)) (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)): 5.4 vs 5.5; mTSS: 5.2 vs 6.0). CZP+MTX group showed significantly greater inhibition of radiographic progression relative to PBO+MTX at week 52 (mTSS CFB=0.36 vs 1.58; p<0.001) and week 24 (mTSS CFB=0.26 vs 0.86; p=0.003). Clinical remission rates (Simple Disease Activity Index, Boolean and DAS28 (ESR)) of the CZP+MTX group were significantly higher compared with those of the PBO+MTX group, at weeks 24 and 52. Safety results in both groups were similar, with no new safety signals observed with addition of CZP to MTX. Conclusions In MTX-naive early RA patients with poor prognostic factors, CZP+MTX significantly inhibited structural damage and reduced RA signs and symptoms, demonstrating the efficacy of CZP in these patients. Trial registration number (NCT01451203). PMID:26139005

  10. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

  12. Simulations of nucleation and early growth stages of protein crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, A M; Wolf, W M; Zielenkiewicz, P

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of known protein crystal structures reveals that interaction energies between monomer pairs alone are not sufficient to overcome entropy loss related to fixing monomers in the crystal lattice. Interactions with several neighbors in the crystal are required for stabilization of monomers in the lattice. A microscopic model of nucleation and early growth stages of protein crystals, based on the above observations, is presented. Anisotropy of protein molecules is taken into account by assigning free energies of association (proportional to the buried surface area) to individual monomer-monomer contacts in the lattice. Lattice simulations of the tetragonal lysozyme crystal based on the model correctly reproduce structural features of the movement of dislocation on the (110) crystal face. The dislocation shifts with the speed equal to the one determined experimentally if the geometric probability of correct orientation is set to 10(-5), in agreement with previously published estimates. At this value of orientational probability, the first nuclei, the critical size of which for lysozyme is four monomers, appear in 1 ml of supersaturated solution on a time scale of microseconds. Formation of the ordered phase proceeds through the growth of nuclei (rather then their association) and requires nucleations on the surface at certain stages. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9251778

  13. Adalimumab discontinuation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis who were initially treated with methotrexate alone or in combination with adalimumab: 1 year outcomes of the HOPEFUL-2 study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshiya; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kawana, Katsuyoshi; Hiramatsu, Katsutoshi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of discontinuation of adalimumab (ADA) for 1 year in Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This 52-week postmarketing study, HOPEFUL-2, enrolled patients who had completed HOPEFUL-1 for early RA, in which patients received either ADA + methotrexate (MTX) or MTX alone in a 26-week randomised phase, followed by ADA+MTX in a 26-week open-label phase. Results A total of 220 patients (ADA discontinuation: 114 patients vs ADA continuation: 106 patients) were enrolled in this study. The proportion of patients with sustained low disease activity (LDA) in the ADA discontinuation group was significantly lower than that in the continuation group (80% (64/80 patients) vs 97% (71/73 patients); p=0.001); however, most patients sustained LDA in both groups. In patients with 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28)-C reactive protein ≤2.0 at week 52, the proportion of patients who achieved sustained LDA at week 104 was 93%, suggesting that DAS28 remission may be a predictor to indicate biological-free disease control in patients with early RA. The incidence of adverse events (AE) was significantly lower in the ADA discontinuation group than in the continuation group (34.2% (39/114 patients) vs 48.1% (51/106 patients); p=0.04), most notably for infection (14.9% vs 27.4%, p=0.031). Conclusions Although ADA discontinuation was associated with an increase in disease activity, a large proportion of patients maintained LDA with MTX monotherapy after ADA discontinuation. Since ADA discontinuation was associated with a lower AE incidence, physicians should weigh the risks and benefits of ADA discontinuation. Trial registration number NCT01163292. PMID:26925252

  14. Predictive value of autoantibodies from anti-CCP2, anti-MCV and anti-human citrullinated fibrinogen tests, in early rheumatoid arthritis patients with rapid radiographic progression at 1 year: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Degboé, Yannick; Constantin, Arnaud; Nigon, Delphine; Tobon, Gabriel; Cornillet, Martin; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nicaise-Roland, Pascale; Nogueira, Leonor; Serre, Guy; Cantagrel, Alain; Ruyssen-Witrand, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We compared the ability of antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP2), against mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) and against citrullinated fibrinogen (AhFibA) to predict 1 year rapid radiographic progression (RRP; total Sharp score variation ≥5 points), in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We analysed 566 patients from the ESPOIR cohort with early RA fulfilling the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria at year 1. We assayed the 3 anticitrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) tests on baseline sera. We compared the performance of these 3 ACPA tests to predict first-year RRP, by comparing areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). We assessed the 1 year RRP risk by ACPA titres. We used a logistic multivariate regression to analyse RRP risk in terms either of ACPA positivity or titre: high (>3 times the N cut-off) and low (1 to 3N). Results 145 patients displayed RRP. Areas under the ROCs were similar (0.60) for the 3 tests. High ACPA titres were associated with 1 year RRP, whatever the test was, and with similar ORs. Low+ anti-MCV titres were not associated with 1-year RRP, whereas low+ anti-CCP2 titres (p=0.0226) and low+ AhFibA titres (p=0.0332) were significantly associated. In multivariate analysis, 1 year RRP was associated with anti-CCP2 positivity (p<0.0001), AhFibA positivity (p<0.0001) and high anti-MCV titres (p<0.0001). Conclusions Anti-CCP2 antibodies and AhFibA were predictive of 1 year RRP in early RA whatever their titre was, whereas only high anti-MCV antibody titres were predictive, potentially making them more discriminant to predict 1 year RRP risk. PMID:26635969

  15. Longitudinal analysis of citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (anti-CP) during 5 year follow up in early rheumatoid arthritis: anti-CP status predicts worse disease activity and greater radiological progression

    PubMed Central

    Ronnelid, J; Wick, M; Lampa, J; Lindblad, S; Nordmark, B; Klareskog, L; van Vollenhoven, R F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study serum levels of citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (anti-CP) during up to 5 years' follow up of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to relate serum levels to disease course and to treatments in clinical practice. Methods: 279 patients with early RA were followed up with clinical investigations, radiographs, and measurement of anti-CP at baseline and after 3 months, 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. Results: 160/279 (57.3%) patients were anti-CP positive at the first visit (mean 5 months after first symptoms). During follow up only 11/279 (3.9%) of the patients changed their anti-CP status. Anti-CP levels fell significantly during the first year, and this drop correlated with the extent of sulfasalazine treatment but not with other drugs or clinical indices. Anti-CP positive and negative patients had similar disease activities at baseline, but during follow up the anti-CP positive patients had worse clinical disease and greater radiological progression, despite at least equally intensive antirheumatic treatment. Conclusions: Anti-CP are stable during the first 5 years of RA, suggesting that events before rather than after onset of clinical manifestations of disease determine this phenotype. The presence of anti-CP at diagnosis predicts a less favourable disease course and greater radiological progression despite antirheumatic treatment, but subsequent changes in antibody levels do not reflect changes in disease activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that anti-CP positive RA is a distinct clinical and pathophysiological entity. PMID:15843452

  16. Discovery 3: A Simulation of Early American Colonization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, John

    This simulation allows students to experience the mystery of exploration and the hazards and perils of colonial life. Students are divided into 4- to 6-person colonizing groups. After acquiring some background information they then become colonists. They spend the remainder of the simulation making decisions, working, coping, surviving, and…

  17. [The pulmonological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bernscherer, György; Karabélyos, Csaba; Tarján, Zsolt

    2008-07-20

    In their review article the authors overview the primary and secondary pulmonary complications of rheumatoid arthritis with the help of bibliographic data. They emphasize the pulmonological complications of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs used for the pharmaceutical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, of which they discuss the methotrexate induced pulmonary diseases. Methotrexate participates nearly in all of additive double and triple--O'Dell-scheme--combined disease modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. Because of that, the early detection of drug-induced pulmonological complications is important. For rheumatologists the treatment of methotrexate resistant rheumatoid arthritis is always getting a higher and higher challenge. Biological therapeutical drugs act as cytokine antagonists, by blocking TNF-alpha and, compared to disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, they can more effectively inhibit the progression of the disease. These are the biological response modifiers. Their main representatives are infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept. At the end, the authors discuss secondary pulmonary complications caused by biological response modifiers, e.g. the biological response modifiers associated pulmonary tuberculosis, bacterial tracheobronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, bronchiectasia, pulmonary oedema, rapid fibrosing alveolitis, and coccidioidomycosis. At 3% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treated with biological response modifiers, who live in Arizona, California, Nevada, pulmonary and systemic mycosis--coccidioidomycosis can appear with a 15% of mortality. As a consequence of frequent earthquakes, the spores getting into the air from the ground infect immunosuppressed patients treated with biological response modifiers. The authors draw attention to the fact that patients who receive biological therapy and travel to the above-mentioned endemic or earthquake-active regions, have a potential high risk, so it is indispensable that they are informed by the

  18. Unmet needs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bykerk, Vivian

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal and patients with RA are still missing a significant number of work days. Early diagnostic criteria are needed to ensure that appropriate treatment is initiated early so as to prevent joint damage. Better prognostic markers are also needed to identify patients with the potential for poor outcomes, in whom more aggressive strategies can be applied at the outset. Because of stringent inclusion criteria and heterogeneous definitions of remission, results seen in clinical trials of RA are not necessarily generalizable to results seen in clinical practice. As a result, existing guidelines may not adequately reflect current practice. In the absence of biomarkers to predict the course of disease, methotrexate remains the standard of care initially for most patients with RA. The ability to predict the course of disease could allow more appropriately targeted therapy and higher rates of remission. PMID:19509330

  19. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

  20. Distinct trajectories of disease activity over the first year in early rheumatoid arthritis patients following a treat-to-target strategy.

    PubMed

    Siemons, Liseth; Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Glas, Cees A W; Van de Laar, Mart a F J

    2014-04-01

    Objective: Although treat-to-target (T2T) strategies are effective in early RA patients, important individual variations exist in the course towards remission. Growth mixture modeling (GMM) provides more insight into this heterogeneity by identifying subgroups of patients with similar response patterns. This study aimed to identify distinct trajectories of disease activity in early RA patients following a T2T strategy, during their first year. Methods: Data on various clinical and patient-reported measures were collected from the DREAM remission induction cohort. GMM was applied to examine the impact of T2T on subgroups characterized by different types of growth trajectories, as measured with the Disease Activity Score for 28 joints. Results: Three distinct trajectories of disease activity were found. The normative trajectory contained most patients (82.6%), showing a quickly decreasing disease activity, stabilizing at remission after 9 months. This group performed best on clinical and patient-reported measures over time and were more likely to be men. A smaller group (14.1%) also approached remission, but demonstrated a slower response to treatment. Finally, a minority (3.3%) showed no improvement after 1 year, despite an initial quick decrease in disease activity during the first months of treatment. Conclusion: Disease activity in early RA patients during the first year of a T2T strategy does not follow a linear pattern, nor is a single developmental trajectory applicable to all patients. Future studies should attempt to identify more specific risk factors for poor outcome to enable early identification of patients in need of alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:24106173

  1. Anglo-French contributions to the recognition of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Kevin J.

    1982-01-01

    Early descriptions of rheumatoid arthritis in the English and French literature are reviewed. Charcot pointed out that the disease was recognised as distinct from gout in eighteenth century England, and pictorial evidence for this is presented. His own work on arthritis led to a series of noteworthy interactions with Alfred Baring Garrod, which are discussed. Images PMID:7051988

  2. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host. PMID:26649443

  3. Just Running Around: Some Reminiscences of Early Simulation/Gaming in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ments, Morry

    2011-01-01

    The article begins with an abbreviated CV of the author and then recounts the formation of Society for the Advancement of Games and Simulation in Education and Training (SAGSET) and the early days of simulation and gaming in the United Kingdom. Four strands of elements of development are described together with the key events of the 1970s and…

  4. Practicing Parenting? Effects of Computerized Infant Simulators on Teenage Attitudes toward Early Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallery, Janet G.

    2002-01-01

    Computerized infant simulators may deter early parenthood. A survey of 1,285 teenagers before and after simulation showed a significant change in some attitudes toward parenting. Males reported the strongest attitude change, while females began with more realistic understandings of parenting. Further study is needed to determine whether attitude…

  5. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, Juan; Hubbard, Susan; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Moulton, David; Denham, Miles E.

    2011-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high performance computing tool will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. As part of the initial development process, a series of demonstrations were defined to test ASCEM components and provide feedback to developers, engage end users in applications, and lead to an outcome that would benefit the sites. The demonstration was implemented for a sub-region of the Savannah River Site General Separations Area that includes the F-Area Seepage Basins. The physical domain included the unsaturated and saturated zones in the vicinity of the seepage basins and Fourmile Branch, using an unstructured mesh fit to the hydrostratigraphy and topography of the site. The calculations modeled variably saturated flow and the resulting flow field was used in simulations of the advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of uranium. As part of the demonstrations, a new set of data management, visualization, and uncertainty quantification tools were developed to analyze simulation results and existing site data. These new tools can be used to provide summary statistics, including information on which simulation parameters were most important in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output.

  6. Evolution of Direct Costs in the First Years of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Impact of Early versus Late Biologic Initiation - An Economic Analysis Based on the ESPOIR Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chevreul, Karine; Haour, Georges; Lucier, Sandy; Harvard, Stephanie; Laroche, Marie-Laure; Mariette, Xavier; Saraux, Alain; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Guillemin, Francis; Fautrel, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate annual direct costs of early RA by resource component in an inception cohort, with reference to four distinct treatment strategies: no disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), synthetic DMARDs only, biologic DMARDs in the first year (‘first-year biologic’, FYB), and biologic DMARDs from the second year after inclusion (‘later-year biologic’, LYB); to determine predictors of total and non-DMARD related costs. Methods The ESPOIR cohort is a French multicentric, prospective study of 813 patients with early arthritis. Data assessing RA-related resource utilisation and disease characteristics were collected at baseline, biannually during the first two years and annually thereafter. Costs predictors were determined by generalised linear mixed analyses. Results Over the 4-year follow-up, mean annual direct total costs per treatment strategy group were €3,612 for all patients and €998, €1,922, €14,791, €8,477 respectively for no DMARDs, synthetic DMARDs only, FYB and LYB users. The main predictors of higher costs were biologic use and higher Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores at baseline. Being a biologic user led to a higher total cost (FYB Rate Ratio (RR) 7.22, [95% CI 5.59–9.31]; LYB RR 4.39, [95% CI 3.58–5.39]) compared to non-biologic users. Only LYB increased non-DMARD related costs compared to all other patients by 60%. Conclusions FYB users incurred the highest levels of total costs, while their non-DMARD related costs remained similar to non-biologic users, possibly reflecting better RA control. PMID:24811196

  7. Elevated Membrane and Soluble CD64: A Novel Marker Reflecting Altered FcγR Function and Disease in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis That Can Be Regulated by Anti-Rheumatic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Fc receptors (FcR) interacting with immune complexes (ICs) is a central event in the immune pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we asked if a specific FcR is linked to RA pathogenesis and if FcR activities relate to disease and treatment outcome in early RA. Material and Methods Twenty autoantibody-positive RA patients and 33 HC were included. The patients were evaluated before and after treatment with methotrexate and prednisolone. At follow-up, the EULAR response criteria were applied to determine the individual treatment outcomes. Serum immunoglobulin levels were measured and the expression of FcR for IgG (FcγR) and IgA (FcαR) on peripheral blood monocytes were determined by flow cytometry. The monocytic FcγR function was evaluated by human IgG1 and IgG3 IC-binding and TNFα stimulated release. Plasma levels of soluble FcRs (sFcRs) were determined with ELISA. Results The IgG1 and IgG3 levels were elevated in the RA sera. The RA monocytes expressed more CD64 and cell surface-bound IgG than HC monocytes, and showed an impaired FcγR function as reflected by changes in IC-binding and decreased IC-stimulated TNFα secretion. These findings correlated significantly with different disease activity markers. Furthermore, sFcRs were elevated in the patient plasma, and sCD64 was specific for RA (compared with a reference group of patients with active psoriatic arthritis). Following treatment, immunoglobulins and sFcR levels were reduced, whereas membrane CD64 was only decreased in patients with good response to treatment. Conclusions Early RA patients display increased membrane and soluble CD64 and an impaired FcγR function correlating with joint disease activity. Beneficial responses of anti-rheumatic treatment in patients reduce CD64. These data suggest sCD64 as an important objective biomarker in RA. PMID:26406605

  8. MRI appearance of retrocalcaneal bursitis and rheumatoid nodule in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hakan; Sildiroglu, Huseyin; Pekkafali, Zekai; Kizilkaya, Esref; Cermik, Hakan

    2006-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology characterized by symmetric, erosive synovitis and sometimes multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid nodules have been reported in as many as 20-30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis; however, they are not commonly seen in the feet. We present magnetic resonance (MR) findings of a rarely seen case of rheumatoid bursitis in the retrocalcaneal bursa associated with a subcutaneous rheumatoid nodule inferior to the calcaneus which histologically confirmed the rheumatoid arthritis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case that rheumatoid bursitis in the retrocalcaneal bursa associated with the rheumatoid nodule in the foot was revealed by MR imaging. PMID:16222409

  9. Rheumatoid meningitis associated with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Stroberg, Edana; Metting, Austin

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient who had rheumatoid meningitis while on infliximab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, which initially presented as transient ischemic attacks. Although our patient had been stable on infliximab for several years, her neurologic symptoms improved when her infliximab was held due to active infection and then recurred after reinitiation of therapy. Rheumatoid meningitis is exceedingly rare; however, there have been several other reports of rheumatoid meningitis developing in patients on TNF-α inhibitor therapy. PMID:27034572

  10. [The comparative effectiveness of high-intensity dynamic training with the use of exercise machines and therapeutic gymnastics for the joints in the patients presenting with early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Orlova, E V; Karateev, D E; Kochetkov, A V; Mozhar, T E

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to compare the effectiveness of two therapeutic exercise programs for the patients presenting with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study included 51 patients. Fifteen of them (group 1) were given conventional medicamental therapy in combination with high-intensity dynamic physical exercises with the use of the Enraf-Nonius training devices (45-60 min). Eighteen patients of group 2 were offered 10 sessions of remedial gymnastics for the joints (45 min each) under the guidance of an instructor that were continued under the domestic conditions (45 min each session thrice weekly for 3 months). Eighteen patients of group 3 were given medicamental therapy alone (control). The parameters estimated in the study included the mean strength of knee joint extension and ankle joint flexion measured with the use of En-TreeM devices, articular pain (100 mm BAHI), DAS28, HAQ, and RAPID3 indices. It was shown that both programs of therapeutic exercises reduced the severity of the disease, improved the functional and motor activity of the patients and their quality of life. The majority of these characteristics were significantly different from those documented in the control group (p<0.05). The clinical effectiveness of high-intensity training with the use of exercise machines was higher than without them (articular pain was reduced by 57.9% (p<0.01), DAS28 by 24.7% (p<0.05), HAQ by 60.7% (p<0.01). RAPID3 by 47.5% (p<0.01), mean strength of extension of the weak and strong knee joints increased by 87.9% (p<0.01) and 70.5% (p<0.01) respectively, the strength of flexion of the severely and less severely affected ankle joints increased by 84.6 (p<0.01) and 68.8% (p<0.01) respectively. Compliance with regular performance of therapeutic joint exercises during 3 months was higher (83.3%) than with high-intensity dynamic training with the use of exercise machines (60%). It is concluded that the latter modality should be recommended to the younger

  11. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  12. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  13. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  14. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  15. The first national clinical audit for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Firth, J; Snowden, N; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A; Galloway, J; Dennison, E M; MacPhie, E; Ide, Z; Rowe, I; Kandala, N; Jameson, K

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first 3 months of follow-up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early rheumatoid arthritis and support for self care were measured against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards; impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient-reported outcome and experience measures. The results demonstrate delays in referral and accessing specialist care and the need for service improvement in treating to target, suppression of high levels of disease activity and support for self-care. Improvements in patient-reported outcomes within 3 months and high levels of overall satisfaction were reported but these results were affected by low response rates. This article presents a summary of the national data from the audit and discusses the implications for nursing practice. PMID:27281595

  16. Model simulations of early westward flow across the Tasman Gateway during the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijp, Willem P.; von der Heydt, Anna S.; Bijl, Peter K.

    2016-04-01

    The timing and role in ocean circulation and climate of the opening of Southern Ocean gateways is as yet elusive. Recent micropalaeontological studies suggest the onset of westward throughflow of surface waters from the SW Pacific into the Australo-Antarctic Gulf through a southern shallow opening of the Tasman Gateway from 49-50 Ma onwards, a direction that is counter to the present-day eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Here, we present the first model results specific to the early-to-middle Eocene where, in agreement with the field evidence, southerly shallow opening of the Tasman Gateway indeed causes a westward flow across the Tasman Gateway. As a result, modelled estimates of dinoflagellate biogeography are in agreement with the recent findings. Crucially, in this situation where Australia is still situated far south and almost attached to Antarctica, the Drake Passage must be sufficiently restricted to allow the prevailing easterly wind pattern to set up this southerly restricted westward flow. In contrast, an open Drake Passage, up to 517 m deep, leads to an eastward flow, even when the Tasman Gateway and the Australo-Antarctic gulf are entirely contained within the latitudes of easterly wind.

  17. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  18. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, H A; Kvasnicka, J

    1978-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with seronegative systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis developed acute cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis and systemic corticosteroids resulted in complete recovery of the pericardial involvement. This was followed by complete remission of rheumatoid disease. Images PMID:686861

  19. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  20. Rheumatoid nodule presenting as Morton's neuroma.

    PubMed

    Chaganti, S; Joshy, S; Hariharan, K; Rashid, M

    2013-09-01

    Among 101 feet that presented with symptoms and signs similar to Morton's neuroma, intermetatarsal rheumatoid nodules were found in five feet (three patients). Two patients had bilateral involvement. Histology of the excised tissue showed the presence of a rheumatoid nodule and Morton's neuroma in four feet and a rheumatoid nodule with unremarkable nerve bundles in one. A rheumatoid nodule can coexist with Morton's neuroma, as seen in our patients, and the presentation is often similar to that of a Morton's neuroma. Our patients were rendered asymptomatic with surgical treatment and went on to have appropriate management of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid nodule should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Morton's neuroma in not only rheumatoid arthritis patients but also asymptomatic patients who have never been tested for rheumatoid antibodies. PMID:23135058

  1. Risks and benefits of low-dosage cyclosporin in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Ferraccioli, G F; Portioli, I

    1997-05-01

    The effects of cyclosporin on the activity of rheumatoid arthritis have mainly been investigated in patients with active, refractory, long-standing disease. The data obtained in these trials suggest that cyclosporin is not only a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis but can also be considered a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), since it seems to be capable of slowing the progression of cartilage and bone damage due to rheumatoid arthritis. The trials conducted so far have led to a better understanding of cyclosporin toxicity and, therefore, to better monitoring of patients in order to avoid it. The reasons for studying the role of cyclosporin in patients with early, active and potentially severe rheumatoid arthritis are the poor prognosis of the disease despite the use of the presently available DMARDs, and the hypothesis that the drug is more efficacious and better tolerated in early rheumatoid arthritis. A new classification of antirheumatic drugs proposes that disease-controlling antirheumatic therapies decrease inflammatory synovitis and prevent structural joint damage or significantly reduce its rate of progression. However, few existing drugs meet these criteria. The 12-month results of a disease-controlling antirheumatic therapy clinical trial with a blinded radiological end-point, named GRISAR (Gruppo Reumatologi Italiani Studio Artrite Reumatoide) comparing cyclosporin with conventional DMARDs in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis provide strong evidence that cyclosporin offers better control of ongoing joint damage than do conventional DMARDs. PMID:18031101

  2. Proposed Planning Procedures: Gaming-Simulation as a Method for Early Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Peter H.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the use of simulation gaming as a research tool in the early assessment of proposed planning procedures in urban renewal projects. About one-half of the citations in the 36-item bibliography are in Dutch; the remainder are in English. (Author/JJD)

  3. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  4. Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of elevations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related biomarkers prior to the onset of clinically apparent RA raises hopes that individuals who are at risk for future RA can be identified in a preclinical phase of disease that is defined as abnormalities of RA-related immune activity prior to the clinically apparent onset of joint disease. Additionally, there is a growing understanding of the immunologic processes that are occurring in preclinical RA, as well as a growing understanding of risk factors that may be mechanistically related to RA development. Furthermore, there are data supporting that treatment of early RA can lead to drug free remission. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use biomarkers and other factors to accurately identify the likelihood and timing of onset of future RA, and intervene with immunomodulatory therapies and/or risk factor modification to prevent the future onset of RA in at-risk individuals. Importantly, several clinical prevention trials for RA have already been tried, and one is underway. However, while our understanding of the growing understanding of the mechanisms and natural history of RA development may be leading us to the implementation of prevention strategies for RA, there are still several challenges to be met. These include developing sufficiently accurate methods of predicting those at high risk for future RA so that clinical trials can be developed based on accurate rates of development of arthritis and subjects can be adequately informed of their risk for disease, identifying the appropriate interventions and biologic targets for optimal prevention, and addressing the psychosocial and economic aspects that are crucial to developing broadly applicable prevention measures for RA. These issues notwithstanding, prevention of RA may be within reach in the near future. PMID:24315049

  5. Isolated Rheumatoid Nodule of the Achilles.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Paul J; Broussard, Gerald; Beaman, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 20% to 25% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis have rheumatoid nodules. These nodules most commonly involve the soft tissues of the upper extremity, particularly adjacent to the olecranon. We present an uncommon case of a solitary rheumatoid nodule arising from the paratenon of the Achilles tendon with ultrasound and magnetic resonance images. PMID:26086458

  6. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L.; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  7. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Abdo; Iorio

    1994-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis of the foot and ankle can be a debilitating problem, particularly for patients who have undergone successful hip or knee arthroplasty. Optimal medical management, use of orthotic devices, and surgical intervention are essential components of patient care. Forefoot involvement with hallux valgus and lesser metatarsophalangeal joint subluxation and dislocation are the most common findings. Reconstruction usually requires lesser metatarsophalangeal joint excisional arthroplasty and first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis. Midfoot tarsometatarsal and intertarsal involvement is treated with orthotic devices and intertarsal fusion for advanced arthropathy. Hindfoot involvement frequently leads to pes planovalgus deformity, which may require isolated talonavicular arthrodesis if treated early or triple arthrodesis for advanced destruction. Ankle involvement is less frequent; when it is unresponsive to conservative measures, ankle symptoms may be improved by arthrodesis. Although great advances have been made in medical and surgical management of rheumatoid arthritis, the disease remains a serious problem. Through prudent use of medical management, orthotic devices, and other conservative measures as well as surgical intervention, long-term function can be enhanced greatly. PMID:10709025

  9. Early Eocene perturbed parameter simulations: multiple methods of proxy-model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagoo, N.; Valdes, P. J.; Flecker, R.

    2012-04-01

    Geological proxy data for the early Eocene, ~55 million years ago, indicate widespread greenhouse conditions across the Earth. High latitude early Eocene temperature estimates inferred from a variety of proxy data are much warmer than their modern counterparts (~10-20°C), whilst low latitude early Eocene temperature estimates where available (~30-35°C) are only slightly warmer than their modern equivalent. This implies a reduced pole to equator temperature gradient during the early Eocene. Climate models are unable to simulate the low latitudinal temperature gradients seen in the early Eocene. The mechanisms for transporting and maintaining heat at high latitudes in order to achieve these reduced gradients are still uncertain although several hypotheses have been proposed. We are interested in reducing this model-data discrepancy by considering both climate model and proxy data uncertainty. A comprehensive study by Murphy et al. 20041 identified a subset of 29 parameters within the UK Hadley centre climate model (HadCM3) whose values cannot be accurately determined from observations. These 29 parameters were identified as being responsible for controlling key physical characteristics of sub-grid scale atmospheric and surface processes by modelling experts. Using a subset of 12 of the uncertain parameters identified by Murphy et al. 2004, we have run climate model experiments perturbing these parameters singly and jointly, within a realistic range, in order to understand the spectrum of climates that result. We use the model, FAMOUS (Fast Met Office/UK Universities Simulator), a low resolution emulator of HadCM3 for our experiments. The relatively low computing time of FAMOUS makes it ideal for long paleoclimate studies. We use an early Eocene paleogeography and run our simulations at 560 ppm, (2 x pre-industrial CO2.) The solar constant for the early Eocene is set to 1359.5 Wm-2. The climate proxy dataset (terrestrial and marine) available for the early Eocene is

  10. Vaccinations for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Lisa M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients. PMID:24925587

  11. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klipple, G L; Cecere, F A

    1989-05-01

    The activity of RA is significantly altered by pregnancy with approximately 70 per cent of patients experiencing substantial improvement in symptoms, signs and sometimes extra-articular manifestations. This lessening of disease activity occurs in association with an almost complete cessation of medications. However, whether partial or complete this remission is short-lived with more than 90 per cent of women who improved relapsing by 6 to 8 months postpartum. Further, in approximately 30 per cent of RA patients the course remains unchanged or worsens during gestation and indeed the first symptoms of RA may develop during pregnancy or shortly thereafter. Conversely active rheumatoid arthritis seems to little influence the maternal course or fetal outcome of pregnancy. The multiple and complex immunologic alterations of the pregnant state are designed to ensure survival of the fetal allograft in a foreign host. A number of these alterations particularly involving modulation of cell-mediated immunity, immunoglobulin composition, immune complex generation, or the inflammatory response have the potential to interfere with the pathophysiology of RA. In short, although the specific mechanism remains an enigma, the reason for the amelioration of RA during pregnancy is probably an incidental and fortuitous reaction to one or more of these immunomodulatory factors. PMID:2657889

  13. Climate model simulations of the observed early-2000s hiatus of global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehl, Gerald A.; Teng, Haiyan; Arblaster, Julie M.

    2014-10-01

    The slowdown in the rate of global warming in the early 2000s is not evident in the multi-model ensemble average of traditional climate change projection simulations. However, a number of individual ensemble members from that set of models successfully simulate the early-2000s hiatus when naturally-occurring climate variability involving the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) coincided, by chance, with the observed negative phase of the IPO that contributed to the early-2000s hiatus. If the recent methodology of initialized decadal climate prediction could have been applied in the mid-1990s using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 multi-models, both the negative phase of the IPO in the early 2000s as well as the hiatus could have been simulated, with the multi-model average performing better than most of the individual models. The loss of predictive skill for six initial years before the mid-1990s points to the need for consistent hindcast skill to establish reliability of an operational decadal climate prediction system.

  14. Anti-Sa antibodies: prognostic and pathogenetic significance to rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    El-Gabalawy, Hani S; Wilkins, John A

    2004-01-01

    Anti-Sa antibodies are detected in the serum of 20–47% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These antibodies have a high degree of specificity for the disease, and appear to identify a subset of early rheumatoid arthritis patients destined to have aggressive and destructive disease. It has recently been confirmed that anti-Sa antibodies are directed to citrullinated vimentin, thus placing them in the anti-citrulline family of autoantibodies. The Sa antigen has previously been shown to be present in synovium. This, along with the demonstration of citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid synovium, suggests that anti-Sa antibodies may play a pathogenetic role in the initiation and/or persistence of rheumatoid synovitis. PMID:15059270

  15. New laboratory markers for the management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Foti, Daniela P; Greco, Marta; Palella, Eleonora; Gulletta, Elio

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, the most prominent of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, represents an important social health problem. Recent insights into the immunopathogenic mechanism of this complex and multiform illness might open new perspectives for a more appropriate laboratory approach. In this review we focus on the most relevant pathogenetic mechanism; indicating the laboratory biomarkers specifically linked to early diagnosis, prognosis, evolutive aspects of the disease, and therapeutic efficacy. Evidence based on laboratory medicine could provide the best outcome for patients. PMID:24933628

  16. The Early Jurassic climate: General circulation model simulations and the paleoclimate record

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of several general circulation model simulations of the Early Jurassic climate. The general circulation model employed was developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies while most paleoclimate data were provided by the Paleographic Atlas Project of the University of Chicago. The first chapter presents an Early Jurassic base simulation, which uses detailed reconstructions of paleogeography, vegetation, and sea surface temperature as boundary condition data sets. The resulting climatology reveals an Earth 5.2[degrees]C warmer, globally, than at present and a latitudinal temperature gradient dominated by high-latitude warming (+20[degrees]C) and little tropical change (+1[degrees]C). Comparisons show a good correlation between simulated results and paleoclimate data. Sensitivity experiments are used to investigate any model-data mismatches. Chapters two and three discuss two important aspects of Early Jurassic climate, continental aridity and global warming. Chapter two focuses on the hydrological capabilities of the general circulation model. The general circulation model's hydrologic diagnostics are evaluated, using the distribution of modern deserts and Early Jurassic paleoclimate data as validating constraints. A new method, based on general circulation model diagnostics and empirical formulae, is proposed for evaluating moisture balance. Chapter three investigates the cause of past global warming, concentrating on the role of increased ocean heat transport. Early Jurassic simulations show that increased ocean heat transports may have been a major factor in past climates. Increased ocean heat transports create latitudinal temperature gradients that closely approximate paleoclimate data and solve the problem of tropical overheating that results from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. Increased carbon dioxide cannot duplicate the Jurassic climate without also including increased ocean heat transports.

  17. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  18. Insights into the early Eocene hydrological cycle from an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, M. J.; Lunt, D. J.; Huber, M.; Heinemann, M.; Kiehl, J.; LeGrande, A.; Loptson, C. A.; Roberts, C. D.; Sagoo, N.; Shields, C.; Valdes, P. J.; Winguth, A.; Winguth, C.; Pancost, R. D.

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies, utilising a range of proxies, indicate that a significant perturbation to global hydrology occurred at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 Ma). An enhanced hydrological cycle for the warm early Eocene is also suggested to have played a key role in maintaining high-latitude warmth during this interval. However, comparisons of proxy data to General Circulation Model (GCM) simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised, despite significant differences in simulated surface temperatures. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P-E distributions within the EoMIP ensemble (Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously-published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure and precipitation relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to preindustrial. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, although the effects of differences in paleogeography/ice sheets are also of importance in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally-averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP/dT) display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that a number of GCMs underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated CO2 or by varying

  19. Ratio of Circulating IFNγ+ “Th17 Cells” in Memory Th Cells Is Inversely Correlated with the Titer of Anti-CCP Antibodies in Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Based on Flow Cytometry Methods of the Human Immunology Project

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with chronic joint inflammation characterized by activated T cells. IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. However, it remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we validated the methods of the Human Immunology Project using only the cell-surface marker through measuring the actual expression of IL-17 and IFNγ. We also evaluated the expression of CD161 in human Th17 cells. We then tried to identify Th17 cells, IL-17+Th17 cells, and IFNγ+Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients using the standardized method of the Human Immunology Project. Our findings validated the method and the expression of CD161. The ratio of IFNγ+Th17 cells in memory T cells was inversely correlated to the titers of anti-CCP antibodies in the early-onset RA patients. These findings suggest that Th17 cells play important roles in the early phase of RA and that anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with early phase RA, especially those with high titers of CCP antibodies. PMID:27294146

  20. Insights into the early Eocene hydrological cycle from an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Matthew; Lunt, Daniel; Pancost, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies utilising a range of geochemical proxies have indicated that a significant perturbation to global hydrology occurred at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 Ma). An enhanced hydrological cycle for the warm early Eocene is also suggested to have played a key role in maintaining high-latitude warmth during this interval. Comparisons of proxy data to General Circulation Model (GCM) simulated hydrology have not widely been made however, and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised despite significant differences in simulated surface temperatures. In this work, we address this by undertaking an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation distributions within the EoMIP ensemble (Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously-published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure and precipitation-relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to preindustrial. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, although the effects of differences in paleogeography/ice sheets are also of importance in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally-averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely as a result of different climate sensitivities (dT/dCO2) and differing parameterisation schemes. Despite this, models with similar global precipitation sensitivities (dP/dT) display different regional responses for a given temperature change. Regions which are particularly model sensitive include the South Pacific, tropical Africa and the Tethys and may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with GCM data illustrates that models tend to unanimously underestimate early Eocene precipitation rates at high latitudes. Models which warm these regions via elevated CO2 or by utilising alternative parameterisations are most

  1. Simulated Microgravity as a Probe for Understanding the Mechanisms of Early Pattern Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, A. W.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Early pattern specification (e.g., axial structure morphogenesis, doreal ventral polarity, etc.) is monitored in amphibian eggs which were subjected to microgravity simulation by constant rotation on a horizontal clinostat. In contrast to previous clinostat experiments, rotation is initiated either prior to fertilization or immediately thereafter. Large proportions of clinostated eggs developed normal axial structures. A model which employs a multiple set of signals for specifying early pattern is discussed. Effects of microgravity simulation on the earliest post fertilization pattern specification event dorsal/ventral polarization is analyzed in detail. Other models are developed and they are discussed. As a general mechanism for explaining the manner in which regional developmental patterns emerge from the initial, radially symmetrial egg, the density compartment model is described. The identification of the various zones or compartments of egg cytoplasm using inverted eggs is explained.

  2. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  3. Gage for evaluating rheumatoid hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houge, J. C.; Plautz, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    Two-axis goniometer accurately measures movements of fingers about knuckle joints, diagnosing hands structurally changed by rheumatoid arthritis. Instrument measures lateral movement which is small in normal knuckles but increased in diseased joints. Goniometer is two connected protractors that simultaneously measure angles in perpindicular planes. Dials are offset to clear bony protuberances; extension and offset adjustments span any hand size.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  5. Medicines to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 55, but it can happen at any age. Rheumatoid arthritis affects women more than men. Visit your doctor to talk about your health and the medicines you may need. This factsheet will give you information about a type of medicine. You will learn ...

  6. Prevention of Stroke in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zha, Alicia M; Di Napoli, Mario; Behrouz, Réza

    2015-12-01

    The risk of cerebrovascular disease is increased among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and remains an underserved area of medical need. Only a minor proportion of RA patients achieve suitable stroke prevention. Classical cardiovascular risk factors appear to be under-diagnosed and undertreated among patients with RA. Reducing the inflammatory burden is also necessary to lower the cardiovascular risk. An adequate control of disease activity and cerebrovascular risk assessment using national guidelines should be recommended for all patients with RA. For patients with a documented history of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular risk factors, smoking cessation and corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the lowest dose possible are crucial. Risk score models should be adapted for patients with RA by introducing a 1.5 multiplication factor, and their results interpreted to appropriately direct clinical care. Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers are preferred treatment options. Biologic and non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs should be initiated early to mitigate the necessity of symptom control drugs and to achieve early alleviation of the inflammatory state. Early control can improve vascular compliance, decrease atherosclerosis, improve overall lipid and metabolic profiles, and reduce the incidence of heart disease that may lead to atrial fibrillation. In patients with significant cervical spine involvement, early intervention and improved disease control are necessary and may prevent further mechanical vascular injury. PMID:26486791

  7. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  8. An Early Warning System for Loan Risk Assessment Based on Rare Event Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Qiu, Yue; Wu, Yueqin

    System simulation is one of important tool for risk assessment. In this paper, a new method is presented to deal with credit risk assessment problems for commercial banks based on rare event simulation. The failure probability of repaying loans of listed company is taken as the criterion to measure the level of credit risk. The rare-event concept is adopted to construct the model of credit risk identification in commercial banks, and cross-entropy scheme is designed to implement the rare event simulation, based on which the loss probability can be assessed. Numerical experiments have shown that the method has a strong capability to identify the credit risk for commercial banks and offers a good tool for early warning.

