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Sample records for simulative high temperature

  1. Simulated Data for High Temperature Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes an effective formal method that can be used to simulate design properties for composites that is inclusive of all the effects that influence those properties. This effective simulation method is integrated computer codes that include composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics, laminate theory, structural analysis, and multi-factor interaction model. Demonstration of the method includes sample examples for static, thermal, and fracture reliability for a unidirectional metal matrix composite as well as rupture strength and fatigue strength for a high temperature super alloy. Typical results obtained for a unidirectional composite show that the thermal properties are more sensitive to internal local damage, the longitudinal properties degrade slowly with temperature, the transverse and shear properties degrade rapidly with temperature as do rupture strength and fatigue strength for super alloys.

  2. High temperature behavior of simulated mixed nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. G.; Lunev, A. V.; Mikhalchik, V. V.; Tenishev, A. V.; Shornikov, D. P.

    2016-04-01

    Specimen of uranium-based mixed nitrides were synthesized by high-temperature nitriding of metal powder. To investigate thermal stability, samples were annealed at high temperature in a helium atmosphere. During these experiments, the effect of increasing the exposure temperature is studied. Raising the exposure temperature results in a multifold increase of mass loss. A comparison with data on pure uranium nitride shows that increasing the complexity of the nitride systems also results in higher mass loss. Later microscopic investigation of test samples revealed that metal precipitates may be found only on the surface of test samples. Electron probe micro-analysis indicates these precipitates to be uranium metal. Nevertheless, compared to pure uranium nitride, uranium-based mixed nitrides exhibit active evaporation at lower temperatures

  3. METCAN updates for high temperature composite behavior: Simulation/verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The continued verification (comparisons with experimental data) of the METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code is updated. Verification includes comparisons at room and high temperatures for two composites, SiC/Ti-15-3 and SiC/Ti-6-4. Specifically, verification of the SiC/Ti-15-3 composite includes comparisons of strength, modulus, and Poisson's ratio as well as stress-strain curves for four laminates at room temperature. High temperature verification includes comparisons of strength and stress-strain curves for two laminates. Verification of SiC/Ti-6-4 is for a transverse room temperature stress-strain curve and comparisons for transverse strength at three temperatures. Results of the verification indicates that METCAN can be used with confidence to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites.

  4. High temperature dilatometry of simulated oxide nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, A. V.; Baranov, V. G.; Kuzmin, R. S.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    High temperature dilatometry of model systems based on uranium dioxide with additives of burnable neutron absorbers both as Gd2O3 and as AlGdO3, and fission products simulators (FPS) was performed. It shown that in some cases instead of high temperature samples shrinkage there is a sharp transition to the expansion, which is associated with an increase of the samples volume due to the formation of liquid phases. The beginning of a complex composition eutectic melting starts at temperatures from 1950 to 2250 °C in the uranium dioxide samples containing significant amounts of Al, Gd, and FPS. Thus, in the analysis of oxide nuclear fuel behavior at high temperatures should be considered that the formation of liquid phases is possible at a temperature of 1000 °C lower than a melting point of pure stoichiometric uranium dioxide if its initial composition became more complex.

  5. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composite (HT MMC) in the following four broad areas: (1) behavior of HT MMC from micromechanics to laminate; (2) HT MMC structural response for simple and complex structural components; (3) HT MMC microfracture; and (4) tailoring of HT MMC behavior for optimum specific performance. Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the computational simulation procedures. Relevant reports are referenced for extended discussion regarding the specific area.

  6. Peptide Bond Isomerization in High-Temperature Simulations.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2016-04-12

    Force fields for molecular simulation are generally optimized to model macromolecules such as proteins at ambient temperature and pressure. Nevertheless, elevated temperatures are frequently used to enhance conformational sampling, either during system setup or as a component of an advanced sampling technique such as temperature replica exchange. Because macromolecular force fields are now put upon to simulate temperatures and time scales that greatly exceed their original design specifications, it is appropriate to re-evaluate whether these force fields are up to the task. Here, we quantify the rates of peptide bond isomerization in high-temperature simulations of three octameric peptides and a small fast-folding protein. We show that peptide octamers with and without proline residues undergo cis/trans isomerization every 1-5 ns at 800 K with three classical atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN, CHARMM22/CMAP, and OPLS-AA/L). On the low microsecond time scale, these force fields permit isomerization of nonprolyl peptide bonds at temperatures ≥500 K, and the CHARMM22/CMAP force field permits isomerization of prolyl peptide bonds ≥400 K. Moreover, the OPLS-AA/L force field allows chiral inversion about the Cα atom at 800 K. Finally, we show that temperature replica exchange permits cis peptide bonds developed at 540 K to subsequently migrate back to the 300 K ensemble, where cis peptide bonds are present in 2 ± 1% of the population of Trp-cage TC5b, including up to 4% of its folded state. Further work is required to assess the accuracy of cis/trans isomerization in the current generation of protein force fields. PMID:26866899

  7. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J.; Ek, J. van; Mercer, J. I.

