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Sample records for simulating structural collapse

  1. Collapsible Geostrut Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Portable truss structure collapsible into smaller volume for storage and transportation. At new site, reerected quickly, without need to reassemble parts. Structure could be tent, dome, tunnel, or platform. Key element in structure joint, called "geostrut joint," includes internal cable. Structure is network of struts attached to geostrut joints. Pulling cables taut in all joints makes structure rigid. Releasing cables relaxes structure.

  2. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  3. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  4. Atomistic simulations of langmuir monolayer collapse.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Christian D; Travesset, Alex

    2006-11-21

    Monolayers at the vapor/water interface collapse by exploring the third dimension at sufficient lateral compression, either by forming three-dimensional structures or by solubilization into the aqueous solution. In this paper, we provide an atomistic description of collapse from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. More specifically, we investigate monolayers of arachidic acids spread on pure water and in an aqueous solution with Ca2+ ions in the subphase. In both cases, it is found that the collapsed systems generally lead to the formation of multilayer structures, which in the system with Ca2+ ions, proceeds by an intermediate regime where the monolayer exhibits significant roughness (of the order of 4 A). If no roughness is present, the system forms collapsed structures into the aqueous solution. The computational cost of atomic MD limits our simulations to relatively small system sizes, fast compression rates, and temporal scales on the order of a nanosecond. We discuss the issues caused by these limitations and present a detailed discussion of how the collapse regime proceeds at long time scales. We conclude with a summary of the implications of our results for further theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:17106994

  5. Dynamic simulation of voltage collapses

    SciTech Connect

    Deuse, J.; Stubbe, M. )

    1993-08-01

    Most of the time the voltage collapse phenomena are studied by means of computer programs designed for the calculation of steady state conditions. But in the real world, the simultaneous occurrences of losses of synchronism, of AVR dynamics or of transformer tap changes call for a full dynamic simulation of voltage phenomena. The present paper shows some examples of dynamic simulations of voltage phenomena using a new general purpose stability program (EUROSTAG), covering in a continuous way the classical fields of transient, mid-term and long-term stability, and also the quasi steady state conditions of a power system.

  6. SPH and Eulerian underwater bubble collapse simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Kipp, M.E.

    1998-05-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. Previously, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine the feasibility of using the coupled finite-element/SPH code PRONTO/SPH for the analysis of various types of underwater explosion problems involving fluid-structure and shock-structure interactions. Here, SPH and Eulerian simulations are used to study the details of underwater bubble collapse, particularly the formation of re-entrant jets during collapse, and the loads generated on nearby structures by the jet and the complete collapse of the bubble. Jet formation is shown to be due simply to the asymmetry caused by nearby structures which disrupt the symmetry of the collapse. However, the load generated by the jet is a minor precursor to the major loads which occur at the time of complete collapse of the bubble.

  7. 1. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE. COLLAPSED ADIT AND COLLAPSED WOODEN STRUCTURE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE. COLLAPSED ADIT AND COLLAPSED WOODEN STRUCTURE. CAMERA IS POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  8. Diverse melting modes and structural collapse of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles: a perspective from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  9. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  10. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  11. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-01

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  12. Simulating the entropic collapse of coarse-grained chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, Tyler N; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W; Harden, James L; Slater, Gary W

    2015-02-17

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  13. Simulating the Entropic Collapse of Coarse-Grained Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  14. Petascale Core-Collapse Supernova Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Bronson

    2009-11-01

    The advent of petascale computing brings with it the promise of substantial increases in physical fidelity for a host of scientific problems. However, the realities of computing on these resources are daunting, and the architectural features of petascale machines will require considerable innovation for effective use. Nevertheless, there exists a class of scientific problems whose ultimate answer requires the application of petascale (and beyond) computing. One example is ascertaining the core-collapse supernova mechanism and explaining the rich phenomenology associated with these events. These stellar explosions produce and disseminate a dominant fraction of the elements in the Universe; are prodigious sources of neutrinos, gravitational waves, and photons across the electromagnetic spectrum; and lead to the formation of neutron stars and black holes. I will describe our recent multidimensional supernova simulations performed on petascale platforms fielded by the DOE and NSF.

  15. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse: Low-metallicity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo

    2014-05-10

    Among many physical processes involved in star formation, radiation transfer is one of the key processes because it dominantly controls the thermodynamics. Because metallicities control opacities, they are one of the important environmental parameters that affect star formation processes. In this work, I investigate protostellar collapse in solar-metallicity and low-metallicity (Z = 0.1 Z {sub ☉}) environments using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Because radiation cooling in high-density gas is more effective in low-metallicity environments, first cores are colder and have lower entropies. As a result, first cores are smaller, less massive, and have shorter lifetimes in low-metallicity clouds. Therefore, first cores would be less likely to be found in low-metallicity star forming clouds. This also implies that first cores tend to be more gravitationally unstable and susceptible to fragmentation. The evolution and structure of protostellar cores formed after the second collapse weakly depend on metallicities in the spherical and magnetized models, despite the large difference in the metallicities. Because this is due to the change of the heat capacity by dissociation and ionization of hydrogen, it is a general consequence of the second collapse as long as the effects of radiation cooling are not very large during the second collapse. On the other hand, the effects of different metallicities are more significant in the rotating models without magnetic fields, because they evolve slower than other models and therefore are more affected by radiation cooling.

  16. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  17. Structural control on karst collapse sinkhole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Antonio; Ascione, Alessandra; Mazzoli, Stefano; Santangelo, Nicoletta

    2013-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes owing their formation to erosion and deformation phenomena caused by subsurface karstification are widespread in the carbonate massifs of peninsular Italy. In contrast with solution dolines, which are densely distributed on the subplanar top surfaces of the carbonate massifs, the collapse sinkholes (hereinafter labelled karst collapse sinkholes) generally occur as isolated landforms and mostly affect the slopes and piedmont areas. In the latter instances, the sinkholes also affect alluvial fan conglomerates, or slope debris, overlying the carbonate rocks. We investigated the karst collapse sinkholes of the southern-central Apennines mountain belt (Italy), which is representative of a young orogenic system, characterised by recent tectonic activity and strong seismicity. The aim of the study is the identification of the causative factors which control the occurrence of such hazardous phenomena. The study was based on a regional scale analysis on sinkhole distribution in relation to the local geological-structural, geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, and was paralleled with field analysis of some selected areas. The regional scale analysis indicates that the karst collapse sinkholes are not the mere response to the concurrence of the climatic and lithological conditions which commonly favour the development of karst processes, the occurrence of such landforms appearing strongly influenced by distinctive structural and hydrogeological conditions. In particular, a close relationship between the karst collapse sinkholes and the main extensional faults showing evidence of late Quaternary activity may be envisaged. This is inferred from the spatial distribution of the karst collapse sinkholes, which is strikingly uneven, the sinkholes generally occurring in alignments following large late Quaternary fault zones, or being clustered at the terminations of those faults. In addition, areas affected by the occurrence of groups of sinkholes, are

  18. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Hix, W. Raphael; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e + e - annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e + e --annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  19. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-20

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  20. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy (≲0.4 kB nucleon-1) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy (≳6 kB nucleon-1) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy (˜4 × 1050 erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  1. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein (1990) to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy ($\\lesssim 0.4\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy ($\\gtrsim 6\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy ($\\sim 4\\times 10^{50}$ erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  2. Numerical simulation of a collapsing bubble subject to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Supponen, O.; Farhat, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper focuses on the simulation of the expansion and aspherical collapse of a laser-generated bubble subjected to an acceleration field and comparison of the results with instances from high-speed videos. The interaction of the liquid and gas is handled with the volume of fluid method. Compressibility effects have been included for each phase to predict the propagation of pressure waves. Initial conditions were estimated through the Rayleigh Plesset equation, based on the maximum bubble size and collapse time. The simulation predictions indicate that during the expansion the bubble shape is very close to spherical. On the other hand, during the collapse the bubble point closest to the bottom of the container develops a slightly higher collapse velocity than the rest of the bubble surface. Over time, this causes momentum focusing and leads to a positive feedback mechanism that amplifies the collapse locally. At the latest collapse stages, a jet is formed at the axis of symmetry, with opposite direction to the acceleration vector, reaching velocities of even 300 m/s. The simulation results agree with the observed bubble evolution and pattern from the experiments, obtained using high speed imaging, showing the collapse mechanism in great detail and clarity.

  3. Simulated Cytoskeletal Collapse via Tau Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sendek, Austin; Fuller, Henry R.; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Cox, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i) taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii) removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii) a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06–0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse. PMID:25162587

  4. Numerical simulations of non-spherical bubble collapse

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSEN, ERIC; COLONIUS, TIM

    2009-01-01

    A high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme is used to simulate the collapse of a gas bubble in water. In order to better understand the damage caused by collapsing bubbles, the dynamics of the shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of a bubble near a planar rigid surface and in a free field are analysed. Collapse times, bubble displacements, interfacial velocities and surface pressures are quantified as a function of the pressure ratio driving the collapse and of the initial bubble stand-off distance from the wall; these quantities are compared to the available theory and experiments and show good agreement with the data for both the bubble dynamics and the propagation of the shock emitted upon the collapse. Non-spherical collapse involves the formation of a re-entrant jet directed towards the wall or in the direction of propagation of the incoming shock. In shock-induced collapse, very high jet velocities can be achieved, and the finite time for shock propagation through the bubble may be non-negligible compared to the collapse time for the pressure ratios of interest. Several types of shock waves are generated during the collapse, including precursor and water-hammer shocks that arise from the re-entrant jet formation and its impact upon the distal side of the bubble, respectively. The water-hammer shock can generate very high pressures on the wall, far exceeding those from the incident shock. The potential damage to the neighbouring surface is quantified by measuring the wall pressure. The range of stand-off distances and the surface area for which amplification of the incident shock due to bubble collapse occurs is determined. PMID:19756233

  5. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka; Salmonson, Jay

    2010-10-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core-collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non-rotating 15 Msolar progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post-collapse environment is expected to be only ~200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. [1] and Obergaulinger et al. [2].

  6. Plasticity-mediated collapse and recrystallization in hollow copper nanowires: a molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Arup Kumar; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2016-01-01

    Summary We study the thermal stability of hollow copper nanowires using molecular dynamics simulation. We find that the plasticity-mediated structural evolution leads to transformation of the initial hollow structure to a solid wire. The process involves three distinct stages, namely, collapse, recrystallization and slow recovery. We calculate the time scales associated with different stages of the evolution process. Our findings suggest a plasticity-mediated mechanism of collapse and recrystallization. This contradicts the prevailing notion of diffusion driven transport of vacancies from the interior to outer surface being responsible for collapse, which would involve much longer time scales as compared to the plasticity-based mechanism. PMID:26977380

  7. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: PROTOSTELLAR CORE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Hori, Yasunori; Saigo, Kazuya; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.jp E-mail: okuzumi@nagoya-u.jp

    2013-01-20

    We report the first three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of protostellar collapse with and without Ohmic dissipation. We take into account many physical processes required to study star formation processes, including a realistic equation of state. We follow the evolution from molecular cloud cores until protostellar cores are formed with sufficiently high resolutions without introducing a sink particle. The physical processes involved in the simulations and adopted numerical methods are described in detail. We can calculate only about one year after the formation of the protostellar cores with our direct three-dimensional RMHD simulations because of the extremely short timescale in the deep interior of the formed protostellar cores, but successfully describe the early phase of star formation processes. The thermal evolution and the structure of the first and second (protostellar) cores are consistent with previous one-dimensional simulations using full radiation transfer, but differ considerably from preceding multi-dimensional studies with the barotropic approximation. The protostellar cores evolve virtually spherically symmetric in the ideal MHD models because of efficient angular momentum transport by magnetic fields, but Ohmic dissipation enables the formation of the circumstellar disks in the vicinity of the protostellar cores as in previous MHD studies with the barotropic approximation. The formed disks are still small (less than 0.35 AU) because we simulate only the earliest evolution. We also confirm that two different types of outflows are naturally launched by magnetic fields from the first cores and protostellar cores in the resistive MHD models.

  8. Vortex Intensification and Collapse of the Lissajous - Ring: Biot-Savart Simulations and Visiometrics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Victor Manuel

    The collapsing "Lissajous-elliptic" vortex ring is examined via quantifications of single- and multi-filament Biot-Savart numerical simulations. Parametric studies with the single-filament model show simple relationships for the collapse boundary in terms of the impulse and energy invariants. Collapse becomes non-monotonic in time, for a sufficiently small initial core "radius". Self-similar, singular-like behavior of the off-filament strain-rate growth has been observed in a small interval, just prior to core overlapping. We achieve a maximum eigenvalue growth of ~300 during a collapsing run. The computation of the strain-rate eigenvalues and vortex stretching in a diagnostics box surrounding the collapse region, yield patterns observed previously in continuum simulations. New diagnostics are presented, including line densities of the energy and the linear and angular momentum, all of which approach zero in the collapse region of the ring. These diagnostics may provide support for initiating surgery in a filament algorithm. Our multi-filament vortex ring simulations present the core flattening observed in continuum simulations of vortex reconnection. Quantifications in a cross section in the collapse region, indicate that the circulation tends to concentrate in the upper part of the dipole structure, where the smallest filament core sizes delta are also located. The vortex stretching pattern in the collapse region for the multi-filament ring is closer to the "peanut" shape observed in the continuum simulations. The simulations with the variable core model indicate that vorticity and strain-rate growth may continue during the close vortex interaction in the inviscid case. Feature extraction-data reduction are key processes in dealing with large datasets. The efficient implementation of these procedures requires distribution of tasks among supercomputers and networks of workstations. The quantification of the objects identified by the feature extraction algorithms

  9. Multidimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae with CHIMERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Bruenn, S. W.; Yakunin, K.; Endeve, E.; Blondin, J. M.; Harris, J. A.; Hix, W. R.; Marronetti, P.; Messer, O. B.; Mezzacappa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are driven by a multidimensional neutrino radiation hydrodynamic (RHD) engine, and full simulation requires at least axisymmetric (2D) and ultimately symmetry-free 3D RHD simulation. We present recent and ongoing work with our multidimensional RHD supernova code CHIMERA to understand the nature of the core-collapse explosion mechanism and its consequences. Recently completed simulations of 12-25 solar mass progenitors(Woosley & Heger 2007) in well resolved (0.7 degrees in latitude) 2D simulations exhibit robust explosions meeting the observationally expected explosion energy. We examine the role of hydrodynamic instabilities (standing accretion shock instability, neutrino driven convection, etc.) on the explosion dynamics and the development of the explosion energy. Ongoing 3D and 2D simulations examine the role that simulation resolution and the removal of the imposed axisymmetry have in the triggering and development of an explosion from stellar core collapse. Companion posters will explore the gravitational wave signals (Yakunin et al.) and nucleosynthesis (Harris et al.) of our simulations.

  10. 3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type B structure, facing east-northeast - Nevada Test Site, Japanese Village, Area 4, Yucca Flat, 4-04 Road near Rainier Mesa Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  11. Numerical Simulations of Silverpit Crater Collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, G. S.; Ivanov, B. A.; Turtle, E. P.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Silverpit crater is a recently discovered, 60-65 Myr old complex crater, which lies buried beneath the North Sea, about 150 km east of Britain. High-resolution images of Silverpit's subsurface structure, provided by three-dimensional seismic reflection data, reveal an inner-crater morphology similar to that expected for a 5-8 km diameter terrestrial crater. The crater walls show evidence of terrace-style slumping and there is a distinct central uplift, which may have produced a central peak in the pristine crater morphology. However, Silverpit is not a typical 5-km diameter terrestrial crater, because it exhibits multiple, concentric rings outside the main cavity. External concentric rings are normally associated with much larger impact structures, for example Chicxulub on Earth, or Orientale on the Moon. Furthermore, external rings associated with large impacts on the terrestrial planets and moons are widely-spaced, predominantly inwardly-facing, asymmetric scarps. However, the seismic data show that the external rings at Silverpit represent closely-spaced, concentric faultbound graben, with both inwardly and outwardly facing fault-scarps. This type of multi-ring structure directly analogous to the Valhalla-type multi-ring basins found on the icy satellites. Thus, the presence and style of the multiple rings at Silverpit is surprising given both the size of the crater and its planetary setting. A further curiosity of the Silverpit structure is that the external concentric rings appear to be extensional features on the West side of the crater and compressional features on the East side. The crater also lies in a local depression, thought to be created by postimpact movement of a salt layer buried beneath the crater.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Silverpit Crater Collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, G. S.; Turtle, E. P.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Silverpit crater is a recently discovered, 60-65 Myr old complex crater, which lies buried beneath the North Sea, about 150 km east of Britain. High-resolution images of Silverpit's subsurface structure, provided by three-dimensional seismic reflection data, reveal an inner-crater morphology similar to that expected for a 5-8 km diameter terrestrial crater. The crater walls show evidence of terracestyle slumping and there is a distinct central uplift, which may have produced a central peak in the pristine crater morphology. However, Silverpit is not a typical 5-km diameter terrestrial crater, because it exhibits multiple, concentric rings outside the main cavity. External concentric rings are normally associated with much larger impact structures, for example Chicxulub on Earth, or Orientale on the Moon. Furthermore, external rings associated with large impacts on the terrestrial planets and moons are widely-spaced, predominantly inwardly-facing, asymmetric scarps. However, the seismic data show that the external rings at Silverpit represent closely-spaced, concentric fault-bound graben, with both inwardly and outwardly facing faults-carps. This type of multi-ring structure is directly analogous to the Valhalla-type multi-ring basins found on the icy satellites. Thus, the presence and style of the multiple rings at Silverpit is surprising given both the size of the crater and its planetary setting.

  13. Spherically Symmetric Core Collapse Supernova Simulations With Boltzmann Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, O. E. B.

    2001-12-01

    I will describe the results of several spherically symmetric core collapse supernova simulations performed with AGILE-BOLTZTRAN, a state-of-the-art radiation hydrodynamics code incorporating Boltzmann neutrino transport. Collapse simulations comparing two 15 M⊙ progenitor models with significant differences in initial Ye (Woosley & Weaver 1995, Heger et al. 2000) exhibit no differences in Ye at bounce, and, consequently, no difference in homologous core mass and shock formation radius. Fully dynamic simulations of core collapse, rebound, and shock propagation for 15 M⊙ and 20 M⊙ progenitor models of Nomoto & Hashimoto (1988) fail to produce explosions. In both cases, the shock stalls at 200 km, then recedes for several hundred milliseconds. The marked similarities observed in all these simulations highlight the need for both improved progenitor models and the incorporation of improved microphysics in modern supernova codes. Spherically symmetric simulations are, for the immediate future, the only computationally feasible way to investigate the nature of the explosion mechanism while including the requisite level of detailed neutrino transport. They also provide one of the few opportunities to delineate the effects of various feedback mechanisms present in the problem. This research was supported by funds from the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research and a DOE PECASE award, and made use of the resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  14. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  15. Collapsible structure for an antenna reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A collapsible support for an antenna reflector for use in supporting spacecraft antennas is described. The support has a regid base and a number of struts which are pivoted at the base. The deployment of the struts and their final configuration for supporting the antenna are illustrated.

  16. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

    2001-01-05

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

  17. 5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  18. Temperature considerations in numerical simulations of collapsing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin

    2014-11-01

    In naval and biomedical engineering applications, the inertial collapse of cavitation bubbles is known to damage its surroundings. While significant attention has been dedicated to investigating the pressures produced by this process, less is known about heating of the surrounding medium, which may be important when collapse occurs near objects whose properties strongly depend on temperature (e.g., polymers). Euler simulations are capable of predicting the high pressures thereby generated. However, numerical errors can occur when solving the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible interface problems. Using a newly developed computational approach that prevents such errors, we investigate the dynamics of shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of individual and collections of gas bubbles, in a free field and near rigid surfaces. We characterize the temperature rises based on the relevant non-dimensional parameters entering the problem. In particular, we show that the temperature of a neighboring object rises due to two mechanisms: the shock produced at collapse and heat diffusion from the hot bubble as it moves toward the object. This work was supported by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0751.

  19. Computational Astrophysics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, dominating the production of elements between oxygen and iron and likely responsible for half the elements heavier than iron. They result from the death throes of massive stars, beginning with stellar core collapse and the formation of a supernova shock wave that must ultimately disrupt such stars. Past, first-principles models most often led to the frustrating conclusion the shock wave stalls and is not revived, at least given the physics included in the models. However, recent progress in the context of two-dimensional, first-principles supernova models is reversing this trend, giving us hope we are on the right track toward a solution of one of the most important problems in astrophysics. Core collapse supernovae are multi-physics events, involving general relativity, hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, nuclear burning, and radiation transport in the form of neutrinos, along with a detailed nuclear physics equation of state and neutrino weak interactions. Computationally, simulating these catastrophic stellar events presents an exascale computing challenge. I will discuss past models and milestones in core collapse supernova theory, the state of the art, and future requirements. In this context, I will present the results and plans of the collaboration led by ORNL and the University of Tennessee.

  20. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse

  1. Relativistic MHD simulations of stellar core collapse and magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, José A.; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Gabler, Michael; Müller, Ewald; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    We present results from simulations of magneto-rotational stellar core collapse along with Alfvén oscillations in magnetars. These simulations are performed with the CoCoA/CoCoNuT code, which is able to handle ideal MHD flows in dynamical spacetimes in general relativity. Our core collapse simulations highlight the importance of genuine magnetic effects, like the magneto-rotational instability, for the dynamics of the flow. For the modelling of magnetars we use the anelastic approximation to general relativistic MHD, which allows for an effective suppression of fluid modes and an accurate description of Alfvén waves. We further compute Alfvén oscillation frequencies along individual magnetic field lines with a semi-analytic approach. Our work confirms previous results based on perturbative approaches regarding the existence of two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. Additional material is presented in the accompanying contribution by Gabler et al (2010b) in these proceedings.

  2. 26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ABOVE ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF STAIRWAY IN CA-290-25. THE PIPE AT CENTER WAS USED TO SPREAD CRUSHED ORE COMING FROM THE JAW CRUSHER EVENLY TO ALL AREA OF THE ORE BIN BELOW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. DEM simulations of the collapse of submerged granular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhao, tao; Houlsby, Guy; Utili, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The collapse of submerged granular columns in plain strain was simulated by 3D Discrete Element Method simulations with periodic boundary in the out-of-plane direction. These analyses are a first step in the attempt to simulate submarine landslides in sandy seabeds in order to investigate the consequent run-out distances. Spherical particles from a realistic particle size distribution of a Leighton buzzard sand and a simple contact model based on linear springs, dashpots and frictional sliders were employed in the presented simulations. A rolling resistance model governed by two micromechanical parameters was added in order to indirectly account for the effect of particle non-sphericity on the angular moment equilibrium of the granular assembly. Calibration of the rolling resistance model leads to predictions of run-out distances in quantitative agreement with the available experimental data. A comparison between the dry and the submerged cases regarding the observed run-out distances and the time of occurrence of landslide propagation were also drawn up.

  4. Collapse of a Liquid Column: Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Celentano, Diego J.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2007-03-01

    This paper is focused on the numerical and experimental analyses of the collapse of a liquid column. The measurements of the interface position in a set of experiments carried out with shampoo and water for two different initial column aspect ratios are presented together with the corresponding numerical predictions. The experimental procedure was found to provide acceptable recurrence in the observation of the interface evolution. Basic models describing some of the relevant physical aspects, e.g. wall friction and turbulence, are included in the simulations. Numerical experiments are conducted to evaluate the influence of the parameters involved in the modeling by comparing the results with the data from the measurements. The numerical predictions reasonably describe the physical trends.

  5. Symmetry energy impact in simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tobias; Hempel, Matthias; Sagert, Irina; Suwa, Yudai; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    We present a review of a broad selection of nuclear matter equations of state (EOSs) applicable in core-collapse supernova studies. The large variety of nuclear matter properties, such as the symmetry energy, which are covered by these EOSs leads to distinct outcomes in supernova simulations. Many of the currently used EOS models can be ruled out by nuclear experiments, nuclear many-body calculations, and observations of neutron stars. In particular the two classical supernova EOS describe neutron matter poorly. Nevertheless, we explore their impact in supernova simulations since they are commonly used in astrophysics. They serve as extremely soft and stiff representative nuclear models. The corresponding supernova simulations represent two extreme cases, e.g., with respect to the protoneutron star (PNS) compactness and shock evolution. Moreover, in multi-dimensional supernova simulations EOS differences have a strong effect on the explosion dynamics. Because of the extreme behaviors of the classical supernova EOSs we also include DD2, a relativistic mean field EOS with density-dependent couplings, which is in satisfactory agreement with many current nuclear and observational constraints. This is the first time that DD2 is applied to supernova simulations and compared with the classical supernova EOS. We find that the overall behaviour of the latter EOS in supernova simulations lies in between the two extreme classical EOSs. As pointed out in previous studies, we confirm the impact of the symmetry energy on the electron fraction. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry energy becomes less important during the post-bounce evolution, where conversely the symmetric part of the EOS becomes increasingly dominating, which is related to the high temperatures obtained. Moreover, we study the possible impact of quark matter at high densities and light nuclear clusters at low and intermediate densities.

  6. Simulation of bubble expansion and collapse in the vicinity of a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Supponen, O.; Farhat, M.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the interaction of laser-generated bubbles with a free surface, including comparison of the results with instances from high-speed videos of the experiment. The Volume Of Fluid method was employed for tracking liquid and gas phases while compressibility effects were introduced with appropriate equations of state for each phase. Initial conditions of the bubble pressure were estimated through the traditional Rayleigh Plesset equation. The simulated bubble expands in a non-spherically symmetric way due to the interference of the free surface, obtaining an oval shape at the maximum size. During collapse, a jet with mushroom cap is formed at the axis of symmetry with the same direction as the gravity vector, which splits the initial bubble to an agglomeration of toroidal structures. Overall, the simulation results are in agreement with the experimental images, both quantitatively and qualitatively, while pressure waves are predicted both during the expansion and the collapse of the bubble. Minor discrepancies in the jet velocity and collapse rate are found and are attributed to the thermodynamic closure of the gas inside the bubble.

  7. Landscape structure and the genetic effects of a population collapse

    PubMed Central

    Caplins, Serena A.; Gilbert, Kimberly J.; Ciotir, Claudia; Roland, Jens; Matter, Stephen F.; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2014-01-01

    Both landscape structure and population size fluctuations influence population genetics. While independent effects of these factors on genetic patterns and processes are well studied, a key challenge is to understand their interaction, as populations are simultaneously exposed to habitat fragmentation and climatic changes that increase variability in population size. In a population network of an alpine butterfly, abundance declined 60–100% in 2003 because of low over-winter survival. Across the network, mean microsatellite genetic diversity did not change. However, patch connectivity and local severity of the collapse interacted to determine allelic richness change within populations, indicating that patch connectivity can mediate genetic response to a demographic collapse. The collapse strongly affected spatial genetic structure, leading to a breakdown of isolation-by-distance and loss of landscape genetic pattern. Our study reveals important interactions between landscape structure and temporal demographic variability on the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations. Projected future changes to both landscape and climate may lead to loss of genetic variability from the studied populations, and selection acting on adaptive variation will likely occur within the context of an increasing influence of genetic drift. PMID:25320176

  8. Simulation of thick-walled submarine pipeline collapse under bending and hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sharif, A.M.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of submarine pipeline buckling or collapse as a result of bending and external pressure is investigated by numerical modeling using finite element analysis. The model takes into account the initial variability of material properties, the effect of cold-work on the pipe material properties and initial geometric imperfections. It is capable of simulating the nonlinear behavior, and structural instability due to the combined effects of bending and pressure. The solution algorithm and verification against experimental results are presented. In addition, a deterministic model for collapse under combined pressure and bending based on measured stress-strain behavior and pipe geometry is derived. Results from both finite element and deterministic models for different parameter sensitivities are examined.

  9. Relativistic structure, stability, and gravitational collapse of charged neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Cristian R.

    2005-11-15

    Charged stars have the potential of becoming charged black holes or even naked singularities. We present a set of numerical solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations that represents spherical charged compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The stellar models obtained are evolved forward in time integrating the Einstein-Maxwell field equations. We assume an equation of state of a neutron gas at zero temperature. The charge distribution is taken as being proportional to the rest mass density distribution. The set of solutions present an unstable branch, even with charge-to-mass ratios arbitrarily close to the extremum case. We perform a direct check of the stability of the solutions under strong perturbations and for different values of the charge-to-mass ratio. The stars that are in the stable branch oscillate and do not collapse, while models in the unstable branch collapse directly to form black holes. Stars with a charge greater than or equal to the extreme value explode. When a charged star is suddenly discharged, it does not necessarily collapse to form a black hole. A nonlinear effect that gives rise to the formation of a shell of matter (in supermassive stars), is negligible in the present simulations. The results are in agreement with the third law of black hole thermodynamics and with the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  10. Ultimate collapse of offshore structures exposed to fire

    SciTech Connect

    Amdahl, J.; Eberg, E.; Holmaas, T.; Landroe, H.; Ulfsnes, M.

    1995-12-31

    A systematic validation of the computer program for analysis of mechanical response USFOS is presented. It is based upon a nonlinear finite element formulation and is capable of predicting total collapse, taking systems effects including force redistribution caused by failing members into account. For acceptance of the method it is vital that component behavior is predicted reliably. For this purpose the element formulation used is calibrated such that buckling curves for fire exposed columns and beam-column behavior are reproduced accurately. As a part of the verification of the program a laboratory test with a three dimensional frame representative of the upper part of a four-legged jacket is carried out. The structure is exposed to a gas pool fire at sea level close to one leg until total collapse takes place. A description of the test is given along with numerically predicted structural response. Some preliminary results from the experiment are also presented. Finally, the use of the integrated fire analysis system is illustrated by application to an actual offshore structure.

  11. Simulations of stripped core-collapse supernovae in close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldi, Alex; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Rossi, Elena Maria

    2016-03-01

    We perform smoothed-particle hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion of a helium star in a close binary system, and study the effects of the explosion on the companion star as well as the effect of the presence of the companion on the supernova remnant. By simulating the mechanism of the supernova from just after core bounce until the remnant shell passes the stellar companion, we are able to separate the various phenomena leading to the final system parameters. In the final system, we measure the mass stripping and ablation from, and the additional velocity imparted to, the companion stars. Our results agree with recent work showing smaller values for these quantities compared to earlier estimates. We do find some differences, however, particularly in the velocity gained by the companion, which can be explained by the different ejecta structure that naturally results from the explosion in our simulations. These results indicate that predictions based on extrapolated Type Ia simulations should be revised. We also examine the structure of the supernova ejecta shell. The presence of the companion star produces a conical cavity in the expanding supernova remnant, and loss of material from the companion causes the supernova remnant to be more metal-rich on one side and more hydrogen-rich (from the companion material) around the cavity. Following the impact of the shell, we examine the state of the companion after being heated by the shock.

  12. Assessment of structural analysis technology for elastic shell collapse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Macy, S. C.; Mccleary, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    The prediction of the ultimate load carrying capability for compressively loaded shell structures is a challenging nonlinear analysis problem. Selected areas of finite element technology research and nonlinear solution technology are assessed. Herein, a finite element analysis procedure is applied to four shell collapse problems which have been used by computational structural mechanics researchers in the past. This assessment will focus on a number of different shell element formulations and on different approaches used to account for geometric nonlinearities. The results presented confirm that these aspects of nonlinear shell analysis can have a significant effect on the predicted nonlinear structural response. All analyses were performed using the CSM Testbed software system which allowed a convenient assessment of different element formulations with a consistent approach to solving the discretized nonlinear equations.

  13. Melt-phase behavior of collapsed PMMA/PVC chains revealed by multiscale simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaofu

    2016-04-01

    Single- and double-chain models of three stereoregular polymers, iso- and syndiotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) and isotactic poly(vinyl chloride), were extensively simulated using systematic coarse-grained (CG) potentials. It was found that, in vacuum, all of these long chains collapse in a two-stage process from their fully extended configurations into coils, and the two chains in each double-chain model ultimately become intertwined. Strong intermolecular interactions were found to occur between two chains of the same polymer ("like pairs"), which helps to explain the high densities of single-component melts. However, the intermolecular interactions between two chains of different polymers ("unlike pairs") were stronger than those in like pairs. The enthalpy of mixing for unlike pairs-obtained from their intermolecular interaction energies-was negative, indicating that the two binary blends considered here are homogeneous systems. Moreover, a more negative enthalpy of mixing is suggested to correlate with better miscibility. These results agree well with corresponding experimental and simulated results, once again validating the accuracy of CG potentials when they are used to explore structural and energetic properties. The local structure captured by the isolated long chains dictates the ability to elucidate melt-phase behavior. A scheme involving the preparation of bulk models with initially collapsed chains was proposed; such CG models could be widely used to rapidly screen pairs of polymers for specific applications. PMID:27037823

  14. Numerical simulations of the translation of collapsing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igualada-Villodre, Elena; Fuster, Daniel; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present a numerical method developed to solve the collapse of single non-spherical bubbles in an incompressible liquid. The Gerris software is used to solve for the 3D conservation equations in both phases in a system where the total volume changes in the gas are imposed. The numerical results are used to discriminate various bubble collapse regimes as a function of the collapse intensity and the strength of a non-symmetrical force (e.g. gravity). At low Weber numbers and non-zero Froude numbers, the bubble remains approximately spherical. In this regime the solution numerically obtained is shown to converge in the inviscid case to the theoretical solution. For large Weber numbers, a fast jet breaks the bubble dissipating an important part of energy during the collapse. Interestingly, it is possible to identify regimes for moderate Weber numbers where the initiation of jet formation influences its translational motion without breaking the bubble. In accordance with numerical results, experiments with bubbles generated by water electrolysis subjected to shock waves show that bubbles suffer non-spherical interface deformations. The results of this study may help to further develop medical applications using bubbles as drug-carriers.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of hollow thick-walled cylinder collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The generation and evolution of plastic deformation in a hollow single-crystal cylinder under high-rate axisymmetric loading were studied. An advantage of the proposed loading scheme is that all loading modes are applied simultaneously within the chosen crystallographic plane of the cylinder base and different strain degrees are achieved along the specimen cross section. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to show that the achievement of a certain strain causes the formation of structural defects on the inner surface of the specimen. The obtained results can be used to explain the main plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline solids.

  16. Simulating Society Transitions: Standstill, Collapse and Growth in an Evolving Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guanghua; Yang, Junjie; Li, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    We developed a model society composed of various occupations that interact with each other and the environment, with the capability of simulating three widely recognized societal transition patterns: standstill, collapse and growth, which are important compositions of society evolving dynamics. Each occupation is equipped with a number of inhabitants that may randomly flow to other occupations, during which process new occupations may be created and then interact with existing ones. Total population of society is associated with productivity, which is determined by the structure and volume of the society. We ran the model under scenarios such as parasitism, environment fluctuation and invasion, which correspond to different driving forces of societal transition, and obtained reasonable simulation results. This work adds to our understanding of societal evolving dynamics as well as provides theoretical clues to sustainable development. PMID:24086530

  17. Multidimensional, multiphysics simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We review the code s architecture and some recently improved implementations used in the code. We also briefly discuss preliminary results obtained with the code in three spatial dimensions.

  18. Multidimensional, multiphysics simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We review the code's architecture and some recently improved implementations used in the code. We also briefly discuss preliminary results obtained with the code in three spatial dimensions.

  19. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Collapsing Prolate Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. P.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    1993-12-01

    We present the results of collapse calculations for elongated clouds performed using the numerical method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The clouds considered are isothermal, prolate spheroids with different axial ratios (a/b). Results are obtained for different values of a/b and mbarL, the mean mass per unit length. It is found that initially uniform clouds undergo fragmentation when the collapse is preferentially down on to the major axis, due to the intrinsic instability of a linear configuration. This occurs when the value of mbarL is sufficiently large. A criterion for elongated clouds to undergo linear collapse is derived using the tensor virial theorem, and it is found that the numerically obtained value of mbarL for which fragmentation occurs corresponds closely to that expected from analytical considerations. The addition of small density perturbations simply results in clouds that fragment more easily, particularly for cases in which a/b is close to unity. Previous calculations, presented by other authors for the case of finite cylinders, show that clouds with cylindrical geometries are highly unstable to the formation of two fragments that occur at the ends of the cylinder. We find that collapsing, prolate spheroids show qualitatively different behaviour, with no preferred tendency to form fragments at the ends of the cloud. Instead fragmentation appears to occur more readily towards the centre of the cloud where the local mass per unit length is greatest. Our implementation of SPH employs spatially variable smoothing lengths, h. In order to obtain a Hamiltonian system, we incorporate terms involving the spatial variability of h in the particle equations of motion, not included in previous implementations. We find that inclusion of these ∇h terms results in much improved energy conservation, but has little effect on the qualitative outcome of the calculations presented here. (fset 'queer "∇")

  20. Confrontation of top-hat spherical collapse against dark halos from cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Daichi; Kitayama, Tetsu; Osato, Ken; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    The top-hat spherical collapse model (TSC) is one of the most fundamental analytical frameworks to describe the non-linear growth of cosmic structure. TSC has motivated, and been widely applied in, various investigations even in the current era of precision cosmology. While numerous studies exist to examine its validity against numerical simulations in a statistical fashion, there are few analyses which compare the TSC dynamics in an individual object-wise basis, which is what we attempt in the present paper. We extract 100 halos at z = 0 from a cosmological N-body simulation according to the conventional TSC criterion for the spherical over-density. Then we trace back their spherical counterparts at earlier epochs. Just prior to the turn-around epoch of the halos, their dynamics are well approximated by TSC, but their turn-around epochs are systematically delayed and the virial radii are larger by ˜20% on average relative to the TSC predictions. We find that this systematic deviation can mainly be ascribed to the non-uniformity/inhomogeneity of dark matter density profiles and the non-zero velocity dispersions, both of which are neglected in TSC. In particular, the inside-out collapse and shell-crossing of dark matter halos play an important role in generating the significant velocity dispersion. The implications of the present result are briefly discussed.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Shock-Induced Nanobubble Collapse in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedadi, Mohammad; Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; van Duin, Adri

    2011-03-01

    Structure of water under shock and shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. In the presence of a nanobubble, we observe a focused nanojet at the onset of nanobubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon nanobubble collapse. The secondary shock wave propagates spherically backwards and induces high pressure as it propagates. Both the propagation velocity and the induced pressure are larger than those of the primary shock. We explored effects of nanobubble radius and shock amplitude on nanojet formation. The nanojet size increases by increasing particle velocity but the effect of increasing radius is more significant. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock-induced collapse of a nanobubble in the vicinity of a cell membrane creates a transient nanopore when the nanojet impacts the membrane. Transient cell poration has potential applications in drug delivery.

  2. Nanobubble collapse on a silica surface in water: billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2013-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate damage caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near an amorphous silica surface. Collapse of an empty bubble generates a high-speed nanojet, which causes pitting on the silica surface. We find pit radii are close to bubble radii, and experiments also indicate linear scaling between them. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and, consequently, the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. PMID:24237524

  3. Nanobubble Collapse on a Silica Surface in Water: Billion-Atom Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2013-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163 840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate damage caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near an amorphous silica surface. Collapse of an empty bubble generates a high-speed nanojet, which causes pitting on the silica surface. We find pit radii are close to bubble radii, and experiments also indicate linear scaling between them. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and, consequently, the damage on the silica surface is mitigated.

  4. A perturbative approach to the numerical simulation of rotational collapse of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperhake, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    The collapse of rotating stars/stellar cores has attracted a lot of attention in the past and is considered among the most promising sources of detectable gravitational waves. We approach the numerical simulation of such scenarios in the slow rotation approximation by evolving gauge invariant second order perturbations on the background of a spherically symmetric collapsing neutron star. Our project thus represents a generalization to 'neutron stars with barotropic equations of state' of work by Cunningham, Price and Moncrief who applied this idea to the analytic background solution for Oppenheimer-Snyder dust collapse. In the slow rotation approximation this approach enables us to obtain fully relativistic simulations of rotating collapsing stars within a well understood numerical framework.

  5. Simple model of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, collapse, and structural elements.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, V P; Pavlov, V I

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms and structural elements of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability whose evolution results in the occurrence of the collapse have been studied in the scope of the rotating shallow water model with horizontal density gradient. Analysis of the instability mechanism shows that two collapse scenarios are possible. One scenario implies anisotropic collapse during which the contact area of a collapsing fragment with the bottom contracts into a spinning segment. The other implies isotropic contracting of the area into a point. The rigorous integral criteria and power laws of collapses are found. PMID:24032919

  6. Comparison of Hyperonic Equations of State for Core Collapse Supernovae Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Char, Prasanta; Banik, Sarmistha

    In this work, we study the dynamical collapse of a non rotating massive star to a black hole using relativistic supernova equations of state (EoS) incorporating Λ hyperons which would be populated, due to Pauli exclusion principle, in the dense matter region after the core collapse. We use 1D GR hydrodynamic code GR1D for our numerical simulations and compare the properties of the currently available hyperonic equations of state.

  7. Platinum-induced structural collapse in layered oxide polycrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianlin; Liu, Changhui; Huang, Haoliang; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhai, Xiaofang; Lu, Yalin E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-30

    Effect of a platinum bottom electrode on the SrBi{sub 5}Fe{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 18} layered oxide polycrystalline films was systematically studied. The doped cobalt ions react with the platinum to form a secondary phase of PtCoO{sub 2}, which has a typical Delafossite structure with a weak antiferromagnetism and an exceptionally high in-plane electrical conductivity. Formation of PtCoO{sub 2} at the interface partially consumes the cobalt dopant and leads to the structural collapsing from 5 to 4 layers, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Considering the weak magnetic contribution from PtCoO{sub 2}, the observed ferromagnetism should be intrinsic of the Aurivillius compounds. Ferroelectric properties were also indicated by the piezoresponse force microscopy. In this work, the platinum induced secondary phase at the interface was observed, which has a strong impact on Aurivillius structural configuration and thus the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties.

  8. Platinum-induced structural collapse in layered oxide polycrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianlin; Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Changhui; Fu, Zhengping; Zhai, Xiaofang; Peng, Ranran; Lu, Yalin

    2015-03-01

    Effect of a platinum bottom electrode on the SrBi5Fe1-xCoxTi4O18 layered oxide polycrystalline films was systematically studied. The doped cobalt ions react with the platinum to form a secondary phase of PtCoO2, which has a typical Delafossite structure with a weak antiferromagnetism and an exceptionally high in-plane electrical conductivity. Formation of PtCoO2 at the interface partially consumes the cobalt dopant and leads to the structural collapsing from 5 to 4 layers, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Considering the weak magnetic contribution from PtCoO2, the observed ferromagnetism should be intrinsic of the Aurivillius compounds. Ferroelectric properties were also indicated by the piezoresponse force microscopy. In this work, the platinum induced secondary phase at the interface was observed, which has a strong impact on Aurivillius structural configuration and thus the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties.

  9. Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment of Structures Subjected to Seismic Excitation and Blast for the Limit State of Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Asprone, D.; Jalayer, F.; Prota, A.; Manfredi, G.

    2008-07-08

    Multi-hazard approach represents a convenient way to address structural reliability of a critical infrastructure. Objective of the present paper is to present a multi-hazard methodology for evaluation of the risk associated with the limit state of collapse for a reinforced concrete (RC) structure subject to both seismic and blast threats. Blast fragility can be defined as the probability of progressive collapse given a blast event has taken place and its evaluation is here suggested via a Monte Carlo procedure, generating different possible blast configurations. For each blast scenario, the consequent damages occurring to the investigated structure are identified and an updating of the structure is then performed. The structural stability under gravity loading is then verified by employing a kinematic plastic limit analysis. The conditional probability of collapse or the blast fragility is then calculated as the mean value of the collapse indicator variable over the number of cases generated by the simulation procedure. Therefore, the seismic fragility is also determined via classical methods described elsewhere and the total risk of collapse is evaluated as the sum of blast and seismic contributions.

  10. Recruitment collapse and population structure of the European eel shaped by local ocean current dynamics.

    PubMed

    Baltazar-Soares, Miguel; Biastoch, Arne; Harrod, Chris; Hanel, Reinhold; Marohn, Lasse; Prigge, Enno; Evans, Derek; Bodles, Kenneth; Behrens, Erik; Böning, Claus W; Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, exploited marine fish stocks are under threat of collapse [1]. Although the drivers behind such collapses are diverse, it is becoming evident that failure to consider evolutionary processes in fisheries management can have drastic consequences on a species' long-term viability [2]. The European eel (Anguilla anguilla; Linnaeus, 1758) is no exception: not only does the steep decline in recruitment observed in the 1980s [3, 4] remain largely unexplained, the punctual detection of genetic structure also raises questions regarding the existence of a single panmictic population [5-7]. With its extended Transatlantic dispersal, pinpointing the role of ocean dynamics is crucial to understand both the population structure and the widespread decline of this species. Hence, we combined dispersal simulations using a half century of high-resolution ocean model data with population genetics tools. We show that regional atmospherically driven ocean current variations in the Sargasso Sea were the major driver of the onset of the sharp decline in eel recruitment in the beginning of the 1980s. The simulations combined with genotyping of natural coastal eel populations furthermore suggest that unexpected evidence of coastal genetic differentiation is consistent with cryptic female philopatric behavior within the Sargasso Sea. Such results demonstrate the key constraint of the variable oceanic environment on the European eel population. PMID:24374306

  11. Catastrophic collapse can occur without early warning: examples of silent catastrophes in structured ecological models.

    PubMed

    Boerlijst, Maarten C; Oudman, Thomas; de Roos, André M

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic and sudden collapses of ecosystems are sometimes preceded by early warning signals that potentially could be used to predict and prevent a forthcoming catastrophe. Universality of these early warning signals has been proposed, but no formal proof has been provided. Here, we show that in relatively simple ecological models the most commonly used early warning signals for a catastrophic collapse can be silent. We underpin the mathematical reason for this phenomenon, which involves the direction of the eigenvectors of the system. Our results demonstrate that claims on the universality of early warning signals are not correct, and that catastrophic collapses can occur without prior warning. In order to correctly predict a collapse and determine whether early warning signals precede the collapse, detailed knowledge of the mathematical structure of the approaching bifurcation is necessary. Unfortunately, such knowledge is often only obtained after the collapse has already occurred. PMID:23593506

  12. Field structure of collapsing wave packets in 3D strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Robinson, P. A.; Goldman, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is constructed for the electric fields in the collapsing wave packets found in 3D simulations of driven and damped isotropic strong Langmuir turbulence. This model, based on a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential, accounts for the distribution of wave-packet shapes observed in the simulations, particularly the predominance of oblate wave packets. In contrast with predictions for undamped and undriven subsonic collapse of scalar fields, oblate vector-field wave packets do not flatten during collapse but, instead, remain approximately self-similar and rigid.

  13. 3D Seismic Imaging over a Potential Collapse Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, Roland; O'Connell, Daniel; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    The Middle-East has seen a recent boom in construction including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas. Before planning and construction can commence, however, the development areas need to be investigated to determine their suitability for the planned project. Subsurface parameters such as the type of material (soil/rock), thickness of top soil or rock layers, depth and elastic parameters of basement, for example, comprise important information needed before a decision concerning the suitability of the site for construction can be made. A similar problem arises in environmental impact studies, when subsurface parameters are needed to assess the geological heterogeneity of the subsurface. Environmental impact studies are typically required for each construction project, particularly for the scale of the aforementioned building boom in the Middle East. The current study was conducted in Qatar at the location of a future highway interchange to evaluate a suite of 3D seismic techniques in their effectiveness to interrogate the subsurface for the presence of karst-like collapse structures. The survey comprised an area of approximately 10,000 m2 and consisted of 550 source- and 192 receiver locations. The seismic source was an accelerated weight drop while the geophones consisted of 3-component 10 Hz velocity sensors. At present, we analyzed over 100,000 P-wave phase arrivals and performed high-resolution 3-D tomographic imaging of the shallow subsurface. Furthermore, dispersion analysis of recorded surface waves will be performed to obtain S-wave velocity profiles of the subsurface. Both results, in conjunction with density estimates, will be utilized to determine the elastic moduli of the subsurface rock layers.

  14. 1. LOWER NOTTINGHAM MINE. COLLAPSED ADIT/WOOD STRUCTURE AND BUILDING 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOWER NOTTINGHAM MINE. COLLAPSED ADIT/WOOD STRUCTURE AND BUILDING 'A' ON THE RIGHT EDGE OF THE IMAGE. COLLAPSED CABIN 'B' AND BUILDING 'C' IS ON THE LEFT SIDE. CAMERA IS POINTED SOUTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Lower Nottingham Mine, Western slope of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  15. KL4 Peptide Induces Reversible Collapse Structures on Multiple Length Scales in Model Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Michael Henderson, J.; Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Notter, Robert H.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of KL4, a 21-residue amphipathic peptide approximating the overall ratio of positively charged to hydrophobic amino acids in surfactant protein B (SP-B), on the structure and collapse of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol monolayers. As reported in prior work on model lung surfactant phospholipid films containing SP-B and SP-B peptides, our experiments show that KL4 improves surfactant film reversibility during repetitive interfacial cycling in association with the formation of reversible collapse structures on multiple length scales. Emphasis is on exploring a general mechanistic connection between peptide-induced nano- and microscale reversible collapse structures (silos and folds). PMID:22208194

  16. Two Dimensional Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae with Neutrino Transport in FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Evan; Couch, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are the end stage of massive star evolution and are central to many aspects of astrophysics. They are the birth site of both neutron stars and black holes and their shocks are responsible for spreading the products of stellar evolution throughout the Galaxy and regulating star formation. Despite their importance and decades of research, the precise mechanism that converts the initial implosion of the collapsing iron core to an explosion that unbinds the majority of the star is unknown. However, we know that the majority of the energy released is ultimately radiated in neutrinos and that the physics of neutrino transport and neutrino heating-among many other aspects-must be treated carefully when modelling the core-collapse supernova central engine. In this talk, I will present recent simulations of core-collapse supernovae from the FLASH hydrodynamics code. We perform two dimensional, neutrino transport simulations using several progenitors. We test the influence of general relativity by using a pseudorelativistic potential that effectively models GR. We show that the more compact protoneutron star predicted from GR increases the neutrino heating and can lead to explosions where the corresponding Newtonian simulations fail.