  9. Interest of modelling in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Beresniak, Ariel; Dupont, Danielle M; Becker, Jean-Claude; Merkesdal, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Such as prospective studies can provide evidence-based information for clinicians and regulatory agencies, modelling studies provide useful information when experimental studies are to complex, too long, or too expensive to carry out. If modelling has been widely used in pharmacokinetics, it is in the field of pharmacoeconomics that numerous models have been published in recent years, including models relevant to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The most common modelling techniques published in RA are decision trees and Markov models which are used to perform cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses using real or simulated populations. This paper reviews the main types of modelling techniques used in pharmacoeconomic studies with the aim of clarifying their interest and limitations for the clinicians. Generating such evidence is highly relevant to assisting clinical recommendations and reimbursement decisions towards enabling the optimal management of RA and reducing its overall clinical and economic burden, for the benefits of patients and health systems. PMID:23078913

  10. Atypical Rheumatoid Nodules: A Possible Precursor to a Rheumatoid Variant in a Rheumatoid-Factor-Negative Patient. Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon; Parker, Wendy L.

    2008-01-01

    Subcutaneous nodules occur in approximately 20–25% of rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive rheumatoid patients. In this paper, we present a unique case of a 47-year-old healthy RF-negative woman with a 3-year history of necrobiotic nodules over the dorsum of her hands, extensor forearms, and lower extremities. This may represent an atypical presentation or a new rheumatoid variant. PMID:19048351

  11. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  12. Management of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid disorders.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, A J; Salha, R

    2013-04-01

    This article summarises the rheumatoid diseases that particularly affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ): psoriatic arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Management is by a joint approach between rheumatologists and maxillofacial surgeons with a specific interest in diseases of the TMJ who give early surgical advice. Steroid injections, whilst useful in the short term, are not useful for long term or repeated treatment, and may lead to collapse of the joint and development of a deformed anterior open bite. These disorders should be managed primarily using standard conservative regimens, and failure to respond should lead to diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopy and appropriate surgical treatment. When ankylosis develops or the joint collapses, a replacement joint should be considered and patients should be referred to an appropriately trained surgeon. PMID:22658606

  13. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  14. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  15. Immune modulation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitrios A; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Bathon, Joan M

    2011-12-01

    The approval - several years ago - of the first tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor for the management of rheumatoid arthritis launched a new era in the therapeutics of rheumatology. Since then an almost cataclysmic discovery of new treatment targets and corresponding biologic agents ensued. Nowadays, the rheumatologist and the rheumatologic patient have the luxury of several immune modulators available to successfully treat the majority of patients with RA or other inflammatory arthritides and conditions. In this review we focus on a discussion of the approved immune modulators/biologic agents available for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We also present an overview of agents under development. For the immune modulators discussed, we describe their mechanism of action and summarise initial data and recent updates on efficacy and safety. PMID:22265267

  16. Bayesian inference analyses of the polygenic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Eli A; Wegmann, Daniel; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Do, Ron; Voight, Benjamin F; Kraft, Peter; Chen, Robert; Kallberg, Henrik J; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Kathiresan, Sekar; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gregersen, Peter K; Alfredsson, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Worthington, Jane; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    The genetic architectures of common, complex diseases are largely uncharacterized. We modeled the genetic architecture underlying genome-wide association study (GWAS) data for rheumatoid arthritis and developed a new method using polygenic risk-score analyses to infer the total liability-scale variance explained by associated GWAS SNPs. Using this method, we estimated that, together, thousands of SNPs from rheumatoid arthritis GWAS explain an additional 20% of disease risk (excluding known associated loci). We further tested this method on datasets for three additional diseases and obtained comparable estimates for celiac disease (43% excluding the major histocompatibility complex), myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease (48%) and type 2 diabetes (49%). Our results are consistent with simulated genetic models in which hundreds of associated loci harbor common causal variants and a smaller number of loci harbor multiple rare causal variants. These analyses suggest that GWAS will continue to be highly productive for the discovery of additional susceptibility loci for common diseases. PMID:22446960

  17. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  18. Ectopic lesion of schistosomiasis of the penis simulating an early carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Badejo, O A; Soyinka, F; Laja, A O

    1978-09-01

    A case of ectopic lesion of Schistosoma haematobium of the penis with extensive tissue destruction, simulating an early carcinoma of the penis and almost resulting in an autoamputation of the crown of the penis, is presented. The penis was surgically repaired and the patient treated with ambilhar. In schistosoma endemic area, it is important to think of ectopic schistosoma lesion by such a presentation. Existing theories to explain the presence of schistosoma eggs in locations outside the portal-caval system were reviewed and another one was advanced: its being sexually transmitted. PMID:31780

  19. Contrasting diagnosis performance of forced oscillation and spirometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Barbosa, Wellington Ribeiro; Lopes, Agnaldo José; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis is directly responsible for 10% to 20% of all mortality. The best way to improve the prognosis is early detection and treatment. The forced oscillation technique is easy to perform and offers a detailed exam, which may be helpful in the early detection of respiratory changes. This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the clinical potential of the forced oscillation technique in the detection of early respiratory alterations in rheumatoid arthritis patients with respiratory complaints and (2) to compare the sensitivity of forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. METHODS: A total of 40 individuals were analyzed: 20 healthy and 20 with rheumatoid arthritis (90% with respiratory complaints). The clinical usefulness of the parameters was evaluated by investigating the sensibility, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01641705. RESULTS: The early adverse respiratory effects of rheumatoid arthritis were adequately detected by the forced oscillation technique parameters, and a high accuracy for clinical use was obtained (AUC>0.9, Se = 80%, Sp = 95%). The use of spirometric parameters did not obtain an appropriate accuracy for clinical use. The diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique parameters was significantly higher than that of spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study provide substantial evidence that the forced oscillation technique can contribute to the easy identification of initial respiratory abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients that are not detectable by spirometric exams. Therefore, we believe that the forced oscillation technique can be used as a complementary exam that may help to improve the treatment of breathing disorders in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:23018292

  20. Simulation of multiple ion channel block provides improved early prediction of compounds’ clinical torsadogenic risk

    PubMed Central

    Mirams, Gary R.; Cui, Yi; Sher, Anna; Fink, Martin; Cooper, Jonathan; Heath, Bronagh M.; McMahon, Nick C.; Gavaghan, David J.; Noble, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Aims The level of inhibition of the human Ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel is one of the earliest preclinical markers used to predict the risk of a compound causing Torsade-de-Pointes (TdP) arrhythmias. While avoiding the use of drugs with maximum therapeutic concentrations within 30-fold of their hERG inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) values has been suggested, there are drugs that are exceptions to this rule: hERG inhibitors that do not cause TdP, and drugs that can cause TdP but are not strong hERG inhibitors. In this study, we investigate whether a simulated evaluation of multi-channel effects could be used to improve this early prediction of TdP risk. Methods and results We collected multiple ion channel data (hERG, Na, l-type Ca) on 31 drugs associated with varied risks of TdP. To integrate the information on multi-channel block, we have performed simulations with a variety of mathematical models of cardiac cells (for rabbit, dog, and human ventricular myocyte models). Drug action is modelled using IC50 values, and therapeutic drug concentrations to calculate the proportion of blocked channels and the channel conductances are modified accordingly. Various pacing protocols are simulated, and classification analysis is performed to evaluate the predictive power of the models for TdP risk. We find that simulation of action potential duration prolongation, at therapeutic concentrations, provides improved prediction of the TdP risk associated with a compound, above that provided by existing markers. Conclusion The suggested calculations improve the reliability of early cardiac safety assessments, beyond those based solely on a hERG block effect. PMID:21300721

  1. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26476882

  2. Selective involvement of ERK and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases in early rheumatoid arthritis (1987 ACR criteria compared to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria): a prospective study aimed at identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    de Launay, Daphne; van de Sande, Marleen GH; de Hair, Maria JH; Grabiec, Aleksander M; van de Sande, Gijs PM; Lehmann, K Aad; Wijbrandts, Carla A; van Baarsen, Lisa GM; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the expression and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in patients with early arthritis who are disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naïve. Methods A total of 50 patients with early arthritis who were DMARD naïve (disease duration <1 year) were prospectively followed and diagnosed at baseline and after 2 years for undifferentiated arthritis (UA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2010 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria), or spondyloarthritis (SpA). Synovial biopsies obtained at baseline were examined for expression and phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by immunohistochemistry and digital analysis. Synovial tissue mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results ERK and JNK activation was enhanced at inclusion in patients meeting RA criteria compared to other diagnoses. JNK activation was enhanced in patients diagnosed as having UA at baseline who eventually fulfilled 1987 ACR RA criteria compared to those who remained UA, and in patients with RA fulfilling 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria at baseline. ERK and JNK activation was enhanced in patients with RA developing progressive joint destruction. JNK activation in UA predicted 1987 ACR RA classification criteria fulfilment (R2=0.59, p=0.02) after follow-up, and disease progression in early arthritis (R2=0.16, p<0.05). Enhanced JNK activation in patients with persistent disease was associated with altered synovial expression of extracellular matrix components and CD44. Conclusions JNK activation is elevated in RA before 1987 ACR RA classification criteria are met and predicts development of erosive disease in early arthritis, suggesting JNK may represent an attractive target in treating RA early in the disease process. PMID:21953337

  3. Methods for detecting early warnings of critical transitions in time series illustrated using simulated ecological data.

    PubMed

    Dakos, Vasilis; Carpenter, Stephen R; Brock, William A; Ellison, Aaron M; Guttal, Vishwesha; Ives, Anthony R; Kéfi, Sonia; Livina, Valerie; Seekell, David A; van Nes, Egbert H; Scheffer, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, including lakes, organisms, ocean circulation patterns, or financial markets, are now thought to have tipping points where critical transitions to a contrasting state can happen. Because critical transitions can occur unexpectedly and are difficult to manage, there is a need for methods that can be used to identify when a critical transition is approaching. Recent theory shows that we can identify the proximity of a system to a critical transition using a variety of so-called 'early warning signals', and successful empirical examples suggest a potential for practical applicability. However, while the range of proposed methods for predicting critical transitions is rapidly expanding, opinions on their practical use differ widely, and there is no comparative study that tests the limitations of the different methods to identify approaching critical transitions using time-series data. Here, we summarize a range of currently available early warning methods and apply them to two simulated time series that are typical of systems undergoing a critical transition. In addition to a methodological guide, our work offers a practical toolbox that may be used in a wide range of fields to help detect early warning signals of critical transitions in time series data. PMID:22815897

  4. Methods for Detecting Early Warnings of Critical Transitions in Time Series Illustrated Using Simulated Ecological Data

    PubMed Central

    Dakos, Vasilis; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Brock, William A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Guttal, Vishwesha; Ives, Anthony R.; Kéfi, Sonia; Livina, Valerie; Seekell, David A.; van Nes, Egbert H.; Scheffer, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, including lakes, organisms, ocean circulation patterns, or financial markets, are now thought to have tipping points where critical transitions to a contrasting state can happen. Because critical transitions can occur unexpectedly and are difficult to manage, there is a need for methods that can be used to identify when a critical transition is approaching. Recent theory shows that we can identify the proximity of a system to a critical transition using a variety of so-called ‘early warning signals’, and successful empirical examples suggest a potential for practical applicability. However, while the range of proposed methods for predicting critical transitions is rapidly expanding, opinions on their practical use differ widely, and there is no comparative study that tests the limitations of the different methods to identify approaching critical transitions using time-series data. Here, we summarize a range of currently available early warning methods and apply them to two simulated time series that are typical of systems undergoing a critical transition. In addition to a methodological guide, our work offers a practical toolbox that may be used in a wide range of fields to help detect early warning signals of critical transitions in time series data. PMID:22815897

  5. Computer simulation on the cooperation of functional molecules during the early stages of evolution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wentao; Hu, Jiming

    2012-01-01

    It is very likely that life began with some RNA (or RNA-like) molecules, self-replicating by base-pairing and exhibiting enzyme-like functions that favored the self-replication. Different functional molecules may have emerged by favoring their own self-replication at different aspects. Then, a direct route towards complexity/efficiency may have been through the coexistence/cooperation of these molecules. However, the likelihood of this route remains quite unclear, especially because the molecules would be competing for limited common resources. By computer simulation using a Monte-Carlo model (with "micro-resolution" at the level of nucleotides and membrane components), we show that the coexistence/cooperation of these molecules can occur naturally, both in a naked form and in a protocell form. The results of the computer simulation also lead to quite a few deductions concerning the environment and history in the scenario. First, a naked stage (with functional molecules catalyzing template-replication and metabolism) may have occurred early in evolution but required high concentration and limited dispersal of the system (e.g., on some mineral surface); the emergence of protocells enabled a "habitat-shift" into bulk water. Second, the protocell stage started with a substage of "pseudo-protocells", with functional molecules catalyzing template-replication and metabolism, but still missing the function involved in the synthesis of membrane components, the emergence of which would lead to a subsequent "true-protocell" substage. Third, the initial unstable membrane, composed of prebiotically available fatty acids, should have been superseded quite early by a more stable membrane (e.g., composed of phospholipids, like modern cells). Additionally, the membrane-takeover probably occurred at the transition of the two substages of the protocells. The scenario described in the present study should correspond to an episode in early evolution, after the emergence of single

  6. A Systematic Review of Serum Biomarkers Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide and Rheumatoid Factor as Tests for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter; Gartemann, Juliane; Hsieh, Jeanie; Creeden, James

    2011-01-01

    This systematic review assesses the current status of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) tests in the diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We reviewed publications on tests and biomarkers for early diagnosis of RA from English-language MEDLINE-indexed journals and non-MEDLINE-indexed sources. 85 publications were identified and reviewed, including 68 studies from MEDLINE and 17 non-MEDLINE sources. Anti-CCP2 assays provide improved sensitivity over anti-CCP assays and RF, but anti-CCP2 and RF assays in combination demonstrate a positive predictive value (PPV) nearing 100%, greater than the PPV of either of the tests alone. The combination also appears to be able to distinguish between patients whose disease course is expected to be more severe and both tests are incorporated in the 2010 ACR Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria. While the clinical value of anti-CCP tests has been established, differences in cut-off values, sensitivities and specificities exist between first-, second- and third-generation tests and harmonization efforts are under way. Anti-CCP and RF are clinically valuable biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of RA patients. The combination of the two biomarkers in conjunction with other clinical measures is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of RA patients. PMID:21915375

  7. Comparing stochastic differential equations and agent-based modelling and simulation for early-stage cancer.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Owen, Markus R; Reps, Jenna; Aickelin, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    There is great potential to be explored regarding the use of agent-based modelling and simulation as an alternative paradigm to investigate early-stage cancer interactions with the immune system. It does not suffer from some limitations of ordinary differential equation models, such as the lack of stochasticity, representation of individual behaviours rather than aggregates and individual memory. In this paper we investigate the potential contribution of agent-based modelling and simulation when contrasted with stochastic versions of ODE models using early-stage cancer examples. We seek answers to the following questions: (1) Does this new stochastic formulation produce similar results to the agent-based version? (2) Can these methods be used interchangeably? (3) Do agent-based models outcomes reveal any benefit when compared to the Gillespie results? To answer these research questions we investigate three well-established mathematical models describing interactions between tumour cells and immune elements. These case studies were re-conceptualised under an agent-based perspective and also converted to the Gillespie algorithm formulation. Our interest in this work, therefore, is to establish a methodological discussion regarding the usability of different simulation approaches, rather than provide further biological insights into the investigated case studies. Our results show that it is possible to obtain equivalent models that implement the same mechanisms; however, the incapacity of the Gillespie algorithm to retain individual memory of past events affects the similarity of some results. Furthermore, the emergent behaviour of ABMS produces extra patters of behaviour in the system, which was not obtained by the Gillespie algorithm. PMID:24752131

  8. Reconciling reconstructed and simulated features of the winter Pacific-North-American pattern in the early 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchettin, D.; Bothe, O.; Lehner, F.; Ortega, P.; Raible, C. C.; Swingedouw, D.

    2014-11-01

    Reconstructions of past climate behavior often describe prominent anomalous periods that are not necessarily captured in climate simulations. Here, we illustrate the contrast between an interdecadal strong positive phase of the winter Pacific/North American pattern (PNA) in the early 19th century that is described by a PNA reconstruction based on tree-rings from northwestern North America, and a slight tendency towards negative winter PNA anomalies during the same period in an ensemble of state-of-the-art coupled climate simulations. Additionally, a pseudo-proxy investigation with the same simulation ensemble allows assessing the robustness of PNA reconstructions using solely geophysical predictors from northwestern North America for the last millennium. The reconstructed early-19th-century positive PNA anomaly emerges as a potentially reliable feature, although it is subject to a number of sources of uncertainty and potential deficiencies. The pseudo-reconstructions demonstrate that the early-19th-century discrepancy between reconstructed and simulated PNA does not stem from the reconstruction process. Instead, reconstructed and simulated features of the early-19th-century PNA can be reconciled by interpreting the reconstructed evolution during this time as an expression of internal climate variability, hence unlikely to be reproduced in its exact temporal occurrence by a small ensemble of climate simulations. However, firm attribution of the reconstructed PNA anomaly is hampered by known limitations and deficiencies of coupled climate models and uncertainties in the early-19th-century external forcing and background climate conditions.

  9. Fluorescence imaging of experimental rheumatoid arthritis in vivo using a fast flying-spot scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J.; Voigt, J.; Seifert, F.; Ebert, B.; Macdonald, R.; Gemeinhardt, I.; Gemeinhardt, O.; Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Vater, A.; Vollmer, S.; Licha, K.; Schirner, M.

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a flying-spot scanner for fluorescence imaging of rheumatoid arthritis in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range following intravenous administration of contrast agents. The new imaging system has been characterized with respect to linearity, dynamic range and spatial resolution with the help of fluorescent phantoms. In vivo experiments were performed on an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, NIR-fluorescence images of early stages of joint inflammation have been compared with findings from contrast enhanced MR imaging and histology.

  10. [Orthopedic treatment of the shoulder joint impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Babko, A M; Poluliakh, M V; Huzhevs'kyĭ, I V; Herasymenko, A S

    2014-12-01

    Brachial joint affection in patients, suffering rheumatoid arthritis, occupies a third place after such of the elbow and the hand. Due to significant reduction of a freedom degree, caused by inflammation, the upper extremity looses function of active instrument for the items transposition. Volume of surgical treatment of such patients depends on stage of the process. On early stages arthroscopic synovectomy of brachial joint is performed and on the late--endoprosthesis. Late results of the treatment are mainly positive. Satisfactory results are based, predominantly, on raising of activity of general rheumatoid inflammation. PMID:25842886

  11. Simulating multiple merger pathways to the central kinematics of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Cox, Thomas J.; Novak, G. S.; Primack, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional integral field surveys such as ATLAS3D are producing rich observational data sets yielding insights into galaxy formation. These new kinematic observations have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanisms leading to a spectrum of fast rotators and slow rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamical simulations, sampling idealized galaxy merger scenarios constructed from model spiral galaxies. Idealized and controlled simulations of this sort complement the more `realistic' cosmological simulations by isolating and analysing the effects of specific parameters, as we do in this paper. We recreate minor and major binary mergers, binary merger trees with multiple progenitors, and multiple sequential mergers. Within each of these categories of formation history, we correlate progenitor gas fraction, mass ratio, orbital pericentre, orbital ellipticity, and spin with remnant kinematic properties. We create kinematic profiles of these 95 simulations comparable to ATLAS3D data. By constructing remnant profiles of the projected specific angular momentum (λ _R= < R|V|rangle / < R √{V^2+σ ^2}rangle), triaxiality, and measuring the incidences of kinematic twists and kinematically decoupled cores, we distinguish between varying formation scenarios. We find that binary mergers nearly always form fast rotators. Slow rotators can be formed from zero initial angular momentum configurations and gas-poor mergers, but are not as round as the ATLAS3D galaxies. Remnants of binary merger trees are triaxial slow rotators. Sequential mergers form round slow rotators that most resemble the ATLAS3D rotators.

  12. Simulating Earthquake Early Warning Systems in the Classroom as a New Approach to Teaching Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    A discussion of P- and S-waves seems an ubiquitous part of studying earthquakes in the classroom. Textbooks from middle school through university level typically define the differences between the waves and illustrate the sense of motion. While many students successfully memorize the differences between wave types (often utilizing the first letter as a memory aide), textbooks rarely give tangible examples of how the two waves would "feel" to a person sitting on the ground. One reason for introducing the wave types is to explain how to calculate earthquake epicenters using seismograms and travel time charts -- very abstract representations of earthquakes. Even when the skill is mastered using paper-and-pencil activities or one of the excellent online interactive versions, locating an epicenter simply does not excite many of our students because it evokes little emotional impact, even in students located in earthquake-prone areas. Despite these limitations, huge numbers of students are mandated to complete the task. At the K-12 level, California requires that all students be able to locate earthquake epicenters in Grade 6; in New York, the skill is a required part of the Regent's Examination. Recent innovations in earthquake early warning systems around the globe give us the opportunity to address the same content standard, but with substantially more emotional impact on students. I outline a lesson about earthquakes focused on earthquake early warning systems. The introductory activities include video clips of actual earthquakes and emphasize the differences between the way P- and S-waves feel when they arrive (P arrives first, but is weaker). I include an introduction to the principle behind earthquake early warning (including a summary of possible uses of a few seconds warning about strong shaking) and show examples from Japan. Students go outdoors to simulate P-waves, S-waves, and occupants of two different cities who are talking to one another on cell phones

  13. Radiation Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Protostellar Collapse: Nonideal Magnetohydrodynamic Effects and Early Formation of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2015-03-01

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  14. Simulation models for European corn borer postdiapause morphogenesis and early infestation of maize in Missouri, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magai, Robert N.; Decker, W. L.; Keaster, Armon J.

    The European corn borer is one of the most damaging insect pests to maize in the United States. Different methods exist for the estimation of time of damage to corn by first generation European corn borer. The most commonly used method is the linear thermal constant concept of phenology which by convention calculates cumulative thermal units from January 1 or another arbitrary date. Linear and nonlinear models based on the thermal units concept developed were to predict and simulate postdiapause development of the European corn borer and subsequent infestation of the maize crop using early spring temperatures (May 1-15) in central Missouri. The developmental rates of European corn borer were obtained from growth chamber investigations that simulated those temperatures, the operational temperatures being selected from a compilation of archival meteorological data from 1948 to 1989. The linear and polynomial regression models were developed to predict phenological stages of the European corn borer using thermal units as developmental rates. The models were compared against each other to determine the better predictor of estimation values: each explained 94 and 98% of the variation in developmental stages, respectively. In addition, the models were tested against independent field data and both models gave good predictions of developmental stages, indicating that either model would be a good predictor.

  15. MRI assessment of early response to certolizumab pegol in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIIb study applying MRI at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, M; Jacobsson, L T H; Schaufelberger, C; Hansen, M Sejer; Bijlsma, J W J; Dudek, A; Rell-Bakalarska, M; Staelens, F; Haake, R; Sundman-Engberg, B; Bliddal, H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the first time point of an MRI-verified response to certolizumab pegol (CZP) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Forty-one patients with active RA despite disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy were randomised 2:1 to CZP (CZP loading dose 400 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 0–4; CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 6–16) or placebo→CZP (placebo at weeks 0–2; CZP loading dose at weeks 2–6; CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks at weeks 8–16). Contrast-enhanced MRI of one hand and wrist was acquired at baseline (week 0) and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16. All six time points were read simultaneously, blinded to time, using the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials RA MRI scoring system. Primary outcome was change in synovitis score in the CZP group; secondary outcomes were change in bone oedema (osteitis) and erosion scores and clinical outcome measures. Results Forty patients were treated (27 CZP, 13 placebo→CZP), and 36 (24 CZP, 12 placebo→CZP) completed week 16. In the CZP group, there were significant reductions from baseline synovitis (Hodges–Lehmann estimate of median change, −1.5, p=0.049) and osteitis scores (−2.5, p=0.031) at week 16. Numerical, but statistically insignificant, MRI inflammation reductions were observed at weeks 1–2 in the CZP group. No significant change was seen in bone erosion score. Improvements across all clinical outcomes were seen in the CZP group. Conclusions CZP reduced MRI synovitis and osteitis scores at week 16, despite small sample size and the technical challenge of reading six time points simultaneously. This study provides essential information on optimal MRI timing for subsequent trials. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01235598. PMID:25512675

  16. Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn H.

    1998-01-01

    Useful vocational rehabilitation strategies for persons with rheumatoid arthritis include (1) management of symptoms and reduction of energy demand; (2) reasonable job accommodations; (3) identification of suitable jobs and necessary training; and (4) enhancement of self-advocacy skills. (SK)

  17. [Large articular geode cyst in rheumatoid polyarthritis].

    PubMed

    Sabri, F; Calmes, D; Muller, M J

    1989-01-01

    A case of a large bone cyst in the tibial condyle of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is reported. The etiology and pathology are discussed, and preventive surgical treatment is recommended. PMID:2801089

  18. A rheumatoid nodule in an unusual location: mediastinal lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Yachoui, Ralph; Ward, Celine; Kreidy, Mazen

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multisystem inflammatory disease characterised by destructive synovitis and varied extra-articular involvement. Rheumatoid lung nodules are the most common pulmonary manifestations of RA. Rheumatoid nodules in mediastinal lymph nodes are extremely uncommon. We describe a male patient with long-standing RA and subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules presenting with multiple lung nodules and mediastinal lymphadenopathies. Definite histopathology of a lymph node was consistent with necrobiotic granuloma due to RA. Clinicians should be aware of rheumatoid nodules as a potential cause of mediastinal lymphadenopathies, mainly in advanced rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23645652

  19. Psychosocial problems among newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Gåfvels, C; Hägerström, M; Nordmark, B; Wändell, P E

    2012-03-01

    We identified patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the ages 18-65 years who needed psychosocial interventions. A total of 123 patients (90 women) were asked to participate, but 19 declined and 4 dropped out early in the study, leaving a total of 100 patients (75 women) in the sample. Questionnaires used were the Epidemiological Investigation on Rheumatoid Arthritis study questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, and the General Coping Questionnaire. Interviews showed that 46% of the included 100 patients had psychosocial problems (PSP). One third of them had problems directly related to RA. The rest had problems with their life situation in general, without or reinforced by RA. Compared to patients without psychosocial problems, PSP patients lived in more strained social situations, especially regarding personal finances and social support. More of the PSP patients were anxious, showed lower SOC scores, and also used more emotion-based coping strategies (resignation, protest, isolation and intrusion) and less problem-oriented (minimization). They also had higher scores on depression and more frequently expected that RA would negatively affect their future. PSP patients also experienced a more negative impact of the disease, a finding not confirmed by the sickness activity score judged by the rheumatologist. Thus, early in the course of RA, screening instruments should be used to identify PSP patients. Psychosocial treatment and support by medical social workers skilled in RA care should be offered. PMID:22089162

  20. Reliable and cost-effective serodiagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pieter W A; Ally, Mahmood M T M; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Early diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) optimises therapeutic benefit and the probability of achieving disease remission. Notwithstanding clinical acumen, early diagnosis is dependent on access to reliable serodiagnostic procedures, as well as on the discerning application and interpretation of these. In the case of RA, however, no disease-specific serodiagnostic procedure is available due to the multi-factorial and polygenic nature of this autoimmune disorder. This has resulted in the development of an array of serodiagnostic procedures based on the detection of autoantibodies reactive with various putative autoantigens. Other procedures based on measurement of elevations in the concentrations of systemic biomarkers of inflammation, most commonly acute phase reactants and cytokines/chemokines, are used as objective indices of disease activity. Following a brief overview of RA research in African populations, the current review is focused on those autoantibodies/biomarkers, specifically rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies and C-reactive protein, which are currently recognised as being the most reliable and cost-effective with respect to disease prediction and diagnosis, as well as in monitoring activity and outcome. PMID:26856871

  1. Reconciling reconstructed and simulated features of the winter Pacific/North American pattern in the early 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchettin, D.; Bothe, O.; Lehner, F.; Ortega, P.; Raible, C. C.; Swingedouw, D.

    2015-06-01

    Reconstructions of past climate behavior often describe prominent anomalous periods that are not necessarily captured in climate simulations. Here, we illustrate the contrast between an interdecadal strong positive phase of the winter Pacific/North American pattern (PNA) in the early 19th century that is described by a PNA reconstruction based on tree rings from northwestern North America, and a slight tendency towards negative winter PNA anomalies during the same period in an ensemble of state-of-the-art coupled climate simulations. Additionally, a pseudo-proxy investigation with the same simulation ensemble allows for assessing the robustness of PNA reconstructions using solely geophysical predictors from northwestern North America for the last millennium. The reconstructed early 19th-century positive PNA anomaly emerges as a potentially reliable feature, although the pseudo-reconstructions are subject to a number of sources of uncertainty and deficiencies highlighted especially at multidecadal and centennial timescales. The pseudo-reconstructions demonstrate that the early 19th-century discrepancy between reconstructed and simulated PNA does not stem from the reconstruction process. Instead, reconstructed and simulated features of the early 19th-century PNA can be reconciled by interpreting the reconstructed evolution during this time as an expression of internal climate variability, which is unlikely to be reproduced in its exact temporal occurrence by a small ensemble of climate simulations. However, firm attribution of the reconstructed PNA anomaly is hampered by known limitations and deficiencies of coupled climate models and uncertainties in the early 19th-century external forcing and background climate state.

  2. Diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most commonly diagnosed systemic inflammatory arthritis. Women, smokers, and those with a family history of the disease are most often affected. Criteria for diagnosis include having at least one joint with definite swelling that is not explained by another disease. The likelihood of a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis increases with the number of small joints involved. In a patient with inflammatory arthritis, the presence of a rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibody, or elevated C-reactive protein level or erythrocyte sedimentation rate suggests a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Initial laboratory evaluation should also include complete blood count with differential and assessment of renal and hepatic function. Patients taking biologic agents should be tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis. Earlier diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis allows for earlier treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic agents. Combinations of medications are often used to control the disease. Methotrexate is typically the first-line drug for rheumatoid arthritis. Biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, are generally considered second-line agents or can be added for dual therapy. The goals of treatment include minimization of joint pain and swelling, prevention of radiographic damage and visible deformity, and continuation of work and personal activities. Joint replacement is indicated for patients with severe joint damage whose symptoms are poorly controlled by medical management. PMID:22150658

  3. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Banik, Snehashish

    2013-01-01

    Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs). Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort. PMID:23997576

  4. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  5. Simulation of blast-induced early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul A; Ford, Corey C

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm3 voxels) five material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female data set. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior, and lateral directions. Three-dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric stress within the first 2 ms of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 ms time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early-time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI. PMID:19449961

  6. Comparison of Snellen and Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study charts using a computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Friedman, Yael; Joskowicz, Leo; Mimouni, Michael; Blumenthal, Eytan Z.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare accuracy, reproducibility and test duration for the Snellen and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts, two main tools used to measure visual acuity (VA). METHODS A computer simulation was programmed to run multiple virtual patients, each with a unique set of assigned parameters, including VA, false-positive and false-negative error values. For each virtual patient, assigned VA was randomly chosen along a continuous scale spanning the range between 1.0 to 0.0 logMAR units (equivalent to 20/200 to 20/20). Each of 30 000 virtual patients were run ten times on each of the two VA charts. RESULTS Average test duration (expressed as the total number of characters presented during the test ±SD) was 12.6±11.1 and 31.2±14.7 characters, for the Snellen and ETDRS, respectively. Accuracy, defined as the absolute difference (± SD) between the assigned VA and the measured VA, expressed in logMAR units, was superior in the ETDRS charts: 0.12±0.14 and 0.08±0.08, for the Snellen and ETDRS charts, respectively. Reproducibility, expressed as test-retest variability, was superior in the ETDRS charts: 0.23±0.17 and 0.11±0.09 logMAR units, for the Snellen and ETDRS charts, respectively. CONCLUSION A comparison of true (assigned) VA to measured VA, demonstrated, on average, better accuracy and reproducibility of the ETDRS chart, but at the penalty of significantly longer test duration. These differences were most pronounced in the low VA range. The reproducibility using a simulation approach is in line with reproducibility values found in several clinical studies. PMID:26949621

  7. Molecular Simulation Study of the Early Stages of Formation of Bioinspired Mesoporous Silica Materials.

    PubMed

    Centi, Alessia; Jorge, Miguel

    2016-07-19

    The use of bioinspired templates, such as polyamines and polypeptides, could lead to significant improvements in the synthesis conditions under which mesoporous materials are traditionally produced, removing the need for strong pH as well as high temperature or pressure. In this work, we perform atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of 1,12-diaminododecane surfactants, in water and in the presence of silica monomers, to investigate the early stages of synthesis of one of the first examples of bioinspired silica materials. Different surfactant concentrations and pH were considered, clarifying the influence of the charge state of the molecules on the self-assembly process. We show that the amphiphilic amines form stable lamellar structures at equilibrium in the range from intermediate to high pH values. In a later stage, when silica species are added to the system, our results reveal that, in the same range of pH, silicates strongly adsorb around these aggregates at the interface with water. This causes a considerable modification of the curvature of the layer, which suggests a tendency for the system to evolve from a lamellar phase to the formation of vesicle structures. Furthermore, we show that silica monomers are able to penetrate the layer spontaneously when defects are created as a result of surfactants' head-to-head repulsion. These findings are in agreement with experimental observations and support the pillaring mechanism postulated for this class of materials. However, our simulations indicate that the aggregation process is driven by charge matching between surfactant heads and silica monomers rather than by hydrogen bond interactions between neutral species, as had been previously hypothesized. PMID:27340948

  8. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  9. Additional diagnostic and clinical value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies compared with rheumatoid factor isotypes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vallbracht, Inka; Helmke, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    In the past decade significant advantages have been made in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and therapeutic strategies have changed a lot. These days, highly effective disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs enable intervention early in the disease process, in order to prevent major joint damage. For years, serological support in the diagnosis of RA has been limited to the presence of rheumatoid factors, although not very specific for RA. During the last years a variety of circulating non-RF antibodies have been discovered and reported to be of potential diagnostic value. CCP2 proved to be a very disease-specific and even sensitive marker for RA. In addition to the diagnostic properties, CCP showed to be a good prognostic marker, CCP helps to predict the erosive or nonerosive progression of the disease, and CCP is already present early in the disease. This diagnostic tool enables the clinician to choose the optimal therapeutic management for each single RA patient. PMID:16081030

  10. Retrospect on the tsunami simulation efforts for the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowsky, Natalja; Androsov, Alexey; Harig, Sven; Immerz, Antonia; Behrens, Jörn; Danilov, Sergey; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2005, the GITEWS project (German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) established from scratch a fully operational tsunami warning system at BMKG in Jakarta. GITEWS was succeeded in 2011 by the smaller project PROTECTS for training the Indonesian staff and consolidating the technical system. With the official end in March 2014, it is time to draw a balance and evaluate the approach. This presentation focuses on the contribution of the tsunami modelling group at the Alfred Wegener Institute. We will give a short overview on the developments of the numerical tsunami simulation model TsunAWI, of the scenario database built with TsunAWI, and of the simulation module SIM that interfaces the database to the decision support system. Some distinctive experiences will be highlighted. Topics include the modeling part as well as the matching process after the database is already set up. On the modeling side, unstructured mesh generation with focus on local bathymetric features and inclusion of precise coastline position as well as numerical parametrization and post processing are covered. The matching of pre calculated scenarios with incoming data in case of a tsunamigenic earthquake is performed in the simulation system SIM, which processes the data of multiple sensors and employs various metrics to limit the choice of possible scenarios from the database. One challenge was that the development of the matching algorithm had to start without having access to real sensor data except seismic information on epicenter and magnitude. Therefore, the algorithm is designed with robustness in mind. Still, the conservative approach allows to narrow down the scenario selection even with limited sensor information. Given more experience in the typical behaviour of sensor data in real events, the algorithm parameters can easily be calibrated towards a more restrictive scenario selection. Another challenge was to ensure the quality control of the data products derived from

  11. A Simulation Study to Assess the Potential of Real-Time GPS for Tsunami Early Warning in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejie; Babeyko, Andrey Y.; Hoechner, Andreas; Ge, Maorong

    2014-05-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has been proved to be a powerful tool for measuring co-seismic ground displacement with application to earthquake rupture inversion. Due to the fact that most of the tsunamis are triggered by large earthquakes, GPS could contribute to tsunami early warning by helping to resolve for the tsunami source in almost real-time. Recently, this became a core of the concept of a 'GPS-Shield for Tsunami Early Warning'. In present study we extend this concept to the Chilean Pacific continental margin. Chile is situated at the western margin of the South American plate which experiences constant tectonic forcing due to the actively subducted Nazca oceanic plate. This ongoing subduction makes almost the whole Chilean coast to be vulnerable to earthquake and tsunami threats. New Chilean tsunami early warning system is expected to incorporate the novel real-time GPS-component for fast source inversion. We use numerical simulation technique to evaluate the potential of the coastal real-time GPS arrays for reliable early warning. We provide start-to-end simulations of the related physical processes (earthquake rupture, ground shaking, tsunami generation and propagation) together with their sensor (GPS) imaging and processing. In particular, co-seismic GPS observations are simulated using Bernese 5.2 software. For GPS data processing, both Bernese 5.2 and (real-time) PANDA are adopted for comparison. We demonstrate our 'close-loop' simulation workbench together with main results reflecting the importance of the real-time GPS component for the tsunami early warning in Chile. Special attention is paid to the uncertainty propagation through the early warning chain.

  12. Discrete Element Model for Simulations of Early-Life Thermal Fracturing Behaviors in Ceramic Nuclear Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Huang; Ben Spencer; Jason Hales

    2014-10-01

    A discrete element Model (DEM) representation of coupled solid mechanics/fracturing and heat conduction processes has been developed and applied to explicitly simulate the random initiations and subsequent propagations of interacting thermal cracks in a ceramic nuclear fuel pellet during initial rise to power and during power cycles. The DEM model clearly predicts realistic early-life crack patterns including both radial cracks and circumferential cracks. Simulation results clearly demonstrate the formation of radial cracks during the initial power rise, and formation of circumferential cracks as the power is ramped down. In these simulations, additional early-life power cycles do not lead to the formation of new thermal cracks. They do, however clearly indicate changes in the apertures of thermal cracks during later power cycles due to thermal expansion and shrinkage. The number of radial cracks increases with increasing power, which is consistent with the experimental observations.