    2014-09-28

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  8. Computer Simulation Studies of Ion Channels at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyun Deok

    The gramicidin channel is the smallest known biological ion channel, and it exhibits cation selectivity. Recently, Dr. John Cuppoletti's group at the University of Cincinnati showed that the gramicidin channel can function at high temperatures (360 ˜ 380K) with significant currents. This finding may have significant implications for fuel cell technology. In this thesis, we have examined the gramicidin channel at 300K, 330K, and 360K by computer simulation. We have investigated how the temperature affects the current and differences in magnitude of free energy between the two gramicidin forms, the helical dimer (HD) and the double helix (DH). A slight decrease of the free energy barrier inside the gramicidin channel and increased diffusion at high temperatures result in an increase of current. An applied external field of 0.2V/nm along the membrane normal results in directly observable ion transport across the channels at high temperatures for both HD and DH forms. We found that higher temperatures also affect the probability distribution of hydrogen bonds, the bending angle, the distance between dimers, and the size of the pore radius for the helical dimer structure. These findings may be related to the gating of the gramicidin channel. Methanococcus jannaschii (MJ) is a methane-producing thermophile, which was discovered at a depth of 2600m in a Pacific Ocean vent in 1983. It has the ability to thrive at high temperatures and high pressures, which are unfavorable for most life forms. There have been some experiments to study its stability under extreme conditions, but still the origin of the stability of MJ is not exactly known. MJ0305 is the chloride channel protein from the thermophile MJ. After generating a structure of MJ0305 by homology modeling based on the Ecoli ClC templates, we examined the thermal stability, and the network stability from the change of network entropy calculated from the adjacency matrices of the protein. High temperatures increase the

  9. Simulation of Fatigue Behavior of High Temperature Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Mike T.; Singhal, Suren N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1996-01-01

    A generalized relatively new approach is described for the computational simulation of fatigue behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMCs). This theory is embedded in a specialty-purpose computer code. The effectiveness of the computer code to predict the fatigue behavior of HT-MMCs is demonstrated by applying it to a silicon-fiber/titanium-matrix HT-MMC. Comparative results are shown for mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical (in-phase and out-of-phase) fatigue, as well as the effects of oxidizing environments on fatigue life. These results show that the new approach reproduces available experimental data remarkably well.

  10. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  11. High Temperature Unfolding and Low Temperature Refolding Pathway of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malau, N. D.; Sumaryada, T.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism that explains the unfolding/refolding process of the protein is still a major problem that has not been fully understood. In this paper we present our study on the unfolding and refolding pathway of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 (CI2) protein through a molecular dynamics simulation technique. The high temperature unfolding simulation were performed at 500 K for 35 ns. While the low temperature refolding simulation performed at 200 K for 35 ns. The unfolding and refolding pathway of protein were analysed by looking at the dynamics of root mean squared deviation (RMSD) and secondary structure profiles. The signatures of unfolding were observed from significant increase of RMSD within the time span of 10 ns to 35 ns. For the refolding process, the initial structure was prepared from the structure of unfolding protein at t=15 ns and T=500 K. Analysis have shown that some of the secondary structures of CI2 protein that have been damaged at high temperature can be refolded back to its initial structure at low temperature simulation. Our results suggest that most of α-helix structure of CI2 protein can be refolded back to its initial state, while only half beta-sheet structure can be reformed.

  12. Simulated Single Tooth Bending of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert, F.; Burke, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Future unmanned space missions will require mechanisms to operate at extreme conditions in order to be successful. In some of these mechanisms, very high gear reductions will be needed to permit very small motors to drive other components at low rotational speed with high output torque. Therefore gearing components are required that can meet the mission requirements. In mechanisms such as this, bending fatigue strength capacity of the gears is very important. The bending fatigue capacity of a high temperature, nickel-based alloy, typically used for turbine disks in gas turbine engines and two tool steel materials with high vanadium content, were compared to that of a typical aerospace alloy-AISI 9310. Test specimens were fabricated by electro-discharge machining without post machining processing. Tests were run at 24 and at 490 C. As test temperature increased from 24 to 490 C the bending fatigue strength was reduced by a factor of five.

  13. Stress relaxation of high strength A-286 bolts in simulated storage at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    It was concluded that thermally activated relaxation of the type customarily encountered at high temperatures was not expected to occur at the low temperatures where long time NERVA storage conditions will prevail. Instances where relaxation occurred by a different mechanism at such moderate temperatures were also reported. Twelve simulated bolted flange test specimens were prepared. Parameters that were varied among the twelve specimens were the flange material, the bolt shank diameter, and the bolt loading in terms of percent of yield strength.

  14. Injection molding simulation with variothermal mold temperature control of highly filled polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, A.; Tschiersky, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    For the installation of a fuel cell stack to convert chemical energy into electricity it is common to apply bipolar plates to separate and distribute reaction gases and cooling agents. For reducing manufacturing costs of bipolar plates a fully automated injection molding process is examined. The high performance thermoplastic matrix material, polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), defies against the chemical setting and the operation temperature up to 200 °C. To adjust also high electrical and thermal conductivity, PPS is highly filled with various carbon fillers up to an amount of 65 percentage by volume. In the first step two different structural plates (one-sided) with three different gate heights and molds are designed according to the characteristics of a bipolar plate. To cope with the approach that this plate should be producible on standard injection molding machines with variothermal mold temperature control, injection molding simulation is used. Additionally, the simulation should allow to formulate a quality prediction model, which is transferrable to bipolar plates. Obviously, the basis for a precise simulation output is an accurate description of the material properties and behavior of the highly filled compound. This, the design of the structural plate and mold and the optimization via simulation is presented, as well. The influence of the injection molding process parameters, e.g. injection time, cycle times, packing pressure, mold temperature, and melt temperature on the form filling have been simulated to determine optimal process conditions. With the aid of the simulation and the variothermal mold temperature control it was possible to reduce the required melt temperature below the decomposition temperature of PPS. Thereby, hazardous decomposition products as hydrogen sulfide are obviated. Thus, the health of the processor, the longevity of the injection molding machine as well as the material and product properties can be protected.