  17. From polymer collapse to confined fluids: investigating the implications of interfacial structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Gaurav

    In the first part of this thesis, we present results from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the collapse transitions of hydrophobic polymers in explicit water. The focus is to understand the roles that curvature and interactions associated with the polymer-water "interface" have on collapse thermodynamics. We show that model hydrophobic polymers can have parabolic, protein-like, temperature-dependent free energies of unfolding. Analysis of the water structure shows that the polymer-water interface can be characterized as soft and weakly dewetted. We also show that an appropriately defined surface tension for the polymer-water interface is independent of the attractive polymer-water interactions. This helped us to develop a perturbation model for predicting the effect of attractions on polymer collapse thermodynamics. In the second part, we explore connections between structure, thermodynamics, and dynamics of inhomogeneous fluids. First, we use molecular dynamics simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT) to study the hard-sphere fluid at approximately 10^3 equilibrium state points, spanning different confininggeometries and particle-boundary interactions. We provide strong empirical evidence that both excess entropy and a new generalized measure of available volume for inhomogeneous fluids correlate excellently with self-diffusivity, approximately independent of the degree of confinement. Next, we study via simulations how tuning particle-wall interactions to flatten or enhance the particle layering of a model confined fluid impacts its self-diffusivity, viscosity, and entropy. Interestingly, interactions that eliminate particle layering can significantly reduce confined fluid mobility, whereas those that enhance layering can have the opposite effect. Excess entropy helps to understand and predict these trends. Finally, we explore the relationships between the effective interparticle interactions, static structure, and tracer diffusivity

  18. Non-Gaussian halo mass function and non-spherical halo collapse: theory vs. simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Achitouv, Ixandra E.; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano E-mail: Pier-Stefano.Corasaniti@obspm.fr

    2012-02-01

    The mass distribution of dark matter halos is a sensitive probe of primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). We derive an analytical formula of the halo mass function by perturbatively computing excursion set path-integrals for a non-Gaussian density field with non-vanishing skewness, f{sub NL}. We assume a stochastic barrier model which captures the main features of the ellipsoidal collapse of halos. Contrary to previous results based on extensions of the Press-Schechter formalism to NG initial conditions, we find that the non-spherical collapse of halos directly alter the signature of primordial NG. This points toward a potential degeneracy between the effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and that of non-linear halo collapse. The inferred mass function is found to be in remarkable agreement with N-body simulations of NG local type. Deviations are well within numerical uncertainties for all values of f{sub NL}{sup loc} in the range of validity of the perturbative calculation (|f{sub nl}{sup loc}|∼<200). Moreover, the comparison with simulation results suggests that for |f{sub NL}|∼>30 the non-linear collapse of halos, as described by our barrier model, strongly deviates from that of Gaussian initial conditions. This is not surprising since the effect of non-linear gravitational processes may be altered by initially large NG. Hence, in the lack of prior theoretical knowledge, halo collapse model parameters should be included in statistical halo mass function data analysis which aim to constrain the signature of primordial NG.

  19. Numerical simulation of cavitation erosion on a NACA0015 hydrofoil based on bubble collapse strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V.; Luo, X.; Escaler, X.; Huang, R.; Valencia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of erosion under unsteady cavitation is crucial to prevent damage in hydraulic machinery. The present investigation deals with the numerical simulation of erosive partial cavitation around a NACA0015 hydrofoil. The study presents the calculation of the bubble collapse strength, Sb, based on the bubble potential energy to identify the surface areas with highest risk of damage. The results are obtained with a numerical scheme assuming homogeneous mixture flow, implicit LES and Zwart cavitation model. The 3D unsteady flow simulation has been solved using OpenFOAM. Python language and OpenFOAM calculator (foamCalcEx) have been used to obtain and represent Sb. The obtained results clearly show the instants of erosive bubble collapse and the affected surface areas.

  20. Two- and three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae with CHIMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Bruenn, S. W.; Harris, James A; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Blondin, J. M.; Marronetti, Pedro; Mauney, Christopher M; Yakunin, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    Ascertaining the core-collapse supernova mechanism is a complex, and yet unsolved, problem dependent on the interaction of general relativity, hydrodynamics, neutrino transport, neutrino-matter interactions, and nuclear equations of state and reaction kinetics. Ab initio modeling of core-collapse supernovae and their nucleosynthetic outcomes requires care in the coupling and approximations of the physical components. We have built our multi-physics CHIMERA code for supernova modeling in 1-, 2-, and 3-D, using ray-by-ray neutrino transport, approximate general relativity, and detailed neutrino and nuclear physics. We discuss some early results from our current series of exploding 2D simulations and our work to perform computationally tractable simulations in 3D using the ``Yin--Yang'' grid.

  1. Bayesian reconstruction of gravitational wave burst signals from simulations of rotating stellar core collapse and bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Roever, Christian; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Christensen, Nelson; Dimmelmeier, Harald; Heng, Ik Siong; Meyer, Renate

    2009-11-15

    Presented in this paper is a technique that we propose for extracting the physical parameters of a rotating stellar core collapse from the observation of the associated gravitational wave signal from the collapse and core bounce. Data from interferometric gravitational wave detectors can be used to provide information on the mass of the progenitor model, precollapse rotation, and the nuclear equation of state. We use waveform libraries provided by the latest numerical simulations of rotating stellar core collapse models in general relativity, and from them create an orthogonal set of eigenvectors using principal component analysis. Bayesian inference techniques are then used to reconstruct the associated gravitational wave signal that is assumed to be detected by an interferometric detector. Posterior probability distribution functions are derived for the amplitudes of the principal component analysis eigenvectors, and the pulse arrival time. We show how the reconstructed signal and the principal component analysis eigenvector amplitude estimates may provide information on the physical parameters associated with the core collapse event.

  2. Numerical simulations of stellar collapse in scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Sperhake, Ulrich; Ott, Christian D.

    2016-07-01

    We present numerical-relativity simulations of spherically symmetric core collapse and compact-object formation in scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The additional scalar degree of freedom introduces a propagating monopole gravitational-wave mode. Detection of monopole scalar waves with current and future gravitational-wave experiments may constitute smoking gun evidence for strong-field modifications of general relativity. We collapse both polytropic and more realistic pre-supernova profiles using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme and an approximate prescription for the nuclear equation of state. The most promising sources of scalar radiation are protoneutron stars collapsing to black holes. In case of a galactic core collapse event forming a black hole, Advanced LIGO may be able to place independent constraints on the parameters of the theory at a level comparable to current solar-system and binary-pulsar measurements. In the region of the parameter space admitting spontaneously scalarised stars, transition to configurations with prominent scalar hair before black-hole formation further enhances the emitted signal. Although a more realistic treatment of the microphysics is necessary to fully investigate the occurrence of spontaneous scalarisation of neutron star remnants, we speculate that formation of such objects could constrain the parameters of the theory beyond the current bounds obtained with solar-system and binary-pulsar experiments.

  3. Impact of the third dimension on simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Bruenn, Stephen W.; Hix, William R.; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Blondin, John M.; Endeve, Eirik; Harris, James Austin; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has been an ongoing challenge to produce explosions that resemble observed supernovae, hampered by availability of appropriate computational resources and codes. For example, the most successful and complete CCSN simulations have been limited to axisymmetry (2D), which alters the behaviors of fluid flows and potentially the simulation outcome. Using a sophisticated 3D simulation from a 15 M⊙ progenitor computed using the Chimera code with appropriate physical detail, we show a delay in the revival of the stalled accretion shock and the development of the explosion energy relative to a comparison 2D simulation. We consider the physical and numerical origins of the differences between 2D and 3D simulations and their long-term impacts on simulation outcomes; and the prospects for the future.

  4. 1-D DSMC simulation of Io's atmospheric collapse and reformation during and after eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. H.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Stewart, B.

    2009-06-01

    A one-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model is used to examine the effects of a non-condensable species on Io's sulfur dioxide sublimation atmosphere during eclipse and just after egress. Since the vapor pressure of SO 2 is extremely sensitive to temperature, the frost-supported dayside sublimation atmosphere had generally been expected to collapse during eclipse as the surface temperature dropped. For a pure SO 2 atmosphere, however, it was found that during the first 10 min of eclipse, essentially no change in the atmospheric properties occurs at altitudes above ˜100 km due to the finite ballistic/acoustic time. Hence immediately after ingress the auroral emission morphology above 100 km should resemble that of the immediate pre-eclipse state. Furthermore, the collapse dynamics are found to be greatly altered by the presence of even a small amount of a non-condensable species which forms a diffusion layer near the surface that prevents rapid collapse. It is found that after 10 min essentially no collapse has occurred at altitudes above ˜20 km when a nominal mole fraction of non-condensable gas is present. Collapse near the surface occurs relatively quickly until a static diffusion layer many mean free paths thick of the non-condensable gas builds up which then retards further collapse of the SO 2 atmosphere. For example, for an initial surface temperature of 110 K and 35% non-condensable mole-fraction, the ratio of the SO 2 column density to the initial column density was found to be 0.73 after 10 min, 0.50 after 30 min, and 0.18 at the end of eclipse. However, real gas species (SO, O 2) may not be perfectly non-condensable at Io's surface temperatures. If the gas species was even weakly condensable (non-zero sticking/reaction coefficient) then the effect of the diffusion layer on the dynamics was dramatically reduced. In fact, if the sticking coefficient of the non-condensable exceeds ˜0.25, the collapse dynamics are effectively the same as

  5. Thermal-Structural Analysis of the MacArthur Maze Freeway Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C R; Wemhoff, A P; McMichael, L D

    2008-02-26

    At approximately 3:41 AM on the morning of April 29, 2007, a tractor-trailer rig carrying 8,600 gallons (32.6 m{sup 3}) of fuel overturned on Interstate 880 in Oakland, CA. The resultant fire weakened the surrounding steel superstructure and caused a 50-yard (45.7 m) long section of the above connecting ramp from Interstate 80 to Interstate 580 to fail in approximately 18 minutes. In this study, we performed a loosely-coupled thermal-structural finite element analysis of the freeway using the LLNL Engineering codes NIKE3D, DYNA3D and TOPAZ3D. First, we applied an implicit structural code to statically initialize the stresses and displacements in the roadway at ambient conditions due to gravity loading. Next, we performed a thermal analysis by approximating the tanker fire as a moving box region of uniform temperature. This approach allowed for feasible calculation of the fire-to-structure radiative view factors and convective heat transport. We used a mass scaling methodology in the thermal analysis to reduce the overall simulation time so an explicit structural analysis could be used, which provided a more computationally efficient simulation of structural failure. Our approach showed structural failure of both spans due to thermal softening under gravity loading at approximately 20 minutes for a fixed fire temperature of 1200 C and fixed thermal properties. When temperature-dependent thermal properties were applied, the south and north spans collapsed at approximately 10 minutes and 16 minutes, respectively. Finally, we performed a preliminary fully-coupled analysis of the system using the new LLNL implicit multi-mechanics code Diablo. Our investigation shows that our approach provides a reasonable first-order analysis of the system, but improved modeling of the transport properties and the girder-box beam connections is required for more accurate predictions.

  6. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION OF PROTO-STELLAR COLLAPSE: TWO-COMPONENT MOLECULAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Ohsuga, Ken; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: masahiro.machida@nao.ac.jp E-mail: matsu@hosei.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We perform a three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) simulation with self-gravity to study the early phase of the low-mass star formation process from a rotating molecular cloud core to a first adiabatic core just before the second collapse begins. Radiation transfer is implemented with the flux-limited diffusion approximation, operator-splitting, and implicit time integrator. In the RMHD simulation, the outer region of the first core attains a higher entropy and its size is larger than that in the magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the barotropic approximation. Bipolar molecular outflow consisting of two components is driven by magnetic Lorentz force via different mechanisms, and shock heating by the outflow is observed. Using the RMHD simulation we can predict and interpret the observed properties of star-forming clouds, first cores, and outflows with millimeter/submillimeter radio interferometers, especially the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.

  7. The influence of inelastic neutrino interactions with light clusters on core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-12-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light clusters in hot nuclear matter on core-collapse supernova simulations. These interactions have been neglected in most hydrodynamical supernova simulations. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged- current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ~ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light clusters have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light clusters, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  8. Relationship between chain collapse and secondary structure formation in a partially folded protein.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kanako; Yamada, Yoshiteru; Matsumura, Yoshitaka; Tsukamoto, Seiichi; Yamamoto-Ohtomo, Mio; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Okabe, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Ikeguchi, Masamichi

    2014-06-01

    Chain collapse and secondary structure formation are frequently observed during the early stages of protein folding. Is the chain collapse brought about by interactions between secondary structure units or is it due to polymer behavior in a poor solvent (coil-globule transition)? To answer this question, we measured small-angle X-ray scattering for a series of β-lactoglobulin mutants under conditions in which they assume a partially folded state analogous to the folding intermediates. Mutants that were designed to disrupt the secondary structure units showed the gyration radii similar to that of the wild type protein, indicating that chain collapse is due to coil-globule transitions. PMID:25100622

  9. Radiation Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Protostellar Collapse: Nonideal Magnetohydrodynamic Effects and Early Formation of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2015-03-01

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  10. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse with application to vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran

    Shockwave lithotripsy is a noninvasive medical procedure wherein shockwaves are repeatedly focused at the location of kidney stones in order to pulverize them. Stone comminution is thought to be the product of two mechanisms: the propagation of stress waves within the stone and cavitation erosion. However, the latter mechanism has also been implicated in vascular injury. In the present work, shock-induced bubble collapse is studied in order to understand the role that it might play in inducing vascular injury. A high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing numerical scheme is developed to simulate the three-dimensional collapse of the bubble in both the free-field and inside a vessel phantom. The primary contributions of the numerical study are the characterization of the shock-bubble and shock-bubble-vessel interactions across a large parameter space that includes clinical shockwave lithotripsy pressure amplitudes, problem geometry and tissue viscoelasticity, and the subsequent correlation of these interactions to vascular injury. Specifically, measurements of the vessel wall pressures and displacements, as well as the finite strains in the fluid surrounding the bubble, are utilized with available experiments in tissue to evaluate damage potential. Estimates are made of the smallest injurious bubbles in the microvasculature during both the collapse and jetting phases of the bubble's life cycle. The present results suggest that bubbles larger than one micrometer in diameter could rupture blood vessels under clinical SWL conditions.

  11. Structures and characterizations of bundles of collapsed double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, X H; Wang, R; Liu, L B; Kang, M; Wen, Y Y; Hou, F; Feng, J M; Li, Y L

    2012-12-21

    The performance of carbon nanotube fibers (CNTFs) significantly depends on the packing styles of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. Revealing the structures and characterizations of CNT bundles is contributive to understanding the structures, properties and even the formation of CNTFs during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing. In this paper, bundles consisting of collapsed double-walled carbon nanotubes (CDWNT) in continuous CNTFs fabricated from CVD processing were characterized and analyzed by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM observations show that the continuous CNTFs are composed of CDWNT-bundle units. CDWNT-bundle units of 10-20 nm in thickness contain near numbers of collapsed tubes. The degree of collapse of the CDWNTs varies with their location in the bundle and their own diameter. CDWNT-bundle units pack side by side or face to face, assembling into super-bundles with diameters of 200-300 nm. XRD patterns show that three novel and strong peaks appear at 10°-15°, 21.3° and 23.7°, respectively, corresponding to CDWNT two side pores (10°-15°) and CDWNT layers (21.3° and 23.7°), which indicates the collapsed tube structures in CNTFs are common characterizations. Finally, a collapse mechanism is discussed from the observation and analysis. PMID:23196759

  12. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Hempel, M.; Liebendoerfer, M.; Fischer, T.; Schaffner-Bielich, J.

    2012-03-20

    We discuss three new equations of state (EOS) in core-collapse supernova simulations. The new EOS are based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich (HS), which includes excluded volume effects and relativistic mean-field (RMF) interactions. We consider the RMF parameterizations TM1, TMA, and FSUgold. These EOS are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results obtained for the new EOS are compared with the widely used EOS of H. Shen et al. and Lattimer and Swesty. The systematic comparison shows that the model description of inhomogeneous nuclear matter is as important as the parameterization of the nuclear interactions for the supernova dynamics and the neutrino signal. Furthermore, several new aspects of nuclear physics are investigated: the HS EOS contains distributions of nuclei, including nuclear shell effects. The appearance of light nuclei, e.g., deuterium and tritium, is also explored, which can become as abundant as alphas and free protons. In addition, we investigate the black hole formation in failed core-collapse supernovae, which is mainly determined by the high-density EOS. We find that temperature effects lead to a systematically faster collapse for the non-relativistic LS EOS in comparison with the RMF EOS. We deduce a new correlation for the time until black hole formation, which allows the determination of the maximum mass of proto-neutron stars, if the neutrino signal from such a failed supernova would be measured in the future. This would give a constraint for the nuclear EOS at finite entropy, complementary to observations of cold neutron stars.

  13. Axisymmetric collapse simulations of rotating massive stellar cores in full general relativity: Numerical study for prompt black hole formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Yu-ichirou; Shibata, Masaru

    2005-04-15

    We perform axisymmetric simulations for gravitational collapse of a massive iron core to a black hole in full general relativity. The iron cores are modeled by {gamma}=4/3 equilibrium polytrope for simplicity. The hydrodynamic equations are solved using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme with a parametric equation of state. The Cartoon method is adopted for solving the Einstein equations. Simulations are performed for a wide variety of initial conditions changing the mass ({approx_equal}2.0-3.0M{sub {center_dot}}), the angular momentum, the rotational velocity profile of the core, and the parameters of the equations of state which are chosen so that the maximum mass of the cold spherical polytrope is {approx_equal}1.6M{sub {center_dot}}. Then, the criterion for the prompt black hole formation is clarified in terms of the mass and the angular momentum for several rotational velocity profile of the core and equations of state. It is found that (i) with the increase of the thermal energy generated by shocks, the threshold mass for the prompt black hole formation is increased by 20-40%, (ii) the rotational centrifugal force increases the threshold mass by < or approx. 25%, (iii) with the increase of the degree of differential rotation, the threshold mass is also increased, and (iv) the amplification factors shown in the results (i)-(iii) depend sensitively on the equation of state. We also find that the collapse dynamics and the structure of the shock formed at the bounce depend strongly on the stiffness of the adopted equation of state. In particular, as a new feature, a strong bipolar explosion is observed for the collapse of rapidly rotating iron cores with an equation of state which is stiff in subnuclear density and soft in supranuclear density. Gravitational waves are computed in terms of a quadrupole formula. It is also found that the waveform depends sensitively on the equations of state.

  14. Neutrino-pair emission from nuclear de-excitation in core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Langanke, K.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2013-12-01

    We study the impact of neutrino-pair production from the de-excitation of highly excited heavy nuclei on core-collapse supernova simulations, following the evolution up to several 100 ms after core bounce. Our study is based on the agile-boltztransupernova code, which features general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and accurate three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry. In our simulations the nuclear de-excitation process is described in two different ways. At first we follow the approach proposed by Fuller and Meyer [Astrophys. J.AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/170317 376, 701 (1991)], which is based on strength functions derived in the framework of the nuclear Fermi-gas model of noninteracting nucleons. Second, we parametrize the allowed and forbidden strength distributions in accordance with measurements for selected nuclear ground states. We determine the de-excitation strength by applying the Brink hypothesis and detailed balance. For both approaches, we find that nuclear de-excitation has no effect on the supernova dynamics. However, we find that nuclear de-excitation is the leading source for the production of electron antineutrinos as well as heavy-lepton-flavor (anti)neutrinos during the collapse phase. At sufficiently high densities, the associated neutrino spectra are influenced by interactions with the surrounding matter, making proper simulations of neutrino transport important for the determination of the neutrino-energy loss rate. We find that, even including nuclear de-excitations, the energy loss during the collapse phase is overwhelmingly dominated by electron neutrinos produced by electron capture.

  15. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  16. Fully Relativistic Simulations of the Merger and Collapse of Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Hirschman, E. W.; Lehner, L.; Liebling, S. L.; Neilsen, D.; Palenzuela, C.; Tohline, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    We present simulations of the inspiral, merger and eventual collapse of neutron star binaries calculated in full general relativity. The Einstein equations are solved in a first order reduction of the general harmonic formulation while the matter is evolved with a relativistic MHD code though magnetic fields are absent in the simulations presented here. We use the adaptive mesh refinement package HAD to resolve the disparate length scales in the problem ranging from the radiation zone down to the internal dynamics of the neutron stars. We will briefly highlight our results for the gravitational radiation waveform as well as the evolution of angular momentum in the rotationally-supported, merged object that eventually collapses. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311, and in part through NASA's ATP program grants NAG5-8497, NAG5-13430 and NNX07AG84G. The computations were performed on Pelican which is supported by LSU's High Performance Computing group, Marylou4 at BYU and with Teragrid resources.

  17. Quantifying Earthquake Collapse Risk of Tall Steel Braced Frame Buildings Using Rupture-to-Rafters Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourhatch, Ramses

    This thesis examines collapse risk of tall steel braced frame buildings using rupture-to-rafters simulations due to suite of San Andreas earthquakes. Two key advancements in this work are the development of (i) a rational methodology for assigning scenario earthquake probabilities and (ii) an artificial correction-free approach to broadband ground motion simulation. The work can be divided into the following sections: earthquake source modeling, earthquake probability calculations, ground motion simulations, building response, and performance analysis. As a first step the kinematic source inversions of past earthquakes in the magnitude range of 6-8 are used to simulate 60 scenario earthquakes on the San Andreas fault. For each scenario earthquake a 30-year occurrence probability is calculated and we present a rational method to redistribute the forecast earthquake probabilities from UCERF to the simulated scenario earthquake. We illustrate the inner workings of the method through an example involving earthquakes on the San Andreas fault in southern California. Next, three-component broadband ground motion histories are computed at 636 sites in the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area by superposing short-period (0.2s-2.0s) empirical Green's function synthetics on top of long-period (> 2.0s) spectral element synthetics. We superimpose these seismograms on low-frequency seismograms, computed from kinematic source models using the spectral element method, to produce broadband seismograms. Using the ground motions at 636 sites for the 60 scenario earthquakes, 3-D nonlinear analysis of several variants of an 18-story steel braced frame building, designed for three soil types using the 1994 and 1997 Uniform Building Code provisions and subjected to these ground motions, are conducted. Model performance is classified into one of five performance levels: Immediate Occupancy, Life Safety, Collapse Prevention, Red-Tagged, and Model Collapse. The results are combined with

  18. Geophysical signatures of collapsed paleokarst structures in the Upper Miocene reefal complex of Mallorca (Balearic Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Albert; Himi, Mahjoub; Lovera, Raúl; Fornòs, Joan; Montes-Egito, Lucila; Evangelista-Teixeira, Washington; de Medeiro-Souza, Anderson; Casado, Ismael; Pinheiro-Lima Filho, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Collapsed paleokarst structures of Mallorca Island represent one of the best examples of collapsed paleocaves because of the good outcrops existing along sea cliffs. These structures have been produced by roof collapse of caverns developed in the underlying reefal complex. Coalesced systems of collapsed paleocaves form an important class of carbonate reservoirs that have arisen from shallow karst processes, followed by collapse, burial and diagenesis. These paleokarts structures are characterised by highly irregular subsurface conditions and for better defining their structure different geophysical methods have been tested over well-defined models exposed in a coastal cliff. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles were acquired using a Wenner-Schlumberger array and electrodes 2m apart. Inverted resistivity sections show high contrasted electrical properties between different sedimentary facies, ranging from low resistivity values (< 40 ohm•m) for clayey infill sediments to high resistivity values (> 1000 ohm•m) for high porosity breccias. Ground probing radar (GPR) profiles were recorded along the same lines using a constant-offset a station spacing of 0.2 m, with an antenna of 50 MHz of dominant frequency. The total recording time window was 500 ns at a sample interval of 1600 ps. These parameters were determined by a series of tests prior to the main acquisition. Different GPR facies have been recognized. Finally, seismic refraction profiles were recorded in order to define the geometry and distribution of seismic velocities of the models along the same profiles. This geophysical investigation demonstrates that the combination of detailed geological (sedimentology, geomorphology, structural geology…) with high resolution geophysical techniques yields the best results for characterizing such geologically complex structures.

  19. On the Requirements for Realistic Modeling of Neutrino Transport in Simulations of Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically-symmetric, general-relativistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general-relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using older weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus up-to-date weak interactions; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has non-negligible effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Finally, we discuss the impact these results have for current, and future, multidimensional models.

  20. Performance of tuned mass damper against structural collapse due to near fault earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domizio, Martín; Ambrosini, Daniel; Curadelli, Oscar

    2015-02-01

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) are devices capable of reducing structural vibration by means of transferring energy from the protected structure to the control device. This vibration control strategy has relatively recent use in civil structures, and was proven effective against wind and far-fault earthquakes. In this paper, the effect of near-fault seismic records on structures with TMDs is studied. This type of seismic records has a short significant duration, with few pulses of high amplitude and low frequency. These characteristics raise a question about TMD performance against this type of earthquakes because the device has a very limited time to transfer the energy from the main structure. In this paper, the efficiency of TMD in preventing the collapse of a structure subjected to a series of near-fault records is analyzed. The structure used is a 4-story steel frame on which TMDs with different values of mass are incorporated. From a series of nonlinear dynamic analyses, where the scale of seismic records is modified, the minimum amplitude of each record that produces the structural collapse is found. By comparing the results of the structure with and without the addition of the control device, conclusions about its performance and capability in the prevention of collapse are established.

  1. Extensional tectonics and collapse structures in the Suez Rift (Egypt)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenet, P. Y.; Colletta, B.; Desforges, G.; Ousset, E.; Zaghloul, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Suez Rift is a 300 km long and 50 to 80 km wide basin which cuts a granitic and metamorphic shield of Precambrian age, covered by sediments of Paleozoic to Paleogene age. The rift structure is dominated by tilted blocks bounded by NW-SE normal faults. The reconstruction of the paleostresses indicates a N 050 extension during the whole stage of rifting. Rifting began 24 My ago with dikes intrusions; main faulting and subsidence occurred during Early Miocene producing a 80 km wide basin (Clysmic Gulf). During Pliocene and Quaternary times, faulting is still active but subsidence is restricted to a narrower area (Present Gulf). On the Eastern margin of the gulf, two sets of fault trends are predominant: (1) N 140 to 150 E faults parallel to the gulf trend with pure dip-slip displacement; and (2) cross faults, oriented NOO to N 30 E that have a strike-slip component consistent with the N 050 E distensive stress regime. The mean dip cross fault is steeper (70 to 80 deg) than the dip of the faults parallel to the Gulf (30 to 70 deg). These two sets of fault define diamond shaped tilted block. The difference of mechanical behavior between the basement rocks and the overlying sedimentary cover caused structural disharmony and distinct fault geometries.

  2. Molecular-dynamics simulations of void collapse in shocked model-molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintmire, J. W.; Robertson, D. H.; White, C. T.

    1994-06-01

    We have carried out a series of molecular-dynamics simulations on a model three-dimensional molecular solid to study the dynamics of shock-induced collapse of void defects. Molecular-dynamics methods were used for a model system of identical particles arranged as diatomic molecules aligned with the center of mass of each molecule at fcc lattice sites, using a \\{111\\} layering for the two-dimensional boundary conditions. The diatoms were internally coupled via a harmonic potential; all other interactions were modeled with Morse potentials between all particles other than the immediate diatomic partner. Using this model, we have investigated the effect of a cylindrical void at right angles to the direction of layering (and impact). Depending on the strength of the incident shock wave, the void is found to collapse either smoothly and symmetrically (like a balloon gradually losing air), or asymmetrically and turbulently. In the latter case, we note the transient formation (for periods of several hundreds of femtoseconds) of ``hot spots'' at the void location both in terms of the local effective temperature and the vibrational energies of the diatoms.

  3. Mathematical simulation of one-dimensional dam-collapse flow over wetted bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medkour, D.; Kadja, M.

    2003-05-01

    A mathematical model is described and applied to simulate sudden total one-dimensional dam-break flow over wetted bed. The dam collapse takes place in a rough sloping non-prismatic channel of various cross-sections. The water parameters to be instantaneously calculated are the height h, the discharge Q, the mean velocity u and the pressure force P. The mentioned flow is governed by the Saint-Venant shallow water equations and the computation process, on the basis of rectangular grid of points, consists of two complementary solutions: (a) at the first instant after the collapse, an analytical procedure is considered. The calculated parameters are taken as initial values in the water stream embraced by the flood wave. Outside this zone, initial conditions are those which preexist before the rupture. (b) Beyond this time, a numerical computation is carried out by using an iterative explicit method of characteristics. (c) Every time stage of calculation starts by determining the discontinuity (wave front) parameters namely its abscissa x_δ, height h_δ, celerity c_δ and alert delay t_δ. The former is the discontinuity arrival time at considered station. Typical results are obtained and compared with similar ones already published by others in the literature.

  4. Axisymmetric general relativistic simulations of the accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, E. B.; Ott, C. D.; Rezzolla, L.; Dessart, L.; Dimmelmeier, H.; Marek, A.; Janka, H.-T.

    2010-02-15

    The accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a white dwarf may lead to the formation of a protoneutron star and a collapse-driven supernova explosion. This process represents a path alternative to thermonuclear disruption of accreting white dwarfs in type Ia supernovae. In the AIC scenario, the supernova explosion energy is expected to be small and the resulting transient short-lived, making it hard to detect by electromagnetic means alone. Neutrino and gravitational-wave (GW) observations may provide crucial information necessary to reveal a potential AIC. Motivated by the need for systematic predictions of the GW signature of AIC, we present results from an extensive set of general-relativistic AIC simulations using a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and an approximate treatment of deleptonization during collapse. Investigating a set of 114 progenitor models in axisymmetric rotational equilibrium, with a wide range of rotational configurations, temperatures and central densities, and resulting white dwarf masses, we extend previous Newtonian studies and find that the GW signal has a generic shape akin to what is known as a 'type III' signal in the literature. Despite this reduction to a single type of waveform, we show that the emitted GWs carry information that can be used to constrain the progenitor and the postbounce rotation. We discuss the detectability of the emitted GWs, showing that the signal-to-noise ratio for current or next-generation interferometer detectors could be high enough to detect such events in our Galaxy. Furthermore, we contrast the GW signals of AIC and rotating massive star iron core collapse and find that they can be distinguished, but only if the distance to the source is known and a detailed reconstruction of the GW time series from detector data is possible. Some of our AIC models form massive quasi-Keplerian accretion disks after bounce. The disk mass is very sensitive to progenitor mass and angular momentum

  5. Estimating the collapse of aggregated fine soil structure in a mountainous forested catchment.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Goro; Shinoda, Seirou; Golosov, Valentin; Chalov, Sergey; Shiiba, Michiharu; Hori, Tomoharu; Oki, Taikan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the relationship of forest soil dryness and antecedent rainfall with suspended sediment (SS) yield due to extreme rainfall events and how this relationship affects the survival of forest plants. Several phenomena contribute to this relationship: increasing evaporation (amount of water vapour discharged from soil) due to increasing air temperature, decreasing moisture content in the soil, the collapse of aggregates of fine soil particles, and the resulting effects on forest plants. To clarify the relationships among climate variation, the collapse of soil particle aggregates, and rainfall-runoff processes, a numerical model was developed to reproduce such aggregate collapse in detail. The validity of the numerical model was confirmed by its application to the granitic mountainous catchment of the Nagara River basin in Japan and by comparison with observational data. The simulation suggests that important problems, such as the collapse of forest plants in response to decreases in soil moisture content and antecedent rainfall, will arise if air temperature continues to increase. PMID:24055411

  6. Probabilistic Modeling of Landfill Subsidence Introduced by Buried Structure Collapse - 13229

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, Kevin; Soong, Te-Yang

    2013-07-01

    The long-term reliability of land disposal facility final cover systems - and therefore the overall waste containment - depends on the distortions imposed on these systems by differential settlement/subsidence. The evaluation of differential settlement is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the waste mass and buried structure placement. Deterministic approaches to long-term final cover settlement prediction are not able to capture the spatial variability in the waste mass and sub-grade properties, especially discontinuous inclusions, which control differential settlement. An alternative is to use a probabilistic model to capture the non-uniform collapse of cover soils and buried structures and the subsequent effect of that collapse on the final cover system. Both techniques are applied to the problem of two side-by-side waste trenches with collapsible voids. The results show how this analytical technique can be used to connect a metric of final cover performance (inundation area) to the susceptibility of the sub-grade to collapse and the effective thickness of the cover soils. This approach allows designers to specify cover thickness, reinforcement, and slope to meet the demands imposed by the settlement of the underlying waste trenches. (authors)

  7. Structural mechanics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biffle, Johnny H.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory has a very broad structural capability. Work has been performed in support of reentry vehicles, nuclear reactor safety, weapons systems and components, nuclear waste transport, strategic petroleum reserve, nuclear waste storage, wind and solar energy, drilling technology, and submarine programs. The analysis environment contains both commercial and internally developed software. Included are mesh generation capabilities, structural simulation codes, and visual codes for examining simulation results. To effectively simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena, a large number of constitutive models have been developed.

  8. Three dimensional core-collapse supernova simulated using a 15 M⊙ progenitor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lentz, Eric J.; Bruenn, Stephen W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M.; Harris, J. Austin; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N.

    2015-07-10

    We have performed ab initio neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations in three and two spatial dimensions (3D and 2D) of core-collapse supernovae from the same 15 M⊙ progenitor through 440 ms after core bounce. Both 3D and 2D models achieve explosions; however, the onset of explosion (shock revival) is delayed by ~100 ms in 3D relative to the 2D counterpart and the growth of the diagnostic explosion energy is slower. This is consistent with previously reported 3D simulations utilizing iron-core progenitors with dense mantles. In the ~100 ms before the onset of explosion, diagnostics of neutrino heating and turbulent kinetic energymore » favor earlier explosion in 2D. During the delay, the angular scale of convective plumes reaching the shock surface grows and explosion in 3D is ultimately lead by a single, large-angle plume, giving the expanding shock a directional orientation not dissimilar from those imposed by axial symmetry in 2D simulations. Finally, we posit that shock revival and explosion in the 3D simulation may be delayed until sufficiently large plumes form, whereas such plumes form more rapidly in 2D, permitting earlier explosions.« less

  9. A method for numerical relativity: Simulation of axisymmetric gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. R., II

    A method is presented which allows fully self-consistent numerical simulation of asymptotically flat axisymmetric nonrotating general relativistic systems. These techniques have been developed to model and understand resulting relativistic effects in gravitational core collapse and gravitational radiation generation. Both vacuum (Brill) spacetimes and matter-filled configurations can be treated. The (3 + 1) decomposition of Arnowitt, Deser and Misner is used to write general relativity in a dynamical form. The conformal approach, including the transverse-traceless decomposition of extrinsic curvature due to York, is used to solve the initial value problem. In addition, these techniques are extended to provide a fully constrained evolution scheme. Several new boundary conditions, applied at large but finite radius, are derived for the elliptic constraint equations. This method uses a simplifying three-gauge, placing the metric in quasi-isotropic form.

  10. Near Real-time Data Analysis of Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations With Bellerophon

    SciTech Connect

    Lingerfelt, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Desai, Sharvari S; Holt, Chastity A; Lentz, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of a software system, Bellerophon, built to support a production-level HPC application called CHIMERA, which simulates core-collapse supernova events at the petascale. Developed over the last four years, Bellerophon enables CHIMERA s geographically dispersed team of collaborators to perform data analysis in near real-time. Its n-tier architecture provides an encapsulated, end-to-end software solution that enables the CHIMERA team to quickly and easily access highly customizable animated and static views of results from anywhere in the world via a web-deliverable, cross-platform desktop application. In addition, Bellerophon addresses software engineering tasks for the CHIMERA team by providing an automated mechanism for performing regression testing on a variety of supercomputing platforms. Elements of the team s workflow management needs are met with software tools that dynamically generate code repository statistics, access important online resources, and monitor the current status of several supercomputing resources.

  11. Inner Structure of Protostellar Collapse Candidate B335 Derived from Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Daniel W. A.; Wilner, David J.; Myers, Philip C.; Tafalla, Mario; Mardones, Diego

    2003-02-01

    We present a study of the density structure of the protostellar collapse candidate B335 using continuum observations from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer made at wavelengths of 1.2 and 3.0 mm. We analyze these data, which probe spatial scales from 5000 to 500 AU, directly in the visibility domain by comparison with synthetic observations constructed from models that assume different physical conditions. This approach allows for much more stringent constraints to be derived from the data than from analysis of images. A single radial power law in density provides a good description of the data, with a best-fit power-law density index p=1.65+/-0.05. Through simulations, we quantify the sensitivity of this result to various model uncertainties, including assumptions of temperature distribution, outer boundary, dust opacity spectral index, and an unresolved central component. The largest uncertainty comes from the unknown presence of a centralized point source. The maximal point source, with 1.2 mm flux of F=12+/-7 mJy, reduces the power-law density index to p=1.47+/-0.07. The remaining sources of systematic uncertainty, of which the most important is the radial dependence of the temperature distribution, likely contribute a total uncertainty at the level of δp<~0.2. Taking into account the uncertainties, we find strong evidence that the power-law index of the density distribution within 5000 AU is significantly less than the value at larger radii, close to 2.0, from previous studies of dust emission and extinction. Images made from the data show clear departures from spherical symmetry, with the globule being slightly extended perpendicular to the outflow axis. The inclusion of a crude model of the outflow as a hollow bipolar cone of constant opening angle improves the fit and leaves the resulting density power-law index unchanged. These results conform well to the generic paradigm of isolated, low-mass star formation, which predicts a power-law density index

  12. Campaign 2 Level 2 Milestone Review 2009: Milestone # 3131 Grain Scale Simulation of Pore Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J

    2009-09-28

    The milestone reviewed on Sept. 16, 2009 was 'High-fidelity simulation of shock initiation of high explosives at the grain scale using coupled hydrodynamics, thermal transport and chemistry'. It is the opinion of the committee that the team has satisfied the milestone. A detailed description of how the goals were met is provided. The milestone leveraged capabilities from ASC Physics and Engineering Materials program combined with experimental input from Campaign 2. A combined experimental-multiscale simulation approach was used to create and validate the various TATB model components. At the lowest length scale, quantum chemical calculations were used to determine equations of state, thermal transport properties and reaction rates for TATB as it is decomposing. High-pressure experiments conducted in diamond anvil cells, gas guns and the Z machine were used to validate the EOS, thermal conductivity, specific heat and predictions of water formation. The predicted reaction networks and chemical kinetic equations were implemented in Cheetah and validated against the lower length scale data. Cheetah was then used within the ASC code ALE3D for high-resolution, thermo-mechanically coupled simulations of pore collapse at the micron size scale to predict conditions for detonation initiation.

  13. 4. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE LOOKING UP TOWARD COLLAPSED ADIT/WOODEN STRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE LOOKING UP TOWARD COLLAPSED ADIT/WOODEN STRUCTURE AND BOXES IN TREES FAR RIGHT. WOOD, METAL FLUME AND WASTE ROCK ARE VISIBLE ON THE LEFT. STREAM BED IS IN MID-RIGHT. UPPER TAILINGS IN LOWER RIGHT. CAMERA POINTED NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  14. High-resolution three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae in multiple progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.; O'Connor, Evan P.

    2014-04-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are granting new insight into the as-yet-uncertain mechanism that drives successful explosions. While there is still debate about whether explosions are obtained more easily in 3D than in 2D, it is undeniable that there exist qualitative and quantitative differences between the results of 3D and 2D simulations. We present an extensive set of high-resolution 1D, 2D, and 3D CCSN simulations with multispecies neutrino leakage carried out in two different progenitors. Our simulations confirm the results of Couch indicating that 2D explodes more readily than 3D. We argue that this is due to the inadequacies of 2D to accurately capture important aspects of the 3D dynamics. We find that without artificially enhancing the neutrino heating rate, we do not obtain explosions in 3D. We examine the development of neutrino-driven convection and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and find that, in separate regimes, either instability can dominate. We find evidence for growth of the SASI for both 15 M {sub ☉} and 27 M {sub ☉} progenitors; however, it is weaker in 3D exploding models. The growth rate of both instabilities is artificially enhanced along the symmetry axis in 2D as compared with our axis-free 3D Cartesian simulations. Our work highlights the growing consensus that CCSNe must be studied in 3D if we hope to solve the mystery of how the explosions are powered.

  15. Local Simulations of the Magnetorotational Instability in Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Sano, Takayoshi

    2012-11-01

    Bearing in mind the application of core-collapse supernovae, we study the nonlinear properties of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of three-dimensional simulations in the framework of a local shearing box approximation. By systematically changing the shear rates that symbolize the degree of differential rotation in nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs), we derive a scaling relation between the turbulent stress sustained by the MRI and the shear-vorticity ratio. Our parametric survey shows a power-law scaling between the turbulent stress (langlangw totrangrang) and the shear-vorticity ratio (gq ) as langlangw totrangrangvpropg δ q with an index of δ ~ 0.5. The MRI-amplified magnetic energy has a similar scaling relative to the turbulent stress, while the Maxwell stress has a slightly smaller power-law index (~0.36). By modeling the effect of viscous heating rates from MRI turbulence, we show that the stronger magnetic fields, or the larger shear rates initially imposed, lead to higher dissipation rates. For a rapidly rotating PNS with a spin period in milliseconds and with strong magnetic fields of 1015 G, the energy dissipation rate is estimated to exceed 1051 erg s-1. Our results suggest that the conventional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is likely to be affected by MRI-driven turbulence, which we speculate, on the one hand, could harm the MHD-driven explosions due to the dissipation of the shear rotational energy at the PNS surface; or, on the other hand, its energy deposition might be potentially favorable for the working of the neutrino-heating mechanism.

  16. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Bruenn, Stephen W. E-mail: mezzacappaa@ornl.gov

    2012-03-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  17. Multimessenger signals of long-term core-collapse supernova simulations: synergetic observation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ko; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Tanaka, Masaomi; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-09-01

    The next Galactic supernova is expected to bring great opportunities for the direct detection of gravitational waves (GW), full flavour neutrinos, and multiwavelength photons. To maximize the science return from such a rare event, it is essential to have established classes of possible situations and preparations for appropriate observations. To this end, we use a long-term numerical simulation of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) of a 17 M⊙ red supergiant progenitor to self-consistently model the multimessenger signals expected in GW, neutrino, and electromagnetic messengers. This supernova model takes into account the formation and evolution of a protoneutron star, neutrino-matter interaction, and neutrino transport, all within a two-dimensional shock hydrodynamics simulation. With this, we separately discuss three situations: (i) a CCSN at the Galactic Center, (ii) an extremely nearby CCSN within hundreds of parsecs, and (iii) a CCSN in nearby galaxies within several Mpc. These distance regimes necessitate different strategies for synergistic observations. In a Galactic CCSN, neutrinos provide strategic timing and pointing information. We explore how these in turn deliver an improvement in the sensitivity of GW analyses and help to guarantee observations of early electromagnetic signals. To facilitate the detection of multimessenger signals of CCSNe in extremely nearby and extragalactic distances, we compile a list of nearby red supergiant candidates and a list of nearby galaxies with their expected CCSN rates. By exploring the sequential multimessenger signals of a nearby CCSN, we discuss preparations for maximizing successful studies of such an unprecedented stirring event.

  18. Ion acoustic wave collapse via two-ion wave decay: 2D Vlasov simulation and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) via two-ion wave decay may transfer energy from the electric field of the IAWs to the particles, resulting in a significant heating of resonant particles. This process has previously been shown in numerical simulations to decrease the plasma reflectivity due to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Two-ion wave decay is a fundamental property of ion acoustic waves that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to inertial confinement fusion experiments, and can lead to a sudden collapse of IAWs. The treatment of all species kinetically, and in particular the electrons, is required to describe the decay process correctly. We present fully kinetic 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of IAWs undergoing decay to a highly nonlinear turbulent state using the code LOKI. The scaling of the decay rate with characteristic plasma parameters and wave amplitude is shown. A new theory describing two-ion wave decay in 2D, that incorporates key kinetic properties of the electrons, is presented and used to explain quantitatively for the first time the observed decay of IAWs. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734. Funded by LDRD 15-ERD-038 and supported by LLNL Grand Challenge allocation.

  19. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  20. General-relativistic Simulations of Three-dimensional Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Mösta, Philipp; Haas, Roland; Drasco, Steve; O'Connor, Evan P.; Reisswig, Christian; Meakin, Casey A.; Schnetter, Erik

    2013-05-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of the post-core-bounce phase of the collapse of a 27 M ⊙ star and pay special attention to the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and neutrino-driven convection. To this end, we perform 3D general-relativistic simulations with a three-species neutrino leakage scheme. The leakage scheme captures the essential aspects of neutrino cooling, heating, and lepton number exchange as predicted by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The 27 M ⊙ progenitor was studied in 2D by Müller et al., who observed strong growth of the SASI while neutrino-driven convection was suppressed. In our 3D simulations, neutrino-driven convection grows from numerical perturbations imposed by our Cartesian grid. It becomes the dominant instability and leads to large-scale non-oscillatory deformations of the shock front. These will result in strongly aspherical explosions without the need for large-scale SASI shock oscillations. Low-l-mode SASI oscillations are present in our models, but saturate at small amplitudes that decrease with increasing neutrino heating and vigor of convection. Our results, in agreement with simpler 3D Newtonian simulations, suggest that once neutrino-driven convection is started, it is likely to become the dominant instability in 3D. Whether it is the primary instability after bounce will ultimately depend on the physical seed perturbations present in the cores of massive stars. The gravitational wave signal, which we extract and analyze for the first time from 3D general-relativistic models, will serve as an observational probe of the postbounce dynamics and, in combination with neutrinos, may allow us to determine the primary hydrodynamic instability.

  1. GENERAL-RELATIVISTIC SIMULATIONS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Moesta, Philipp; Haas, Roland; Drasco, Steve; O'Connor, Evan P.; Reisswig, Christian; Meakin, Casey A.; Schnetter, Erik

    2013-05-10

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of the post-core-bounce phase of the collapse of a 27 M{sub Sun} star and pay special attention to the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and neutrino-driven convection. To this end, we perform 3D general-relativistic simulations with a three-species neutrino leakage scheme. The leakage scheme captures the essential aspects of neutrino cooling, heating, and lepton number exchange as predicted by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor was studied in 2D by Mueller et al., who observed strong growth of the SASI while neutrino-driven convection was suppressed. In our 3D simulations, neutrino-driven convection grows from numerical perturbations imposed by our Cartesian grid. It becomes the dominant instability and leads to large-scale non-oscillatory deformations of the shock front. These will result in strongly aspherical explosions without the need for large-scale SASI shock oscillations. Low-l-mode SASI oscillations are present in our models, but saturate at small amplitudes that decrease with increasing neutrino heating and vigor of convection. Our results, in agreement with simpler 3D Newtonian simulations, suggest that once neutrino-driven convection is started, it is likely to become the dominant instability in 3D. Whether it is the primary instability after bounce will ultimately depend on the physical seed perturbations present in the cores of massive stars. The gravitational wave signal, which we extract and analyze for the first time from 3D general-relativistic models, will serve as an observational probe of the postbounce dynamics and, in combination with neutrinos, may allow us to determine the primary hydrodynamic instability.

  2. Estimating structural collapse fragility of generic building typologies using expert judgment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.; Perkins, David M.; Aspinall, Willy P.; Kiremidjian, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    The structured expert elicitation process proposed by Cooke (1991), hereafter referred to as Cooke's approach, is applied for the first time in the realm of structural collapse-fragility assessment for selected generic construction types. Cooke's approach works on the principle of objective calibration scoring of judgments couple with hypothesis testing used in classical statistics. The performance-based scoring system reflects the combined measure of an expert's informativeness about variables in the problem are under consideration, and their ability to enumerate, in a statistically accurate way through expressing their true beliefs, the quantitative uncertainties associated with their assessments. We summarize the findings of an expert elicitation workshop in which a dozen earthquake-engineering professionals from around the world were engaged to estimate seismic collapse fragility for generic construction types. Development of seismic collapse fragility-functions was accomplished by combining their judgments using weights derived from Cooke's method. Although substantial effort was needed to elicit the inputs of these experts successfully, we anticipate that the elicitation strategy described here will gain momentum in a wide variety of earthquake seismology and engineering hazard and risk analyses where physical model and data limitations are inherent and objective professional judgment can fill gaps.

  3. Structure of tracheae and the functional implications for collapse in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Webster, Matthew R; Socha, John J; Teresi, Luciano; Nardinocchi, Paola; De Vita, Raffaella

    2015-12-01

    The tracheal tubes of insects are complex and heterogeneous composites with a microstructural organization that affects their function as pumps, valves, or static conduits within the respiratory system. In this study, we examined the microstructure of the primary thoracic tracheae of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The organization of the taenidia, which represents the primary source of structural reinforcement of the tracheae, was analyzed. We found that the taenidia were more disorganized in the regions of highest curvature of the tracheal tube. We also used a simple finite element model to explore the effect of cross-sectional shape and distribution of taenidia on the collapsibility of the tracheae. The eccentricity of the tracheal cross-section had a stronger effect on the collapse properties than did the distribution of taenidia. The combination of the macro-scale geometry, meso-scale heterogeneity, and microscale organization likely enables rhythmic tracheal compression during respiration, ultimately driving oxygen-rich air to cells and tissues throughout the insect body. The material design principles of these natural composites could potentially aid in the development of new bio-inspired microfluidic systems based on the differential collapse of tracheae-like networks. PMID:26584154

  4. Method for numerical relativity: simulation of axisymmetric gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation generation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.R. II

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented that allows fully self-consistent numerical simulation of asymptotically flat axisymmetric nonrotating general relativistic systems. These techniques were developed to model and understand resulting relativistic effects in gravitational core collapse and gravitational radiation generation. Both vacuum (Brill) spacetimes and matter-filled configurations can be treated. The author uses the (3 + 1) composition of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner to write general relativity in a dynamical form. The conformal approach, including the transverse-traceless decomposition of extrinsic curvature due to York, is used to solve the initial-value problem. In addition, these techniques are extended to provide a fully constrained evolution scheme. Several new boundary conditions, applied at large but finite radius, are derived for the elliptic constraint equations. The method uses a simplifying three-gauge, placing the metric in quasi-isotropic form. The resulting three-metric contains only two components that must be solved. One, the conformal factor, is fixed by the Hamiltonian constraint. The second has nice radiative features and is related in the weak-field limit to the usual transverse-traceless gravitational wave amplitude. The time slicing is determined by implementation of the maximal slicing condition.

  5. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-11-01

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to ~ 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  6. Multi-dimensional Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae employing Ray-by-Ray Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. R.; Mezzacappa, A.; Liebendoerfer, M.; Messer, O. E. B.; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.