  13. Virtual Quake and Tsunami Squares: Scenario Earthquake and Tsunami Simulations for a Pacific Rim GNSS Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, K.; Yoder, M. R.; Sachs, M. K.; Heien, E. M.; Donnellan, A.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Plans for the first operational prototype for a Pacific Rim Tsunami Early Warning (TEW) system utilizing real-time data from the Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS) are now gaining momentum. The proposed Pacific Rim TEW prototype may resemble the Japanese Meteorological Society's early warning algorithms and use earthquake parameters rapidly determined from GPS data to select the most similar earthquake and tsunami scenario from a database of precomputed scenarios to guide alerts and disaster response. To facilitate the development of this Pacific Rim TEW system, we have integrated tsunami modeling capabilities into the earthquake simulator Virtual Quake (formerly Virtual California). We will present the first results from coupling the earthquake simulator output (seafloor displacements) with the tsunami modeling method called Tsunami Squares. Combining Virtual Quake and Tsunami Squares provides a highly scalable and flexible platform for producing catalogs of tsunami scenarios for a wide range of simulated subduction zone earthquakes.

  14. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted PMID:23493495

  15. Nerve Zap Eased Rheumatoid Arthritis in Small Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159838.html Nerve Zap Eased Rheumatoid Arthritis in Small Study Treatment worked some for patients ... the gut may help ease stubborn symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, preliminary research suggests. The study, of 17 adults ...

  16. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 April 2013 (historical) Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly ... reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to recently-published research in the ...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis: an evolutionary force in biologics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip M; Isaacs, John D

    2015-01-01

    The advent of biologic therapy has transformed the outcomes of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), but has also highlighted important issues for their development. Early attempts at T-cell driven therapies gave mixed results with difficulties extrapolating from non-human models to first in man trials. There is currently one T-cell modulating therapy - abatacept - licenced for use in RA. Cytokine inhibition has proven to be more fruitful with a number of anti-TNF and IL6 agents either licenced for use in RA or in development. The B-cell depleting therapy rituximab has also shown good efficacy as a chemotherapy agent repurposed for RA treatment. Overall the biologics show good efficacy in RA and have been shown to retard progression of radiographic joint damage. However, this benefit comes with a burden of increased infection risk and a financial cost significantly higher than conventional disease modifying therapies. As a result current UK licencing holds the biologics in reserve following failure of a conventional therapy and the presence of moderate to severely active disease. The long term use of the biologics in RA has highlighted the risk of immunogenicity, with significant proportions of patients developing anti-drug antibodies and losing therapeutic effect. The side effect profile and cost also raise the question around duration of therapy and trials of drug tapering following disease remission are now taking place with several biologic agents. Our inability to stratify patients to the most appropriate biologic drug (stratified or precision medicine) has also catalysed a large and critically important research agenda. Beyond identifying new biologic targets, the development of biosimilar agents will likely drive the future shape of the RA biologics market as lower cost alternatives are developed, thereby improving access to these therapies. PMID:25760301

  18. Chiral changes of simple amino acids in early Earth's ocean by meteorite impacts: Experimental simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, A.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.

    2012-12-01

    It has been recognized that meteorite impacts on early Earth ocean may have contributed significantly for molecules related to the origin of life to originate and evolve. We have already established the formation of simple biomolecules from inorganic materials through oceanic impacts that may have occurred at late heavy bombardment. These simple molecules including amino acids need to be subjected to further developments to initiate life on the Earth. The chirality of terrestrial amino acids constructing proteins is only L-type. In order to make clear the the point that biomolecules are formed by oceanic impacts of meteorites, it wll be crucial to determine how they select the chirality. In order to investigate the basic chemistry on chirality of simple amino acids, we tried to simulate experimentally the chiral change of some amino acids present in ocean at that time under shock loading. Each aqueous solution (0.1 M) of L- and D-valine was prepared and used as mixtures of olivine powders and solutions in sealed steel containers. We performed shock recovery experiments at an impact condition where samples were compressed at ~5 GPa. The analytical results of shock recovered solutions indicate that valine survives significantly (~10%) and that L- and D-valines transform partially to D- and L-valine, respectively. The transformation rate varied with the chemical species present in solutions. These results imply that meteorite impacts as well as the surrounding conditions play important roles to control the chirality of simple amino acids that may have been formed at that time.

  19. Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sangueza, Omar P; Caudell, Misty D; Mengesha, Yebabe M; Davis, Loretta S; Barnes, Cheryl J; Griffin, Julia E; Fleischer, Alan B; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2002-08-01

    Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD) is an entity that has not been clearly defined either clinically or histopathologically. It is seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases. In the past, many cases of PNGD have been described under several different names including palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis, linear subcutaneous bands, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with cutaneous cords and arthritis, rheumatoid papules, and Churg-Strauss granuloma. We report 7 additional cases of PNGD. Clinically, 6 patients presented with erythematous to violaceous plaques, papules, and nodules on multiple body sites; one presented with subcutaneous linear bands on the shoulder. Five had rheumatoid arthritis; one had adult-onset Still's disease; and one showed clinical signs of rheumatoid arthritis, although serologically the rheumatoid factor was negative. On histologic examination, a spectrum of changes was observed ranging from urticaria-like infiltrates to leukocytoclastic vasculitis and granuloma annulare with neutrophils. We report these cases to expand the histologic spectrum of this entity and to further delineate the different forms of clinical presentation. PMID:12140472

  20. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  1. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  2. Genetic epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, A H; Kwoh, C K; Venglish, C M; Aston, C E; Chakravarti, A

    1995-01-01

    We conducted family studies and segregation analyses of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that were based on consecutive patients with RA ascertained without regard to family history or known risk factors. First-degree relatives from 135 simplex and 30 multiplex families were included in the analyses. A highly penetrant recessive major gene, with a mutant allele frequency of .005, was identified as the most parsimonious genetic risk factor. Significant evidence for heterogeneity in risk for RA was observed for proband gender but not for proband age at onset. Kaplan-Meier risk analysis demonstrated significant evidence for differences in the distribution of risk among first-degree relatives. These analyses demonstrated that both proband gender and age at onset are important risk factors but that proband gender appears to be the more important determinant of risk, with relatives of male probands having the greatest cumulative risk for RA. In addition, log-linear modeling identified proband gender, familiality (multiplex or simplex), and an interaction term between these two variables as being adequate to define the distribution of risk in families. The pattern of risk for RA among susceptible individuals and its inheritance is thus heterogeneous. For future genetic analyses, families with an excess of affected males having a young age at onset may be the most informative in identifying the putative recessive gene and its modifiers. PMID:7611283

  3. Diet therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Carter, R L; Katz, P; Kowsari, B; Longley, S; Finnie, S

    1983-04-01

    Although diet therapy for arthritis has received considerable publicity, there is little objective information about its efficacy. We undertook a 10-week, controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six patients completed the study; 11 were on an experimental diet (a specific popular diet free of additives, preservatives, fruit, red meat, herbs, and dairy products) and 15 were on a "placebo" diet. Of 183 variables analyzed, there were no clinically important differences among rheumatologic, laboratory, immunologic, radiologic, or nutritional findings between patients on experimental and placebo diets. Six RA patients on the placebo and 5 on the experimental diet improved by objective criteria. Improvement averaged 29% for patients on placebo and 32% for patients on experimental diets. Two patients on the experimental diet improved notably, elected to remain on the experimental diet following the study period, have continued to improve, and noted exacerbations of disease upon consuming nonexperimental diet foods. Our study failed to provide evidence of objective overall clinical benefit of this diet as followed by a group of patients with longstanding, progressive, active RA. However, our data are not inconsistent with the possibility that individualized dietary manipulations might be beneficial for selected patients with rheumatic disease. PMID:6838671

  4. The microbiome and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Jose U.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay between predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers is required for disease manifestation. New insights from DNA sequence-based analyses of gut microbial communities and a renewed interest in mucosal immunology suggest that the microbiome represents an important environmental factor that can influence autoimmune disease manifestation. This Review summarizes the historical clues that suggest a possible role for the microbiota in the pathogenesis of RA, and will focus on new technologies that might provide scientific evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:21862983

  5. Interleukin 6 and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuji; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a representative cytokine featuring pleiotropic activity and redundancy. A transient synthesis of IL-6 contributes to host defense against infectious agents and tissue injuries by inducing acute phase reactions and immunological and hematopoietic responses. However, uncontrolled persistent production of IL-6 may lead to the development of several immune-mediated diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with joint and systemic inflammation resulting from immunological abnormalities and it has been found that IL-6 plays a key role in the development of this disease. Clinical trials in various parts of the world of tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, have proved its efficacy and tolerable safety either as monotherapy or in combination with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. As a result, it is currently used as a first-line biologic for the treatment of moderate-to-severe RA in more than 100 countries. Clarification of the mechanism(s) through which tocilizumab exerts its effect on RA and of the reason(s) why IL-6 is continuously produced in RA can be expected to lead to the best use of this agent for RA patients and aid in investigations into the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24524085

  6. Comparative clinical utility of once-weekly subcutaneous abatacept in the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rakieh, Chadi; Conaghan, Philip G

    2014-01-01

    Biologic therapies in rheumatoid arthritis are now part of standard practice for disease that proves difficult to control with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. While anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies have been commonly used, other targeted biologic therapies with different mechanisms of action are becoming increasingly available. Abatacept is a recombinant fusion protein that inhibits the T-cell costimulatory molecules required for T-cell activation. Intravenous abatacept has good clinical efficacy with an acceptably low toxicity profile in rheumatoid arthritis, but the subcutaneous mode of delivery has only recently become available. In this article, we examine key efficacy and safety data for subcutaneous abatacept in rheumatoid arthritis, incorporating evidence from five large Phase III studies that included people with an inadequate response to methotrexate and an inadequate response to biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. The results demonstrate that subcutaneous abatacept has efficacy and safety comparable with that of intravenous abatacept and adalimumab. In addition, inhibition of radiographic progression at year 1 in relatively early rheumatoid arthritis is consistent with that of adalimumab. Subcutaneous abatacept is well tolerated, with very low rates of discontinuation in both short-term and long-term follow-up. PMID:24812514

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis and work: The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on absenteeism and presenteeism.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2015-06-01

    For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), being in paid work is very important, and it increases self-esteem and financial independence. Although the management of RA has changed in the last 15 years to early aggressive treatment and the introduction of biologic treatments, many patients still have to take sick leave or even stop working because of their RA (i.e., absenteeism). For those remaining in paid work, patients may experience problems due to RA resulting in productivity loss while at work (i.e., presenteeism). The costs attributed to absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e., indirect costs) have been estimated to be very high, and they even exceed direct costs. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate these costs. This manuscript examines the relationship between the use of biologic therapy and absenteeism, with a focus on sick leave, and on presenteeism, and it provides an overview of indirect costs of absenteeism and presenteeism in those treated with biologic therapies. PMID:26612244

  8. Recovery of clinical but not radiographic outcomes by the delayed addition of adalimumab to methotrexate-treated Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: 52-week results of the HOPEFUL-1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Naoki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Mukai, Masaya; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Uchida, Shoji; Akama, Hideto; Kupper, Hartmut; Arora, Vipin; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy outcomes of initial treatment with adalimumab + MTX vs adalimumab addition following 26 weeks of MTX monotherapy in Japanese early RA patients naive to MTX with high disease activity. Methods. Patients completing the 26-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adalimumab + MTX were eligible to receive 26 weeks of open-label adalimumab + MTX. Patients were assessed for mean change from baseline in the 28-joint DAS with ESR (DAS28-ESR) and modified total Sharp score (mTSS), and for the proportions of patients achieving clinical, functional or radiographic remission. Results. Of 333 patients assessed, 278 (137 from the initial adalimumab + MTX and 141 from the initial placebo + MTX groups) completed the 52-week study. Significant differences in clinical and functional parameters observed during the 26-week blinded period were not apparent following the addition of open-label adalimumab to MTX. Open-label adalimumab + MTX slowed radiographic progression through week 52 in both groups, but patients who received adalimumab + MTX throughout the study exhibited less radiographic progression than those who received placebo + MTX during the first 26 weeks (mean ΔmTSS at week 52 = 2.56 vs 3.30, P < 0.001). Conclusion. Delayed addition of adalimumab in Japanese MTX-naive early RA patients did not impact clinical and functional outcomes at week 52 compared with the earlier addition of adalimumab. However, the accrual of significant structural damage during blinded placebo + MTX therapy contributed to the persistence of differences between the treatment strategies, suggesting that Japanese patients at risk for aggressive disease should benefit from the early inclusion of adalimumab + MTX combination therapy. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/), NCT00870467. PMID:24441150

  9. Isolated Rheumatoid Nodules: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Michael; Gilbert, Erin; Blumenthal, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a 27-year-old male with multiple nonpainful soft tissue masses over several metacarpals, bilateral elbows, the left wrist, and both knees since the age of 4. Physical exam was significant for firm, nonmobile, nodular growths over the extensor surfaces of bilateral elbows and knees and on the 2nd and 5th metacarpal phalangeal joints. Laboratory studies revealed an unremarkable rheumatoid factor, negative ANA screening and normal joint radiographs. Differential diagnosis included subcutaneous granuloma annulare (SGA), seronegative rheumatoid nodule, and calcinosis cutis. Biopsy is the only method to distinguish benign rheumatoid nodules from SGA. This case illustrates the importance of biopsy in diagnosis, an awareness of the potential complications, and the need for good follow-up. PMID:25802526

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis, the contraceptive pill, and androgens.

    PubMed

    James, W H

    1993-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that low androgen concentrations are a cause of rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain a number of established features of the epidemiology of the disease. These include: (a) the variation of disease activity with pregnancy; (b) the variation of age at onset by sex; (c) the variation by sex with HLA-B15; (d) the association with bone mineral density; and (e) the differing time trends in incidence rates by sex. It is argued, moreover, that if one makes a plausible assumption--namely, that women who choose oral contraceptives have high androgen concentrations at the time they first make this choice--then an explanation becomes available for the confusion about the relation between rheumatoid arthritis and oral contraception. Grounds are adduced for that assumption. If this line of reasoning is substantially correct it also has implications for the relations between rheumatoid arthritis and smoking and consumption of alcohol. PMID:8323402

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis in population samples in Iraq.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawi, Z S; Alazzawi, A J; Alajili, F M; Alwakil, R

    1978-01-01

    A prevalence survey for rheumatoid arthritis was carried out during the summer of 1975 in persons aged 16 years and over in areas of Iraq representative of differences in geography and ethnicity. Definite rheumatoid arthritis was observed in 1% of the 6999 individuals studied, but differences in occurrence rates in relation to various associated characteristics were not detected. It is concluded that present rheumatological services in Iraq have not developed in response to the magnitude of the existing burden. Morning stiffness was reported fairly frequently by individuals without rheumatoid arthritis, but the significance of this observation is not easy to determine. Raynaud's phenomenon was also recorded, but comparative evaluation of the findings is not possible. PMID:629609

  12. Early warnings of the potential for malaria transmission in Rural Africa using the Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, T. K.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Early warnings of malaria transmission allow health officials to better prepare for future epidemics. Monitoring rainfall is recognized as an important part of malaria early warning systems, as outlined by the Roll Back Malaria Initiative. The Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Simulator (HYDREMATS) is a mechanistic model that relates rainfall to malaria transmission, and could be used to provide early warnings of malaria epidemics. HYDREMATS is used to make predictions of mosquito populations and vectorial capacity for 2005, 2006, and 2007 in Banizoumbou village in western Niger. HYDREMATS is forced by observed rainfall, followed by a rainfall prediction based on the seasonal mean rainfall for a period two or four weeks into the future. Predictions made using this method provided reasonable estimates of mosquito populations and vectorial capacity, two to four weeks in advance. The predictions were significantly improved compared to those made when HYDREMATS was forced with seasonal mean rainfall alone.

  13. ANTHEM simulations of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J. )

    1989-12-01

    The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implict plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment.

  14. ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Insufficiency fractures of the distal tibia misdiagnosed as cellulitis in three patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Straaton, K.V.; Lopez-Mendez, A.; Alarcon, G.S. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe 3 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with diffuse pain, swelling, and erythema of the distal aspect of the lower extremity, suggestive of either cellulitis or thrombophlebitis, but were found to have insufficiency fractures of the distal tibia. The value of technetium-99m diphosphonate bone scintigraphy in the early recognition of these fractures and a possible explanation for the associated inflammatory symptoms are discussed.

  16. North African vegetation-precipitation feedback in early and mid-Holocene climate simulations with CCSM3-DGVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmayani, R.; Prange, M.; Schulz, M.

    2015-02-01

    The present study analyses the sign, strength, and working mechanism of the vegetation-precipitation feedback over North Africa in middle (6 ka BP) and early Holocene (9 ka BP) simulations using the comprehensive coupled climate-vegetation model CCSM3-DGVM (Community Climate System Model version 3 and a dynamic global vegetation model). The coupled model simulates enhanced summer rainfall and a northward migration of the West African monsoon trough along with an expansion of the vegetation cover for the early and middle Holocene compared to the pre-industrial period. It is shown that dynamic vegetation enhances the orbitally triggered summer precipitation anomaly by approximately 20% in the Sahara-Sahel region (10-25° N, 20° W-30° E) in both the early and mid-Holocene experiments compared to their fixed-vegetation counterparts. The primary vegetation-rainfall feedback identified here operates through surface latent heat flux anomalies by canopy evaporation and transpiration and their effect on the mid-tropospheric African easterly jet, whereas the effects of vegetation changes on surface albedo and local water recycling play a negligible role. Even though CCSM3-DGVM simulates a positive vegetation-precipitation feedback in the North African region, this feedback is not strong enough to produce multiple equilibrium climate-ecosystem states on a regional scale.

  17. North African vegetation-precipitation feedback in early and mid-Holocene climate simulations with CCSM3-DGVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmayani, R.; Prange, M.; Schulz, M.

    2014-05-01

    The present study analyses the sign, strength and working mechanism of the vegetation-precipitation feedback over North Africa in middle (6 ka BP) and early Holocene (9 ka BP) simulations using the comprehensive coupled climate-vegetation model CCSM3-DGVM. The coupled model simulates enhanced summer rainfall and a northward migration of the West African monsoon trough along with an expansion of the vegetation cover for the early and middle Holocene compared to pre-industrial. It is shown that dynamic vegetation enhances the orbitally triggered summer precipitation anomaly by approximately 20% in the Sahara/Sahel region (10° N-25° N, 20° W-30° E) in both the early and mid-Holocene experiments compared to their fixed-vegetation counterparts. The primary vegetation-rainfall feedback identified here operates through surface latent heat flux anomalies by canopy evaporation and transpiration and their effect on the mid-tropospheric African Easterly Jet, whereas the effects of vegetation changes on surface albedo and local water recycling play a negligible role. Even though CCSM3-DGVM simulates a positive vegetation-precipitation feedback in the North African region, this feedback is not strong enough to produce multiple equilibrium climate-ecosystem states on a regional scale.

  18. The mass and angular momentum distribution of simulated massive early-type galaxies to large radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufen; Gerhard, Ortwin; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Hilz, Michael; Churazov, Eugene; Lyskova, Natalya

    2014-03-01

    We study the dark and luminous mass distributions, circular velocity curves (CVCs), line-of-sight kinematics and angular momenta for a sample of 42 cosmological zoom simulations of galaxies with stellar masses from 2.0 × 1010 to 3.4 × 1011 M⊙ h-1. Using a temporal smoothing technique, we are able to reach large radii. We find the following. The dark matter halo density profiles outside a few kpc follow simple power-law models, with flat dark matter CVCs for lower mass systems, and rising CVCs for high-mass haloes. The projected stellar density distributions at large radii can be fitted by Sérsic functions with n ≳ 10, larger than for typical early-type galaxies (ETGs). The massive systems have nearly flat total (luminous plus dark matter) CVCs at large radii, while the less massive systems have mildly decreasing CVCs. The slope of the circular velocity at large radii correlates with circular velocity itself. The dark matter fractions within the projected stellar half-mass radius Re are in the range 15-30 per cent and increase to 40-65 per cent at 5Re. Larger and more massive galaxies have higher dark matter fractions. The fractions and trends with mass and size are in agreement with observational estimates, even though the stellar-to-total mass ratio is ˜2-3 times higher than estimated for ETGs. The short axes of simulated galaxies and their host dark matter haloes are well aligned and their short-to-long axis ratios are correlated. The stellar root mean square velocity vrms(R) profiles are slowly declining, in agreement with planetary nebulae observations in the outer haloes of most ETGs. The line-of-sight velocity fields {bar{v}} show that rotation properties at small and large radii are correlated. Most radial profiles for the cumulative specific angular momentum parameter λ(R) are nearly

  19. [Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis, was announced from Japan College of Rheumatology. This guideline was made by the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) method with a concept of "treat to target" led for European and American recommendation of rheumatoid arthritis. It assesses not only evidences but also the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences, values and preferences of the patient, and resource use. It is constructed by evidence summary of 88 clinical questions and 37 recommendations about medication, orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:27311182

  20. Chemokines and angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Pakozdi, Angela; Szentpetery, Agnes; Besenyei, Timea; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, chemokines mediate the migration of inflammatory leukocytes into the synovium. Among the four known chemokine families, CXC, CC chemokines and fractalkine seem to be of outstanding importance in this process. Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is also important during the perpetuation of inflammation underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, authors discuss the role of the most important chemokines and chemokine repetors in arthritis-associated neovascularization. The process and regulation of angiogenesis are described in this context as well. Apart from discussing the pathogenic role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritic vessel formation, authors also review the important relevance of chemokines and angiogenesis for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19482623

  1. Rheumatoid Cachexia Revisited: A Metabolic Co-Morbidity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Masuko, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease in which pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, play a crucial role. The chronic inflammation, combined with reduced physical activity, leads to muscle wasting whereas fat mass would be maintained; the resulting abnormal metabolic state is described as rheumatoid cachexia. Since the loss of muscle volume would be compensated by the increased fat mass, body mass index (BMI) is reported not to reflect the nutritional status in RA patients. The implication of rheumatoid cachexia for cardiovascular risk and clinical prognosis is not clearly understood, however, adequate control of disease activity in combination with appropriate physical exercise could be the most important strategy to control rheumatoid cachexia and related metabolic problems. PMID:25988122

  2. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Measurement of rheumatoid factor may aid in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866....5775 Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A rheumatoid...

  3. Modeling Temporal Processes in Early Spacecraft Design: Application of Discrete-Event Simulations for Darpa's F6 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubos, Gregory F.; Cornford, Steven

    2012-01-01

    While the ability to model the state of a space system over time is essential during spacecraft operations, the use of time-based simulations remains rare in preliminary design. The absence of the time dimension in most traditional early design tools can however become a hurdle when designing complex systems whose development and operations can be disrupted by various events, such as delays or failures. As the value delivered by a space system is highly affected by such events, exploring the trade space for designs that yield the maximum value calls for the explicit modeling of time.This paper discusses the use of discrete-event models to simulate spacecraft development schedule as well as operational scenarios and on-orbit resources in the presence of uncertainty. It illustrates how such simulations can be utilized to support trade studies, through the example of a tool developed for DARPA's F6 program to assist the design of "fractionated spacecraft".

  4. A rheumatoid arthritis study by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Carolina S.; Silva, Ana Carla A.; Santos, Tatiano J. P. S.; Martin, Airton A.; dos Santos Fernandes, Ana Célia; Andrade, Luís E.; Raniero, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease of unknown causes and a new methods to identify it in early stages are needed. The main purpose of this work is the biochemical differentiation of sera between normal and RA patients, through the establishment of a statistical method that can be appropriately used for serological analysis. The human sera from 39 healthy donors and 39 rheumatics donors were collected and analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The results show significant spectral variations with p<0.05 in regions corresponding to protein, lipids and immunoglobulins. The technique of latex particles, coated with human IgG and monoclonal anti-CRP by indirect agglutination known as FR and CRP, was performed to confirm possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique.

  5. Rheumatoid cachexia and other nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Torres, Gilberto Fabián; González-Baranda, Lourdes Larisa; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases ranges from 4 to 95%, depending on the detection method used. Formerly described as the single term rheumatoid cachexia, nutritional alterations can currently be grouped and subdivided based on the physiopathological mechanisms involved: chronic disease-related inflammatory conditions (cachexia), malnutrition associated to acute malnutrition inflammatory conditions (protein-caloric malnutrition) and starvation-related malnutrition. Clinical manifestations of malnutrition associated to rheumatic diseases vary from the patient with low weight or overweight and obesity; with lean body mass depletion as well as functional repercussions, and impact of quality of life as a common denominator. Additionally, the associated increase in body fat mass increases the risk for cardiovascular morbidity. A multidisciplinary approach towards rheumatic diseases should include aspects oriented towards prevention, early identification, diagnosis and correction of nutritional alterations. PMID:26094123

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  7. Urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, C; Frey, B M; Bird, H A

    1997-01-01

    The objective was to analyse whether the activity of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 is altered by disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion, expressed as a fraction of the urinary creatinine output, was measured in 21 patients with RA treated with three different disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) over 24 weeks. There were no correlations between urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol/creatinine (6 beta-OHC/Creat) ratio and measurements of disease activity such as plasma viscosity, Ritchie articular index and early morning stiffness. In addition, the three DMARDs sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate and D-penicillamine, smoking and the intake of various CYP3A4 substrates had no consistent detectable effect on the 6 beta-OHC/Creat ratio. There is no evidence that the dosage of drugs metabolized by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme needs to be adjusted for disease activity in RA. PMID:9117175

  8. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  9. Complement activation induced by rabbit rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R R; Brown, J C

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit rheumatoid factor produced in animals by hyperimmunized with group C streptococcal vaccine activated guinea pig complement. Anti-streptococcal serum was fractionated by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography into excluded (19S) and included (7S) material and examined for hemolytic activity in a sensitive homologous hemolytic assay system. In the presence of complement, both 19S and 7S antistreptococcal serum fractions induced lysis of bovine (ox) erythrocytes coated with mildly reduced and carboxymethylated rabbit anti-erythrocyte immunoglobulin G. That rabbit rheumatoid factor was responsible for the observed hemolytic activity was substantiated by hemolytic inhibition assays. Significant inhibition of hemolysis was effected when antistreptococcal serum fractions were incubated in the presence of human immunoglobulin G, rabbit immunoglobulin G, and Fc, whereas, no inhibition was detected when the same fractions were tested in the presence of rabbit Fab or F(ab')2 fragments. Deaggregation of inhibitor preparations revealed a preferential reactivity of rheumatoid factor for rabbit immunoglobulin G. In addition to the rheumatoid factor-dependent hemolytic activity observed in humoral preparations, immunoglobulin G-specific antibody-forming cells in spleen and peripheral blood lymphocyte isolates were enumerated by plaque-forming cell assay. PMID:7399707

  10. [Cystic Rheumatoid Arthritis--case report].

    PubMed

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Fernando Pimentel; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Teresa Laura; Barros, Rita; de Matos, António Alves; Branco, Jaime Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Among the many radiological findings seen in Rheumatoid Arthritis RA small subchondral geodes and erosions are typical. Large geodes are far less common abnormalities and their presence may indicate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. We present a case report of a 55-year old woman with seronegative RA that developed a large geode in the knee with extensive joint destruction. PMID:18159206

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Davis MC, Reich JW, et al. Comparison of cognitive behavioral and mindfulness meditation interventions on adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis for patients with and without history of recurrent depression. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology . 2008;76(3):408–421. Acupuncture Casimiro L, ...

  12. Sulphasalazine and regression of rheumatoid nodules.

    PubMed

    Englert, H J; Hughes, G R; Walport, M J

    1987-03-01

    The regression of small rheumatoid nodules was noted in four patients after starting sulphasalazine therapy. This coincided with an improvement in synovitis and also falls in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C reactive protein (CRP). The relation between the nodule regression and the sulphasalazine therapy is discussed. PMID:2883940

  13. Optical monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis: Monte Carlo generated reconstruction kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minet, O.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Zabarylo, U.

    2008-06-01

    Optical imaging in biomedicine is governed by the light absorption and scattering interaction on microscopic and macroscopic constituents in the medium. Therefore, light scattering characteristics of human tissue correlate with the stage of some diseases. In the near infrared range the scattering event with the coefficient approximately two orders of magnitude greater than absorption plays a dominant role. When measuring the optical parameters variations were discovered that correlate with the rheumatoid arthritis of a small joint. The potential of an experimental setup for transillumination the finger joint with a laser diode and the pattern of the stray light detection are demonstrated. The scattering caused by skin contains no useful information and it can be removed by a deconvolution technique to enhance the diagnostic value of this non-invasive optical method. Monte Carlo simulations ensure both the construction of the corresponding point spread function and both the theoretical verification of the stray light picture in rather complex geometry.

  14. Early stage intercalation of doxorubicin to DNA fragments observed in molecular dynamics binding simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hongxing; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Chun

    2012-09-01

    The intercalation mode between doxorubicin (an anticancer drug) and two 6-base-pair DNA model fragments (d(CGATCG)₂ and d(CGTACG)₂) has been well studied by X-ray crystallography and NMR experimental methods. Yet, the detailed intercalation pathway at molecular level remains elusive. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics binding simulations of these two systems using AMBER DNA (parmbsc0) and drug (GAFF) force fields starting from the unbound state. We observed outside binding (minor groove binding or end-binding) in all six independent binding simulations (three for each DNA fragment), followed by the complete intercalation of a drug molecule in two simulations (one for each DNA fragment). First, our data directly supported that the minor groove binding is the dominant pre-intercalation step. Second, we observed that the opening and flipping of a local base pair (A3-T10 for d(CGATCG)₂ and C1-G12 for d(CGTACG)₂) in the two intercalation trajectories. This locally cooperative flipping-intercalation mechanism was different from the previously proposed rise-insertion mechanism by which the distance between two neighboring intact base pairs increases to create a space for the drug insertion. Third, our simulations provided the first set of data to support the applicability of the AMBER DNA and drug force fields in drug-DNA atomistic binding simulations. Implications on the kinetics pathway and drug action are also discussed. PMID:23079648

  15. Simulation of the early stage of binary alloy decomposition, based on the free energy density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, P. E.; Svetukhin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Based on the free energy density functional method, the early stage of decomposition of a onedimensional binary alloy corresponding to the approximation of regular solutions has been simulated. In the simulation, Gaussian composition fluctuations caused by the initial alloy state are taken into account. The calculation is performed using the block approach implying discretization of the extensive solution volume into independent fragments for each of which the decomposition process is calculated, and then a joint analysis of the formed second phase segregations is performed. It was possible to trace all stages of solid solution decomposition: nucleation, growth, and coalescence (initial stage). The time dependences of the main phase distribution characteristics are calculated: the average size and concentration of the second phase particles, their size distribution function, and the nucleation rate of the second phase particles (clusters). Cluster trajectories in the size-composition space are constructed for the cases of growth and dissolution.

  16. Morbidity impact of rheumatoid arthritis on society.

    PubMed

    McDuffie, F C

    1985-01-21

    Classic and definite rheumatoid arthritis affects from 0.5 to 1 percent of the United States' population between the ages of 20 and 80. In the age group of 55 to 75 years, this figure increases to 4.5 percent. In addition to the pain and suffering produced by this disease, family structure is dramatically affected--the divorce rate for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is 70 percent above that for the general population. Rheumatoid arthritis also results in serious economic loss to society. In 1983, the direct cost (out-of-pocket expense for medical care) was $777 million, and the indirect cost (loss of productivity) was $215 million, with a total of approximately $1 billion. The average person with stage III rheumatoid arthritis suffers a 60 percent decline in earnings during the first six years after onset of the disease. Recent studies have indicated that the ability to remain employed depends at least as much on job-related factors as on the extent of disease or success of medical treatment. Job autonomy or the ability to control one's working conditions is the most important factor. Other important variables are education, seniority, and work that is not excessively physically demanding. Good transportation between home and job is also an essential requirement for remaining employed. There are few data available on the cost/benefit ratio of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. An 18-month study showed a trend toward greater improvement in patients given optimal care by a team of experts in a medical center as compared with average treatment provided in the community. A study in Scotland on cost of hospitalization of 366 patients (about one half underwent surgery) showed cost benefits of xi 14,000 to xi 131,000 over a five- to 10-year period for those who returned to work. Patients who did not return to work incurred medical costs of xi 100,000. There is little question that more effective medical treatment and better rehabilitation strategies for people

  17. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    PubMed

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  18. Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S.; Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.

    2014-05-15

    Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

  19. Evaluation of aqua crop simulation of early season evaporation and water flux in a semiarid environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AquaCrop model of crop growth, water use, yield and water use efficiency (WUE) is intended for use by extension personnel, farm and irrigation managers, planners and other less advanced users of simulation models in irrigation planning and scheduling. It could be useful in estimating changes in ...

  20. 3D Simulations of the Early Mars Climate with a General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forget, F.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Cha, S.; Marcq, E.; Schaeffer, J.; Wanherdrick, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental conditions that existed on Mars during the Noachian period are subject to debate in the community. In any case, there are compelling evidence that these conditions were different than what they became later in the amazonian and possibly the Hesperian periods. Indeed, most of the old cratered terrains are disected by valley networks (thought to have been carved by flowing liquid water), whereas younger surface are almost devoid of such valleys. In addition, there are evidence that the erosion rate was much higher during the early noachian than later. Flowing water is surprising on early Mars because the solar luminosity was significantly lower than today. Even with the thick atmosphere (up to several bars).To improve our understanding of the early Mars Climate, we have developed a 3D general circulation model similar to the one used on current Earth or Mars to study the details of the climate today. Our first objective is to answer the following questions : how is the Martian climate modified if 1) the surface pressure is increased up to several bars (our baseline: 2 bars) and 2) if the sun luminosity is decreased by 25 account the heat possibly released by impacts during short periods, although it may have played a role .For this purpose, we have coupled the Martian General Circulation model developed at LMD with a sophisticated correlated k distribution model developped at NASA Ames Research Center. It is a narrow band model which computes the radiative transfer at both solar and thermal wavelengths (from 0.3 to 250 microns).

  1. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  2. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  3. Serum selenium concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, J R; Lemley-Gillespie, S; Palmer, W R; Weaver, A L; Moore, G F; Klassen, L W

    1991-01-01

    Selenium is a trace element and an essential part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells from oxidative damage. Selenium has been shown to have antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and immune altering effects. Serum selenium concentrations in 101 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis were found to be significantly lower than those in 29 normal, healthy controls (mean (SD) 148 (42) v 160 (25) micrograms/l) and also lower than those in eight patients with fibrositis (148 (42) v 166 (25) micrograms/l). It is speculated that serum selenium concentrations may modulate the effect of viral or other infections in subjects with the appropriate genetic background and in this way enhance the development or progression of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2059080

  4. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  5. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures. PMID:27407274

  6. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging: opportunities for rheumatoid arthritis disease assessment and monitoring long-term treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) combined with early initiation of an appropriate treatment regimen is acknowledged as an important factor in improving clinical outcomes in patients with RA. Early diagnosis allows treatment intervention to occur sooner in order to inhibit the progression of structural joint damage as well as providing improved patient quality of life. Unfortunately, early diagnosis has been challenging due to the non-specific signs and symptoms associated with many polyarthropathies and the lack of accurate definitive diagnostic tests that can accurately classify RA at presentation. The emphasis on early diagnosis has fueled the need for powerful, sensitive, non-invasive imaging techniques that not only accurately define RA and give an indication of prognosis, but can also serve as a tool to monitor long-term treatment outcomes. This article reviews the potential uses of magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for the classification, documentation, and clinical monitoring of RA. PMID:12110151

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and pseudo-vesicular skin plaques: rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatosis*

    PubMed Central

    Manriquez, Juan; Giesen, Laura; del Puerto, Constanza; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A 54 year-old woman with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consulted us because of weight loss, fever and skin eruption. On physical examination, erythematous plaques with a pseudo-vesicular appearance were seen on the back of both shoulders. Histological examination was consistent with rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatosis (RND). After 3 days of prednisone treatment, the skin eruption resolved. RND is a rare cutaneous manifestation of seropositive RA, characterized by asymptomatic, symmetrical erythematous plaques with a pseudo-vesicular appearance. Histology characteristically reveals a dense, neutrophilic infiltrate with leucocitoclasis but without other signs of vasculitis. Lesions may resolve spontaneously or with RA treatment. This case illustrates an uncommon skin manifestation of active rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27579747

  9. Effective hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from an early Earth atmosphere inferred from high-accuracy numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Umemoto, Takafumi; Ishiwatari, Masaki

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen driven by solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation heating is numerically simulated by using the constrained interpolation profile scheme, a high-accuracy scheme for solving the one-dimensional advection equation. For a wide range of hydrogen number densities at the lower boundary and solar EUV fluxes, more than half of EUV heating energy is converted to mechanical energy of the escaping hydrogen. Less energy is lost by downward thermal conduction even giving low temperature for the atmospheric base. This result differs from a previous numerical simulation study that yielded much lower escape rates by employing another scheme in which relatively strong numerical diffusion is implemented. Because the solar EUV heating effectively induces hydrogen escape, the hydrogen mixing ratio was likely to have remained lower than 1 vol% in the anoxic Earth atmosphere during the Archean era.

  10. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and their measures have a long and important history for determining the status and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This article describes the history and evolution of PROs for RA and the current state of the field, with key examples of accepted and widely used measures, and offers some reflection on the roles of PROs for the study and management of RA. PMID:27133486

  11. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established. PMID:27317820

  12. Parasitic rheumatism presenting as rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burnstein, S L; Liakos, S

    1983-06-01

    A symmetrical polyarthritis with low titer positive rheumatoid factor occurred in a young man who also complained of chronic diarrhea after returning from Vietnam. Endolimax nana grew on stool culture. Both the patient's diarrhea and arthritis responded effectively to therapy with metronidazole. The diagnosis of parasitic rheumatism was made in retrospect. Diagnostic consideration should be given to this entity in patients with unusual arthropathies, particularly if they have stayed in an endemic parasitic country and have gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:6604161

  13. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  14. The early phases of galaxy clusters formation in IR: coupling hydrodynamical simulations with GRASIL-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, Gian Luigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Obreja, Aura; Borgani, Stefano; De Lucia, Gabriella; Murante, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    We compute and study the infrared and sub-mm properties of high-redshift (z ≳ 1) simulated clusters and protoclusters. The results of a large set of hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations including active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, have been treated with the recently developed radiative transfer code GRASIL-3D, which accounts for the effect of dust reprocessing in an arbitrary geometry. Here, we have slightly generalized the code to adapt it to the present purpose. Then we have post-processed boxes of physical size 2 Mpc encompassing each of the 24 most massive clusters identified at z = 0, at several redshifts between 0.5 and 3, producing IR and sub-mm mock images of these regions and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the radiation coming out from them. While this field is in its infancy from the observational point of view, rapid development is expected in the near future thanks to observations performed in the far-IR and sub-mm bands. Notably, we find that in this spectral regime our prediction are little affected by the assumption required by this post-processing, and the emission is mostly powered by star formation (SF) rather than accretion on to super massive black hole (SMBH). The comparison with the little observational information currently available, highlights that the simulated cluster regions never attain the impressive star formation rates suggested by these observations. This problem becomes more intriguing taking into account that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the same simulations turn out to be too massive. It seems that the interplay between the feedback schemes and the star formation model should be revised, possibly incorporating a positive feedback mode.