  15. Hydrogen atom recombination on tungsten at high temperature: Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutigliano, M.; Santoro, D.; Balat-Pichelin, M.

    2014-10-01

    Atom recombination at wall is a phenomenon involved in many plasma experiments and also in present tokamaks and future fusion plasma reactors like ITER. This exothermic surface reaction is catalyzed by the material and depends on its composition and temperature. In the MESOX experimental set-up, several methods were developed for the measurement of the recombination parameters. In this paper, a method developed for the experimental evaluation of the recombination coefficient of atomic hydrogen γH on tungsten at high temperature is presented using two series of atomic lines (Hα and He or Hβ and H2) and the results obtained for surface temperature up to 1350 K are given. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation has been done for the recombination of hydrogen atoms on tungsten in conditions close to the experimental ones using a semi-classical collisional method. Modeling results are compared to the experimental data for two surface temperature values and a fairly good agreement was obtained.

  16. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  17. Combined thermal and bending fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  18. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulation of turbulent transport in high ion temperature discharge of Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko; Sugama, Hideo; Maeyama, Shinya; Nunami, Masanori; Nakajima, Noriyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Turbulent transport in a high ion temperature discharge of Large Helical Device (LHD) is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations including kinetic electrons. A new electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulation code GKV+enables us to examine electron heat and particle fluxes as well as ion heat flux in finite beta heliotron/stellarator plasmas. This problem has not been previously explored because of numerical difficulties associated with complex three-dimensional magnetic structures as well as multiple spatio-temporal scales related to electromagnetic ion and electron dynamics. The turbulent fluxes, which are evaluated through a nonlinear simulation carried out in the K-super computer system, will be reported. This research uses computational resources of K at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project (Project ID: hp140044).

  19. Optimized design and simulation of high temperature pressure pipeline strain monitoring with optical fiber sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Yueming; Lou, Jun

    2011-08-01

    methods mentioned above cannot satisfy the strain change monitoring of high temperature pressure piping. In this paper a novel method is presented using optical Fiber Bragg Grating sensor to carry on the real-time monitoring of the high temperature pressure piping surface strain change. firstly the stress and strain analysis of the high temperature pressure piping surface is given based on the established theoretical model, then optimized design and simulation is accomplished with computer ANSYS software. In the end a optimized set-up is put forward and discussed.

  20. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Elevation in Soft Tissue by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Sim, Imbo; Kang, Gwan Suk; Choi, Min Joo

    In focused ultrasound surgery, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to destroy pathological tissue deep inside the body without any damage to the surrounding normal tissue. This noninvasive technique has been used to treat malignant tumors of the liver, prostate, kidney, and benign breast tumors via a percutaneous or transrectal approach without the need for general anaesthesia. In the present study, a finite element method was used for the simulation of temperature elevation in soft tissue by HIFU. First, the HIFU field was modeled using the Westervelt equation for the propagation of finite-amplitude sound in a thermoviscous fluid in order to account for the effects of diffraction, absorption, and nonlinearity. Second, the Pennes bioheat transfer equation was used to predict the temperature elevation in soft tissue by HIFU. In order to verify the numerical simulation, the simulated temperature elevation at the focus in a tissue-mimicking phantom was compared with the measurements, using a concave focused transducer with a focal length of 62.6 mm, a radius of 35.0 mm, and a center frequency of 1.1 MHz.

  2. Simulation of temperature rise in Li-ion cells at very high currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jing; Tiedemann, William; Newman, John

    2014-12-01

    The Dualfoil model is used to simulate the electrochemical behavior and temperature rise for MCMB/LiCoO2 Li-ion cells under a small constant-resistance load, approaching a short-circuit condition. Radial mass transport of lithium from the center of the pore to the pore wall has been added to the model to describe better current limitations at very high discharge currents. Electrolyte and solid-surface-concentration profiles of lithium ions across the cell at various times are developed and analyzed to explain the lithium-ion transport limitations. Sensitivity tests are conducted by changing solution and solid-state diffusion coefficients, and the heat-transfer coefficient. Because diffusion coefficients increase at high temperature, calculated discharge curves can show currents dropping initially but then rising to a second peak, with most of the available capacity being consumed in the second peak. Conditions which lead to such a second peak are explored.

  3. Calculation of high-temperature crude oil/water/vapor separations using simulated distillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Langhoff, J.A.; Wu, C.H.

    1984-09-01

    High-temperature crude oil-water-vapor separation takes place in steam flooding and in-situ combustion processes. It also takes place in hydrocarbon recovery from deep volatile oil reservoirs. A practical procedure using the Holland and Welch method and simulated distillation data was developed to calculate crude oil-water-vapor separations at 387/sup 0/F (197/sup 0/C) and 456/sup 0/F (235/sup 0/C). The overhead yields obtained from the calculations were expressed as a function of the steam distillation factor, V /SUB w/ /V /SUB oi/ . The results were compared with laboratory crude oil steam distillation data. The approach satisfactorily predicted the overhead yields of thirteen out of sixteen crude oils with an average error of 11%. This is within experimental error of crude oil steam distillation. Twelve pseudocomponents of crude oils were selected and characterized using simulated distillation data for the calculations. The physical properties of the pseudocomponents were determined from existing correlations and from matching laboratory steam distillation data. The use of simulated distillation data eliminates the uncertainty and assumptions normally involved in the selection of crude oil pseudocomponents using Bureau of Mines distillation data, and thus, improves the reliability of the proposed computational approach. The proposed approach has many advantages. It eliminates the need of conducting experimental steam distillation tests if crude oil simulated distillation data are available. It is easy and fast to calculate the overhead yields and densities without using the equation of state and uncertain pseudocomponent critical properties and interaction parameters. The proposed approach will provide useful information for designing and operating thermal recovery processes, and for predicting hydrocarbon recovery from high-temperature volatile oil reservoirs.