    2001-12-01

    Decades of research on the mechanism which causes core collapse supernovae has evolved a paradigm wherein the shock that results from the formation of the proto-neutron star stalls, failing to produce an explosion. Only when the shock is re-energized by the tremendous neutrino flux that is carrying off the binding energy of this proto-neutron star can it drive off the star's envelope, creating a supernova. Work in recent years has demonstrated the importance of multi-dimensional hydrodynamic effects like convection to successful simulation of an explosion. Further work has established the necessity of accurately characterizing the distribution of neutrinos in energy and direction. This requires discretizing the neutrino distribution into multiple groups, adding greatly to the computational cost. However, no supernova simulations to date have combined self-consistent multi-group neutrino transport with multi-dimensional hydrodynamics. We present preliminary results of our efforts to combine these important facets of the supernova mechanism by coupling self-consistent ray-by-ray multi-group Boltzmann and flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport schemes to multi-dimensional hydrodynamics. This research is supported by NASA under contract NAG5-8405, by the NSF under contract AST-9877130, and under a SciDAC grant from the DoE Office of Science High Energy and Nuclear Physics Program. Work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  7. Magnetorotational collapse of massive stellar cores to neutron stars: Simulations in full general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Stephens, Branson C.

    2006-11-01

    We study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects arising in the collapse of magnetized, rotating, massive stellar cores to proto-neutron stars (PNSs). We perform axisymmetric numerical simulations in full general relativity with a hybrid equation of state. The formation and early evolution of a PNS are followed with a grid of 2500×2500 zones, which provides better resolution than in previous (Newtonian) studies. We confirm that significant differential rotation results even when the rotation of the progenitor is initially uniform. Consequently, the magnetic field is amplified both by magnetic winding and the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Even if the magnetic energy EEM is much smaller than the rotational kinetic energy Trot at the time of PNS formation, the ratio EEM/Trot increases to 0.1 0.2 by the magnetic winding. Following PNS formation, MHD outflows lead to losses of rest mass, energy, and angular momentum from the system. The earliest outflow is produced primarily by the increasing magnetic stress caused by magnetic winding. The MRI amplifies the poloidal field and increases the magnetic stress, causing further angular momentum transport and helping to drive the outflow. After the magnetic field saturates, a nearly stationary, collimated magnetic field forms near the rotation axis and a Blandford-Payne type outflow develops along the field lines. These outflows remove angular momentum from the PNS at a rate given by J˙˜ηEEMCB, where η is a constant of order ˜0.1 and CB is a typical ratio of poloidal to toroidal field strength. As a result, the rotation period quickly increases for a strongly magnetized PNS until the degree of differential rotation decreases. Our simulations suggest that rapidly rotating, magnetized PNSs may not give rise to rapidly rotating neutron stars.

  8. Simulating the impact of freshwater inputs and deep-draft icebergs formed during a MIS 6 Barents Ice Sheet collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Clare L.; Green, J. A. Mattias; Bigg, Grant R.

    2011-06-01

    An intermediate complexity climate model is used to simulate the collapse of the Barents Ice Sheet during Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6; 140 ka B.P) with the purpose of investigating whether a mass input of freshwater from the collapse could have affected the convection and deep water formation in the North Atlantic Ocean. Further experiments used a coupled dynamic and thermodynamic iceberg model to determine the effects of deep-draft icebergs, rather than freshwater alone, on the ocean circulation. The results predict that the collapse of the Barents Ice Sheet had a significant impact on the meridional overturning circulation in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Freshwater fluxes have more of an impact on the Atlantic overturning circulation during the actual release period compared to icebergs, but the bergs induce effects over longer time scales even after the pulse is removed. Freshwater fluxes of 0.15 sverdrup (Sv) and iceberg surges of 0.1 Sv trigger significant changes in the global patterns, particularly in the North Pacific where there is strengthening of the overturning circulation at the expense of that in the North Atlantic, and associated increases in Pacific sea surface temperatures. These results highlight the importance of simulating not only the correct flux but also the form of the freshwater input from ice sheet collapses appropriately.

  9. Collapse of a Rotating Supermassive Star to a Supermassive Black Hole: Fully Relativistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2002-06-01

    We follow the collapse in axisymmetry of a uniformly rotating, supermassive star (SMS) to a supermassive black hole in full general relativity. The initial SMS of arbitrary mass M is marginally unstable to radial collapse and rotates at the mass-shedding limit. The collapse proceeds homologously early on and results in the appearance of an apparent horizon at the center. Although our integration terminates before final equilibrium is achieved, we determine that the final black hole will contain about 90% of the total mass of the system and will have a spin parameter J/M2~0.75. The remaining gas forms a rotating disk about the nascent hole.

  10. Density profiles of loose and collapsed cohesive granular structures generated by ballistic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-03-01

    Loose granular structures stabilized against gravity by an effective cohesive force are investigated on a microscopic basis using contact dynamics. We study the influence of the granular Bond number on the density profiles and the generation process of packings, generated by ballistic deposition under gravity. The internal compaction occurs discontinuously in small avalanches and we study their size distribution. We also develop a model explaining the final density profiles based on insight about the collapse of a packing under changes of the Bond number.

  11. Subsurface architecture of a strike-slip collapse structure: insights from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxby, Jennifer; Gottsmann, Joachim; Cashman, Katherine; Gutierrez, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    While most calderas are created by roof collapse along ring-like faults into an emptying magma reservoir during a large and violent explosive eruption, an additional condition for caldera formation may be tectonically induced extensional stresses. Here we provide geophysical insights into the shallow sub-volcanic plumbing system of a collapse caldera in a major strike-slip tectonic setting by inverting Bouguer gravity data from the Ilopango caldera in El Salvador. Despite a long history of catastrophic eruptions with the most recent in 500 A.D., the internal architecture of the caldera has not been investigated, although studies of the most recent eruption have not identified the ring faults commonly associated with caldera collapse. The gravity data show that low-density material aligned along the principal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) forms a pronounced gravity low beneath the caldera. Extending to around 6 km depth, the low density structure likely maps a complex stacked shallow plumbing system composed of magmatic and fractured hydrothermal reservoirs. A substantial volume of the plumbing system must be composed of a vapour phase to explain the modeled negative density contrasts. We use these constraints to map the possible multi-phase parameter space contributing to the subsurface architecture of the caldera and propose that the local extension along the complex ESFZ controls accumulation, ascent and eruption of magma at Ilopango. The data further suggest that future eruptions at Ilopango could be facilitated by rapid rise of magma along conjugate fault damage zones through a mechanically weak crust under tension. This may explain the absence of clear ring fault structures at the caldera.

  12. Infilled masonry walls contribution in mitigating progressive collapse of multistory reinforced concrete structures according to UFC guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmy, Huda; Hadhoud, Hamed; Mourad, Sherif

    2015-09-01

    A structure is subjected to progressive collapse when an element fails, resulting in failure of adjoining structural elements which, in their turn, cause further structural failure leading eventually to partial or total collapse. The failure of a primary vertical support might occur due to extreme loadings such as bomb explosion in a terrorist attack, gas explosion and huge impact of a car in the parking area. Different guidelines such as the General Services Administration (GSA 2003) and the Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC 2009) addressed the structural progressive collapse due to the sudden loss of a main vertical support. In the current study, a progressive collapse assessment according to the UFC guidelines is carried out for a typical ten-story reinforced concrete framed structure designed according to codes [(ACI 318-08) and (ASCE 7-10)] for minimum design loads for buildings and other structures. Fully nonlinear dynamic analysis for the structure was carried out using Applied Element Method (AEM). The investigated cases included the removal of a corner column, an edge column, an edge shear wall, internal columns and internal shear wall. The numerical analysis showed that simplification of the problem into 3D bare frames would lead to uneconomical design. It was found for the studied case that, the infilled masonry walls have a valuable contribution in mitigating progressive collapse of the reinforced concrete framed structures. Neglecting these walls would lead to uneconomical design.

  13. A Combined Spectral/Godunov Code for the Simulation of Gravitational Waves from Stellar Supernova Core Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, J.; Dimmelmeier, H.; Font, J. A.

    2008-04-01

    Supernovae represent powerful sources of gravitational radiation. Their numerical simulation, even of simplified core collapse models, requires numerical techniques that are able to handle strong hydrodynamic shocks and a general-relativistic gravitational field. Such hydrodynamics can be modeled with high-resolution shock-capturing (HRSC) schemes, also known as Godunov schemes, in general relativity, while the Einstein equations for the gravitational field may require much computer power, if solved in the same way. It is therefore interesting to use spectral methods to model the gravitational field, which is always regular enough to avoid any Gibbs phenomenon, in conjunction with HRSC schemes for the hydrodynamics equations. We present such a code combining both methods to model stellar core collapse simulations and the resulting gravitational waves, with the most recent equations of state and a simplified neutrino treatment. Some additional results on neutron star oscillations are also shown.

  14. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  15. Axisymmetric Ab Initio Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations of 12--25 Solar Mass Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bruenn, S. W.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Messer, Bronson; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Blondin, J. M.; Endeve, Eirik; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley & Heger (2007) progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M_sun. All four models exhibit shock revival over ~ 200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 solar mass model and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) appearing first in the 25 solar mass model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 solar mass model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3,000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B=10^{51} ergs) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar mass models, respectively, and are increasing. The three least massive of our models are already sufficiently energetic to completely unbind the envelopes of their progenitors (i.e., to explode), as evidenced by our best estimate of their explosion energies, which first become positive at 320, 380, and 440 ms after bounce. By 850 ms the 12 solar mass diagnostic explosion energy has saturated at 0.38 B, and our estimate for the final kinetic energy of the ejecta is ~ 0.3 B, which is comparable to observations for lower-mass progenitors.

  16. Structural Collapse of the Hydroquinone-Formic Acid Clathrate: A Pressure-Medium-Dependent Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Eikeland, Espen; Thomsen, Maja K; Madsen, Solveig R; Overgaard, Jacob; Spackman, Mark A; Iversen, Bo B

    2016-03-14

    The energy landscape governing a new pressure-induced phase transition in the hydroquinone-formic acid clathrate is reported in which the host structure collapses, opening up the cavity channels within which the guest molecules migrate and order. The reversible isosymmetric phase transition causes significant changes in the morphology and the birefringence of the crystal. The subtle intermolecular interaction energies in the clathrate are quantified at varying pressures using novel model energies and energy frameworks. These calculations show that the high-pressure phase forms a more stable host network at the expense of less-stable host-guest interactions. The phase transition can be kinetically hindered using a nonhydrostatic pressure-transmitting medium, enabling the comparison of intermolecular energies in two polymorphic structures in the same pressure range. Overall this study illustrates a need for accurate intermolecular energies when analyzing self-assembly structures and supramolecular aggregates. PMID:26879515

  17. Charge-controlled nano-structuring in partially collapsed star-shaped macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Uhlík, Filip; Košovan, Peter; Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Borisov, Oleg V

    2016-05-25

    Hydrophobic polyelectrolytes exhibit intra-molecular nano-scale self-organization instead of macroscopic phase separation because of the interplay between short-range hydrophobic attraction and long-range electrostatic repulsion. We aim to unravel how the morphology of the intra-molecular nanostructures can be controlled through the topology of the macromolecule on one hand and by adjustable ionization on the other hand. Specifically, we focus on hydrophobic star-branched polyelectrolytes, composed of either strong or weak acidic monomers. While both collapse in a globule when uncharged, and expand to full stretching of arms at high ionization, they exhibit quite different intermediate scenarios. For the strong ones, we observe the formation of bundles of arms as the main structural motif, and for the weak ones the intramolecular micelle-like structure is found at the same overall charge of the macromolecule. Here intramolecular disproportionation leaves some arms in a collapsed virtually neutral core, while others are substantially ionized and stretched in the corona. PMID:27140226

  18. Continuum viscoplastic simulation of a granular column collapse on large slopes : μ(I) rheology and lateral wall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Mangeney, Anne; Ionescu, Ioan; Bouchut, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The description of the mechanical behaviour of granular flows and in particular of the static/flowing transition is still an open and challenging issue with strong implication for hazard assessment [{Delannay et al.}, 2016]. In particular, {detailed quantitative} comparison between numerical models and observations is necessary to go further in this direction. We simulate here dry granular flows resulting from the collapse of granular columns on an inclined channel (from horizontal to 22^o) and compare precisely the results with laboratory experiments performed by {Mangeney et al.} [2010] and {Farin et al.} [2014]. Incompressibility is assumed despite the dilatancy observed in the experiments (up to 10%). The 2-D model is based on the so-called μ(I) rheology that induces a Drucker-Prager yield stress and a variable viscosity. A nonlinear Coulomb friction term, representing the friction on the lateral walls of the channel is added to the model. We demonstrate that this term is crucial to accurately reproduce granular collapses on slopes higher than 10o whereas it remains of little effect on horizontal slope [{Martin et al.}, 2016]. We show that the use of a variable or a constant viscosity does not change significantly the results provided that these viscosities are of the same order [{Ionescu et al.}, 2015]. However, only a fine tuning of the constant viscosity (η = 1 Pa.s) makes it possible to predict the slow propagation phase observed experimentally on large slopes. This was not possible when using, without tuning, the variable viscosity calculated from the μ(I) rheology with the parameters estimated from experiments. Finally, we discuss the well-posedness of the model with variable and constant viscosity based in particular on the development of shear bands observed in the numerical simulations. References Delannay, R., Valance, A., Mangeney, A., Roche, O., and Richard, P., 2016. Granular and particle-laden flows: from laboratory experiments to field

  19. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Simulations with the Isotropic Diffusion Source Approximation for Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Hempel, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernova is investigated via non-relativistic, two-dimensional (2D), neutrino radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the transport of electron flavor neutrinos, we use the interaction rates defined by Bruenn and the isotropic diffusion source approximation (IDSA) scheme, which decomposes the transported particles into trapped-particle and streaming-particle components. Heavy neutrinos are described by a leakage scheme. Unlike the “ray-by-ray” approach in some other multidimensional supernova models, we use cylindrical coordinates and solve the trapped-particle component in multiple dimensions, improving the proto-neutron star resolution and the neutrino transport in angular and temporal directions. We provide an IDSA verification by performing one-dimensional (1D) and 2D simulations with 15 and 20 M⊙ progenitors from Woosley et al. and discuss the difference between our IDSA results and those existing in the literature. Additionally, we perform Newtonian 1D and 2D simulations from prebounce core collapse to several hundred milliseconds postbounce with 11, 15, 21, and 27 M⊙ progenitors from Woosley et al. with the HS(DD2) equation of state. General-relativistic effects are neglected. We obtain robust explosions with diagnostic energies Edia ≳ 0.1-0.5 B (1 B ≡ 1051 erg) for all considered 2D models within approximately 100-300 ms after bounce and find that explosions are mostly dominated by the neutrino-driven convection, although standing accretion shock instabilities are observed as well. We also find that the level of electron deleptonization during collapse dramatically affects the postbounce evolution, e.g., the neglect of neutrino-electron scattering during collapse will lead to a stronger explosion.

  20. I35W collapse, rebuild, and structural health monitoring - challenges associated with structural health monitoring of bridge systems

    SciTech Connect

    French, C. E.; Hedegaard, B.; Shield, C. K.; Stolarski, H.

    2011-06-23

    During evening rush hour traffic on August 1, 2007, the major interstate highway bridge carrying I35W over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis catastrophically failed, tragically taking the lives of thirteen people and injuring many more. The steel truss bridge, constructed in 1967, was undergoing deck reconstruction during the collapse, and was estimated to carry more than 140,000 vehicles daily. This tragedy generated great interest in employment of structural health monitoring systems. The I35W St. Anthony Falls Bridge, a post-tensioned concrete box bridge constructed to replace the collapsed steel truss bridge, contains over 500 instruments to monitor the structural behavior. Numerical models of the bridge are being developed and calibrated to the collected data obtained from truck load tests and thermal effects. The data obtained over the first few years of monitoring are being correlated with the calibrated models and used to develop the baseline bridge behavior. This information is being used to develop a system to monitor and interpret the long-term behavior of the bridge. This paper describes the instrumentation, preliminary results from the data and model calibration, the plan for developing long-term monitoring capabilities, and the challenges associated with structural health monitoring of bridge systems. In addition, opportunities and directions for future research required to fully realize the objectives of structural health monitoring are described.

  1. On the solution of elastic-plastic static and dynamic postbuckling collapse of general structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1983-01-01

    Many investigations have considered structural collapse from strictly the transient point of view. While such an approach is ideally correct, certain difficulties have to be overcome in its implementation. The present investigation is concerned with the development of self-adaptive algorithms which make it possible to conduct the analysis of both static elastic and elastic-plastic postbuckling, as well as static loading to the onset of buckling followed by subsequent dynamic postbuckling. The approach employed to solve the static portion of loading is to extend the constrained Incremental Newton-Raphson (INR) algorithm by incorporating elastic-plastic constitutive characterizations. Large deformation moderate strain theory is adopted to establish the overall strategy. Attention is given to governing field equations, aspects of algorithmic development, and numerical experiments conducted to illustrate the efficiency and stability of the developed schemes.

  2. High Structural Stability of Textile Implants Prevents Pore Collapse and Preserves Effective Porosity at Strain

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Uwe; Otto, Jens; Mühl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement of tissues by use of textiles is encouraged by the reduced rate of recurrent tissue dehiscence but for the price of an inflammatory and fibrotic tissue reaction to the implant. The latter mainly is affected by the size of the pores, whereas only sufficiently large pores are effective in preventing a complete scar entrapment. Comparing two different sling implants (TVT and SIS), which are used for the treatment of urinary incontinence, we can demonstrate that the measurement of the effective porosity reveals considerable differences in the textile construction. Furthermore the changes of porosity after application of a tensile load can indicate a structural instability, favouring pore collapse at stress and questioning the use for purposes that are not “tension-free.” PMID:25973427

  3. Progenitor-dependent Explosion Dynamics in Self-consistent, Axisymmetric Simulations of Neutrino-driven Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summa, Alexander; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11–28 M ⊙, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si–O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si–O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage through their maxima, our models exhibit short advection timescales, which favor the efficient growth of the standing accretion-shock instability. The latter plays a supportive role at least for the initiation of the re-expansion of the stalled shock before runaway. Taking into account the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We validate the robustness of our findings by testing the influence of stochasticity, numerical resolution, and approximations in some aspects of the microphysics.

  4. Sowing Black Hole Seeds: Forming Direct Collapse Black Holes With Realistic Lyman-Werner Radiation Fields in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Dunn, Glenna; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars detected at redshifts z > 6 require that the first black holes form early and grow to ~109 solar masses within one Gyr. Our work uses cosmological simulations to study the formation and early growth of direct collapse black holes. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H2) causes gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H2 formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H2 formation, Jcrit, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H2 self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field, using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H2 non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H2 cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary Jcrit from 30 to 104 J21 to study the effect on seed black holes, focusing on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. We discuss the constraints on massive black hole occupation fraction in the quasar epoch, and implications for reionization, high-redshift X-ray background radiation, and gravitational waves.

  5. Self-Consistent Simulations of Accretion-Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiser, Io; Ott, Christian; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; O'Connor, Evan

    2013-04-01

    Accreting white dwarfs and white dwarf mergers are commonly thought to end in thermonuclear explosions that produce Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, there is an alternative outcome for these systems that has not been theoretically explored as thoroughly, nor has it been securely identified observationally. Some white dwarfs, rather than exploding, should undergo electron capture and collapse to neutron stars. This accretion-induced collapse (AIC) scenario is expected to be intrinsically rare compared to SNe Ia, and past studies indicate that the associated optical transient would be faint and short-lived, near the detection limits of current surveys. However, until now there have not been self-consistent numerical studies of AIC that examine the explosion dynamics, subsequent evolution, and all resulting observables. We use GR1D, a one-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamics code, to follow AIC through collapse, core bounce, explosion, and shock breakout and to present new results on its neutrino signature and nucleosynthetic yields. This study is preliminary to the goal of developing fully self-consistent three-dimensional models that will yield predictions for electromagnetic, neutrino, and gravitational-wave signals form AIC events.

  6. Self-Consistent Simulations of Accretion-Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiser, Io; Ott, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Accreting white dwarfs and white dwarf mergers are commonly thought to end in thermonuclear explosions that produce Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, there is an alternative outcome for these systems that has not been theoretically explored as thoroughly, nor has it been securely identified observationally. Some white dwarfs, rather than exploding, should undergo electron capture and collapse to neutron stars. This accretion-induced collapse (AIC) scenario is expected to be intrinsically rare compared to SNe Ia, and past studies indicate that the associated optical transient would be faint and short-lived, near the detection limits of current surveys. However, until now there have not been self-consistent numerical studies of AIC that examine the explosion dynamics, subsequent evolution, and all resulting observables. We use GR1D, a one-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamics code, to follow AIC through collapse, core bounce, explosion, and shock breakout and to present new results on its neutrino signature. This study is preliminary to the goal of developing fully self-consistent three-dimensional models that will yield predictions for electromagnetic, neutrino, and gravitational-wave signals form AIC events.

  7. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  8. An improved multipole approximation for self-gravity and its importance for core-collapse supernova simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.; Graziani, Carlo; Flocke, Norbert

    2013-12-01

    Self-gravity computation by multipole expansion is a common approach in problems such as core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae, where single large condensations of mass must be treated. The standard formulation of multipole self-gravity in arbitrary coordinate systems suffers from two significant sources of error, which we correct in the formulation presented in this article. The first source of error is due to the numerical approximation that effectively places grid cell mass at the central point of the cell, then computes the gravitational potential at that point, resulting in a convergence failure of the multipole expansion. We describe a new scheme that avoids this problem by computing gravitational potential at cell faces. The second source of error is due to sub-optimal choice of location for the expansion center, which results in angular power at high multipole l values in the gravitational field, requiring a high—and expensive—value of multipole cutoff l {sub max}. By introducing a global measure of angular power in the gravitational field, we show that the optimal coordinate for the expansion is the square-density-weighted mean location. We subject our new multipole self-gravity algorithm, implemented in the FLASH simulation framework, to two rigorous test problems: MacLaurin spheroids for which exact analytic solutions are known, and core-collapse supernovae. We show that key observables of the core-collapse simulations, particularly shock expansion, proto-neutron star motion, and momentum conservation, are extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the multipole gravity, and the accuracy of their computation is greatly improved by our reformulated solver.

  9. Voltage collapse in complex power grids

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Porco, John W.; Dörfler, Florian; Bullo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A large-scale power grid's ability to transfer energy from producers to consumers is constrained by both the network structure and the nonlinear physics of power flow. Violations of these constraints have been observed to result in voltage collapse blackouts, where nodal voltages slowly decline before precipitously falling. However, methods to test for voltage collapse are dominantly simulation-based, offering little theoretical insight into how grid structure influences stability margins. For a simplified power flow model, here we derive a closed-form condition under which a power network is safe from voltage collapse. The condition combines the complex structure of the network with the reactive power demands of loads to produce a node-by-node measure of grid stress, a prediction of the largest nodal voltage deviation, and an estimate of the distance to collapse. We extensively test our predictions on large-scale systems, highlighting how our condition can be leveraged to increase grid stability margins. PMID:26887284

  10. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a total collapse, it is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, ...

  11. From forced collapse to H ii region expansion in Mon R2: Envelope density structure and age determination with Herschel⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didelon, P.; Motte, F.; Tremblin, P.; Hill, T.; Hony, S.; Hennemann, M.; Hennebelle, P.; Anderson, L. D.; Galliano, F.; Schneider, N.; Rayner, T.; Rygl, K.; Louvet, F.; Zavagno, A.; Könyves, V.; Sauvage, M.; André, Ph.; Bontemps, S.; Peretto, N.; Griffin, M.; González, M.; Lebouteiller, V.; Arzoumanian, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Benedettini, M.; Di Francesco, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Minier, V.; Nguyên Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Pezzuto, S.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Russeil, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The surroundings of H ii regions can have a profound influence on their development, morphology, and evolution. This paper explores the effect of the environment on H ii regions in the MonR2 molecular cloud. Aims: We aim to investigate the density structure of envelopes surrounding H ii regions and to determine their collapse and ionisation expansion ages. The Mon R2 molecular cloud is an ideal target since it hosts an H ii region association, which has been imaged by the Herschel PACS and SPIRE cameras as part of the HOBYS key programme. Methods: Column density and temperature images derived from Herschel data were used together to model the structure of H ii bubbles and their surrounding envelopes. The resulting observational constraints were used to follow the development of the Mon R2 ionised regions with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. Results: The four hot bubbles associated with H ii regions are surrounded by dense, cold, and neutral gas envelopes, which are partly embedded in filaments. The envelope's radial density profiles are reminiscent of those of low-mass protostellar envelopes. The inner parts of envelopes of all four H ii regions could be free-falling because they display shallow density profiles: ρ(r) ∝ r- q with q ≤slant 1.5. As for their outer parts, the two compact H ii regions show a ρ(r) ∝ r-2 profile, which is typical of the equilibrium structure of a singular isothermal sphere. In contrast, the central UCH ii region shows a steeper outer profile, ρ(r) ∝ r-2.5, that could be interpreted as material being forced to collapse, where an external agent overwhelms the internal pressure support. Conclusions: The size of the heated bubbles, the spectral type of the irradiating stars, and the mean initial neutral gas density are used to estimate the ionisation expansion time, texp ~ 0.1 Myr, for the dense UCH ii and compact H ii regions and ~ 0.35 Myr for the extended H ii region. Numerical simulations with and

  12. From orogenic collapse to rifting ; structures of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pubellier, M.; Chan, L. S.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Shen, W.; Ringenbach, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    The opening of the South China Sea has been a matter of debate for many years because of its internal structure, the differences between the conjugate margins and the variations of rifting and spreading directions. Although it is considered as being a back-arc basin, it is not sitting directly above a subduction zone, and the rifting process lasted for an unusually long duration. Among the specific characteristics is the early phase of rifting which took place early in place of the former Yanshanian andean-type mountain range. This stage is marked by narrow basins filled with deformed conglomerate, and initiated around 70My ago within a framework where the oblique subduction marked by igneous activity and ductile wrench faults, was replaced by orogenic collapse. The rifting stage is marked by Eocene syntectonic normal faults and occasional volcanics centres and has proceeded from NW-SE to NS extension. The NW stretching created at least two aborted basins which remained at rift stage. Extension was followed by spreading from 33 to ~20 Ma in the South China Sea. The ocean floor spreading also changed direction to NW-SE with a propagator inside the Sunda shelf from 20 to 17My ago. However the propagator opening implies that deformation is also taken by rifting around a southern wedge which in turn created strain inside the thinned crust. Another extension parallel to the margin is also observed althought the spreading was in process. The southward motion of the southern conjugate margin was later accommodated by its subduction beneath the NW Borneo wedge until completion of the Proto South China Sea subduction. Variations of rifting spreading through time and variations of structural styles are discussed in terms of boundary forces acting to the SE.

  13. Constraining the supersaturation density equation of state from core-collapse supernova simulations?. Excluded volume extension of the baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    In this article the role of the supersaturation density equation of state (EOS) is explored in simulations of failed core-collapse supernova explosions. Therefore the nuclear EOS is extended via a one-parameter excluded-volume description for baryons, taking into account their finite and increasing volume with increasing density in excess of saturation density. Parameters are selected such that the resulting supernova EOS represent extreme cases, with high pressure variations at supersaturation density which feature extreme stiff and soft EOS variants of the reference case, i.e. without excluded-volume corrections. Unlike in the interior of neutron stars with central densities in excess of several times saturation density, central densities of core-collapse supernovae reach only slightly above saturation density. Hence, the impact of the supersaturation density EOS on the supernova dynamics as well as the neutrino signal is found to be negligible. It is mainly determined from the low- and intermediate-density domain, which is left unmodified within this generalized excluded volume approach.

  14. Simulated effects of salt-mine collapse on ground-water flow and land subsidence in a glacial aquifer system, Livingston County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Miller, Todd S.; Kappel, William M.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the hydrogeology of the Genesee Valley and the effects of the ceiling collapse of the Retsof salt mine on the aquifer system. It discusses the origin and character of glacial sediments; the occurrence, flow directions, and chemical quality of water in the aquifer system before the collapse; the effects of the collapse on the aquifer system in terms of land subsidence, water-level declines, changes in water quality, and exsolution of natural gas, and design and calibration of the ground-water-flow model. It also presents results of flow-model simulations, including an estimated ground-water budget and graphs showing the simulated water-level recovery; and results of subsidence simulations, including maps and graphs showing the extent of land subsidence.

  15. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices. PMID:27457494

  16. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices.

  17. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices. PMID:27457494

  18. The effect of dark matter resolution on the collapse of baryons in high-redshift numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the impact of dark matter particle resolution on the formation of a baryonic core in high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations. We test the effect that both particle smoothing and particle splitting have on the hydrodynamic properties of a collapsing halo at high redshift (z > 20). Furthermore, we vary the background field intensity, with energy below the Lyman limit (<13.6 eV), as may be relevant for the case of metal-free star formation and supermassive black hole seed formation. We find that using particle splitting methods greatly increases our particle resolution without introducing any numerical noise and allows us to achieve converged results over a wide range of external background fields. Additionally, we find that for lower values of the background field a lower dark matter particle mass is required. We define the radius of the core as the point at which the enclosed baryonic mass dominates over the enclosed dark matter mass. For our simulations this results in Rcore ˜ 5 pc. We find that in order to produce converged results which are not affected by dark matter particles requires that the relationship Mcore/MDM > 100.0 be satisfied, where Mcore is the enclosed baryon mass within the core and MDM is the minimum dark matter particle mass. This ratio should provide a very useful starting point for conducting convergence tests before any production run simulations. We find that dark matter particle smoothing is a useful adjunct to already highly resolved simulations.

  19. Three dimensional core-collapse supernova simulated using a 15 M progenitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Bruenn, Stephen W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M.; Harris, J. Austin; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N.

    2015-07-10

    We have performed ab initio neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations in three and two spatial dimensions (3D and 2D) of core-collapse supernovae from the same 15 M⊙ progenitor through 440 ms after core bounce. Both 3D and 2D models achieve explosions; however, the onset of explosion (shock revival) is delayed by ~100 ms in 3D relative to the 2D counterpart and the growth of the diagnostic explosion energy is slower. This is consistent with previously reported 3D simulations utilizing iron-core progenitors with dense mantles. In the ~100 ms before the onset of explosion, diagnostics of neutrino heating and turbulent kinetic energy favor earlier explosion in 2D. During the delay, the angular scale of convective plumes reaching the shock surface grows and explosion in 3D is ultimately lead by a single, large-angle plume, giving the expanding shock a directional orientation not dissimilar from those imposed by axial symmetry in 2D simulations. Finally, we posit that shock revival and explosion in the 3D simulation may be delayed until sufficiently large plumes form, whereas such plumes form more rapidly in 2D, permitting earlier explosions.

  20. ON THE IMPACT OF THREE DIMENSIONS IN SIMULATIONS OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.

    2013-09-20

    We present one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernovae including a parameterized neutrino heating and cooling scheme in order to investigate the critical core neutrino luminosity (L{sub crit}) required for explosion. In contrast to some previous works, we find that 3D simulations explode later than 2D simulations, and that L{sub crit} at fixed mass accretion rate is somewhat higher in three dimensions than in two dimensions. We find, however, that in two dimensions L{sub crit} increases as the numerical resolution of the simulation increases. In contrast to some previous works, we argue that the average entropy of the gain region is in fact not a good indicator of explosion but is rather a reflection of the greater mass in the gain region in two dimensions. We compare our simulations to semi-analytic explosion criteria and examine the nature of the convective motions in two dimensions and three dimensions. We discuss the balance between neutrino-driven buoyancy and drag forces. In particular, we show that the drag force will be proportional to a buoyant plume's surface area while the buoyant force is proportional to a plume's volume and, therefore, plumes with greater volume-to-surface-area ratios will rise more quickly. We show that buoyant plumes in two dimensions are inherently larger, with greater volume-to-surface-area ratios, than plumes in three dimensions. In the scenario that the supernova shock expansion is dominated by neutrino-driven buoyancy, this balance between buoyancy and drag forces may explain why 3D simulations explode later than 2D simulations and why L{sub crit} increases with resolution. Finally, we provide a comparison of our results with other calculations in the literature.

  1. Oxygen limitations on marine animal distributions and the collapse of epibenthic community structure during shoaling hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jackson W F; Tunnicliffe, Verena

    2015-08-01

    Deoxygenation in the global ocean is predicted to induce ecosystem-wide changes. Analysis of multidecadal oxygen time-series projects the northeast Pacific to be a current and future hot spot of oxygen loss. However, the response of marine communities to deoxygenation is unresolved due to the lack of applicable data on component species. We repeated the same benthic transect (n = 10, between 45 and 190 m depths) over 8 years in a seasonally hypoxic fjord using remotely operated vehicles equipped with oxygen sensors to establish the lower oxygen levels at which 26 common epibenthic species can occur in the wild. By timing our surveys to shoaling hypoxia events, we show that fish and crustacean populations persist even in severe hypoxia (<0.5 mL L(-1) ) with no mortality effects but that migration of mobile species occurs. Consequently, the immediate response to hypoxia expansion is the collapse of community structure; normally partitioned distributions of resident species coalesced and localized densities increased. After oxygen renewal and formation of steep oxygen gradients, former ranges re-established. High frequency data from the nearby VENUS subsea observatory show the average oxygen level at our site declined by ~0.05 mL L(-1) year(-1) over the period of our study. The increased annual duration of the hypoxic (<1.4 mL L(-1) ) and severely hypoxic periods appears to reflect the oxygen dynamics demonstrated in offshore source waters and the adjacent Strait of Georgia. Should the current trajectory of oxygen loss continue, community homogenization and reduced suitable habitat may become the dominant state of epibenthic systems in the northeast Pacific. In situ oxygen occurrences were not congruent with lethal and sublethal hypoxia thresholds calculated across the literature for major taxonomic groups indicating that research biases toward laboratory studies on Atlantic species are not globally applicable. Region-specific hypoxia thresholds are necessary to

  2. Structure and collapse of a surface-grown strong polyelectrolyte brush on sapphire.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Iain E; Thomas, Robert K; Titmus, Simon; Osborne, Victoria; Edmondson, Steve; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Klein, Jacob

    2012-02-14

    We have used neutron reflectometry to investigate the behavior of a strong polyelectrolyte brush on a sapphire substrate, grown by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from a silane-anchored initiator layer. The initiator layer was deposited from vapor, following treatment of the substrate with an Ar/H(2)O plasma to improve surface reactivity. The deposition process was characterized using X-ray reflectometry, indicating the formation of a complete, cross-linked layer. The brush was grown from the monomer [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (METAC), which carries a strong positive charge. The neutron reflectivity profile of the swollen brush in pure water (D(2)O) showed that it adopted a two-region structure, consisting of a dense surface region ∼100 Å thick, in combination with a diffuse brush region extending to around 1000 Å from the surface. The existence of the diffuse brush region may be attributed to electrostatic repulsion from the positively charged surface region, while the surface region itself most probably forms due to polyelectrolyte adsorption to the hydrophobic initiator layer. The importance of electrostatic interactions in maintaining the brush region is confirmed by measurements at high (1 M) added 1:1 electrolyte, which show a substantial transfer of polymer from the brush to the surface region, together with a strong reduction in brush height. On addition of 10(-4) M oppositely charged surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate), the brush undergoes a dramatic collapse, forming a single dense layer about 200 Å in thickness, which may be attributed to the neutralization of the monomers by adsorbed dodecyl sulfate ions in combination with hydrophobic interactions between these dodecyl chains. Subsequent increases in surfactant concentration result in slow increases in brush height, which may be caused by stiffening of the polyelectrolyte chains due to further dodecyl sulfate adsorption. PMID:22292571

  3. Isotropic sources and attenuation structure: Nuclear tests, mine collapses, and Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Sean Ricardo

    This dissertation investigates two different, but related, topics: isotropic sources and attenuation structure. The first section reports the analysis of explosions, earthquakes, and collapses in the western US using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. We find that in the band of interest (0.02-0.10 Hz) the source-type is insensitive to small velocity model perturbations and several kilometers of incorrect depth when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 5. However, error in the isotropic moment grows from 50% to 200% as the source depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m. We add an analysis of the Crandall Canyon Mine collapse that occurred on 6 August 2007 in Utah to our dataset. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007 demonstrating the low frequency regional waveforms carry sufficient information to distinguish the source-type. Finally, confidence in the regional full moment tensor inversion solution is described via the introduction of the network sensitivity solution (NSS), which takes into account the unique station distribution, frequency band, and signal-to-noise ratio of a given event scenario. The method is tested for the well-recorded nuclear test, JUNCTION, at the Nevada Test Site and the October 2006 North Korea test, where the station coverage is poor and the event magnitude is small. Both events contain large isotropic components that are 60% of the total moment, though the NTS event is much better constrained than the North Korea test. The network solutions illustrate the effect

  4. Isotropic sources and attenuation structure: Nuclear tests, mine collapses, and Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Sean Ricardo

    This dissertation investigates two different, but related, topics: isotropic sources and attenuation structure. The first section reports the analysis of explosions, earthquakes, and collapses in the western US using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. We find that in the band of interest (0.02-0.10 Hz) the source-type is insensitive to small velocity model perturbations and several kilometers of incorrect depth when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 5. However, error in the isotropic moment grows from 50% to 200% as the source depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m. We add an analysis of the Crandall Canyon Mine collapse that occurred on 6 August 2007 in Utah to our dataset. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007 demonstrating the low frequency regional waveforms carry sufficient information to distinguish the source-type. Finally, confidence in the regional full moment tensor inversion solution is described via the introduction of the network sensitivity solution (NSS), which takes into account the unique station distribution, frequency band, and signal-to-noise ratio of a given event scenario. The method is tested for the well-recorded nuclear test, JUNCTION, at the Nevada Test Site and the October 2006 North Korea test, where the station coverage is poor and the event magnitude is small. Both events contain large isotropic components that are 60% of the total moment, though the NTS event is much better constrained than the North Korea test. The network solutions illustrate the effect

  5. Microsecond Rearrangements of Hydrophobic Clusters in an Initially Collapsed Globule Prime Structure Formation during the Folding of a Small Protein.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-07-31

    Determining how polypeptide chain collapse initiates structure formation during protein folding is a long standing goal. It has been challenging to characterize experimentally the dynamics of the polypeptide chain, which lead to the formation of a compact kinetic molten globule (MG) in about a millisecond. In this study, the sub-millisecond events that occur early during the folding of monellin from the guanidine hydrochloride-unfolded state have been characterized using multiple fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes. The kinetic MG is shown to form in a noncooperative manner from the unfolded (U) state as a result of at least three different processes happening during the first millisecond of folding. Initial chain compaction completes within the first 37μs, and further compaction occurs only after structure formation commences at a few milliseconds of folding. The transient nonnative and native-like hydrophobic clusters with side chains of certain residues buried form during the initial chain collapse and the nonnative clusters quickly disassemble. Subsequently, partial chain desolvation occurs, leading to the formation of a kinetic MG. The initial chain compaction and subsequent chain rearrangement appear to be barrierless processes. The two structural rearrangements within the collapsed globule appear to prime the protein for the actual folding transition. PMID:27370109

  6. Results from Core-collapse Simulations with Multi-dimensional, Multi-angle Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Burrows, Adam; Ott, Christian D.; Livne, Eli

    2011-02-01

    We present new results from the only two-dimensional multi-group, multi-angle calculations of core-collapse supernova evolution. The first set of results from these calculations was published in 2008 by Ott et al. We have followed a nonrotating and a rapidly rotating 20 M sun model for ~400 ms after bounce. We show that the radiation fields vary much less with angle than the matter quantities in the region of net neutrino heating. This happens because most neutrinos are emitted from inner radiative regions and because the specific intensity is an integral over sources from many angles at depth. The latter effect can only be captured by multi-angle transport. We then compute the phase relationship between dipolar oscillations in the shock radius and in matter and radiation quantities throughout the post-shock region. We demonstrate a connection between variations in neutrino flux and the hydrodynamical shock oscillations, and use a variant of the Rayleigh test to estimate the detectability of these neutrino fluctuations in IceCube and Super-Kamiokande. Neglecting flavor oscillations, fluctuations in our nonrotating model would be detectable to ~10 kpc in IceCube, and a detailed power spectrum could be measured out to ~5 kpc. These distances are considerably lower in our rapidly rotating model or with significant flavor oscillations. Finally, we measure the impact of rapid rotation on detectable neutrino signals. Our rapidly rotating model has strong, species-dependent asymmetries in both its peak neutrino flux and its light curves. The peak flux and decline rate show pole-equator ratios of up to ~3 and ~2, respectively.

  7. On the interaction between shear dusty currents and buildings in vertical collapse: Theoretical aspects, experimental observations, and 3D numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; de Tullio, Marco D.; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Liu, Guilin

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the behavior of vertical building collapses that, at impact on the ground, can generate shear dusty currents. These currents macroscopically resemble natural currents like dust storms and pyroclastic density currents, which may heavily interact with the surroundings while propagating. In particular, shear dusty currents are generated because of building collapse after pulverization, whereas pyroclastic density currents can be generated because of eruptive column or volcano collapse after fragmentation. Pyroclastic density currents can move for kilometers, and then load the surroundings by flow dynamic pressure; a similar dynamical behavior occurs in shear dusty currents that load buildings. We employed 3D engineering fluid dynamics to simulate the generation (by vertical collapse), and the propagation and building interaction of shear dusty currents. We used an Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase approach to model the gas-particle flow, and an immersed boundary technique to mesh the domain, in order to account for sedimentary processes and complex 3D urban geometry in the computation. Results show that the local dynamic pressure of the shear current is amplified up to a factor ~ 10 because of flow-building interaction. Also, the surroundings consisting of multiple buildings and empty spaces make walls and streets as surfaces of particle accumulation, which from the collapse zone on can get thinner by exponential law. These results can help better assessing the intricate interaction between pyroclastic density currents and urban surroundings, as well as better link fragmentation, collapse and density current to each other.

  8. Catastrophic vs gradual collapse of thin-walled nanocrystalline Ni hollow cylinders as building blocks of microlattice structures.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Jang, Dongchan; Valdevit, Lorenzo; Schaedler, Tobias A; Jacobsen, Alan J; B Carter, William; Greer, Julia R

    2011-10-12

    Lightweight yet stiff and strong lattice structures are attractive for various engineering applications, such as cores of sandwich shells and components designed for impact mitigation. Recent breakthroughs in manufacturing enable efficient fabrication of hierarchically architected microlattices, with dimensional control spanning seven orders of magnitude in length scale. These materials have the potential to exploit desirable nanoscale-size effects in a macroscopic structure, as long as their mechanical behavior at each appropriate scale - nano, micro, and macro levels - is properly understood. In this letter, we report the nanomechanical response of individual microlattice members. We show that hollow nanocrystalline Ni cylinders differing only in wall thicknesses, 500 and 150 nm, exhibit strikingly different collapse modes: the 500 nm sample collapses in a brittle manner, via a single strain burst, while the 150 nm sample shows a gradual collapse, via a series of small and discrete strain bursts. Further, compressive strength in 150 nm sample is 99.2% lower than predicted by shell buckling theory, likely due to localized buckling and fracture events observed during in situ compression experiments. We attribute this difference to the size-induced transition in deformation behavior, unique to nanoscale, and discuss it in the framework of "size effects" in crystalline strength. PMID:21851060

  9. Collapse of an HIV-1 protease (1DIFA-dimer) in an effective solvent medium by a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2010-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (1DIFA) consists of two polypeptide chains, each monomer with 99 residues where two aspartic acid residues (Asp^25) form the active catalytic site. The conformation and dynamics of the protein chain (with 198 residues) are investigated on a cubic lattice where empty sites represent effective solvent. Specificities of residues are captured via an interaction matrix (residue-residue, residue-solvent) of the Lennard-Jones potential. We examine global properties such as the variation of the root mean square displacement and radius of gyration with the time steps for a range of solvent interaction strength. Local quantities include energy and mobility profiles of residues to understand the active segments (useful in proteolysis). The hydrophobic residues possess higher energy and lower mobility while the electrostatic and polar residues are more mobile despite their lower interaction energy. We find that the radius of gyration of the protein collapses (globular structure) in a narrow range of solvent interaction strength.

  10. A new equation of state with light nuclei and their weak interactions in core-collapse supernova simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2014-05-02

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ∼ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hands, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light nuclei, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  11. A new equation of state with light nuclei and their weak interactions in core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ˜ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hands, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light nuclei, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  12. Shallow seismic imaging of flank collapse structures in oceanic island volcanoes: Application to the Western Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, L.; González, P.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic flank collapse counts among the many hazards associated with volcanic activity. This type of event involves the mobilization of large volumes, producing debris avalanches. It affects mostly oceanic island volcanoes, involving the potential for tsunami occurrence. Geophysical imaging can illuminate subvolcanic features such as volcano-tectonic structures, magmatic plumbing systems or differences in rock type. The most commonly used geophysical methods are gravity, electromagnetics and seismics. In particular, seismic measurements quantify anomalies in seismic waves propagation velocities and can be used to obtain information on the subsurface arrangement of different materials. In the Western Canary Islands, the Cumbre Vieja volcano in La Palma (Canary Islands) has been proposed to be near the collapse stage. Previous geophysical studies that have been carried out on the flank of the volcano comprise gravity and electromagnetic methods. These types of surveys gather information on the deep structures of the volcano (1-2 km). In this project, we complement previous studies by using seismic methods to investigate the near-surface seismic structure of the Cumbre Vieja fault system (La Palma Island) and the structure of the well-developed San Andres fault system (El Hierro Island). We aim to compare the Cumbre Vieja and San Andres fault systems to infer the degree of maturity of collapse structures. We carried out reflection and refraction seismic surveys in order to image approximately the first 10 meters of the subsurface. We used 24 low frequency (4,5 Hz) geophones as receivers and a sledge hammer as the seismic source. The survey lines were located across visible parts of the fault systems at the Cumbre Vieja volcano and the San Andres fault in El Hierro. Here, we present the survey setup and results from the preliminary analysis of the data.

  13. Structural transformation in the collapse transition of the single flexible homopolymer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenbing

    1998-09-01

    The structural transformation in the coil-globule transition of a single flexible lattice chain has been investigated using dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The results based upon ensemble averaging illustrated that for the homopolymers with limited chain length, an intermediate state with a dense-core and molten-shell structure reversibly occurs in the transition region. It was attributed to a special microphase separation behavior in an isolated coil, performing with densifying the dense core and contracting the thin shell. The continuous appearance of the size transition and its tendency to discontinuity at the theta temperature with the chain length approaching infinity were illustrated by the coexistence curves of the monomers with limited chain length. A possible explanation and its implications to the general mechanism of protein folding are also discussed.

  14. The Campi Flegrei Deep Drilling Project: understanding the structure and mechanisms of large collapse calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Natale, Giuseppe; Troise, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Large calderas are the most dangerous volcanoes on the Earth. They are produced by collapse during explosive super-eruptions, which are capable of triggering global catastrophes comparable to large meteorite impacts. The mechanisms of unrest and eruption at calderas are at a large extent unknown and, as demonstrated by volcanological research in the last decades, they may be very different from those characterizing more commonly studied stratovolcanoes. Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) represents an ideal natural laboratory to fully understand mechanisms of caldera dynamics and to develop techniques for eruption forecast and effective risk mitigation. It is an active volcanic area marked by a quasi-circular caldera depression, formed by huge ignimbritic eruptions. The caldera has recently experienced intense deformation, originating uplift phenomena of more than 3.5 m in 15 years, with maximum rates of 1 m/year in the period 1982-1984, which caused the temporary evacuation of 30,000 people from the centre of Pozzuoli and exposed more than 500,000 to impending eruption risk (several millions in case of an ignimbritic eruption). This area will be the target of a leading International project, the ‘Campi Flegrei Deep Drilling Project', sponsored by ICDP, aimed to study in detail, by a crustal deviated drilling reaching the depth of about 4 km, the deep structure of the caldera. The role of deep drilling at this area is crucial. It could give a fundamental, precise insight into the substructure, the geometry and character of the geothermal systems and their role in the unrest episodes, as well as to explain magma chemistry and the mechanisms of magma-water interaction. One of the main goal will be giving a precise determination of the magma depth, based on the extrapolation of the geothermal gradient in purely conductive conditions, occurring below the maximum aquifer depth. The choice of Campi Flegrei as a target for the deep study of large calderas is justified by the

  15. The Development of Explosions in Axisymmetric Ab Initio Core-collapse Supernova Simulations of 12-25 M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenn, Stephen W.; Lentz, Eric J.; Hix, W. Raphael; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Harris, J. Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M.; Chertkow, Merek Austin; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N.

    2016-02-01

    We present four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations initiated from 12, 15, 20, and 25 {M}⊙ zero-age main sequence progenitors. All of the simulations yield explosions and have been evolved for at least 1.2 s after core bounce and 1 s after material first becomes unbound. These simulations were computed with our Chimera code employing RbR spectral neutrino transport, special and general relativistic transport effects, and state-of-the-art neutrino interactions. Continuing the evolution beyond 1 s after core bounce allows the explosions to develop more fully and the processes involved in powering the explosions to become more clearly evident. We compute explosion energy estimates, including the negative gravitational binding energy of the stellar envelope outside the expanding shock, of 0.34, 0.88, 0.38, and 0.70 Bethe (B ≡ {10}51 erg) and increasing at 0.03, 0.15, 0.19, and 0.52 {\\text{B s}}-1, respectively, for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 {M}⊙ models at the endpoint of this report. We examine the growth of the explosion energy in our models through detailed analyses of the energy sources and flows. We discuss how the explosion energies may be subject to stochastic variations as exemplfied by the effect of the explosion geometry of the 20 {M}⊙ model in reducing its explosion energy. We compute the proto-neutron star masses and kick velocities. We compare our results for the explosion energies and ejected {}56{Ni} masses against some observational standards despite the large error bars in both models and observations.

  16. The development of explosions in axisymmetric ab initio core-collapse supernova simulations of 12–25 M⊙ stars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bruenn, Stephen W.; Lentz, Eric J.; Hix, William Raphael; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Harris, James Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M.; Chertkow, Merek Austin; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; et al

    2016-02-16

    We present four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations initiated from 12, 15, 20, and 25 M⊙ zero-age main sequence progenitors. All of the simulations yield explosions and have been evolved for at least 1.2 s after core bounce and 1 s after material first becomes unbound. These simulations were computed with our Chimera code employing RbR spectral neutrino transport, special and general relativistic transport effects, and state-of-the-art neutrino interactions. Continuing the evolution beyond 1 s after core bounce allows the explosions to develop more fully and the processes involved in powering the explosions to become more clearly evident. Wemore » compute explosion energy estimates, including the negative gravitational binding energy of the stellar envelope outside the expanding shock, of 0.34, 0.88, 0.38, and 0.70 Bethe (B ≡ 1051 erg) and increasing at 0.03, 0.15, 0.19, and 0.52 BS–1, respectively, for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 M⊙ models at the endpoint of this report. We examine the growth of the explosion energy in our models through detailed analyses of the energy sources and flows. We discuss how the explosion energies may be subject to stochastic variations as exemplfied by the effect of the explosion geometry of the 20 M⊙ model in reducing its explosion energy. We compute the proto-neutron star masses and kick velocities. In conclusion, we compare our results for the explosion energies and ejected 56Ni masses against some observational standards despite the large error bars in both models and observations.« less

  17. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  18. Collapse in Thermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M. I.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dobson, D. P.; Davies, R.