  15. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  16. Early stage oxynitridation process of Si(001) surface by NO gas: Reactive molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Haining; Srivastava, Pooja; Choi, Keunsu; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2016-03-01

    Initial stage of oxynitridation process of Si substrate is of crucial importance in fabricating the ultrathin gate dielectric layer of high quality in advanced MOSFET devices. The oxynitridation reaction on a relaxed Si(001) surface is investigated via reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A total of 1120 events of a single nitric oxide (NO) molecule reaction at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000 K are statistically analyzed. The observed reaction kinetics are consistent with the previous experimental or calculation results, which show the viability of the reactive MD technique to study the NO dissociation reaction on Si. We suggest the reaction pathway for NO dissociation that is characterized by the inter-dimer bridge of a NO molecule as the intermediate state prior to NO dissociation. Although the energy of the inter-dimer bridge is higher than that of the intra-dimer one, our suggestion is supported by the ab initio nudged elastic band calculations showing that the energy barrier for the inter-dimer bridge formation is much lower. The growth mechanism of an ultrathin Si oxynitride layer is also investigated via consecutive NO reactions simulation. The simulation reveals the mechanism of self-limiting reaction at low temperature and the time evolution of the depth profile of N and O atoms depending on the process temperature, which would guide to optimize the oxynitridation process condition.

  17. Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.; Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D.

    1995-04-01

    Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

  18. The Early Stage of Folding of Villin Headpiece Subdomain Observed in a 200-Nanosecond Fully Solvated Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yong; Wang, Lu; Kollman, Peter A.

    1998-08-01

    A new approach in implementing classical molecular dynamics simulation for parallel computers has enabled a simulation to be carried out on a protein with explicit representation of water an order of magnitude longer than previously reported and will soon enable such simulations to be carried into the microsecond time range. We have used this approach to study the folding of the villin headpiece subdomain, a 36-residue small protein consisting of three helices, from an unfolded structure to a molten globule state, which has a number of features of the native structure. The time development of the solvation free energy, the radius of gyration, and the mainchain rms difference from the native NMR structure showed that the process can be seen as a 60-nsec ``burst'' phase followed by a slow ``conformational readjustment'' phase. We found that the burial of the hydrophobic surface dominated the early phase of the folding process and appeared to be the primary driving force of the reduction in the radius of gyration in that phase.

  19. The early stage of folding of villin headpiece subdomain observed in a 200-nanosecond fully solvated molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yong; Wang, Lu; Kollman, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    A new approach in implementing classical molecular dynamics simulation for parallel computers has enabled a simulation to be carried out on a protein with explicit representation of water an order of magnitude longer than previously reported and will soon enable such simulations to be carried into the microsecond time range. We have used this approach to study the folding of the villin headpiece subdomain, a 36-residue small protein consisting of three helices, from an unfolded structure to a molten globule state, which has a number of features of the native structure. The time development of the solvation free energy, the radius of gyration, and the mainchain rms difference from the native NMR structure showed that the process can be seen as a 60-nsec “burst” phase followed by a slow “conformational readjustment” phase. We found that the burial of the hydrophobic surface dominated the early phase of the folding process and appeared to be the primary driving force of the reduction in the radius of gyration in that phase. PMID:9707572

  20. The winter Pacific-North-American pattern in the early 19th century in proxy-based reconstructions and climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Bothe, Oliver; Lehner, Flavio; Ortega, Pablo; Raible, Christoph C.; Swingedouw, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of past climate behavior often describe prominent anomalous periods that are not necessarily captured in climate simulations. In this contribution, we illustrate the case of the winter Pacific/North American pattern (PNA) in the early 19th century. During this period, the interdecadal strong positive PNA phase described by a PNA reconstruction based on tree-rings from northwestern North America contrasts with the slight tendency towards negative winter PNA anomalies in an ensemble of state-of-the-art coupled climate simulations. In an attempt to reconcile the simulated and reconstructed behaviors, the robustness of PNA reconstructions based exclusively on geophysical predictors from northwestern North America is investigated following a pseudo-proxy analysis in the same simulation ensemble. The reconstructed early-19th-century positive PNA anomaly emerges as a potentially reliable feature, although it is subject to a number of sources of uncertainty and potential deficiencies. The pseudo-reconstructions demonstrate that the early-19th-century discrepancy between reconstructed and simulated PNA does not stem from the reconstruction process. Instead, reconstructed and simulated features of the early-19th-century PNA can be reconciled by interpreting the reconstructed evolution during this time as an expression of internal climate variability, hence distinguished from the externally-forced signal described by the ensemble mean and unlikely to be reproduced in its exact temporal occurrence by a small ensemble of climate simulations.

  1. The TRIDEC Virtual Tsunami Atlas - customized value-added simulation data products for Tsunami Early Warning generated on compute clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, P.; Hammitzsch, M.; Babeyko, A.; Wächter, J.

    2012-04-01

    The development of new Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS) requires the modelling of spatio-temporal spreading of tsunami waves both recorded from past events and hypothetical future cases. The model results are maintained in digital repositories for use in TEWS command and control units for situation assessment once a real tsunami occurs. Thus the simulation results must be absolutely trustworthy, in a sense that the quality of these datasets is assured. This is a prerequisite as solid decision making during a crisis event and the dissemination of dependable warning messages to communities under risk will be based on them. This requires data format validity, but even more the integrity and information value of the content, being a derived value-added product derived from raw tsunami model output. Quality checking of simulation result products can be done in multiple ways, yet the visual verification of both temporal and spatial spreading characteristics for each simulation remains important. The eye of the human observer still remains an unmatched tool for the detection of irregularities. This requires the availability of convenient, human-accessible mappings of each simulation. The improvement of tsunami models necessitates the changes in many variables, including simulation end-parameters. Whenever new improved iterations of the general models or underlying spatial data are evaluated, hundreds to thousands of tsunami model results must be generated for each model iteration, each one having distinct initial parameter settings. The use of a Compute Cluster Environment (CCE) of sufficient size allows the automated generation of all tsunami-results within model iterations in little time. This is a significant improvement to linear processing on dedicated desktop machines or servers. This allows for accelerated/improved visual quality checking iterations, which in turn can provide a positive feedback into the overall model improvement iteratively. An approach to set

  2. Effects of simulated weightlessness on meiosis. Fertilization, and early development in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The initial goal was to construct a clinostat which could support mammalian cell culture. The clinostat was selected as a means by which to simulate microgravity conditions within the laboratory, by constant re-orientation of cells with respect to the gravity vector. The effects of this simulated microgravity on in-vitro meiotic maturation of oocytes, using mouse as the model system, was investigated. The effects of clinostat rotation on fertilization in-vitro was then examined. Specific endpoints included examining the timely appearance of male and female pronuclei (indicating fertilization) and the efficiency of extrusion of the second polar body. Particular attention was paid to detecting anomalies of fertilization, including parthenogenetic activation and multiple pronuclei. Finally, for the preliminary studies on mouse embryogenesis, a key feature of the clinostat was modified, that of the position of the cells during rotation. A means was found to immobilize the cells during the clinostat reotation, permitting the cells to remain at the axis of rotation yet not interfering with cellular development.

  3. Early and transient stages of Cu oxidation: Atomistic insights from theoretical simulations and in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing; Zou, Lianfeng; Zhou, Guangwen; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yang, Judith C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of metal oxidation is critical to corrosion control, catalysis synthesis, and advanced materials engineering. Although, metal oxidation process is rather complicated, different processes, many of them coupled, are involved from the onset of reaction. Since first introduced, there has been great success in applying heteroepitaxial theory to the oxide growth on a metal surface as demonstrated in the Cu oxidation experiments. In this paper, we review the recent progress in experimental findings on Cu oxidation as well as the advances in the theoretical simulations of the Cu oxidation process. We focus on the effects of defects such as step edges, present on realistic metal surfaces, on the oxide growth dynamics. We show that the surface steps can change the mass transport of both Cu and O atoms during oxide growth, and ultimately lead to the formation of different oxide morphology. We also review the oxidation of Cu alloys and explore the effect of a secondary element to the oxide growth on a Cu surface. From the review of the work on Cu oxidation, we demonstrate the correlation of theoretical simulations at multiple scales with various experimental techniques.

  4. NETs are a source of citrullinated autoantigens and stimulate inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khandpur, Ritika; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Gizinski, Alison; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Knight, Jason S.; Friday, Sean; Li, Sam; Patel, Rajiv M.; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul; Chen, Pojen; Fox, David A.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    The early events leading to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain unclear but formation of autoantibodies to citrullinated antigens (ACPA) is considered a key pathogenic phenomenon. Neutrophils isolated from patients with various autoimmune diseases display enhanced extracellular trap formation (NETs), a phenomenon that externalizes autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules. We investigated whether aberrant NETosis occurs in RA, determined its triggers and examined its deleterious inflammatory consequences. Enhanced NETosis was observed in circulating and synovial fluid RA neutrophils, compared to neutrophils from healthy controls and from patients with osteoarthritis. Further, netting neutrophils infiltrated RA synovial tissue, rheumatoid nodules and skin. NETosis correlated with ACPA presence and levels and with systemic inflammatory markers. RA sera and immunoglobulin fractions from RA patients with high levels of ACPA and/or rheumatoid factor significantly enhanced NETosis, and the NETs induced by these autoantibodies displayed distinct protein content. During NETosis, neutrophils externalized citrullinated autoantigens implicated in RA pathogenesis, whereas anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies potently induced NET formation. The inflammatory cytokines IL-17A and TNF-α induced NETosis in RA neutrophils. In turn, NETs significantly augmented inflammatory responses in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts, including induction of IL-6, IL-8, chemokines and adhesion molecules. These observations implicate accelerated NETosis in RA pathogenesis, through externalization of citrullinated autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules that may promote aberrant adaptive and innate immune responses in the joint and in the periphery, and perpetuate pathogenic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:23536012

  5. Current therapies in rheumatoid arthritis: a Latin American perspective.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Catoggio, Luis Jose; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ostojich, Kasmir; Cardiel, Mario H

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting the synovium of joints, tendons, and some extra-articular sites. RA prevalence in Latin America ranges from 0.4 to 1.6%. Early treatment of RA translates into a substantial reduction in the cost to society. In light of this, early disease clinics are being established in some countries. Barriers to RA management, such as delay in referral to rheumatologists and limited access to therapy, have been identified. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been adapted by countries according to their own situations. The need for keeping accurate records of biologics prescribed has been addressed by biologic registries, thereby contributing toward a better understanding of rheumatic diseases and their treatment. Current biologics include the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab), B-cell depletion agent (rituximab), interleukin-6 receptor blocker (tocilizumab), and T-cell co-stimulatory blocker (abatacept). Future therapies include kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and fostamatinib), alternative TNF-α inhibitors (golimumab and certolizumab), and biosimilars. PMID:23337169

  6. Heparan Sulfate Differences in Rheumatoid Arthritis versus Healthy Sera

    PubMed Central

    López-Hoyos, Marcos; Seo, Youjin; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a complex and highly variable polysaccharide, expressed ubiquitously on the cell surface as HS proteoglycans (HSPGs), and found in the extracellular matrix as free HS fragments. Its heterogeneity due to various acetylation and sulfation patterns endows a multitude of functions. In animal tissues, HS interacts with a wide range of proteins to mediate numerous biological activities; given its multiple roles in inflammation processes, characterization of HS in human serum has significant potential for elucidating disease mechanisms. Historically, investigation of HS was limited by its low concentration in human serum, together with the complexity of the serum matrix. In this study, we used a modified mass spectrometry method to examine HS disaccharide profiles in the serum of 50 women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and compared our results to 51 sera from healthy women. Using various purification methods and online LC-MS/MS, we discovered statistically significant differences in the sulfation and acetylation patterns between populations. Since early diagnosis of RA is considered important in decelerating the disease's progression, identification of specific biomolecule characterizations may provide crucial information towards developing new therapies for suppressing the disease in its early stages. This is the first report of potential glycosaminoglycan biomarkers for RA found in human sera, while acknowledging the obvious fact that a larger population set, and more stringent collection parameters, will need to be investigated in the future. PMID:25217862

  7. Paleopathologic evidence for the evolution of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klepinger, L L

    1978-01-01

    A human skeleton recovered from a Sicilian archaeological site and dating from the Hellenistic period (330-210 B.C.) presents a pathological pattern suggesting a transition between ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, providing evidence in support of the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis may have recently evolved out of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:367177

  8. Pixel value analysis for detection of simulated early external root resorption.

    PubMed

    Poleti, Marcelo Lupion; Fernandes, Thais Maria Freire; Paiz, Camila Cristina; Rubira-Bullen, Izabel Regina Fischer; Capelozza, Ana Lúcia Alvares

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of pixel value analysis using images generated by the Digora™ and Visualix™ systems for the early detection of external root resorption (ERR). Thirty extracted human lower incisors were radiographed using the Digora and Visualix systems; then, ERR was induced by immersing the teeth in 6 mol L-1 of hydrochloric acid for different periods of time (10, 30 and 60 minutes). ERR was confirmed by calcium quantification with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. One digital image was acquired per time period at 70 kVp, 7 mA, 2.2 mm filtration, focus-film distance of 30 cm, and with exposure times of 0.09 s in the Digora system and 0.05 s in Visualix system. The region of interest was defined using ImageJ software. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Pearson's correlation (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the time for ERR induction and the pixel values with either system. A positive correlation between the time of ERR induction and the calcium concentration was observed (r = 0.8892; p < 0.001). In conclusion, independent of the site of ERR induction and the digital system, pixel value analysis was not effective for ERR detection. PMID:25229785

  9. Computer aided graphics simulation modelling using seismogeologic approach in sequence stratigraphy of Early Cretaceous Punjab platform, Central Indus Basin, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, T.M.; Khan, K.A.

    1996-08-01

    Modelling stratigraphic sequence by using seismo-geologic approach, integrated with cyclic transgressive-regressive deposits, helps to identify a number of non-structural subtle traps. Most of the hydrocarbons found in Early Cretaceous of Central Indus Basin pertain to structural entrapments of upper transgressive sands. A few wells are producing from middle and basal regressive sands, but the massive regressive sands have not been tested so far. The possibility of stratigraphic traps like wedging or pinch-out, a lateral gradation, an uplift, truncation and overlapping of reservoir rocks is quite promising. The natural basin physiography at times has been modified by extensional episodic events into tectono-morphic terrain. Thus, seismo scanning of tectonically controlled sedimentation might delineate some subtle stratigraphic traps. Amplitude maps representing stratigraphic sequences are generated to identify the traps. Seismic expressions indicate the reservoir quality in terms of amplitude increase or decrease. The data is modelled on computer using graphics simulation techniques.

  10. Simulation of Prebiotic Processing by Comet and Meteoroid Impact: Implications for Life on Early Earth and Other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    We develop a reacting flow model to simulate the shock induced chemistry of comets and meteoroids entering planetary atmospheres. Various atmospheric compositions comprising of simpler molecules (i.e., CH4, CO2, H2O, etc.) are investigated to determine the production efficiency of more complex prebiotic molecules as a function of composition, pressure, and entry velocity. The possible role of comets and meteoroids in creating the inventory of prebiotic material necessary for life on Early Earth is considered. Comets and meteoroids can also introduce new materials from the Interstellar Medium (ISM) to planetary atmospheres. The ablation of water from comets, introducing the element oxygen into Titan's atmosphere will also be considered and its implications for the formation of organic and prebiotic material.

  11. Investigating the Value of Abatacept in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Studies

    PubMed Central

    Petrakis, Ioannis; Kyriopoulos, John

    2013-01-01

    Background. Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive inflammatory disease that affects greatly patients' quality of life and demands for aggressive management early on during the course of the disease. The discovery of biologics has equipped rheumatologists with evolutionary treatment tools but has also impacted greatly management costs. Objectives. To conduct a systematic review in order to evaluate the cost effectiveness of abatacept in the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. Pubmed, the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Outcomes Research Digest, the National Health System Economic Evaluation Database, and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were searched. Results. In total 301 studies were identified and 42 met the inclusion criteria. Half of the selected studies evaluated abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, after failure of or intolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. Of those, 82% were in favor of abatacept as a cost-effective or dominant strategy versus varying alternatives, whereas 18% favored other treatments. Conclusion. The majority of evidence from the published literature supports that abatacept can be a cost-effective alternative in the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, especially in patients that have demonstrated inadequate response or intolerance to anti-TNF agents or conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. PMID:23819062

  12. How does established rheumatoid arthritis develop, and are there possibilities for prevention?

    PubMed

    van Beers-Tas, Marian H; Turk, Samina A; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan

    2015-01-01

    Established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic state with more or less joint damage and inflammation, which persists after a phase of early arthritis. Autoimmunity is the main determinant of persistence. Although the autoimmune response is already fully developed in the phase of early arthritis, targeted treatment within the first months produces better results than delayed treatment. Prevention of established RA currently depends on the success of remission-targeted treatment of early disease. Early recognition is aided by the new criteria for RA. Further improvement may be possible by even earlier recognition and treatment in the at-risk phase. This requires the improvement of prediction models and strategies, and more intervention studies. Such interventions should also be directed at modifiable risk factors such as smoking and obesity. The incidence of RA has declined for decades in parallel with the decrease of smoking rates; however, a recent increase has occurred that is associated with obesity. PMID:26697764

  13. Effects of simulated oilfield produced water on early seedling growth after treatment in a pilot-scale constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Pardue, Michael J; Castle, James W; Rodgers, John H; Huddleston, George M

    2015-01-01

    Seed germination and early seedling growth bioassays were used to evaluate phytotoxicity of simulated oilfield produced water (OPW) before and after treatment in a subsurface-flow, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS). Responses to untreated and treated OPW were compared among seven plant species, including three monocotyledons: corn (Zea mays), millet (Panicum miliaceum), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor); and four dicotyledons: lettuce (Lactuca sativa), okra (Abelmoschus esculents), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), and soybean (Glycine max). Phytotoxicity was greater in untreated OPW than in treated OPW. Exposures to untreated and treated OPW enhanced growth in some plant species (sorghum, millet, okra, and corn) relative to a negative control and reduced growth in other plant species (lettuce, soybean, and watermelon). Early seedling growth parameters indicated that dicotyledons were more sensitive to test waters compared to monocotyledons, suggesting that morphological differences between plant species affected phytotoxicity. Results indicated the following sensitivity scale for plant species: lettuce>soybean>watermelon>corn>okra≈millet>sorghum. Phytotoxicity of the treated OPW to lettuce and soybean, although concentrations of COCs were less than irrigation guideline concentrations, suggests that chemical characterization and comparison to guideline concentrations alone may not be sufficient to evaluate water for use in growing crops. PMID:25409245

  14. Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

    2011-01-02

    Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

  15. SIMULATIONS OF EARLY BARYONIC STRUCTURE FORMATION WITH STREAM VELOCITY. II. THE GAS FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Yoshida, Naoki; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-20

    Understanding the gas content of high-redshift halos is crucial for studying the formation of the first generation of galaxies and reionization. Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that the relative 'stream' velocity between the dark matter and baryons at the time of recombination-formally a second-order effect, but an unusually large one-can influence the later structure formation history of the universe. We quantify the effect of the stream velocity on the so-called characteristic mass-the minimum mass of a dark matter halo capable of retaining most of its baryons throughout its formation epoch-using three different high-resolution sets of cosmological simulations (with separate transfer functions for baryons and dark matter) that vary in box size, particle number, and the value of the relative velocity between the dark matter and baryons. In order to understand this effect theoretically, we generalize the linear theory filtering mass to properly account for the difference between the dark matter and baryonic density fluctuation evolution induced by the stream velocity. We show that the new filtering mass provides an accurate estimate for the characteristic mass, while other theoretical ansatzes for the characteristic mass are substantially less precise.

  16. Monsters in the dark: predictions for luminous galaxies in the early Universe from the BLUETIDES simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Dacen; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert; Nagai, Daisuke

    2016-09-01

    Using deep Hubble and Spitzer observations Oesch et al. have identified a bright (MUV ≈ -22) star-forming galaxy candidate at z ≈ 11. The presence of GN-z11 implies a number density ˜10-6 Mpc-3, roughly an order of magnitude higher than the expected value based on extrapolations from lower redshift. Using the unprecedented volume and high resolution of the BLUETIDES cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, we study the population of luminous rare objects at z > 10. The luminosity function in BLUETIDES implies an enhanced number of massive galaxies, consistent with the observation of GN-z11. We find about 30 galaxies at MUV ≈ -22 at z = 11 in the BLUETIDES volume, including a few objects about 1.5 mag brighter. The probability of observing GN-z11 in the volume probed by Oesch et al. is ˜13 per cent. The predicted properties of the rare bright galaxies at z = 11 in BLUETIDES closely match those inferred from the observations of GN-z11. BLUETIDES predicts a negligible contribution from faint AGN in the observed SED. The enormous increase in volume surveyed by WFIRST will provide observations of ˜1000 galaxies with MUV < -22 beyond z = 11 out to z = 13.5.

  17. Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Scott; Maltrud, Mathew; Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Cameron-Smith, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH4 distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

  18. Color matrix display simulation based upon luminance and chromatic contrast sensitivity of early vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Russel A.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Larimer, James O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a new simulation model for color matrix display development. It models the physical structure, the signal processing, and the visual perception of static displays, to allow optimization of display design parameters through image quality measures. The model is simple, implemented in the Mathematica computer language, and highly modular. Signal processing modules operate on the original image. The hardware modules describe backlights and filters, the pixel shape, and the tiling of the pixels over the display. Small regions of the displayed image can be visualized on a CRT. Visual perception modules assume static foveal images. The image is converted into cone catches and then into luminance, red-green, and blue-yellow images. A Haar transform pyramid separates the three images into spatial frequency and direction-specific channels. The channels are scaled by weights taken from human contrast sensitivity measurements of chromatic and luminance mechanisms at similar frequencies and orientations. Each channel provides a detectability measure. These measures allow the comparison of images displayed on prospective devices and, by that, the optimization of display designs.

  19. Gestational and Early Postnatal Exposure to Simulated High Altitude Does Not Modify Postnatal Body Mass Growth Trajectory in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Champin, Graciela M.; Bozzini, Clarisa; Alippi, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bozzini, Carlos E, Graciela M. Champin, Clarisa Bozzini, and Rosa M. Alippi. Gestational and Early Postnatal Exposure to Simulated High Altitude Does Not Modify Postnatal Body Mass Growth Trajectory in the Rat. High Alt Med Biol 15:418–421, 2014.—Postnatal hypoxia blunts body mass growth. It is also known that the quality of the fetal environment can influence the subsequent adult phenotype. The main purpose of the study was to determine whether gestational hypoxia and early postnatal hypoxia are able to blunt growth when the offspring is raised under normoxia. Hypobaric hypoxia was induced in simulated high altitude (SHA) chambers in which air was maintained at 380 mmHg (5450 m). Mature Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were divided in normoxic (NX) and hypoxic (HX) groups and, in the case of the HX group, maintained for 1 month at 5450 m. Mating was then allowed under NX or HX conditions. Offspring were NX-NX, NX-HX, HX-HX, or HX-NX: the first term indicates NX or HX during both gestation and the first 30 days of life; the second term indicates NX or HX during postnatal life between days 30 and 133. Body mass (g) was measured periodically and body mass growth rate (BMGR, g/d) was estimated between days 33 and 65 of postnatal life. Results can be summarized as follows: 1) BM was significantly higher in NX than in HX rats at weaning; 2) BMGR was not significantly different between NX-NX and HX-NX rats, and between HX-HX and NX-HX animals; and 3) BMGR was significantly higher in rats living under NX conditions than in those living under HX conditions during postnatal life. Data suggest that that hypobaric hypoxia during gestational and early postnatal development of rats does not alter the regulation of body mass growth in rats when compared to that seen under sea-level conditions. PMID:25184739

  20. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  1. A 3D simulation of the early winter distribution of reactive chlorine in the north polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.; Rood, R.; Waters, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W.; Elson, L.; Geller, M.; Chi, Y.; Cerniglia, M.; Steenrod, S.

    1993-01-01

    Early in December 1991, high values of ClO are seen by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite at latitudes south of areas of temperatures cold enough to form polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A 3D simulation shows that the heterogeneous conversion of chlorine reservoirs to reactive chlorine on the surfaces of PSCs (processing) takes place at high latitudes. Often the processed air must be transported to lower latitudes, where the reactive chlorine is photochemically converted to ClO, to be observed by MLS. In this simulation, one incidence of cold temperatures is associated with an anticyclone, and a second with a cyclone. The transport of processed air associated with the anticyclone is marked by shearing; a decrease in the maximum of the processed air is accompanied by growth of the area influenced by the processing. In contrast, the air processed in the cyclonic event spreads more slowly. This shows that transport and shearing is a crucial element to the evolution of reactive chlorine associated with a processing event. In particular, transport and shearing, as well as photochemical processes, can cause variations in observed ClO.

  2. [New assessment method in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shintaro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    To assess disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), several composite measures have been used. However, more objective indices have been desired due to subjectivity in conventional indices. The Multi-Biomarker Disease Activity(MBDA) score is a novel serum testing based disease activity score ranging 1-100, derived from pre-specified algorithms in combination with 12 biomarkers. The MBDA score not only reflects disease activity in RA, but also is predictive for radiographic progression and risk of flare after drug reduction. Here we review usefulness of the MBDA score in RA. PMID:27311181

  3. Therapeutic implications of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aletaha, Daniel; Blüml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of autoantibodies. Their value for diagnostic/prognostic purposes has been well established. In contrast, their role in established disease and their associations with disease activity is less clear. Moreover, as evidence is accumulating that these autoantibodies are causally involved in certain key aspects of the disease, such as the initiation and perpetuation of joint inflammation or join destruction, autoantibodies in RA can no longer be regarded as mere epiphenomena, but are integral elements of the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:27252890

  4. Arthroplasty of the elbow in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, C; Vainio, K

    1976-05-21

    The study consists of 208 elbow arthroplasties performed on rheumatoid arthritic patients. A straight resection of the joint was used in 53 cases and a modified Hass arthroplasty with skin interposition in 155 cases. The average postoperative range of motion in these groups was 100 degrees and 96 degrees respectively. Postoperatively the joint was painless in 81 and 67% of the elbows respectively. The Hass arthroplasty gave a better stability and extension power. The most common complications were paresthesias in the region of the ulnar nerve and bone resorption in the region of the ulnar nerve and bone resorption in the region of the olecranon fossa. PMID:779734

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2007-12-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3). PMID:17982455

  6. Successful leukocytapheresis therapy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Keisuke; Torigoe, Masataka; Iwakura, Mikako; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ishii, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis in whom early-phase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was successfully treated by leukocytapheresis (LCAP). The effects of prednisone, tacrolimus, and etanercept were limited, but LCAP was highly effective and its efficacy continued even after cessation of LCAP. Moreover, remission was maintained for 2 years after discontinuation of medication. LCAP may be an important treatment option for RA patients with end-stage renal failure who are on hemodialysis. PMID:24517518

  7. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a global perspective on the use of antirheumatic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Envalds, Minja; Pincus, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    Modern therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on knowledge of the severity of the natural history of the disease. RA patients are approached with early and aggressive treatment strategies, methotrexate as an anchor drug, biological targeted therapies in those with inadequate response to methotrexate, and “tight control,” aiming for remission and low disease activity according to quantitative monitoring. This chapter presents a rationale for current treatment strategies for RA with antirheumatic drugs, a review of published reports concerning treatments in clinical cohorts outside of clinical trials, and current treatments at 61 sites in 21 countries in the QUEST-RA database. PMID:18437286

  8. Early warning of freshwater salinization due to upward brine displacement by species transport simulations combined with a hydrochemical genesis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Maria; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Shallow groundwater resources could be possibly affected by intruding brines, which are displaced along hydraulically conductive faults as result of subsurface activities like CO2 injection. To avoid salinization of potable freshwater aquifers an early detection of intruding saline water is necessary, especially in regions where an initial geogenic salinization already exists. Our study is based on work of Tillner et al. [1] and Langer et al. [2] who investigated the influence of permeable fault systems on brine displacement for the prospective storage site Beeskow-Birkholz in the Northeast German Basin. With a 3D regional scale model considering the deep groundwater system, they demonstrated that the existence of hydraulically conductive faults is not necessarily an exclusion criterion for potential injection sites, because salinization of shallower aquifers strongly depends on the effective damage zone volume, the initial salinity distribution and overlying reservoirs [2], while permeability of fault zones does not influence salinization of shallower aquifers significantly [1]. Here we extracted a 2D cross section regarding the upper 220 m of the study area mainly represented by shallow freshwater aquifers, but also considering an initial geogenic salinization [3]. We took flow rates of the intruding brines from the previous studies [2] and implemented species transport simulations with the program code SHEMAT [4]. Results are investigated and interpreted with the hydrochemical genesis model GEBAH [5] which has been already applied as early warning of saltwater intrusions into freshwater aquifers and surface water [6]. GEBAH allows a categorization of groundwater by the ion ratios of the dissolved components and offers a first indicative determination for an existence and the intensity of saline water intrusion in shallow groundwater aquifer, independent of the concentration of the solution. With our model we investigated the migration of saline water through a

  9. Spaceflight and simulated microgravity cause a significant reduction of key gene expression in early T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Emily M; Yoshida, Miya C; Candelario, Tara Lynne T; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2015-03-15

    Healthy immune function depends on precise regulation of lymphocyte activation. During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo and Shuttle eras, multiple spaceflight studies showed depressed lymphocyte activity under microgravity (μg) conditions. Scientists on the ground use two models of simulated μg (sμg): 1) the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and 2) the random positioning machine (RPM), to study the effects of altered gravity on cell function before advancing research to the true μg when spaceflight opportunities become available on the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study is to compare the effects of true μg and sμg on the expression of key early T-cell activation genes in mouse splenocytes from spaceflight and ground animals. For the first time, we compared all three conditions of microgravity spaceflight, RPM, and RWV during immune gene activation of Il2, Il2rα, Ifnγ, and Tagap; moreover, we confirm two new early T-cell activation genes, Iigp1 and Slamf1. Gene expression for all samples was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results demonstrate significantly increased gene expression in activated ground samples with suppression of mouse immune function in spaceflight, RPM, and RWV samples. These findings indicate that sμg models provide an excellent test bed for scientists to develop baseline studies and augment true μg in spaceflight experiments. Ultimately, sμg and spaceflight studies in lymphocytes may provide insight into novel regulatory pathways, benefiting both future astronauts and those here on earth suffering from immune disorders. PMID:25568077

  10. Simulation of Birch and Pine Litter Influence on Early Stage of Reclaimed Soil Formation Process under Controlled Conditions.

    PubMed

    Woś, Bartłomiej; Pietrzykowski, Marcin

    2015-07-01

    The impact of litter decomposition on chemical substrate properties and element leaching during early soil formation in afforested post-mine sites and the influence of different tree species are key issues in new ecosystem development. Scots pine ( L.) and common birch ( Roth) are important pioneering species used in afforestation of post-mine sites in central and eastern Europe. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of litter decomposition of these species on the chemical properties of mine soil substrates. The impact of litter decomposition on soil properties was tested on quaternary and neogene substrates with different textures (sands, loams, and mixtures of clays and sands) in a controlled incubation experiment using PVC columns. Simulation of precipitation and leaching was undertaken for 10 wk at a temperature of 16°C with distilled water (200 mL wk) through cylinders with litter, substrate + litter, and control substrate (no litter). Filtrated water solution was collected once a week for laboratory analysis, and the concentrations of dissolved organic C, total N, K, Ca, Mg, and P were determined. The study results indicate a stronger impact of the common birch on the chemical properties of reclaimed mine soils compared with pine. After the experiment, birch litter caused significant changes in pH in quaternary sands, concentration of P in quaternary loams (Ql) and mixtures of neogene clays and quaternary sands (QsNc), exchangeable Ca in QsNc, and Mg in Ql and QsNc compared with pine litter. Birch, in comparison to pine, may affect the intensity of early-stage soil-forming processes by increasing nutrient availability and transport into the soil profile, which may affect the development of soil microbial communities. This process results in different soil properties under the two tree species. PMID:26437090

  11. Spaceflight and simulated microgravity cause a significant reduction of key gene expression in early T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emily M.; Yoshida, Miya C.; Candelario, Tara Lynne T.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy immune function depends on precise regulation of lymphocyte activation. During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo and Shuttle eras, multiple spaceflight studies showed depressed lymphocyte activity under microgravity (μg) conditions. Scientists on the ground use two models of simulated μg (sμg): 1) the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and 2) the random positioning machine (RPM), to study the effects of altered gravity on cell function before advancing research to the true μg when spaceflight opportunities become available on the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study is to compare the effects of true μg and sμg on the expression of key early T-cell activation genes in mouse splenocytes from spaceflight and ground animals. For the first time, we compared all three conditions of microgravity spaceflight, RPM, and RWV during immune gene activation of Il2, Il2rα, Ifnγ, and Tagap; moreover, we confirm two new early T-cell activation genes, Iigp1 and Slamf1. Gene expression for all samples was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results demonstrate significantly increased gene expression in activated ground samples with suppression of mouse immune function in spaceflight, RPM, and RWV samples. These findings indicate that sμg models provide an excellent test bed for scientists to develop baseline studies and augment true μg in spaceflight experiments. Ultimately, sμg and spaceflight studies in lymphocytes may provide insight into novel regulatory pathways, benefiting both future astronauts and those here on earth suffering from immune disorders. PMID:25568077

  12. Laser transillumination for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, E.; Podbielska, H.; Bauer, J.; Dmochowska, L.; Dziewięcka, M.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, the special portable apparatus was constructed for performing the transillumination examination on interphalangeal joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. It consisted of He-Ne laser with optics for collimated illumination, special holder for placing the finger (perpendicular to optical axis, dorsal site towards camera), and CCD camera with memory stick. The captured images in JPEG format with 1152x864 resolution were converted into the gray level pictures and analyzed by means of image processing program from OPTIMAS. 35 ill patients and 11 healthy volunteers were examined. The histograms and 35 luminances were calculated. The average function was applied in order to calculate the mean gray level values in images of corresponding fingers of healthy subjects. These values were compared with values calculated for ill persons. We proved that that transillumination images may have a diagnostic value. For RA suffering patients the corresponding transillumination images represented the lower gray level values than the average value of finger of health volunteers. For II finger of left hand 96% images of ill persons have lower gray level and in case of right hand it was 93%. This proves that basing in transillumination one can diagnose with high probability the patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. MicroRNAs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Eisa; Eftekhari, Rahil; Oraei, Mona; Gharib, Alvand; Bidad, Katayoon

    2015-04-01

    The role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the development of rheumatic diseases has been an interesting field of research over the past decades all around the world. Research on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been active and ongoing, and investigations have attempted to use miRNAs as biomarkers in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This review focuses on experimental researches in the field of miRNAs and RA to present the data available up to this date and includes researches searched by keywords "microRNA" and "rheumatoid arthritis" in PubMed from 2008 to January 2015. All references were also searched for related papers. miRNAs are shown to act as proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory agents in diverse cell types, and their role seems to be regulatory in most instances. Researchers have evaluated miRNAs in patients compared to controls or have investigated their role by overexpressing or silencing them. Multiple targets have been identified in vivo, in vitro, or in silico, and the researches still continue to show their efficacy in clinical settings. PMID:25736037

  14. Collagenase in synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sorsa, T; Konttinen, Y T; Lindy, O; Ritchlin, C; Saari, H; Suomalainen, K; Eklund, K K; Santavirta, S

    1992-08-01

    There are two types of collagenases, products of two distinct genes, called MMP-1 (matrix metalloproteinase 1 or "fibroblast-type collagenase") and MMP-8 ("neutrophil collagenase"). In synovial fluid, MMP-8 is stored as latent proenzyme in polymorphonuclear neutrophils. MMP-8 is activated by hypochlorous acid produced by myeloperoxidase from hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion and by the hydroxyl radical produced in Haber Weiss reaction fed by superoxide produced by, eg, NADPH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) oxidase and xanthine oxidase. In addition to activation upon secretion, oxidatively modified MMP-8 is susceptible to a subsequent proteolytic attack and activation by cathepsin G. The authors suggest that activation of neutrophil-derived MMP-8 involves oxidative, nonproteolytic activation upon secretion and a more slowly progressive proteolytic activation by cathepsin G (or chymases and tryptases), and that these oxidative and proteolytic activation mechanisms act in concert. In contrast to MMP-8, MMP-1 is synthesized de novo and secreted immediately after synthesis by fibroblasts, macrophages, and some epithelial cells. Human rheumatoid synovial tissue contains mainly fibroblast-type MMP-1 collagenase as assessed by collagenase extracted from synovial tissue and by MMP-1 and MMP-8 immunostaining. It is suggested that in vivo, MMP-1 in synovitis tissue is activated by a plasminogen activator/plasminogen/prostromelysin (alternatively tryptases)/proMMP-1 cascade. In conclusion, MMP-8 and MMP-1 show type-specific compartmentalization and modes of activation in rheumatoid synovial fluid and tissue. PMID:1411581

  15. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  16. Macrophage heterogeneity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Udalova, Irina A; Mantovani, Alberto; Feldmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages are very important in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The increase in the number of sublining macrophages in the synovium is an early hallmark of active rheumatic disease, and high numbers of macrophages are a prominent feature of inflammatory lesions. The degree of synovial macrophage infiltration correlates with the degree of joint erosion, and depletion of these macrophages from inflamed tissue has a profound therapeutic benefit. Research has now uncovered an unexpectedly high level of heterogeneity in macrophage origin and function, and has emphasized the role of environmental factors in their functional specialization. Although the heterogeneous populations of macrophages in RA have not been fully characterized, preliminary results in mouse models of arthritis have contributed to our understanding of the phenotype and ontogeny of synovial macrophages, and to deciphering the properties of monocyte-derived infiltrating and tissue-resident macrophages. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive polarization of macrophages towards proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes could lead to identification of signalling pathways that inform future therapeutic strategies. PMID:27383913