  4. Mesoscale climatic simulation of surface air temperature cooling by highly reflective greenhouses in SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Campra, Pablo; Millstein, Dev

    2013-01-01

    A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m(-2) of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance. PMID:24074145

  5. Theory and Simulation of A Novel Viscosity Measurement Method for High Temperature Semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rose; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The properties of molten semiconductors are good indicators for material structure transformation and hysteresis under temperature variations. Viscosity, as one of the most important properties, is difficult to measure because of high temperature, high pressure, and vapor toxicity of melts. Recently, a novel method was developed by applying a rotating magnetic field to the melt sealed in a suspended quartz ampoule, and measuring the transient torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall. The method was designed to measure viscosity in short time period, which is essential for evaluating temperature hysteresis. This paper compares the theoretical prediction of melt flow and ampoule oscillation with the experimental data. A theoretical model was established and the coupled fluid flow and ampoule torsional vibration equations were solved numerically. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experimental data. The results also showed that both electrical conductivity and viscosity could be calculated by fitting the theoretical results to the experimental data. The transient velocity of the melt caused by the rotating magnetic field was found reach equilibrium in about half a minute, and the viscosity of melt could be calculated from the altitude of oscillation. This would allow the measurement of viscosity in a minute or so, in contrast to the existing oscillation cup method, which requires about an hour for one measurement.

  6. Development of the High Temperature Fretting Wear Simulator for Steam Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choon Yeol; Kim, Joong Ho; Bae, Joon Woo; Chai, Young Suck

    In nuclear power plant, fretting wear due to a combination of impact and sliding motions of the U-tubes against the supports and/or foreign objects caused by flow induced vibration, can make a serious problem in steam generator. A test rig, fretting wear simulator, is developed to elucidate fretting wear mechanism qualitatively and quantitatively. The realistic condition of steam generator of high temperature up to 320°C, high pressure up to 15 MPa, and water environment could be achieved by a test rig. The fretting wear simulator consists of main frame, water loop system, and control unit. Actual contact region under a realistic condition of steam generator was isolated using autoclave. Effects of various parameters such as the amounts of impact and sliding motions, applied loads and initial gaps and so forth are considered in this research. After the experiment, wear damage was measured by a three-dimensional profiler and the surface was also studied by SEM microscopically. Initial results were also presented.

  7. Immobilization of simulated radioactive soil waste containing cerium by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xianhe; Qin, Zhigui; Yuan, Xiaoning; Wang, Chunming; Cai, Xinan; Zhao, Weixia; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ping; Fan, Xiaoling

    2013-11-01

    A simulated radioactive soil waste containing cerium as an imitator element has been immobilized by a thermite self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process. The compositions, structures, and element leaching rates of products with different cerium contents have been characterized. To investigate the influence of iron on the chemical stability of the immobilized products, leaching tests of samples with different iron contents with different leaching solutions were carried out. The results showed that the imitator element cerium mainly forms the crystalline phases CeAl11O18 and Ce2SiO5. The leaching rate of cerium over a period of 28 days was 10-5-10-6 g/(m2 day). Iron in the reactants, the reaction products, and the environment has no significant effect on the chemical stability of the immobilized SHS products.

  8. Temperature dependence of creep compliance of highly cross-linked epoxy: A molecular simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Khabaz, Fardin Khare, Ketan S. Khare, Rajesh

    2014-05-15

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of temperature on the creep compliance of neat cross-linked epoxy. Experimental studies of mechanical behavior of cross-linked epoxy in literature commonly report creep compliance values, whereas molecular simulations of these systems have primarily focused on the Young’s modulus. In this work, in order to obtain a more direct comparison between experiments and simulations, atomistically detailed models of the cross-linked epoxy are used to study their creep compliance as a function of temperature using MD simulations. The creep tests are performed by applying a constant tensile stress and monitoring the resulting strain in the system. Our results show that simulated values of creep compliance increase with an increase in both time and temperature. We believe that such calculations of the creep compliance, along with the use of time temperature superposition, hold great promise in connecting the molecular insight obtained from molecular simulation at small length- and time-scales with the experimental behavior of such materials. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first reported effort that investigates the creep compliance behavior of cross-linked epoxy using MD simulations.

  9. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  10. High temperature reaction between sea salt deposit and (U,Zr)O2 simulated corium debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masahide; Nishi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    In order to clarify the possible impacts of seawater injection on the chemical and physical state of the corium debris formed in the severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, the high temperature reaction between sea salt deposit and (U,Zr)O2 simulated corium debris (sim-debris) was examined in the temperature range from 1088 to 1668 K. A dense layer of calcium and sodium uranate formed on the surface of a sim-debris pellet at 1275 K under airflow, with the thickness of over 50 μm. When the oxygen partial pressure is low, calcium is likely to dissolve into the cubic sim-debris phase to form solid solution (Ca,U,Zr)O2+x. The diffusion depth was 5-6 μm from the surface, subjected to 1275 K for 12 h. The crystalline MgO remains affixed on the surface as the main residue of salt components. A part of it can also dissolve into the sim-debris.