    2013-12-01

    Collapsing thermal plumes have been investigated through experimental and numerical simulations. Collapsing plumes are an uncommon fluid dynamical phenomenon, usually seen when the buoyancy source is turned off. A series of fluid dynamical experiments were conducted on thermal plumes at a variety of temperature and viscosity contrasts, in a 26.5 cm^3 cubic tank heated by a constant temperature heater 2 cm in diameter and no-slip bottom and top surfaces. Working fluids included Lyle's Golden Syrup and ADM's Liquidose 436 syrup, which have strongly-temperature dependent viscosity and high Pr number (10^3-10^7 at experimental conditions). Visualisation included white light shadowgraphs and PIV of the central plane. Temperature contrasts ranged from 3-60°C, and two differing forms of collapse were identified. At very low temperature differences 'no rise' collapse was discovered, where the plumes stagnate in the lower third of the tank before collapsing. At temperature differences between 10-23°C normal evolution occurred until 'lens shape' collapse developed between midway and two-thirds of the distance from the base. The lens shape originated in the top of the conduit and was present throughout collapse. At temperatures above ΔT=23°C the plumes follow the expected growth and shape and flatten out at the top of the tank. Thermal collapse remains difficult to explain given experimental conditions (continuous heating). Instead it is possible that small density differences arising from crystallization at ambient temperatures changes plume buoyancy-inducing collapse. We show results on the evolution of the refractive index of the syrup through time to ascertain this possibility. Preliminary numerical results using Fluidity will be presented to explore a greater parameter range of viscosity contrasts and tank aspect ratios.

  19. First MHD simulation of collapse and fragmentation of magnetized molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2004-02-01

    This is the first paper about fragmentation and mass outflow in molecular clouds by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) nested-grid simulations. The binary star formation process is studied, paying particular attention to the fragmentation of a rotating magnetized molecular cloud. We assume an isothermal rotating and magnetized cylindrical cloud in hydrostatic balance. Non-axisymmetric as well as axisymmetric perturbations are added to the initial state and the subsequent evolutions are studied. The evolution is characterized by three parameters: the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric perturbations, the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. As a result, it is found that non-axisymmetry hardly evolves in the early phase, but begins to grow after the gas contracts and forms a thin disc. Disc formation is strongly promoted by the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. There are two types of fragmentation: that from a ring and that from a bar. Thin adiabatic cores fragment if their thickness is less than 1/4 of the radius. For the fragments to survive, they should be formed in a heavily elongated barred core or a flat round disc. In the models showing fragmentation, outflows from respective fragments are found as well as those driven by the rotating bar or the disc.

  20. Computer simulations of stellar collapse and supernovae explosions - Non-rotating and rotating models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrandt, W.

    1982-11-01

    Computer simulation models of type II supernova explosions are reviewed. For nonrotating models, it is discussed whether or not a shock wave generated from the rebounding core by itself causes mass ejection. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic models are discussed in detail. In the former, entropy is strictly conserved and weak interaction reactions are ignored. Consequently, the electron concentration stays high and a very energetic supernova explosion results. In the nonadiabatic model, most of the shock energy is consumed in dissociating heavy nuclei on the way out, the rest being radiated away by neutrinos. In none of the recent computations does a supernova explosion result; possibilities to overcome these difficulties are discussed. Then, computation in which the assumption of spherical symmetry is omitted are addressed. Rotating models are considered, and it is shown that even initially moderately rotating stellar cores add important modifications to the simple core-bounce picture. Finally, processes resulting from the presence of magnetic fields, lepton number, entropy gradients, and unburned nuclear fuel are treated.

  1. A comparative study of chemical kinetics models for HMX in mesoscale simulations of shock initiation due to void collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Nirmal; Schweigert, Igor; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    The development of chemical kinetics schemes for use in modeling the reactive mechanics of energetic materials such as HMX has been an active area of research. Decomposition, deflagration and detonation models need to predict time to ignition and locations of onset of chemical reaction in energetic materials when used in meso- and macro-scale simulations. Modeling the chemical processes and development of appropriate kinetic law is challenging work because of lack of experimental data. However, significant work has been done in this area. Multistep kinetic models by Tarver and Tran, Henson and Smilowitz have provided plausible chemical kinetic rate laws for HMX. These models vary in the way they model the details of the decomposition process. Hence, a comparative study of different models will provide an understanding of the uncertainties involved in predicting ignition in HMX. In the current work, hot-spot ignition due to void collapse in shock compressed HMX has been analyzed using several reaction rate models, including the Tarver-Tran 4-equation model, the Henson-Smilowitz 7-equation model, and a new rate model that combines the condensed-phase decomposition rates measured by Brill et al and the detailed mechanism of nitramine flame chemistry due to Yetter et al. The chemical models have been incorporated in a massively parallel Eulerian code SCIMITAR3D. The variations in the predicted thresholds due to differences in the rate models will be discussed.

  2. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Transient simulation and analysis of current collapse due to trapping effects in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xing-Ye; Feng, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuan-Gang; Gu, Guo-Dong; Song, Xu-Bo; Cai, Shu-Jun

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional (2D) transient simulations of an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) are carried out and analyzed to investigate the current collapse due to trapping effects. The coupling effect of the trapping and thermal effects are taken into account in our simulation. The turn-on pulse gate-lag transient responses with different quiescent biases are obtained, and the pulsed current-voltage (I-V) curves are extracted from the transients. The experimental results of both gate-lag transient current and pulsed I-V curves are reproduced by the simulation, and the current collapse due to the trapping effect is explained from the view of physics based on the simulation results. In addition, the results show that bulk acceptor traps can influence the gate-lag transient characteristics of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs besides surface traps and that the thermal effect can accelerate the emission of captured electrons for traps. Pulse transient simulation is meaningful in analyzing the mechanism of dynamic current collapse, and the work in this paper will benefit the reliability study and model development of GaN-based devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61306113).

  4. Characterization of the structural collapse undergone by an unstable system of ultrasoft particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestipino, Santi; Malescio, Gianpietro

    2016-09-01

    The effective repulsion between macromolecules such as polymer chains or dendrimers is everywhere finite, implying that interaction centers can even coincide. If, in addition, the large-distance attraction is sufficiently strong, then the system is driven unstable. An unstable system lacks a conventional thermodynamics since, in the infinite-size limit, it eventually collapses to a finite-size cluster (for instance, a polymer dispersion undergoes irreversible coagulation when increasing the amount of dissolved salt beyond a certain limit). Using a double-Gaussian (DG) potential for demonstration, we study the phase behavior of a system of ultrasoft particles as a function of the attraction strength η. Above a critical threshold ηc, the DG system is unstable but its collective behavior is far from trivial since two separate regions of the thermodynamic plane can be identified, based on the value taken by the average waiting time for collapse: this is finite and small on one side of the boundary, while presumably infinite in the other region. In order to make sense of this evidence, we consider a stable system of particles interacting through a DG potential augmented with a hard core (stabilized DG, or SDG potential). We provide arguments supporting the view that the boundary line of the unstable DG model is the remnant of the spinodal line of a fluid-fluid phase transition occurring in the SDG model when the hard-core diameter is sent to zero.

  5. Influence of the structure on the collapse of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based microgels: an insight by quantitative dielectric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Zhao, Kongshuang

    2016-05-14

    The collapse of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/poly(acrylic acid) semi-interpenetrating polymer network (PNIPAM/PAA SIPN) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(NIPAM-co-AA)) microgel suspensions is studied by dielectric spectroscopy in a frequency range from 40 Hz to 110 MHz as a function of temperature. Dielectric measurements show that the structure affects the relaxation behavior of microgels: two relaxations (micro-Brownian motion and interfacial polarization at low frequency and counterion polarization at high frequency) are observed in the SIPN microgel whose charges mainly exist in domains and one relaxation (interfacial polarization) is observed in the copolymer microgel whose charges distribute in the whole network. A dielectric model is proposed to describe the collapsed microgel suspensions, from which some parameters, such as the volume fraction and the permittivity of microgels, were calculated using Hanai's equation. The temperature dependencies of these parameters show that the SIPN microgel has better low-temperature swelling properties and thermal responsiveness. This is caused by different polymer-solvent and electrostatic repulsion interactions in different microgels. Compared with pure PNIPAM, the relationship of volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) is VPTTP(NIPAM-co-AA) > VPTTPNIPAM/PAA SIPN > VPTTPNIPAM, and it is explained from the viewpoint of interaction. Besides, the activation energy data prove that the structure influences the electrical properties of microgels, which is consistent with the results obtained from quantitative dielectric analysis. PMID:27035253

  6. Tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, C S

    1991-06-01

    Tracheal collapse, one form of tracheal obstruction, is classically described as occurring in middle-aged or older toy breed dogs with a history of chronic "goose-honk" cough. Many dogs with tracheal collapse fit this description, but others are young and may wheeze, hack, or have no cough at all. Patients with a history and physical examination compatible with tracheal collapse are definitively diagnosed based on the findings of the following respiratory tract examinations: inspiratory/expiratory radiographs, fluoroscopy, culture and susceptibility, and a thorough endoscopic evaluation. Prosthetic ring tracheoplasty relieves many of the signs of tracheal obstruction but does not cure the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are expected to give the dog a better quality life. Following prosthetic ring tracheoplasty, most dogs are more active, breathe easier, cough less, and require less medical treatment for respiratory disease. PMID:1802250

  7. 3-cm Fine Structure Masers: A Unique Signature of Supermassive Black Hole Formation via Direct Collapse in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Sethi, Shiv; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    The direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario describes the isothermal collapse of a pristine gas cloud directly into a massive, {M}{BH} = 104-106{M}⊙ black hole. In this paper we show that large H i column densities of primordial gas at T˜ {10}4 K with low molecular abundance—which represent key aspects of the DCBH scenario—provide optimal conditions for the pumping of the 2p-level of atomic hydrogen by trapped Lyα photons. This Lyα pumping mechanism gives rise to an inverted level population of the 2{s}1/2-2{p}3/2 transition, and therefore also gives rise to stimulated fine structure emission at λ =3.04 {cm} (rest-frame). We show that simplified models of the DCBH scenario amplify the CMB by up to a factor of ˜ {10}5, above which the maser saturates. Hyperfine splitting of the 3 cm transition gives rise to a characteristic broad (FWHM ˜ tens of MHz in the observers frame) asymmetric line profile. This signal subtends an angular scale of ˜1-10 mas, which translates to a flux of ˜0.3-3 μJy, which is detectable with ultra-deep surveys being planned with SKA1-MID. While challenging, as the signal is visible for a fraction of the collapse time of the cloud, the matching required physical conditions imply that a detection of the redshifted 3-cm emission line could provide direct evidence for the DCBH scenario.

  8. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. II. A two-dimensional analytical model for a rotating and accreting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Most stars are born in the gaseous protocluster environment where the gas is reprocessed after the global collapse from the diffuse molecular cloud. The knowledge of this intermediate step gives more accurate constraints on star formation characteristics. Aims: We demonstrate that a virialized globally supported structure, in which star formation happens, is formed out of a collapsing molecular cloud, and we derive a mapping from the parent cloud parameters to the protocluster to predict its properties with a view to confront analytical calculations with observations and simulations. Methods: We decomposed the virial theorem into two dimensions to account for the rotation and the flattened geometry. Equilibrium was found by balancing rotation, turbulence, and self-gravity, while turbulence was maintained through accretion driving and it dissipates in one crossing time. We estimated the angular momentum and the accretion rate of the protocluster from the parent cloud properties. Results: The two-dimensional virial model predicts the size and velocity dispersion given the mass of the protocluster and that of the parent cloud. The gaseous protoclusters lie on a sequence of equilibrium with the trend R ~ M0.5 with limited variations, depending on the evolutionary stage, parent cloud, and parameters that are not well known, such as turbulence driving efficiency by accretion and turbulence anisotropy. The model reproduces observations and simulation results successfully. Conclusions: The properties of protoclusters follow universal relations and they can be derived from that of the parent cloud. The gaseous protocluster is an important primary stage of stellar cluster formation, and should be taken into account when studying star formation. Using simple estimates to infer the peak position of the core mass function (CMF) we find a weak dependence on the cluster mass, suggesting that the physical conditions inside protoclusters may contribute to set a CMF, and by

  9. AXISYMMETRIC AB INITIO CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS OF 12-25 M{sub Sun} STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruenn, Stephen W.; Yakunin, Konstantin N.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Blondin, John M.; Endeve, Eirik; Marronetti, Pedro

    2013-04-10

    We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley and Heger progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub Sun }. All four models exhibit shock revival over {approx}200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 M{sub Sun} model and the standing accretion shock instability appearing first in the 25 M{sub Sun} model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 M{sub Sun} model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B = 10{sup 51} erg) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub Sun} models, respectively, and are increasing. The three least massive of our models are already sufficiently energetic to completely unbind the envelopes of their progenitors (i.e., to explode), as evidenced by our best estimate of their explosion energies, which first become positive at 320, 380, and 440 ms after bounce. By 850 ms the 12 M{sub Sun} diagnostic explosion energy has saturated at 0.38 B, and our estimate for the final kinetic energy of the ejecta is {approx}0.3 B, which is comparable to observations for lower mass progenitors.

  10. Dramatic changes in the electronic structure upon transition to the collapsed tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaka, R. S.; Jiang, Rui; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Harmon, B. N.; Kaminski, Adam; Tomić, Milan; Valentí, Roser; Lee, Yongbin

    2014-01-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to study the electronic structure of CaFe2As2 in the collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase. This unusual phase of iron arsenic high-temperature superconductors was hard to measure as it exists only under pressure. By inducing internal strain, via the postgrowth thermal treatment of single crystals, we were able to stabilize the CT phase at ambient pressure. We find significant differences in the Fermi surface topology and band dispersion data from the more common orthorhombic-antiferromagnetic or tetragonal-paramagnetic phases, consistent with electronic structure calculations. The top of the hole bands sinks below the Fermi level, which destroys the nesting present in parent phases. The absence of nesting in this phase, along with an apparent loss of Fe magnetic moment, are now clearly experimentally correlated with the lack of superconductivity in this phase.

  11. Core Formation And Gravothermal Collapse Of Self-interacting Dark Matter Halos: Monte Carlo N-body simulation versus Conducting Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Shapiro, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) has been proposed to solve the cuspy core problem of dark matter halos in standard CDM. There are two ways to investigate the effect of the 2-body, non-gravitational, elastic collisions of SIDM, Monte-Carlo N-body simulation and a conducting fluid model. The former is a gravitational N-body simulation with a Monte Carlo algorithm for the SIDM scattering that changes the direction of N-body particles randomly according to a given scattering cross section. The latter is a system of fluid conservation equations with a thermal conduction that describes the collisional effect, which was originally invented to describe the gravothermal collapse of globular clusters. Our previous work found a significant disagreement as regards the strength of collisionality required to solve cuspy core problem. However the two methods have not been properly tested against each other. Here, we make direct comparisons between Monte Carlo N-body simulations and analytic and numerical solutions of the conducting fluid (gaseous) model, for various isolated self-interacting dark matter halos. The N-body simulations reproduce the analytical self-similar solution of gravothermal collapse in the fluid model when one free parameter, the coefficient of heat conduction C, is chosen to be 0.75. The gravothermal collapse results of the simulations agrees well with our 1D numerical hydro solutions of the fluid model within 20% for other initial conditions, including Plummer model, Hernquist profile and NFW profile. In conclusion the conducting fluid model is in reasonably good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations for isolated halos. We will pursue the origin of the reported disagreement between two methods in a cosmological environment by comparing new N-body simulations with fully cosmological initial conditions.

  12. Collapsing Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  13. Asymmetrically multi-collapsed structure of Kikai caldera in southern off Kyushu Island, Japan: A reconstruction from seismic reflection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegami, F.; Kiyokawa, S.; Oiwane, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Minowa, Y.; Kuratomi, T.

    2012-12-01

    Kikai caldera (Matsumoto, 1943) is a mostly submerged highly active caldera complex located in the southern Japan 40 km off Kyushu Island. The caldera has bathymetrically two rims partially that are previously considered as older-outer and newer-inner ones (Yokoyama et al., 1966). The caldera is believed to be the source of Akahoya tephra (Machida and Arai, 1978) which date was determined as 7300 cal. BP (Fukusawa, 1995) which is the most recent VEI-7 class eruption in the eastern margin of Asia. Intense earthquakes (Naruo and Kobayashi, 2002), low-aspect ratio Koya ignimbrite (Maeno and Taniguchi, 2007) and tsunami (Geshi, 2009) are presumed to have taken place at the climax of the eruption. There are at least two other series of giant eruption deposits that are considered to have originated from the Kikai caldera (Ono et al., 1986) and this indicates that it has been serving as an eruptive center for the past 150,000 years. We conducted seismic reflection observations in two survey cruises (KT-10-18 and KT-11-11) in 2010 and 2011 using a research vessel Tansei-maru of JAMSTEC (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology). The sound source was a 150 cubic inches G-I gun with 10 seconds of shot interval, and a 48-channled streamer cable was used for acquisition. Totally 24 profiles were obtained with the speed of 4 knots. First, the absence of large fault in northern and western caldera rim indicates Kikai likely had an asymmetric "trapdoor" style collapse (Lipman, 1995) rather than the ideal "piston" type one. Inner and outer topographic rims at the east to south do correspond with large faults, however the both of them may have worked in 7300 BP eruption because they reach to the seafloor. Such asymmetric multi-collapse would provide some characteristics to the climactic pyroclastic flow in 7300 BP. Second, the bathymetric rise at the center of the caldera consists of high-amplitude surface and chaotic thick facies outwardly collapsed by intense normal

  14. Peer review of the National Transportation Safety Board structural analysis of the I-35W bridge collapse.

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, Kenneth West; Redmond, James Michael; Wellman, Gerald William

    2008-10-01

    The Engineering Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories provided an independent peer review of the structural analysis supporting the National Transportation Safety Board investigation of the August 1, 2007 collapse of the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis. The purpose of the review was to provide an impartial critique of the analysis approach, assumptions, solution techniques, and conclusions. Subsequent to reviewing numerous supporting documents, a SNL team of staff and management visited NTSB to participate in analysis briefings, discussions with investigators, and examination of critical elements of the bridge wreckage. This report summarizes the opinion of the review team that the NTSB analysis effort was appropriate and provides compelling supporting evidence for the NTSB probable cause conclusion.

  15. Ascraeus Mons Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Ascraeus Mons. The pits and channels are all related to lava tube formation and emptying.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 8, Longitude 253.9 East (106.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  16. Collapse of the native structure caused by a single amino acid exchange in human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Binter, Alexandra; Pulido, Sergio A.; Saf, Robert; Zangger, Klaus; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is essential for the antioxidant defense system, stabilization of tumor suppressors (e.g. p53, p33, and p73), and activation of quinone-based chemotherapeutics. Overexpression of NQO1 in many solid tumors, coupled with its ability to convert quinone-based chemotherapeutics into potent cytotoxic compounds, have made it a very attractive target for anticancer drugs. A naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (C609T) leading to an amino acid exchange (P187S) has been implicated in the development of various cancers and poor survival rates following anthracyclin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite its importance for cancer prediction and therapy, the exact molecular basis for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S is currently unknown. Therefore, we solved the crystal structure of NQO1 P187S. Surprisingly, this structure is almost identical to NQO1. Employing a combination of NMR spectroscopy and limited proteolysis experiments, we demonstrated that the single amino acid exchange destabilized interactions between the core and C-terminus, leading to depopulation of the native structure in solution. This collapse of the native structure diminished cofactor affinity and led to a less competent FAD-binding pocket, thus severely compromising the catalytic capacity of the variant protein. Hence, our findings provide a rationale for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S with a frequently occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:25143260

  17. Fast collapse but slow formation of secondary structure elements in the refolding transition of E. coli adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ratner, V; Amir, D; Kahana, E; Haas, E

    2005-09-23

    The various models proposed for protein folding transition differ in their order of appearance of the basic steps during this process. In this study, steady state and time-resolved dynamic non-radiative excitation energy transfer (FRET and trFRET) combined with site specific labeling experiments were applied in order to characterize the initial transient ensemble of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK) molecules upon shifting conditions from those favoring denaturation to refolding and from folding to denaturing. Three sets of labeled AK mutants were prepared, which were designed to probe the equilibrium and transient distributions of intramolecular segmental end-to-end distances. A 176 residue section (residues 28-203), which spans most of the 214 residue molecule, and two short secondary structure chain segments including an alpha-helix (residues 169-188) and a predominantly beta-strand region (residues 188-203), were labeled. Upon fast change of conditions from denaturing to folding, the end-to-end distance of the 176 residue chain section showed an immediate collapse to a mean value of 26 A. Under the same conditions, the two short secondary structure elements did not respond to this shift within the first ten milliseconds, and retained the characteristics of a fully unfolded state. Within the first 10 ms after changes of the solvent from folding to denaturing, only minor changes were observed at the local environments of residues 203 and 169. The response of these same local environments to the shift of conditions from denaturing to folding occurred within the dead time of the mixing device. Thus, the response of the CORE domain of AK to fast transfer from folding to unfolding conditions is slow at all three conformational levels that were probed, and for at least a few milliseconds the ensemble of folded molecules is maintained under unfolding conditions. A different order of the changes was observed upon initiation of refolding. The AK molecules undergo

  18. Numerical simulation of bubble collapse and the transfer of vapor and noncondensable gas through the bubble interface using the ghost fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinbo, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Watanabe, M.; Takahira, H.

    2015-12-01

    The ghost fluid method is improved to include heat and mass transfer across the gas- liquid interface during the bubble collapse in a compressible liquid. This transfer is due to both nonequilibrium phase transition at the interface and diffusion of the noncondensable gas across the interface. In the present method, the ghost fluids are defined with the intention of conserving the total mass, momentum, and energy, as well as the mass of each component while considering the heat and mass fluxes across the interface. The gas phase inside the bubble is a mixture of vapor and noncondensable gas, where binary diffusion between the mixture components is taken into account. The gas diffusion in the surrounding liquid is also considered. This method is applied to a simulation of a single spherical bubble collapse with heat and mass transfer across the interface in a compressible liquid. When noncondensable gas is present, it accumulates near the interface due to vapor condensation, thereby preventing further condensation. This results in a weaker bubble collapse than the case without noncondensable gas.

  19. Structure and evolution of collapse sinkholes: Combined interpretation from physico-chemical modelling and geophysical field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-09-01

    In karst rocks (limestone, anhydrite, gypsum, etc.), water flowing through fissures and bedding partings can enlarge voids either by physical or chemical dissolution. Within a geologically short period of time, the increase in void space creates a large secondary porosity typical for soluble rocks, which is responsible for preferential flow through the karst rock, often through cave systems with passages reaching the meter-scale and more. This large-scale voids in the sub-surface can initiate collapse of the overburden, either through wall or roof breakdown, and the initial void created by dissolution can migrate upwards and finally cause a surface collapse and create a collapse sinkhole. While the dissolution part of this evolution is in the order of 10,000-100,000 years, the final mechanical collapse can occur on time scales of days. We have studied a typical collapse sinkhole site in the southern Harz Mountains in Germany, with anhydrite (partly converted to gypsum) as soluble rock in the sub-surface. We discuss geophysical measurements (gravity, electrical resistivity tomography, self potential, magnetics) from the location to identify the local collapse sinkhole signal and the possibility to separate the collapse sinkhole signal from the broader geological signal of the study site. We model the initiation of sub-surface voids with our numerical tool KARSTAQUIFER, a 3D karst evolution model describing flow and dissolution in karst rocks. We apply this numerical model to predict collapse sinkholes in a locality in the Harz Mountains.

  20. Collapse Miscellany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearle, Philip

    An introduction to the CSL (Continuous Spontaneous Localization) theory of dynamical wave function collapse is provided, including a derivation of CSL from two postulates, a new result. There follows a review of applications to a free particle, or to a `small' rigid cluster of free particles, in a single wave-packet and in interfering packets: the latter result is new. [Editors note: for a video of the talk given by Prof. Pearle at the Aharonov-80 conference in 2012 at Chapman University, see http://quantum.chapman.edu/talk-11.

  1. Super-resolution microscopy reveals a preformed NEMO lattice structure that is collapsed in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Scholefield, Janine; Henriques, Ricardo; Savulescu, Anca F; Fontan, Elisabeth; Boucharlat, Alix; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Smahi, Asma; Israël, Alain; Agou, Fabrice; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB pathway has critical roles in cancer, immunity and inflammatory responses. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which mutations in genes involved in the pathway cause disease has provided valuable insight into its regulation, yet many aspects remain unexplained. Several lines of evidence have led to the hypothesis that the regulatory/sensor protein NEMO acts as a biological binary switch. This hypothesis depends on the formation of a higher-order structure, which has yet to be identified using traditional molecular techniques. Here we use super-resolution microscopy to reveal the existence of higher-order NEMO lattice structures dependent on the presence of polyubiquitin chains before NF-κB activation. Such structures may permit proximity-based trans-autophosphorylation, leading to cooperative activation of the signalling cascade. We further show that NF-κB activation results in modification of these structures. Finally, we demonstrate that these structures are abrogated in cells derived from incontinentia pigmenti patients. PMID:27586688

  2. CCD photometry of globular cluster core structure. 2: U-band profiles for 15 candidate collapsed-core clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugger, Phyllis M.; Cohn, Haldan N.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1995-01-01

    We present U-band CCD surface brightness profiles for 15 of the 21 globular clusters that have been identified as having collapsed cores by Djorgovski & King (1986). Fourteen of the clusters were observed with the Cerro Tololo 4 m telescope; NGC 7078 was observed with the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6 m telescope (CFHT). We have fitted the profiles with seeing-convolved power laws, both with and without cores, to assess the evidence for central power-law structure and to place upper limits on core radius r(sub c). We find nine of the clusters (NGC 5946, NGC 6284, NGC 6293, NGC 6325, NGC 6342, NGC 6558, NGC 6624, NGC 6681, and NGC 7078) to have unresolved cores, with upper limits r(sub c) less than or = 1.9 arcsecs. Three of the clusters (NGC 6453, NGC 6522, and NGC 7099) have marginally resolved cores, with upper limits in the range 2.7 arcsecs less than or = r(sub c) less than or = 3.4 arcsecs. The remaining three clusters (NGC 6355, NGC 6397, and NGC 6752) have resolved cores. Of the latter three clusters, NGC 6355 and NGC 6752 are consistent with single-mass King model structure. The median cluster distances are 9.2 kpc for those with unresolved cores, 7.2 kpc for those with marginally resolved cores, and 4.1 kpc for those with resolved cores. The 13 clusters that do not resemble single-mass King models have central power-law structure with surface brightness slopes in the range of d ln S/d ln r = -0.6 to -0.8. These slopes are consistent with the models of Grabhorn et al. (1992) for clusters evolving beyond core collapse. The models include a centrally concentrated population of nonluminous remnants with masses in the range 1.2-1.4 solar mass, thus providing evidence for significant neutron star populations in most of our cluster sample. This finding is consistent with the observation of centrally concentrated low-mass X-ray binary and millisecond pulsar populations in several clusters.

  3. Collapse Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02154 Collapse Tubes

    The discontinuous channels in this image are collapsed lava tubes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.7N, Longitude 317.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Relationship between tissue structural collapse and disappearance of flesh transparency during postmortem changes in squid mantles.

    PubMed

    Kugino, Mutsuko; Kugino, Kenji; Tamura, Tomoko; Asakura, Tomiko

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between squid flesh transparency and muscle tissue microstructure. Squid mantle muscle was stored at 4 degrees C after being transported for 2 h by 4 different transportation methods used commonly in Japan (Group 1: live squid packed in ice-cold seawater; Group 2: live squid packed at 4 degrees C; Group 3: squid killed immediately after harvest and packed at 4 degrees C; Group 4: live squid packed in a fish tank containing seawater). Parameters of muscle tissue transparency were measured by an image analysis of digital images of squid muscle tissue. The mantle muscle tissue was observed under a transmission electron microscope to determine the postmortem structural changes at the cellular level. The ATP content of muscle tissue and rupture energy of squid flesh were also measured. As a result, the transparency of squid flesh and the ATP content of the muscles showed the same pattern of change in degree as time passed. The values of these parameters were highest in the group of squid killed immediately followed in order by those transported live, the refrigerated squid, and squid stored in ice-cold seawater. The mantle muscle tissue started to lose its transparency when the ATP in the muscle tissue started to decline. Disintegration of squid muscle tissue structure at the cellular level during storage under refrigeration for 24 h (4 degrees C) was observed in all methods of transportation. This suggested that destruction of the squid muscle tissue structure by autolysis is remarkably fast. The muscle tissue structure disintegrates due to decomposition of the muscle proteins, and muscle transparency is lost because the entire muscle develops a mixed coarse-minute structure. PMID:20492111

  5. Opening of the blood-brain barrier tight junction due to shock wave induced bubble collapse: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Goliaei, Ardeshir; Adhikari, Upendra; Berkowitz, Max L

    2015-08-19

    Passage of a shock wave across living organisms may produce bubbles in the blood vessels and capillaries. It was suggested that collapse of these bubbles imposed by an impinging shock wave can be responsible for the damage or even destruction of the blood-brain barrier. To check this possibility, we performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on systems that contained a model of tight junction from the blood-brain barrier. In our model, we represent the tight junction by two pairs of interacting proteins, claudin-15. Some of the simulations were done in the absence of a nanobubble, some in its presence. Our simulations show that when no bubble is present in the system, no damage to tight junction is observed when the shock wave propagates across it. In the presence of a nanobubble, even when the impulse of the shock wave is relatively low, the implosion of the bubble causes serious damage to our model tight junction. PMID:26075566

  6. Structure and evolution of collapse sinkholes: Combined interpretation from physico-chemical modelling and geophysical field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko

    2015-04-01

    In karst rocks (limestone, anhydrite, gypsum, ...), water flowing through fissures and bedding partings can enlarge voids either by physical and/or chemical dissolution. Within a geologically short period of time, the increase in void space creates a large secondary porosity typical for soluble rocks, which is responsible for preferential flow through the karst rock, often through cave systems with passages reaching the meter-scale and more. This large-scale voids in the sub-surface can initiate collapse of the overburden, either through wall or roof breakdown, and the initial void created by dissolution can migrate upwards and finally cause a surface collapse and create a collapse sinkhole. While the dissolution part of this evolution is in the order of 10,000-100,000 years, the final mechanical collapse can occur on time scales of days. We have studied the initiation of sub-surface voids with our numerical tool KARSTAQUIFER, a 3D karst evolution model describing flow and dissolution in karst rocks. We apply this numerical model to a typical collapse sinkhole site in the southern Harz Mountains in Germany, with anhydrite as soluble rock in the sub-surface. We then discuss geophysical measurements (gravity, electrical resistivity tomography, self potential, magnetics) from the location to identify the local collapse sinkhole signal and the possibility to separate the collapse sinkhole signal from the broader geological signal of the study site.

  7. Formation of fractal-like structures driven by carbon nanotubes-based collapsed hollow capsules.

    PubMed

    Salgueiriño-Maceira, Verónica; Hoppe, Cristina E; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A

    2007-01-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) based hollow capsules were obtained by degradation under acidic conditions of core-shell nanocomposites build up upon adsorption of multilayers of CNTs (shell) onto melamine-formaldehyde (MF) spheres (core). By evaporation of the dispersions obtained, polymeric fractal patterns from the degradation products of the MF core were formed onto silicon wafers. The proposed mechanism for the formation of these structures is based on the role of the capsules as arrangements of heterogeneities that facilitate the dewetting of the liquid polymeric films. PMID:17214481

  8. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  9. Structured building model reduction toward parallel simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Justin R.; Hencey, Brondon M.

    2013-08-26

    Building energy model reduction exchanges accuracy for improved simulation speed by reducing the number of dynamical equations. Parallel computing aims to improve simulation times without loss of accuracy but is poorly utilized by contemporary simulators and is inherently limited by inter-processor communication. This paper bridges these disparate techniques to implement efficient parallel building thermal simulation. We begin with a survey of three structured reduction approaches that compares their performance to a leading unstructured method. We then use structured model reduction to find thermal clusters in the building energy model and allocate processing resources. Experimental results demonstrate faster simulation and low error without any interprocessor communication.

  10. Fires in storages of LFO: Analysis of hazard of structural collapse of steel-aluminium containers.

    PubMed

    Rebec, A; Kolšek, J; Plešec, P

    2016-04-01

    Pool fires of light fuel oil (LFO) in above-ground storages with steel-aluminium containers are discussed. A model is developed for assessments of risks of between-tank fire spread. Radiative effects of the flame body are accounted for by a solid flame radiation model. Thermal profiles evolved due to fire in the adjacent tanks and their consequential structural response is pursued in an exact (materially and geometrically non-linear) manner. The model's derivation is demonstrated on the LFO tank storage located near the Port of Koper (Slovenia). In support of the model, data from literature are adopted where appropriate. Analytical expressions are derived correspondingly for calculations of emissive characteristics of LFO pool fires. Additional data are collected from experiments. Fire experiments conducted on 300cm diameter LFO pans and at different wind speeds and high-temperature uniaxial tension tests of the analysed aluminium alloys types 3xxx and 6xxx are presented. The model is of an immediate fire engineering practical value (risk analyses) or can be used for further research purposes (e.g. sensitivity and parametric studies). The latter use is demonstrated in the final part of the paper discussing possible effects of high-temperature creep of 3xxx aluminium. PMID:26802486

  11. Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation. I. Collapsing Cores within Collapsing Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo-Romero, Raúl; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Loughnane, Robert M.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor-Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like r-2 density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with the background, has a time-variable mass, and evolves along the locus of the ensemble of observed prestellar cores in a plot of M/MBE versus M, where M is the core's mass and MBE is the critical BE mass, spanning the range from the “stable” to the “unstable” regimes, even though it is collapsing at all times. We conclude that the presence of an unstable background allows a core to evolve dynamically from the time when it first appears, even when it resembles a pressure-confined, stable BE-sphere. The core can be thought of as a ram-pressure confined BE-sphere, with an increasing mass due to the accretion from the unstable background.

  12. Fluid-structure Interaction Simulations of Deformable Soft Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman

    2011-11-01

    Soft tissue interacts with the surrounding fluid environment in many biological and biomedical applications. Simulating such an interaction is quite challenging due to the large non-linear deformations of tissue, flow pulsatility, transition to turbulence, and non-linear fluid-structure interaction. We have extended our previous three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) framework for rigid bodies (Borazjani, Ge, and Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational Physics, 2008) to deformable soft tissue by coupling our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver for fluids with a non-linear large deformation finite element method for soft tissue. We use Fung-type constitutive law for the soft tissue that can capture the stress-strain behavior of the tissue. The FSI solver adopts a strongly-coupled partitioned approach that is stabilized with under-relaxation and Aitken acceleration technique. We validate our solvers against the experimental data for tissue valves and elastic tubes. We show the capabilities of our solver by simulating the fluid-structure interaction of tissue valves implanted in the aortic positions and elastic collapsible tubes. This work was partly supported by the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo.

  13. Towards a formal description of the collapse approach to the inflationary origin of the seeds of cosmic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Sudarsky, Daniel E-mail: sudarsky@nucleares.unam.mx

    2012-07-01

    Inflation plays a central role in our current understanding of the universe. According to the standard viewpoint, the homogeneous and isotropic mode of the inflaton field drove an early phase of nearly exponential expansion of the universe, while the quantum fluctuations (uncertainties) of the other modes gave rise to the seeds of cosmic structure. However, if we accept that the accelerated expansion led the universe into an essentially homogeneous and isotropic space-time, with the state of all the matter fields in their vacuum (except for the zero mode of the inflaton field), we can not escape the conclusion that the state of the universe as a whole would remain always homogeneous and isotropic. It was recently proposed in [A. Perez, H. Sahlmann and D. Sudarsky, {sup O}n the quantum origin of the seeds of cosmic structure{sup ,} Class. Quant. Grav. 23 (2006) 2317–2354] that a collapse (representing physics beyond the established paradigm, and presumably associated with a quantum-gravity effect à la Penrose) of the state function of the inflaton field might be the missing element, and thus would be responsible for the emergence of the primordial inhomogeneities. Here we will discuss a formalism that relies strongly on quantum field theory on curved space-times, and within which we can implement a detailed description of such a process. The picture that emerges clarifies many aspects of the problem, and is conceptually quite transparent. Nonetheless, we will find that the results lead us to argue that the resulting picture is not fully compatible with a purely geometric description of space-time.

  14. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  15. Elements of Regolith Simulant's Cost Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of lunar regolith simulants is much higher than many users anticipate. After all, it is nothing more than broken rock. This class will discuss the elements which make up the cost structure for simulants. It will also consider which elements can be avoided under certain circumstances and which elements might be altered by the application of additional research and development.

  16. Analysing Deep Structure in Games and Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gredler, Margaret Bell

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the design of games and simulations focuses on the fundamental defining features called deep structure. The two main levels of interaction in games and simulations are described; generalized reinforcers are discussed; types of defective contingencies are explained, including escape or avoidance behaviors; and the concept of negative…

  17. Structural Reliability and Monte Carlo Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, P. J.; Harlow, G.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes a simple boom structure and assesses its reliability using elementary engineering mechanics. Demonstrates the power and utility of Monte-Carlo simulation by showing that such a simulation can be implemented more readily with results that compare favorably to the theoretical calculations. (Author/MM)

  18. Three-dimensional simulations of rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae: finding a neutrino-powered explosion aided by non-axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2016-09-01

    We report results from a series of three-dimensional (3D) rotational core-collapse simulations for 11.2 and 27 M⊙ stars employing neutrino transport scheme by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. By changing the initial strength of rotation systematically, we find a rotation-assisted explosion for the 27 M⊙ progenitor , which fails in the absence of rotation. The unique feature was not captured in previous two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent rotating models because the growing non-axisymmetric instabilities play a key role. In the rapidly rotating case, strong spiral flows generated by the so-called low T/|W| instability enhance the energy transport from the proto-neutron star (PNS) to the gain region, which makes the shock expansion more energetic. The explosion occurs more strongly in the direction perpendicular to the rotational axis, which is different from previous 2D predictions.

  19. Synthetic observations of first hydrostatic cores in collapsing low-mass dense cores. II. Simulated ALMA dust emission maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commerçon, B.; Levrier, F.; Maury, A. J.; Henning, Th.; Launhardt, R.

    2012-12-01

    Context. First hydrostatic cores are predicted by theories of star formation, but their existence has never been demonstrated convincingly by (sub)millimeter observations. Furthermore, the multiplicity in the early phases of the star formation process is poorly constrained. Aims: The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we seek to provide predictions for ALMA dust continuum emission maps from early Class 0 objects. Second, we show to what extent ALMA will be able to probe the fragmentation scale in these objects. Methods: Following our companion paper, we post-processed three state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement calculations to compute the emanating dust emission maps. We then produced synthetic ALMA observations of the dust thermal continuum from first hydrostatic cores. Results: We present the first synthetic ALMA observations of dust continuum emission from the first hydrostatic cores. We analyze the results given by the different bands and configurations and we discuss for which combinations of the two the first hydrostatic cores would most likely be observed. We also show that observing dust continuum emission with ALMA will help in identifying the physical processes occurring within collapsing dense cores. If the magnetic field is playing a role, the emission pattern will show evidence of a pseudo-disk and even of a magnetically driven outflow, which pure hydrodynamical calculations cannot reproduce. Conclusions: The capabilities of ALMA will enable us to make significant progress towards understanding the fragmentation at the early Class 0 stage and discovering first hydrostatic cores.

  20. Multicolor Light Curve Simulations of Population III Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Shock Breakout to 56Co Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Blinnikov, Sergey; Suzuki, Tomoharu

    2016-04-01

    The properties of the first generation of stars and their supernova (SN) explosions remain unknown due to the lack of actual observations. Recently, many transient surveys have been conducted and the feasibility of detecting supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars is growing. In this paper, we study the multicolor light curves for a number of metal-free core-collapse SN models (25–100 {M}ȯ ) to determine the indicators for the detection and identification of first generation SNe. We use mixing-fallback supernova explosion models that explain the observed abundance patterns of metal-poor stars. Numerical calculations of the multicolor light curves are performed using the multigroup radiation hydrodynamic code stella. The calculated light curves of metal-free SNe are compared with non-zero-metallicity models and several observed SNe. We have found that the shock breakout characteristics, the evolution of the photosphere’s velocity, the luminosity, and the duration and color evolution of the plateau, that is, all of the SN phases from shock breakout to 56Co decay, are helpful for estimating the parameters of the SN progenitor: the mass, the radius, the explosion energy, and the metallicity. We conclude that the multicolor light curves could potentially be used to identify first-generation SNe in current (Subaru/HSC) and future transient surveys (LSST, James Webb Space Telescope). They are also suitable for identifying low-metallicity SNe in the nearby universe (PTF, Pan-STARRS, Gaia).

  1. Shock-induced nanobubble collapse and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedadi, Mohammad Hossein

    The shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field. Monitoring the collapse of a cavitation nanobubble, we observe a focused nanojet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a water hammer shock wave upon bubble collapse. The nanojet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. The shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of approximately 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. Moreover, a substantial number of positive and negative ions appear when the nanojet hits the distal side of the nanobubble and the water hammer shock forms. Furthermore, two promising applications of shock-induced nanobubble collapse have been explored. Our simulations of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles reveal penetration of nanojets into lipid bilayers. The nanojet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them, which transiently enhance the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate across the bilayer. The effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. Finally, the shock-induced collapse of CO2-filled nanobubbles in water is investigated. The energetic nanojet and high-pressure water hammer shock formed during and after collapse of the nanobubble trigger mechano-chemical H2O-CO2 reactions, some of which lead to splitting of water molecules. The dominant pathways through which splitting of water molecules occur are identified.

  2. Simulations of Metallic Nanoscale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2003-03-01

    Density-functional-theory calculations can be used to understand and predict materials properties based on their nanoscale composition and structure. In combination with efficient search algorithms DFT can furthermore be applied in the nanoscale design of optimized materials. The first part of the talk will focus on two different types of nanostructures with an interesting interplay between chemical activity and conducting states. MoS2 nanoclusters are known for their catalyzing effect in the hydrodesulfurization process which removes sulfur-containing molecules from oil products. MoS2 is a layered material which is insulating. However, DFT calculations indicates the exsistence of metallic states at some of the edges of MoS2 nanoclusters, and the calculations show that the conducting states are not passivated by for example the presence of hydrogen gas. The edge states may play an important role for the chemical activity of MoS_2. Metallic nanocontacts can be formed during the breaking of a piece of metal, and atomically thin structures with conductance of only a single quantum unit may be formed. Such open metallic structures are chemically very active and susceptible to restructuring through interactions with molecular gases. DFT calculations show for example that atomically thin gold wires may incorporate oxygen atoms forming a new type of metallic nanowire. Adsorbates like hydrogen may also affect the conductance. In the last part of the talk I shall discuss the possibilities for designing alloys with optimal mechanical properties based on a combination of DFT calculations with genetic search algorithms. Simulaneous optimization of several parameters (stability, price, compressibility) is addressed through the determination of Pareto optimal alloy compositions within a large database of more than 64000 alloys.

  3. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  4. Collapse, environment, and society

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas. PMID:22371579

  5. Collapse, environment, and society.

    PubMed

    Butzer, Karl W

    2012-03-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas. PMID:22371579

  6. Structural model uncertainty in stochastic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.D.; Morrison, J.D.

    1997-09-01

    Prediction uncertainty in stochastic simulation models can be described by a hierarchy of components: stochastic variability at the lowest level, input and parameter uncertainty at a higher level, and structural model uncertainty at the top. It is argued that a usual paradigm for analysis of input uncertainty is not suitable for application to structural model uncertainty. An approach more likely to produce an acceptable methodology for analyzing structural model uncertainty is one that uses characteristics specific to the particular family of models.

  7. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in thermal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Shiao, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot structures is a major activity at NASA-Lewis, and consists of five program elements: (1) probabilistic loads, (2) probabilistic finite element analysis, (3) probabilistic material behavior, (4) assessment of reliability and risk, and (5) probabilistic structural performance evaluation. Attention is given to quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on High Pressure Fuel Turbopump blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the Space Shuttle Main Engine; the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; evaluation of the failure probability; reliability and risk-cost assessment; and an outline of an emerging approach for eventual hot structures certification. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability/reliability of hot structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic framework. In addition, the approach can be readily extended to computationally simulate certification of hot structures for aerospace environments.

  8. Simulating Vibrations in a Complex Loaded Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Tim T.

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamic Response Computation (DIRECT) computer program simulates vibrations induced in a complex structure by applied dynamic loads. Developed to enable rapid analysis of launch- and landing- induced vibrations and stresses in a space shuttle, DIRECT also can be used to analyze dynamic responses of other structures - for example, the response of a building to an earthquake, or the response of an oil-drilling platform and attached tanks to large ocean waves. For a space-shuttle simulation, the required input to DIRECT includes mathematical models of the space shuttle and its payloads, and a set of forcing functions that simulates launch and landing loads. DIRECT can accommodate multiple levels of payload attachment and substructure as well as nonlinear dynamic responses of structural interfaces. DIRECT combines the shuttle and payload models into a single structural model, to which the forcing functions are then applied. The resulting equations of motion are reduced to an optimum set and decoupled into a unique format for simulating dynamics. During the simulation, maximum vibrations, loads, and stresses are monitored and recorded for subsequent analysis to identify structural deficiencies in the shuttle and/or payloads.

  9. Gravitational collapse of depletion-induced colloidal gels.

    PubMed

    Harich, R; Blythe, T W; Hermes, M; Zaccarelli, E; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Poon, W C K

    2016-05-11

    We study the ageing and ultimate gravitational collapse of colloidal gels in which the interparticle attraction is induced by non-adsorbing polymers via the depletion effect. The gels are formed through arrested spinodal decomposition, whereby the dense phase arrests into an attractive glass. We map the experimental state diagram onto a theoretical one obtained from computer simulations and theoretical calculations. Discrepancies between the experimental and simulated gel regions in the state diagram can be explained by the particle size and density dependence of the boundary below which the gel is not strong enough to resist gravitational stress. Visual observations show that gravitational collapse of the gels falls into two distinct regimes as the colloid and polymer concentrations are varied, with gels at low colloid concentrations showing the onset of rapid collapse after a delay time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to provide quantitative, spatio-temporally resolved measurements of the solid volume fraction in these rapidly collapsing gels. We find that during the delay time, a dense region builds up at the top of the sample. The rapid collapse is initiated when the gel structure is no longer able to support this dense layer. PMID:27001686

  10. Signatures of Star Cluster Formation by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  11. Towards numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; White, Susan M.; Huang, Shao-Ching; Mallya, Sanjay; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low pressure loads incurred during breathing. The numerical simulation with patient-specific upper airway model can provide assistance for diagnosis and treatment assessment. The eventual goal of this research is the development of numerical tool for air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with OSA. This tool is expected to capture collapse of the airway in respiratory flow conditions, as well as the effects of various treatment protocols. Here, we present our ongoing progress toward this goal. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the air-tissue interface in the complex patient-specific airway geometries. For the structure simulation, a cut-cell FEM is used. Non-linear Green strains are used for properly resolving the large tissue displacements in the soft palate structures. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled. Preliminary results will be shown, including flow simulation inside the 3D rigid upper airway of patients with OSA, and several validation problem for the fluid-structure coupling.

  12. Numerically simulating the sandwich plate system structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Qing; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Niu, Huai-Lei; Li, Chen-Feng

    2010-09-01

    Sandwich plate systems (SPS) are advanced materials that have begun to receive extensive attention in naval architecture and ocean engineering. At present, according to the rules of classification societies, a mixture of shell and solid elements are required to simulate an SPS. Based on the principle of stiffness decomposition, a new numerical simulation method for shell elements was proposed. In accordance with the principle of stiffness decomposition, the total stiffness can be decomposed into the bending stiffness and shear stiffness. Displacement and stress response related to bending stiffness was calculated with the laminated shell element. Displacement and stress response due to shear was calculated by use of a computational code write by FORTRAN language. Then the total displacement and stress response for the SPS was obtained by adding together these two parts of total displacement and stress. Finally, a rectangular SPS plate and a double-bottom structure were used for a simulation. The results show that the deflection simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is larger than the same simulated by solid elements and the analytical solution according to Hoff theory and approximate to the same simulated by the mixture of shell-solid elements, and the stress simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is approximate to the other simulating methods. So compared with calculations based on a mixture of shell and solid elements, the numerical simulation method given in the paper is more efficient and easier to do.

  13. Collapsible Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA needed a means of orbiting a large radio telescope antenna. Astro Research Corporation developed a new structure that was strong, lightweight, folded into a small storage space, and could be erected by rotation. Later they adapted it to commercial use. Today the "Astromast" tower consists of tubular aluminum alloy and stainless steel members that deploy into small three-sided bays, each made rigid by six diagonal cables. All joints are flexible to permit folding and unfolding. Tower packs into container 5% of its height, can be erected without tools and is reusable. Tower has won "Design of the Year" award from Machine Design. Variations include portable emergency bridges and commercial scaffolding.

  14. A comprehensive classification of collapse calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Marti, J.; Acocella, V.; Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Cas, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collapse calderas are volcanic depressions that result from the disruption of the magma chamber roof during an eruption or lateral intrusion of magma. Their formation implies a perturbation of the structure and dynamics of the associated magma chambers. Collapse calderas are present in any geodynamic environment and may be associated with a wide range of magma compositions. Caldera morphology and structure yield information on subsidence mechanisms, evolutionary stage of collapse and the associated magma chamber, while any eruptive product provides the clues on magma composition and eruption dynamics. The term "caldera" has been commonly used to define certain sizes of collapses in volcanic areas, rather than a specific process. Moreover, several different classifications of collapse caldera have been proposed considering separately various aspects such as morphology, structure, composition, style of subsidence, size, eruption dynamics, or tectonic controls. However, the causative relationships between the resulting caldera types are not always well defined, thus causing confusion on the causes and results of each caldera process. This study has two main goals. 1) First, we provide a timely definition for calderas: we propose to restrict the term collapse caldera to those cases in which there is a direct interaction of the structures controlling collapse with an underlying magma chamber, independently of its size. 2) We present a comprehensive classification of collapse calderas based on an event tree structure that considers a hierarchy of criteria that we analyse in a logical sequence. This classification allows identifying any collapse caldera as a function of its dynamic, geometric, evolutionary and compositional conditions.