  17. The interplay between inflammation and metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Conigliaro, P; Candi, E; Melino, G; Perricone, R

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone that lead to joint destruction. The autoimmune process in RA depends on the activation of immune cells, which use intracellular kinases to respond to external stimuli such as cytokines, immune complexes, and antigens. An intricate cytokine network participates in inflammation and in perpetuation of disease by positive feedback loops promoting systemic disorder. The widespread systemic effects mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines in RA impact on metabolism and in particular in lymphocyte metabolism. Moreover, RA pathobiology seems to share some common pathways with atherosclerosis, including endothelial dysfunction that is related to underlying chronic inflammation. The extent of the metabolic changes and the types of metabolites seen may be good markers of cytokine-mediated inflammatory processes in RA. Altered metabolic fingerprints may be useful in predicting the development of RA in patients with early arthritis as well as in the evaluation of the treatment response. Evidence supports the role of metabolomic analysis as a novel and nontargeted approach for identifying potential biomarkers and for improving the clinical and therapeutical management of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. Here, we review the metabolic changes occurring in the pathogenesis of RA as well as the implication of the metabolic features in the treatment response. PMID:26379192

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Stride from Research to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ill-Min; Ketharnathan, Sarada; Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rajakumar, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Over 70 different genetic variants with a significant association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been discovered. Anti-citrullination protein antibodies (ACPA)-positive RA variants are more well-defined than their ACPA-negative counterparts. The human leukocyte antigen, HLA-DRB1 locus remains the prime suspect in anti-citrullination protein antibodies (ACPA)—positive RA. Different HLA-DRB1 alleles are linked to RA susceptibility across different ethnicities. With evolving techniques, like genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, more non-HLA susceptibility loci have been identified for both types of RA. However, the functional significance of only a handful of these variants is known. Their roles include increasing susceptibility to RA or in determining the speed at which the disease progresses. Additionally, a couple of variations are associated with protection from RA. Defining such clear-cut biological functions can aid in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of RA. Recent research has focused on the implication of microRNAs, with miR-146a widely studied. In addition to disease susceptibility, genetic variations that influence the efficacy and toxicity of anti-RA agents have also been identified. Polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene influence the effectiveness of methotrexate, the first line of therapy in RA. Larger studies are, however, needed to identify potential biomarkers for early disease identification and monitoring disease progression. PMID:27338350

  19. The interplay between inflammation and metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Conigliaro, P; Candi, E; Melino, G; Perricone, R

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone that lead to joint destruction. The autoimmune process in RA depends on the activation of immune cells, which use intracellular kinases to respond to external stimuli such as cytokines, immune complexes, and antigens. An intricate cytokine network participates in inflammation and in perpetuation of disease by positive feedback loops promoting systemic disorder. The widespread systemic effects mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines in RA impact on metabolism and in particular in lymphocyte metabolism. Moreover, RA pathobiology seems to share some common pathways with atherosclerosis, including endothelial dysfunction that is related to underlying chronic inflammation. The extent of the metabolic changes and the types of metabolites seen may be good markers of cytokine-mediated inflammatory processes in RA. Altered metabolic fingerprints may be useful in predicting the development of RA in patients with early arthritis as well as in the evaluation of the treatment response. Evidence supports the role of metabolomic analysis as a novel and nontargeted approach for identifying potential biomarkers and for improving the clinical and therapeutical management of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. Here, we review the metabolic changes occurring in the pathogenesis of RA as well as the implication of the metabolic features in the treatment response. PMID:26379192

  20. Different effects of biological drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Benucci, Maurizio; Sallì, Salvatore; Bongiovanni, Sara; Boccassini, Laura; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2013-03-01

    Biological drugs have brought new hope to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in whom previously existing treatments could not control inflammation, joint destruction, or the progression of disability. The five currently available TNF blockers are approved for treating RA patients, but they have different structures, morphology, pharmacokinetic properties, and activity. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) have shown that they improve the signs and symptoms of both early and long-standing RA and other inflammatory arthritides, prevent radiographic progression, and improve the patients' health-related quality of life. However, they are more effective in combination with methotrexate (MTX) than alone. Combined treatment is generally well tolerated, and seems to be relatively safe in the short term, as confirmed by RCTs, long-term observational studies and in clinical practice. Patients who fail to respond or develop adverse effects - when treated with one anti-TNF agent can be successfully treated with a second TNF antagonist. However, in the case of primary failure, it is possible that biological agents with a different mechanism of action may be more successful. Tocilizumab alone or in combination with MTX is more effective than MTX monotherapy in reducing disease activity over 24 weeks. Abatacept is well tolerated and retains its efficacy over time, as does rituximab in non-responders to other anti-TNF drugs. Finally, although these drugs improve the quality of life of RA patients, they considerably increase direct medical costs. PMID:23219774

  1. Screening Optimization of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bella; Zapantis, Ekaterini; Petryna, Olga; Efthimiou, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are at increased risk of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but there are no clear guidelines for LTBI screening with Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) or Quantiferon TB Gold testing (QFT-G). Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in a high risk, largely foreign-born, inner city, RA population. After screening 280 RA patients, 134 patients who had both TST and QFT-G testing performed during their initial evaluation were included. Results. Out of 132 RA patients included in our analysis, 50 (37.8%) patients were diagnosed with LTBI with either positive TST 42 (31.8%) or QFT-G 23 (17.4%). 15 (11.4%) were positive and 82 (62.1%) were negative for both tests. The agreement between TST and QFT-G was 73.5% (Kappa 0.305, CI = 95% 0.147–0.463, p = 0.081).  Conclusions. There was low-moderate agreement (κ = 0.305) between TST and QFT-G. In the absence of clearly defined gold standard and limitations associated with both tests, we propose early screening with both tests for patients who need prompt treatment with BRMs. Patients who are not immediate candidates for BRM treatment may be safely and cost effectively screened with a two-step process: initial screening with TST and if negative, IGRA testing. Patients positive for either test should be promptly treated. PMID:26294972

  2. [Optimal Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis with Companion Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shunichi

    2015-11-01

    The medical strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has markedly advanced in recent years. The introduction of biologics in addition to methotrexate, an anchor drug, has made it possible to not only suppress pain and inflammation (clinical remission), but also inhibit joint destruction (structural remission), leading to cure from the disease. Since the condition and pathology are heterogeneous among individual patients, optimal treatment for each patient based on the use of companion diagnostics is desired (precision medicine). ACPA is important to diagnose RA, but also to assess the prognosis. ACPA is also a part of companion diagnostics for preclinical RA because it has been found to be positive before the onset. Treatment should be performed under consideration of the disease state such as activity, prognosis regarding joint destruction, and complications. It is also important to clarify the patient characteristics, such as responsiveness to the drugs and risk of adverse effects. Biomarkers, such as proteomics and pharmacogenomics, have been reported as companion diagnostics for optimal treatment of RA. RA is a multifactorial disorder with clinically heterogeneous features. Gene-environment interaction is closely involved in the production of ACPA, and then secondary stimuli to joints may lead to symptoms of RA. Joint injury, emotional stress, and infections often trigger the onset of RA. It is possible to cure RA, achieving complete remission, by early aggressive treatment and returning to the pre-clinical state with environmental improvement. [Review] PMID:26995880

  3. [Occupational therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: what rheumatologists need to know?].

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Pedro Henrique Tavares Queiroz; Pontes, Tatiana Barcelos; Matheus, João Paulo Chieregato; Muniz, Luciana Feitosa; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Interventions focusing on education and self-management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by the patient improves adherence and effectiveness of early treatment. The combination of pharmacologic and rehabilitation treatment aims to maximize the possibilities of intervention, delaying the appearance of new symptoms, reducing disability and minimizing sequelae, decreasing the impact of symptoms on patient's functionality. Occupational therapy is a health profession that aims to improve the performance of daily activities by the patient, providing means for the prevention of functional limitations, adaptation to lifestyle changes and maintenance or improvement of psychosocial health. Due to the systemic nature of RA, multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary for the proper management of the impact of the disease on various aspects of life. As a member of the health team, occupational therapists objective to improve and maintaining functional capacity of the patient, preventing the progression of deformities, assisting the process of understanding and coping with the disease and providing means for carrying out the activities required for the engagement of the individual in meaningful occupations, favoring autonomy and independence in self-care activities, employment, educational, social and leisure. The objective of this review is to familiarize the rheumatologist with the tools used for assessment and intervention in occupational therapy, focusing on the application of these principles to the treatment of patients with RA. PMID:25440699

  4. Genetic Markers of Cardiovascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; López-Mejías, Raquel; García-Bermúdez, Mercedes; González-Juanatey, Carlos; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the most common cause of premature mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is the result of an accelerated atherosclerotic process. Both RA and atherosclerosis are complex polygenic diseases. Besides traditional CV risk factors and chronic inflammation, a number of studies have confirmed the role of genetic factors in the development of the atherogenesis observed in RA. In this regard, besides a strong association between the HLA-DRB1∗04 shared epitope alleles and both endothelial dysfunction, an early step in the atherosclerotic process, and clinically evident CV disease, other polymorphisms belonging to genes implicated in inflammatory and metabolic pathways, located inside and outside the HLA region, such as the 308 variant (G > A, rs1800629) of the TNFA locus, the rs1801131 polymorphism (A > C; position + 1298) of the MTHFR locus, or a deletion of 32 base pairs on the CCR5 gene, seem to be associated with the risk of CV disease in patients with RA. Despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic basis of CV disease in RA, further studies are required to better establish the genetic influence in the increased risk of CV events observed in patients with RA. PMID:22927710

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Stride from Research to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Ketharnathan, Sarada; Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rajakumar, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Over 70 different genetic variants with a significant association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been discovered. Anti-citrullination protein antibodies (ACPA)-positive RA variants are more well-defined than their ACPA-negative counterparts. The human leukocyte antigen, HLA-DRB1 locus remains the prime suspect in anti-citrullination protein antibodies (ACPA)-positive RA. Different HLA-DRB1 alleles are linked to RA susceptibility across different ethnicities. With evolving techniques, like genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, more non-HLA susceptibility loci have been identified for both types of RA. However, the functional significance of only a handful of these variants is known. Their roles include increasing susceptibility to RA or in determining the speed at which the disease progresses. Additionally, a couple of variations are associated with protection from RA. Defining such clear-cut biological functions can aid in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of RA. Recent research has focused on the implication of microRNAs, with miR-146a widely studied. In addition to disease susceptibility, genetic variations that influence the efficacy and toxicity of anti-RA agents have also been identified. Polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene influence the effectiveness of methotrexate, the first line of therapy in RA. Larger studies are, however, needed to identify potential biomarkers for early disease identification and monitoring disease progression. PMID:27338350

  6. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ3 integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein. PMID:25099015

  7. Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Corey C.; Taylor, Paul Allen

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

  8. Extra-articular disease manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis: incidence trends and risk factors over 46 years

    PubMed Central

    Turesson, C; O'Fallon, W; Crowson, C; Gabriel, S; Matteson, E

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the trends in incidence of extra-articular rheumatoid arthritis (ExRA) in a well defined community based cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to examine possible predictors of ExRA occurrence. Methods: Using the resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, a retrospective medical record review was conducted of a cohort of 609 cases of RA in Olmsted County, MN, diagnosed during 1955–94. These cases had been previously classified using the ACR 1987 criteria for RA. Patients were followed up from 1955 to 2000 (median follow up 11.8 years; range 0.1–42.8), and incident ExRA manifestations were recorded according to predefined criteria. Time to first presentation of ExRA was compared in patients with RA by decade of diagnosis. Possible ExRA risk factors were identified in case record reviews. Results: ExRA occurred in 247 patients (40.6%). A subgroup of 78 patients (12.8%) had ExRA manifestations considered to be severe in a previous study from Malmö, Sweden. The incidence of severe ExRA did not change significantly over the decades (p=0.165). In a multivariate analysis the main predictors of severe ExRA were smoking at RA diagnosis (risk ratio (RR)=2.94; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.68 to 5.13) and early disability (Steinbrocker class III-IV at diagnosis) (RR=2.45; 95% CI 1.51 to 4.00). The effect of smoking overwhelmed the weaker effect of rheumatoid factor seropositivity. Conclusion: There was no decrease in the incidence of extra-articular manifestations in patients with RA diagnosed up to 1995. Smoking and early disability are independent risk factors for extra-articular RA. PMID:12860726

  9. Total elbow arthroplasty in patients who have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Connor, P M; Morrey, B F

    1998-05-01

    Patients who have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis often are seen at a very young age because of severe stiffness and pain in several joints. While total elbow replacement may be indicated in these patients, this procedure is difficult to perform because of contracture of the soft tissues and the extremely small bones and intramedullary cavities in these patients. As there is little information in the literature regarding this procedure, we attempted to learn about the long-term results by evaluating nineteen patients (twenty-four elbows) with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who had been managed with total elbow arthroplasty. At an average of 7.4 years (range, two to fourteen years) after the operation, there was an improvement in the average Mayo elbow performance score from 31 points (range, 5 to 55 points) preoperatively to 90 points (range, 55 to 100 points). Twenty-two (96 per cent) of the twenty-three elbows available at the most recent follow-up evaluation caused little or no pain, but the improvement in the range of motion was not as reliable. The average arc of flexion improved from only 63 degrees preoperatively to 90 degrees postoperatively; the average postoperative arc of flexion began at 35 degrees, with additional flexion to 125 degrees. Examination of the four elbows that had been ankylosed before the procedure revealed an average arc of 73 degrees after the operation, and evaluation of the twenty ipsilateral wrists that were not limited by disease revealed that pronation and supination had been maintained. The average functional score improved from 9 points (range, 0 to 25 points) preoperatively to 23 points (range, 15 to 25 points) postoperatively (p < 0.001). The function of eighteen elbows (78 per cent) did not adversely affect the ability to perform activities of daily living. There were thirteen complications, including one perioperative death, that affected twelve of the twenty-four elbows. Seven of the nine early complications, including a

  10. Leaders’ and followers’ individual experiences during the early phase of simulation-based team training: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Meurling, Lisbet; Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Wallin, Carl-Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence shows that team training can develop essential team skills and contribute to better patient outcomes. Current simulation-based team training (SBTT) programmes most often include targets and feedback focused on the whole team and/or leader, ignoring the follower as a unique entity. By considering followers’ individual experiences, and tailoring behavioural targets for training and feedback, SBTT could be improved. Our aim was to explore the individual experiences and behaviours of leaders and followers during the early phase of SBTT, and we hypothesised that leaders and followers would show different responses. Methods Medical students (n=54) participated in half-day SBTT including three video-recorded scenarios. Self-efficacy was assessed pretraining and post-training. For each scenario (n=36), the individual teamwork behaviours, concentration, mental strain and the team's clinical performance were recorded. Data were analysed using a mixed model allowing for participants to be their own control in their roles as leader or follower. Results Self-efficacy improved. In the role of leader, participants communicated to a greater extent and experienced higher mental strain and concentration than they did in the role of follower. Discussion The increased self-efficacy enables a positive learning outcome after only three scenarios. Individual experiences and behaviours differed between the role of leader and that of follower. By shedding further light on leaders’ and followers’ individual experiences and behaviours, targets for training and feedback could be specified in order to improve SBTT. PMID:23293119

  11. A 15-year exercise program for rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Marley, W P; Santilli, T F

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of rheumatoid vasculitis and responses to a 15-year supervised exercise program. This patient presented with significant impairment in mobility and physical work capacity. His exercise tolerance improved considerably and he benefited emotionally. PMID:9572643

  12. [Genetics and genomics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): An update].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Elías, Ana Karen; Maldonado-Murillo, Karina; López-Mendoza, Luis Fernando; Ramírez-Bello, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects approximately 0.5-1% of the general population and leads to chronic synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone, and disability. The heritability of rheumatoid arthritis has been estimated to be about 60%, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37%. Other genes, such as PTPN22, STAT4, CTLA4, TRAF1, PADI4, IRF5, FCRL3, TNFIP3, TNF-α, miRNAs, CD28, CD40, TYK2, etc., have been associated with susceptibility, severity, activity, and treatment response of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of gene variants located in immune system genes associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27160622

  13. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 September 2014 (historical) Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in ...

  14. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk for osteoporosis, are two to three times more likely than men to have rheumatoid arthritis as well. Osteoporosis Management Strategies Strategies for preventing and treating osteoporosis in ...

  15. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, I; Farny, M; Billey, T; Olivier, P; Lassoued, S

    1998-01-01

    A 75-year old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), which responded to treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d). PMID:9523389

  16. The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence? Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The name of the one of the first authors is spelt incorrectly in the article, 'The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence? The correct spelling is Aikaterini Chatzidionysiou. PMID:26855334

  17. Breast lumps: a rare site for rheumatoid nodules.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Ali, Hiam; Vidya, Raghavan

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) of the breast is a rare benign inflammatory disease and its presentation closely mimics breast cancer. Its diagnosis is mainly based on histology and there is no consensus agreement regarding its management. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman presenting with a right breast lump associated with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and raised rheumatoid factor. Following triple assessment (history and examination, imaging and biopsy), GM was diagnosed and she was treated conservatively. PMID:25903203

  18. [Strategies for improved healthcare of people with the endemic disease rheumatism exemplified by rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kalden, J R; Burkhardt, H; Buss, B; Donhauser-Gruber, U; Erstling, U; Gromnica-Ihle, E; Karberg, K; Karger, T; Kneitz, C H; Krause, A; Krüger, K; Lorenz, H-M; Müller-Ladner, U; Rubbert-Roth, A; Steffens-Korbanka, P; Tony, H-P; Wendler, J; Wollenhaupt, J; Burmester, G

    2011-10-01

    New therapeutic principles and considerable diagnostic advances have made it possible to define different rheumatic diseases and especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at an early stage and by starting an early and aggressive medication a considerable proportion of patients with RA will reach the status of low disease activity or even remission. With the additional development of composite measures to estimate the disease activity of RA, it was the goal of an international working group consisting of rheumatologists and patients to develop recommendations for treating rheumatoid arthritis in a similar way as for patients with hypertension or diabetes, with the aim to achieve remission as often as possible. This treat-to-target initiative has taken off in quite a number of different countries including Germany leading to discussions on how this initiative can be integrated into the specific national healthcare systems and what possibilities would exist for its implementation. To develop strategies for an improved healthcare of people suffering from rheumatic diseases and using RA as an example, action elements and postulates were developed which will be discussed in more detail in the present manuscript. PMID:21979315

  19. Parasympathetic dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients with ocular dryness.

    PubMed Central

    Barendregt, P J; van der Heijde, G L; Breedveld, F C; Markusse, H M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether abnormalities in the function of the autonomic nervous system are associated with oral and ocular dryness in rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Pupillography was done using an infrared light reflection method (IRIS) to measure both parasympathetic function (constriction latency and the latency of maximum constriction velocity (MCV)) and sympathetic function (dilatation latency) in rheumatoid arthritis patients with and without ocular dryness. The Schirmer and Saxon tests were used to measure the tear and saliva production respectively. RESULTS: The Schirmer and Saxon test results in rheumatoid arthritis patients with ocular dryness were reduced (P < 0.05) compared with rheumatoid arthritis patients without ocular dryness and healthy controls. Constriction latency and MCV latency were prolonged in rheumatoid arthritis patients with ocular dryness compared to the other two groups (P < 0.05). A negative correlation was found between the degree of ocular dryness and both constriction latency and MCV latency. No correlation was found between the results of pupillography and saliva production. CONCLUSIONS: Parasympathetic dysfunction may play a role in ocular dryness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8882130

  20. Gene Polymorphisms and Pharmacogenetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with genetic predisposition. The advent of new biological agents, as well as the more traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, has resulted in highly efficient therapies for reducing the symptoms and signs of RA; however, not all patients show the same level of response in disease progression to these therapies. These variations suggest that RA patients may have different genetic regulatory mechanisms. The extensive polymorphisms revealed in non-coding gene-regulatory regions in the immune system, as well as genetic variations in drug-metabolizing enzymes, suggest that this type of variation is of functional and evolutionary importance and may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies. Pharmacogenetics is a rapidly advancing area of research that holds the promise that therapies will soon be tailored to an individual patient’s genetic profile. PMID:19506728

  1. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  2. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  3. CDP-870 (certolizumab) in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, V V; Moots, R J

    2005-04-01

    The development of biological anti-TNF-alpha therapy has revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases, and has identified a worldwide market for expensive yet effective therapies for chronic diseases. Certolizumab (CDP-870) is a new agent that employs a novel strategy to neutralise TNF-alpha--namely the prokaryotic expression of TNF-alpha-specific Fab antibody fragments, coupled to polyethylene glycol--to produce a drug that is potentially less expensive to manufacture than other anti-TNF-alpha agents and which may be administered by subcutaneous injection once a month. The background to the ongoing development of this new agent and its clinical effects are discussed in this article. PMID:15934837

  4. [Tofacitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The combined use of synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) such as methotrexate and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) has revolutionized treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients. However, bDMARDs are limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong products have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active RA patients with sDMARD-naïve, inadequately responsive to sDMARDs or TNF-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. The common adverse events were related to infection, hematologic and hepatic disorders and association of tofacitinib with carcinogenicity and infections remains debated. PMID:27311188

  5. Treg cells in rheumatoid arthritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Cooles, Faye A H; Isaacs, John D; Anderson, Amy E

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease arising from a breakdown in immunological self-tolerance, which leads to aberrant immune responses to autoantigens. Regulatory CD4(+) T-cells (Tregs) underpin one of the key mechanisms of self-tolerance and are a major focus of study in RA and other autoimmune diseases. In order to design new and improved therapies to reinstate self-tolerance, and perhaps cure disease, we need to understand the complex mechanism of action of Tregs. This review addresses recent findings in the field of Tregs in RA, with particular focus on identification of potential defects in Treg-mediated self-tolerance mechanisms present in RA patients, as well as how Tregs interact with other cells in the inflamed joints. As antigen-specific Tregs are a potential route for the reinstatement of immune tolerance, we also discuss new strategies currently being investigated which expand or induce de novo generation of Tregs. PMID:23888361

  6. Effect of yogic package on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Kumar; Bhandari, R B; Rana, Budhi Bal

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of yogic package (YP) with some selected pranayama, cleansing practices and meditation on pain intensity, inflammation, stiffness, pulse rate (PR), blood pressure (BP), lymphocyte count (LC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum uric acid (UA) level among subjects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Randomized control group design was employed to generate pre and post data on participants and controls. Repealed Measure ANOVAs with Bonferroni adjustment were applied to check significant overall difference among pre and post means of participants and controls by using PASW (SPSS Inc. 18th Version). Observed result favored statistically significant positive effect of YP on selected RA parameters and symptoms under study at P<0.05, 0.01 and 0.001 respectively that showed remarkable improvement in RA severity after 40-day practice of YP. It concluded that YP is a significant means to reduce intensity of RA. PMID:23362725

  7. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Żuchowski, Paweł; Dura, Marta; Zalewska, Joanna; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may arise when the patient has symptoms typical for both diseases simultaneously. Cases of coexistence of RA with AS – according to our best knowledge – are rare. This study aims to compare our experience in diagnosis and treatment of concomitant RA and AS with the experience of other researchers. Implementation of the proper diagnostic algorithm, allowing for correct diagnosis of both diseases in one patient, may be useful for differential diagnosis of similar cases in the future.

  8. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group. PMID:27182251

  9. Cardiovascular risk score in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wagan, Abrar Ahmed; Mahmud, Tafazzul E Haque; Rasheed, Aflak; Zafar, Zafar Ali; Rehman, Ata ur; Ali, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the 10-year Cardiovascular risk score with QRISK-2 and Framingham risk calculators in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Non Rheumatoid Arthritis subjects and asses the usefulness of QRISK-2 and Framingham calculators in both groups. Methods: During the study 106 RA and 106 Non RA patients age and sex matched participants were enrolled from outpatient department. Demographic data and questions regarding other study parameters were noted. After 14 hours of fasting 5 ml of venous blood was drawn for Cholesterol and HDL levels, laboratory tests were performed on COBAS c III (ROCHE). QRISK-2 and Framingham risk calculators were used to get individual 10-year CVD risk score. Results: In this study the mean age of RA group was (45.1±9.5) for Non RA group (43.7±8.2), with female gender as common. The mean predicted 10-year score with QRISK-2 calculator in RA group (14.2±17.1%) and Non RA group was (13.2±19.0%) with (p-value 0.122). The 10-year score with Framingham risk score in RA group was (12.9±10.4%) and Non RA group was (8.9±8.7%) with (p-value 0.001). In RA group QRISK-2 (24.5%) and FRS (31.1%) cases with predicted score were in higher risk category. The maximum agreement scores between both calculators was observed in both groups (Kappa = 0.618 RA Group; Kappa = 0.671 Non RA Group). Conclusion: QRISK-2 calculator is more appropriate as it takes RA, ethnicity, CKD, and Atrial fibrillation as factors in risk assessment score. PMID:27375684

  10. Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibody (ACPA) Assays and their Role in the Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Liao, Katherine; Nair, Raj; Ringold, Sarah; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, assays for the detection of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) are used in RA diagnosis. This review summarizes the biologic basis and development of ACPA assays, available ACPA assays and their performance characteristics, and diagnostic properties of ACPA alone and compared to rheumatoid factor (RF) in early RA. We also review correlations, precision, costs and cost-effectiveness, availability, stability and reproducibility of the available assays. Taken together, data indicate that ACPA has a higher specificity than RF for early RA, good predictive validity, high sensitivity, apparent cost-effectiveness and good stability and reproducibility. Given its superior performance characteristics and increasing availability, ACPA is emerging as the most useful single assay for the diagnosis of RA. PMID:19877103

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment and Causes | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  15. New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical) New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients People with rheumatoid ... in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism. In addition, sleep disruptions, which are common among people with RA, ...

  16. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  17. Simulation of the early startup period of high-temperature heat pipes from the frozen state by a rarefied vapor self-diffusion model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe startup process is described physically and is divided into five periods for convenience of analysis. The literature survey revealed that none of the previous attempts to simulate the heat pipe startup process numerically were successful, since the rarefied vapor flow in the heat pipe was not considered. Therefore, a rarefied vapor self-diffusion model is proposed, and the early startup periods, in which the rarefied vapor flow is dominant within the heat pipe, are first simulated numerically. The numerical results show that large vapor density gradients existed along the heat pipe length, and the vapor flow reaches supersonic velocities when the density is extremely low. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data of the early startup period with good agreement.

  18. Current concepts in the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction that causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the combined use of methotrexate, a synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and biologic DMARD has revolutionized treatment of RA. Clinical remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients, and rapid and appropriate induction of remission by intensive treatment with biological DMARD and methotrexate is prerequisite to halt joint damage and functional disabilities. However, biological DMARD is limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong molecules have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active patients with methotrexatenaïve, inadequately responsive to methotrexate or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. Meanwhile, association of tofacitinib on carcinogenicity and malignancy is under debate and further investigation on post-marketing survey would be warranted. On the other hand, discontinuation of a biological DMARD without disease flare is our next goal and desirable from the standpoint of risk reduction and cost effectiveness, especially for patients with clinical remission. Recent reports indicate that more than half of early RA patients could discontinue TNF-targeted biological DMARD without clinical flare and functional impairment after obtaining clinical remission. Contrarily, for established RA, fewer patients sustained remission after the discontinuation of biological DMARD and “deep remission” at the discontinuation was a key factor to keep the treatment holiday of biological DMARD. PMID:26932398

  19. Current concepts in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction that causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the combined use of methotrexate, a synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and biologic DMARD has revolutionized treatment of RA. Clinical remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients, and rapid and appropriate induction of remission by intensive treatment with biological DMARD and methotrexate is prerequisite to halt joint damage and functional disabilities. However, biological DMARD is limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong molecules have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active patients with methotrexatenaïve, inadequately responsive to methotrexate or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. Meanwhile, association of tofacitinib on carcinogenicity and malignancy is under debate and further investigation on post-marketing survey would be warranted. On the other hand, discontinuation of a biological DMARD without disease flare is our next goal and desirable from the standpoint of risk reduction and cost effectiveness, especially for patients with clinical remission. Recent reports indicate that more than half of early RA patients could discontinue TNF-targeted biological DMARD without clinical flare and functional impairment after obtaining clinical remission. Contrarily, for established RA, fewer patients sustained remission after the discontinuation of biological DMARD and "deep remission" at the discontinuation was a key factor to keep the treatment holiday of biological DMARD. PMID:26932398

  20. Sleep Loss Exacerbates Fatigue, Depression, and Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; FitzGerald, John D.; Ranganath, Veena K.; Nicassio, Perry M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Disturbances of sleep are hypothesized to contribute to pain. However, experimental data are limited to healthy pain-free individuals. This study evaluated the effect of sleep loss during part of the night on daytime mood symptoms and pain perceptions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with control subjects. Design: A between-groups laboratory study with assessment of mood symptoms and pain perception before and after partial night sleep deprivation (PSD; awake 23:00 hr to 03:00 hr). Setting: General clinical research center. Participants: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 27) and volunteer comparison control subjects (n = 27). Measurements: Subjective reports of sleep, mood symptoms and pain, polysomnographic assessment of sleep continuity, and subjective and objective assessment of rheumatoid arthritis-specific joint pain. Results: PSD induced differential increases in self-reported fatigue (P < 0.09), depression (P < 0.04), anxiety (P < 0.04), and pain (P < 0.01) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with responses in control subjects, in whom differential increases of self-reported pain were independent of changes in mood symptoms, subjective sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep fragmentation. In the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, PSD also induced increases in disease-specific activity as indexed by self-reported pain severity (P < 0.01) and number of painful joints (P < 0.02) as well as clinician-rated joint counts (P < 0.03). Conclusion: This study provides the first evidence of an exaggerated increase in symptoms of mood and pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after sleep loss, along with an activation of rheumatoid arthritis-related joint pain. Given the reciprocal relationship between sleep disturbances and pain, clinical management of pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis should include an increased focus on the prevention and treatment of sleep disturbance in this clinical

  1. Dendritic cells provide a potential link between smoking and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    smoking on inflamed rheumatoid synovial tissue involves activation of the AHR pathway. A subset of synovial DCs is important in the response to cigarette smoke. The potential for smoking to affect DC behaviour in joint tissues has relevance to both early and late phases of RA pathogenesis and warrants further investigation. PMID:23036591

  2. A double blind randomised trial of low power laser treatment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Heussler, J K; Hinchey, G; Margiotta, E; Quinn, R; Butler, P; Martin, J; Sturgess, A D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To define the value of low power laser treatment in small joint rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS--Twenty five women with active disease were recruited. The metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints of one hand were treated with 12 J/cm2 for 30 s with a gallium-aluminium-arsenate laser. The other hand received a sham laser treatment designed so that neither therapist nor patient could distinguish the active laser from the sham laser. Each patient received 12 treatments over four weeks. The following parameters were measured: pain as assessed by visual analogue scale; range of joint movements; grip strength; duration of early morning stiffness, joint circumference, Jebsen's hand assessment; drug usage; total swollen joint counts; Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales; three phase bone scans; haematological and serological tests. RESULTS--A total of 72% of patients reported pain relief but this reduction was reported equally in both hands. No significant changes were seen in other clinical, functional, scintigraphic, or laboratory features. Neither patients nor staff were able to detect which hand was treated with the active laser. CONCLUSION--When this specific laser and dose regimen was used, low power laser treatment had no objective effect on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It did appear to produce analgesia through a powerful placebo effect. PMID:8257205

  3. Evaluation of human serum of severe rheumatoid arthritis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. S.; Raniero, L.; Santo, A. M. E.; Pinheiro, M. M.; Andrade, L. E. C.; Cardoso, M. A. G.; Junior, J. S.; Martin, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease, recurrent and systemic, initiated by autoantibodies and maintained by inflammatory mechanisms cellular applicants. The evaluation of this disease to promote early diagnosis, need an associations of many tools, such as clinical, physical examination and thorough medical history. However, there is no satisfactory consensus due to its complexity. In the present work, confocal Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the biochemical composition of human serum of 40 volunteers, 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis presenting clinical signs and symptoms, and 16 healthy donors. The technique of latex agglutination for the polystyrene covered with human immunoglobulin G and PCR (protein c-reactive) was performed for confirmation of possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique. This study aimed to verify the changes for the characteristics Raman peaks of biomolecules such as immunoglobulins amides and protein. The results were highly significant with a good separation between groups mentioned. The discriminant analysis was performed through the principal components and correctly identified 92% of the donors. Based on these results, we observed the behavior of arthritis autoimmune, evident in certain spectral regions that characterize the serological differences between the groups.

  4. Increased risk of revision for infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients with total hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Fenstad, Anne M; Dale, Håvard; Havelin, Leif; Hallan, Geir; Overgaard, Søren; Pedersen, Alma B; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Eskelinen, Antti; Mäkelä, Keijo; Engesæter, Lars B; Fevang, Bjørg-Tilde

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, including immune modulation. We investigated the risk of revision for infection after primary total hip replacement (THR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a 16-year period, and compared it with that in THR patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods We identified 13,384 THRs in RA patients and 377,287 THRs in OA patients from 1995 through 2010 in a dataset from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Kaplan-Meier survival curves, with revision for infection as the endpoint, were constructed. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate the relative risk (RR) of revision for infection adjusted for age, sex, fixation technique, and year of primary surgery. Results RA patients had a 1.3 times (95% CI 1.0–1.6) higher risk of revision for infection. After 2001, this risk increased more for RA patients than for OA patients. During the first 3 months and from 8 years postoperatively, the risk of revision for infection was higher in RA patients with THRs fixated with antibiotic-loaded cement than in corresponding OA patients. Interpretation We found a slightly higher overall risk of revision for infection in RA patients than in OA patients, but this difference was only present after 2001. In THRs with antibiotic-loaded cement, the risk of very early and late infections leading to revision was higher in RA patients than in OA patients. PMID:25782042

  5. A comparative study of the effects of bucillamine and salazosulfapyridine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mikio; Ueda, Naoki; Ohara, Hidetsugu; Abe, Muneaki; Kinoshita, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    Bucillamine (Buc), developed in Japan, is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) which has been used to treat numerous patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan and Korea with favorable results. However, it has not been used globally. In the present study, we compared the timing of onset of efficacy and the usefulness of this drug with that of the globally accepted agent salazosulfapyridine (SASP). There were 26 patients in the Buc group and 23 in the SASP group. We compared changes in the number of swollen joints, number of painful joints, duration of morning stiffness, grip strength, levels of inflammatory marker [erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP)], rheumatoid factor (RF), physician's rating by visual analogue scale (VAS), patient's rating of pain, patient's overall rating (VAS), and improvement according to European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria (DAS28-CRP, DAS28-ESR) in these two groups of patients. Both Buc and SASP were shown to be efficacious within 3 months after the start of treatment. Both drugs were found to be suitable as first-line treatment of early RA. Signs of efficacy tended to occur earlier with Buc than with SASP, and Buc also tended to have higher efficacy than SASP. PMID:19363607

  6. Anti-TNFalpha therapy of rheumatoid arthritis: what can we learn about chronic disease?

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Marc; Brennan, Fionula M; Paleolog, Ewa; Cope, Andrew; Taylor, Peter; Williams, Richard; Woody, Jim; Maini, Ravinder N

    2004-01-01

    The importance of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was initially proposed on the basis of analysis of cytokine gene regulation at the local site of the disease, the synovium. This was then verified in animal models and established in an extensive series of clinical trials, culminating in now 250000 treated patients with either of two approved TNF inhibitors, antibody or fusion protein. The degree and magnitude of clinical benefit has enabled analyses of the mechanism by which anti-TNF benefits, and hence insights into important steps in the disease process. It was found that essentially all aspects of RA were ameliorated, and important mechanisms of benefit involved diminution of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules and chemokines, leading to reduced cell trafficking, reduced angiogenesis and most importantly halting of joint destruction. What of the problems? Safety is better than prior drugs, but there is a small increase in severe infections, smaller than might have been anticipated. Cost is the major drawback limiting greater use. In view of the central pathological processes down-regulated, and their role in many diseases, the early clinical success of anti-TNF in RA led to subsequent successful trials and registration in Crohn's disease and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and successful trials in ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The era of anti-cytokine therapeutics is just dawning. PMID:15027483

  7. [Assessment of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: implications for recommending exercise].