  11. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  12. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    James, W.F.

    1985-09-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  13. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  14. Towards material-specific simulations of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Simulations of high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) cuprates have typically fallen into two categories: (1) studies of generic models such as the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model, that are believed to capture the essential physics necessary to describe the superconducting state, and, (2) first principles electronic structure calculations that are based on the local density approximation (LDA) to density functional theory (DFT) and lead to materials specific models. With advent of massibely parallel vector supercomputers, such as the Cray X1E at ORNL, and cluster algorithms such as the Dynamical Cluster Approximation (DCA), it is now possible to systematically solve the 2D Hubbard model with Quantum Monte Carol (QMC) simulations and to establish that the model indeed describes d-wave superconductivity [1]. Furthermore, studies of a multi-band model with input parameters generated from LDA calculations demonstrate that the existence of a superconducting transition is very sensitive to the underlying band structure [2]. Application of the LDA to transition metal oxides is, however, hampered by spurious self-interactions that particularly affects localized orbitals. Here we apply the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD) to describe the electronic structure of the cuprates. It was recently applied with success to generate input parameters for simple models of Mn doped III-V semiconductors [3] and is known to properly describe the antiferromagnetic insulating ground state of the parent compounds of the HTSC cuprates. We will discus the models for HTSC cuprates derived from the SIC-LSD study and how the differences to the well-known LDA results impact the QMC-DCA simulations of the magnetic and superconducting properties. [1] T. A. Maier, M. Jarrell, T. C. Schulthess, P. R. C. Kent, and J. B. White, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 237001 (2005). [2] P. Kent, A. Macridin, M. Jarrell, T. Schulthess, O. Andersen, T. Dasgupta, and O. Jepsen, Bulletin of

  15. Numerical simulation on pulverized coal combustion and NOx emissions in high temperature air from circulating fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianguo; Ouyang, Ziqu; Lu, Qinggang

    2013-06-01

    High temperature air combustion is a prospecting technology in energy saving and pollutants reduction. Numerical simulation on pulverized coal combustion and NOx emissions in high temperature air from circulating fluidized bed was presented. The down-fired combustor, taken as the calculation domain, has the diameter of 220 mm and the height of 3000 mm. 2 cases with air staging combustion are simulated. Compared the simulation results with experimental data, there is a good agreement. It is found that the combustion model and NOx formation model are applicable to simulate the pulverized coal combustion and NOx emissions in high temperature air from circulating fluidized bed. The results show that there is a uniform temperature profile along the axis of the down-fired combustor. The NOx emissions are lower than those of ordinary pulverized coal combustion, and the NOx emissions are 390 mg/m3 and 352 mg/m3 in Case 1 and Case 2, respectively. At the range of 300-600 mm below the nozzle, the NO concentration decreases, mainly resulting from some homogeneous reactions and heterogeneous reaction. NO concentration has a little increase at the position of 800 mm below the nozzle as the tertiary air supplied to the combustor at the position of 600 mm below the nozzle.

  16. Changes in size of nano phase iron inclusions with temperature: Experimental simulation of space weathering effects at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, S. S.; Moroz, L. V.; Stockhoff, T.; Baither, D.; Bischoff, A.; Hiesinger, H.

    2011-10-01

    The mean size of nano phase iron inclusions (npFe0), produced during the space weathering of iron-rich regolith of airless solar system bodies, significantly affects visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectra. To experimentally simulate the change in the size of npFe0 inclusions with increasing temperature, we produced sputter film deposits on a silicon dioxide substrate by sputtering a pressed pellet prepared from fine olivine powder using 600V Ar+ ions. This silicon dioxide substrate covered with the deposit was later heated to 450°C for 24 hours in an oven under argon atmosphere. Initial TEM analysis of the unheated silicon dioxide substrate showed the presence of a ~ 50 nm-thick layer of an amorphous deposit with nano clusters that has not yet been identified.

  17. High temperature antenna development for space shuttle, volume 2. [space environment simulation effects on antenna radiation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    An S-band antenna system and a group of off-the-shelf aircraft antenna were exposed to temperatures simulating shuttle orbital cold soak and entry heating. Radiation pattern and impedance measurements before and after exposure to the thermal environments were used to evaluate the electrical performance. The results of the electrical and thermal testing are given. Test data showed minor changes in electrical performance and established the capability of these antenna to withstand both the low temperatures of space flight and the high temperatures of entry.

  18. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of uranium at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, R Q; Yang, L H; Moriarty, J A

    2008-01-22

    Constant-volume quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations of uranium (U) have been carried out over a range of pressures and temperatures that span the experimentally observed solid orthorhombic {alpha}-U, body-centered cubic (bcc), and liquid phases, using an ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential method within the generalized gradient approximation of density functional theory. A robust U pseudopotential has been constructed for these simulations that treats the 14 valence and outer-core electrons per atom necessary to calculate accurate structural and thermodynamic properties up to 100 GPa. Its validity has been checked by comparing low-temperature results with experimental data and all-electron full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital calculations of several different uranium solid structures. Calculated QMD energies and pressures for the equation of state of uranium in the solid and liquid phases are given, along with results for the Grueneisen parameter and the specific heat. We also present results for the radial distribution function, bond-angle distribution function, electronic density of states, and liquid diffusion coefficient, as well as evidence for short-range order in the liquid.