  15. Domain Collapse in Grooved Magnetic Garnet Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, J.; Fedyunin, Y.; Patterson, G.

    1995-01-01

    Domain collapse fields in grooved garnet material were investigated by experimental observation and numerical simulation. The results indicate that the change in domain collapse field is largely due to magnetostatic effects produced by the groove edge. A simplified model based on the effective field produced at a groove edge, and local changes in the material thickness explain the observed trends very well.!.

  16. Shock Wave Induced Collapse of Arrays of Nanobubbles Located Next to a Lipid Membrane: Coarse-Grained Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Santo, Kolattukudy P; Berkowitz, Max L

    2015-07-23

    We used molecular dynamics simulations to study creation of pores in lipid bilayer membranes by inducing shock waves in systems containing arrays of nanobubbles next to these membranes. Shock waves impinged on the bubbles imploding them and produced nanojets that subsequently hit the bilayers making pores in them. Our simulations were performed using the MARTINI coarse-grained force field. The emphasis in our study was on the interaction of shock waves with two-bubble arrays when the bubbles were placed in different alignments. We observed that the largest damage to the bilayer was produced when two bubbles were positioned in a serial alignment and the bubbles touched each other. When two touching each other bubbles were located parallel to the membrane surface and at the same distance from the surface, the membrane damage was reduced, compared to the damage done by explosion of two independent nanobubbles. When two nanobubbles were placed in slanted configurations, the damage was intermediate between damages produced by two bubbles in parallel or serial alignment. Damage to the membrane produced by arrays containing more than two bubbles can be understood as a combination of damage produced by all three alignments of two bubbles. PMID:25117111

  17. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  18. Simulating the formation of cosmic structure.

    PubMed

    Frenk, C S

    2002-06-15

    A timely combination of new theoretical ideas and observational discoveries has brought about significant advances in our understanding of cosmic evolution. Computer simulations have played a key role in these developments by providing the means to interpret astronomical data in the context of physical and cosmological theory. In the current paradigm, our Universe has a flat geometry, is undergoing accelerated expansion and is gravitationally dominated by elementary particles that make up cold dark matter. Within this framework, it is possible to simulate in a computer the emergence of galaxies and other structures from small quantum fluctuations imprinted during an epoch of inflationary expansion shortly after the Big Bang. The simulations must take into account the evolution of the dark matter as well as the gaseous processes involved in the formation of stars and other visible components. Although many unresolved questions remain, a coherent picture for the formation of cosmic structure is now beginning to emerge. PMID:12804279

  19. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  20. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  1. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  2. Structured Debriefing in Simulation-Based Education.

    PubMed

    Palaganas, Janice C; Fey, Mary; Simon, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Debriefing following a simulation event is a conversational period for reflection and feedback aimed at sustaining or improving future performance. It is considered by many simulation educators to be a critical activity for learning in simulation-based education. Deep learning can be achieved during debriefing and often depends on the facilitation skills of the debriefer as well as the learner's perceptions of a safe and supportive learning environment as created by the debriefer. On the other hand, poorly facilitated debriefings may create adverse learning, generate bad feelings, and may lead to a degradation of clinical performance, self-reflection, or harm to the educator-learner relationship. The use of a structure that recognizes logical and sequential phases during debriefing can assist simulation educators to achieve a deep level of learning. PMID:26909457

  3. Numerical Simulation of Downstream Flooding due to a Flexible-Dam Collapse. The case of "La Esperanza" dam, Hidalgo-México: Implication on Hazard Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areu Rangel, O. S., Sr.; Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Bonasia, R.

    2015-12-01

    The risk of flooding of settlements located downstream of a dam is high due to the large number of people living on natural waterways. Risk assessment of flooding could help in projecting containment and protection in case of a dam-break. For projecting containment and protection works, the assessment should take into account velocities, densities and impact pressure of the water on the villages in risk. Therefore, it is appealing to conduct a series of numerical simulations of downstream flooding including velocity and pressure fields, and their temporal and spatial fluctuations. The present work focuses on the real case of "La Esperanza" dam, located in the state of Hidalgo (Mexico). The dam was built 70 years ago and currently two thirds of its capacity is covered with silt, which implies a very high horizontal thrust. The simulation of the flood due to failure of the dam was carried on using the DualSPHysics code, a new implementation of the mesh-free Lagrangian Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) method. For the boundary conditions, a Digital Elevation Model of the potentially affected area was built using satellite images, the actual bathymetry of the dam and cross sections of the channel. In order to evaluate the hazard posed to the villages located downstream of the dam, different collapse scenarios were simulated, with particular focus on the consequences of the temporal variation of rainfall. Preliminary results show acceleration and dynamic pressure values of water in especially selected areas that are subjected to high risk for the elevated number of inhabitant.

  4. SIMULATING ACCELERATOR STRUCTURE OPERATION AT HIGH POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V

    2004-09-15

    The important limiting factors in high-gradient accelerator structure operation are dark current capture, RF breakdown and electron multipacting. These processes involve both primary and secondary electron field emission and produce plasma and X-rays. To better understand these phenomena, they have simulated dark current generation and transport in a linac structure and a square-bend waveguide, both high power tested at SLAC. For these simulations, they use the parallel, time-domain, unstructured-grid code Tau3P and the particle tracking module Track3P. In this paper, they present numerical results and their comparison with measurements on energy spectrum of electrons transmitted in a 30-cell structure and of X-rays emitted from the square-bend waveguide.

  5. Solvent controlled ion association in structured copolymers: Molecular dynamics simulations in dilute solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Dipak; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-09-01

    Tailoring the nature of individual segments within ion containing block co-polymers is one critical design tool to achieve desired properties. The local structure including the size and distribution of the ionic blocks, as well as the long range correlations, are crucial for their transport ability. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations on the effects of varying the concentrations of the ionizable groups on the conformations of pentablock ionomer that consist of a center block of ionic sulfonated styrene tethered to polyethylene and terminated by a bulky substituted styrene in dilute solutions. Sulfonation fractions f (0 ≤ f ≤ 0.55), spanning the range from ionomer to polyelectrolytes, were studied. Results for the equilibrium conformation of the chains in water and a 1:1 mixture of cyclohexane and heptane are compared to that in implicit poor solvents with dielectric constants ɛ = 1.0 and 77.73. In water, the pentablock collapses with the sulfonated groups on the outer surface. As f increases, the ionic, center block increasingly segregates from the hydrophobic regions. In the 1:1 mixture of cyclohexane and heptane, the flexible blocks swell, while the center ionic block collapses for f > 0. For f = 0, all blocks swell. In both implicit poor solvents, the pentablock collapses into a nearly spherical shape for all f. The sodium counterions disperse widely throughout the simulation cell for both water and ɛ = 77.73, whereas for ɛ = 1.0 and mixture of cyclohexane and heptane, the counterions largely condense onto the collapsed pentablock.

  6. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  7. Computational simulation of human upper airway collapse using a pressure-/state-dependent model of genioglossal muscle contraction under laminar flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqi; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P.

    2012-01-01

    A three-element, pressure- and state (sleep and wake) -dependent contraction model of the genioglossal muscle was developed based on the microstructure of skeletal muscle and the cross-bridge theory. This model establishes a direct connection between the contractile forces generated in muscle fibers and the measured electromyogram signals during various upper airway conditions. This effectively avoids the difficulty of determining muscle shortening velocity during complex pharyngeal conditions when modeling the muscle’s contractile behaviors. The activation of the genioglossal muscle under different conditions was then simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of varying each modeled parameter on the muscle’s contractile behaviors. This muscle contraction model was then incorporated into our anatomically correct, two-dimensional computational model of the pharyngeal airway to perform a finite-element analysis of air flow, tissue deformation, and airway collapse. The model-predicted muscle deformations are consistent with previous observations regarding upper airway behavior in normal subjects. PMID:15831800

  8. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON THE LIQUID DROP MODEL OF HEAVY NUCLEI AND QUANTUM APPROACH TO LIGHT NUCLEI FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-08-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to {approx}1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes.

  9. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in thermal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot structures is a major activity at Lewis Research Center. It consists of five program elements: (1) probabilistic loads; (2) probabilistic finite element analysis; (3) probabilistic material behavior; (4) assessment of reliability and risk; and (5) probabilistic structural performance evaluation. Recent progress includes: (1) quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFT) blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME); (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; (3) evaluation of the failure probability; (4) reliability and risk-cost assessment, and (5) an outline of an emerging approach for eventual hot structures certification. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability/reliability of hot structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic framework. In addition, the approach can be readily extended to computationally simulate certification of hot structures for aerospace environments.

  10. Simulation of plasma double-layer structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.; Joyce, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic plasma double layers are numerically simulated by means of a magnetized 2 1/2 dimensional particle in cell method. The investigation of planar double layers indicates that these one dimensional potential structures are susceptible to periodic disruption by instabilities in the low potential plasmas. Only a slight increase in the double layer thickness with an increase in its obliqueness to the magnetic field is observed. Weak magnetization results in the double layer electric field alignment of accelerated particles and strong magnetization results in their magnetic field alignment. The numerical simulations of spatially periodic two dimensional double layers also exhibit cyclical instability. A morphological invariance in two dimensional double layers with respect to the degree of magnetization implies that the potential structures scale with Debye lengths rather than with gyroradii. Electron beam excited electrostatic electron cyclotron waves and (ion beam driven) solitary waves are present in the plasmas adjacent to the double layers.

  11. Computational simulation of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  12. Computational simulation of hot composites structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  13. Dynamic Deployment Simulations of Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of using Control Volume (CV) method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method in LSDYNA to simulate the dynamic deployment of inflatable space structures is investigated. The CV and ALE methods were used to predict the inflation deployments of three folded tube configurations. The CV method was found to be a simple and computationally efficient method that may be adequate for modeling slow inflation deployment sine the inertia of the inflation gas can be neglected. The ALE method was found to be very computationally intensive since it involves the solving of three conservative equations of fluid as well as dealing with complex fluid structure interactions.

  14. Highly reduced current collapse in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors by combined application of oxygen plasma treatment and field plate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asubar, Joel T.; Yoshida, Satoshi; Tokuda, Hirokuni; Kuzuhara, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    We report on the highly reduced current collapse in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) by combined application of pre-passivation oxygen (O2) plasma treatment and gate field plate (FP) structures schemes. Four different devices were fabricated in this work: (1) conventional HEMT as reference device, (2) field-plated HEMT, (3) O2 plasma-treated HEMT, (4) both field-plated and O2 plasma-treated HEMT. Analysis of dependence of normalized dynamic R on (NDR) on gate pulse on-time (t on) revealed that gate-FP reduces the emission time constant (τ i ) of trapped electrons while O2-plasma treatment decreases the density of traps. For all measurement conditions, the device with both FP and O2 plasma treatment exhibited the least NDR compared to devices with either FP or O2 plasma treatment only, demonstrating for the first time the compatibility of both O2 plasma treatment and FP schemes in mitigating current collapse.

  15. Online Simulation of Radiation Track Structure Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik

    2015-01-01

    Space radiation comprises protons, helium and high charged and energy (HZE) particles. High-energy particles are a concern for human space flight, because they are no known options for shielding astronauts from them. When these ions interact with matter, they damage molecules and create radiolytic species. The pattern of energy deposition and positions of the radiolytic species, called radiation track structure, is highly dependent on the charge and energy of the ion. The radiolytic species damage biological molecules, which may lead to several long-term health effects such as cancer. Because of the importance of heavy ions, the radiation community is very interested in the interaction of HZE particles with DNA, notably with regards to the track structure. A desktop program named RITRACKS was developed to simulate radiation track structure. The goal of this project is to create a web interface to allow registered internal users to use RITRACKS remotely.

  16. Digital system for structural dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Lagace, L. J.; Wojnar, M. K.; Glor, C.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art digital hardware and software for the simulation of complex structural dynamic interactions, such as those which occur in rotating structures (engine systems). System were incorporated in a designed to use an array of processors in which the computation for each physical subelement or functional subsystem would be assigned to a single specific processor in the simulator. These node processors are microprogrammed bit-slice microcomputers which function autonomously and can communicate with each other and a central control minicomputer over parallel digital lines. Inter-processor nearest neighbor communications busses pass the constants which represent physical constraints and boundary conditions. The node processors are connected to the six nearest neighbor node processors to simulate the actual physical interface of real substructures. Computer generated finite element mesh and force models can be developed with the aid of the central control minicomputer. The control computer also oversees the animation of a graphics display system, disk-based mass storage along with the individual processing elements.

  17. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Chen, Longquan; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Surface attached nanobubbles populate surfaces submerged in water. These nanobubbles have a much larger contact angle and longer lifetime than predicted by classical theory. Moreover, it is difficult to distinguish them from hydrophobic droplets, e.g., polymeric contamination, using standard atomic force microscopy. Here, we report fast dynamics of a three phase contact line moving over surface nanobubbles, polymeric droplets, and hydrophobic particles. The dynamics is distinct: across polymeric droplets the contact line quickly jumps and hydrophobic particles pin the contact line, while surface nanobubbles rapidly shrink once merging with the contact line, suggesting a method to differentiate nanoscopic gaseous, liquid, and solid structures. Although the collapse process of surface nanobubbles occurs within a few milliseconds, we show that it is dominated by microscopic dynamics rather than bulk hydrodynamics.

  18. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  19. Caribbean-Wide, Long-Term Study of Seagrass Beds Reveals Local Variations, Shifts in Community Structure and Occasional Collapse

    PubMed Central

    van Tussenbroek, Brigitta I.; Cortés, Jorge; Collin, Rachel; Fonseca, Ana C.; Gayle, Peter M. H.; Guzmán, Hector M.; Jácome, Gabriel E.; Juman, Rahanna; Koltes, Karen H.; Oxenford, Hazel A.; Rodríguez-Ramirez, Alberto; Samper-Villarreal, Jimena; Smith, Struan R.; Tschirky, John J.; Weil, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The CARICOMP monitoring network gathered standardized data from 52 seagrass sampling stations at 22 sites (mostly Thalassia testudinum-dominated beds in reef systems) across the Wider Caribbean twice a year over the period 1993 to 2007 (and in some cases up to 2012). Wide variations in community total biomass (285 to >2000 g dry m−2) and annual foliar productivity of the dominant seagrass T. testudinum (<200 and >2000 g dry m−2) were found among sites. Solar-cycle related intra-annual variations in T. testudinum leaf productivity were detected at latitudes > 16°N. Hurricanes had little to no long-term effects on these well-developed seagrass communities, except for 1 station, where the vegetation was lost by burial below ∼1 m sand. At two sites (5 stations), the seagrass beds collapsed due to excessive grazing by turtles or sea-urchins (the latter in combination with human impact and storms). The low-cost methods of this regional-scale monitoring program were sufficient to detect long-term shifts in the communities, and fifteen (43%) out of 35 long-term monitoring stations (at 17 sites) showed trends in seagrass communities consistent with expected changes under environmental deterioration. PMID:24594732

  20. Caribbean-wide, long-term study of seagrass beds reveals local variations, shifts in community structure and occasional collapse.

    PubMed

    van Tussenbroek, Brigitta I; Cortés, Jorge; Collin, Rachel; Fonseca, Ana C; Gayle, Peter M H; Guzmán, Hector M; Jácome, Gabriel E; Juman, Rahanna; Koltes, Karen H; Oxenford, Hazel A; Rodríguez-Ramirez, Alberto; Samper-Villarreal, Jimena; Smith, Struan R; Tschirky, John J; Weil, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The CARICOMP monitoring network gathered standardized data from 52 seagrass sampling stations at 22 sites (mostly Thalassia testudinum-dominated beds in reef systems) across the Wider Caribbean twice a year over the period 1993 to 2007 (and in some cases up to 2012). Wide variations in community total biomass (285 to >2000 g dry m(-2)) and annual foliar productivity of the dominant seagrass T. testudinum (<200 and >2000 g dry m(-2)) were found among sites. Solar-cycle related intra-annual variations in T. testudinum leaf productivity were detected at latitudes > 16°N. Hurricanes had little to no long-term effects on these well-developed seagrass communities, except for 1 station, where the vegetation was lost by burial below ∼1 m sand. At two sites (5 stations), the seagrass beds collapsed due to excessive grazing by turtles or sea-urchins (the latter in combination with human impact and storms). The low-cost methods of this regional-scale monitoring program were sufficient to detect long-term shifts in the communities, and fifteen (43%) out of 35 long-term monitoring stations (at 17 sites) showed trends in seagrass communities consistent with expected changes under environmental deterioration. PMID:24594732

  1. EVIDENCE AGAINST THE OSCILLATING TWO-STREAM INSTABILITY AND SPATIAL COLLAPSE OF LANGMUIR WAVES IN SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Malaspina, D. M.; Ergun, R. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently Thejappa et al. studied a specific Langmuir wave packet observed by STEREO A and argued based on the electric field from one of the three antennas that this packet satisfied the conditions for the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI) and was undergoing wave collapse. We analyze the same event using all three electric components and show that, while the wave packet has structure consistent with collapse simulations and theory, the field strength is well below that required for collapse to proceed. Analyzing the three electric field components shows that the power spectrum and dominance of wave power perpendicular to the local magnetic field are inconsistent with OTSI. We show that this packet and other more intense packets are inconsistent with collapse and show no evidence of OTSI, but are likely trapped eigenmodes in density wells. Therefore, OTSI and collapse are unlikely explanations for intense Langmuir events observed in the solar wind.

  2. Electron acceleration by magnetic collapse during decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Euan D.; Potts, Hugh E.; Teodoro, Luis F. A.; Diver, Declan A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper identifies the non-equilibrium evolution of magnetic field structures at the onset of large-scale recombination of an inhomogeneously ionized plasma. The context for this is the Universe during the epoch of recombination. The electromagnetic treatment of this phase transition can produce energetic electrons scattered throughout the Universe, localized near the edges of magnetic domains. This is confirmed by a numerical simulation in which a magnetic domain is modelled as a uniform field region produced by a thin surrounding current sheet. Conduction currents sustaining the magnetic structure are removed as the charges comprising them combine into neutrals. The induced electric field accompanying the magnetic collapse is able to accelerate ambient stationary electrons (that is, electrons not participating in the current sheet) to energies of up to order 10keV. This is consistent with theoretical predictions. The localized electron acceleration leads to local imbalances of charge which has implications for charge separation in the early Universe.

  3. A monolithic collapse origin for the thin and thick disc structure of the S0 galaxy ESO 243-49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, S.; Salo, H.; Peletier, R. F.; Mentz, J.

    2016-09-01

    ESO 243-49 is a high-mass (circular velocity vc ≈ 200 km s-1), edge-on S0 galaxy in the Abell 2877 cluster at a distance of ~95 Mpc. To elucidate the origin of the thick disc of this S0 galaxy, we use Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) science verification data to study its kinematics and stellar populations. The thick disc emits ~80% of the light at heights in excess of 3.5 arcsec (1.6 kpc). The rotation velocities of its stars lag by 30-40 km s-1 compared to those in the thin disc, which is compatible with the asymmetric drift. The thick disc is found to be more metal-poor than the thin disc, but both discs have old ages. We suggest an internal origin for the thick disc stars in high-mass galaxies. We propose that the thick disc formed either a) first in a turbulent phase with a high star formation rate and that a thin disc formed shortly afterwards, or b) because of the dynamical heating of a thin pre-existing component. Either way, the star formation in ESO 243-49 was quenched just a few Gyr after the galaxy was born and the formation of a thin and a thick disc must have occurred before the galaxy stopped forming stars. The formation of the discs was so fast that it could be described as a monolithic collapse where several generations of stars formed in rapid succession. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory using the Very Large Telescope under programme 60.A-9328(A).

  4. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  5. Multiscale Simulation of Microbe Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V.; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin. PMID:21802438

  6. Collapsable seal member

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  7. Collapsable seal member

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1983-12-08

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  8. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  9. Finite Element Simulation of Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Y. Lawrence; Panahandeh, M.

    1996-01-01

    Finite element equations representing the behavior of piezoelectric materials when bounded to a typical structure and used as sensors and actuators were developed. Emphasis was placed on generating sensor output equations of piezoelectric sensors and responses of a typical structure bonded with piezoelectric sensors and actuators on the basis of finite element formulation. The model can predict not only structural responses due to both mechanical and electrical loading but also electrical potential due to mechanical or thermal effects. The resulted finite element equations were then used for simple control design and performance evaluation. In the control algorithm, voltages coming out from piezoelectric sensors, which are proportional to strains at sensing locations, are taken as input. The voltages applied to the piezoelectric actuators are used as output. The feasibility of integrating control algorithm with the element routine developed herein and FEAP was demonstrated. In particular, optimal independent modal space control was implemented in a software package on the basis of finite element formulation. A rudimentary finite element-control algorithm package was also developed to evaluate the performance of candidate control laws. A few numerical simulations using the software package developed herein were given. The integrated software package will provide a design tool to address issues such as how adaptive smart systems will scale to a full size aircraft, the amount of piezoelectric materials and the powers needed to actuate it for desired performance. It will also provide a viable new structural control design concept for practical applications in large flexible structures such as aerospace vehicles and aircraft.

  10. Atomistic modeling of shock-induced void collapse in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Davila, L P; Erhart, P; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A; Lubarda, V A; Schneider, M S; Becker, R; Kumar, M

    2005-03-09

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that shock-induced void collapse in copper occurs by emission of shear loops. These loops carry away the vacancies which comprise the void. The growth of the loops continues even after they collide and form sessile junctions, creating a hardened region around the collapsing void. The scenario seen in our simulations differs from current models that assume that prismatic loop emission is responsible for void collapse. We propose a new dislocation-based model that gives excellent agreement with the stress threshold found in the MD simulations for void collapse as a function of void radius.

  11. Resolving the Formation of Protogalaxies. II.Central Gravitational Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Abel, Tom

    2007-10-15

    Numerous cosmological hydrodynamic studies have addressed the formation of galaxies. Here we choose to study the first stages of galaxy formation, including non-equilibrium atomic primordial gas cooling, gravity and hydrodynamics. Using initial conditions appropriate for the concordance cosmological model of structure formation, we perform two adaptive mesh refinement simulations of {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} galaxies at high redshift. The calculations resolve the Jeans length at all times with more than 16 cells and capture over 14 orders of magnitude in length scales. In both cases, the dense, 10{sup 5} solar mass, one parsec central regions are found to contract rapidly and have turbulent Mach numbers up to 4. Despite the ever decreasing Jeans length of the isothermal gas, we only find one site of fragmentation during the collapse. However, rotational secular bar instabilities transport angular momentum outwards in the central parsec as the gas continues to collapse and lead to multiple nested unstable fragments with decreasing masses down to sub-Jupiter mass scales. Although these numerical experiments neglect star formation and feedback, they clearly highlight the physics of turbulence in gravitationally collapsing gas. The angular momentum segregation seen in our calculations plays an important role in theories that form supermassive black holes from gaseous collapse.

  12. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  13. Bellechester, Minnesota, USA, lagoon collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, E. C.; Broberg, J. S.; Kehren, A. R.; Graziani, M. M.; Turri, W. L.

    1993-12-01

    Bellechester, Minnesota, is a small community of approximately 155 residents located on the county line between Goodhue and Wabasha counties in southeast Minnesota's karst region. Bellechester is served by a 21-year-old wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) consisting of three waste-stabilization ponds. On 28 April 1992 six sinkholes were discovered to have drained cell 2 of the WWTF resulting in the loss of approximately 8.7×106 1 of partially treated effluent and about 600 m3 of soil into previously undetected subsurface voids of unknown dimensions. In the week following the collapse, approximately 200 water wells located within a 5-km radius of the WWTF were sampled in an after-the-fact, emergency sampling program. Twelve samples with elevated fecal coliform levels, 18 samples with nitrate-nitrogen greater than the 10 mg/1 standard, and no samples with elevated chlorides were found. However, the elevated levels could not be unambiguously attributed to the WWTF collapse. This is the third WWTF to fail by sinkhole collapse in southeast Minnesota since 1974. All three collapsed lagoons have been located in similar geomorphic and stratigraphic settings. However, at least two lagoons have collapsed in the adjacent area in northeast Iowa, and these lagoons are located at different stratigraphic positions. Twenty-two WWTFs constructed in southeast Minnesota's karst region in the last 25 years have been identified as subject to potential sinkhole collapse. An unknown but significant number of manure storage lagoons, flood control structures, etc., have also been constructed in the karst region and are at risk. Public agencies are beginning to develop plans to deal with the risk associated with existing and future waste lagoons in this environment. The critical hydrogeologic parameters that can be used to prioritize the risk of collapse at existing facilities include: (1) the lithology of the first bedrock beneath each lagoon, (2) the thickness of surficial materials

  14. Intense electromagnetic outbursts from collapsing hypermassive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Liebling, Steven L.; Thompson, Christopher; Hanna, Chad

    2012-11-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of a magnetized neutron star using a novel numerical approach able to capture both the dynamics of the star and the behavior of the surrounding plasma. In this approach, a fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics implementation models the collapse of the star and provides appropriate boundary conditions to a force-free model which describes the stellar exterior. We validate this strategy by comparing with known results for the rotating monopole and aligned rotator solutions and then apply it to study both rotating and nonrotating stellar collapse scenarios and contrast the behavior with what is obtained when employing the electrovacuum approximation outside the star. The nonrotating electrovacuum collapse is shown to agree qualitatively with a Newtonian model of the electromagnetic field outside a collapsing star. We illustrate and discuss a fundamental difference between the force-free and electrovacuum solutions, involving the appearance of large zones of electric-dominated field in the vacuum case. This provides a clear demonstration of how dissipative singularities appear generically in the nonlinear time evolution of force-free fluids. In both the rotating and nonrotating cases, our simulations indicate that the collapse induces a strong electromagnetic transient, which leaves behind an uncharged, unmagnetized Kerr black hole. In the case of submillisecond rotation, the magnetic field experiences strong winding, and the transient carries much more energy. This result has important implications for models of gamma-ray bursts. Even when the neutron star is surrounded by an accretion torus (as in binary merger and collapsar scenarios), a magnetosphere may emerge through a dynamo process operating in a surface shear layer. When this rapidly rotating magnetar collapses to a black hole, the electromagnetic energy released can compete with the later output in a Blandford-Znajek jet. Much less electromagnetic energy is

  15. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  16. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longquan; Chan, Chon U.; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains that entrap on immersed solid surfaces in water. They are surprisingly stable and are difficult to be distinguished from polymeric/hydrophobic drops and solid particles (contamination). Here, we report a comparative study of contact line motion across surface nanobubbles, polymeric drops and solid particles. We show that surface nanobubbles spontaneously collapse once contact line touches them while a fast jump process and a pinning process are observed on polymeric drops and on solid particles, respectively. These distinct contact line dynamics provide a new approach to identify surface nanobubbles. The collapse of surface nanobubbles demonstrates their gaseous property and also indicates that they are metastable. The collapse process last few milliseconds with a characteristic speed of 0.1 mm/s, which is much longer and slower than that of hydrodynamic phenomena. We further show that the collapse phenomenon can be explained with a microscopic contact line dynamics.

  17. Collapse transition in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Guy; Thirumalai, D; Haran, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    The coil-globule transition, a tenet of the physics of polymers, has been identified in recent years as an important unresolved aspect of the initial stages of the folding of proteins. We describe the basics of the collapse transition, starting with homopolymers and continuing with proteins. Studies of denatured-state collapse under equilibrium are then presented. An emphasis is placed on single-molecule fluorescence experiments, which are particularly useful for measuring properties of the denatured state even under conditions of coexistence with the folded state. Attempts to understand the dynamics of collapse, both theoretically and experimentally, are then described. Only an upper limit for the rate of collapse has been obtained so far. Improvements in experimental and theoretical methodology are likely to continue to push our understanding of the importance of the denatured-state thermodynamics and dynamics for protein folding in the coming years. PMID:19081910

  18. Countdown to Systems Collapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tysseling, John C.; Easton, Jeff; Weaks, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the University of New Mexico Albuquerque developed a strategic business plan for renewing its utility systems when faced with the imminent collapse of its entire energy infrastructure and a $75-100 million price tag for upgrades. (EV)

  19. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax)

    MedlinePlus

    Air around the lung; Air outside the lung; Pneumothorax dropped lung; Spontaneous pneumothorax ... Collapsed lung can be caused by an injury to the lung. Injuries can include a gunshot or knife wound ...

  20. Direct collapse to supermassive black hole seeds: comparing the AMR and SPH approaches

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Nagamine, Kentaro; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    We provide detailed comparison between the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code enzo-2.4 and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)/N-body code gadget-3 in the context of isolated or cosmological direct baryonic collapse within dark matter (DM) haloes to form supermassive black holes. Gas flow is examined by following evolution of basic parameters of accretion flows. Both codes show an overall agreement in the general features of the collapse; however, many subtle differences exist. For isolated models, the codes increase their spatial and mass resolutions at different pace, which leads to substantially earlier collapse in SPH than in AMR cases due to higher gravitational resolution in gadget-3. In cosmological runs, the AMR develops a slightly higher baryonic resolution than SPH during halo growth via cold accretion permeated by mergers. Still, both codes agree in the build-up of DM and baryonic structures. However, with the onset of collapse, this difference in mass and spatial resolution is amplified, so evolution of SPH models begins to lag behind. Such a delay can have effect on formation/destruction rate of H2 due to UV background, and on basic properties of host haloes. Finally, isolated non-cosmological models in spinning haloes, with spin parameter λ ∼ 0.01–0.07, show delayed collapse for greater λ, but pace of this increase is faster for AMR. Within our simulation set-up, gadget-3 requires significantly larger computational resources than enzo-2.4 during collapse, and needs similar resources, during the pre-collapse, cosmological structure formation phase. Yet it benefits from substantially higher gravitational force and hydrodynamic resolutions, except at the end of collapse. PMID:27279786

  1. Direct collapse to supermassive black hole seeds: comparing the AMR and SPH approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang; Nagamine, Kentaro; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-07-01

    We provide detailed comparison between the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code ENZO-2.4 and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)/N-body code GADGET-3 in the context of isolated or cosmological direct baryonic collapse within dark matter (DM) haloes to form supermassive black holes. Gas flow is examined by following evolution of basic parameters of accretion flows. Both codes show an overall agreement in the general features of the collapse; however, many subtle differences exist. For isolated models, the codes increase their spatial and mass resolutions at different pace, which leads to substantially earlier collapse in SPH than in AMR cases due to higher gravitational resolution in GADGET-3. In cosmological runs, the AMR develops a slightly higher baryonic resolution than SPH during halo growth via cold accretion permeated by mergers. Still, both codes agree in the build-up of DM and baryonic structures. However, with the onset of collapse, this difference in mass and spatial resolution is amplified, so evolution of SPH models begins to lag behind. Such a delay can have effect on formation/destruction rate of H2 due to UV background, and on basic properties of host haloes. Finally, isolated non-cosmological models in spinning haloes, with spin parameter λ ˜ 0.01-0.07, show delayed collapse for greater λ, but pace of this increase is faster for AMR. Within our simulation set-up, GADGET-3 requires significantly larger computational resources than ENZO-2.4 during collapse, and needs similar resources, during the pre-collapse, cosmological structure formation phase. Yet it benefits from substantially higher gravitational force and hydrodynamic resolutions, except at the end of collapse.

  2. Direct Collapse to Supermassive Black Hole Seeds: Comparing the AMR and SPH Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang; Nagamine, Kentaro; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-03-01

    We provide detailed comparison between the AMR code Enzo-2.4 and the SPH/N-body code GADGET-3 in the context of isolated or cosmological direct baryonic collapse within dark matter (DM) halos to form supermassive black holes. Gas flow is examined by following evolution of basic parameters of accretion flows. Both codes show an overall agreement in the general features of the collapse, however, many subtle differences exist. For isolated models, the codes increase their spatial and mass resolutions at different pace, which leads to substantially earlier collapse in SPH than in AMR cases due to higher gravitational resolution in GADGET-3. In cosmological runs, the AMR develops a slightly higher baryonic resolution than SPH during halo growth via cold accretion permeated by mergers. Still, both codes agree in the buildup of DM and baryonic structures. However, with the onset of collapse, this difference in mass and spatial resolution is amplified, so evolution of SPH models begins to lag behind. Such a delay can have effect on formation/destruction rate of H2 due to UV background, and on basic properties of host halos. Finally, isolated non-cosmological models in spinning halos, with spin parameter λ ˜ 0.01 - 0.07, show delayed collapse for greater λ, but pace of this increase is faster for AMR. Within our simulation setup, GADGET-3 requires significantly larger computational resources than Enzo-2.4 during collapse, and needs similar resources, during the pre-collapse, cosmological structure formation phase. Yet it benefits from substantially higher gravitational force and hydrodynamic resolutions, except at the end of collapse.

  3. Relativistic dynamical collapse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearle, Philip

    2015-05-01

    A model is discussed where all operators are constructed from a quantum scalar field whose energy spectrum takes on all real values. The Schrödinger picture wave function depends upon space and time coordinates for each particle, as well as an inexorably increasing evolution parameter s which labels a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces. The model is constructed to be manifestly Lorentz invariant in the interaction picture. Free particle states and interactions are discussed in this framework. Then, the formalism of the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) theory of dynamical collapse is applied. The collapse-generating operator is chosen to be the particle number space-time density. Unlike previous relativistically invariant models, the vacuum state is not excited. The collapse dynamics depends upon two parameters, a parameter Λ which represents the collapse rate/volume and a scale factor ℓ. A common example of collapse dynamics, involving a clump of matter in a superposition of two locations, is analyzed. The collapse rate is shown to be identical to that of nonrelativistic CSL when the GRW-CSL choice of ℓ=a =1 0-5 cm , is made, along with Λ =λ /a3 (GRW-CSL choice λ =1 0-16s-1). The collapse rate is also satisfactory with the choice ℓ as the size of the Universe, with Λ =λ /ℓa2. Because the collapse narrows wave functions in space and time, it increases a particle's momentum and energy, altering its mass. It is shown that, with ℓ=a , the change of mass of a nucleon is unacceptably large but, when ℓ is the size of the Universe, the change of mass over the age of the Universe is acceptably small.

  4. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  5. A Structured Debriefing Process for International Business Culture Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Peter; Palmer, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a nine-step structure for debriefing an international business culture simulation. Stresses the need to address three stages in the experiential learning cycle: reflection, processing, and transfer. Appendices include the specific simulation used and a debriefing note. (DB)

  6. Simulation analysis of the temperature dependence of lignin structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Schulz, Roland; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Lignins are hydrophobic, branched polymers that regulate water conduction and provide protection against chemical and biological degradation in plant cell walls. Lignins also form a residual barrier to effective hydrolysis of plant biomass pretreated at elevated temperatures in cellulosic ethanol production. Here, the temperature-dependent structure and dynamics of individual softwood lignin polymers in aqueous solution are examined using extensive (17ms) molecular dynamics simulations. With decreasing temperature the lignins are found to transition from mobile, extended to glassy, compact states. The polymers are comprised of blobs, inside which the radius of gyration of a polymer segment is a power-law function of the number of monomers comprising it. In the low temperature states the blobs are inter-permeable, the polymer does not conform to Zimm/Stockmayer theory, and branching does not lead to reduction of the polymer size, the radius of gyration being instead determined by shape anisotropy. At high temperatures the blobs become spatially separated leading to a fractal crumpled globule form. The low-temperature collapse is thermodynamically driven by the increase of the translational entropy and density fluctuations of water molecules removed from the hydration shell , thus distinguishing lignin collapse from enthalpically driven coil-globule polymer transitions and providing a thermodynamic role of hydration water density fluctuations in driving hydrophobic polymer collapse. Although hydrophobic, lignin is wetted, leading to locallyenhanced chain dynamics of solvent-exposed monomers. The detailed characterization obtained here provides insight at atomic detail into processes relevant to biomass pretreatment for cellulosic ethanol production and general polymer coil-globule transition phenomena.

  7. Simulation Analysis of the Temperature Dependence of Lignin Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Schulz, Roland; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Lignins are hydrophobic, branched polymers that regulate water conduction and provide protection against chemical and biological degradation in plant cell walls. Lignins also form a residual barrier to effective hydrolysis of plant biomass pretreated at elevated temperatures in cellulosic ethanol production. Here, the temperature-dependent structure and dynamics of individual softwood lignin polymers in aqueous solution are examined using extensive (17 s) molecular dynamics simulations. With decreasing temperature the lignins are found to transition from mobile, extended to glassy, compact states. The polymers are composed of blobs, inside which the radius of gyration of a polymer segment is a power-law function of the number of monomers comprising it. In the low temperature states the blobs are interpermeable, the polymer does not conform to Zimm/Stockmayer theory, and branching does not lead to reduction of the polymer size, the radius of gyration being instead determined by shape anisotropy. At high temperatures the blobs become spatially separated leading to a fractal crumpled globule form. The low-temperature collapse is thermodynamically driven by the increase of the translational entropy and density fluctuations of water molecules removed from the hydration shell, thus distinguishing lignin collapse from enthalpically driven coil globule polymer transitions and providing a thermodynamic role of hydration water density fluctuations in driving hydrophobic polymer collapse. Although hydrophobic, lignin is wetted, leading to locally enhanced chain dynamics of solvent-exposed monomers. The detailed characterization obtained here provides insight at atomic detail into processes relevant to biomass pretreatment for cellulosic ethanol production and general polymer coil globule transition phenomena.

  8. Toward numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; White, Susan M.; Mallya, Sanjay M.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low-pressure loads incurred during breathing. This paper describes efforts toward the development of a numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with sleep apnea. A procedure by which patient-specific airway geometries are segmented and processed from dental cone-beam CT scans into signed distance fields is presented. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method based on the signed distance field is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the airflow in the airway geometries. For simulation of structure mechanics with large expected displacements, a cut-cell finite element method with nonlinear Green strains is used. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled with a partitioned iterative algorithm. Preliminary results are shown for flow simulation inside the three-dimensional rigid upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Two validation cases for the fluid-structure coupling problem are also presented.

  9. GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE AND FILAMENT FORMATION: COMPARISON WITH THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Hartmann, Lee

    2009-10-20

    Recent models of molecular cloud formation and evolution suggest that such clouds are dynamic and generally exhibit gravitational collapse. We present a simple analytic model of global collapse onto a filament and compare this with our numerical simulations of the flow-driven formation of an isolated molecular cloud to illustrate the supersonic motions and infall ram pressures expected in models of gravity-driven cloud evolution. We compare our results with observations of the Pipe Nebula, an especially suitable object for our purposes as its low star formation activity implies insignificant perturbations from stellar feedback. We show that our collapsing cloud model can explain the magnitude of the velocity dispersions seen in the {sup 13}CO filamentary structure by Onishi et al. and the ram pressures required by Lada et al. to confine the lower-mass cores in the Pipe Nebula. We further conjecture that higher-resolution simulations will show small velocity dispersions in the densest core gas, as observed, but which are infall motions and not supporting turbulence. Our results point out the inevitability of ram pressures as boundary conditions for molecular cloud filaments, and the possibility that especially lower-mass cores still can be accreting mass at significant rates, as suggested by observations.

  10. Nanomaterials under extreme environments: A study of structural and dynamic properties using reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh

    Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important with the continuing advances in experimental techniques. As researchers around the world are trying to expand the current understanding of the behavior of materials at the atomistic scale, the limited resolution of equipment, both in terms of time and space, act as roadblocks to a comprehensive study. Numerical methods, in general and molecular dynamics, in particular act as able compliment to the experiments in our quest for understanding material behavior. In this research work, large scale molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechano-chemical behavior under extreme conditions of a variety of systems with many real world applications. The body of this work is divided into three parts, each covering a particular system: 1) Aggregates of aluminum nanoparticles are good solid fuel due to high flame propagation rates. Multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the mechanism underlying higher reaction rate in a chain of aluminum nanoparticles as compared to an isolated nanoparticle. This is due to the penetration of hot atoms from reacting nanoparticles to an adjacent, unreacted nanoparticle, which brings in external heat and initiates exothermic oxidation reactions. 2) Cavitation bubbles readily occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate chemical and mechanical damages caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near amorphous silica. Collapse of an empty nanobubble generates high-speed nanojet, resulting in the formation of a pit on the surface. The pit contains a large number of silanol groups and its volume is found to be directly proportional to the volume of the nanobubble. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and consequently the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. 3) The structure and dynamics of water confined in

  11. The Emission of Internal Waves by Coherent Structures Emerging from Turbulence Collapse in a Stably-Stratified Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, G. R.; Browand, F. K.; Bell, R.

    1999-11-01

    The coupling between vortical and wave modes in stably-stratified fluids has long been of interest in understanding the particular characteristics that distinguish decaying turbulence in atmospheric mesoscales and small scales in the ocean. Using the initially-turbulent towed-sphere wake as a model case, it can be demonstrated that no matter how vigorous the initial tubulence event, as measured here by the body Froude number, F ≡ 2U/ND, the decaying flow always transitions through a régime where local Froude numbers are of order one, and subsequent evolution is F-independent. During the transitional, or non-equilibrium régime, the coupling of wave and vortical modes produces internal wave packets whose vertical length scale is determined by the local structure thickness. Quantitative measurements of the wavenumber-frequency relations suggest that the propagation of the wave packets can be understood in a linear framework, though of course their origin cannot be. If appropriate scaling laws can be determined, then predictions of wavelength, propagation times and energy fluxes can be made for geophysical and engineering applications.

  12. MAGNETOROTATIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE IN THREE DIMENSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mösta, Philipp; Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; Piro, Anthony L.; Boydstun, Kristen; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Reisswig, Christian; Schnetter, Erik

    2014-04-20

    We present results of new three-dimensional (3D) general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of rapidly rotating strongly magnetized core collapse. These simulations are the first of their kind and include a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to postbounce neutrino emission. Our results show that the 3D dynamics of magnetorotational core-collapse supernovae are fundamentally different from what was anticipated on the basis of previous simulations in axisymmetry (2D). A strong bipolar jet that develops in a simulation constrained to 2D is crippled by a spiral instability and fizzles in full 3D. While multiple (magneto-)hydrodynamic instabilities may be present, our analysis suggests that the jet is disrupted by an m = 1 kink instability of the ultra-strong toroidal field near the rotation axis. Instead of an axially symmetric jet, a completely new, previously unreported flow structure develops. Highly magnetized spiral plasma funnels expelled from the core push out the shock in polar regions, creating wide secularly expanding lobes. We observe no runaway explosion by the end of the full 3D simulation 185 ms after bounce. At this time, the lobes have reached maximum radii of ∼900 km.

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATION ON STRUCTURE FORMATION WITH EXTREMELY LIGHT BOSONIC DARK MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, T.-P.; Chiueh Tzihong E-mail: chiuehth@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2009-05-20

    A bosonic dark matter model is examined in detail via high-resolution simulations. These bosons have particle mass of the order of 10{sup -22} eV and are noninteracting. If they do exist and can account for structure formation, these bosons must be condensed into the Bose-Einstein state and described by a coherent wave function. This matter, also known as fuzzy dark matter, is speculated to be able, first, to eliminate the subgalactic halos to solve the problem of overabundance of dwarf galaxies, and, second, to produce flat halo cores in galaxies suggested by some observations. We investigate this model with simulations up to 1024{sup 3} resolution in a 1 h {sup -1} Mpc box that maintains the background matter density {omega} {sub m} = 0.3 and {omega}{sub {lambda}} = 0.7. Our results show that the extremely light bosonic dark matter can indeed eliminate low-mass halos through the suppression of short-wavelength fluctuations, as predicted by the linear perturbation theory. But in contrast to expectation, our simulations yield singular cores in the collapsed halos, where the halo density profile is similar, but not identical, to the Navarro-Frenk-White profile. Such a profile arises regardless of whether the halo forms through accretion or merger. In addition, the virialized halos exhibit anisotropic turbulence inside a well-defined virial boundary. Much like the velocity dispersion of standard dark matter particles, turbulence is dominated by the random radial flow in most part of the halos and becomes isotropic toward the halo cores. Consequently, the three-dimensional collapsed halo mass distribution can deviate from spherical symmetry, as the cold dark matter halo does.

  14. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  15. BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN FAILING CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2011-04-01

    We present results of a systematic study of failing core-collapse supernovae and the formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). Using our open-source general-relativistic 1.5D code GR1D equipped with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and over 100 presupernova models, we study the effects of the choice of nuclear equation of state (EOS), zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss prescription on BH formation. We find that the outcome, for a given EOS, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing protoneutron star (PNS) structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkof equations, we find that thermal pressure support in the outer PNS core is responsible for raising the maximum PNS mass by up to 25% above the cold NS value. By artificially increasing neutrino heating, we find the critical neutrino heating efficiency required for exploding a given progenitor structure and connect these findings with ZAMS conditions, establishing, albeit approximately, for the first time based on actual collapse simulations, the mapping between ZAMS parameters and the outcome of core collapse. We also study the effect of progenitor rotation and find that the dimensionless spin of nascent BHs may be robustly limited below a* = Jc/GM{sup 2} = 1 by the appearance of nonaxisymmetric rotational instabilities.

  16. Understanding Sodium Channel Function and Modulation Using Atomistic Simulations of Bacterial Channel Structures.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, C; Allen, T W

    2016-01-01

    Sodium channels are chief proteins involved in electrical signaling in the nervous system, enabling critical functions like heartbeat and brain activity. New high-resolution X-ray structures for bacterial sodium channels have created an opportunity to see how these proteins operate at the molecular level. An important challenge to overcome is establishing relationships between the structures and functions of mammalian and bacterial channels. Bacterial sodium channels are known to exhibit the main structural features of their mammalian counterparts, as well as several key functional characteristics, including selective ion conduction, voltage-dependent gating, pore-based inactivation and modulation by local anesthetic, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptic drugs. Simulations have begun to shed light on each of these features in the past few years. Despite deviations in selectivity signatures for bacterial and mammalian channels, simulations have uncovered the nature of the multiion conduction mechanism associated with Na(+) binding to a high-field strength site established by charged glutamate side chains. Simulations demonstrated a surprising level of flexibility of the protein, showing that these side chains are active participants in the permeation process. They have also uncovered changes in protein structure, leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate that have been proposed to correspond to inactivated structures. These observations offer the potential to examine the mechanisms of state-dependent drug activity, focusing on pore-blocking and pore-based slow inactivation in bacterial channels, without the complexities of inactivation on multiple timescales seen in eukaryotic channels. Simulations have provided molecular views of the interactions of drugs, consistent with sites predicted in mammalian channels, as well as a wealth of other sites as potential new drug targets. In this chapter, we survey the new insights into sodium channel function that

  17. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse dolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical for karst rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow pathes in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become instable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending of the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth propagates towards the surface and finally results in a collapse structure, such as collapse dolines, sinkholes, and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of dolines, solution and collapse dolines, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure and three-dimensional structural models for the current situation derived for the different locations.

  18. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the centre of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as standing accretion shock instability and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. The potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory is analysed. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  19. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-03-17

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  20. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; et al

    2015-03-17

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernovamore » remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.« less

  1. Canine tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Tappin, S W

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal collapse occurs most commonly in middle-aged, small breed dogs. Clinical signs are usually proportional to the degree of collapse, ranging from mild airway irritation and paroxysmal coughing to respiratory distress and dyspnoea. Diagnosis is made by documenting dynamic airway collapse with radiographs, bronchoscopy or fluoroscopy. Most dogs respond well to medical management and treatment of any concurrent comorbidities. Surgical intervention may need to be considered in dogs that do not respond or have respiratory compromise. A variety of surgical techniques have been reported although extraluminal ring prostheses or intraluminal stenting are the most commonly used. Both techniques have numerous potential complications and require specialised training and experience but are associated with good short- and long-term outcomes. PMID:26780854

  2. A phased approach to enable hybrid simulation of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Billie F.; Chang, Chia-Ming; Frankie, Thomas M.; Kuchma, Daniel A.; Silva, Pedro F.; Abdelnaby, Adel E.

    2014-08-01

    Hybrid simulation has been shown to be a cost-effective approach for assessing the seismic performance of structures. In hybrid simulation, critical parts of a structure are physically tested, while the remaining portions of the system are concurrently simulated computationally, typically using a finite element model. This combination is realized through a numerical time-integration scheme, which allows for investigation of full system-level responses of a structure in a cost-effective manner. However, conducting hybrid simulation of complex structures within large-scale testing facilities presents significant challenges. For example, the chosen modeling scheme may create numerical inaccuracies or even result in unstable simulations; the displacement and force capacity of the experimental system can be exceeded; and a hybrid test may be terminated due to poor communication between modules (e.g., loading controllers, data acquisition systems, simulation coordinator). These problems can cause the simulation to stop suddenly, and in some cases can even result in damage to the experimental specimens; the end result can be failure of the entire experiment. This study proposes a phased approach to hybrid simulation that can validate all of the hybrid simulation components and ensure the integrity large-scale hybrid simulation. In this approach, a series of hybrid simulations employing numerical components and small-scale experimental components are examined to establish this preparedness for the large-scale experiment. This validation program is incorporated into an existing, mature hybrid simulation framework, which is currently utilized in the Multi-Axial Full-Scale Sub-Structuring Testing and Simulation (MUST-SIM) facility of the George E. Brown Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) equipment site at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A hybrid simulation of a four-span curved bridge is presented as an example, in which three piers are

  3. Collapsible high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A lightweight small high gain antenna which is capable of being packaged in a collapsed form and automatically expanded when in use is described. The antenna includes a cylindrical housing having a rod with a piston adjacent to one end extending through it. Attached to the outer end of the rod in a normally collapsed state is a helical wire coil. When the gas producing means is activated the piston and rod are shifted outwardly to expand the wire coil. A latch is provided for holding the helical coil in the expanded position.

  4. Dynamical collapse of trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemond, J. J. Benjamin; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Grebogi, Celso; van de Wouw, Nathan; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Friction induces unexpected dynamical behaviour. In the paradigmatic pendulum and double-well systems with friction, modelled with differential inclusions, distinct trajectories can collapse onto a single point. Transversal homoclinic orbits display collapse and generate chaotic saddles with forward dynamics that is qualitatively different from the backward dynamics. The space of initial conditions converging to the chaotic saddle is fractal, but the set of points diverging from it is not: friction destroys the complexity of the forward dynamics by generating a unique horseshoe-like topology.