    PubMed

    de Santana, Frederico Santos; Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; de Freitas, João Paulo Marques; Miranda, Raphaela Franco; Muniz, Luciana Feitosa; Santos Neto, Leopoldo; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Balsamo, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic symmetric polyarthritis of large and small joints and by morning stiffness that may lead to musculoskeletal impairment, with functional impotence. The concept of functionality relates to the ability of an individual to perform effectively and independently daily activities and tasks of everyday life. The aim of this review is to familiarize the rheumatologist with the concept of functional capacity evaluation and with the tests that can be applied in this population, as these are important steps for a proper exercise prescription. From functional tests already used in the elderly population, the Physical Fitness and Rheumatology Laboratory - LAR - Brasilia, which is accompanying patients from Brasilia Cohort of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis, describes in this article a protocol of tests to assess functional capacity for application in patients with RA, including the description of tests: 1) Sit and Reach; 2) Agility/Dynamic Balance; 3) Manual Dynamometry; 4) Sit Back and Lift; 5) Biceps Curl and 6) Six-minute Walk Test. PMID:25627302

  8. Correlation of the score for subjective pain with physical disability, clinical and radiographic scores in recent onset rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Fiorini, Tania; Panni, Benedetta; Turiel, Maurizio; Cazzola, Marco; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2002-01-01

    Background To analyse the relationship between subjective pain score and other measures of clinical, radiographic and functional status; in particular Larsen radiographic scores and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ); in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a disease duration of less than 3 years. Methods In this cross sectional study of 105 patients with RA (76 women, 29 men: mean age 50.93; mean disease duration 15.86 months; 71% rheumatoid factor positive) subjective pain was assessed according to the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Correlation coefficients between pain score and disease activity measures (patients' global assessment of disease by VAS, number of tender and swollen joints, morning stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], C-reactive protein [CRP] and titre of rheumatoid factor, radiographic evaluations (Larsen-Dale scores for radiographic damage of the small joints of the hands, wrist and feet), disability measures (health assessment questionnaire [HAQ]), and demographic variables were calculated; hierarchical regression analysis was done with subjective pain score as the dependent variable. Results The Spearman's correlation coefficient comparing subjective pain and HAQ was 0.421 (p < 0.001), between subjective pain and global assessment of disease and morning stiffness was 0.573 (p < 0.001) and 0.427 (p < 0.001) respectively, and between pain and number of tender and swollen joints 0.037 and 0.050 respectively (p > 0.05). In regression analysis, global assessment of disease by patients explained 32.8% of the variation in pain intensity score, morning stiffness 10.7%, CRP 4.0%, HAQ 3.8% and Larsen-Dale scores explained 2.1%; other variables were not significant in the model. Conclusions Pain scores of patients with early severe rheumatoid arthritis are correlated at higher levels with patients' global assessment of disease and with morning stiffness rather than with radiographic or other clinical variables such as number of

  9. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA. PMID:27586802

  10. Sarilumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Simon Cooper is interviewed by Ellen Clarke, Commissioning Editor Simon Cooper has >18 years of global experience in the pharmaceutical industry. He joined Sanofi in July 2014 as the Vice President, Global Project Head. In his current position at Sanofi, Dr Cooper is responsible for the clinical development of sarilumab and the worldwide submission in rheumatoid arthritis. He joined Sanofi after serving as the Global Program Medical Director at Novartis since 2012. In this role, Dr Cooper acted as the clinical lead for secukinumab psoriasis submission. Prior to Novartis, Dr Cooper held various posts at Human Genome Sciences, USA, including Executive Director of Clinical Research, Senior Director of Clinical Research and Director of Clinical Research. During his tenure at Human Genome Sciences, USA, Dr Cooper was involved in the submission of belimumab leading to its approval for SLE, and was responsible for its subsequent clinical development program. Dr Cooper has also previously held positions at MedImmune Ltd, UK, Roche, Napp Pharmaceutical Research Ltd, Wyeth Research and Medeval Ltd. In these roles, his responsibilities ranged from medical oversight of clinical trials to medical support for commercial, medical affairs and business development. He received a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from University of Newcastle upon Tyne Medical School. PMID:26860742

  11. Neutrophil gene expression in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Andrew; Bakstad, Denise; Allen, John C; Thomas, Luke; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2005-10-01

    There is now a growing awareness that infiltrating neutrophils play an important role in the molecular pathology of rheumatoid arthritis. In part, this arises from the fact that neutrophils have potent cytotoxic activity, but additionally from the fact that inflammatory neutrophils can generate a number of cytokines and chemokines that can have a direct influence on the progress of an inflammatory episode. Furthermore, the molecular properties of inflammatory neutrophils are quite different from those normally found in the circulation. For example, inflammatory neutrophils, but not blood neutrophils, can express cell surface receptors (such as MHC Class II molecules and FcgammaRI) that dramatically alter the way in which these cells can interact with ligands to modulate immune function. Cytokine/chemokine expression and surface expression of these novel cell surface receptors is dependent upon the neutrophil responding to local environmental factors to selectively up-regulate the expression of key cellular components via signalling pathways coupled to transcriptional activation. However, major changes in the expression levels of some proteins are also regulated by post-translational modifications that alter rates of proteolysis, and hence changes in the steady-state levels of these molecules. PMID:16112850

  12. Salicylate pharmacokinetics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, S G; Roberts, M S; Friesen, W T; Francis, H W

    1989-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid (SA) and its major metabolite salicyluric acid (SU) were studied in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis following a 900 mg oral dose of acetylsalicylic acid and during 6 weeks of chronic administration of enteric coated aspirin (3,900 mg day). Response to therapy was also monitored. 2. The various pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the study were similar to those observed in other single dose salicylate studies amongst healthy volunteers but were not predictive of salicylate concentration in the chronic dose study. 3. Plasma concentrations of SA (total and unbound) were found to decline significantly over the 6 weeks and plasma SU concentrations increased. 4. During the chronic dosing study, there was a significant increase in the Vmax (total and unbound) for the formation of SU, whilst the Km and SU clearance remained constant. Also, the elimination rate constant (k) for salicylate was not significantly affected. 5. Therapeutic response to salicylate therapy was not significantly affected by the decline in SA concentrations. PMID:2590603

  13. [Colonic microbial biocenosis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Gul'neva, M Iu; Noskov, S M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study colonic microbial biocenosis and colonizing ability of opportunistic bacteria in 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 30 healthy subjects. RA was diagnosed based on the American Rheumatism Association criteria (1987). Qualitative and quantitative composition of the microflora was detected by a bacteriological method. StatSoft Statistics 6.0 was used to treat the data obtained. RA was associated with significant modification of the intestinal flora, viz. decrease in lactobacteria and significant increase of enterococci, clostridia, colibacteria showing reduced enzymatic activity, and opportunistic species. Also, symbiotic relationships between microorganisms altered. The fraction of bifidobacteria, bacteroids, and lactopositive colibacteria reduced while the abundance of opportunistic enterobacteria and staphylococci was elevated. Opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae were present in urine and nasal mucosa which suggested their translocation from the intestines. It is concluded that changes in intestinal microflora and colonization by opportunistic bacteria enhance the risk of development of co-morbid conditions in patients with RA. PMID:21932563

  14. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis medications and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Funakubo Asanuma, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects mainly women during their childbearing years. As aging of childbirth advances in Japan, women who plan pregnancy would increase after they developed RA. Recent findings showed that high disease activity of RA might impair fertility. Planning pregnancy is preferable after female patients achive and maintain low disease activity or remission of RA. Women on methotrexate, which is the anchor drug for RA, need to discontinue the medication with a high risk of causing birth defects during conception and pregnancy. Data of RA patients exposed TNF inhibitors during pregnancy has been accumulating in recent years. These data suggest that increased risk of spontaneous abortion and congenital abnomalies has not been observed. Although there is insufficient data about safety of breastfeeding while using TNF inhibitors, the secretion of the drugs in breast milk is very little and fetal toxicity has not been observed. Since long term safety of children exposed TNF inhibitors in uterus has not been established, we should discontinue the drugs as soon as pregnancy is recognized. TNF inhibitors may be an useful tools for management of active RA resistant to conventional DMARDs in women who desire to bear children. PMID:25765688

  15. Epidemiology of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Southern Albania

    PubMed Central

    Koko, Vjollca; Ndrepepa, Ana; Skenderaj, Skender

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, incidence and the burden of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Southern Albania. Material and Methods: This is an epidemiologic observational study with cross-sectional analyses of all patients with RA who lived in Southern Albania during the 1995-2011 years. The RA prevalence, incidence and disability-adjusted life years (DALY) were assessed. Results: During the 1995-2011 years, 194 patients (154 females and 40 males) with RA living in Southern Albania were identified. The prevalence of RA in 2011 was 0.25% in general population and 0.34% in adult (>14 years) population. The incidence of RA in 2011 was 0.012% (12 new cases per 100000 inhabitants) and 0.016% (16 new cases per 100000 adults). The prevalence increased (from 0.036% in 1996 to 0.25% in 2011) and the incidence did not change over the study period. The mortality was 3.2% (n=7 deaths). The DALY due to RA was 823 years per 100000 inhabitants during 1995-2011 years. Conclusion: RA in Southern Albania has a prevalence of 0.25 % and an annual incidence of 0.012% in the general population in 2011. RA was responsible for a considerable burden on the health of population during the 1995-2011 years. PMID:26236163

  16. [GWAS of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Drug Discovery].

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Koichiro

    2015-04-01

    We have conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously found that myelin basic protein (MBP) is associated with RA. One of the MBP isoforms (Golli-MBP) is expressed not only in nerve cells, but also in hematopoietic cells, and may negatively regulate T-cell receptor signaling. We expanded the GWAS level by collaborating with laboratories in Japan and then throughout the world. Meta-analysis of GWAS data resulted in the identification of -100 genomic loci associated with RA development. The -100 genomic loci contain -400 candidate genes, and it is not easy to find out which genes actually play important roles in RA. By incorporating available public databases, we succeeded in narrowing down the susceptibility genes from 377 to 98. We also showed that regulatory T cells are associated with RA based on the combination of the histone methylation database and our mega-GWAS results. Protein-protein interaction and drug discovery databases gave us information that some of the drugs have already been developed as therapeutic medicines for RA, and some of them were used for diseases other than RA. These drugs may be used for RA in the near future (drug repurposing). The combination of biological databases and GWAS results may be a novel method to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:26536782

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients. PMID:26521325

  18. Mutated citrullinated vimentin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kuna, Andrea Tesija

    2012-01-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common inflammatory systemic autoimmune disease, primarily affecting the peripheral joints. The past decade has been marked with revolutionary changes both in the therapeutic and diagnostic perspectives of RA. The discovery of an RA-specific citrullination-driven immune reaction gave a substantial contribution in the diagnostic approach to RA. Efforts directed towards the identification of the antigenic target specifically recognized by these autoantibodies resulted in the identification of vimentin in citrullinated form as the potential native antigen, among other proteins. Furthermore, it was found that the mutation of vimentin represents an independent trigger of antigenic properties, in addition to citrullination. As a result of this discovery, a commercial ELISA using mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) was developed. Increasingly, data now support the use of anti-MCV in RA diagnosis and prognosis for errosion. This review summarizes the research to date on the use of anti-MCV in RA diagnosis and prognosis and its potential use as a therapeutic marker. The pathologic role of these antibodies in RA disease is also discussed. PMID:22037509

  19. TNF inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIXI; XU, SHENGQIAN

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy has markedly improved treatment outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists, such as infliximab (IFX), etanercept (ETN), adalimumab (ADA), golimumab (GOLI) and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have been widely used for the treatment of RA. IFX provides significant, clinically relevant improvement in physical function and the quality of life, inhibits progressive joint damage and sustains improvement in the signs and symptoms of patients with RA. ETN is effective and safe for patients with RA. Combination therapy with ETN plus methotrexate (MTX) reduces disease activity, decreases total joint score progression, slows the pace of joint destruction and improves function more effectively compared to any of the monotherapies. ADA with or without MTX also relieves the signs and symptoms of RA. CZP and GOLI expand the therapeutic schedule for patients with RA. The TNF-α inhibitors have similar efficacy, but distinct clinical pharmacokinetic and -dynamic properties. The common adverse events of these TNF-α antagonists include adverse reactions, infections and injection-site reaction. Additionally, these adverse events are mostly mild or moderate and their incidence is low. Certain patients exhibit a lack of response to anti-TNF-α therapies. Some patients may discontinue the initial drug and switch to a second anti-TNF-α agent. The shortage of clinical response to one agent may not predict deficiency of response to another. This review mainly addresses the latest developments of these biological agents in the treatment of RA. PMID:24648915

  20. Janus kinase inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kunihiro

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has advanced substantially over the past decade with the development of biologics targeting inflammatory cytokines. Recent progress in treating RA has been achieved with janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors (Jakinibs), an orally available disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug targeting the intracellular kinase JAK and with similar efficacy to biologics. The first Jakinib approved for RA was tofacitinib, which exerted superiority to methotrexate and non-inferiority to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. In recent years, the Jakinib baricitinib has demonstrated superiority to both methotrexate and a TNF inhibitor, adalimumab. Given these promising findings, Jakinibs are expected to represent the next generation compounds for treating RA, and a number of Jakinibs are currently in clinical trials. Jakinibs can differ substantially in their selectivity against JAKs; tofacitinib and baricitinib target multiple JAKs, whereas the most recently developed Jakinibs target only a single JAK. The influence of Jakinib selectivity on efficacy and side effects is of great interest, requiring further careful observation. PMID:26994322

  1. Serum Trace Element Concentrations in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sahebari, Maryam; Ayati, Razie; Mirzaei, Hamed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Hejazi, Sepideh; Saghafi, Massoud; Saadati, Nayyereh; Ferns, Gordon A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a condition that is associated with oxidative stress. Serum trace elements and their related transport proteins, e.g., albumin and ceruloplasmin, play an important role in the antioxidant defense. Trace element status may therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of RA or be affected by the disease activity of this chronic inflammatory condition. The study participants were 110 patients with RA and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of albumin, ceruloplasmin, selenium, zinc, copper, and zinc/copper ratio were measured in all subjects. The relationship between these parameters and disease activity score was also assessed. Lower concentrations of serum Alb, Zn, and Se were independently related to disease activity index. High concentrations of serum copper were associated with the presence of RA. Serum Cu concentrations were positively related to disease activity as assessed by the disease activity score. Low serum concentrations of Zn and Se, and high serum Cu concentrations may be associated with the presence of RA or be a consequence of this condition. Of the trace elements that were investigated in the present study, only serum Cu was positively correlated with disease activity. PMID:26450515

  2. Cells of the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen; Distler, Oliver; Pap, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For some time synovial fibroblasts have been regarded simply as innocent synovial cells, mainly responsible for synovial homeostasis. During the past decade, however, a body of evidence has accumulated illustrating that rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) are active drivers of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Details regarding the intracellular signalling cascades that result in long-term activation and synthesis of proinflammatory molecules and matrix-degrading enzymes by RASFs have been analyzed. Molecular, cellular and animal studies have identified various interactions with other synovial and inflammatory cells. This expanded knowledge of the distinct role played by RASFs in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis has moved these fascinating cells to the fore, and work to identify targeted therapies to inhibit their joint destructive potential is underway. PMID:18177509

  3. Ascites and other incidental findings revealing undiagnosed systemic rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Matthew Chak Hin; Disney, Benjamin; Perkins, Philip; Wood, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 43-year-old man presenting to the gastroenterology outpatient department with exudative ascites. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pericardial effusion and pleural effusion were detected on further imaging. Further clinical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on the left arm, which were confirmed to be rheumatoid nodules on histology. Inflammatory markers were elevated with positive serology for rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated protein antibody. Our investigations excluded tuberculosis, pancreatitis and malignancy in the patient. Following review by a rheumatologist, a diagnosis of systemic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was made. Pleuritis and pericarditis are well recognised as extra-articular manifestation of RA. Ascites, however, is rarely recognised as a manifestation of RA. Our literature search revealed two other cases of ascites due to RA disease activity, and both patients had long-standing known RA. This case adds to the discussion on whether ascites and peritonitis should be classified as extra-articular manifestations of RA. PMID:26055583

  4. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Singh, Nilkamal

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting that yoga is a useful add-on therapy for RA patients. However, all studies showed limitations with respect to sample size, study design, description and duration of yoga intervention, and assessment tools and statistical methods used. Additionally, the studies did not attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying observed benefits. Hence, evidence suggests a definite role of yoga in RA improvement, reducing pain, improving function, and creating a positive mental state. However, detailed analysis and additional studies are necessary to verify these observations. PMID:24198591

  5. [Recent advances in upper extremity surgery for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Nishida, Keiichiro

    2016-06-01

    The number of cases with rheumatoid arthritis who requires arthroscopic synovectomy is declining, but it is still a useful procedure in combination with effective pharmacologic disease control. For the destruction of glenohumeral joint, total shoulder arthroplasty is effective for pain relief and functional outcome for patients without rotator cuff impairment. The reverse shoulder arthroplasty has been shown favorable short-term results, but need a careful indication for rheumatoid shoulder with poor bone stock and bone quality. Linked or unlinked total elbow arthroplasty are now reliable methods for the reconstruction of rheumatoid elbows with acceptable long-term survival. Joint replacement surgery for proximal interphalangeal joint is a challenging procedure in terms of relatively high complication rate and disappointing improvement in range of motion, whereas achieves good patients' satisfaction for pain relief and improved finger appearances. PMID:27311189

  6. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The interrelationship among lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils appears to be an important aspect of the synovial inflammation that is characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis. In a study comparing gold sodium aurothiomalate (GST) with auranofin (Au), an orally absorbed compound, both appeared to inhibit the disease process and no difference between parenteral and oral administration was observed. Another study involved two groups of nine patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis. One group underwent plasmapheresis. The second group underwent total lymphoid irradiation. Both agents appeared to inhibit the disease process. Plasmapheresis was better tolerated that irradiation.

  7. [Methotrexate - anchor drug in the treament of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Methotrexate is in the centre of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. There are new insights in the understanding of its mechanism: intracellular polyglutamation activates the methotrexate molecule. The magnitude of this step is associated with response to the treatment. Further on, it was found that even low doses of methotrexate are sufficient to guarantee its effect as comedication of TNF-inhibitors. Finally, from the follow-up of long term cohorts it seems that methotrexate reduces mortality in rheumatoid arthritis independently from its effect on disease activity. PMID:26841182

  8. The role of exercise in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Metsios, George S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonis; Kitas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with significant functional impairment and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Along with pharmacological therapy, exercise seems to be a very promising intervention to improve disease-related outcomes, including functional ability and systemic manifestations, such as the increased cardiovascular risk. In this review, we discuss the physiological mechanisms by which exercise improves inflammation, cardiovascular risk and psychological health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and describe in detail how exercise can be incorporated in the management of this disease using real examples from our clinical practice. PMID:26178249

  9. Tocilizumab-induced psoriasiform rash in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Sánchez Gaviño, Juan Antonio; McGonagle, Dennis; García-Martinez, Eva; Iñiguez de Onzoño Martín, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody against the interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor and has been approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who have had an inadequate response to previous biological therapies. Psoriasiform skin lesions, especially palmoplantar pustulosis lesions, are well described following anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. We describe a 79-year-old woman with rheumatoid factor-positive, anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive erosive RA, who developed a psoriasiform palmoplantar pustulosis reaction following treatment with TCZ therapy (IL-6 receptor). The rash showed histological features compatible with psoriasis and disappeared following discontinuation of TCZ. PMID:24942661

  10. Adiponectin stimulates IL-8 production by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, Kanako; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Suguro, Toru; Kawai, Shinichi

    2009-01-09

    The adipokines are linked not only to metabolic regulation, but also to immune responses. Adiponectin, but not leptin or resistin induced interleukin-8 production from rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF). The culture supernatant of RSF treated with adiponectin induced chemotaxis, although adiponectin itself had no such effect. Addition of antibody against adiponectin, and inhibition of adiponectin receptor gene decreased adiponectin-induced IL-8 production. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B was increased by adiponectin. The induction of interleukin-8 was inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. These findings suggest that adiponectin contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to therapy with cyclophosphamide and mesna. A case report of a patient with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A C; Misra, D P; Patro, P S; Agarwal, V

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid vasculitis usually occurs on the background of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, although in rare cases the patients can be seronegative. We report a woman with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with rheumatoid vasculitis who developed toxic epidermal necrolysis involving most of her body surface area, while on therapy with intravenous cyclophosphamide and mesna. After withdrawal of suspected offending agents, administration of intravenous immunoglobulin, and supportive therapy, she had a favorable outcome. Such an occurrence is rare and serves to educate about a potentially life-threatening adverse event associated with a commonly used immunosuppressive agent. PMID:26555550

  12. A comparative phenotypical analysis of rheumatoid nodules and rheumatoid synovium with special reference to adhesion molecules and activation markers

    PubMed Central

    Elewaut, D.; De Keyser, F.; De Wever, N.; Baeten, D.; Van Damme, N.; Verbruggen, G.; Cuvelier, C.; Veys, E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1)To analyse the in situ expression of adhesion molecules in rheumatoid nodules. (2) To compare the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules in synovial tissue and subcutaneous nodules obtained from the same patients. (3) To compare the expression of adhesion molecules and activation markers on T cell lines from nodules and synovium.
METHODS—(1) Immunohistochemical analysis by APAAP technique of E selectin, CD44, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, and VCAM-1 was performed on 10 rheumatoid nodules from seven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); nodules and synovium were simultaneously analysed from three patients. (2) T cell lines were generated from RA nodules (n=7) and synovium (n=7) by interleukin 2 expansion, and subsequently characterised by flow cytometry for surface expression of αEβ7, α4β7, CD44, L selectin, LFA-1a, PECAM-1, and CD30.
RESULTS—(1) In rheumatoid nodules, the palisading layer strongly stains for ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, but less pronounced for CD44. VCAM-1 staining was usually negative. ICAM-1 is upregulated in the vessels surrounding the central zone of fibrinoid necrosis. The immunohistological picture in different nodules derived from the same patient was similar. (2) The endothelial expression of adhesion molecules is comparable in RA nodules and synovium on an individual level, except for E selectin, which is overexpressed in nodule endothelium. (3) T cell lines from nodules and synovium display similar adhesion molecule profiles. However, the expression of CD30, a T cell activation marker linked with Th2 subsets, is higher in nodules compared with synovium.
CONCLUSION—These data support a recirculation hypothesis of T cells between articular and extra-articular manifestations in RA, although the activation state of the T cells in each of these localisations may differ.

 Keywords: T cells; adhesion molecules; rheumatoid nodules; rheumatoid synovium PMID:9797554

  13. Development of macromolecular prodrug for rheumatoid arthritis☆

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Quan, Ling-dong; Cui, Liao; Goldring, Steven R.; Wang, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is considered to be one of the major public health problems worldwide. The development of therapies that target tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and co-stimulatory pathways that regulate the immune system have revolutionized the care of patients with RA. Despite these advances, many patients continue to experience symptomatic and functional impairment. To address this issue, more recent therapies that have been developed are designed to target intracellular signaling pathways involved in immunoregulation. Though this approach has been encouraging, there have been major challenges with respect to off-target organ side effects and systemic toxicities related to the widespread distribution of these signaling pathways in multiple cell types and tissues. These limitations have led to an increasing interest in the development of strategies for the macromolecularization of anti-rheumatic drugs, which could target them to the inflamed joints. This approach enhances the efficacy of the therapeutic agent with respect to synovial inflammation, while markedly reducing non-target organ adverse side effects. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive overview of the rational design and optimization of macromolecular prodrugs for treatment of RA. The superior and the sustained efficacy of the prodrug may be partially attributed to their Extravasation through Leaky Vasculature and subsequent Inflammatory cell-mediated Sequestration (ELVIS) in the arthritic joints. This biologic process provides a plausible mechanism, by which macromolecular prodrugs preferentially target arthritic joints and illustrates the potential benefits of applying this therapeutic strategy to the treatment of other inflammatory diseases. PMID:22433784

  14. Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Cho, Be-Long; An, Ah-Reum; Seo, Young-Gyun; Jin, Ho-Seong; Oh, Seung-Min; Jang, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and metabolic syndrome (Mets) are considered to be diseases with common traits that can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease incidence; studies in other countries examined the relationship between these diseases. However, existing studies did not show consistent results. In the present study, the relationship between RA and Mets in Koreans was examined using the data of the 4th and 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Methods The present study used the data of the 4th and 5th KNHANES, conducted between 2007 and 2012. Among 25,812 adults aged over 40, 19,893 were selected as study subjects, excluding 5,919 who did not have variable information needed for the analysis. T-test and chi-square test were used for the analysis of related variables. To determine the relationship between diagnostic status of RA and Mets, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed by controlling confounding variables, which were selected through literature review and statistical analysis. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between diagnostic status of RA and Mets. When age, education level, average monthly household income, smoking, alcohol consumption, and level of physical activity were adjusted, the prevalence of Mets was lower in RA patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65 to 0.96). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between treatment status of RA and Mets. When age, education level, average monthly household income, smoking, alcohol consumption, and level of physical activity were adjusted, there was a significant negative correlation in women (aOR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.96). Conclusion The relationship between RA and Mets showed a significantly negative correlation in Korean women. The group that received RA treatment showed significantly lower prevalence

  15. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hollan, I; Dessein, P H; Ronda, N; Wasko, M C; Svenungsson, E; Agewall, S; Cohen-Tervaert, J W; Maki-Petaja, K; Grundtvig, M; Karpouzas, G A; Meroni, P L

    2015-10-01

    The increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recognized for many years. However, although the characteristics of CVD and its burden resemble those in diabetes, the focus on cardiovascular (CV) prevention in RA has lagged behind, both in the clinical and research settings. Similar to diabetes, the clinical picture of CVD in RA may be atypical, even asymptomatic. Therefore, a proactive screening for subclinical CVD in RA is warranted. Because of the lack of clinical trials, the ideal CVD prevention (CVP) in RA has not yet been defined. In this article, we focus on challenges and controversies in the CVP in RA (such as thresholds for statin therapy), and propose recommendations based on the current evidence. Due to the significant contribution of non-traditional, RA-related CV risk factors, the CV risk calculators developed for the general population underestimate the true risk in RA. Thus, there is an enormous need to develop adequate CV risk stratification tools and to identify the optimal CVP strategies in RA. While awaiting results from randomized controlled trials in RA, clinicians are largely dependent on the use of common sense, and extrapolation of data from studies on other patient populations. The CVP in RA should be based on an individualized evaluation of a broad spectrum of risk factors, and include: 1) reduction of inflammation, preferably with drugs decreasing CV risk, 2) management of factors associated with increased CV risk (e.g., smoking, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, kidney disease, depression, periodontitis, hypothyroidism, vitamin D deficiency and sleep apnea), and promotion of healthy life style (smoking cessation, healthy diet, adjusted physical activity, stress management, weight control), 3) aspirin and influenza and pneumococcus vaccines according to current guidelines, and 4) limiting use of drugs that increase CV risk. Rheumatologists should take responsibility for the education of

  16. Glucocorticoids and chronotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that the morning symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are linked to the circadian abnormal increase in night inflammation, favoured by inadequate cortisol secretion under conditions of active disease. Therefore, exogenous glucocorticoid treatment is recommended in RA at low doses since it may partially act like a ‘replacement therapy’. The prevention/treatment of the night upregulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction (and related flare of cytokine synthesis) has been shown to be more effective when exogenous glucocorticoid administration is obtained with a night-time-release formulation. Large-scale trials documented that modified-release prednisone has greater efficacy then morning prednisone for long-term low-dose glucocorticoid treatment in patients with RA, showing at least a more significant reduction in morning joint stiffness. Interestingly, despite a considerably higher cost than conventional prednisone, chronotherapy with night-time-release prednisone was recognised as a cost-effective option for patients with RA not on glucocorticoids who are eligible for therapy with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Moreover, since different cell populations involved in the inflammatory process are particularly activated during the night, other therapeutical approaches used in RA, for example, conventional DMARDs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), should follow the same concepts of glucocorticoid chronotherapy. Indeed, bedtime methotrexate chronotherapy was found to improve RA symptoms compared to the current standard dosing methods, and several available NSAIDs (ie, indomethacin, aceclofenac, ketoprofen, flurbiporfen, lornoxicam) have been very recently modified in their formulation, in order to obtain chronotherapeutical effects in RA. PMID:27042335

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis patients' experience of climate care.

    PubMed

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff's enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients' illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  18. Prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in France: 2001

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, F; Saraux, A; Guggenbuhl, P; Roux, C; Fardellone, P; Le Bihan, E; Cantagrel, A; Chary-Valckenaere, I; Euller-Ziegler, L; Flipo, R; Juvin, R; Behier, J; Fautrel, B; Masson, C; Coste, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prevalence estimates of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) vary across Europe. Recent estimates in southern European countries showed a lower prevalence than in northern countries. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of RA in France in a multiregional representative sample in the year 2001. Methods: A two stage random sample was constituted in seven areas (20 counties) from the national telephone directory of households and by the next birthday method in each household. Patient-interviewers, member of self help groups, were trained to administer telephone surveys using a validated questionnaire for case detection of inflammatory rheumatism, and conducted the survey under quality control. All suspected cases of RA were confirmed by their rheumatologist or by clinical examination. Prevalence estimates after probability sampling correction were standardised for age and sex (national census 1999). Results: An average response rate of 64.7% (two stages combined) led to a total of 9395 respondents. Standardised prevalence was 0.31% (95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.48) for RA, 0.51% in women and 0.09% in men, with a higher age-specific prevalence in the 65–74 year age band. A geographical analysis of county clustering showed significant variation across the country. Conclusion: This national multiregional cooperative study demonstrates the usefulness of working in association with patients of self help groups. It showed a similar prevalence of RA to that of the spondyloarthropathies estimated concomitantly during the survey. It provides a reliable basis for definition of population targets for healthcare delivery and drug treatments. PMID:15800010

  19. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Takeo; Amin, Mohammad A.; Ruth, Jeffrey H.; Campbell, Phillip L.; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Ha, Christine M.; Stinson, W. Alex; Domino, Steven E.; Koch, Alisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the role of α(1,2)-linked fucosylation of proteins by fucosyltransferase1 (fut1) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) angiogenesis. Methods Analysis of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in synovial tissues (STs) was performed by immunohistological staining. α(1,2)-linked fucosylated angiogenic chemokine expression in synovial fluids (SFs) was determined by immunoprecipitation and lectin blotting. To determine the angiogenic role of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA, we performed human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC) chemotaxis and Matrigel assays using nondepleted and α(1,2)-linked fucosylated protein depleted RA SFs. To examine the production of proangiogenic chemokines by fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) in HMVECs, cells were transfected with fut1 sense or antisense oligonucleotides, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed. We then studied mouse lung endothelial cell (MLEC) chemotaxis using wild type and fut1 gene deficient MLECs. Results α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins on RA ST endothelial cells (ECs) were highly expressed compared to normal ST. α(1,2)-linked fucosylated monocyte chemoattract protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 was present in RA SFs, and was significantly elevated compared to osteoarthritis SFs. Depletion of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA SFs induced less HMVEC migration and tube formation compared to nondepleted RA SFs. We found that blocking fut1 expression in ECs resulted in decreased MCP-1/CCL2 and regulated upon activation and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5 production. Finally, we showed that fut1 regulates EC migration in response to vascular endothelial cell growth factor. Conclusions α(1,2)-linked fucosylation by fut1 may be an important new target for angiogenic diseases like RA. PMID:24692243

  20. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  1. MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Redelinghuys, Pierre; Whitehead, Lauren; Augello, Andrea; Drummond, Rebecca A; Levesque, Jean-Michel; Vautier, Simon; Reid, Delyth M; Kerscher, Bernhard; Taylor, Julie A; Nigrovic, Peter A; Wright, John; Murray, Graeme I; Willment, Janet A; Hocking, Lynne J; Fernandes, Maria J G; De Bari, Cosimo; Mcinnes, Iain B; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    Background Myeloid inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor (MICL, Clec12A) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) expressed predominantly by myeloid cells. Previous studies have suggested that MICL is involved in controlling inflammation. Objective To determine the role of this CLR in inflammatory pathology using Clec12A−/− mice. Methods Clec12A−/− mice were generated commercially and primarily characterised using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Mechanisms and progress of disease were characterised by clinical scoring, histology, flow cytometry, irradiation bone-marrow chimera generation, administration of blocking antibodies and in vivo imaging. Characterisation of MICL in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was determined by immunohistochemistry and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Anti-MICL antibodies were detected in patient serum by ELISA and dot-blot analysis. Results MICL-deficient animals did not present with pan-immune dysfunction, but exhibited markedly exacerbated inflammation during CAIA, owing to the inappropriate activation of myeloid cells. Polymorphisms of MICL were not associated with disease in patients with RA, but this CLR was the target of autoantibodies in a subset of patients with RA. In wild-type mice the administration of such antibodies recapitulated the Clec12A−/− phenotype. Conclusions MICL plays an essential role in regulating inflammation during arthritis and is an autoantigen in a subset of patients with RA. These data suggest an entirely new mechanism underlying RA pathogenesis, whereby the threshold of myeloid cell activation can be modulated by autoantibodies that bind to cell membrane-expressed inhibitory receptors. PMID:26275430

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis patients’ experience of climate care

    PubMed Central

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff’s enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients’ illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  3. Simulated NASA Satellite Data Products for the NOAA Integrated Coral Reef Observation Network/Coral Reef Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    This RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment will demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensor data as significant input to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ICON/ CREWS (Integrated Coral Reef Observation System/Coral Reef Early Warning System). The project affects the Coastal Management Program Element of the Applied Sciences Program.

  4. Olecranon Bursitis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gamarra-Hilburn, Carla F; Rios, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Septic bursitis is usually caused by bacterial organisms. However, infectious bursitis caused by fungi is very rare. Herein, we present a 68-year-old woman with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis who developed pain, erythema, and swelling of the right olecranon bursa. Aspiration of the olecranon bursa showed a white blood cell count of 3.1 × 10(3)/μL (41% neutrophils, 30% lymphocytes, and 29% monocytes). Fluid culture was positive for Candida parapsilosis. She was treated with caspofungin 50 mg intravenously daily for 13 days followed by fluconazole 200 mg orally daily for one week. She responded well to this treatment but had recurrent swelling of the bursa. Bursectomy was recommended but she declined this option. This case, together with other reports, suggests that the awareness of uncommon pathogens, their presentation, and predisposing risk factors are important to establish an early diagnosis and prevent long-term complications. PMID:27595032

  5. Development and Evaluation of Dual Cross-Linked Pulsatile Beads for Chronotherapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Abanesh kumar; Pande, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, pulsatile release beads were prepared by ionic gelation technique. Lornoxicam dual cross-linked beads were prepared by dropping dispersed phase of lornoxicam, pectin, and sodium alginate into the dispersion phase of different concentrations of calcium chloride solution followed by aluminium chloride solution. The formulated beads were further coated by Eudragit L & S 100 in the ratio 1 : 2 w/w in order to achieve desired lag time. In vitro release study showed lag time of 5–8 h before release of lornoxicam from the formulated beads. Thus, formulated dual cross-linked beads when administered at bed time may release lornoxicam when needed most for chronotherapeutics of early morning rheumatoid arthritis attacks in chronic patients. PMID:26556001

  6. Olecranon Bursitis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Grissel

    2016-01-01

    Septic bursitis is usually caused by bacterial organisms. However, infectious bursitis caused by fungi is very rare. Herein, we present a 68-year-old woman with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis who developed pain, erythema, and swelling of the right olecranon bursa. Aspiration of the olecranon bursa showed a white blood cell count of 3.1 × 103/μL (41% neutrophils, 30% lymphocytes, and 29% monocytes). Fluid culture was positive for Candida parapsilosis. She was treated with caspofungin 50 mg intravenously daily for 13 days followed by fluconazole 200 mg orally daily for one week. She responded well to this treatment but had recurrent swelling of the bursa. Bursectomy was recommended but she declined this option. This case, together with other reports, suggests that the awareness of uncommon pathogens, their presentation, and predisposing risk factors are important to establish an early diagnosis and prevent long-term complications. PMID:27595032

  7. Bone loss: Quantitative imaging techniques for assessing bone mass in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Njeh, Christopher F; Genant, Harry K

    2000-01-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with clinical manifestation of low trauma fractures. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a risk factor due to generalized and articular bone loss. This minireview presents past and current bone mass measurement techniques in RA. These techniques include: plain radiographs, absorptiometry, quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and ultrasound. The most widely used technique is dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). RA patients have lower bone mass as compared with normals and substantial bone loss may occur early after the onset of disease. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) at the hand using either DXA or ultrasound maybe a useful tool in the management of RA patients. PMID:11094457

  8. [The criteria of differentiated diagnostics of early arthritis on the basis of analysis of serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity].

    PubMed

    Volkova, M V; Kunder, E V

    2012-10-01

    The study analyzed serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity in patients with early arthritis--early rheumatoid arthritis and acute reactive arthritis. The criteria of their differential diagnostics were developed on the basis of data obtained. The genuine methods were applied to analyze hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity of blood serum based on formation of clot of etacridine acetate (rivanol) with hyaluronic acid and DNA inversely proportionally to their polymerization under the impact of enzymes. The increased serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity was established in patients with early arthritis as compared with control group (p < 0.001). The prevalence of mentioned types of activity under early rheumatoid arthritis as compared with acute reactive arthritis was detected too. The rests for differentiate diagnostics of early rheumatoid arthritis and acute reactive arthritis were developed conformed to criteria of the most useful diagnostic tests in rheumatology. PMID:23265051

  9. Patient Preferences Regarding Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapies: A Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Louder, Anthony M.; Singh, Amitabh; Saverno, Kim; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Aten, Aaron J.; Koenig, Andrew S.; Pasquale, Margaret K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), provides patients with an alternative to subcutaneously or intravenously administered biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Little is known about patient preference for novel RA treatments. Objective To investigate patient preferences for attributes associated with RA treatments. Methods A choice-based conjoint survey was mailed to 1400 randomly selected commercially insured patients (aged 21–80 years) diagnosed with RA, who were continuously enrolled from May 1, 2012, through April 30, 2013, and had ≥2 medical claims for International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code 714.0 and no previous biologic DMARD use. Treatment attributes included route of administration; monthly out-of-pocket cost; frequency of administration; ability to reduce daily joint pain and swelling; likelihood of serious adverse events; improvement in the ability to perform daily tasks; and medication burden. Mean attribute importance scores were calculated after adjusting for patient demographics (eg, age, sex, years since diagnosis) using a hierarchical Bayes model. Patient preferences for each treatment attribute were ranked by the importance score. Part-worth utilities (ie, preference scores) were used to perform a conjoint market simulation. Results A total of 380 patients (response rate, 27.1%) returned the survey. Their mean age (± standard deviation) was 54.9 (± 9.3) years. Nonrespondents were 2 years younger (mean, 52.9 years; P = .002) but did not differ significantly from respondents in known clinical characteristics. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, mean patients' ranking of treatment attribute importance, in decreasing order, was route of administration, 34.1 (± 15.5); frequency of administration, 16.4 (± 6.8); serious adverse events, 12.0 (± 9.3); cost, 10.1 (± 6.2); medication

  10. Cognitive Distortion in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relation to Depression and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the relation between cognitive distortion, as measured by the Cognitive Error Questionnaire, and both self-reported and interview-rated depression and disability in 92 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Found cognitive distortion significantly associated with depression, and also related to physical disability. Discusses the results,…

  11. Pain Coping Strategies and Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined role of pain episodes and active and passive pain coping strategies in predicting depression in 287 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Findings revealed pain, passive coping, and interaction between the 2 accounted for higher depression. Results also indicated that frequent use of passive pain coping strategies in face of high pain…

  12. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  13. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  14. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-01-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described. Images PMID:3977410

  15. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-02-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described. PMID:3977410

  16. Increased incidence of rheumatoid arthritis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chia-Chun; Chang, Shun-Jen; Tsai, Wen-Chan; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Wu, Cheng-Chin; Sung, Wan-Yu; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Yen, Jeng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Past studies have shown inconsistent results on whether there is an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis. To investigate the possible relationship between the 2 autoimmune diseases, we performed a nationwide cohort study utilizing the National Health Insurance Research Database and the Registry of Catastrophic Illness. A total of 1456 newly diagnosed patients with MS and 10,362 control patients were matched for age, sex, and initial diagnosis date. Patients with MS had a higher incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (age-adjusted standardized incidence ratio: 1.72; 95% confidence interval = 1.01–2.91). There was a positive correlation in being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in patients previously diagnosed with MS when stratified by sex and age. The strength of this association remained statistically significant after adjusting for sex, age, and smoking history (hazard ratio: 1.78, 95% confidence interval = 1.24–2.56, P = 0.002). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that a diagnosis of MS increased the likelihood of a subsequent diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in patients, independent of sex, age, and smoking history. PMID:27368008

  17. Sustainability of Forefoot Reconstruction for the Rheumatoid Foot.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Kathie J; Rincker, Sarah A; Hyer, Christopher F

    2016-01-01

    Ninety percent of patients with rheumatoid arthritis will display foot and ankle pathologic features, including hallux valgus, lesser metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint subluxation/dislocation, and hammertoe deformity. Recently, a trend has ensued toward joint preservation with distal metatarsal osteotomies and various bunion corrective procedures. However, the reference standard remains first MTP joint fusion, lesser metatarsal head resection, and lesser proximal interphalangeal joint fusion. The present retrospective study followed the results of 4 different surgeons who had performed the reference standard rheumatoid forefoot reconstruction from August 2008 to August 2012 on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Radiographic and statistical analysis of the data from 20 patients determined an overall first MTP joint fusion rate of 90%, often occurring by 108 (range 64 to 202) days postoperatively. Radiographic nonunion occurred in 2 of the 20 patients (10%), although both were asymptomatic, with no revision necessary. Lesser digit deformity revision occurred in 1 patient (5%), and mild to moderate infection developed in 4 patients (20%). The radiographic and clinical follow-up period was 12 months. Our study found that this technique provides exceptional radiographic improvement, an acceptable time to fusion, a low reoperation rate, and minimal complications. In addition, correction of the deformity was maintained at 1 year postoperatively. In conclusion, first MTP joint fusion with lesser metatarsal head resection should remain the reference standard for surgical intervention of the rheumatoid foot. PMID:26970909

  18. Interleukin 35 Synovial Fluid Levels Are Associated with Disease Activity of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Šenolt, Ladislav; Šumová, Barbora; Jandová, Romana; Hulejová, Hana; Mann, Heřman; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Filková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the association of systemic and local interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 37 patients with treatment naïve early RA, 49 with established RA and 29 control patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were studied. Serum and paired synovial fluid samples were analysed for IL-35. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed according to the 28-Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Results The levels of serum IL-35 were significantly higher in patients with treatment naïve early RA compared to those with established disease and control OA subjects. In addition, serum levels of IL-35 significantly decreased 12 weeks after initiation of glucocorticoids and conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with treatment naïve early RA. Synovial fluid IL-35 levels were significantly higher in RA compared to OA patients, were significantly elevated compared to serum counterparts and correlated with synovial fluid leukocyte count (r=0.412; p<0.01), serum CRP levels (r=0.362; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r=0.430, p<0.01). Conclusion This is the first study showing elevated circulating levels of IL-35 in treatment naïve early RA, its significant decrease after treatment initiation and positive association between increased synovial fluid IL-35 and disease activity in patients with long-lasting RA. PMID:26204444

  19. A three-dimensional simulation of transition and early turbulence in a time-developing mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, A. B.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of the transition and early turbulence regimes in the time developing mixing layer was investigated. The sensitivity of the mixing layer to the disturbance field of the initial condition is considered. The growth of the momentum thickness, the mean velocity profile, the turbulence kinetic energy, the Reynolds stresses, the anisotropy tensor, and particle track pictures of computations are all examined in an effort to better understand the physics of these regimes. The amplitude, spectrum shape, and random phases of the initial disturbance field were varied. A scheme of generating discrete orthogonal function expansions on some nonuniform grids was developed. All cases address the early or near field of the mixing layer. The most significant result shows that the secondary instability of the mixing layer is produced by spanwise variations in the straining field of the primary vortex structures.