  19. High Temperature Microwave Dielectric Properties of JSC-1AC Lunar Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Shawn M.; Merritt, Brandon J.; Griffin, Brittany F.; Hintze, Paul E.; Shulman, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave heating has many potential lunar applications including sintering regolith for lunar surface stabilization and heating regolith for various oxygen production reactors. The microwave properties of lunar simulants must be understood so this technology can be applied to lunar operations. Dielectric properties at microwave frequencies for a common lunar simulant, JSC-1AC, were measured up to 1100 C, which is approximately the melting point. The experimentally determined dielectric properties included real and imaginary permittivity (epsilon', epsilon"), loss tangent (tan delta), and half-power depth, the di stance at which a material absorbs 50% of incident microwave energy. Measurements at 2.45 GHz revealed tan delta of JSC-1A increases from 0.02 at 25 C to 0.31 at 110 C. The corresponding half-power depth decreases from a peak of 286 mm at 110 C, to 13 mm at 1100 C. These data indicate that JSC-1AC becomes more absorbing, and thus a better microwave heater as temperature increases. A half-power depth maximum at 100-200 C presents a barrier to direct microwave heating at low temperatures. Microwave heating experiments confirm the sluggish heating effect of weak absorption below 200 C, and increasingly strong absorption above 200 C, leading to rapid heating and melting of JSC-1AC.

  20. A methodology for thermodynamic simulation of high temperature, internal reforming fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matelli, José Alexandre; Bazzo, Edson

    This work presents a methodology for simulation of fuel cells to be used in power production in small on-site power/cogeneration plants that use natural gas as fuel. The methodology contemplates thermodynamics and electrochemical aspects related to molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells (MCFC and SOFC, respectively). Internal steam reforming of the natural gas hydrocarbons is considered for hydrogen production. From inputs as cell potential, cell power, number of cell in the stack, ancillary systems power consumption, reformed natural gas composition and hydrogen utilization factor, the simulation gives the natural gas consumption, anode and cathode stream gases temperature and composition, and thermodynamic, electrochemical and practical efficiencies. Both energetic and exergetic methods are considered for performance analysis. The results obtained from natural gas reforming thermodynamics simulation show that the hydrogen production is maximum around 700 °C, for a steam/carbon ratio equal to 3. As shown in the literature, the found results indicate that the SOFC is more efficient than MCFC.

  1. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  2. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  3. Examination of Climate Simulations Across Spatial Resolutions and their Representation of the Continental High Temperature Bias over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R.; Newman, A. J.; Ikeda, K.; Liu, C.; Barlage, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Many Global Climate Models (GCMs) are known to have a high near surface temperature bias over the central portions of Northern Hemisphere continents (e.g. North America). It has been postulated that this high bias is due to the lack of propagating convection in the GCMs, due to their coarse resolution and convective parameterizations. Recent results from the Clouds Above the United States and Errors at the Surface (CAUSES) program indicate that there may be myriad factors contributing to the high bias. Additionally, high resolution, convection permitting simulations (grid spacing of 4 km) performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have shown that the warm bias persists, even though propagating convection is now resolved in long-term climate simulations. This presentation will examine summertime retrospective regional climate simulations with high temperature biases over the contiguous United States (CONUS) at resolutions similar to GCMs (36-km grid spacing) down to convective permitting resolutions (4-km grid spacing). Identification of days with and without large bias contributions are examined and contrasted. Differences in regional water budgets, surface precipitation, representations of propagating convection, mesoscale organized downdrafts and their evolution will be diagnosed. Use of surface, radiosonde, radar, and satellite observations can highlight key differences in the evolution of clouds, precipitation and resultant cold pools. Additional aspects related to the land-surface such as albedo specification, sensible and latent heat flux partitioning and irrigation impacts on flux partitioning will be discussed.

  4. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  5. High temperature oxidation of HFPD thermal-sprayed MCrAlY coatings in simulated gas turbine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzunce, F. J.; Higuera, V.; Poveda, S.; Carriles, A.

    2002-12-01

    NiCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY powders were thermal-sprayed using the high frequency pulse detonation method (HFPD) onto AISI 310 austenitic stainless steel samples to obtain dense, adherent, high temperature oxidation resistant coatings. The oxidation behavior of both types of coatings in a 1000°C simulated gas turbine environment was experimentally determined. The porosity, hardness, coating thickness, and microstructure were not significantly modified by the high temperature oxidation cycles, but the internal oxidation increases significantly after a very low oxidation time. Surface phase composition was evaluated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques, revealing the formation of a continuous and highly protective alumina layer. The oxidation kinetics of both coatings can be characterized by parabolic rate constants, which are very close to those for the formation of aluminum oxide on nickel or cobalt based alloys at similar conditions.

  6. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature for high-burnup cladding alloys exposed to simulated drying-storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.; Einziger, R. E.