  5. Systematic and simulation-free coarse graining of homopolymer melts: A structure-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    We propose a systematic and simulation-free strategy for coarse graining of homopolymer melts, where each chain of Nm monomers is uniformly divided into N segments, with the spatial position of each segment corresponding to the center-of-mass of its monomers. We use integral-equation theories suitable for the study of equilibrium properties of polymers, instead of many-chain molecular simulations, to obtain the structural and thermodynamic properties of both original and coarse-grained (CG) systems, and quantitatively examine how the effective pair potentials between CG segments and the thermodynamic properties of CG systems vary with N. Our systematic and simulation-free strategy is much faster than those using many-chain simulations, thus effectively solving the transferability problem in coarse graining, and provides the quantitative basis for choosing the appropriate N-values. It also avoids the problems caused by finite-size effects and statistical uncertainties in many-chain simulations. Taking the simple hard-core Gaussian thread model [K. S. Schweizer and J. G. Curro, Chem. Phys. 149, 105 (1990)] as the original system, we demonstrate our strategy applied to structure-based coarse graining, which is quite general and versatile, and compare in detail the various integral-equation theories and closures for coarse graining. Our numerical results show that the effective CG potentials for various N and closures can be collapsed approximately onto the same curve, and that structure-based coarse graining cannot give thermodynamic consistency between original and CG systems at any N < Nm.

  6. Systematic and simulation-free coarse graining of homopolymer melts: A structure-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-02-07

    We propose a systematic and simulation-free strategy for coarse graining of homopolymer melts, where each chain of N{sub m} monomers is uniformly divided into N segments, with the spatial position of each segment corresponding to the center-of-mass of its monomers. We use integral-equation theories suitable for the study of equilibrium properties of polymers, instead of many-chain molecular simulations, to obtain the structural and thermodynamic properties of both original and coarse-grained (CG) systems, and quantitatively examine how the effective pair potentials between CG segments and the thermodynamic properties of CG systems vary with N. Our systematic and simulation-free strategy is much faster than those using many-chain simulations, thus effectively solving the transferability problem in coarse graining, and provides the quantitative basis for choosing the appropriate N-values. It also avoids the problems caused by finite-size effects and statistical uncertainties in many-chain simulations. Taking the simple hard-core Gaussian thread model [K. S. Schweizer and J. G. Curro, Chem. Phys. 149, 105 (1990)] as the original system, we demonstrate our strategy applied to structure-based coarse graining, which is quite general and versatile, and compare in detail the various integral-equation theories and closures for coarse graining. Our numerical results show that the effective CG potentials for various N and closures can be collapsed approximately onto the same curve, and that structure-based coarse graining cannot give thermodynamic consistency between original and CG systems at any N < N{sub m}.

  7. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  8. Computer Simulation Methods for Defect Configurations and Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will describe general computer simulation methods, including ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo method, and their applications to the calculations of defect configurations in various materials (metals, ceramics and oxides) and the simulations of nanoscale structures due to ion-solid interactions. The multiscale theory, modeling, and simulation techniques (both time scale and space scale) will be emphasized, and the comparisons between computer simulation results and exprimental observations will be made.

  9. Collapse of the EPR fine structure of a one-dimensional array of weakly interacting binuclear units: A dimensional quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Abud, Julián E.; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Santana, Ricardo C.

    2011-09-01

    coupling between units, we observe in single-crystal samples sudden merges of the fine structure peaks, accompanied by a large narrowing, when the inter-binuclear coupling becomes larger than the splitting of the triplet state. In addition, and because of this collapse of the fine structure peaks, the spectra of powder samples display a strong and unexpected central peak that decreases in intensity with decreasing temperature, as it occurs with the binuclear signals. We first discuss the dimensional quantum phase transition indicated by the spectral changes using Anderson-Kubo's theory of exchange narrowing. The data allow evaluation of the binuclear exchange coupling J0 = (-74 ± 3) cm-1, and the interactions between neighbor binuclear units |J'| = (0.04 ± 0.01) cm-1. We also consider the magnetic excitations (triplet excitons or triplons) arising from the inter-binuclear couplings, and introduce a model explaining qualitatively the observed collapse and narrowing of the EPR spectra in terms of these excitons. We analyze the role of temperature in the inter-binuclear interactions and the exchange correlation times of the binuclear systems and compare our results with those in binuclear compounds in which Bose-Einstein condensation occurs.

  10. 3-D simulation of nanopore structure for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Mo; Pak, Y Eugene; Chun, Honggu; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for simulating nanopore structure by using conventional 3-D simulation tool to mimic the I-V behavior of the nanopore structure. In the simulation, we use lightly doped silicon for ionic solution where some parameters like electron affinity and dielectric constant are fitted to consider the ionic solution. By using this method, we can simulate the I-V behavior of nanopore structure depending on the location and the size of the sphere shaped silicon oxide which is considered to be an indicator of a DNA base. In addition, we simulate an Ionic Field Effect Transistor (IFET) which has basically the nanopore structure, and show that the simulated curves follow sufficiently the I-V behavior of the measurement data. Therefore, we think it is reasonable to apply parameter modeling mentioned above to simulate nanopore structure. The key idea is to modify electron affinity of silicon which is used to mimic the KCl solution to avoid band bending and depletion inside the nanopore. We could efficiently utilize conventional 3-D simulation tool to simulate the I-V behavior of nanopore structures. PMID:22966538

  11. Four tails problems for dynamical collapse theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueen, Kelvin J.

    2015-02-01

    The primary quantum mechanical equation of motion entails that measurements typically do not have determinate outcomes, but result in superpositions of all possible outcomes. Dynamical collapse theories (e.g. GRW) supplement this equation with a stochastic Gaussian collapse function, intended to collapse the superposition of outcomes into one outcome. But the Gaussian collapses are imperfect in a way that leaves the superpositions intact. This is the tails problem. There are several ways of making this problem more precise. But many authors dismiss the problem without considering the more severe formulations. Here I distinguish four distinct tails problems. The first (bare tails problem) and second (structured tails problem) exist in the literature. I argue that while the first is a pseudo-problem, the second has not been adequately addressed. The third (multiverse tails problem) reformulates the second to account for recently discovered dynamical consequences of collapse. Finally the fourth (tails problem dilemma) shows that solving the third by replacing the Gaussian with a non-Gaussian collapse function introduces new conflict with relativity theory.

  12. A Search for Protostellar Collapse in Late Class I Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, E. M.; Mardones, D.; Evans, N. J., II; Myers, P. C.; Shirley, Y. L.; Wilson, C. D.

    2000-10-01

    Asymmetric spectra of optically thick spectral lines are associated with protostellar collapse in young stellar objects. Such asymmetries have been believed to be confined solely to the Class 0 stage, but collapse signatures have now been observed in Class I sources with Tbol < 200 K. We present partial results of a survey that extends earlier results in Class 0 and I sources of HCO+, a molecule that shows strong line asymmetry in simulations of collapsing clouds, to Class I sources with Tbol < 650 K to find when protostellar collapse ends and how infall motions change with time.

  13. Silo collapse under granular discharge.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, G; Colonnello, C; Boltenhagen, P; Darias, J R; Peralta-Fabi, R; Brau, F; Clément, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, at a laboratory scale, the collapse of cylindrical shells of radius R and thickness t induced by a granular discharge. We measure the critical filling height for which the structure fails upon discharge. We observe that the silos sustain filling heights significantly above an estimation obtained by coupling standard shell-buckling and granular stress distribution theories. Two effects contribute to stabilize the structure: (i) below the critical filling height, a dynamical stabilization due to granular wall friction prevents the localized shell-buckling modes to grow irreversibly; (ii) above the critical filling height, collapse occurs before the downward sliding motion of the whole granular column sets in, such that only a partial friction mobilization is at play. However, we notice also that the critical filling height is reduced as the grain size d increases. The importance of grain size contribution is controlled by the ratio d/√[Rt]. We rationalize these antagonist effects with a novel fluid-structure theory both accounting for the actual status of granular friction at the wall and the inherent shell imperfections mediated by the grains. This theory yields new scaling predictions which are compared with the experimental results. PMID:25615503

  14. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  15. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  16. Scaling of curvature in subcritical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, David; Duncan, G. Comer

    1998-09-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric scalar field. For those data that just barely do not form black holes we find the maximum curvature at the position of the central observer. We find a scaling relation between this maximum curvature and distance from the critical solution. The scaling relation is analogous to that found by Choptuik for the black hole mass for those data that do collapse to form black holes. We also find a periodic wiggle in the scaling exponent.

  17. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-01

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death". PMID:26088782

  18. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mina, Aziz N.; Awadallah, Attia A.; Phillips, Adel H.; Ahmed, Riham R.

    2012-02-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model & LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  19. Collapse analysis of a waffle plate strongback for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monasa, Frank F.; Roche, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    The structural integrity was studied of the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) Strongback of the SSF for the launch environment. The strongback structure supports the electrical power system for SSF. To achieve minimum launch mass, it is essential that flight structures are designed as light as possible. A nonlinear structural analysis was conducted to determine the collapse load of the structure and the associated factor of safety against the service loads. A modeling technique is provided for simulating the load conditions and the buckling and post buckling (collapse) load is evaluated of the IEA Strongback structure, using the finite element computer code MARC. Two of four strongback panels were modeled and analyzed. The effects were examined of the following factors on the global behavior of the strongback panels: (1) load simplification and simulation; (2) type of support boundary conditions; and (3) the possibility of weight reduction of the original structure. For this purpose, several models of the two panels of the strongback were considered. The stress level and distribution in the panels for launch condition, the Eigenvalue critical buckling load and/or the collapse load were determined.

  20. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage. PMID:25890856

  1. Chapter 2: Simulations of the Structure of Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Himmel, M. E.; Brady, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the homopolymer of (1 {yields} 4)-{beta}-D-glucose. The chemical composition of this polymer is simple, but understanding the conformation and packing of cellulose molecules is challenging. This chapter describes the structure of cellulose from the perspective of molecular mechanics simulations, including conformational analysis of cellobiose and simulations of hydrated cellulose I{beta} with CSFF and GLYCAM06, two sets of force field parameters developed specifically for carbohydrates. Many important features observed in these simulations are sensitive to differences in force field parameters, giving rise to dramatically different structures. The structures and properties of non-naturally occurring cellulose allomorphs (II, III, and IV) are also discussed.

  2. A New Ground Motion Intensity Measure, Peak Filtered Acceleration (PFA), to Estimate Collapse Vulnerability of Buildings in Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shiyan

    In this thesis, we develop an efficient collapse prediction model, the PFA (Peak Filtered Acceleration) model, for buildings subjected to different types of ground motions. For the structural system, the PFA model covers modern steel and reinforced concrete moment-resisting frame buildings (potentially reinforced concrete shear wall buildings). For ground motions, the PFA model covers ramp-pulse-like ground motions, long-period ground motions, and short-period ground motions. To predict whether a building will collapse in response to a given ground motion, we first extract long-period components from the ground motion using a Butterworth low-pass filter with suggested order and cutoff frequency. The order depends on the type of ground motion, and the cutoff frequency depends on the building's natural frequency and ductility. We then compare the filtered acceleration time history with the capacity of the building. The capacity of the building is a constant for 2-dimentional buildings and a limit domain for 3-dimentional buildings. If the filtered acceleration exceeds the building's capacity, the building is predicted to collapse. Otherwise, it is expected to survive the ground motion. The parameters used in PFA model, which include fundamental period, global ductility and lateral capacity, can be obtained either from numerical analysis or interpolation based on the reference building system proposed in this thesis. The PFA collapse prediction model greatly reduces computational complexity while archiving good accuracy. It is verified by FEM simulations of 13 frame building models and 150 ground motion records. Based on the developed collapse prediction model, we propose to use PFA (Peak Filtered Acceleration) as a new ground motion intensity measure for collapse prediction. We compare PFA with traditional intensity measures PGA, PGV, PGD, and Sa in collapse prediction and find that PFA has the best performance among all the intensity measures. We also provide a

  3. Modelling Glacier Retreat after Ice Shelf Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, J.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Rott, H.; Bamber, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements have shown the consistent and ongoing speed-up and retreat of glaciers that were once buttressed by the collapsed Larsen B ice shelf. Understanding the response of grounded ice to ice shelf collapse is a prerequisite to future predictions of sea level rise as other ice shelfs such as Scar Inlet or the Larsen Ice Shelf further weaken due to changing atmospheric and ocean conditions.We present model results for a number of sensitivity experiments that aim to simulate the response of glaciers to the collapse of Larsen B. For this purpose we use a state of the art shallow shelf model with grounding line resolving capabilities. The model is initialized to observed pre-2002 conditions with the ice shelf in place, and transient runs are done that study the response to a weakening and removal of the ice shelf. Results are compared to a novel dataset of observed ice velocities, which provides the most comprehensive overview of dynamical changes after the collapse to-date. In addition, we investigate glacier response to the future collapse of Scar Inlet, a remnant of the Larsen B ice shelf which has been suggested to show signs of weakening in recent years. Results will also be used to inform a future Antartic Peninsula-wide modelling study.

  4. Collapse of an antibubble.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)(1/2), according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film. PMID:23848619

  5. Collapse of an antibubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)1/2, according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film.

  6. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  7. Collapsing angiokeloidal dermatofibroma.

    PubMed

    Schnebelen, Alicia M; Brown, J Ahmad; Cheung, Wang L; Hiatt, Kim M; Smoller, Bruce R

    2012-10-01

    A heterogeneous group of benign fibrohistiocytic lesions has been assembled under the umbrella term, dermatofibroma. These lesions share a morphology of bland spindled cells encompassed by and intercalating through thick dermal collagen; unique variants have been described based on secondary histologic features, some of which include aneurysmal, myxoid, lipidized, signet ring, angiomatous, and keloidal. Here, we present a distinct dermatofibroma variant henceforth known as collapsing angiokeloidal dermatofibroma identified in 2 patients with slowly growing nodules of the buttock and the arm. Microscopically, the lesions have a characteristic dermatofibroma appearance but are accompanied by unusual diffuse small caliber vessels whose walls are collapsed by a thick, eosinophilic, keloid-like substance. The eosinophilic material resembles the adjacent dermal collagen; however, it does not stain for type-4 collagen or type-1 procollagen, amyloid, or glycogen. Although the exact composition of the keloidal material remains ambiguous, the architectural novelty of collapsing angiokeloidal dermatofibroma serves to further expand the morphologic spectrum of benign fibrous histiocytomas, although highlighting the difficulty in distinguishing between it and similar lesions. PMID:22576077

  8. Simulation of Sintering of Layered Structures

    SciTech Connect

    OLEVSKY,EUGENE; TIKARE,VEENA; GARINO,TERRY J.; BRAGINSKY,MICHAEL V.

    2000-11-22

    An integrated approach, combining the continuum theory of sintering and Potts model based mesostructure evolution analysis, is used to solve the problem of bi-layered structure sintering. Two types of bi-layered structures are considered: layers of the same material with different initial porosity, and layers of two different materials. The effective sintering stress for the bi-layer powder sintering is derived, both at the meso- and the macroscopic levels. Macroscopic shape distortions and spatial distributions of porosity are determined as functions of the dimensionless specific time of sintering. The effect of the thickness of the layers on shrinkage, warpage, and pore-grain structure is studied. Ceramic ZnO powders are employed as a model experimental system to assess the model predictions.

  9. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Guobao; Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Kraimer, Martin; /Argonne

    2012-07-06

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  10. Atmospheric icing of structures: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ágústsson, H.; Elíasson, Á. J.; Thorsteins, E.; Rögnvaldsson, Ó.; Ólafsson, H.

    2012-04-01

    This study compares observed icing in a test span in complex orography at Hallormsstaðaháls (575 m) in East-Iceland with parameterized icing based on an icing model and dynamically downscaled weather at high horizontal resolution. Four icing events have been selected from an extensive dataset of observed atmospheric icing in Iceland. A total of 86 test-spans have been erected since 1972 at 56 locations in complex terrain with more than 1000 icing events documented. The events used here have peak observed ice load between 4 and 36 kg/m. Most of the ice accretion is in-cloud icing but it may partly be mixed with freezing drizzle and wet snow icing. The calculation of atmospheric icing is made in two steps. First the atmospheric data is created by dynamically downscaling the ECMWF-analysis to high resolution using the non-hydrostatic mesoscale Advanced Research WRF-model. The horizontal resolution of 9, 3, 1 and 0.33 km is necessary to allow the atmospheric model to reproduce correctly local weather in the complex terrain of Iceland. Secondly, the Makkonen-model is used to calculate the ice accretion rate on the conductors based on the simulated temperature, wind, cloud and precipitation variables from the atmospheric data. In general, the atmospheric model correctly simulates the atmospheric variables and icing calculations based on the atmospheric variables correctly identify the observed icing events, but underestimate the load due to too slow ice accretion. This is most obvious when the temperature is slightly below 0°C and the observed icing is most intense. The model results improve significantly when additional observations of weather from an upstream weather station are used to nudge the atmospheric model. However, the large variability in the simulated atmospheric variables results in high temporal and spatial variability in the calculated ice accretion. Furthermore, there is high sensitivity of the icing model to the droplet size and the possibility that

  11. Protostellar collapse in a self-gravitating sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Boss, Alan; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary calculations of protostellar cloud collapse starting from an isothermal, self-gravitating gaseous layer in hydrostatic equilibrium. This gravitationally unstable layer collapses into a flattened or toroidal density distribution, even in the absence of rotation or magnetic fields. We suggest that the flat infalling envelope recently observed in HL Tau by Hayashi et al.is the result of collapse from an initially nonspherical layer. We also speculate that the later evolution of such a flattened, collapsing envelope can produce a structure similar to the 'flared disk' invoked by Kenyon and Hartmann to explain the infrared excesses of many T Tauri stars.

  12. Interacting dark energy collapse with matter components separation

    SciTech Connect

    Delliou, M. Le; Barreiro, T. E-mail: tmbarreiro@ulusofona.pt

    2013-02-01

    We use the spherical collapse model of structure formation to investigate the separation in the collapse of uncoupled matter (essentially baryons) and coupled dark matter in an interacting dark energy scenario. Following the usual assumption of a single radius of collapse for all species, we show that we only need to evolve the uncoupled matter sector to obtain the evolution for all matter components. This gives us more information on the collapse with a simplified set of evolution equations compared with the usual approaches. We then apply these results to four quintessence potentials and show how we can discriminate between different quintessence models.

  13. Dynamics of adaptive structures: Design through simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a helical bi-morph actuator/sensor concept by mimicking the change of helical waveform in bacterial flagella is perhaps the first application of bacterial motions (living species) to longitudinal deployment of space structures. However, no dynamical considerations were analyzed to explain the waveform change mechanisms. The objective is to review various deployment concepts from the dynamics point of view and introduce the dynamical considerations from the outset as part of design considerations. Specifically, the impact of the incorporation of the combined static mechanisms and dynamic design considerations on the deployment performance during the reconfiguration stage is studied in terms of improved controllability, maneuvering duration, and joint singularity index. It is shown that intermediate configurations during articulations play an important role for improved joint mechanisms design and overall structural deployability.

  14. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution is driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer and either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical of soluble rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow paths in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become unstable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending on the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth may propagate towards the surface and finally results at the surface as collapse sinkholes and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of sinkholes, solution and collapse sinkholes, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure, and we derive three-dimensional structural models of the current situation for the different locations with our numerical tool PREDICTOR.

  15. Estimating Building Simulation Parameters via Bayesian Structure Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Richard E; New, Joshua Ryan; Parker, Lynne Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Many key building design policies are made using sophisticated computer simulations such as EnergyPlus (E+), the DOE flagship whole-building energy simulation engine. E+ and other sophisticated computer simulations have several major problems. The two main issues are 1) gaps between the simulation model and the actual structure, and 2) limitations of the modeling engine's capabilities. Currently, these problems are addressed by having an engineer manually calibrate simulation parameters to real world data or using algorithmic optimization methods to adjust the building parameters. However, some simulations engines, like E+, are computationally expensive, which makes repeatedly evaluating the simulation engine costly. This work explores addressing this issue by automatically discovering the simulation's internal input and output dependencies from 20 Gigabytes of E+ simulation data, future extensions will use 200 Terabytes of E+ simulation data. The model is validated by inferring building parameters for E+ simulations with ground truth building parameters. Our results indicate that the model accurately represents parameter means with some deviation from the means, but does not support inferring parameter values that exist on the distribution's tail.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Electronic Structure Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Succi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory has been proposed. In particular, it was shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. By using a discrete version of this new formalism, the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule were calculated accurately. Here, we discuss the main ideas behind the lattice kinetic approach to electronic structure computations, offer some considerations for prospective extensions, and also show additional numerical results, namely the geometrical configuration of the water molecule.

  17. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  18. Geomechanical numerical simulations of complex geologic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Arguello, J.G.; Stone, C.M.; Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Ability to predict mechanical response of rock in three dimensions over the spatial and time scales of geologic interest would give the oil and gas industry the ability to reduce risk on prospects, improve pre-project initial reserve estimates, and lower operating costs. A program has recently been initiated, under the auspices of the Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI), to achieve such a computational technology breakthrough by adapting the unique advanced quasistatic finite element technology developed by Sandia to the mechanics applications important to exploration and production activities within the oil and gas industry. As a precursor to that program, in an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the approach, several complex geologic structures of interest were analyzed with the existing two-dimensional quasistatic finite element code, SANTOS, developed at Sandia. Examples are presented and discussed.

  19. Large eddy simulation of ship tracks in the collapsed marine boundary layer: a case study from the Monterey area ship track experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A. H.; Bretherton, C. S.; Wood, R.

    2015-05-01

    For the first time, a large eddy simulation (LES) coupled to a bulk aerosol scheme is used to simulate an aircraft-sampled ship track. The track was formed by the M/V Sanko Peace on 13 June 1994 in a shallow drizzling boundary layer with high winds but very low background aerosol concentrations (10 cm-3). A Lagrangian framework is used to simulate the evolution of a short segment of track as it is advected away from the ship for 8 h (a downwind distance exceeding 570 km). Using aircraft observations for initialization, good agreement is obtained between the simulated and observed features of the ambient boundary layer outside the track, including the organization of the cloud into mesoscale rolls. After 8 h, a line of aerosol is injected to start the ship track. The simulation successfully reproduces the significant albedo enhancement and suppression of drizzle observed within the track. The aerosol concentration within the track dilutes as it broadens due to turbulent mixing. A sensitivity study shows the broadening rate strongly depends on the alignment between the track and the wind-aligned boundary layer rolls, as satellite images of ship tracks suggest. Entrainment is enhanced within the simulated track, but the observed 100 m elevation of the ship track above the surrounding layer is not simulated, possibly because the LES quickly sharpens the rather weak observed inversion. Liquid water path within the simulated track increases with time even as the ambient liquid water path is decreasing. The albedo increase in the track from liquid water and cloud fraction enhancement (second indirect effect) eventually exceeds that from cloud droplet number increases (first indirect or Twomey effect). In a sensitivity study with a higher initial ambient aerosol concentration, stronger ship track aerosol source, and much weaker drizzle, there is less liquid water inside the track than outside for several hours downwind, consistent with satellite estimates for such

  20. Large-eddy simulation of ship tracks in the collapsed marine boundary layer: a case study from the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A. H.; Bretherton, C. S.; Wood, R.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, a large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled to a bulk aerosol scheme is used to simulate an aircraft-sampled ship track. The track was formed by the M/V Sanko Peace on 13 June 1994 in a shallow drizzling boundary layer with high winds but very low background aerosol concentrations (10 cm-3). A Lagrangian framework is used to simulate the evolution of a short segment of track as it is advected away from the ship for eight hours (a downwind distance exceeding 570 km). Using aircraft observations for initialization, good agreement is obtained between the simulated and observed features of the ambient boundary layer outside the track, including the organization of cloud into mesoscale rolls. After eight hours, a line of aerosol is injected to start the ship track. The simulation successfully reproduces the significant albedo enhancement and suppression of drizzle observed within the track. The aerosol concentration within the track dilutes as it broadens due to turbulent mixing. A sensitivity study shows the broadening rate strongly depends on the alignment between the track and the wind-aligned boundary layer rolls, as satellite images of ship tracks suggest. Entrainment is enhanced within the simulated track, but the observed 100 m elevation of the ship track above the surrounding layer is not simulated, possibly because the LES quickly sharpens the rather weak observed inversion. Liquid water path within the simulated track increases with time even as the ambient liquid water path is decreasing. The albedo increase in the track from liquid water and cloud fraction enhancement (second indirect effect) eventually exceeds that from cloud droplet number increases (first indirect or Twomey effect). In a sensitivity study with a higher initial ambient aerosol concentration, stronger ship track aerosol source, and much weaker drizzle, there is less liquid water inside the track than outside for several hours downwind, consistent with satellite estimates for

  1. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional self-gravitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow of a self-gravitating fluid is numerically simulated using a Fourier pseudospectral method with a logarithmic variable formulation. Two cases with zero total angular momentum are studied in detail, a 323 simulation (Run B). Other than the grid size, the primary difference between the two cases are that Run A modeled atomic hydrogen and had considerably more compressible motion initially than Run B, which modeled molecular hydrogen. The numerical results indicate that gravitational collapse can proceed in a variety of ways. In the Run A, collapse led to an elongated tube-like structure, while in the Run B, collapse led to a flatter, disklike structure.

  2. Formation of coherent structures in kinetic simulations of collisionless turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss recent large-scale kinetic simulations of collisionless turbulence in two environments, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosheath. Formation of copious coherent structures is observed in both cases, despite the facts that the geometry, characteristic plasma parameters, and driving mechanisms are drastically different between the two systems. In addition to the traditional planar current sheets, other types of coherent current structures have been observed in 3D fully kinetic simulations with initial conditions relevant to the solar wind. These structures are discussed in detail. In 3D global hybrid simulations of the interaction between solar wind and planetary magnetospheres, the foreshock dynamics driven by reflected ions is shown to have a significant impact on the structure of the bow shock, as well as on the magnetosheath turbulence. A complicated interaction between turbulence, bow shock, and global flow leads to global perturbations in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  3. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  4. Understand rotating isothermal collapses yet

    SciTech Connect

    Tohline, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar virial equation is used to describe the dynamic properties of equilibrium gas clouds, taking into account the relative effects of surface pressure, rotation, self gravity and internal isothermal pressure. Details concerning the internal structure of the clouds are ignored in order to obtain a globalized analytical expression. The obtained solution to the equation is found to agree with the surface-pressure-dominated model of Stahler (1983), and the rotation-dominated model of Hayashi, Narita, and Miyama (1982). On the basis of the analytical expression of virial equilibrium in the clouds, some of the limiting properties of isothermal clouds are described, and a realistic starting model for cloud collapse is proposed. 18 references.

  5. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  6. Intraglobular structures in multiblock copolymer chains from a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, K.; Banaszak, M.

    2011-07-01

    Multiblock copolymer chains in implicit nonselective solvents are studied by using a Monte Carlo method, which employs a parallel tempering algorithm. Chains consisting of 120A and 120B monomers, arranged in three distinct microarchitectures: (10-10)12,(6-6)20, and (3-3)40, collapse to globular states upon cooling, as expected. By varying both the reduced temperature T* and the compatibility between monomers ω, numerous intraglobular structures are obtained: diclusters (handshake, spiral, torus with a core, etc.), triclusters, and n clusters with n>3 (lamellar and other), which are reminiscent of the block copolymer nanophases for spherically confined geometries. Phase diagrams for various chains in the (T*,ω) space are mapped. The structure factor S(k), for a selected microarchitecture and ω, is calculated. Since S(k) can be measured in scattering experiments, it can be used to relate simulation results to an experiment. Self-assembly in those systems is interpreted in terms of competition between minimization of the interfacial area separating different types of monomers and minimization of contacts between chain and solvent. Finally, the relevance of this model to the protein folding is addressed.

  7. Computational simulation for analysis and synthesis of impact resilient structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2013-10-01

    Impact resilient structures are of great interest in many engineering applications varying from civil, land vehicle, aircraft and space structures, to mention a few examples. To design such structure, one has to resort fundamental principles and take into account progress in analytical and computational approaches as well as in material science and technology. With such perspectives, this work looks at a generic beam and plate structure subject to impact loading and carry out analysis and numerical simulation. The first objective of the work is to develop a computational algorithm to analyze flat plate as a generic structure subjected to impact loading for numerical simulation and parametric study. The analysis will be based on dynamic response analysis. Consideration is given to the elastic-plastic region. The second objective is to utilize the computational algorithm for direct numerical simulation, and as a parallel scheme, commercial off-the shelf numerical code is utilized for parametric study, optimization and synthesis. Through such analysis and numerical simulation, effort is devoted to arrive at an optimum configuration in terms of loading, structural dimensions, material properties and composite lay-up, among others. Results will be discussed in view of practical applications.

  8. Controlled multibody dynamics simulation for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Wu, S. C.; Chang, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multibody dynamics discipline, and dynamic simulation in control structure interaction (CSI) design are discussed. The use, capabilities, and architecture of the Large Angle Transient Dynamics (LATDYN) code as a simulation tool are explained. A generic joint body with various types of hinge connections; finite element and element coordinate systems; results of a flexible beam spin-up on a plane; mini-mast deployment; space crane and robotic slewing manipulations; a potential CSI test article; and multibody benchmark experiments are also described.

  9. Stochastic search in structural optimization - Genetic algorithms and simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, Prabhat

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of illustrative applications of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing methods in structural optimization. The advantages of such stochastic search methods over traditional mathematical programming strategies are emphasized; it is noted that these methods offer a significantly higher probability of locating the global optimum in a multimodal design space. Both genetic-search and simulated annealing can be effectively used in problems with a mix of continuous, discrete, and integer design variables.

  10. Simulating semiconductor structures for next-generation optical inspection technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golani, Ori; Dolev, Ido; Pond, James; Niegemann, Jens

    2016-02-01

    We present a technique for optimizing advanced optical imaging methods for nanoscale structures, such as those encountered in the inspection of cutting-edge semiconductor devices. The optimization flow is divided to two parts: simulating light-structure interaction using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and simulating the optical imaging system by means of its optical transfer function. As a case study, FDTD is used to simulate 10-nm silicon line-space and static random-access memory patterns, with irregular structural protrusions and silicon-oxide particles as defects of interest. An ultraviolet scanning-spot optical microscope is used to detect these defects, and the optimization flow is used to find the optimal imaging mode for detection.

  11. Impact and Penetration Simulations for Composite Wing-like Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to develop methodologies for the analysis of wing-like structures subjected to impact loadings. Low-speed impact causing either no damage or only minimal damage and high-speed impact causing severe laminate damage and possible penetration of the structure were to be considered during this research effort. To address this goal, an assessment of current analytical tools for impact analysis was performed. Assessment of the analytical tools for impact and penetration simulations with regard to accuracy, modeling, and damage modeling was considered as well as robustness, efficient, and usage in a wing design environment. Following a qualitative assessment, selected quantitative evaluations will be performed using the leading simulation tools. Based on this assessment, future research thrusts for impact and penetration simulation of composite wing-like structures were identified.

  12. Graphene wrinkling: formation, evolution and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changguo; Liu, Yuanpeng; Lan, Lan; Tan, Huifeng

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we focus on the studies of graphene wrinkling, from its formation to collapse, and its dependence on aspect ratio and temperature using molecule dynamics simulation. Based on our results, the first wrinkle is not formed on the edge but in the interior of graphene. The fluctuations of edge slack warps drive the wrinkling evolution in graphene which is distinguished from the bifurcation in continuum film. There are several obvious stages in wrinkling progress, including incubation, infancy, youth, maturity and gerontism periods which are identified by the atomic displacement difference due to the occurrences of new wrinkles. The wrinkling progress is over when the C-C bonds in highly stretched corners are broken which contributes to the wrinkling collapse. The critical wrinkling strain, the wrinkling pattern and extent depend on the aspect ratio of graphene, the wrinkling level and collapsed strains do not. Only the collapsed strain is sensitive to the temperature, the other wrinkling parameters are independent of the temperature. Our results would benefit the understanding of the physics of graphene wrinkling and the design of nanomechanical devices by tuning the wrinkles.

  13. Sonoporation at Small and Large Length Scales: Effect of Cavitation Bubble Collapse on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haohao; Comer, Jeffrey; Cai, Wensheng; Chipot, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a promising means to effect controlled delivery of therapeutic agents through cell membranes. One possible mechanism that explains the enhanced permeability of lipid bilayers is the fast contraction of cavitation bubbles produced on the membrane surface, thereby generating large impulses, which, in turn, enhance the permeability of the bilayer to small molecules. In the present contribution, we investigate the collapse of bubbles of different diameters, using atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the force exerted on the membrane. The total impulse can be computed rigorously in numerical simulations, revealing a superlinear dependence of the impulse on the radius of the bubble. The collapse affects the structure of a nearby immobilized membrane, and leads to partial membrane invagination and increased water permeation. The results of the present study are envisioned to help optimize the use of ultrasound, notably for the delivery of drugs. PMID:26261957

  14. Numerical Simulation of Flow-Induced Structure in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro

    2007-04-01

    It is important to investigate the flow-induced structure for the analysis of the mechanism of flow behavior of complex fluids. The present paper includes two topics in which the flow-induced structure is numerically investigated. The first topic treats the suspensions of disc-like particles under simple shear flows. Disc-like particles were modeled by oblate spheroid particles, and the Brownian dynamics simulation was performed for suspensions of the particles interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. This simulation confirmed that this model system was applicable to the analysis of flow of suspension of disc-like particles. The second one is the numerical simulation of the deformation behavior of a droplet in shear flows. The present simulation is the first step for the numerical simulation of the flow-induced structure in emulsions. This simulation can demonstrate the deformation behavior of droplet observed in experiments and predict effects of non-Newtonian property of fluids on the droplet deformation.

  15. Gravitational collapse of Hagedorn fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    We consider a toy model for the relativistic collapse of a homogeneous perfect fluid that takes into account an equation of state for high density matter, in the form of a Hagedorn phase, and semiclassical corrections in the strong field. We show that collapse reaches a critical minimum size and then bounces. We discuss the conditions needed for the collapse to halt and form a compact object. We argue that implications of models such as the one presented here are of great importance for astrophysics as they show that black holes may not be the only final outcome of collapse of very massive stars.

  16. Magnetized Tolman-Bondi collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germani, Cristiano; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the gravitational implosion of magnetized matter by studying the inhomogeneous collapse of a weakly magnetized Tolman-Bondi spacetime. The role of the field is analyzed by looking at the convergence of neighboring particle world lines. In particular, we identify the magnetically related stresses in the Raychaudhuri equation and use the Tolman-Bondi metric to evaluate their impact on the collapsing dust. We find that, despite the low energy level of the field, the Lorentz force dominates the advanced stages of the collapse, leading to a strongly anisotropic contraction. In addition, of all the magnetic stresses, those that resist the collapse are found to grow faster.

  17. Collapse of modern carbonate platform margins

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, H.T.; Hine, A.C.; Gardulski, A.

    1985-01-01

    Modern carbonate platform margins in the Florida-Bahama region have been viewed as depositional or constructional features. However, recent studies have shown that carbonate escarpments, such as the Blake-Bahama and West Florida Escarpments, are erosional in origin where the platform margins have a scalloped or horse-shoe shape. Seismic reflection data from one of these crescentic features along the west Florida platform margin indicate that it originated by large scale gravity collapse (slump). This collapse structure extends for at least 120 km along the margin and has removed about 350 m of strata as young as early Neogene. Although at least three generations of slope failure are recognized, catastrophic collapse appears to have occurred in the mid-Miocene. Gravitational instability due to high rates of sediment accumulation may have been the triggering mechanism. These data suggest that submarine slumping is an important process in the retreat of limestone escarpments and in the generation of carbonate megabreccia debris flows. Scalloped platform margins occur on satellite images of northern Exuma Sound and Columbus Basin in the Bahamas. The authors suggest that large-scale submarine slumping can cause elongation of structurally controlled intraplatform basins (Exuma South), and produce anomalous horse-shoe shaped basins (Columbus Basin) by mega-collapse processes.

  18. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1994-01-01

    We simulate collisional evolution of grains in dense turbulent molecular cloud cores (or Bok globules) in static equilibrium and free-fall collapse, assuming spherical symmetry. Relative velocities are due to thermal motions, differential settling, and turbulence, with the latter dominant for sonic turbulence with an assumed Kolmogorov spectrum. Realistic criteria are used to determine outcomes of collisions (coagulation vs. destruction) as functions of particle size and velocity. Results are presented for a variety of cloud parameters (radial density profile, turbulent velocity) and particle properties (density, impact strength). Results are sensitive to the assumed mechanical properties (density and impact strength) of grain aggregates. Particle growth is enhanced if aggregates have low density or fractal structures. On a timescale of a few Myr, an initial population of 0.1 micrometers grains may produce dense compact particles approximately 1 micrometer in size, or fluffy aggregates approximately 100 micrometers. For impact strengths less than or equal to 10(exp 6) ergs/g, a steady state is reached between coagulation of small grains and collisional disruption of larger aggregates. Formation of macroscopic aggregates requires high mechanical strengths and low aggregate densities. We assume sonic turbulence during collapse, with varied eddy size scales determining the dissipation rate or turbulence strength. The degree of collisional evolution during collapse is sensitive to the assumed small-scale structure (inner sc ale) of the turbulence. Weak turbulence results in few collisions and preserves the precollapse particle size distribution with little change. Strong turbulence tends to produce net destruction, rather than particle growth, during infall, unless inpact strengths are greater than 10(exp 6)ergs/g.

  19. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution. PMID:25982895

  20. Shock wave induced damage of a protein by void collapse

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lau, Edmond Y.; Berkowitz, Max L.; Schwegler, Eric R.

    2016-01-05

    In this study, we report on a series of molecular dynamics simulations that were used to examine the effects of shockwaves on a membrane bound ion channel. A planar shockwave was found to compress the ion channel upon impact but the protein geometry resembles the initial structure as soon as the solvent density begins to dissipate. When a void was placed in close proximity to the membrane, the shockwave proved to be much more destructive to the protein due to formation of a nanojet that results from the asymmetric collapse of the void. The nanojet was able to cause significantmore » structural changes to the protein even at low particle velocities that are not able to directly cause poration of the membrane.« less

  1. Simulated tornado debris tracks: implications for inferring corner flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael; Lewellen, David

    2011-11-01

    A large collection of three-dimensional large eddy simulations of tornadoes with fine debris have been recently been performed as part of a longstanding effort at West Virginia University to understand tornado corner flow structure and dynamics. Debris removal and deposition is accounted for at the surface, in effect simulating formation of tornado surface marks. Physical origins and properties of the most prominent marks will be presented, and the possibility of inferring tornado corner flow structure from real marks in the field will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0635681 and AGS-1013154.

  2. The Nimitz Freeway Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most tragic sights created by the Loma Prieta earthquake of Oct. 17, 1989, was the collapse of the double-deck Nimitz Freeway (the Cypress Street Viaduct on Interstate 880) just south and east of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in Oakland. Along a 1.4-km north-south stretch, the upper deck of the freeway fell on top of the lower deck of the freeway, killing 42 motorists (see Fig. 1). Even though the earthquake occurred during rush hour (5:04 p.m.), traffic was extremely light that day because the third game of the World Series between the Oakland Athletics and the San Francisco Giants was about to begin and many commuters were already at home in front of their television sets.

  3. Simulation approach to understanding the processes that structure food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, H.I.; Gardner, R.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Post, W.M.

    1984-08-01

    A simulation model of food web dynamics, WEB, was constructed and used in Monte Carlo experiments to study the relationship between structure and function in food webs. Four main experiments were designed using WEB. The first tested the robustness of food web structures at equilibrium to variations in the functional response of predators in the food web to the densities of their prey. The second experiment clarified the roles of predation and resource limitation in the process of structuring food webs. A third experiment studied the influence of productivity on food web structure and function using simulated food webs. The final experiment was designed to study the differential successes of generalists and specialists. The main advantage gained by using a simulation approach in each of these experiments was the ability to assess the roles played by processes of predation and competition in structuring model food webs. This was accomplished by interpreting the order of extinction events that occurred in the simulations and relating these to the species configurations at equilibrium. 61 references, 23 figures.

  4. Assessing inflow rates in atomic cooling haloes: implications for direct collapse black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Volonteri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Supermassive black holes are not only common in the present-day galaxies, but billion solar masses black holes also powered z ≥ 6 quasars. One efficient way to form such black holes is the collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud into a so-called direct collapse black hole. The main requirement for this scenario is the presence of large accretion rates of ≥ 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1 to form a supermassive star. It is not yet clear how and under what conditions such accretion rates can be obtained. The prime aim of this work is to determine the mass accretion rates under non-isothermal collapse conditions. We perform high-resolution cosmological simulations for three primordial haloes of a few times 107 M⊙ illuminated by an external UV flux, J21 = 100-1000. We find that a rotationally supported structure of about parsec size is assembled, with an aspect ratio between 0.25 and 1 depending upon the thermodynamical properties. Rotational support, however, does not halt collapse, and mass inflow rates of ˜ 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1 can be obtained in the presence of even a moderate UV background flux of strength J21 ≥ 100. To assess whether such large accretion rates can be maintained over longer time-scales, we employed sink particles, confirming the persistence of accretion rates of ˜ 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1. We propose that complete isothermal collapse and molecular hydrogen suppression may not always be necessary to form supermassive stars, precursors of black hole seeds. Sufficiently high inflow rates can be obtained for UV flux J21 = 500-1000, at least for some cases. This value brings the estimate of the abundance of direct collapse black hole seeds closer to that high-redshift quasars.

  5. Underdosage of the upper-airway mucosa for small fields as used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a comparison between radiochromic film measurements, Monte Carlo simulations, and collapsed cone convolution calculations.

    PubMed

    Martens, C; Reynaert, N; De Wagter, C; Nilsson, P; Coghe, M; Palmans, H; Thierens, H; De Neve, W

    2002-07-01

    Head-and-neck tumors are often situated at an air-tissue interface what may result in an underdosage of part of the tumor in radiotherapy treatments using megavoltage photons, especially for small fields. In addition to effects of transient electronic disequilibrium, for these small fields, an increased lateral electron range in air will result in an important extra reduction of the central axis dose beyond the cavity. Therefore dose calculation algorithms need to model electron transport accurately. We simulated the trachea by a 2 cm diameter cylindrical air cavity with the rim situated 2 cm beneath the phantom surface. A 6 MV photon beam from an Elekta SLiplus linear accelerator, equipped with the standard multileaf collimator (MLC), was assessed. A 10 x 2 cm2 and a 10 x 1 cm2 field, both widthwise collimated by the MLC, were applied with their long side parallel to the cylinder axis. Central axis dose rebuild-up was studied. Radiochromic film measurements were performed in an in-house manufactured polystyrene phantom with the films oriented either along or perpendicular to the beam axis. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with BEAM and EGSnrc. Calculations were also performed using the pencil beam (PB) algorithm and the collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm of Helax-TMS (MDS Nordion, Kanata, Cahada) version 6.0.2 and using the CCC algorithm of Pinnacle (ADAC Laboratories, Milpitas, CA, USA) version 4.2. A very good agreement between the film measurements and the Monte Carlo simulations was found. The CCC algorithms were not able to predict the interface dose accurately when lateral electronic disequilibrium occurs, but were shown to be a considerable improvement compared to the PB algorithm. The CCC algorithms overestimate the dose in the rebuild-up region. The interface dose was overestimated by a maximum of 31% or 54%, depending on the implementation of the CCC algorithm. At a depth of 1 mm, the maximum dose overestimation was 14% or 24%. PMID

  6. Structure of overheated metal clusters: MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    The structure of overheated metal clusters appeared in condensation process was studied by computer simulation techniques. It was found that clusters with size larger than several tens of atoms have three layers: core part, intermediate dense packing layer and a gas- like shell with low density. The change of the size and structure of these layers with the variation of internal energy and the size of cluster is discussed.

  7. Numerical simulations of drop impact on superhydrophobic structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, Davide; Larentis, Stefano; Pugno, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    During the last decade drop impact dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces has been intensively investigated because of the incredible properties of water repellency exhibited by this kind of surfaces, mostly inspired by biological examples such as Lotus leave. Thanks to the recent progress in micro-fabrication technology is possible to tailor surfaces wettability defining specific pillar-like structured surfaces. In this work, the behavior of impinging drops on these pillar-like surfaces is simulated, characterizing temporal evolution of droplets contact radius and drop maximal deformation dependence on Weber number. Numerical simulations results are compared with theoretical and experimental results guaranteeing simulation reliability. Fingering patterns obtained from drop impact has been studied obtaining a correlation between number of fingers and Weber number. Drop fragmentation pattern obtained from simulations supports the proposed correlation. Different drop impact outcomes (e.g. rebound, fragmentation) on structured superhydrophobic surfaces are simulated, focusing on the influence of micro-structured surface geometrical pattern. This investigation is relevant in order to define design rules for possible reliable non wettable surfaces. Financial support by Alta Scuola Politecnica.

  8. Multiscale Simulations of the Structure and Dynamics of the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, Jean; Lapenta, Giovanni; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing observations by the spacecraft of NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission are revealing a very complex structure and dynamics of the low-latitude magnetopause. One of the main difficulties to comprehend physical processes occurring at the magnetopause is that it requires following both the evolution of the large-scale interaction of the solar wind with the dayside magnetosphere, and the details of the kinetic processes that enable transport of energy and mass in localized regions of the magnetospheric boundary. To address this multiscale problem, we have carried out particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the dayside magnetopause. These simulations employ domains that are large enough to include large-scale features of the solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field (e.g., field curvature and plasma asymmetries). The numerical challenge is dealt with by using the implicit iPic3d simulation code together with the results of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We discuss the results of the PIC simulations in the context of the global MHD states that provide initial and boundary conditions, and local spacecraft observations at the magnetopause. In particular, we analyze the evolution of electromagnetic fields and particle distributions in different regions of the simulations to determine how reconnection processes affect the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheric boundary.

  9. 31. VIEW OF COLLAPSED APRON OF BRIDGE NO. 10 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF COLLAPSED APRON OF BRIDGE NO. 10 AND ELEMENTS OF SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING SOUTH. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  10. Global MHD Simulation of Mesoscale Structures at the Magnetospheric Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean

    1998-01-01

    The research carried out for this protocol was focused on the study of mesoscales structures at the magnetospheric boundary. We investigated three areas: (1) the structure of the magnetospheric boundary for steady solar wind conditions; (2) the dynamics of the dayside magnetospheric boundary and (3) the dynamics of the distant tail magnetospheric boundary. Our approach was to use high resolution three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. We first considered simple variations of the interplanetary conditions to obtain generic cases that helped us in establishing the basic cause and effect relationships for steady solar wind conditions. Subsequently, we used actual solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters measured by an upstream spacecraft as input to the simulations and compared the simulation results with sequences of events observed by another or several other spacecraft located downstream the bow shock. In particular we compared results with observations made when spacecraft crossed the magnetospheric boundary.

  11. Hybrid Simulation of Linked Structural System With Shear Friction Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-soo; Choi, Jae-hyouk

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid simulations were conducted to investigate effects of the friction damper on seismic behavior of a composite structure consisting of an old concrete structure and a new steel frame. The hybrid simulation results have indicated that the cyclical behavior of the friction damper made of steel plate and aluminum plate could be accurately simulated with the so-called perfect elastic-plastic model without degradation in stiffness. It has also been verified that the seismic performance of the composite structures could be accurately predicted if one use the perfect elastic-plastic model to simulate the behavior of the connecting friction damper. In addition, the tests have shown that the use of friction damper to connect an existing unfit concrete building and new steel building could effectively reduce their displacement response and acceleration response simultaneously. The mitigation degree due to the friction damper on the seismic response of the composite structures depends upon the relative stiffness of the two buildings, the natural periods, and the mass ratio of the two buildings.

  12. Structural materials from lunar simulants through thermal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, Kirsten

    1992-01-01

    Thermal liquefaction that allows development of intermediate ceramic composites from a lunar simulant with various admixtures is used to develop structural materials for construction on the moon. Bending and compressive properties of resulting composites are obtained from laboratory tests and evaluated with respect to the use of three different types and fibers.

  13. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y; Endeve, Eirik; Budiardja, R. D.; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrohysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observale by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes by collapse and explosion.

  14. Collapse pressures of biodegradable stents.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subbu; Poh, Tan Lay; Vinalia, Tjong; Mak, Koon Hou; Boey, Freddy

    2003-05-01

    Biodegradable stent prototypes were produced from poly L-lactic acid polymers with different molecular weights. The effects of molecular weight, drug incorporation and stent design on the collapse pressure of the stents were evaluated. While molecular weights did not show a significant effect on the collapse pressure of the stents, drug incorporation at high percentage decreased the collapse pressure of the stents substantially. Cryogenic fracture surfaces showed significant drug agglomeration as the concentration increased. The design of the stent was also found to a have significant effect on the collapse pressure. The stent produced from the same material has a higher collapse pressure when the load bearing surface area is increased. PMID:12628831

  15. Simulating the large-scale structure of HI intensity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehars, Sebastian; Paranjape, Aseem; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations of a 2.6 Gpc / h box with 20483 particles (particle mass 1.6 × 1011 Msolar / h). Using a conditional mass function to populate the simulated dark matter density field with halos below the mass resolution of the simulation (108 Msolar / h < Mhalo < 1013 Msolar / h), we assign HI to those halos according to a phenomenological halo to HI mass relation. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 lesssim z lesssim 0.9 in redshift bins of width Δ z ≈ 0.05 and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects and redshift space distortions on the angular clustering of HI. Focusing on the autocorrelations of the maps, we apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that these estimators agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  16. Parametric nonlinear lumped element model for circular CMUTs in collapsed mode.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, Elif; Ozgurluk, Alper; Atalar, Abdullah; Köymen, Hayrettin

    2014-01-01

    We present a parametric equivalent circuit model for a circular CMUT in collapsed mode. First, we calculate the collapsed membrane deflection, utilizing the exact electrical force distribution in the analytical formulation of membrane deflection. Then we develop a lumped element model of collapsed membrane operation. The radiation impedance for collapsed mode is also included in the model. The model is merged with the uncollapsed mode model to obtain a simulation tool that handles all CMUT behavior, in transmit or receive. Large- and small-signal operation of a single CMUT can be fully simulated for any excitation regime. The results are in good agreement with FEM simulations. PMID:24402904

  17. Kinetic and Structural Evolution of Self-gravitating, Magnetized Clouds: 2.5-dimensional Simulations of Decaying Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Stone, James M.