  20. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  1. Why do we need new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Chikanza, I C; Jawed, S; Naughton, D; Blake, D R

    1998-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by progressive joint damage. The classical treatments of the disease such as myocrisin and sulphasalazine, are not always effective at controlling the disease. This has necessitated the development of novel agents for treating rheumatoid arthritis. Most of these drugs are biological in nature and are targeted at specific sites of the inflammatory cascade of reactions. A number of clinical trials have been conducted. The clinical effects that have been observed are transient, necessitating repeated treatments and the risk of vaccination effects. Many of these agents have to be administered parenterally, production costs are very high. Consequently, chemical entities which can be taken orally need to be developed. Since the immune system is very complex with pleiotropic cytokines and redundancy in some of the regulatory networks, it may therefore be necessary to use multiple agents targeted at different specific sites of the inflammatory cascade or that different agents could be given at different stages of the disease, to induce disease remission and maintain the response to therapy. Cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) play important physiological roles in the host's defence systems against infections and malignancy. The chronic inhibition of these cytokines by targeted therapies may therefore lead to the development of side effects. Thus, carefully controlled long-term studies will be required to assess the safety of selective targeting of processes involved in inflammation. A more recent novel approach is to target hypoxic tissues with bioreductive agents. Thus, some of the established rheumatoid arthritis treatments could be linked to bioreductive agents and released in hypoxic tissues where inflammation is occurring. This review summarizes the important developments in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. There is no doubt that despite

  2. Radiographic estimation in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Manxhuka-Kërliu, Suzana; Rexhepi, Mjellma

    2011-01-01

    Long since it have been suggested that a subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, diagnosed with negative rheumatoid factor tests, represents a clinical entity quite distinct from that of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to establish a scientific comparative analysis between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, regarding some radiological and clinical parameters, applied for the first time on patients from Kosovo. Two hundred fifty patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were retrospectively studied by analysis the radiographic damage and clinical parameters of the disease, using a data base. All examinees were between 25-60 years of age (Xb=49.96, SD=10.37) with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xb = 6.41, SD=6.47). All patients underwent a standardised evaluation radiographs. Baseline standardised poster anterior radiographs of hands and feet and radiographs of other joints, depending on indications, were assessed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values correlated with the radiological damages and statistical difference was found for seronegative subset (r=0.24, p<0.01). Longer duration of the disease resulted in the increase of radiological changes in both subsets (r=0.66, p<0.01) seronegative, (r=0.49, p<0.01) seropositive. Anatomic changes of IInd and IIIrd level were nearly equally distributed in both subsets, 76 (60.8%) seronegative, 75 (60%) seropositive. Radiological damages are nearly equal in both subsets, elevate in relation to the duration of the disease and correlate with ESR values. Regarding the sero-status, differences within sex, with some exceptions, are not relevant. Although there are some definite quantitative and qualitative differences regarding sero-status, obviously there is a great deal of overlap between the two groups. PMID:21875421

  3. Circulating interleukin-6 and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Xiao, Yu; Xing, Dan; Ma, Xin-long; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interleukin-6 (IL-6), as a pleiotropic cytokine, has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the pathogenisis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, whether this association is causal or not remains unclear, because of the multifactorial role of IL-6 and related confounding factors. We aimed to evaluate the causal relevance between circulating IL-6 levels and the risk of RA through meta-analytical Mendelian randomization approach. IL-6 gene -174G/C variant was selected as an instrument in this Mendelian randomization meta-analysis. Article identification and data collection were conducted in duplicate and independently by 2 authors. The STATA software was used for data analysis. In total, 15 and 5 articles on the association of the -174G/C variant with RA risk and circulating IL-6 level, respectively, were included. The overall analysis showed that C allelic and GC+CC genotype were significantly with 1.59-fold (95% CI: 1.19–2.14) and 1.63-fold (95% CI: 1.17–2.26) increased risk of developing RA, respectively. Asian populations showed stronger association with 4.55-fold (95% CI: 1.62–12.75), 1.84-fold (95% CI: 1.13–2.99), and 4.69-fold (95% CI: 1.68–13.14) increased RA risk in carriers of -174C allelic, CC, and GC+CC genotype, respectively. Carriers of GC+CC genotype showed significant reduction in the circulating IL-6 level compared with GG carriers (WMD = −0.77; 95% CI: −1.16 to −0.38; P = 0.000) in overall populations. Mendelian randomization presented 6% and 22% increased risk of RA with 0.1 pg/mL reduction of circulating IL-6 level in overall and Asian populations, respectively. This Mendelian randomization meta-analysis demonstrated that the long-term genetically reduced circulating IL-6 level might be causally related to a higher risk of RA, especially in Asian populations. PMID:27281095

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis, Proteus, anti-CCP antibodies and Karl Popper.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling joint disease affecting over 20 million people worldwide. The cause of RA is most probably linked to the triad of microbial trigger, genetic association and autoimmunity and can be explained using the philosophical method of Karl Popper or Popperian sequences. Ten "Popper sequences" have been identified which point to the urinary microbe Proteus mirabilis as the cause of RA: Popper sequence 1 establishes that HLA-DR4 lymphocytes injected into a rabbit evoke specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria. Popper sequence 2 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria are present in RA patients from 14 different countries. Popper sequence 3 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria in RA patients are disease specific since no such antibodies are found in other conditions. Popper sequence 4 establishes that when RA patients have high titres of antibodies to Proteus such bacteria are found in urinary cultures. Popper sequence 5 establishes that only Proteus bacteria and no other microbes evoke significantly elevated antibodies in RA patients. Popper sequence 6 establishes that the "shared epitope" EQR(K)RAA shows "molecular mimicry" with the sequence ESRRAL found in Proteus haemolysin. Popper sequence 7 establishes that Proteus urease contains a sequence IRRET which has "molecular mimicry" with LRREI found in collagen XI of hyaline cartilage. Popper sequence 8 establishes that sera obtained from RA patients have cytopathic properties against sheep red cells coated with the cross-reacting EQR(K)RAA and LRREI self-antigen peptides. Popper sequence 9 establishes that Proteus sequences in haemolysin and urease as well as the self antigens, HLA-DR1/4 and collagen XI, each contain an arginine doublet, thereby providing a substrate for peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) to give rise to citrulline, which is the main antigenic component of CCP, antibodies to which are found in early cases of RA. Popper sequence 10 establishes that

  5. Early breast cancer detection method based on a simulation study of single-channel passive microwave radiometry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Spiros A.; Savva, Andonis D.; Asvestas, Pantelis A.; Nikolopoulos, Christos D.; Capsalis, Christos N.; Cavouras, Dionisis A.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to provide a methodology for detecting temperature alterations in human breast, based on single channel microwave radiometer imaging. Radiometer measurements were simulated by modelling the human breast, the temperature distribution, and the antenna characteristics. Moreover, a simulated lesion of variable size and position in the breast was employed to provide for slight temperature changes in the breast. To detect the presence of a lesion, the temperature distribution in the breast was reconstructed. This was accomplished by assuming that temperature distribution is the mixture of distributions with unknown parameters, which were determined by means of the least squares and the singular value decomposition methods. The proposed method was validated in a variety of scenarios by altering the lesion size and location and radiometer position. The method proved capable in identifying temperature alterations caused by lesions, at different locations in the breast.

  6. Laboratory Drop Towers for the Experimental Simulation of Dust-aggregate Collisions in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-06-01

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System.

  7. Laboratory Drop Towers for the Experimental Simulation of Dust-aggregate Collisions in the Early Solar System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System. PMID:24962693

  8. Laboratory drop towers for the experimental simulation of dust-aggregate collisions in the early solar system.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System. PMID:24962693

  9. Ultrasound in management of rheumatoid arthritis: ARCTIC randomised controlled strategy trial

    PubMed Central

    Aga, Anna-Birgitte; Olsen, Inge Christoffer; Lillegraven, Siri; Hammer, Hilde B; Uhlig, Till; Fremstad, Hallvard; Madland, Tor Magne; Lexberg, Åse Stavland; Haukeland, Hilde; Rødevand, Erik; Høili, Christian; Stray, Hilde; Noraas, Anne; Hansen, Inger Johanne Widding; Bakland, Gunnstein; Nordberg, Lena Bugge; van der Heijde, Désirée; Kvien, Tore K

    2016-01-01

    clinical tight control arm reached the primary endpoint (mean difference 3.3%, 95% confidence interval −7.1% to 13.7%). Secondary endpoints (disease activity, physical function, and joint damage) were similar between the two groups. Six (5%) patients in the ultrasound tight control arm and seven (6%) patients in the conventional arm had serious adverse events. Conclusions The systematic use of ultrasound in the follow-up of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis treated according to current recommendations is not justified on the basis of the ARCTIC results. The findings highlight the need for randomised trials assessing the clinical application of medical technology. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT01205854. PMID:27530741

  10. Patient initiated outpatient follow up in rheumatoid arthritis: six year randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Sarah; Kirwan, John; Pollock, Jon; Mitchell, Kathryn; Hehir, Maggie; Blair, Peter S; Memel, David; Perry, Mark G

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether direct access to hospital review initiated by patients with rheumatoid arthritis would result in improved clinical and psychological outcome, reduced overall use of healthcare resources, and greater satisfaction with care than seen in patients receiving regular review initiated by a rheumatologist. Design Two year randomised controlled trial extended to six years. Setting Rheumatology outpatient department in teaching hospital. Participants 209 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis for over two years; 68 (65%) in the direct access group and 52 (50%) in the control group completed the study (P = 0.04). Main outcome measures Clinical outcome: pain, disease activity, early morning stiffness, inflammatory indices, disability, grip strength, range of movement in joints, and bone erosion. Psychological status: anxiety, depression, helplessness, self efficacy, satisfaction, and confidence in the system. Number of visits to hospital physician and general practitioner for arthritis. Results Participants were well matched at baseline. After six years there was only one significant difference between the two groups for the 14 clinical outcomes measured (deterioration in range of movement in elbow was less in direct access patients). There were no significant differences between groups for median change in psychological status. Satisfaction and confidence in the system were significantly higher in the direct access group at two, four, and six years: confidence 9.8 v 8.4, 9.4 v 8.0, 8.7 v 6.9; satisfaction 9.3 v 8.3, 9.3 v 7.7, 8.9 v 7.1 (all P < 0.02). Patients in the direct access group had 38% fewer hospital appointments (median 8 v 13, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Over six years, patients with rheumatoid arthritis who initiated their reviews through direct access were clinically and psychologically at least as well as patients having traditional reviews initiated by a physician. They requested fewer appointments, found direct access more

  11. Efficacy of tocilizumab on MRI-determined bone oedema in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bensaoud, Nada; Rostom, Samira; Bahiri, Rachid; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of tocilizumab on bone oedema in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this longitudinal study, patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2009 criteria with inadequate response or intolerance to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), treated with tocilizumab, were included. Sociodemographic characteristics and clinical and laboratory data for the disease were collected at baseline (M0) and 06 months (M6) of treatment. Disease activity was assessed using disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), simplified disease activity index (SDAI) and clinical disease activity index (CDAI). MRI of the dominant hand was performed at baseline and M6 of treatment. The primary outcome measure was the assessment of bone oedema by rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) bone oedema. Secondary outcomes included RAMRIS synovitis, DAS28, C-reactive protein (CRP) and SDAI at baseline and M6. Twenty-two patients with RA were included, 19 females (86.4 %), with a mean of age 42 ± 13.7. The mean disease duration was 8 ± 5.2 years. The mean DAS28 was 5.78 ± 0.87. The median CRP was 16 mg/l (6.7 to 36.3). The average SDAI was 90 ± 34. Three patients were excluded from the study for serious side effects. At baseline, bone oedema was present in 41 % of patients (N = 9), with a median bone oedema RAMRIS 0 (0 to 7.2). At M6, bone oedema decreased or disappeared in 32 % (N = 7) with a significant improvement in the RAMRIS bone oedema score (p = 0.04). Moreover, there is a significant improvement in RAMRIS synovitis (p < 0.0001) as well as in activity parameters: DAS28 (p < 0.0001), CRP (p < 0.0001) and SDAI (p < 0.0001). This study suggests that tocilizumab is associated with a significant improvement on MRI-determined bone oedema in the short term. This improvement in bone oedema is correlated

  12. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Marina Amaral de Ávila; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; Ferré, Felipe; Bernatsky, Sasha; Rahme, Elham; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs). METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI) for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67) for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11) for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) in patients with ankylosing

  13. The role of side-chain interactions in the early steps of aggregation: Molecular dynamics simulations of an amyloid-forming peptide from the yeast prion Sup35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gsponer, Jörg; Haberthür, Urs; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2003-04-01

    Understanding the early steps of aggregation at atomic detail might be crucial for the rational design of therapeutics preventing diseases associated with amyloid deposits. In this paper, aggregation of the heptapeptide GNNQQNY, from the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35, was studied by 20 molecular dynamics runs for a total simulation time of 20 μs. The simulations generate in-register parallel packing of GNNQQNY -strands that is consistent with x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared data. The statistically preferred aggregation pathway does not correspond to a purely downhill profile of the energy surface because of the presence of enthalpic barriers that originate from out-of-register interactions. The parallel -sheet arrangement is favored over the antiparallel because of side-chain contacts; in particular, stacking interactions of the tyrosine rings and hydrogen bonds between amide groups. No ordered aggregation was found in control simulations with the mutant sequence SQNGNQQRG in accord with experimental data and the strong sequence dependence of aggregation.

  14. A population-based study on the association between rheumatoid arthritis and voice problems.

    PubMed

    Hah, J Hun; An, Soo-Youn; Sim, Songyong; Kim, So Young; Oh, Dong Jun; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Sung-Gyun; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rheumatoid arthritis increases the frequency of organic laryngeal lesions and the subjective voice complaint rate in those with no organic laryngeal lesion. We performed a cross-sectional study using the data from 19,368 participants (418 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 18,950 controls) of the 2008-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The associations between rheumatoid arthritis and organic laryngeal lesions/subjective voice complaints were analyzed using simple/multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sample adjusting for confounding factors, including age, sex, smoking status, stress level, and body mass index, which could provoke voice problems. Vocal nodules, vocal polyp, and vocal palsy were not associated with rheumatoid arthritis in a multiple regression analysis, and only laryngitis showed a positive association (adjusted odds ratio, 1.59; 95 % confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; P = 0.047). Rheumatoid arthritis was associated with subjective voice discomfort in a simple regression analysis, but not in a multiple regression analysis. Participants with rheumatoid arthritis were older, more often female, and had higher stress levels than those without rheumatoid arthritis. These factors were associated with subjective voice complaints in both simple and multiple regression analyses. Rheumatoid arthritis was not associated with organic laryngeal diseases except laryngitis. Rheumatoid arthritis did not increase the odds ratio for subjective voice complaints. Voice problems in participants with rheumatoid arthritis originated from the characteristics of the rheumatoid arthritis group (higher mean age, female sex, and stress level) rather than rheumatoid arthritis itself. PMID:26758436

  15. Cutaneous abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis compared with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, K M J; Ladoyanni, E; Treharne, G J; Hale, E D; Erb, N; Kitas, G D

    2006-01-01

    Background Cutaneous abnormalities are common in rheumatoid arthritis, but exact prevalence estimates are yet to be established. Some abnormalities may be independent and coincidental, whereas others may relate to rheumatoid arthritis or its treatment. Objectives To determine the exact nature and point prevalence of cutaneous abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with those in patients with non‐inflammatory rheumatic disease. Methods 349 consecutive outpatients for rheumatology (205 with rheumatoid arthritis and 144 with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions) were examined for skin and nail signs by a dermatologist. Histories of rheumatology, dermatology, drugs and allergy were noted in detail. Results Skin abnormalities were reported by more patients with rheumatoid arthritis (61%) than non‐inflammatory controls (47%). More patients with rheumatoid arthritis (39%) than controls (10%) attributed their skin abnormality to drugs. Cutaneous abnormalities observed by the dermatologist were also more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (76%) than in the group with non‐inflammatory disease (60%). Specifically, bruising, athlete's foot, scars, rheumatoid nodules and vasculitic lesions were more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. The presence of bruising was predicted only by current steroid use. The presence of any other specific cutaneous abnormalities was not predicted by any of the variables assessed. In the whole group, current steroid use and having rheumatoid arthritis were the only important predictors of having any cutaneous abnormality. Conclusions Self‐reported and observed cutaneous abnormalities are more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls with non‐inflammatory disease. These include cutaneous abnormalities related to side effects of drugs or to rheumatoid arthritis itself and other abnormalities previously believed to be independent but which may be of clinical

  16. Clinical research on postoperative efficacy and related factors of early simulation hyperbaric oxygen therapy for severe craniocerebral injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lanjuan; Li, Baolin; Yang, Caifu; Li, Chengjian; Peng, Yueli

    2016-01-01

    In order to discuss the clinical efficacy of simulation hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for severe craniocerebral injury and analyze the related factors of it, 108 patients who transferred to our department during December 2010 - December 2014 for ventilator treatment after operation of severe craniocerebral injury were taken as the subjects of the study. These patients were divided into conventional treatment group and simulation hyperbaric oxygen therapy group to contrast the curative effects. At the meantime, GOS score and length of stay in intensive care unit (ICU) of two groups 6 months after treatment, as well as changes in the indexes of the HBO group during treatment were performed statistical analysis. Then factors affecting prognosis of simulation HBOT were performed regression analysis and principal component analysis. The results showed that when compared to the control group, differences in cases with four GOS score and one GOS score in the treatment group were significant (p<0.05). Jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), jugular bulb oxygen partial pressure (PjO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) of the simulation HBO group before the first time treatment on the first day and after the first time treatment on the third day were significantly increased, with statistical significance (p<0.05); serum lactic acid (Lac) and blood glucose (Glu) decreased significantly (p<0.05). Prior to and during the first treatment on the first day, jugular bulb pressure (Pj) and central venous pressure (CVP) had no significant difference (p>0.05). Regression analysis indicated that factors affecting prognosis included cerebral contusion, coronary heart disease, hydrocephalus and tracheotomy. Principal component analysis found the factors were hydrocephalus, coronary heart disease, tracheotomy, cerebral contusion, cerebral infarction and glasgow coma scale (GCS) before treatment. Therefore, stimulation HBOT can

  17. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator 3. Early Plasma Insulin Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Introduction AIDA is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been available without charge via the Internet for over 12 years. Recent articles have described the incorporation of a novel generic model of insulin absorption into AIDA as a way of enhancing its capabilities. The basic model components to be integrated have been overviewed, with the aim being to provide simulations of regimens utilizing insulin analogues, as well as insulin doses greater than 40 IU (the current upper limit within the latest release of AIDA [v4.3a]). Some preliminary calculated insulin absorption results have also recently been described. Methods This article presents the first simulated plasma insulin profiles from the integration of the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption model, and the currently implemented model in AIDA for insulin disposition. Insulin absorption has been described by the physiologically based model of Tarín and colleagues. A single compartment modeling approach has been used to specify how absorbed insulin is distributed in, and eliminated from, the human body. To enable a numerical solution of the absorption model, a spherical subcutaneous depot for the injected insulin dose has been assumed and spatially discretized into shell compartments with homogeneous concentrations, having as its center the injection site. The number of these compartments will depend on the dose and type of insulin. Insulin inflow arises as the sum of contributions to the different shells. For this report the first bench testing of plasma insulin determinations has been done. Results Simulated plasma insulin profiles are provided for currently available insulin preparations, including a rapidly acting insulin analogue (e.g., lispro/Humalog or aspart/Novolog), a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation (e.g., Actrapid), intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue (e.g., glargine/Lantus), as

  18. A case of hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis with a high serum level of rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Atsuko; Murata, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Atsuko; Ogawa, Eisaku; Uhara, Hisashi; Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis with an elevated serum rheumatoid factor level. Hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis is an immune complex-mediated disease characterised by urticarial eruptions. High levels of rheumatoid factor may be associated with hypocomplementaemia due to the consumption of complement, because the rheumatoid factor can form immune complexes with immunoglobulin. It is necessary to pay attention to the amounts of complement in cases of urticarial eruptions with elevated rheumatoid factor level. The eruptions were relieved with a combination of prednisolone and colchicine. PMID:23905981

  19. Simulated Surface Energy Budgets Over the Southeastern US: The GHCC Satellite Assimilation System and the NCEP Early Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary

    1999-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite-observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. An advantage of this technique for short-range forecasts (0-48h) is that it does not require a complex land-surface formulation within the atmospheric model. As a result, we can avoid having to specify land surface characteristics such as vegetation resistances, green fraction, leaf area index, soil physical and hydraulic characteristics, stream flow, runoff, and the vertical and horizontal distribution of soil moisture.

  20. Database of tsunami scenario simulations for Western Iberia: a tool for the TRIDEC Project Decision Support System for tsunami early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Zaniboni, Filippo; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    TRIDEC is a EU-FP7 Project whose main goal is, in general terms, to develop suitable strategies for the management of crises possibly arising in the Earth management field. The general paradigms adopted by TRIDEC to develop those strategies include intelligent information management, the capability of managing dynamically increasing volumes and dimensionality of information in complex events, and collaborative decision making in systems that are typically very loosely coupled. The two areas where TRIDEC applies and tests its strategies are tsunami early warning and industrial subsurface development. In the field of tsunami early warning, TRIDEC aims at developing a Decision Support System (DSS) that integrates 1) a set of seismic, geodetic and marine sensors devoted to the detection and characterisation of possible tsunamigenic sources and to monitoring the time and space evolution of the generated tsunami, 2) large-volume databases of pre-computed numerical tsunami scenarios, 3) a proper overall system architecture. Two test areas are dealt with in TRIDEC: the western Iberian margin and the eastern Mediterranean. In this study, we focus on the western Iberian margin with special emphasis on the Portuguese coasts. The strategy adopted in TRIDEC plans to populate two different databases, called "Virtual Scenario Database" (VSDB) and "Matching Scenario Database" (MSDB), both of which deal only with earthquake-generated tsunamis. In the VSDB we simulate numerically few large-magnitude events generated by the major known tectonic structures in the study area. Heterogeneous slip distributions on the earthquake faults are introduced to simulate events as "realistically" as possible. The members of the VSDB represent the unknowns that the TRIDEC platform must be able to recognise and match during the early crisis management phase. On the other hand, the MSDB contains a very large number (order of thousands) of tsunami simulations performed starting from many different

  1. IL-10-Expressing Th2 Cells Contribute to the Elevated Antibody Production in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Ma, Liheng; Yang, Shufeng; Wang, Shaohua; Wei, Xuan; Song, Shuchun

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease associated with progressive disability, systemic complications, and early death. Multiple lines of evidence have placed adaptive immune responses in the center of RA pathogenesis. However, the functional roles of T helper cells are insufficiently described. Here, we examined the Th2 cell subsets and their functions in RA patients. A downregulation of IL-4(+) cells in CD4(+) T cells were observed in RA patients, indicating a downregulation of Th2 cells, and these results were confirmed by using and CXCR3 and CCR6 surface markers. We then found that CXCR3(-)CCR6(-) Th2 cells can be separated into IL-4(+) (single positive), IL-10(+) (single positive), and IL-4(+)IL-10(+) (double positive) subsets. Further results showed that CXCR5 only expressed on IL-10+ Th2 cells. The CXCR5(+) and CXCR5(-) Th2 cells each exhibited distinctive features in helping B cell antibody secretion. CXCR5(+) Th2 cells were more potent at stimulating total Ig and IgM secretion, while CXCR5(-) Th2 cells were more potent at stimulating IgE. IL-10 was required for helping B cell total Ig, IgM, and IgE production, while IL-4 was required for total Ig and IgE. The frequencies of IL-10(+) and IL-4(+)IL-10(+) Th2 cells were positively correlated with rheumatoid factor titer in vivo. Together, our study demonstrated distinctive subsets within Th2 cells, each with different impacts on antibody production and RA disease. PMID:26956472

  2. Linkage proof for PTPN22, a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility gene and a human autoimmunity gene

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Rat, Anne-Christine; Migliorini, Paola; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Alves, Helena; Pierlot, Céline; Glikmans, Elodie; Garnier, Sophie; Dausset, Jean; Vaz, Carlos; Fernandes, Manuela; Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Lemaire, Isabelle; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dequeker, Jan; Radstake, Timothy R.; Van Riel, Piet; van de Putte, Leo; Lopes-Vaz, Antonio; Prum, Bernard; Bardin, Thomas; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François

    2007-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 allele 1858T has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases. RA is the most frequent of those multifactorial diseases. The RA association was usually restricted to serum rheumatoid factor positive disease (RF+). No interaction was shown with HLA-DRB1, the first RA gene. Many case-control studies replicated the RA association, showing an allele frequency increase of ≈5% on average and large variations of population allele frequencies (2.1–15.5%). In multifactorial diseases, the final proof for a new susceptibility allele is provided by departure from Mendel's law (50% transmission from heterozygous parents). For PTPN22–1858T allele, convincing linkage proof was available only for type 1 diabetes. We aimed at providing this proof for RA. We analyzed 1,395 West European Caucasian individuals from 465 “trio” families. We replicated evidence for linkage, demonstrating departure from Mendel's law in this subset of early RA onset patients. We estimated the overtransmission of the 1858T allele in RF+ families: T = 63%, P < 0.0007. The 1858T allele frequency increased from 11.0% in controls to 17.4% in RF+ RA for the French Caucasian population and the susceptibility genotype (1858T/T or T/C) from 20.2% to 31.6% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8 (1.2–2.8)]. In conclusion, we provided the linkage proof for the PTPN22–1858T allele and RF+ RA. With diabetes and RA, PTPN22 is therefore a “linkage-proven” autoimmunity gene. PTPN22 accounting for ≈1% of the RA familial aggregation, many new genes could be expected that are as many leads to definitive therapy for autoimmune diseases. PMID:17237219

  3. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, K.; Matsui, N.; Nohira, K.; Suguro, T.; Kitakata, Y.; Uchiyama, G.; Miyoshi, T.; Uematsu, S.; Inoue, S.; Arimizu, N.

    1986-03-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of labeled leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 33 patients, the incidence of pain and swelling in 66 wrist joints and 66 knee joints was compared with the accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes. No accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes was seen in any of the patients' wrists (0/12) or knee joints (0/14) when both pain and swelling were absent. In contrast, 93% (25/27) of wrist joints and 80% (24/30) of knee joints with both pain and swelling were positive by (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scintigraphy. There was little correlation between the stage of the disease, as determined by radiography, and (/sup 111/In)leukocyte accumulation. This study suggests that (/sup 111/In)leukocyte imaging may be a reliable procedure for monitoring the activity of rheumatoid arthritis, especially for confirming the lack of an ongoing inflammatory response.

  4. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Kotzin, B.L.; Hoppe, R.T.; Slavin, S.; Gottlieb, M.; Calin, A.; Fuks, Z.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    Subdiaphragmatic lymphoid radiation was used as an alternative to cytotoxic drug therapy to treat six patients with progressive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. All were previously unresponsive to conventional therapy. Radiation (4,000 rad) was given to subdiaphragmatic lymphoid tissues in fractionated doses of 150 to 250 rad each. Three of the six patients demonstrated long-lasting clinical improvement with a decrease in synovitis and morning stiffness and an increase in joint function. All six patients showed a profound depression in the peripheral blood lymphocyte count which persisted for at least six months. The irradiation was well tolerated; there have been no serious complications due to radiotherapy with follow-up ranging from 13 to 36 months. The substantial efficacy in some patients and the lack of severe toxicity in all suggests that radiotherapy deserves further study as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Hemorrhagic Synovial Cyst Associated with Rheumatoid Atlantoaxial Subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jae Jon; Seo, Dong Kwang; Choi, Seung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cyst on prevertebral space of C1-2 joint is rare but may be associated hemorrhagic event. We describe a case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with sudden severe headache in her left occipital area with dyspnea. She had rheumatoid arthritis for 14-years. Large hemorrhagic cystic mass was seen around prevertebral space of the atlantoaxial joint on the left side on cervical MRI (magnetic resonance image) and it obstructed the nasopharyngeal cavity. Aspiration of the cystic lesion was performed via transoral approach, followed by posterior occipito-cervical fusion. The specimen was xanthochromic, suggesting old hemorrhage. The patient was tolerable on her postoperative course and showed good respiration and relieved headache. We suggest that repeated microtrauma due to atalantoaxial subluxation associated with rheumatoid arthritis as a main cause of hemorrhagic event on the cyst. PMID:24757465

  6. Coronary microvascular dysfunction in chronic inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Faccini, Alessia; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Camici, Paolo G

    2016-06-14

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatoid diseases (CIRD) such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis are an important risk factor for the development of ischaemic heart disease and a source of high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In patients affected by CIRD, inflammation can affect coronary microvascular function and contribute to the development of myocardial ischemia and cardiovascular events, even in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease. Understanding the molecular aspects that underlie the development of coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) in CIRD is of fundamental importance to identify specific therapeutic targets. In this article, we review the pathogenic mechanisms leading to CMD in CIRD, including the controversial results obtained with the use of different therapeutic strategies. We also propose that a practical diagnostic algorithm as the identification of CMD in patients with CIRD may lead to effective measures to prevent the development of angina pectoris and reduce the risk of rapid disease progression. PMID:26912605

  7. Food intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis. II. Clinical and histological aspects.

    PubMed Central

    van de Laar, M A; Aalbers, M; Bruins, F G; van Dinther-Janssen, A C; van der Korst, J K; Meijer, C J

    1992-01-01

    Six patients with rheumatoid factor positive rheumatoid arthritis who had shown a marked symptomatic improvement during four weeks of hypoallergic, artificial diet were studied in greater detail. Placebo controlled rechallenges showed intolerance for specific foodstuffs in four patients. In three of these patients biopsies of both the synovial membrane and of the proximal small intestine were carried out before and during allergen free feeding. In two patients, both with raised serum IgE concentrations and specific IgE antibodies to certain foods, a marked reduction of mast cells in the synovial membrane and proximal small intestine was demonstrated. Although the number of food intolerant patients with RA remains limited and markers of allergic activity are scanty, our observations suggest an underlying immunoallergological mechanism. PMID:1575572

  8. The molecular mechanism of osteoclastogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Kotake, Shigeru; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Suda, Tatsuo

    2002-01-01

    Bone-resorbing osteoclasts are formed from hemopoietic cells of the monocyte–macrophage lineage under the control of bone-forming osteoblasts. We have cloned an osteoblast-derived factor essential for osteoclastogenesis, the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Synovial fibroblasts and activated T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis also express RANKL, which appears to trigger bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis as well. Recent studies have shown that T lymphocytes produce cytokines other than RANKL such as IL-17, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IFN-γ, which have powerful regulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. The possible roles of RANKL and other cytokines produced by T lymphocytes in bone destruction are described. PMID:12223101

  9. Angiogenesis and rheumatoid arthritis: pathogenic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Colville-Nash, P R; Scott, D L

    1992-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis can be considered as one of the family of 'angiogenesis dependent diseases'. Angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis is controlled by a variety of factors found in the synovial fluid and pannus tissue. Modulation of the angiogenic component of the disease may alter the pathogenesis of the condition, and subsequent cartilage and joint destruction, by reducing the area of the endothelium in the pannus and restricting pannus growth. Current therapeutic strategies exert, to varying extents, an inhibitory effect on the angiogenic process. In particular, the mode of action of the slow acting antirheumatic drugs may be due to their effect on the angiogenic response. The development of novel angiostatic treatments for chronic inflammatory joint disease may lead to a new therapeutic approach in controlling disease progression. PMID:1378718

  10. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis: rare cutaneous manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Veronez, Isis Suga; Dantas, Fernando Luiz; Valente, Neusa Yuriko; Kakizaki, Priscila; Yasuda, Thaís Helena; Cunha, Thaís do Amaral

    2015-01-01

    Besides being an uncommon clinicopathological entity, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, also described as interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis (IGDA), has shown a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, such as linear and erythematous lesions, papules, plaques and nodules. Histological features include dense dermal histiocytic infiltrate, usually in a palisade configuration, and scattered neutrophils and eosinophils. We describe a middle aged woman with rheumatoid arthritis of difficult management and cutaneous lesions compatible with IGDA. PMID:26131871

  11. [Pyoderma gangrenosum associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Beber, André Avelino Costa; Knob, Cristiane Faccin; Shons, Karen Regina Rosso; Neumaier, Walter; da Silva, João Carlos Nunes; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, which is associated with non-infectious systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. It is more common in adults and may present with four distinct clinical forms, all leading to ulceration of the skin affected. Its diagnosis is clinical and demands exclusion of other causes. Treatment should be performed with local care and systemic therapy. PMID:25627229

  12. Monitoring the remineralization of early simulated lesions using a pH cycling model with CP-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    If caries lesions are detected early enough they can be arrested by chemical intervention and dietary changes without the need for chemical intervention. Optical coherence tomography is ideally suited to monitor the changes that occur in caries lesions as a result of nonsurgical intervention, since OCT can nondestructively image the internal structure of the lesion. One of the most important changes that occurs in a lesion is preferential deposition of mineral in the outer surface zone. The deposition creates a highly mineralized and weakly scattering surface zone that is clearly visible in OCT images. Since this zone is near the highly reflective surface it is necessary to use cross-polarization OCT imaging to resolve this zone. Several CP-OCT studies have been conducted employing different remineralization models that produce lesions with varying mineral gradients. Previous studies have also demonstrated that automated algorithms can be used to assess the lesion depth and severity even with the presence of the weakly reflective surface zone. In this study we investigated the remineralization of lesions of varying severity using a pH cycling remineralization model and the change of the lesion was monitored using CP-OCT. Although the lesion depth and severity decreased after remineralization, there was still incomplete remineralization of the body of the lesion.