    2013-02-01

    Structural analyses of dry casks containing high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of drying-storage temperature histories. Following drying-storage simulation, samples were subjected to ring-compression test (RCT) loading, which was used as a ductility screening test and to simulate pinch-type loading that may occur during cask transport. RCT samples with <2% offset strain prior to >50% wall cracking were assessed as brittle. Prior to testing high-burnup cladding, many tests were conducted with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) and ZIRLO™ to determine target 400 °C hoop stresses for high-burnup rodlets. Zry-4 cladding segments, from a 67-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 520-620 wppm hydrogen and ZIRLO™ cladding segments from a 70-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 350-650 wppm hydrogen were defueled and tested. Following drying-storage simulation, the extent of radial-hydride precipitation was characterized by the radial-hydride continuity factor. It was found that the DBTT was dependent on: cladding material, irradiation conditions, and drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature). High-burnup ZIRLO™ exhibited higher susceptible to radial-hydride formation and embrittlement than high-burnup Zry-4. It was also observed that uniformly pre-hydrided, non-irradiated cladding was not a good surrogate for high-burnup cladding because of the high density of circumferential hydrides across the wall and the high metal-matrix ductility for

  7. Operating Range for High Temperature Borosilicate Waste Glasses: (Simulated Hanford Enveloped)

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, J.; Ramsey, W. G.; Toghiani, R. K.

    2003-02-24

    The following results are a part of an independent thesis study conducted at Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory-Mississippi State University. A series of small-scale borosilicate glass melts from high-level waste simulant were produced with waste loadings ranging from 20% to 55% (by mass). Crushed glass was allowed to react in an aqueous environment under static conditions for 7 days. The data obtained from the chemical analysis of the leachate solutions were used to test the durability of the resulting glasses. Studies were performed to determine the qualitative effects of increasing the B2O3 content on the overall waste glass leaching behavior. Structural changes in a glass arising due to B2O3 were detected indirectly by its chemical durability, which is a strong function of composition and structure. Modeling was performed to predict glass durability quantitatively in an aqueous environment as a direct function of oxide composition.

  8. First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-04-10

    The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

  9. Numerical simulation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at high operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jie; Lee, Seung Jae

    A three-dimensional, single-phase, non-isothermal numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell at high operating temperature (T ≥ 393 K) was developed and implemented into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for convective and diffusive transport and allows predicting the concentration of species. The heat generated from electrochemical reactions, entropic heat and ohmic heat arising from the electrolyte ionic resistance were considered. The heat transport model was coupled with the electrochemical and mass transport models. The product water was assumed to be vaporous and treated as ideal gas. Water transportation across the membrane was ignored because of its low water electro-osmosis drag force in the polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The results show that the thermal effects strongly affect the fuel cell performance. The current density increases with the increasing of operating temperature. In addition, numerical prediction reveals that the width and distribution of gas channel and current collector land area are key optimization parameters for the cell performance improvement.

  10. Evaluation of high-resolution simulations of daily-scale temperature and precipitation over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Megan D.; Diffenbaugh, Noah S.

    2009-12-01

    Extreme climate events have been increasing over much of the world, and dynamical models predict further increases in response to enhanced greenhouse forcing. We examine the ability of a high-resolution nested climate model, RegCM3, to capture the statistics of daily-scale temperature and precipitation events over the conterminous United States, using observational and reanalysis data for comparison. Our analyses reveal that RegCM3 captures the pattern of mean, interannual variability, and trend in the tails of the daily temperature and precipitation distributions. However, consistent biases do exist, including wet biases in the topographically-complex regions of the western United States and hot biases in the southern and central United States. The biases in heavy precipitation in the western United States are associated with excessively strong surface and low-level winds. The biases in daily-scale temperature and precipitation in the southcentral United States are at least partially driven by biases in circulation and moisture fields. Further, the areas of agreement and disagreement with the observational data are not intuitive from analyzing the simulated mean seasonal temperature and precipitation fields alone. Our evaluation should enable more informed application and improvement of high-resolution climate models for the study of future changes in socially- and economically-relevant temperature and precipitation events.

  11. Simulation of high-temperature water-CO2 flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey

    2010-05-01

    Coupled water and carbon dioxide flows in porous media can take place both in natural volcanic environments and in industrial processes, for example, underground carbon dioxide storage or geothermal energy recovery. Pressures and temperatures in these flows can considerably exceed their values in critical point of water. Nowadays there are no adequate mathematical models that can in aggregate describe both water and water-carbon dioxide mixture properties in sub- and supercritical regions and the dynamics of their flows in such conditions. Thereby the influence of critical conditions on water flows in porous media is not well understood. In the paper cubic equation of state is used to describe water-carbon dioxide mixture in wide range of conditions including critical conditions for mixture. The equation generalizes well known Peng-Robinson equation and can be used to describe properties not only of hydrocarbons but also of carbon-dioxide and water. The real mixture properties measurements are used to determine the equation coefficients. Comparison between experimental measurements and data calculated via the equation of state shows a good agreement between the data. For example the error in water density calculation is less than 10% in the whole range of pressure-enthalpy conditions. Effective and fast algorithms for phase equilibrium calculation via pressure, enthalpy and mixture composition where developed. These thermodynamic variables are the most suitable for trans-critical flow simulations. The developed numerical model that is based on mass and energy conservation laws was used to study hydrothermal system in Solfatara volcano (Campi Flegrei). The flows in porous media that take place in the system are forced by presence of magmatic chamber located at depth of 9 km. Magma degassing makes a hot supercritical plume of water-carbon dioxide mixture that ascends to shallow layers where magmatic fluid mixes with cold meteoric water. The model assumes a source of

  12. Temperature estimators in computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, César; González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-05-01

    Temperature is a key physical quantity that is used to describe equilibrium between two bodies in thermal contact. In computer simulations, the temperature is usually estimated by means of the equipartition theorem, as an average over the kinetic energy. However, recent studies have shown that the temperature can be estimated using only the particles positions, which has been called configurational temperature. Through classical molecular dynamics simulations of 108-argon-atoms system, we compare the performance of four different temperature estimators: the usual kinetic temperature and three configurational temperatures, Our results show that the different estimators converge to the same value, but their fluctuations are different.