    1999-03-01

    The molecular component of the Galaxy is comprised of turbulent, magnetized clouds, many of which are self-gravitating and form stars. To develop an understanding of how these clouds' kinetic and structural evolution may depend on their level of turbulence, mean magnetization, and degree of self-gravity, we perform a survey of direct numerical MHD simulations in which three parameters are independently varied. Our simulations consist of solutions to the time-dependent MHD equations on a two-dimensional grid with periodic boundary conditions; an additional ``half'' dimension is also incorporated as dependent variables in the third Cartesian direction. Two of our survey parameters, the mean magnetization parameter β≡c2sound/v2Alfven and the Jeans number nJ≡Lcloud/LJeans, allow us to model clouds that either meet or fail conditions for magneto-Jeans stability and magnetic criticality. Our third survey parameter, the sonic Mach number M≡σvelocity/csound, allows us to initiate turbulence of either sub- or super-Alfvénic amplitude; we employ an isothermal equation of state throughout. We evaluate the times for each cloud model to become gravitationally bound and measure each model's kinetic energy loss over the fluid-flow crossing time. We compare the evolution of density and magnetic field structural morphology and quantify the differences in the density contrast generated by internal stresses for models of differing mean magnetization. We find that the values of β and nJ, but not the initial Mach number M, determine the time for cloud gravitational binding and collapse: for mean cloud density nH2=100 cm-3, unmagnetized models collapse after ~5 Myr, and magnetically supercritical models generally collapse after 5-10 Myr (although the smallest magneto-Jeans stable clouds survive gravitational collapse until t~15 Myr), while magnetically subcritical clouds remain uncollapsed over the entire simulations; these cloud collapse times scale with the mean density as

  18. Simulation of period doubling of recurrent solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    Based on satellite observations of a recurrent solar wind structure conducted in 1974, an MHD simulation model, and input functions generated from plasma and magnetic field data, the continuing evolution of the solar wind structure outside 5 AU is studied. The model uses the Rankine-Hugoniot relations to describe the jumps in flow properties across the shocks, and it treats shocks as surfaces of discontinuity with zero thickness. Two interaction processes (the collision and the merging of shocks) play important roles in restructuring the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. The simulation result shows that period doubling occurs between 5 and 10 AU. The recurrent solar wind appears to be a persistent new structure between 10 and 20 AU, and it consists of one merged interaction region per solar rotation.

  19. Topics in the theory of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd Alan

    We study the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the neutron stars they create. We study the microphysics of neutrino interactions and demonstrate the importance of two processes previously ignored in full supernova simulations: inelastic neutrino-nucleon scattering and nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung. We show that these processes dominate neutrino-electron scattering and electron-positron annihilation as thermalization and production mechanisms, respectively, for mu- and tau- neutrinos in regimes vital to emergent spectrum formation. In addition, we solve the general-relativistic steady- state eigenvalue problem of neutrino-driven protoneutron star winds, which immediately follow core-collapse supernova explosions. We provide velocity, density, temperature, and composition profiles and explore the systematics and structures generic to such a wind for a variety of protoneutron star characteristics. Furthermore, we derive the entropy, dynamical timescale, and compositions essential in assessing this site as a candidate for r-process nucleosynthesis. Finally, we construct dynamical models of core-collapse supernovae. We employ a full solution to the transport equation for each neutrino species, a realistic high- density nuclear equation of state, and explicit hydrodynamics. We present results from a set of different supernova progenitors. We vary the microphysics and nuclear equation of state and compare our results to those of other groups. We examine the electron-neutrino breakout phenomenon and address the importance of nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and inelastic neutrino- electron scattering in μ and τ neutrino spectrum formation. We convolve the emergent spectra obtained in these models with terrestrial neutrino detectors and find that the electron-neutrino breakout burst can likely be observed and identified uniquely.

  20. Nanostructured water and carbon dioxide inside collapsing carbon nanotubes at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenwen; Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2016-07-20

    We present simulations of the collapse under hydrostatic pressure of carbon nanotubes containing either water or carbon dioxide. We show that the molecules inside the tube alter the dynamics of the collapse process, providing either mechanical support and increasing the collapse pressure, or reducing mechanical stability. At the same time the nanotube acts as a nanoanvil, and the confinement leads to the nanostructuring of the molecules inside the collapsed tube. In this way, depending on the pressure and on the concentration of water or carbon dioxide inside the nanotube, we observe the formation of 1D molecular chains, 2D nanoribbons, and even molecular single and multi-walled nanotubes. The structure of the encapsulated molecules correlates with the mechanical response of the nanotube, opening up opportunities for the development of new devices or composite materials. Our analysis is quite general and it can be extended to other molecules in carbon nanotube nanoanvils, providing a strategy to obtain a variety of nano-objects with controlled features. PMID:27400409

  1. Reduced-Order Simulation of Large Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Simon

    2007-11-01

    Simulating electromagnetic waves inside finite periodic or almost periodic three-dimensional structures is important to research in linear particle acceleration, high power microwave generation, and photonic bandgap structures. While eigenmodes of periodic structures can be determined from analysis of a single unit cell, based on Floquet theory, the general case of aperiodic structures, with defects or non-uniform properties, typically requires 3D electromagnetic simulation of the entire structure. When the structure is large and high accuracy is necessary this can require high-performance computing techniques to obtain even a few eigenmodes [1]. To confront this problem, we describe an efficient, field-based algorithm that can accurately determine the complete eigenmode spectrum for extended aperiodic structures, up to some chosen frequency limit. The new method combines domain decomposition with a non-traditional, dual eigenmode representation of the fields local to each cell of the structure. Two related boundary value eigenproblems are solved numerically in each cell, with (a) electrically shielded, and (b) magnetically shielded interfaces, to determine a combined set of basis fields. By using the dual solutions in our field representation we accurately represent both the electric and magnetic surface currents that mediate coupling at the interfaces between adjacent cells. The solution is uniformly convergent, so that typically only a few modes are used in each cell. We present results from 3D simulations that demonstrate the speed and low computational needs of the algorithm. [1] Z. Li, et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 558 (2006), 168-174.

  2. Jet dynamics after cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Gekle, Stephan; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-11-01

    It has been recently shown -Gekle, Gordillo, van der Meer and Lohse, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008 (submitted)- that the liquid velocity field after cavity collapse can be analytically described as a superposition of a discontinuous line of sinks plus a concentrated point sink. This theory is able to quantitatively predict the axial and radial positions of the base of the high speed jets ejected. Nevertheless, the flow field within the fast sharp pointed jets shooting up and downwards cannot be predicted using this simplified description. Instead, we will show that downstream of a small region with a size of the order of the jet base, in which the liquid is accelerated upwards, liquid velocity and jet shape can be described by a simple unidirectional model in remarkable agreement with simulations. Up to first order, fluid particles conserve their velocities but we also show that, no matter how large the local Weber number at pinch-off is, capillarity ends up playing a role in the breakup of the ejected liquid jets.

  3. Simulation of the photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) uses six video cameras in the Space Shuttle cargo bay to measure vibration of the Russian Mir space station Kvant-ll solar array. It occurs on Shuttle/Mir docking mission STS-74 scheduled for launch in November 1995. The objective of PASDE is to demonstrate photogrammetric technology for measuring 'untargeted' spacecraft appendage structural dynamics. This paper discusses a pre-flight simulation test conducted in July 1995, focusing on the image processing aspects. The flight camera system recorded vibrations of a full-scale structural test article having grids of white lines on black background, similar in appearance to the Mir solar array. Using image correlation analysis, line intersections on the structure are tracked in the video recordings to resolutions of less than 0.1 pixel. Calibration and merging of multiple camera views generated 3-dimensional displacements from which structural modal parameters are then obtained.

  4. Modeling of Large Avionic Structures in Electrical Network Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piche, A.; Perraud, R.; Lochot, C.

    2012-05-01

    The extensive introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in conjunction with an increase of electrical systems in aircraft has led to new electromagnetic issues. This situation has reinforced the need for numerical simulation early in the design phase. In this context, we have proposed [1] a numerical methodology to deal with 3D CFRP avionic structures in time domain simulations at system level. This paper presents the last results on this subject and particularly the modeling of A350 fuselage in SABER computation containing the aircraft power distribution.

  5. Research of TREETOPS Structural Dynamics Controls Simulation Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Rose M.

    1996-01-01

    Under the provisions of contract number NAS8-40194, which was entitled 'TREETOPS Structural Dynamics and Controls Simulation System Upgrade', Oakwood College contracted to produce an upgrade to the existing TREETOPS suite of analysis tools. This suite includes the main simulation program, TREETOPS, two interactive preprocessors, TREESET and TREEFLX, an interactive post processor, TREEPLOT, and an adjunct program, TREESEL. A 'Software Design Document', which provides descriptions of the argument lists and internal variables for each subroutine in the TREETOPS suite, was established. Additionally, installation guides for both DOS and UNIX platforms were developed. Finally, updated User's Manuals, as well as a Theory Manual, were generated.

  6. Simulations of the formation of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. D. M.

    Numerical studies related to the simulation of structure growth are examined. The linear development of fluctuations in the early universe is studied. The research of Aarseth, Gott, and Turner (1979) based on N-body integrators that obtained particle accelerations by direct summation of the forces due to other objects is discussed. Consideration is given to the 'pancake theory' of Zel'dovich (1970) for the evolution from adiabatic initial fluctuation, the neutrino-dominated universe models of White, Frenk, and Davis (1983), and the simulations of Davis et al. (1985).

  7. Discrete element simulations of gravitational volcanic deformation. 1; Deformation structures and geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Julia K.; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional particle dynamics simulations of granular piles subject to frictional Coulomb failure criteria to gain a first-order understanding of different modes of gravitational deformation within volcanoes. Under uniform basal and internal strength conditions, granular piles grow self-similarly, developing distinctive stratigraphies, morphologies, and structures. Piles constructed upon cohesive substrates exhibit particle avalanching, forming outward dipping strata and angle of repose slopes. Systematic decreases in basal strength lead to progressively deeper and steeper internal detachment faults and slip along a basal decollement; landslide forms grade from shallow slumps to deep-seated landslide and, finally, to axial subsidence and outward flank displacements, or volcanic spreading. Surface slopes decrease and develop concave up morphologies with decreasing decollement strength; depositional layers tilt progressively inward. Spatial variations in basal strength cause lateral transitions in pile structure, stratigraphy, and morphology. This approximation of volcanoes as Coulomb granular piles reproduces the richness of deformational structures and surface morphologies in many volcanic settings. The gentle slopes of Hawaiian volcanoes and Olympus Mons on Mars suggest weak basal decollements that enable volcanic spreading. High-angle normal faults, favored above weak decollements, are interpreted in both settings and may explain catastrophic sector collapse in Hawaii and broad aureole deposits surrounding Olympus Mons. In contrast, steeper slopes and shallow detachment faults predominate in the Canary Islands, thought to lack a weak decollement, favoring smaller, more frequent slope failures than predicted for Hawaii. The numerical results provide a useful predictive tool for interpreting dynamic behavior and associated geologic hazards of active volcanoes.

  8. Track structure of carbon ions: measurements and simulations.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Colautti, P; Moro, D; Grosswendt, B

    2014-10-01

    The likelihood of radiation to produce clustered damages in irradiated biological tissue and the reparability of such damages are closely related to the stochastics of localised ionising interactions within small volumes of nanometre sizes, determined by the particle track structure. Track structure investigations in nanometre-sized volumes have been subject of research for several decades, mainly by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Today, the 'track-nanodosimeter', installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, is a measuring device able to count the electrons produced in a 20-nm equivalent sensitive site (De Nardo et al. A detector for track-nanodosimetry. Nucl. Instrum. Methods. Phys. Res. A 484: , 312-326 (2002)). It allows studying track structure properties both in the near neighbourhood of a primary particle trajectory and separately in the penumbra region. An extended study for different ionising particles of medical interest has been recently performed with the track-nanodosimeter (Conte et al. Track structure of light ions: experiments and simulations. New J. Phys. 14: , 093010, (2012)). Here, new experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations for 240- and 96-MeV (12)C-ions are presented and discussed. PMID:24249779

  9. Simulation of Aircraft Engine Blade-Out Structural Dynamics. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly; Gallardo, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    A primary concern of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event and the subsequent windmilling of the engine. Reliable simulations of the blade-out event are required to insure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes such as MSC NASTRAN are typically used and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine's turbomachinery. The present study provides the equations of motion for rotordynamic response including the effect of spooldown speed and rotor unbalance and examines the effects of these terms on a cantilevered rotor. The effect of spooldown speed is found to be greater with increasing spooldown rate. The parametric term resulting from the mass unbalance has a more significant effect on the rotordynamic response than does the spooldown term. The parametric term affects both the peak amplitudes as well as the resonant frequencies of the rotor.

  10. Simulation of Aircraft Engine Blade-Out Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly; Gallardo, Vicente

    2001-01-01

    A primary concern of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event and the subsequent windmilling of the engine. Reliable simulations of the blade-out event are required to insure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes such as MSC NASTRAN are typically used and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine's turbomachinery. The present study provides the equations of motion for rotordynamic response including the effect of spooldown speed and rotor unbalance and examines the effects of these terms on a cantilevered rotor. The effect of spooldown speed is found to be greater with increasing spooldown rate. The parametric term resulting from the mass unbalance has a more significant effect on the rotordynamic response than does the spooldown term. The parametric term affects both the peak amplitudes as well as the resonant frequencies of the rotor.

  11. Structure-Based Simulations Reveal Concerted Dynamics of GPCR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Suresh, Pooja; Romo, Tod D.; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vital class of proteins that transduce biological signals across the cell membrane. However, their allosteric activation mechanism is not fully understood; crystal structures of active and inactive receptors have been reported, but the functional pathway between these two states remains elusive. Here, we employ structure-based (Gō-like) models to simulate activation of two GPCRs, rhodopsin and the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We used data-derived reaction coordinates that capture the activation mechanism for both proteins, showing that activation proceeds through quantitatively different paths in the two systems. Both reaction coordinates are determined from the dominant concerted motions in the simulations so the technique is broadly applicable. There were two surprising results. First, the main structural changes in the simulations were distributed throughout the transmembrane bundle, and not localized to the obvious areas of interest, such as the intracellular portion of helix 6. Second, the activation (and deactivation) paths were distinctly non-monotonic, populating states that were not simply interpolations between the inactive and active structures. These transitions also suggest a functional explanation for β2AR’s basal activity: it can proceed through a more broadly defined path during the observed transitions. PMID:24889093

  12. The influence of coupled horizontal-vertical ground excitations on the collapse margins of modern RC-MRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsangi, Ehsan Noroozinejad; Tasnimi, Abbas Ali

    2016-05-01

    With the increasing interest in vertical ground motions, the focus of this study is to investigate the effect of concurrent horizontal-vertical excitations on the seismic response and collapse fragilities of RC buildings designed according to modern seismic codes and located near active faults. It must be stressed that only mid- to high-rise buildings are of significant concern in the context of this research. The considered structures are categorized as intermediate and special RC-MRFs and have been remodeled using distributed and lumped plasticity computational approaches in nonlinear simulation platforms, so that the utilized NL models can simulate all possible modes of deterioration. For better comparison, not only was the combined vertical and horizontal motion applied, but also a single horizontal component was considered for direct evaluation of the effect of the vertical ground motions (VGMs). At the member level, axial force variation and shear failure as the most critical brittle failure mechanisms were studied, while on the global level, adjusted collapse margin ratios (ACMRs) and mean annual frequency of collapseCollapse) using a new vector-valued intensity measure were investigated. Findings from the study indicate that VGMs have significant effects on both local and global structural performance and cannot be neglected.

  13. The influence of coupled horizontal-vertical ground excitations on the collapse margins of modern RC-MRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsangi, Ehsan Noroozinejad; Tasnimi, Abbas Ali

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing interest in vertical ground motions, the focus of this study is to investigate the effect of concurrent horizontal-vertical excitations on the seismic response and collapse fragilities of RC buildings designed according to modern seismic codes and located near active faults. It must be stressed that only mid- to high-rise buildings are of significant concern in the context of this research. The considered structures are categorized as intermediate and special RC-MRFs and have been remodeled using distributed and lumped plasticity computational approaches in nonlinear simulation platforms, so that the utilized NL models can simulate all possible modes of deterioration. For better comparison, not only was the combined vertical and horizontal motion applied, but also a single horizontal component was considered for direct evaluation of the effect of the vertical ground motions (VGMs). At the member level, axial force variation and shear failure as the most critical brittle failure mechanisms were studied, while on the global level, adjusted collapse margin ratios (ACMRs) and mean annual frequency of collapse ( λ Collapse) using a new vector-valued intensity measure were investigated. Findings from the study indicate that VGMs have significant effects on both local and global structural performance and cannot be neglected.

  14. Gravitational collapse of Vaidya spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, Vitalii

    2016-03-01

    The gravitational collapse of generalized Vaidya spacetime is considered. It is known that the endstate of gravitational collapse, as to whether a black hole or a naked singularity is formed, depends on the mass function M(v,r). Here we give conditions for the mass function which corresponds to the equation of the state P = αρ where α ∈ (0, 1 3] and according to these conditions we obtain either a black hole or a naked singularity at the endstate of gravitational collapse. Also we give conditions for the mass function when the singularity is gravitationally strong.

  15. Theory of the antibubble collapse.

    PubMed

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2015-03-13

    A theory of the collapse of a punctured antibubble is developed. The motion of the rim of air formed at the edge of the collapsing air film cannot be described by a potential flow and is characterized by high Reynolds numbers. The rim velocity is not constant but gradually decreases with time and is determined by the balance between the surface tension and hydrodynamic drag forces. A collapse equation is derived and solved. The agreement between the theory and existing experiments is shown. PMID:25815936

  16. A simulated force generator with an adaptive command structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, P. Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Force Laydown Automated Generator (FLAG) is a script-driven behavior model that automatically creates military formations from the platoon level up to division level for use in simulations built on the FLAMES simulation framework. The script allows users to define formation command structure, command relationships, vehicle type and equipment, and behaviors. We have used it to automatically generate more than 3000 units in a single simulation. Currently, FLAG is used in the Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate (AFRL/MN) to assist their Comprehensive Analysis Process (CAP). It produces a reasonable threat laydown of red forces for testing their blue concept weapons. Our success in the application of FLAG leads us to believe that it offers an invaluable potential for use in training environments and other applications that need a large number of reactive, adaptive forces - red or blue.

  17. Fluid Structure Interaction Simulations of Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri

    2011-11-01

    Pediatric ventricular assist devices (PVADs) are used for mechanical circulatory support in children with failing hearts. They can be used to allow the heart to heal naturally or to extend the life of the patient until transplant. A PVAD has two chambers, blood and air, separated by a flexible membrane. The air chamber is pressurized, which drives the membrane and pumps the blood. The primary risk associated with these devices is stroke or embolism from thrombogenesis. Simulation of these devices is difficult due to a complex coupling of two fluid domains and a thin membrane, requiring fluid-structure interaction modeling. The goal of this work is to accurately simulate the hemodynamics of a PVAD. We perform FSI simulations using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element framework to account for large motions of the membrane and the fluid domains. The air, blood, and membrane are meshed as distinct subdomains, and a method for non-matched discretizations at the fluid-structure interface is presented. The use of isogeometric analysis to model the membrane mechanics is also discussed, and the results of simulations are presented.

  18. Tracking Non-rigid Structures in Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gezahegne, A; Kamath, C

    2008-01-10

    A key challenge in tracking moving objects is the correspondence problem, that is, the correct propagation of object labels from one time step to another. This is especially true when the objects are non-rigid structures, changing shape, and merging and splitting over time. In this work, we describe a general approach to tracking thousands of non-rigid structures in an image sequence. We show how we can minimize memory requirements and generate accurate results while working with only two frames of the sequence at a time. We demonstrate our results using data from computer simulations of a fluimix problem.

  19. Structure identification methods for atomistic simulations of crystalline materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2012-05-28

    Here, we discuss existing and new computational analysis techniques to classify local atomic arrangements in large-scale atomistic computer simulations of crystalline solids. This article includes a performance comparison of typical analysis algorithms such as common neighbor analysis (CNA), centrosymmetry analysis, bond angle analysis, bond order analysis and Voronoi analysis. In addition we propose a simple extension to the CNA method that makes it suitable for multi-phase systems. Finally, we introduce a new structure identification algorithm, the neighbor distance analysis, which is designed to identify atomic structure units in grain boundaries.

  20. Simulation of terahertz metamaterial absorbers with microbolometer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiaopei; Jiang, Yadong; Fan, Lin

    2014-09-01

    The metamaterial absorber in terahertz (THz) region, with the metal pattern layer/dielectric spacer/metal reflective layer sandwich structure, is characterized in this paper. The principle of metamaterial absorber absorbing terahertz wave was introduced firstly. The top layer of metamaterial absorber is a periodically patterned with metallic subwavelength structure, which also serves as an electric resonator. The bottom layer is a thick metal plane, which is used to reduce THz wave transmittance. The dielectric layer between two metallic layers results in magnetic resonance and the resonance depends on the thickness and dielectric constant of the dielectric layer. The absorption of metamaterial absorber to terahertz wave was simulated with CST software. The relationship between the size of the metamaterial structure and absorption frequency was analyzed with the simulation results. The results indicate that the absorption frequency is affected by the cell constant and geometric structure of top metal pattern, and absorption rate is related to both the thickness of dielectric layer and the size of resonator. In the end, the possibility of integrating the metamaterial absorber with micro-bridge structure to design room temperature terahertz detector was discussed, and the manufacturing process was introduced about room temperature terahertz detector with high THz wave absorption rate.

  1. Simulation of interdigitated back contact solar cell with trench structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Min; Chun, Seungju; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-Eun; Lee, Jong-Han; Boo, Hyunpil; Bae, Soohyun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-02-01

    We performed two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulations for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells with rear trench structures (TS), denoted here as TS-IBC solar cells. First, we calculated a reference simulation model for conventional IBC solar cells. We then assumed a trench structure at the rear surface of the IBC solar cell. For this structure, we analyzed solar cell performance as a function of various trench depths and type. It was found that emitter trench formation affects minority carrier collection, such that the short-circuit current density increases with increasing trench depth. However, the back-surface field (BSF) trench exhibited poor minority carrier collection, which reduced the conversion efficiency of the TS-IBC solar cells. It was also found that for the same trench depth (30 μm), the difference in conversion efficiencies of an IBC solar cell with an emitter trench and that with a BSF trench was 0.6%. We are thus convinced that the emitter trench structure is more important than the BSF trench structure.

  2. Deterministic evaluation of collapse risk for a decomissioned flooded mine system: 3D numerical modelling of subsidence, roof collapse and impulse water flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanza, Riccardo; Fernandez Merodo, Josè Antonio; di Prisco, Claudio; Frigerio, Gabriele; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Orlandi, Gianmarco

    2013-04-01

    Aim of the study is the assessment of stability conditions for an abandoned gypsum mine (Bologna , Italy). Mining was carried out til the end of the 70s by the room and pillar method. During mining a karst cave was crossed karstic waters flowed into the mine. As a consequence, the lower level of the mining is completely flooded and portions of the mining levels show critical conditions and are structurally prone to instability. Buildings and infrastructures are located above the first and second level and a large portion of the area below the mine area, and just above of the Savena river, is urbanised. Gypsum geomechanical properties change over time; water, or even air humidity, dissolves or weaken gypsum pillars, leading progressively to collapse. The mine is located in macro-crystalline gypsum beds belonging to the Messinian Gessoso Solfifera Formation. Selenitic gypsum beds are interlayered with by centimetre to meter thick shales layers. In order to evaluate the risk related to the collapse of the flooded level (level 3) a deterministic approach based on 3D numerical analyses has been considered. The entire abandoned mine system up to the ground surface has been generated in 3D. The considered critical scenario implies the collapse of the pillars and roof of the flooded level 3. In a first step, a sequential collapse starting from the most critical pillar has been simulated by means of a 3D Finite Element code. This allowed the definition of the subsidence basin at the ground surface and the interaction with the buildings in terms of ground displacements. 3D numerical analyses have been performed with an elasto-perfectly plastic constitutive model. In a second step, the effect of a simultaneous collapse of the entire level 3 has been considered in order to evaluate the risk of a flooding due to the water outflow from the mine system. Using a 3D CFD (Continuum Fluid Dynamics) finite element code the collapse of the level 3 has been simulated and the volume of

  3. Collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars: Post black hole formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saijo, Motoyuki; Hawke, Ian

    2009-09-15

    We investigate the collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars (SMSs) by means of 3+1 hydrodynamic simulations in general relativity. We particularly focus on the onset of collapse to understand the final outcome of collapsing SMSs. We find that the estimated ratio of the mass between the black hole and the surrounding disk from the equilibrium star is roughly the same as the results from numerical simulation. This suggests that the picture of axisymmetric collapse is adequate, in the absence of nonaxisymmetric instabilities, to illustrate the final state of the collapse. We also find that quasiperiodic gravitational waves continue to be emitted after the quasinormal mode frequency has decayed. We furthermore have found that when the newly formed black hole is almost extreme Kerr, the amplitude of the quasiperiodic oscillation is enhanced during the late stages of the evolution. Geometrical features, shock waves, and instabilities of the fluid are suggested as a cause of this amplification behavior. This alternative scenario for the collapse of differentially rotating SMSs might be observable by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

  4. Artificial Market Simulation with Embedded Complex Network Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Makoto; Shirayama, Susumu

    We investigate a factor of the `network effect' that affects on communication service markets by a multi-agent based simulation approach. The network effect is one of a market characteristic, whereby the benefit of a service or a product increase with use. So far, the network effect has been studied in terms of macroscopic metrics, and interaction patterns of consumers in the market were often ignored. To investigate an infulence of structures of the interaction patterns, we propose a multi-agent based model for a communication serivce market, in which embedded complex network structures are considered as an interaction pattern of agents. Using several complex network models as the interaction patterns, we study the dynamics of a market in which two providers are competing. By a series of simulations, we show that the structural properties of the complex networks, such as the clustering coefficient and degree correlations, are the major factors of the network effect. We also discuss an adequate model of the interaction pattern for reproducing the market dynamics in the real world by performing simulations exploiting with a real data of social network.

  5. Structure and Properties of HELICAL CARBON NANOTUBES through MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Akshay; Verma, Deepti; Gupta, Shakti S.

    Helical Carbon Nanotubes (HCNTs) are coiled 3-valent carbon networks which represent pure carbon helix. Here we study the geometries of two classes: hexagonal helix containing purely polyhex networks and the second class with 5-and 7-membered rings besides hexagons. We followed a model of hexagonal, single wall HCNTs, and determined their relaxed configuration using MD simulations based on Tersoff potential. A race-track like structure is observed in the cross-section of HCNTs upon minimization. For generating class two helix, the adjacency matrix eigenvector's (AME) method is applied which utilizes 3-coordinated tiling of the plane by 5-,6-,and 7-membered ring for the construction of helical structures. The application of the AME method to torusenes is crucial for class two helix generation as it is based on an appropriate choice of bi-lobial eigenvectors triplet which can be selected on the basis of their nodal properties as verified here. After 3-D transformations the final structure was obtained with the help of MM3-potential based MD simulations on Tinker commercial code. The spring constants of HCNTs are computed through MD simulations.

  6. Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian Simulation for Overpressure Structural Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew; Pan, Hua; Miller, David; Cogar, John

    2011-06-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in Lagrangian based Finite Element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Eulerian hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Eulerian codes, however, break down over larger time scales; whereas, Lagrangian modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Eulerian blast modeling with Lagrangian system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements in overpressure structural response modeling using a Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm are compared to results from Eulerian hydrocode simulations and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  7. Coupled Euler-La Grange simulation for overpressure structural response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew N.; Miller, David K.; Pan, Hua; Cogar, John

    2012-03-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in La Grange based finite element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Euler hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Euler codes, however, break down over larger time scales due to advection; whereas, Lagrange modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Euler blast modeling with La Grange system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements for high explosive overpressure structural response modeling specifically with respect COMP-B high explosive acting upon blasted fragments using a Coupled Euler-La Grange algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Euler-La Grange algorithm are compared to results from an Euler hydrocode simulation (CTH) and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  8. Simulation of optical breast density measurements using structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Jessica; Nouizi, Farouk; Li, Yifan; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Su, Min-Ying; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-02-01

    Breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer and we propose using diffuse optical tomography with structured light illuminations (SLI) to quantify the percentage of the fibroglandular (dense) tissue within the breast. Segmentations of dense tissue from breast MRI cases were used to create a geometric model of the breast. COMSOL-generated Finite Element Method (FEM) meshes were used for simulating photon migration through the breast tissue and reconstructing the absorption maps. In these preliminary simulations, the absorption coefficients of the non-dense and dense tissue were assigned using literature values based on their concentrations of water, lipid, oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin as they are the main chromophores, or absorbers of light, within the breast. Synthetic SLI measurements were obtained using a FEMbased forward solver. During the simulation, 12 distinct patterns consisting of vertical stripes, horizontal stripes, and checkerboard patterns were used for illumination and detection. Using these simulated measurements, FEM-based inverse solvers were used to reconstruct the 3D absorption maps. In this study, the methods are applied to reconstruct the absorption maps for multiple wavelengths (780nm, 830nm, 900nm, 1000nm) using one case as an example. We are currently continuing these simulations with additional cases and reconstructing 3D concentration maps of the chromophores within the dense and non-dense breast tissue.

  9. Deployment Simulation Methods for Ultra-Lightweight Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    2003-01-01

    Two dynamic inflation simulation methods are employed for modeling the deployment of folded thin-membrane tubes. The simulations are necessary because ground tests include gravity effects and may poorly represent deployment in space. The two simulation methods are referred to as the Control Volume (CV) method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. They are available in the LS-DYNA nonlinear dynamic finite element code. Both methods are suitable for modeling the interactions between the inflation gas and the thin-membrane tube structures. The CV method only considers the pressure induced by the inflation gas in the simulation, while the ALE method models the actual flow of the inflation gas. Thus, the transient fluid properties at any location within the tube can be predicted by the ALE method. Deployment simulations of three packaged tube models; namely coiled, Z-folded, and telescopically-folded configurations, are performed. Results predicted by both methods for the telescopically-folded configuration are correlated and computational efficiency issues are discussed.

  10. Formation of planetesimals in collapsing pebble clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg Jansson, K.; Johansen, A.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids and Kuiper belt objects are remnant planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. Their physical properties hold important clues to understanding how minor bodies formed in the Solar Nebula. The first stage of the planet formation process is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm-cm-sized pebbles. Due to the interaction with the gas in the protoplanetary disk, these pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound particle pebble 'clouds'. Pebbles in the cloud collide with each other, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it contracts, and one would expect the particles to move faster and faster due to the negative heat capacity nature of self-gravitating systems. However, for high-mass clouds, the collapse is limited by free-fall and the cloud does not have time to virialize. This in turn leads to lower collision speeds but thanks to increased density also to increased collision rates and a runaway collapse. We investigate three important properties of the collapse: (i) the time-scale to collapse to solid density, (ii) the temporal evolution of the size spectrum of the pebbles, and (iii) the multiplicity of the resulting planetesimals. We find that planetesimals larger than 100 km in radius collapse on the free-fall time-scale of about 25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision time-scales and hence collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10-km-scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1-km-scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble cloud also determines the structure of the resulting planetesimal. The collision speed among the pebbles in low- mass clouds is below the threshold for fragmentation, forming pebble- pile planetesimals consisting of the primordial pebbles from the nebula. Planetesimals above 100 km in radius, on the other hand, consist of mixtures of dust (pebble fragments) and pebbles which have undergone

  11. On the number density of "direct collapse" black hole seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Volonteri, Marta; Latif, Muhammad; Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) reside in the center of most local galaxies, but they also power active galactic nuclei and quasars, detected up to z = 7. These quasars put constraints on early BH growth and the mass of BH seeds. The scenario of "direct collapse" is appealing as it leads to the formation of large mass BH seeds, 10^4-10^6 {M_{⊙}}, which eases explaining how quasars at z = 6 - 7 are powered by BHs with masses >109 M⊙. Direct collapse, however, appears to be rare, as the conditions required by the scenario are that gas is metal-free, the presence of a strong photo-dissociating Lyman-Werner flux, and large inflows of gas at the center of the halo, sustained for 10 - 100 Myr. We performed several cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that cover a large range of box sizes and resolutions, thus allowing us to understand the impact of several physical processes on the distribution of direct collapse BHs. We identify halos where direct collapse can happen, and derive the number density of BHs. We also investigate the discrepancies between hydrodynamical simulations, direct or post-processed, and semi-analytical studies. Under optimistic assumptions, we find that for direct collapse to account for BHs in normal galaxies, the critical Lyman-Werner flux required for direct collapse must be about two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by 3D simulations that include detailed chemical models. However, when supernova feedback is relatively weak, enough direct collapse BHs to explain z = 6 - 7 quasars can be obtained for Lyman-Werner fluxes about one order of magnitude lower than found in 3D simulations.

  12. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  13. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  14. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10more » $$^{44}$$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.« less

  15. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-01

    Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  16. Bubble collapse near a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Popinet, Stephane

    2000-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on jet formation for bubbles collapsing near solid boundaries is studied numerically. A connected marker technique is used which allows the Navier-Stokes equations with free-surface boundary conditions to be solved accurately and efficiently. Good agreement is obtained between experimental data and numerical simulations for the collapse of large bubbles. A parametric study of the effect of viscosity on jet impact velocity is undertaken. The jet impact velocity is found to decrease as viscosity increases and above a certain threshold jet impact is impossible. We study how the critical Reynolds number depends on the compression ratio and the initial distance from the wall. A simple scaling law is found to link this critical Reynolds number to the other non-dimensional parameters of the problem. A simple model of the collapse and jet formation allows to recover the principal features of the numerical data. More information at http://www.lmm.jussieu.fr/ ~zaleski/zaleski.html .

  17. Concentration, ellipsoidal collapse, and the densest dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoli, Chiamaka; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2016-03-01

    The smallest dark matter haloes are the first objects to form in the hierarchical structure formation of cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology and are expected to be the densest and most fundamental building blocks of CDM structures in our Universe. Nevertheless, the physical characteristics of these haloes have stayed illusive, as they remain well beyond the current resolution of N-body simulations (at redshift zero). However, they dominate the predictions (and uncertainty) in expected dark matter annihilation signal, amongst other astrophysical observables. Using the conservation of total energy and the ellipsoidal collapse framework, we can analytically find the mean and scatter of concentration c and 1D velocity dispersion σ1d for haloes of different virial mass M200. Both c and σ _1d/M_{200}^{1/3} are in good agreement with numerical results within the regime probed by simulations - slowly decreasing functions of mass that approach constant values at large masses. In particular, the predictions for the 1D velocity dispersion of cluster mass haloes are surprisingly robust as the inverse heat capacity of cosmological haloes crosses zero at M200 ˜ 1014 M⊙. However, we find that current extrapolations from simulations to smallest CDM haloes dramatically depend on the assumed profile (e.g. NFW versus Einasto) and fitting function, which is why theoretical considerations, such as the one presented here, can significantly constrain the range of feasible predictions.

  18. Environmental consequences of the Retsof Salt Mine roof collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1994, the largest salt mine in North America, which had been in operation for more than 100 years, catastrophically flooded when the mine ceiling collapsed. In addition to causing the loss of the mine and the mineral resources it provided, this event formed sinkholes, caused widespread subsidence to land, caused structures to crack and subside, and changed stream flow and erosion patterns. Subsequent flooding of the mine drained overlying aquifers, changed the groundwater salinity distribution (rendering domestic wells unusable), and allowed locally present natural gas to enter dwellings through water wells. Investigations including exploratory drilling, hydrologic and water-quality monitoring, geologic and geophysical studies, and numerical simulation of groundwater flow, salinity, and subsidence have been effective tools in understanding the environmental consequences of the mine collapse and informing decisions about management of those consequences for the future. Salt mines are generally dry, but are susceptible to leaks and can become flooded if groundwater from overlying aquifers or surface water finds a way downward into the mined cavity through hundreds of feet of rock. With its potential to flood the entire mine cavity, groundwater is a constant source of concern for mine operators. The problem is compounded by the viscous nature of salt and the fact that salt mines commonly lie beneath water-bearing aquifers. Salt (for example halite or potash) deforms and “creeps” into the mined openings over time spans that range from years to centuries. This movement of salt can destabilize the overlying rock layers and lead to their eventual sagging and collapse, creating permeable pathways for leakage of water and depressions or openings at land surface, such as sinkholes. Salt is also highly soluble in water; therefore, whenever water begins to flow into a salt mine, the channels through which it flows increase in diameter as the surrounding salt dissolves

  19. Bosonization approach for "atomic collapse" in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagimura, Aya; Onogi, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    We study quantum electrodynamics with 2+1 dimensional massless Dirac fermion around a Coulomb impurity. Around a large charge with atomic number Z > 137, the QED vacuum is expected to collapse due to the strong Coulombic force. While the relativistic quantum mechanics fails to make reliable predictions for the fate of the vacuum, the heavy ion collision experiment also does not give clear understanding of this system. Recently, the "atomic collapse" resonances were observed on graphene where an artificial nuclei can be made. In this paper, we present our nonperturbative study of the vacuum structure of the quasiparticles in graphene with a charge impurity which contains multi-body effect using bosonization method.

  20. Energy balance in the WTC collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kaiqi; Xu, Kang; Ansourian, Peter; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of this report is to provide an analysis of Twin Towers of the New York City's World Trade Centre collapsed after attacked by two jet aircrafts. The approach mainly focused on the effect of temperature on mechanical properties of the building, by modelling heat energy in the south tower. Energy balance during the collapse between the energy inputs by aircraft petrol and the transient heat to the towers was conducted. Both the overall structure between 80 to 83 stories and individual elements was modelled. The main elements contributed to the heat transition includes external and internal columns. Heat applied in 2D and 3D models for single elements was through convection and conduction. Analysis of transient heat was done using Strand7.

  1. Stress evolution during caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holohan, E. P.; Schöpfer, M. P. J.; Walsh, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanics of caldera collapse are subject of long-running debate. Particular uncertainties concern how stresses around a magma reservoir relate to fracturing as the reservoir roof collapses, and how roof collapse in turn impacts upon the reservoir. We used two-dimensional Distinct Element Method models to characterise the evolution of stress around a depleting sub-surface magma body during gravity-driven collapse of its roof. These models illustrate how principal stress orientations rotate during progressive deformation so that roof fracturing transitions from initial reverse faulting to later normal faulting. They also reveal four end-member stress paths to fracture, each corresponding to a particular location within the roof. Analysis of these paths indicates that fractures associated with ultimate roof failure initiate in compression (i.e. as shear fractures). We also report on how mechanical and geometric conditions in the roof affect pre-failure unloading and post-failure reloading of the reservoir. In particular, the models show how residual friction within a failed roof could, without friction reduction mechanisms or fluid-derived counter-effects, inhibit a return to a lithostatically equilibrated pressure in the magma reservoir. Many of these findings should be transferable to other gravity-driven collapse processes, such as sinkhole formation, mine collapse and subsidence above hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  2. Critical slowing down as early warning for the onset of collapse in mutualistic communities.

    PubMed

    Dakos, Vasilis; Bascompte, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Tipping points are crossed when small changes in external conditions cause abrupt unexpected responses in the current state of a system. In the case of ecological communities under stress, the risk of approaching a tipping point is unknown, but its stakes are high. Here, we test recently developed critical slowing-down indicators as early-warning signals for detecting the proximity to a potential tipping point in structurally complex ecological communities. We use the structure of 79 empirical mutualistic networks to simulate a scenario of gradual environmental change that leads to an abrupt first extinction event followed by a sequence of species losses until the point of complete community collapse. We find that critical slowing-down indicators derived from time series of biomasses measured at the species and community level signal the proximity to the onset of community collapse. In particular, we identify specialist species as likely the best-indicator species for monitoring the proximity of a community to collapse. In addition, trends in slowing-down indicators are strongly correlated to the timing of species extinctions. This correlation offers a promising way for mapping species resilience and ranking species risk to extinction in a given community. Our findings pave the road for combining theory on tipping points with patterns of network structure that might prove useful for the management of a broad class of ecological networks under global environmental change. PMID:25422412

  3. Diverse structural evolution at z > 1 in cosmologically simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 < z < 3. We measure automated diagnostics of galaxy morphology in cosmological simulations of the formation of 22 central galaxies with 9.3 < log10M*/M⊙ < 10.7. These high-spatial-resolution zoom-in calculations enable accurate modelling of the rest-frame UV and optical morphology. Even with small numbers of galaxies, we find that structural evolution is neither universal nor monotonic: galaxy interactions can trigger either bulge or disc formation, and optically bulge-dominated galaxies at this mass may not remain so forever. Simulated galaxies with M* > 1010M⊙ contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 < z < 2. By this epoch, simulated galaxies with specific star formation rates below 10- 9.7 yr- 1 are more likely than normal star-formers to have a broader mix of structural types, especially at M* > 1010 M⊙. We analyse a cosmological major merger at z ˜ 1.5 and find that the newly proposed Multimode-Intensity-Deviation (MID) morphology diagnostics trace later merger stages while Gini-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is <100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.

  4. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  5. Unconstrained Structure Formation in Coarse-Grained Protein Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan

    The ability of proteins to fold into well-defined structures forms the basis of a wide variety of biochemical functions in and out of the cell membrane. Many of these processes, however, operate at time- and length-scales that are currently unattainable by all-atom computer simulations. To cope with this difficulty, increasingly more accurate and sophisticated coarse-grained models are currently being developed. In the present thesis, we introduce a solvent-free coarse-grained model for proteins. Proteins are modeled by four beads per amino acid, providing enough backbone resolution to allow for accurate sampling of local conformations. It relies on simple interactions that emphasize structure, such as hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity. Realistic alpha/beta content is achieved by including an effective nearest-neighbor dipolar interaction. Parameters are tuned to reproduce both local conformations and tertiary structures. By studying both helical and extended conformations we make sure the force field is not biased towards any particular secondary structure. Without any further adjustments or bias a realistic oligopeptide aggregation scenario is observed. The model is subsequently applied to various biophysical problems: (i) kinetics of folding of two model peptides, (ii) large-scale amyloid-beta oligomerization, and (iii) protein folding cooperativity. The last topic---defined by the nature of the finite-size thermodynamic transition exhibited upon folding---was investigated from a microcanonical perspective: the accurate evaluation of the density of states can unambiguously characterize the nature of the transition, unlike its corresponding canonical analysis. Extending the results of lattice simulations and theoretical models, we find that it is the interplay between secondary structure and the loss of non-native tertiary contacts which determines the nature of the transition. Finally, we combine the peptide model with a high-resolution, solvent-free, lipid

  6. Modeling bistable behaviors in morphing structures through finite element simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe; Chen, Zi

    2014-01-01

    Bistable structures, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelets, can transit between different configurations upon certain external stimulation. Here we study, through three-dimensional finite element simulations, the bistable behaviors in elastic plates in the absence of terminate loads, but with pre-strains in one (or both) of the two composite layers. Both the scenarios with and without a given geometric mis-orientation angle are investigated, the results of which are consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. This work can open ample venues for programmable designs of plant/shell structures with large deformations, with applications in designing bio-inspired robotics for biomedical research and morphing/deployable structures in aerospace engineering. PMID:24211939

  7. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  8. Analysis of forest structure using thematic mapper simulator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Westman, W. E.; Brass, J. A.; Stephenson, N. J.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Spanner, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data for sensing forest structure information has been explored by principal components and feature selection techniques. In a survey of forest structural properties conducted for 123 field sites of the Sequoia National Park, the canopy closure could be well estimated (r = 0.62 to 0.69) by a variety of channel bands and band ratios, without reference to the forest type. Estimation of the basal area was less successful (r = 0.51 or less) on the average, but could be improved for certain forest types when data were stratified by floristic composition. To achieve such a stratification, individual sites were ordinated by a detrended correspondence analysis based on the canopy of dominant species. The analysis of forest structure in the Sequoia data suggests that total basal area can be best predicted in stands of lower density, and in younger even-aged managed stands.

  9. Correlating simulated surface marks with near-surface tornado structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.

    Tornadoes often leave behind patterns of debris deposition, or "surface marks", which provide a direct signature of their near surface winds. The intent of this thesis is to investigate what can be learned about near-surface tornado structure and intensity through the properties of surface marks generated by simulated, debris-laden tornadoes. Earlier work showed through numerical simulations that the tornado's structure and intensity is highly sensitive to properties of the near-surface flow and can change rapidly in time for some conditions. The strongest winds often occur within tens of meters of the surface where the threat to human life and property is highest, and factors such as massive debris loadings and asymmetry of the main vortex have proven to be critical complications in some regimes. However, studying this portion of the flow in the field is problematic; while Doppler radar provides the best tornado wind field measurements, it cannot probe below about 20 m, and interpretation of Doppler data requires assumptions about tornado symmetry, steadiness in time, and correlation between scatterer and air velocities that are more uncertain near the surface. As early as 1967, Fujita proposed estimating tornado wind speeds from analysis of aerial photography and ground documentation of surface marks. A handful of studies followed but were limited by difficulties in interpreting physical origins of the marks, and little scientific attention has been paid to them since. Here, Fujita's original idea is revisited in the context of three-dimensional, large-eddy simulations of tornadoes with fully-coupled debris. In this thesis, the origins of the most prominent simulated marks are determined and compared with historical interpretations of real marks. The earlier hypothesis that cycloidal surface marks were directly correlated with the paths of individual vortices (either the main vortex or its secondary vortices, when present) is unsupported by the simulation results

  10. Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

    2012-03-24

    The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

  11. Numerical simulations of waves in a magnetically structured atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Thomas Peter

    A physical model for simulating waves in a stellar atmosphere was developed from a combination of basic fluid mechanics, plasma physics, and electrodynamics. The model was three dimensional and included the effects of gravity, magnetic fields, and viscosity. An algorithm was developed to numerically implement this model. The resulting program used an explicit time integration scheme based on Runge-Kutta and a combination of finite difference and spectral methods to evaluate the spatial derivatives. A number of numerical boundary conditions were developed—the most successful used a modified Sommerfeld radiation condition. The program was written and coded in Fortran on a Vax computer. Additional routines were written to evaluate the required fast fourier transforms and to graph and display the data. The program was tested on a large number of one and two dimensional problems for which the solutions were known. These problems included acoustic waves, Alfvén waves, magnetoacoustic waves, shocks, rarefactions, and contact discontinuities. The numerical results agreed with the analytic solutions of the physical problems to within the precision requested of the simulation. The program proved to be stable and robust for all the problems attempted. This program was then used to simulate three problems for which analytic solutions are not known. All three simulations concerned the propagation of waves in magnetically structured atmospheres and may be applied to outstanding problems in solar physics. First, the interactions of non-linear waves and a flux slab were studied. From the result it is apparent that sources of shocks and rarefactions, such as the solar convection zone, do not concentrate the magnetic field in flux sheaths. Next I used the program to simulate the interaction of non-linear waves with a flux tube. The results suggest that the magnetic fields in flux tubes are also not concentrated by pairs of passing shocks and rarefactions; however, a complete

  12. Numerical simulation of shock interaction with above-ground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Joseph D.; Lohner, Rainald

    1994-05-01

    This final report for DNA contract DNA 001-89-C-0098 for the time period May 15, 1989 to Dec 31, 1992 describes the results of several of the computations conducted under this research effort. The numerical simulations conducted simulated shock wave diffraction phenomenon about complex-geometry two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Since a significant part of this effort was composed of parametric studies that have been delivered to the sponsors, the Defense Nuclear Agency and the Air Force Ballistic Missile Organization (BMO), and conducted under the now defunct Rail Garrison project, we included in this report a detailed description of the results of the major computations, and a brief summary of all the repetitive computations. The final report is divided into three sections. Chapter 1 describes in detail the two-dimensional numerical methodology and typical two-dimensional computation, i.e., the application of the numerical methodology to the simulation of shock interaction with a typical 2-D train (a 2-D cut at the center of a 3-D train). Chapter 2 describes the numerical development of a passive shock reflector, a major effort undertaken in this project. The objective of this effort was to design a passive device that, while allowing the ventilation of the enclosure under steady conditions, will prevent blast waves impinging on the wall from entering the enclosure when the structure is impacted by a shock.

  13. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  14. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, K.; Saadatmanesh, H.; Allen, T.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. Here, it is vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility and deformation characteristics be defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objective is to describe the research results in two areas for the above goal: (1) liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compressed under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress.

  15. 3D Ultrasonic Wave Simulations for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Leckey Cara A/; Miler, Corey A.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for the detection of damage in aerospace materials is an important area of research at NASA. Ultrasonic guided Lamb waves are a promising SHM damage detection technique since the waves can propagate long distances. For complicated flaw geometries experimental signals can be difficult to interpret. High performance computing can now handle full 3-dimensional (3D) simulations of elastic wave propagation in materials. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate ultrasound scattering from flaws in materials. EFIT results have been compared to experimental data and the simulations provide unique insight into details of the wave behavior. This type of insight is useful for developing optimized experimental SHM techniques. 3D EFIT can also be expanded to model wave propagation and scattering in anisotropic composite materials.

  16. Visualizing microscopic structure and dynamics of simulated silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, B. B.; Bohara, B.

    2013-12-01

    We perform a detailed visualization-based analysis of atomic-position series data for silicate melts obtained from first-principles (quantum mechanical) molecular dynamics simulations. This involves processing atomic trajectories as well as relevant structural and dynamical information. Clutter associated with trajectory rendering can be reduced with an adaptive position-merging scheme. To gain insight into the short- and mid-range order of the melt structure, we extract and visualize the details of radial distribution function (RDF) and coordination environment. The first peaks of all partial RDFs lie in the distance range of 1.6 to 4 Å and the corresponding mean coordination numbers vary from less than 1 to more than 9. The coordination environments involving cations and anions differ substantially from each other, each consisting of a rich set of coordination states. These states vary both spatially and temporally: The per-atom coordination information extracted on the fly is rendered instantaneously as the spheres and polyhedra as well as along the corresponding trajectories using a color-coding scheme. The information is also visualized as clusters formed by atoms that are coordinated at different time intervals during the entire simulation. The animated visualization suggests that the melt structure can be viewed as a dynamic (partial) network of Al/Si-O coordination polyhedra connected via bridging oxygen in an inhomogeneous distribution of mobile cations including magnesium, calcium, and protons.