  13. Radiocarpal and Midcarpal Instability in Rheumatoid Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Raven, Eric E.J.; van den Bekerom, Michel P.J.; Beumer, Annechien; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at identifying the criteria for the diagnosis of Radiocarpal instability in rheumatoid arthritis RA). Methods: The main databases were searched to identify studies describing the pathophysiology of Radiocarpal instability in patients with RA. We focussed on the epidemiology, radiographic parameters, criteria for instability and on treatment options. Results. In the search 108 articles were found, of these 12 studies were included for this review. Instability occurs in at an average of 35.2% of the rheumatoid wrists. The instability was found between 8 and 13 years after onset of rheumatoid arthritis. A strong correlation was found between instability, duration of RA and Larsen score. Several radiographic methods were described to evaluate Radiocarpal instability in RA. Several treatment options for instability in patients with RA are described. All with their own indications and limitations. Conclusion: On a standard AP radiograph deformity can be measured using the carpal height and the ulnar translation index of Chamay. This gives an indication for instability. For describing the deterioration of the joints the Larsen score is most used. If there are more radiographs in time the Simmen classification can be used. For real assessment of instability dynamic radiographs are needed. Level of Evidence: Level IV. PMID:26448803

  14. Dispositional Affect in Unique Subgroups of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Danielle B.; Mehta, Swati; Pope, Janet E.; Harth, Manfred; Shapiro, Allan; Teasell, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis may experience increased negative outcomes if they exhibit specific patterns of dispositional affect. Objective. To identify subgroups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis based on dispositional affect. The secondary objective was to compare mood, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, disability, and quality of life between subgroups. Methods. Outpatients from a rheumatology clinic were categorized into subgroups by a cluster analysis based on dispositional affect. Differences in outcomes were compared between clusters through multivariate analysis of covariance. Results. 227 patients were divided into two subgroups. Cluster 1 (n = 85) included patients reporting significantly higher scores on all dispositional variables (experiential avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, worry, fear of pain, and perfectionism; all p < 0.001) compared to patients in Cluster 2 (n = 142). Patients in Cluster 1 also reported significantly greater mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing (all p < 0.001). Clusters did not differ on quality of life or disability. Conclusions. The present study identifies a subgroup of rheumatoid arthritis patients who score significantly higher on dispositional affect and report increased mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing. Considering dispositional affect within subgroups of patients with RA may help health professionals tailor interventions for the specific stressors that these patients experience. PMID:27445594

  15. Relationship between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Vilana Maria Adriano; Melo, Iracema Matos; Lima, Vilma

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis (PD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are immunoinflammatory diseases where leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory mediators induce alveolar bone loss, synovitis, and joint destruction, respectively. Thus, we reviewed the relationship between both diseases considering epidemiological aspects, mechanical periodontal treatment, inflammatory mediators, oral microbiota, and antibodies, using the keywords “periodontitis” and “rheumatoid arthritis” in PubMed database between January 2012 and March 2015, resulting in 162 articles. After critical reading based on titles and abstracts and following the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 26 articles were included. In the articles, women over 40 years old, smokers and nonsmokers, mainly constituted the analyzed groups. Eight studies broached the epidemiological relationship with PD and RA. Four trials demonstrated that the periodontal treatment influenced the severity of RA and periodontal clinical parameters. Nine studies were related with bacteria influence in the pathogenesis of RA and the presence of citrullinated proteins, autoantibodies, or rheumatoid factor in patients with PD and RA. Five studies investigated the presence of mediators of inflammation in PD and RA. In summary, the majority of the articles have confirmed that there is a correlation between PD and RA, since both disorders have characteristics in common and result from an imbalance in the immunoinflammatory response. PMID:26347200

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis vaccine therapies: perspectives and lessons from therapeutic ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccines for models of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Kenneth S.; Mikecz, Katalin; Steiner, Harold L.; Glant, Tibor T.; Finnegan, Alison; Carambula, Roy E.; Zimmerman, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases is reviewed with rheumatoid arthritis as the focus. Therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases must regulate or subdue responses to common self-antigens. Ideally, such a vaccine would initiate an antigen-specific modulation of the T-cell immune response that drives the inflammatory disease. Appropriate animal models and types of T helper cells and signature cytokine responses that drive autoimmune disease are also discussed. Interpretation of these animal models must be done cautiously because the means of initiation, autoantigens, and even the signature cytokine and T helper cell (Th1 or Th17) responses that are involved in the disease may differ significantly from those in humans. We describe ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccine modulation of T-cell autoimmune responses as a strategy for the design of therapeutic vaccines for rheumatoid arthritis, which may also be effective in other autoimmune conditions. PMID:25787143

  17. Functional affinity of IgM rheumatoid factor in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rath, S; Hogben, D N; Devey, M E

    1988-01-01

    The functional affinity of IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) was measured in 31 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 24 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 13 with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), and in 13 seropositive healthy individuals. The functional affinity of IgM RF from patients with RA was significantly lower than in the other clinical groups studied. In addition, there was a significant inverse correlation between functional affinity and titre of IgM RF in all the groups. These results suggest that the usual mechanisms of affinity based selective pressure (somatic diversification and antigen selection) may operate differently for autoantibodies to serum antigens such as IgG. PMID:3365027

  18. The effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, Robin D.; Little, Edward E.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290–320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66% of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation.

  19. Numerical simulation of formation of cyclone vortex flows in the intratropical zone of convergence and their early detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingalev, I. V.; Astaf'eva, N. M.; Orlov, K. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.; Mingalev, V. S.; Mingalev, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms of formation of cyclonic vortices in the tropical atmosphere of the Earth are investigated in the intratropical zone of convergence using numerical simulation made with the complete system of equations of gas dynamics taking into account transport of infrared radiation, phase transitions of water vapor into microdrops of water and ice particles, and sedimentation of these drops and ice particles in the field of gravity force. Observational data on the structure of dominant air streams, which are formed in the intratropical zone of convergence over the North Atlantic in the periods of its highest thermodynamic intensity and instability, are used in the initial and boundary conditions of the model. Formation of cyclonic vortex flows is obtained numerically at sufficiently strong bending of the intratropical zone of convergence. The results of numerical modeling are compared with the data of satellite microwave monitoring: global radio thermal fields of the Earth from the electronic collection GLOBAL-Field allowing one to study the structure of atmospheric motions in a wide range of space-time scales.

  20. Production of nitrogen oxides by lightning and coronae discharges in simulated early Earth, Venus and Mars environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Navarro-González, R.; McKay, C. P.; Coll, P.; Raulin, F.

    We present measurements for the production of nitrogen oxides (NO and N 2O) in CO 2-N 2 mixtures that simulate different stages of the evolution of the atmospheres of the Earth, Venus and Mars. The nitrogen fixation rates by two different types of electrical discharges, namely lightning and coronae, were studied over a wide range in CO 2 and N 2 mixing ratios. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed with a maximum energy yield estimated to be ˜1.3×10 16 molecule J -1 at 80% CO 2 and ˜1.3×10 14 molecule J -1 at 50% CO 2 for lightning and coronae discharges, respectively. Nitrous oxide (N 2O) is only formed by coronae discharge with a maximum energy yield estimated to be ˜1.2×10 13 molecule J -1 at 50% CO 2. The pronounced difference in NO production in lightning and coronae discharges and the lack of formation of N 2O in lightning indicate that the physics and chemistry involved in nitrogen fixation differs substantially in these two forms of electric energy.

  1. [Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis--significance of alfacalcidol in prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schacht, E

    2000-01-01

    Besides localised osteopenia, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without corticosteroids develop in 30-50% osteoporosis induced by several factors and thus a higher risk of fractures. Bone loss appears very early and correlates directly with disease activity and also later with the negative effects of restrictive mobility. Corticosteroids reduce as a pathogenetic co-factor intestinal calcium absorption and increase renal calcium excretion resulting in compensatory increased PTH-release and increased sensitivity of bone to PTH. In addition, corticosteroids inhibit osteoblast function as well as the favourable effects of growth factors and sex hormones on bone. It has recently been recognised that the expression of D-hormone receptors (VDRs) is suppressed by these medications and that corticosteroids probably induce VDR disorders. The negative influence of corticosteroids on muscle strength (indirectly--via increased PTH-levels, lowered IGF-1-levels or reduced D-hormone activity) is a feature which has been underestimated. The demonstrated drop in 1,25(OH)2D3 (D-hormone) levels in patients with RA in correlation with C-reactive protein (CRP) is of significance in the pathogenesis of RA-induced osteoporosis and could further promote the process of inflammation. There is a general consensus that cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha) induce bone resorption in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. There are, however, new findings which show that cytokines like TNF-alpha also interfere with bone formation by promoting apoptosis of osteoblasts and reduce the muscle strength, too. D-hormone preparations (alfacalcidol, calcitriol) possess immunoregulatory effects in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the cytokines IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha and particularly IL-12. At the cellular level, D-hormone reduces the expression of Th1 helper cells directly or indirectly by inhibition of IL-12 from monocytes. Therapy with alfacalcidol or calcitriol results in increased

  2. The timing of glucocorticoid administration in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, N. G.; Gudbjornsson, B.; Larsson, A.; Hallgren, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that the timing of prednisolone administration might be critical in determining its effect on the diurnal rheumatoid inflammatory process.
METHODS—26 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were randomly divided into two equal groups and allocated to low doses of prednisolone at either 2.00 am or 7.30 am. Because of the diurnal variation in disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis, assessments of the two study groups were performed at 7.30 am both at the start of the study (day 1) and after four doses of prednisolone (day 5). The study protocol differences in the time period from the last dose of prednisolone to assessment were 5.5 hours in the 2.00 am group and 24 hours in the 7.30 am group.
RESULTS—Administration of low doses of prednisolone (5 or 7.5 mg daily) at 2.00 am had favourable effects on the duration of morning stiffness (P << 0.001), joint pain (P < 0.001), Lansbury index (P << 0.001), Ritchie index (P << 0.001), and morning serum concentrations of IL-6 (P < 0.01). The other study group showed minor but significant effects on morning stiffness (P < 0.05) and circulating concentrations of IL-6 (P < 0.05). Modest and similar improvements of C reactive protein, serum amyloid protein A, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were seen in both study groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Administration of low doses of glucocorticoids with a rather short biological half life seems to improve acute rheumatoid arthritis symptoms if it precedes the period of circadian flare in inflammatory activity, as defined by enhanced IL-6 synthesis. Further studies are needed to test the relative merits of different timing protocols of glucocorticoid administration in rheumatoid arthritis.

 PMID:9059137

  3. Perivascular infiltration in normal skin of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: association with rheumatoid factors and HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Bernelot Moens, H J; Ament, H J; Vroom, T M; Feltkamp, T E; van der Korst, J K

    1988-01-01

    The relation between immunohistological findings in biopsy specimens of apparently normal skin, HLA antigens, and rheumatoid factors (RF) was studied in 120 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), selected for treatment with D-penicillamine. Perivascular infiltration (PVI) of more than three mononuclear cells was present in 77 (68%) of 114 patients, accompanied usually by the presence of IgM or C3, or both, in immunofluorescence studies. The number of perivascular cells was associated significantly with the titre of circulating RF. A weak relation of both perivascular cellular infiltration and RF with HLA-DR3 and DR4 did not reach statistical significance. It is concluded that the histological presence of perivascular inflammation is associated mainly with deposition of RF. It is suggested that the first is merely an epiphenomenon of the latter. PVI was not prognostic for the occurrence of the clinical syndrome of rheumatoid vasculitis. For practical purposes skin biopsies do not appear to be useful in the evaluation of individual patients with RA. PMID:3058055

  4. Effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Pearl, C.A.; Hoffman, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290-320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66 of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation. Copyright 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  5. Standard instruction versus simulation: Educating registered nurses in the early recognition of patient deterioration in paediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jessica; Nash, Robyn; Lewis, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and stabilising deterioration in a child with significant clinical compromise is both a challenging and necessary role of the paediatric critical care nurse. Within adult critical care research, high fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been shown to positively impact learner outcomes regarding identification and management of a deteriorating patient; however, there is a paucity of evidence examining the use of HFPS in paediatric nursing education. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HFPS on nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge for recognising and managing paediatric deterioration. Further, participants' perceptions of the learning experiences specific to the identification and management of a deteriorating child were also explored. Registered nurses working in a tertiary-referral paediatric critical care unit were recruited for this quasi-experimental study. Using a pre-test/post-test control-group design, participants were assigned to one of two learning experiences: HFPS or standard instruction. Following the learning experience, nurses were also invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. 30 nurses participated in the study (control n=15, experiment n=15). Participants in the HFPS intervention were most likely to demonstrate an increase in both perceived self-efficacy (p=<0.01) and knowledge (p=<0.01). No statistically significant change was observed in control group scores. The mean difference in self-efficacy gain score between the two groups was 5.67 score units higher for the experiment group compared to the control. HFPS also yielded higher follow-up knowledge scores (p=0.01) compared to standard instruction. Ten nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of the interview data identified four themes: self-awareness, hands-on learning, teamwork, and maximising learning. The results of this study suggest that HFPS can positively influence nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge test scores

  6. The impact of rheumatoid foot on disability in Colombian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Bayona, Javier; Zuluaga, Natalia; Mejia, Santiago; Hincapie, Maria-Eugenia; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background Alterations in the feet of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are a cause of disability in this population. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the impact that foot impairment has on the patients' global quality of life (QOL) based on validated scales and its relationship to disease activity. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which 95 patients with RA were enrolled. A complete physical examination, including a full foot assessment, was done. The Spanish versions of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) Disability Index and of the Disease Activity Score (DAS 28) were administered. A logistic regression model was used to analyze data and obtain adjusted odds ratios (AORs). Results Foot deformities were observed in 78 (82%) of the patients; hallux valgus (65%), medial longitudinal arch flattening (42%), claw toe (lesser toes) (39%), dorsiflexion restriction (tibiotalar) (34%), cock-up toe (lesser toes) (25%), and transverse arch flattening (25%) were the most frequent. In the logistic regression analysis (adjusted for age, gender and duration of disease), forefoot movement pain, subtalar movement pain, tibiotalar movement pain and plantarflexion restriction (tibiotalar) were strongly associated with disease activity and disability. The positive squeeze test was significantly associated with disability risk (AOR = 6,3; 95% CI, 1.28–30.96; P = 0,02); hallux valgus, and dorsiflexion restriction (tibiotalar) were associated with disease activity. Conclusion Foot abnormalities are associated with active joint disease and disability in RA. Foot examinations provide complementary information related to the disability as an indirect measurement of quality of life and activity of disease in daily practice. PMID:19527518

  7. Psychosocial management of chronic pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Louise

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous reviews and meta-analyses that confirm that psychological therapy is efficacious for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in terms of managing pain. Therefore, the literature has moved on to answer additional questions: 1) What types of interventions are most strongly supported by the current evidence? 2) Do different patients benefit from different approaches? 3) When is it best to intervene? 4) What modalities are best for administering the intervention? 5) What model of care should we be proposing that will result in widespread implementation and will ensure access for patients with RA? This review concludes that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most efficacious treatment for pain management in RA; however, there are indications that mindfulness may have particular benefits for patients with a history of depression. CBT is most effective when administered early in the course of the disease. However, there is at present little evidence to confirm whether or not psychosocial interventions are effective for patients with comorbid psychological disorders. One of the major challenges is ensuring access to effective interventions for patients, particularly early on in the course of the disease, with a view to preventing physical and psychological morbidity. A stepped-care model is proposed; however, we urgently need more, better-quality trials of minimal interventions, particularly in Internet-delivered CBT, which appears promising and may form the cornerstone of future stepped-care models for providing psychosocial care to patients with RA. PMID:27042139

  8. Two- and three-dimensional optical tomography of finger joints for diagnostics of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Hanson, Kenneth M.; Beuthan, Juergen

    1998-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common diseases of human joints. This progressive disease is characterized by an inflammation process that originates in the inner membrane (synovalis) of the capsule and spreads to other parts of the joint. In early stages the synovalis thickness and the permeability of this membrane changes. This leads to changes in the optical parameters of the synovalis and the synovial fluid (synovia), which occupies the space between the bones. The synovia changes from a clear yellowish fluid to a turbid grayish substance. In this work we present 2 and 3-dimensional reconstruction schemes for optical tomography of the finger joints. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on the diffusion approximation and employs adjoint differentiation techniques for the gradient calculation of the objective function with respect to the spatial distribution of optical properties. In this way, the spatial distribution of optical properties within the joints is reconstructed with high efficiency and precision. Volume information concerning the synovial space and the capsula are provided. Furthermore, it is shown that small changes of the scattering coefficients can be monitored. Therefore, optical tomography has the potential of becoming a useful tool for the early diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in RA.

  9. Psychosocial management of chronic pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Louise

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous reviews and meta-analyses that confirm that psychological therapy is efficacious for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in terms of managing pain. Therefore, the literature has moved on to answer additional questions: 1) What types of interventions are most strongly supported by the current evidence? 2) Do different patients benefit from different approaches? 3) When is it best to intervene? 4) What modalities are best for administering the intervention? 5) What model of care should we be proposing that will result in widespread implementation and will ensure access for patients with RA? This review concludes that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most efficacious treatment for pain management in RA; however, there are indications that mindfulness may have particular benefits for patients with a history of depression. CBT is most effective when administered early in the course of the disease. However, there is at present little evidence to confirm whether or not psychosocial interventions are effective for patients with comorbid psychological disorders. One of the major challenges is ensuring access to effective interventions for patients, particularly early on in the course of the disease, with a view to preventing physical and psychological morbidity. A stepped-care model is proposed; however, we urgently need more, better-quality trials of minimal interventions, particularly in Internet-delivered CBT, which appears promising and may form the cornerstone of future stepped-care models for providing psychosocial care to patients with RA. PMID:27042139

  10. Biochemical markers of ongoing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis - current and future applications, limitations and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease associated with potentially debilitating joint inflammation, as well as altered skeletal bone metabolism and co-morbid conditions. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to control disease activity offers the highest likelihood of preserving function and preventing disability. Joint inflammation is characterized by synovitis, osteitis, and/or peri-articular osteopenia, often accompanied by development of subchondral bone erosions, as well as progressive joint space narrowing. Biochemical markers of joint cartilage and bone degradation may enable timely detection and assessment of ongoing joint damage, and their use in facilitating treatment strategies is under investigation. Early detection of joint damage may be assisted by the characterization of biochemical markers that identify patients whose joint damage is progressing rapidly and who are thus most in need of aggressive treatment, and that, alone or in combination, identify those individuals who are likely to respond best to a potential treatment, both in terms of limiting joint damage and relieving symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe currently available biochemical markers of joint metabolism in relation to the pathobiology of joint damage and systemic bone loss in RA; to assess the limitations of, and need for additional, novel biochemical markers in RA and other rheumatic diseases, and the strategies used for assay development; and to examine the feasibility of advancement of personalized health care using biochemical markers to select therapeutic agents to which a patient is most likely to respond. PMID:21539724

  11. Geode of the femur: an uncommon manifestation potentially reflecting the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonuk; Terk, Michael R; Hu, Bing; Garber, Elayne K; Weisman, Michael H

    2006-12-01

    Geodes are noted frequently in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but large geodes of the femur are uncommon. We describe a patient with RA and a large geode in his femur; histological findings were consistent with a rheumatoid nodule and chronically inflamed synovium. We review the literature of large femoral geodes and what this particular manifestation may reflect about the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:17080513

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  13. Rapidly progressive aortic valve incompetence in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, J P; Douglas-Jones, A G; Pritchard, M H

    1991-10-01

    A 27-year-old female with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of onset at age 18 years developed progressive aortic valve incompetence requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. Rheumatoid aortic valve disease may be more rapidly progressive than aortic valve disease from other causes and awareness of this by the monitoring physicians may help to avoid the possible complications. PMID:1913010

  14. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866.5775 Section 866.5775 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the rheumatoid factor (antibodies to immunoglobulins) in serum, other body fluids, and...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866.5775 Section 866.5775 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the rheumatoid factor (antibodies to immunoglobulins) in serum, other body fluids, and...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866.5775 Section 866.5775 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the rheumatoid factor (antibodies to immunoglobulins) in serum, other body fluids, and...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866.5775 Section 866.5775 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the rheumatoid factor (antibodies to immunoglobulins) in serum, other body fluids, and...

  18. Bilateral Cricoarytenoid Arthritis: A Cause of Recurrent Upper Airway Obstruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Pradeep; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Venkatachalam, VP

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral cricoarytenoid joint arthritis with history of rheumatoid arthritis, presented with stridor to the outpatient department. Endolaryngoscopy revealed adducted vocal cords and a nodule over left arytenoid which later confirmed to be rheumatoid nodule on histopathologic examination. Initially, although patient responded well to medical treatment, recurrence was noticed after 6 months follow-up.

  19. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Julie Kristine; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18) in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4) supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab. Results Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab. Conclusions The plasma sCD18 levels were altered

  20. Computer simulation model for early post-capture phase of lunar orbital evolution: implications for thermal history of Earth and Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Malcuit, R.J.; Winters, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Gravitational capture of a lunar-sized body entails dissipation of about 2 x 10/sup 35/ ergs within the bodies of Earth and Moon by body tides during a close gravitational encounter. For capture to occur, the deformation constants (Love numbers) must be sufficiently high and Q (specific energy dissipation factor) must be sufficiently low. Initial conditions for the two-body orbital simulation are perigee = 20 R/sub e/ (Earth radii), apogee = 270 R/sub e/, and semi-minor axis = 73 R/sub e/. This early post-capture orbit has angular momentum equivalent to a circular lunar orbit of 40 R/sub e/. For simplification, the effects of Earth rotation are neglected and Love numbers are held constant during each calculation. The main variable controlling orbital evolution is Q. Since about 7 x 10/sup 35/ ergs must be dissipated for capture and subsequent orbital circularization, the bodies of both Earth and Moon are heated considerably. Using the Love numbers given above, about 10% of the energy goes to Earth and about 90% goes to Moon. Although the 10% allocated to Earth would be sufficient to melt only a thin zone of mantle material, the combination of energy dissipation and tidal action during such as orbital circularization scenario could lead to enhanced rates of crustal spreading and subduction on an already warm Earth. The authors think that this thermal episode may be sufficient to cause widespread destruction and/or metamorphism of the ancient crust of Earth. They suggest that lunar capture and subsequent early geocentric orbital evolution occurred about 3.9 billion years ago.

  1. Prostaglandin E2 modulation of rheumatoid factor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarellos, A; Lipsky, P E; Jasin, H E

    1988-12-01

    We examined the influence of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on the in vitro synthesis of rheumatoid factor (RF) by purified human B and T lymphocytes stimulated with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 or pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Supernatants were assayed for total IgM and RF. PGE2 at concentrations of 10(-7) M to 10(-9) M significantly inhibited RF and IgM secretion stimulated by S aureus Cowan 1, a cross-linker of B cell surface Ig. The magnitude of inhibition of RF production was significantly greater than that of total IgM at low PGE2 concentrations (P less than 0.05). In contrast, PWM-stimulated cultures were only minimally inhibited by PGE2 at all concentrations tested. Since cross-linking of surface Ig renders B cells more susceptible to inhibition by PGE2, heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG) was added to the PWM-stimulated cultures in an attempt to increase the sensitivity of precursors of RF-secreting cells to the inhibitory effects of PGE2. Addition of HAIgG markedly increased PGE2-mediated inhibition of RF synthesis without significantly affecting IgM production. Inhibition could not be overcome by the addition of soluble T helper cell factors, indicating that PGE2-mediated suppression was not the result of an inhibitory action of T helper cells. When lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis were examined, HAIgG was found to be unable to induce sensitivity to PGE2-mediated inhibition of responsiveness. These results suggest that down-regulation of RF synthesis requires both cross-linking of surface Ig and the influence of PGE2. Abnormalities in this immunoregulatory mechanism may explain the ongoing production of RF in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3264162

  2. HLA-DQw alloantigens and pulmonary dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wise, R A; Wigley, F M; Scott, T E; Hochberg, M C

    1988-09-01

    HLA-DR4 and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (secondary Sjögren's syndrome) are associated with abnormal pulmonary function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Since recent investigations have found that much of the genomic polymorphism of the HLA-DR4 haplotype comes from the closely linked DQw allele, we reanalyzed this set of data to evaluate the relationship between the DQw allotypes and pulmonary function in rheumatoid arthritis. Using a step-wise regression analysis, we found that the presence of DQw1 was a stronger predictor of an abnormal forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (D) than the presence of DR4, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, smoking status, or any other clinical parameter. DQw1-positive patients had a mean (+/- SD) percent of predicted FEV1, FVC, and D of 84.2 (+/- 19.8), 88.0 (+/- 17.9) and 85.6 (+/- 20.9) percent, respectively, all significantly lower than DQw-1 negative patients (p = 0.02, 0.02, and 0.03). Smokers with the heterozygous phenotype, DQw1/DQw3, tended to have obstructive disease of the airways, with a mean (+/- SD) FEV1 of 80.1 +/- 24.4 percent of predicted, compared to 95.7 +/- 12.1 percent of predicted in DQw1/DQw3-negative individuals (p = 0.03). Patients who had a DQw2 allele were more likely to have normal pulmonary function. We conclude that the HLA-DQw1 allotype is a strong predictor of abnormal pulmonary function and that it may identify smoking subjects with rheumatoid arthritis subjects who are prone to develop obstruction of airflow. PMID:3409744

  3. Inherited and noninherited risk factors in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weyand, C M; Goronzy, J J

    1995-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is likely the result of a concerted action of several inherited and noninherited factors. Although there is a high suspicion that environmental factors are important, proof is missing. Most information has been collected on genetic risk factors. The inheritance pattern for RA is complex, and there is good evidence that HLA as well as non-HLA genes are involved. Almost all racial-ethnic groups share the association of RA with the HLA-DRB1-encoded sequence motif QKRAA or QRRAA. However, the completeness of the association varies significantly in different ethnic cohorts, as can be expected in a multigene model. The sequence motif translates into a pocket in the antigen-binding site of the HLA-DR molecule. The "rheumatoid pocket" accommodates peptide side chains and has distinct binding characteristics. Epidemiologic evidence points toward a role for non-HLA genes. Candidate genes, such as transporter in antigen processing (TAP) genes are currently explored. Major advances in defining and understanding the contribution of inherited and noninherited factors in RA may come from abandoning the concept of RA as a single entity and accepting a heterogeneity model for RA. Distributions of HLA-DR genes indicate that several subsets of RA patients exist. Seronegative (prognostically good) and seropositive (prognostically worse) patients can be distinguished by the arginine versus lysine substitution at position 71 of the HLA-DRB1 gene. A different dimension of disease, rheumatoid organ disease, appears to be reached in patients with two HLA-DRB1*0401 alleles. Identification of distinct RA subsets may allow us to stratify patients into categories that differ with respect to etiology, disease course, clinical pattern, and treatment response. PMID:7612412

  4. Effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment requires comprehensive management strategies.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Work by Lee and colleagues has shown that decreased sleep quality and increased psychiatric distress increase pain sensitivity at both articular and nonarticular sites in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This work is consistent with prior studies showing that factors independent of RA disease activity can influence RA outcome measures. Owing to increasing pressure on rheumatologists to use outcome measures to inform treatment decisions, the work by Lee and colleagues highlights the need for comprehensive RA management strategies to understand and address the human factors that influence outcomes measures. Such strategies will ensure appropriate use of increasingly expensive therapies while maximizing patient satisfaction and reimbursement. PMID:20067592

  5. Effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment requires comprehensive management strategies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Work by Lee and colleagues has shown that decreased sleep quality and increased psychiatric distress increase pain sensitivity at both articular and nonarticular sites in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This work is consistent with prior studies showing that factors independent of RA disease activity can influence RA outcome measures. Owing to increasing pressure on rheumatologists to use outcome measures to inform treatment decisions, the work by Lee and colleagues highlights the need for comprehensive RA management strategies to understand and address the human factors that influence outcomes measures. Such strategies will ensure appropriate use of increasingly expensive therapies while maximizing patient satisfaction and reimbursement. PMID:20067592

  6. Potential food-drug interactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masuko, Kayo; Tohma, Shigeto; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2013-04-01

    Various medications are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Food-drug interactions may occur with concomitant ingestion of particular food. For example, methotrexate (MTX), the anchor drug in the therapeutic strategy against RA, is an antifolate agent. Excessive presence or absence of dietary folic acid may regulate MTX metabolism, possibly leading to unexpected adverse reactions. In this review, we focus on MTX, isoniazide and calcineurin inhibitors, and the implications of potential food-drug reactions in rheumatology, suggesting the important role of nutritional evaluations in RA patients. PMID:23773634

  7. Lipoprotein (a), lipids, and lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S; Wållberg-Jonsson, S; Dahlén, G

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), (Lp(a)), an independent atherogenic factor, was significantly increased in 93 patients with classical, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of median disease activity. In the patients with Lp(a) concentrations above the upper reference value of 480 mg/l there was a significant correlation between Lp(a) and the concentration of orosomucoid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the platelet count. The plasma concentrations of cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in both male and female patients were significantly lower than in controls. Apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein AI in the patients correlated significantly with total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol respectively. PMID:1829348

  8. [Rheumatoid arthritis: problems and significance of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The last decade is prominent for significant progress in research in the field of mechanisms underlying development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) opening new prospects in pathogenetic treatment of this disease. A great success of RA pharmacotherapy during the last 10 year period is design of novel genetically engineered biological medicines. Achievements of molecular biology, pharmacological genetics and biological infornmation science promote an individual approach to treatment of RA patients within a new conception of individual medicine which considers personal aspects of genomic and proteomic sciences. This novel approach to treatment of RA patients can improve RA outcomes and noticeably reduce cost of the treatmnent. PMID:22830204

  9. Effect of dietary restrictions on disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Beri, D; Malaviya, A N; Shandilya, R; Singh, R R

    1988-01-01

    Additions in five steps were made, as a possible therapeutic measure, to the diet of 27 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after a period of two weeks of a basal isocaloric diet free from pulses, cereals, milk, and non-vegetarian protein foods. Fourteen patients finally took part in the trial, 10 (71%) of whom showed significant clinical improvement. Only three patients (11%) adhered to the diet for a period of 10 months. The others discontinued the diet and were then treated with conventional disease modifying drugs. The study indicates that dietary factors may influence inflammatory response in RA. PMID:3278696

  10. Designing micro- and nano-particles for treating rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mitragotri, Samir; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2011-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, destructive autoimmune disease that can cause disability and have a negative socioeconomic impact. Despite significant advances in therapeutic options, limitations on the routes of administration and the requirement for frequent and long-term dosing often lead to systemic adverse effects and patient non-compliance. Micro and nanoparticle systems that selectively deliver drugs to inflamed synovium have the potential to improve drug efficacy while leaving extrasynovial tissues unaffected. This review summarizes key design parameters of RA-targeted drug carriers and discusses design considerations for improving RA therapies. PMID:22139688

  11. [Trends in orthopaedic surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-12-01

    Significant advancement in pharmacological treatment including biological agents has gradually changed the role and content of surgical treatments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The number of joint replacements in the large joints of lower limbs has decreased, while the number of surgeries in the small joints of hand and feet has increased. Favorable disease control by pharmacological treatment has changed the needs of patients for surgeries and expanded the options of operative procedures for surgeons. The changing needs of patients demanding the higher level of quality of life may seek a change in the surgical treatments. PMID:26608856

  12. Role of immunity to mycobacterial stress proteins in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, L.; Winrow, V.; Blake, D.

    1990-01-01

    'Stress Proteins in Inflammation' provided a forum for the discussion of topical issues in this rapidly moving field. The mycobacterial 65 kDa stress proteins play a key role in certain animal models of inflammatory arthritis. However, the impression emerging is that the mechanism probably involves more than a simple cross-reaction between mycobacterial SP65 and either the host SP65 or a cartilage antigen, and that evidence for a primary role in human rheumatoid arthritis is lacking. A realistic role for immune responses against stress proteins might be the amplification or perpetuation of inflammation. If so, this is unlikely to be limited to arthritis. PMID:2184873

  13. [NSAID prescription in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Rajko; Curković, Bozidar; Babić-Naglić, Durdica; Kehler, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the first choice in the tretment of rheumatic diseases. Nonsteroidal-antiinflammatory drugs show high efficacy, but they could be responsible for gastrointestinal and cardiovascular adverse events. When the gastrointestinal risk is generally accepted, cardiovascular risk is still without consensus. Did the discussion about potential cardiovascular risk with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs influenced their prescription in real life? Data on 201 patients with rheumatoid arthritis show that the prescription of nonselective, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs remain unchanged. More than two third of the patients use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs despite they have established cardiovascular disease. PMID:17580545

  14. Clinical analysis of leg ulcers and gangrene in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Michiko; Nagai, Yayoi; Sogabe, Yoko; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Inoue, Chizuru; Okada, Etsuko; Tago, Osamu; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-12-01

    Leg ulcers are often complicated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however, the etiology is multifactorial. We examined the cases of leg ulceration or gangrene in seven RA patients who were hospitalized over the past 3 years. One patient was diagnosed as having pyoderma gangrenosum. Although vasculitis was suspected in three patients, no histological evidence was obtained from the skin specimens. In these patients, angiography revealed the stenosis or occlusion of digital arteries. In the remaining three patients, leg ulcers were considered to be due to venous insufficiency. Treatment should be chosen depending on the causes of leg ulcers. PMID:24304368

  15. A study of the early-stage evolution of relativistic electron-ion shock using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, E. J.; Min, K.; Choi, C. R.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2014-07-15

    We report the results of a 3D particle-in-cell simulation carried out to study the early-stage evolution of the shock formed when an unmagnetized relativistic jet interacts with an ambient electron-ion plasma. Full-shock structures associated with the interaction are observed in the ambient frame. When open boundaries are employed in the direction of the jet, the forward shock is seen as a hybrid structure consisting of an electrostatic shock combined with a double layer, while the reverse shock is seen as a double layer. The ambient ions show two distinct features across the forward shock: a population penetrating into the shocked region from the precursor region and an accelerated population escaping from the shocked region into the precursor region. This behavior is a signature of a combination of an electrostatic shock and a double layer. Jet electrons are seen to be electrostatically trapped between the forward and reverse shock structures showing a ring-like distribution in a phase-space plot, while ambient electrons are thermalized and become essentially isotropic in the shocked region. The magnetic energy density grows to a few percent of the jet kinetic energy density at both the forward and the reverse shock transition layers in a rather short time scale. We see little disturbance of the jet ions over this time scale.

  16. The 29 September 2009 Samoa Islands Tsunami: Simulations Based on the First Focal Mechanism Solutions and Implications on Tsunami Early Warning Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Armigliato, Alberto; Tinti, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    The tsunamigenic earthquake (Mw = 8.1) that occurred on 29 September 2009 at 17:48 UTC offshore of the Samoa archipelago east of the Tonga trench represents an example of the so-called "outer-rise" earthquakes. The areas most affected were the south coasts of Western and American Samoa, where almost 200 people were killed and run-up heights were measured in excess of 5 m at several locations along the coast. Moreover, tide gauge records showed a maximum peak-to-peak height of about 3.5 m near Pago Pago (American Samoa) and of 1.5 m offshore of Apia (Western Samoa). In this work, different fault models based on the focal mechanism solutions proposed by Global CMT and by USGS immediately after the 2009 Samoan earthquake are tested by comparing the near-field recorded signals (three offshore DART buoys and two coastal tide gauges) and the synthetic signals provided by the numerical simulations. The analysis points out that there are lights and shadows, in the sense that none of the computed tsunamis agrees satisfactorily with all the considered signals, although some of them reproduce some of the records quite well. This "partial agreement" and "partial disagreement" are analysed in the perspective of tsunami forecast and of Tsunami Early Warning System strategy.

  17. Assessment of phalangeal bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis by quantitative ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Roben, P; Barkmann, R; Ullrich, S; Gause, A; Heller, M; Gluer, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Periarticular osteopenia is an early radiological sign of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) devices have recently been shown to be useful for assessing osteoporosis. In this study the capability of a transportable and easy to use QUS device to detect skeletal impairment of the finger phalanges in patients with RA was investigated.
METHODS—In a cross sectional study 83 women (30 controls, 29 with glucocorticosteroid (GC) treated RA, and 24 with GC treated vasculitis) were examined. QUS measurements were obtained at the metaphyses of the proximal phalanges II-V and directly at the proximal interphalangeal joints II-IV with a DBM Sonic 1200 (IGEA, Italy) QUS device. Amplitude dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) was evaluated. In 23 of the patients with RA, hand radiographs were evaluated.
RESULTS—Significant differences between patients with RA and the other groups were found for AD-SoS at both measurement sites. Compared with age matched controls, the AD-SoS of patients with RA was lowered by two and three standard deviations at the metaphysis and joint, respectively. Fingers of patients with RA without erosions (Larsen score 0-I) already had significantly decreased QUS values, which deteriorated further with the development of erosions (Larsen II-V).
CONCLUSION—This study indicates that QUS is sensitive to phalangeal periarticular bone loss in RA. QUS is a quick, simple, and inexpensive method free of ionising radiation that appears to be suited to detection of early stages of periarticular bone loss. Its clinical use in the assessment of early RA should be further evaluated in prospective studies.

 PMID:11406521

  18. Fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis; a persistent problem: a large longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Tsonaka, Roula; Huizinga, Tom W J; Boonen, Annelies; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fatigue is prevalent and disabling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Surprisingly, the long-term course of fatigue is studied seldom and it is unclear to what extent it is influenced by inflammation. This study aimed to determine the course of fatigue during 8 years follow-up, its association with the severity of inflammation and the effect of improved treatment strategies. Methods 626 patients with RA included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic cohort were studied during 8 years. Fatigue severity, measured on a 0–100 mm scale, and other clinical variables were assessed yearly. Patients included in 1993–1995, 1996–1998 and 1999–2007 were treated with delayed treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), early treatment with mild DMARDs and early treatment with methotrexate respectively. After multiple imputation, the serial measurements were analysed using linear quantile mixed models. Results Median fatigue severity at baseline was 45 mm and remained, despite treatment, rather stable thereafter. Female gender (effect size=4.4 mm), younger age (0.2 mm less fatigue/year), higher swollen and tender joint counts (0.3 mm and 1.0 mm more fatigue/swollen or tender joint) and C reactive protein-levels (0.1 mm more fatigue per mg/L) were independently and significantly (p<0.05) associated with fatigue severity over 8 years. Although improved treatment strategies associated with less severe radiographic progression, there was no effect on fatigue severity (p=0.96). Conclusions This largest longitudinal study on fatigue so far demonstrated that the association between inflammation and fatigue is statistically significant but effect sizes are small, suggesting that non-inflammatory pathways mediate fatigue as well. Improved treatment strategies did not result in less severe fatigue. Therefore, fatigue in RA remains an ‘unmet need’. PMID:26509063

  19. Management of cardiovascular risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: evidence and expert opinion

    PubMed Central

    van den Oever, Inge A.M.; van Sijl, Alper M.

    2013-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in rheumatoid arthritis. The classical cardiovascular risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, obesity and physical inactivity do not appear to explain the excess cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis, although they do contribute, albeit in a different way or to a lesser extent, to rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with the general population. A very important link between rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease is inflammation as it plays a key role in all stages of atherosclerosis: from endothelial dysfunction to plaque rupture and thrombosis. It also has an influence on and accentuates some traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidaemia, obesity and insulin resistance. To date, the exact pathophysiologic mechanism by which this relation between cardiovascular disease and rheumatoid arthritis can be explained is not completely clear. Cardiovascular risk management in rheumatoid arthritis is mandatory. Unfortunately, the way this should be done remains a point of discussion. In this review issues regarding cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis and its management will be addressed, according to evidence presented in the latest studies and our own experience-based opinion. PMID:23904862

  20. Upconversion nanoprobes for efficiently in vitro imaging reactive oxygen species and in vivo diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Zhen; Li, Zhenhua; Ju, Enguo; Gao, Nan; Zhou, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Over-generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is closely associated with the biological processes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, efficient monitoring ROS in inflammatory joints would be essential for better understanding the pathogenesis and optimizing therapeutic interventions. Herein, we designed a ratiometric nanoprobe utilizing upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) conjugated with chromophore labeled hyaluronic acid (HA) for high sensitively sensing ROS in the aqueous solution, bioimaging ROS in inflammatory mimic cells and diagnosing RA in vivo. In this approach, the conjugation of HA conferred UCNPs not only water solubility but also biocompatibility and ROS recognizing properties. Particularly, the HA backbone cleavage and detachment of chromophore labeled HA fragments from UCNPs induced by ROS inhibited the luminescent energy transfer (LRET) and allowed rational metric upconversion luminescence (UCL) emission as the detection signal. Importantly, the upconversion nanoprobe showed high effectiveness for early assessing the treatment response of arthritic animals to an antiarthritic drug-methotrexate (MTX). PMID:25477167