  17. Detailed Multidimensional Simulations of the Structure and Dynamics of Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulations in which the various physical and chemical processes can be independently controlled can significantly advance our understanding of the structure, stability, dynamics and extinction of flames. Therefore, our approach has been to use detailed time-dependent, multidimensional, multispecies numerical models to perform carefully designed computational experiments of flames on Earth and in microgravity environments. Some of these computational experiments are complementary to physical experiments performed under the Microgravity Program while others provide a fundamental understanding that cannot be obtained from physical experiments alone. In this report, we provide a brief summary of our recent research highlighting the contributions since the previous microgravity combustion workshop. There are a number of mechanisms that can cause flame instabilities and result in the formation of dynamic multidimensional structures. In the past, we have used numerical simulations to show that it is the thermo-diffusive instability rather than an instability due to preferential diffusion that is the dominant mechanism for the formation of cellular flames in lean hydrogen-air mixtures. Other studies have explored the role of gravity on flame dynamics and extinguishment, multi-step kinetics and radiative losses on flame instabilities in rich hydrogen-air flames, and heat losses on burner-stabilized flames in microgravity. The recent emphasis of our work has been on exploring flame-vortex interactions and further investigating the structure and dynamics of lean hydrogen-air flames in microgravity. These topics are briefly discussed after a brief discussion of our computational approach for solving these problems.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Variable Mass, Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Matras, Alex L.; Wilson, Heath E.

    2009-01-01

    distribution of mass in the fuel tank or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case for various propellant levels. Based on the mass consumed by the liquid engine or SRB, the appropriate propellant model is coupled with the dry structure model for the stage. Then using vehicle configuration data, the integrated vehicle model is assembled and operated on by the constant system shape functions. The system mode shapes and frequencies can then be computed from the resulting generalized mass and stiffness matrices for that mass configuration. The rigid body mass properties of the vehicle are derived from the integrated vehicle model. The coupling terms between the vehicle rigid body motion and elastic deformation are also updated from the constant system shape functions and the integrated vehicle model. This approach was first used to analyze variable mass spinning beams and then prototyped into a generic dynamics simulation engine. The resulting code was tested against Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV-)class problems worked in the TREETOPS simulation package and by Wilson [2]. The Ares I System Integration Laboratory (SIL) is currently being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test vehicle avionics hardware and software in a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) environment and certify that the integrated system is prepared for flight. The Ares I SIL utilizes the Ares Real-Time Environment for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation (ARTEMIS) tool to simulate the launch vehicle and stimulate avionics hardware. Due to the presence of vehicle control system filters and the thrust oscillation suppression system, which are tuned to the structural characteristics of the vehicle, ARTEMIS must incorporate accurate structural models of the Ares I launch vehicle. The ARTEMIS core dynamics simulation models the highly coupled nature of the vehicle flexible body dynamics, propellant slosh, and vehicle nozzle inertia effects combined with mass and flexible body properties that vary significant with time

  19. Gopherus agassizii (desert tortoise). Burrow collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughran, Caleb L.; Ennen, Joshua; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    In the deserts of the southwestern U.S., burrows are utilized by the Desert Tortoise to escape environmental extremes (reviewed by Ernst and Lovich 2009. Turtles of the United States and Canada. 2nd ed. Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 827 pp.). However, the potential for mortality through burrow collapse and entrapment is poorly documented. Nicholson and Humphreys (1981. Proceedings of the Desert Tortoise Council, pp. 163−194) suggested that collapse due to livestock trampling may cause mortality. In addition, Lovich et al. (2011. Chelon. Cons. Biol. 10[1]:124–129) documented a Desert Tortoise that used a steel culvert as a burrow surrogate. The culvert filled completely with sediment following a significant rain event, entombing the animal and ultimately resulting in its death. We note that this mortality was associated with an anthropogenic structure; because tortoises are prodigious diggers, one might hypothesize that they have the ability to dig out of collapsed natural burrows in most situations. Circumstances described here presented us with an opportunity to test this hypothesis.

  20. Simulation and modeling techniques for parachute fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Keith Robert

    This thesis is on advanced flow simulation and modeling techniques for fluid-structure interactions (FSI) encountered in parachute systems. The main fluid dynamics solver is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) finite element formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible flows. The DSD/SST formulation, which was introduced earlier for flow computations involving moving boundaries and interfaces, gives us the capability to handle parachute structural deformations. The structural dynamics solver is based on a total Lagrangian finite element formulation of the equilibrium equations for a "tension structure" composed of membranes, cables, and concentrated masses. The fluid and structure are coupled iteratively within a nonlinear iteration loop, with multiple nonlinear iterations improving the convergence of the coupled system. Unstructured mesh generation and mesh moving techniques for handling of parachute deformations are developed and/or adapted to address the challenges posed by the coupled problem. The FSI methodology was originally implemented on the Thinking Machines CM-5 supercomputer and is now actively used on the CRAY T3E-1200. Applications to a variety of round and cross parachutes used by the US Army are presented, and different stages of the parachute operations, including inflation and terminal descent, are modeled.

  1. Instability of black hole formation in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-01-15

    We consider here the classic scenario given by Oppenheimer, Snyder, and Datt, for the gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud, and examine its stability under the introduction of small tangential stresses. We show, by offering an explicit class of physically valid tangential stress perturbations, that an introduction of tangential pressure, however small, can qualitatively change the final fate of collapse from a black hole final state to a naked singularity. This shows instability of black hole formation in collapse and sheds important light on the nature of cosmic censorship hypothesis and its possible formulations. The key effect of these perturbations is to alter the trapped surface formation pattern within the collapsing cloud and the apparent horizon structure. This allows the singularity to be visible, and implications are discussed.

  2. Probabilistic Simulation of the Human Factor in Structural Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Singhal, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    The formal approach described herein computationally simulates the probable ranges of uncertainties for the human factor in probabilistic assessments of structural reliability. Human factors such as marital status, professional status, home life, job satisfaction, work load, and health are studied by using a multifactor interaction equation (MFIE) model to demonstrate the approach. Parametric studies in conjunction with judgment are used to select reasonable values for the participating factors (primitive variables). Subsequently performed probabilistic sensitivity studies assess the suitability of the MFIE as well as the validity of the whole approach. Results show that uncertainties range from 5 to 30 percent for the most optimistic case, assuming 100 percent for no error (perfect performance).

  3. Probabilistic simulation of the human factor in structural reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Singhal, Surendra N.

    1994-09-01

    The formal approach described herein computationally simulates the probable ranges of uncertainties for the human factor in probabilistic assessments of structural reliability. Human factors such as marital status, professional status, home life, job satisfaction, work load, and health are studied by using a multifactor interaction equation (MFIE) model to demonstrate the approach. Parametric studies in conjunction with judgment are used to select reasonable values for the participating factors (primitive variables). Subsequently performed probabilistic sensitivity studies assess the suitability of the MFIE as well as the validity of the whole approach. Results show that uncertainties range from 5 to 30 percent for the most optimistic case, assuming 100 percent for no error (perfect performance).

  4. Phase structure of a single urban intersection: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim Foulaadvand, M.; Fukui, M.; Belbasi, S.

    2010-07-01

    We study the phase structure of a cellular automata model proposed by Belbasi and Foulaadvand to describe the vehicular traffic flow at the intersection of two perpendicular streets. A set of traffic lights operating in a fixed-time scheme controls the traffic flow. A closed boundary condition is applied to the streets, each of which conducts a unidirectional flow. Streets are single-lane and cars cannot turn upon reaching the intersection. Via extensive Monte Carlo simulations it is shown that the model phase diagram consists of ten phases. The flow characteristics in each phase are investigated and the types of phase transitions between phases are specified.

  5. Simulation analysis for ion assisted fast ignition using structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.

    2016-05-01

    As the heating efficiency by fast electrons in the fast ignition scheme is estimated to be very low due to their large divergence angle and high energy. To mitigate this problem, low-density plastic foam, which can generate not only proton (H+) but also carbon (C6+) beams, can be introduced to currently used cone-guided targets and additional core heating by ions is expected. According to 2D PIC simulations, it is found that the ion beams also diverge by the static electric field and concave surface deformation. Thus structured targets are suggested to optimize ion beam characteristics, and their improvement and core heating enhancement by ion beams are confirmed.

  6. Simulation of the CLIC transfer structure by means of MAFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millich, Antonio

    1993-12-01

    The function of the CTS is to extract 30 GHz power from the drive beam and to make it available for the acceleration of the main beam. The simulation of a six cells section of the CTS using the MAFIA set of codes has provided the designers of the structure with a set of RF parameters at 30 GHz. The frequency domain analysis has allowed the plotting of the dispersion curves for the first few pass bands, whereas the time domain analysis has provided results on the shape and magnitude of the longitudinal and transverse wake fields and of the loss factors.

  7. Growth Simulation and Structure Analysis of Obliquely Deposited Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Izotov, A. V.; Solovev, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the Monte Carlo method, a model of growth of thin films prepared by oblique angle deposition of particles is constructed. The morphology of structures synthesized by simulation is analyzed. To study the character of distribution of microstructural elements (columns) in the film plane, the autocorrelation function of the microstructure and the fast Fourier transform are used. It is shown that with increasing angle of particle incidence, the film density monotonically decreases; in this case, anisotropy arises and monotonically increases in the cross sections of columns, and the anisotropy of distribution of columns in the substrate plane also increases.

  8. Dipole collapse and reversal precursors in a numerical dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter; Driscoll, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2009-03-01

    Precursors to extreme geomagnetic field changes are examined in a numerical dynamo with a reversing dipolar magnetic field. A dynamo model with compositional convection in a rotating spherical shell produces a strongly dipolar external magnetic field over 6 Myr of simulated paleomagnetic time, with stable polarity epochs and occasional dipole collapses, some of which result in polarity reversals or dipole axis excursions. We analyze the model behavior during two dipole collapses, one that leads to a polarity reversal and one that does not, focusing on observable precursors. Reversed magnetic field induced in the dynamo interior by intermittent convective variability is the primary cause of dipole collapse. Spots of reversed magnetic flux emerge on the outer boundary at an early stage, then re-emerge with greater intensity at the height of the collapse. The energy in the external field cascades to higher harmonics as these reversed patches appear. Butterfly diagrams showing the reversed and normal flux contributions to the axial dipole reveal poleward migration of the patches during dipole collapse. Axial dipole reduction by precursory reversed flux is several times larger in the reversing case, compared to the non-reversing case. A butterfly diagram of the geomagnetic field since 1840 shows high latitude reversed flux emerging on the core-mantle boundary. Although the reversed geomagnetic flux is presently too weak to be labeled a reversal precursor, it is consistent with early stage dipole collapse in the dynamo model.

  9. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  10. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  11. A new model for submarine volcanic collapse formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Jennifer L.; Edwards, Margo H.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Perfit, Michael R.; Cann, Johnson R.

    2003-09-01

    Collapse pits and an associated suite of collapse-related features that form in submarine lava flows are ubiquitous on the global mid-ocean ridge crest. Collapse pits, the lava tube systems they expose, and lenses of talus created by the collapse process combine to produce a permeable region in the shallow ocean crust and are thought to contribute significantly to the 100-300 m thick low velocity zone observed at intermediate to fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. This horizon of low-density, high-porosity material is likely to be an important aquifer for the transfer of hydrothermal fluids in the upper ocean crust. In a recent survey of the East Pacific Rise at 9°37'N, we used photographs, video and observations from the submersible Alvin, and DSL-120A side scan data to determine that 13% of the 720,000 m2 of seafloor imaged had foundered to form collapse pits. In 98% of the images collapse pits occurred in lobate flows, and the rest in sheet flows. On the basis of our observations and analyses of collapse features, and incorporating data from previous models for collapse formation plus laboratory and theoretical models of basalt lava behavior in the deep ocean, we develop a detailed multistage physical model for collapse formation in the deep ocean. In our model, lava extruded on the seafloor traps pockets of seawater beneath the flow that are instantly vaporized to a briny steam. The seawater is transformed to vapor at temperatures above 480°C with a 20 times expansion in volume. Bubbles of vapor rise through the lava and concentrate below the chilled upper crust of the lava flow, creating gas-filled cavities at magmatic temperatures. Fluid lava from the cavity roofs drips into the vapor pockets to create delicate drip and septa structures, a process that may be enhanced by water vapor diffusing into the magma and reducing its melting point. As the vapor pocket cools, the pressure within it drops, causing a pressure gradient to develop across the upper crust. The

  12. The Structural Underpinnings of Policy Learning: A Classroom Policy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Stephen

    This paper investigates the relationship between the centrality of individual actors in a social network structure and their policy learning performance. In a dynamic comparable to real-world policy networks, results from a classroom simulation demonstrate a strong relationship between centrality in social learning networks and grade performance. Previous research indicates that social network centrality should have a positive effect on learning in other contexts and this link is tested in a policy learning context. Second, the distinction between collaborative learning versus information diffusion processes in policy learning is examined. Third, frequency of interaction is analyzed to determine whether consistent, frequent tics have a greater impact on the learning process. Finally, the data arc analyzed to determine if the benefits of centrality have limitations or thresholds when benefits no longer accrue. These results demonstrate the importance of network structure, and support a collaborative conceptualization of the policy learning process.

  13. Probabilistic simulation of the human factor in structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Many structural failures have occasionally been attributed to human factors in engineering design, analyses maintenance, and fabrication processes. Every facet of the engineering process is heavily governed by human factors and the degree of uncertainty associated with them. Factors such as societal, physical, professional, psychological, and many others introduce uncertainties that significantly influence the reliability of human performance. Quantifying human factors and associated uncertainties in structural reliability require: (1) identification of the fundamental factors that influence human performance, and (2) models to describe the interaction of these factors. An approach is being developed to quantify the uncertainties associated with the human performance. This approach consists of a multi factor model in conjunction with direct Monte-Carlo simulation.

  14. Mechanism of Polymer Collapse in Miscible Good Solvents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ropero, Francisco; Hajari, Timir; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2015-12-24

    We propose a physical mechanism for co-nonsolvency of a stimulus-responsive polymer in water/methanol mixed solution based on results obtained with molecular simulations. Even though the phenomenon is well known, the mechanism behind co-nonsolvency is still under debate. Herein, we study co-nonsolvency of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) in methanol aqueous solutions, the most widely studied and experimentally well-characterized system. Our results show that at low alcohol content of the solution methanol preferentially binds to the PNiPAM globule and drives polymer collapse. The energetics of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, or bridging-type interactions with the globule is found to play no role. Instead, preferential methanol binding results in a significant increase in the globule's configurational entropy, stabilizing methanol-enriched globular structures over wet globular structures in neat water. This mechanism drives the reduction of the lower critical solution temperature with increasing methanol content in the co-nonsolvency regime and eventually leads to polymer collapse. The globule-to-coil re-entrance at high methanol concentrations is instead driven by changes in solvent-excluded volume of the coil and globular states imparted by a decrease in solvent density with increasing methanol content of the solution: with increasing proportion of larger solvent particles (methanol), the entropic (cavity formation) cost of redistributing solvent molecules upon polymer re-entrance becomes smaller. This effect provides a natural explanation for the experimentally observed dependence of the re-entrance transition on chain molecular weight. PMID:26619003

  15. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  16. LOOS: an extensible platform for the structural analysis of simulations.

    PubMed

    Romo, Tod D; Grossfield, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis library) as an object-oriented library designed to facilitate the rapid development of tools for the structural analysis of simulations. LOOS supports the native file formats of most common simulation packages including AMBER, CHARMM, CNS, Gromacs, NAMD, Tinker, and X-PLOR. Encapsulation and polymorphism are used to simultaneously provide a stable interface to the programmer and make LOOS easily extensible. A rich atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included as part of the library. LOOS enables students and casual programmer-scientists to rapidly write their own analytical tools in a compact and expressive manner resembling scripting. LOOS is written in C++ and makes extensive use of the Standard Template Library and Boost, and is freely available under the GNU General Public License (version 3) LOOS has been tested on Linux and MacOS X, but is written to be portable and should work on most Unix-based platforms. PMID:19965179

  17. Visualizing microscopic structure of simulated model basalt melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohara, Bidur; Karki, Bijaya B.

    2013-08-01

    We perform a detailed visualization-based analysis of atomic-position series data for model basalt melt obtained from first-principles (quantum mechanical) molecular dynamics simulations. To gain insight into the short- and mid-range order of the melt structure, we extract and visualize the details of radial distribution function (RDF) and coordination environment. The first peaks of all partial RDFs lie in the distance range of 1.6-4 Å and the corresponding mean coordination numbers vary from less than 1 to more than 9. The coordination environments involving cations and anions differ substantially from each other, each consisting of a rich set of coordination states. These states vary both spatially and temporally: The per-atom coordination information extracted on the fly is rendered instantaneously as the spheres and polyhedra as well as along the corresponding trajectories using a color-coding scheme. The information is also visualized as clusters formed by atoms that are coordinated at different time intervals during the entire simulation. The Si-O coordination is comprised of almost all tetrahedra (4-fold) whereas the Al-O coordination includes both tetrahedra (4-fold) and pentahedra (5-fold). The animated visualization suggests that the melt structure can be viewed as a dynamic (partial) network of Al/Si-O coordination polyhedra connected via bridging oxygen in an inhomogeneous distribution of mobile magnesium and calcium atoms.

  18. Simulation of population growth and structure of the population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, A. Z.

    2002-08-01

    A computer study of population growth and biological ageing in the Penna model is presented. The stress is put on the analysis of the age structure and the distribution of 'bad' mutations m in the population. Results of computer simulation are compared with the simplest logistic model approach which ignores genetic contribution to the life game and accounts only for death due to limited environmental capacity, the Verhulst factor. The Penna model accounts also for genetic load and results of the simulation show that the final population essentially consists of the fittest individuals, as is expected. A more detailed analysis of the genome structure Δ( m) discloses significant marks of the history. The main conclusions are: (a) there is a clear correlation between population n, age a and the number m of bad mutations and (b) there is no correlation between particular configurations Δ( m) of genomes of the same m and the fraction of the population of this characteristics Δ( m). A typical run takes a couple of hours on an HP EXEMPLAR machine, and for a population of about n=10 6.

  19. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  20. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine both numerically and analytically the collapse of the singular isothermal sphere in the context of low-mass star formation. We consider the case where the onset of collapse is initiated by some arbitrary process which is accompanied by a central output of either heat or kinetic energy. We find two classes of numerical solutions describing this manner of collapse. The first approaches in time the expansion wave solution of Shu, while the second class is characterized by an ever-decreasing central accretion rate and the presence of an outwardly propagating weak shock. The collapse solution which represents the dividing case between these two classes is determined analytically by a similarity analysis. This solution shares with the expansion wave solution the properties that the gas remains stationary with an r(sup -2) density profile at large radius and that, at small radius, the gas free-falls onto a nascent core at a constant rate which depends only on the isothermal sound speed. This accretion rate is a factor of approx. 0.1 that predicted by the expansion wave solution. This reduction is due in part to the presence of a weak shock which propagates outward at 1.26 times the sound speed. Gas in the postshock region first moves out subsonically but is then decelerated and begins to collapse. The existence of two classes of numerical collapse solutions is explained in terms of the instability to radial perturbations of the analytic solution. Collapse occurring in the manner described by some of our solutions would eventually unbind a finite-sized core. However, this does not constitute a violation of the instability properties of the singular isothermal sphere which is unstable both to collapse and to expansion. To emphasize this, we consider a purely expanding solution for isothermal spheres. This solution is found to be self-similar and results in a uniform density core in the central regions of the gas. Our solutions may be relevant to the 'luminosity

  1. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine both numerically and analytically the collapse of the singular isothermal sphere in the context of low-mass star formation. We consider the case where the onset of collapse is initiated by some arbitrary process which is accompanied by a central output of either heat or kinetic energy. We find two classes of numerical solutions describing this manner of collapse. The first approaches in time the expansion wave solution of Shu, while the second class is characterized by an ever-decreasing central accretion rate and the presence of an outwardly propagating weak shock. The collapse solution which represents the dividing case between these two classes is determined analytically by a similarity analysis. This solution shares with the expansion wave solution the properties that the gas remains stationary with an r(exp -2) density profile at large radius and that, at small radius, the gas free-falls onto a nascent core at a constant rate which depends only on the isothermal sound speed. This accretion rate is a factor of approx. 0.1 that predicted by the expansion wave solution. This reduction is due in part to the presence of a weak shock which propagates outward at 1.26 times the sound speed. Gas in the postshock region first moves out subsonically but is then decelerated and begins to collapse. The existence of two classes of numerical collapse solutions is explained in terms of the instability to radial perturbations of the analytic solution. Collapse occurring in the manner described by some of our solutions would eventually unbind a finite-sized core. However, this does not constitute a violation of the instability properties of the singular isothermal sphere which is unstable both to collapse and to expansion. To emphasize this, we consider a purely expanding solution for isothermal spheres. This solution is found to be self-similar and results in a uniform density core in the central regions of the gas. Our solutions may be relevant to the 'luminosity

  2. Energy ejection in the collapse of a cold spherical self-gravitating cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.; Sylos Labini, F.

    2009-08-01

    When an open system of classical point particles interacting by Newtonian gravity collapses and relaxes violently, an arbitrary amount of energy may, in principle, be carried away by particles which escape to infinity. We investigate here, using numerical simulations, how this released energy and other related quantities (notably the binding energy and size of the virialized structure) depend on the initial conditions, for the one-parameter family of starting configurations given by randomly distributing N cold particles in a spherical volume. Previous studies have established that the minimal size reached by the system scales approximately as N1/3, a behaviour which follows trivially when the growth of perturbations (which regularize the singularity of the cold collapse in the N -> ∞ limit) is assumed to be unaffected by the boundaries. Our study shows that the energy ejected grows approximately in proportion to N1/3, while the fraction of the initial mass ejected grows only very slowly with N, approximately logarithmically, in the range of N simulated. We examine in detail the mechanism of this mass and energy ejection, showing explicitly that it arises from the interplay of the growth of perturbations with the finite size of the system. A net lag of particles compared to their uniform spherical collapse trajectories develops first at the boundaries and then propagates into the volume during the collapse. Particles in the outer shells are then ejected as they scatter through the time-dependent potential of an already re-expanding central core. Using modified initial configurations, we explore the importance of fluctuations at different scales and discreteness (i.e. non-Vlasov) effects in the dynamics.

  3. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-02-01

    This report contains the results of structural tests to determine the response of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters to simulated tornado conditions. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The type of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 m/sup 3//s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, faceguards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits.

  4. Solution Structures of Rat Amylin Peptide: Simulation, Theory, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Allam S.; Wang, Lu; Lin, Yu-Shan; Ling, Yun; Chopra, Manan; Zanni, Martin T.; Skinner, James L.; De Pablo, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Amyloid deposits of amylin in the pancreas are an important characteristic feature found in patients with Type-2 diabetes. The aggregate has been considered important in the disease pathology and has been studied extensively. However, the secondary structures of the individual peptide have not been clearly identified. In this work, we present detailed solution structures of rat amylin using a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. A new Monte Carlo method is presented to determine the free energy of distinct biomolecular conformations. Both folded and random-coil conformations of rat amylin are observed in water and their relative stability is examined in detail. The former contains an α-helical segment comprised of residues 7–17. We find that at room temperature the folded structure is more stable, whereas at higher temperatures the random-coil structure predominates. From the configurations and weights we calculate the α-carbon NMR chemical shifts, with results that are in reasonable agreement with experiments of others. We also calculate the infrared spectrum in the amide I stretch regime, and the results are in fair agreement with the experimental line shape presented herein. PMID:20141758

  5. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any Cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  6. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  7. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Sutjahjo, Edhi

    1991-01-01

    Predictive methods/computer codes for the computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component are discussed. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, degradation in material properties of a composite laminate at use temperature, dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, degradation in the first ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including the propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisture) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  8. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Nagpal, V. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents predictive methods/codes for computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of (1) acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, (2) degradation in material properties of the composite laminate at use temperature, (3) dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, (4) degradation in the first-ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and (5) acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisure) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  9. Massively Parallel Simulations of Diffusion in Dense Polymeric Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup, Wilcox, R.T. , Hobbs, J.D. , Ford, D.M.

    1997-11-01

    An original computational technique to generate close-to-equilibrium dense polymeric structures is proposed. Diffusion of small gases are studied on the equilibrated structures using massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations running on the Intel Teraflops (9216 Pentium Pro processors) and Intel Paragon(1840 processors). Compared to the current state-of-the-art equilibration methods this new technique appears to be faster by some orders of magnitude.The main advantage of the technique is that one can circumvent the bottlenecks in configuration space that inhibit relaxation in molecular dynamics simulations. The technique is based on the fact that tetravalent atoms (such as carbon and silicon) fit in the center of a regular tetrahedron and that regular tetrahedrons can be used to mesh the three-dimensional space. Thus, the problem of polymer equilibration described by continuous equations in molecular dynamics is reduced to a discrete problem where solutions are approximated by simple algorithms. Practical modeling applications include the constructing of butyl rubber and ethylene-propylene-dimer-monomer (EPDM) models for oxygen and water diffusion calculations. Butyl and EPDM are used in O-ring systems and serve as sealing joints in many manufactured objects. Diffusion coefficients of small gases have been measured experimentally on both polymeric systems, and in general the diffusion coefficients in EPDM are an order of magnitude larger than in butyl. In order to better understand the diffusion phenomena, 10, 000 atoms models were generated and equilibrated for butyl and EPDM. The models were submitted to a massively parallel molecular dynamics simulation to monitor the trajectories of the diffusing species.

  10. VALIDATION OF TRANSIENT STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS: AN EXAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    J. SCHULTZ; F. HEMEZ; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    The field of computational structural dynamics is on the threshold of revolutionary change. The ever-increasing costs of physical experiments coupled with advances in massively parallel computer architecture are steering the engineering analyst to be more and more reliant on numerical calculations with little to no data available for experimental confirmation. New areas of research in engineering analysis have come about as a result of the changing roles of computations and experiments. Whereas in the past the primary function of physical experiments has been to confirm or ''prove'' the accuracy of a computational simulation, the new environment of engineering is forcing engineers to allocate precious experimental resources differently. Rather than trying to ''prove'' whether a calculation is correct, the focus is on learning how to use experimental data to ''improve'' the accuracy of computational simulations. This process of improving the accuracy of calculations through the use of experimental data is termed ''model validation.'' Model validation emphasizes the need for quantitative techniques of assessing the accuracy of a computational prediction with respect to experimental measurements, taking into account that both the prediction and the measurement have uncertainties associated with them. The ''vugraph norm,'' where one overlays transparencies of simulated data and experimental data in an attempt to show consistency, is no longer an adequate means of demonstrating validity of predictions. To approach this problem, a paradigm from the field of statistical pattern recognition has been adopted [1]. This paradigm generalizes the extraction of corresponding ''features'' from the experimental data and the simulated data, and treats the comparison of these sets of features as a statistical test. The parameters that influence the output of the simulation (such as equation parameters, initial and boundary conditions, etc.) can then be adjusted to minimize the

  11. Numerical simulations and stability of magnetic structures in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S.; Avinash, K.; Shaikh, D.; Zank, G. P.

    2008-12-01

    We extend the three fluid model of Avinash and Zank [2007] for magnetic structures in the heliosheath to a four fluid model consisting of electrons, pick-up ions (PUIs), solar wind ions (SWI), and neutral hydrogen. The PUIs are generated by neutrals via charge exchange with SWI. Since the kinetic pressure of PUIs is nearly three to four times the pressure of SWI, these are more suited to mediate small scale structures in the heliosheath such as magnetic holes/humps etc. The constant energy exchange between these two fluids drives them non-adiabatic. The PUIs are isothermal while SWI are non adiabatic with an index ~1.25. The four fluid model captures these effects via a modified equation of state for PUI and SWI. The phase space of time independent solutions in terms of the Mach numbers of PUI and SWI is constructed to delineate the parameter space which allows structure formation in the heliosheath. We examine the stability of the time independent solutions by evolving them via a full system of Hall -MHD equations. The simulation results show that these solutions are not quite stable. As the structure propagates it develops growing oscillations in the wings. Concomitantly, there are changes in the amplitude and width of the structure. This instability could be due to local changes in the velocity of the structure and reflects an exchange between the kinetic and magnetic parts of the total energy. Our results showing the presence of growing oscillations in the wings of solitary wave solutions are consistent with the recent analysis of magnetic holes in the heliosheth by Burlaga et al [2007].

  12. Parallel adaptive fluid-structure interaction simulation of explosions impacting on building structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    We pursue a level set approach to couple an Eulerian shock-capturing fluid solver with space-time refinement to an explicit solid dynamics solver for large deformations and fracture. The coupling algorithms considering recursively finer fluid time steps as well as overlapping solver updates are discussed in detail. Our ideas are implemented in the AMROC adaptive fluid solver framework and are used for effective fluid-structure coupling to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D. Beside simulations verifying the coupled fluid-structure solver and assessing its parallel scalability, the detailed structural analysis of a reinforced concrete column under blast loading and the simulation of a prototypical blast explosion in a realistic multistory building are presented.

  13. Exploring protein flexibility: incorporating structural ensembles from crystal structures and simulation into virtual screening protocols.

    PubMed

    Osguthorpe, David J; Sherman, Woody; Hagler, Arnold T

    2012-06-14

    The capacity of proteins to adapt their structure in response to various perturbations including covalent modifications, and interactions with ligands and other proteins plays a key role in biological processes. Here, we explore the ability of molecular dynamics (MD), replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), and a library of structures of crystal-ligand complexes, to sample the protein conformational landscape and especially the accessible ligand binding site geometry. The extent of conformational space sampled is measured by the diversity of the shapes of the ligand binding sites. Since our focus here is the effect of this plasticity on the ability to identify active compounds through virtual screening, we use the structures generated by these techniques to generate a small ensemble for further docking studies, using binding site shape hierarchical clustering to determine four structures for each ensemble. These are then assessed for their capacity to optimize enrichment and diversity in docking. We test these protocols on three different receptors: androgen receptor (AR), HIV protease, and CDK2. We show that REMD enhances structural sampling slightly as compared both to MD, and the distortions induced by ligand binding as reflected in the crystal structures. The improved sampling of the simulation methods does not translate directly into improved docking performance, however. The ensemble approach did improve enrichment and diversity, and the ensemble derived from the crystal structures performed somewhat better than those derived from the simulations. PMID:22424156

  14. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator-NB32-Large Space Structure Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. As part of this experimentation, the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle. Pictured is an entire unit that has been constructed and is sitting in the bottom of a mock-up shuttle cargo bay pallet.

  15. Excision technique in constrained formulations of Einstein equations: collapse scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Carrión, I.; Vasset, N.; Novak, J.; Jaramillo, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new excision technique used in constrained formulations of Einstein equations to deal with black hole in numerical simulations. We show the applicability of this scheme in several scenarios. In particular, we present the dynamical evolution of the collapse of a neutron star to a black hole, using the CoCoNuT code and this excision technique.

  16. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  17. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  18. Solid-solid collapse transition in a two dimensional model molecular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-11-01

    Solid-solid collapse transition in open framework structures is ubiquitous in nature. The real difficulty in understanding detailed microscopic aspects of such transitions in molecular systems arises from the interplay between different energy and length scales involved in molecular systems, often mediated through a solvent. In this work we employ Monte-Carlo simulation to study the collapse transition in a model molecular system interacting via both isotropic as well as anisotropic interactions having different length and energy scales. The model we use is known as Mercedes-Benz (MB), which, for a specific set of parameters, sustains two solid phases: honeycomb and oblique. In order to study the temperature induced collapse transition, we start with a metastable honeycomb solid and induce transition by increasing temperature. High density oblique solid so formed has two characteristic length scales corresponding to isotropic and anisotropic parts of interaction potential. Contrary to the common belief and classical nucleation theory, interestingly, we find linear strip-like nucleating clusters having significantly different order and average coordination number than the bulk stable phase. In the early stage of growth, the cluster grows as a linear strip, followed by branched and ring-like strips. The geometry of growing cluster is a consequence of the delicate balance between two types of interactions, which enables the dominance of stabilizing energy over destabilizing surface energy. The nucleus of stable oblique phase is wetted by intermediate order particles, which minimizes the surface free energy. In the case of pressure induced transition at low temperature the collapsed state is a disordered solid. The disordered solid phase has diverse local quasi-stable structures along with oblique-solid like domains.

  19. Solid-solid collapse transition in a two dimensional model molecular system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh S; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-11-21

    Solid-solid collapse transition in open framework structures is ubiquitous in nature. The real difficulty in understanding detailed microscopic aspects of such transitions in molecular systems arises from the interplay between different energy and length scales involved in molecular systems, often mediated through a solvent. In this work we employ Monte-Carlo simulation to study the collapse transition in a model molecular system interacting via both isotropic as well as anisotropic interactions having different length and energy scales. The model we use is known as Mercedes-Benz (MB), which, for a specific set of parameters, sustains two solid phases: honeycomb and oblique. In order to study the temperature induced collapse transition, we start with a metastable honeycomb solid and induce transition by increasing temperature. High density oblique solid so formed has two characteristic length scales corresponding to isotropic and anisotropic parts of interaction potential. Contrary to the common belief and classical nucleation theory, interestingly, we find linear strip-like nucleating clusters having significantly different order and average coordination number than the bulk stable phase. In the early stage of growth, the cluster grows as a linear strip, followed by branched and ring-like strips. The geometry of growing cluster is a consequence of the delicate balance between two types of interactions, which enables the dominance of stabilizing energy over destabilizing surface energy. The nucleus of stable oblique phase is wetted by intermediate order particles, which minimizes the surface free energy. In the case of pressure induced transition at low temperature the collapsed state is a disordered solid. The disordered solid phase has diverse local quasi-stable structures along with oblique-solid like domains. PMID:24320339

  20. Sinkholes, collapse structures and large landslides in an active salt dome submerged by a reservoir: The unique case of the Ambal ridge in the Karun River, Zagros Mountains, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Lizaga, Iván

    2016-02-01

    Ambal ridge, covering 4 km2, is a salt pillow of Gachsaran Formation with significant salt exposures in direct contact with the Karun River, Zagros Mountains. The highly cavernous salt dome is currently being flooded by the Gotvand Reservoir, second largest in Iran. Geomorphic evidence, including the sharp deflection of the Karun River and defeated streams indicate that Ambal is an active halokinetic structure, probably driven by erosional unloading. Around 30% of the salt dome is affected by large landslides up to ca. 50 × 106 m3 in volume. Slope oversteepening related to fluvial erosion and halokinetic rise seems to be the main controlling factor. A total of 693 sinkholes have been inventoried (170 sinkholes/km2), for which a scaling relationship has been produced. The depressions occur preferentially along a belt with a high degree of clustering. This spatial distribution is controlled by the proximity to the river, slope gradient and halite content in the bedrock. A large compound depression whose bottom lies below the normal maximum level of the reservoir will likely be flooded by water table rise forming a lake. The impoundment of the reservoir has induced peculiar collapse structures 220-280 m across, expressed by systems of arcuate fissures and scarps. Rapid subsurface salt dissolution is expected to generate and reactivate a large number of sinkholes and may reactivate landslides with a significant vertical component due to lack of basal support.

  1. Filamented ion tail structures at Titan: A hybrid simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyerabend, Moritz; Simon, Sven; Motschmann, Uwe; Liuzzo, Lucas

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the processes that lead to the detection of split signatures in ion density during several crossings of the Cassini spacecraft through Titan's mid-range plasma tail (T9, T63, and T75). During each of these flybys, the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer detected Titan's ionospheric ion population twice; i.e., the spacecraft passed through two spatially separated regions where cold ions were detected, with the regions also being dominated by ions of different masses in the case of T9. Whether this filamented tail structure is an omnipresent feature of Titan's plasma interaction or a result of non-stationary upstream conditions during specific flybys is still unclear. To explain these features, we apply the hybrid simulation code AIKEF (kinetic ions and fluid electrons). Our model includes chemical reactions as well as a realistic photoionization model for a sophisticated description of the ionospheric composition of Titan. Our simulations show that the filamentation of Titan's tail is indeed a common feature of the moon's plasma interaction. Light ionospheric species escape along draped magnetic field lines to form a parabolically shaped filament structure, which is mainly seen in planes that contain the upstream magnetospheric magnetic field and the upstream flow direction. In addition, transport of ions of all species from the ramside towards downstream produces a cone structure behind Titan, with a region of decreased density inside and filaments of 1-2 RT (RT=2575 km) thickness and enhanced density at the surface of the cone. Spacecraft trajectories that penetrate these structures allow for the detection of split signatures in the tail. The orientation of the upstream magnetic field and plasma flow as well as local time effects (i.e., Titan's orbital position) influence the location of the filaments in the tail and can also cause asymmetries in their sizes and densities. The detection of the split signatures along a spacecraft trajectory may

  2. Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kinjal; Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-12-01

    We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but does not form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a thermalized form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

  3. Computer simulation of the structure of ionic surfaces and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, D.

    1994-09-01

    The classic Madelung problem, i.e., the divergence associated with the r{sup {minus}1} term in the Coulomb potential of condensed ionic systems, was recently cast into an absolutely convergent form that is readily evaluated by direct lattice summation, revealing a net r{sup {minus}5} range of this potential. This realization that Coulomb interactions in condensed systems can actually be rather short ranged (if the system is overall neutral) permits novel physical insights into their structure and energetics to be gained. As an example, the authors demonstrate that an understanding of the range and the nature of the convergence of the Coulomb potential leads naturally to the prediction, verified here by computer simulations for rocksalt-structured surfaces, that all surfaces in predominantly ionic materials should be fundamentally reconstructed. The work also provides a conceptual framework for the theoretical treatment of polar surfaces and interfaces, as demonstrated here for the case of the (111) stacking fault and of the (111) twin boundary in the rocksalt structure.

  4. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, H. L.; Gregory, W. S.; Ricketts, C. I.; Smith, P. R.

    1982-02-01

    The response of high efficiency particulate air filters to simulated tornado conditions was determined. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The types of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 cu m/s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, face-guards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits.

  5. Probabilistic simulation of the human factor in structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    A formal approach is described in an attempt to computationally simulate the probable ranges of uncertainties of the human factor in structural probabilistic assessments. A multi-factor interaction equation (MFIE) model has been adopted for this purpose. Human factors such as marital status, professional status, home life, job satisfaction, work load and health, are considered to demonstrate the concept. Parametric studies in conjunction with judgment are used to select reasonable values for the participating factors (primitive variables). Suitability of the MFIE in the subsequently probabilistic sensitivity studies are performed to assess the validity of the whole approach. Results obtained show that the uncertainties for no error range from five to thirty percent for the most optimistic case.

  6. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of versatile engineering materials from locally available materials in space is an important step toward establishment of outposts such as on the moon and Mars. Here development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. It is also vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility, and deformation characteristics are defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objectives include two areas: (1) thermal liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 1100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a traxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compacted under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or insitu stress. The second area was described in previous progress reports and publications; since the presently available device allows vacuum levels up to only 10(exp -4) torr, it is recommended that a vacuum pump that can allow higher levels of vacuum is acquired.

  7. Immersed boundary methods for simulating fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yang, Xiaolei

    2014-02-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems commonly encountered in engineering and biological applications involve geometrically complex flexible or rigid bodies undergoing large deformations. Immersed boundary (IB) methods have emerged as a powerful simulation tool for tackling such flows due to their inherent ability to handle arbitrarily complex bodies without the need for expensive and cumbersome dynamic re-meshing strategies. Depending on the approach such methods adopt to satisfy boundary conditions on solid surfaces they can be broadly classified as diffused and sharp interface methods. In this review, we present an overview of the fundamentals of both classes of methods with emphasis on solution algorithms for simulating FSI problems. We summarize and juxtapose different IB approaches for imposing boundary conditions, efficient iterative algorithms for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of dynamic immersed boundaries, and strong and loose coupling FSI strategies. We also present recent results from the application of such methods to study a wide range of problems, including vortex-induced vibrations, aquatic swimming, insect flying, human walking and renewable energy. Limitations of such methods and the need for future research to mitigate them are also discussed.

  8. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bona, Sergio; Lutzemberger, Ludovico; Salvetti, Ovidio

    2003-12-01

    Recent developments of medical software applications—from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations—have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  9. Linking Microbial Community Structure to Function in Representative Simulated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Ian M.; Wilder, Hailey A.; Quazi, Shanin J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are generally studied as a single strain under ideal growing conditions, although these conditions are not the norm in the environments in which pathogens typically proliferate. In this investigation, a representative microbial community along with Escherichia coli O157:H7, a model pathogen, was studied in three environments in which such a pathogen could be found: a human colon, a septic tank, and groundwater. Each of these systems was built in the lab in order to retain the physical/chemical and microbial complexity of the environments while maintaining control of the feed into the models. The microbial community in the colon was found to have a high percentage of bacteriodetes and firmicutes, while the septic tank and groundwater systems were composed mostly of proteobacteria. The introduction of E. coli O157:H7 into the simulated systems elicited a shift in the structures and phenotypic cell characteristics of the microbial communities. The fate and transport of the microbial community with E. coli O157:H7 were found to be significantly different from those of E. coli O157:H7 studied as a single isolate, suggesting that the behavior of the organism in the environment was different from that previously conceived. The findings in this study clearly suggest that to gain insight into the fate of pathogens, cells should be grown and analyzed under conditions simulating those of the environment in which the pathogens are present. PMID:23396331

  10. Structural, Physical, and Compositional Analysis of Lunar Simulants and Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul; Street, Kenneth W.; Gaier, James

    2008-01-01

    Relative to the prior manned Apollo and unmanned robotic missions, planned Lunar initiatives are comparatively complex and longer in duration. Individual crew rotations are envisioned to span several months, and various surface systems must function in the Lunar environment for periods of years. As a consequence, an increased understanding of the surface environment is required to engineer and test the associated materials, components, and systems necessary to sustain human habitation and surface operations. The effort described here concerns the analysis of existing simulant materials, with application to Lunar return samples. The interplay between these analyses fulfills the objective of ascertaining the critical properties of regolith itself, and the parallel objective of developing suitable stimulant materials for a variety of engineering applications. Presented here are measurements of the basic physical attributes, i.e. particle size distributions and general shape factors. Also discussed are structural and chemical properties, as determined through a variety of techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM and TEM microscopy, Mossbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy, inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping. A comparative description of currently available stimulant materials is discussed, with implications for more detailed analyses, as well as the requirements for continued refinement of methods for simulant production.

  11. Poration of lipid bilayers by shock-induced nanobubble collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Vedadi, Mohammad; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2011-01-01

    We investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal dynamics of nanobubble shrinkage and collapse, leading to the formation and penetration of nanojets into lipid bilayers. The nanojet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them, which transiently enhance the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined.

  12. Dynamics of a vapor nanobubble collapsing near a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaletti, Francesco; Gallo, Mirko; Marino, Luca; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper a diffuse interface approach [1] is used to address the collapse of a sub-micron vapor bubble near solid boundaries. This formulation enables an unprecedented description of interfacial flows that naturally takes into account topology modification and phase changes (both vapor/liquid and vapor/supercritical fluid transformations). Results from numerical simulations are exploited to discuss the complex sequence of events associated with the bubble collapse near a wall, encompassing shock-wave emissions in the liquid and reflections from the wall, their successive interaction with the expanding bubble, the ensuing asymmetry of the bubble and the eventual jetting phase.

  13. REVIVAL OF THE STALLED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SHOCK TRIGGERED BY PRECOLLAPSE ASPHERICITY IN THE PROGENITOR STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2013-11-20

    Multi-dimensional simulations of advanced nuclear burning stages of massive stars suggest that the Si/O layers of presupernova stars harbor large deviations from the spherical symmetry typically assumed for presupernova stellar structure. We carry out three-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations with and without aspherical velocity perturbations to assess their potential impact on the supernova hydrodynamics in the stalled-shock phase. Our results show that realistic perturbations can qualitatively alter the postbounce evolution, triggering an explosion in a model that fails to explode without them. This finding underlines the need for a multi-dimensional treatment of the presupernova stage of stellar evolution.

  14. Structure finding in cosmological simulations: the state of affairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebe, Alexander; Pearce, Frazer R.; Lux, Hanni; Ascasibar, Yago; Behroozi, Peter; Casado, Javier; Moran, Christine Corbett; Diemand, Juerg; Dolag, Klaus; Dominguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Elahi, Pascal; Falck, Bridget; Gottlöber, Stefan; Han, Jiaxin; Klypin, Anatoly; Lukić, Zarija; Maciejewski, Michal; McBride, Cameron K.; Merchán, Manuel E.; Muldrew, Stuart I.; Neyrinck, Mark; Onions, Julian; Planelles, Susana; Potter, Doug; Quilis, Vicent; Rasera, Yann; Ricker, Paul M.; Roy, Fabrice; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Sgró, Mario A.; Springel, Volker; Stadel, Joachim; Sutter, P. M.; Tweed, Dylan; Zemp, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    The ever increasing size and complexity of data coming from simulations of cosmic structure formation demand equally sophisticated tools for their analysis. During the past decade, the art of object finding in these simulations has hence developed into an important discipline itself. A multitude of codes based upon a huge variety of methods and techniques have been spawned yet the question remained as to whether or not they will provide the same (physical) information about the structures of interest. Here we summarize and extent previous work of the `halo finder comparison project': we investigate in detail the (possible) origin of any deviations across finders. To this extent, we decipher and discuss differences in halo-finding methods, clearly separating them from the disparity in definitions of halo properties. We observe that different codes not only find different numbers of objects leading to a scatter of up to 20 per cent in the halo mass and Vmax function, but also that the particulars of those objects that are identified by all finders differ. The strength of the variation, however, depends on the property studied, e.g. the scatter in position, bulk velocity, mass and the peak value of the rotation curve is practically below a few per cent, whereas derived quantities such as spin and shape show larger deviations. Our study indicates that the prime contribution to differences in halo properties across codes stems from the distinct particle collection methods and - to a minor extent - the particular aspects of how the procedure for removing unbound particles is implemented. We close with a discussion of the relevance and implications of the scatter across different codes for other fields such as semi-analytical galaxy formation models, gravitational lensing and observables in general.

  15. Dynamic Response of Viscoelastic Plates to High Pressure Induced by Bubble Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, S.; Klaseboer, E.; Lou, J.

    2013-06-01

    The numerical simulations of viscoelastic plates to high pressure induced by underwater explosion bubble will be presented in this paper. The boundary-element method (BEM) is used to simulate the physical process of the explosive bubble growth, contraction and collapse. The finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the viscoelastic plates response to the high pressure induced by underwater explosion bubble. The interaction of the viscoelastic plates and the underwater explosion bubble is simulated numerically via the coupled BEM-FEM. The computational procedure for the prediction of dynamic response of the viscoelastic plates to the high pressure induced by underwater explosion bubble is demonstrated. The case studies are conducted to examine the effects of different charge weights and locations on dynamic response of the viscoelastic plate. The results from this study may provide some insights into to the problem of viscoelastic structures subjected to underwater explosion bubble, which might be useful for potential applications in biomedicine or marine industry.

  16. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  17. Collapsing lattice animals and lattice trees in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-06-01

    We present high statistics simulations of weighted lattice bond animals and lattice trees on the square lattice, with fugacities for each non-bonded contact and for each bond between two neighbouring monomers. The simulations are performed using a newly developed sequential sampling method with resampling, very similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used for linear chain polymers. We determine with high precision the line of second-order transitions from an extended to a collapsed phase in the resulting two-dimensional phase diagram. This line includes critical bond percolation as a multicritical point, and we verify that this point divides the line into different universality classes. One of them corresponds to the collapse driven by contacts and includes the collapse of (weakly embeddable) trees. There is some evidence that the other is subdivided again into two parts with different universality classes. One of these (at the far side from collapsing trees) is bond driven and is represented by the Derrida-Herrmann model of animals having bonds only (no contacts). Between the critical percolation point and this bond-driven collapse seems to be an intermediate regime, whose other end point is a multicritical point P* where a transition line between two collapsed phases (one bond driven and the other contact driven) sparks off. This point P* seems to be attractive (in the renormalization group sense) from the side of the intermediate regime, so there are four universality classes on the transition line (collapsing trees, critical percolation, intermediate regime, and Derrida-Herrmann). We obtain very precise estimates for all critical exponents for collapsing trees. It is already harder to estimate the critical exponents for the intermediate regime. Finally, it is very difficult to obtain with our method good estimates of the critical parameters of the Derrida-Herrmann universality class. As regards the bond-driven to contact-driven transition in the

  18. Testing simulation and structural models with applications to energy demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Hendrik

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation deals with energy demand and consists of two parts. Part one proposes a unified econometric framework for modeling energy demand and examples illustrate the benefits of the technique by estimating the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital. Part two assesses the energy conservation policy of Daylight Saving Time and empirically tests the performance of electricity simulation. In particular, the chapter "Imposing Monotonicity and Curvature on Flexible Functional Forms" proposes an estimator for inference using structural models derived from economic theory. This is motivated by the fact that in many areas of economic analysis theory restricts the shape as well as other characteristics of functions used to represent economic constructs. Specific contributions are (a) to increase the computational speed and tractability of imposing regularity conditions, (b) to provide regularity preserving point estimates, (c) to avoid biases existent in previous applications, and (d) to illustrate the benefits of our approach via numerical simulation results. The chapter "Can We Close the Gap between the Empirical Model and Economic Theory" discusses the more fundamental question of whether the imposition of a particular theory to a dataset is justified. I propose a hypothesis test to examine whether the estimated empirical model is consistent with the assumed economic theory. Although the proposed methodology could be applied to a wide set of economic models, this is particularly relevant for estimating policy parameters that affect energy markets. This is demonstrated by estimating the Slutsky matrix and the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital, which are crucial parameters used in computable general equilibrium models analyzing energy demand and the impacts of environmental regulations. Using the Berndt and Wood dataset, I find that capital and energy are complements and that the data are significantly consistent with duality

  19. Topics in Core-Collapse Supernova Theory: The Formation of Black Holes and the Transport of Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Evan Patrick

    Core-Collapse Supernovae are one of the most complex astrophysical systems in the universe. They deeply entwine aspects of physics and astrophysics that are rarely side by side in nature. To accurately model core-collapse supernovae one must self-consistently combine general relativity, nuclear physics, neutrino physics, and magneto-hydrodynamics in a symmetry-free computational environment. This is a challenging task, as each one of these aspects on its own is an area of great study. We take an open approach in an effort to encourage collaboration in the core-collapse supernovae community. In this thesis, we develop a new open-source general-relativistic spherically-symmetric Eulerian hydrodynamics code for studying stellar collapse, protoneutron star formation, and evolution until black hole formation. GR1D includes support for finite temperature equations of state and an efficient and qualitatively accurate treatment of neutrino leakage. GR1D implements spherically-symmetric rotation, allowing for the study of slowly rotating stellar collapse. GR1D is available at http://www.stellarcollapse.org. We use GR1D to perform an extensive study of black hole formation in failing core-collapse supernovae. Over 100 presupernova models from various sources are used in over 700 total simulations. We systematically explore the dependence of black hole formation on the input physics: initial zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, nuclear equation of state, rotation, and stellar mass loss rates. Assuming the core-collapse supernova mechanism fails and a black hole forms, we find that the outcome, for a given equation of state, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing the protoneutron star structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of