  13. Simulation of RCC Crack Growth Due to Carbon Oxidation in High-Temperature Gas Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, E. V.; Levin, D. A.; Picetti, Donald J.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    The carbon wall oxidation technique coupled with a CFD technique was employed to study the flow in the expanding crack channel caused by the oxidation of the channel carbon walls. The recessing 3D surface morphing procedure was developed and tested in comparison with the arcjet experimental results. The multi-block structured adaptive meshing was used to model the computational domain changes due to the wall recession. Wall regression rates for a reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples, that were tested in a high enthalpy arcjet environment, were computationally obtained and used to assess the channel expansion. The test geometry and flow conditions render the flow regime as the transitional to continuum, therefore Navier-Stokes gas dynamic approach with the temperature jump and velocity slip correction to the boundary conditions was used. The modeled mechanism for wall material loss was atomic oxygen reaction with bare carbon. The predicted channel growth was found to agree with arcjet observations. Local gas flow field results were found to affect the oxidation rate in a manner that cannot be predicted by previous mass loss correlations. The method holds promise for future modeling of materials gas-dynamic interactions for hypersonic flight.

  14. Simulation of a high temperature thermal energy storage system employing several families of phase-change storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Previous work by the author entailed modeling of the Packed Bed Thermal Energy Storage System, utilizing Phase-Change Materials, and a performance evaluation of the system based on the Second Law of thermodynamics. A principal conclusion reached is that the use of a single family of phase-change storage material may not in fact produce a thermodynamically superior system relative to one utilizing sensible heat storage material. This prompted us to modify our model so that we could investigate whether or not a significantly improved performance may be achieved via the use of multiple families of phase-change materials instead. Other factors investigated in the present work include the effect on system performance due to the thermal mass of the containment vessel wall, varying temperature and mass flow rate of the flue gas entering the packed bed during the storage process, and thermal radiation which could be a significant factor at high temperature levels. The resulting model is intended to serve as an integral part of a real-time simulation of the application of a high temperature regenerator in a periodic brick plant. This paper describes the more comprehensive model of the high temperature thermal energy storage system and presents results indicating that improved system performance could be achieved via a judicious choice of multiple families of phase-change materials.

  15. Study of iron structure stability in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic with oxygen injection using molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Sudarko; Shafii, Mohammad Ali; Celino, Massimo

    2014-09-30

    Corrosion of structural materials in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic is a major problem for design of PbBi cooled reactor. One technique to inhibit corrosion process is to inject oxygen into coolant. In this paper we study and focus on a way of inhibiting the corrosion of iron using molecular dynamics method. For the simulation results we concluded that effective corrosion inhibition of iron may be achieved by injection 0.0532 wt% to 0.1156 wt% oxygen into liquid lead-bismuth. At this oxygen concentration the structure of iron material will be maintained at about 70% in bcc crystal structure during interaction with liquid metal.

  16. Ion Association in High-Temperature Aqueous HCl Solutions. A Molecular Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T.; Mesmer, R.E.; Simonson, J.M.

    1999-10-30

    The profiles of the potential of mean force for the Cl- - H3O+ pair, as predicted by two ab initio models, are determined by constraint molecular dynamics simulation at a near-critical condition. The corresponding association constants are then determined and compared with that from conductance measurements to test the reliability of the current simulation models for HCl.

  17. Fault current limiter based on high temperature superconductors - different concepts, test results, simulations, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, W.; Chen, M.; Lakner, M.; Rhyner, J.; Braun, D.; Lanz, W.

    2001-05-01

    All electric equipment in a power system has to be designed to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses of potential short-circuit currents. Any reduction of these currents can lead to significant cost savings. Among all current limiting devices, superconducting fault current limiters (SCFCL) offer ideal performance: in normal operation the SCFCL is in its superconducting state and has negligible impedance, in the event of a fault, the transition into the normal conducting state passively limits the current. Different high temperature superconductors (HTS) materials, like YBCO films, Bi2223 wires or Bi2212 bulk are under development for the use in SCFCL. Due to the brittle nature of HTS and the hot-spot problem, most HTS components for current limitation are composites comprising the HTS, a mechanical substrate or support, and an electrical bypass. The performance of the composites largely depend on the parameters: critical current density, I- V characteristics, thermal conductivity, thermal mass, and electrical bypass. Mainly two different concepts of SCFCL, namely, the “resistive” and the “shielded core” concept have been pursued in the past. In 1996 the first ever SCFCL was installed in a hydro-power plant. The device had a rated power of 1.2 MVA, it was of the “shielded core” type and was based on tubes of Bi2212-bulk material. The feasibility of the technology has been demonstrated in a one-year-endurance test. Recently more compact “resistive” SCFCLs based on the same Bi2212-bulk material have been developed. Theoretical models for the SCFCL show good agreement with experimental data. They are used to study the influence of SCFCLs in power systems in order to evaluate technical and economical advantages.

  18. Large-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulation and kinetic modeling of high-temperature pyrolysis of the Gloeocapsomorphaprisca microfossils.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chenyu; Raman, Sumathy; van Duin, Adri C T

    2014-06-12

    The ability to predict accurately the thermal conversion of complex carbonaceous materials is of value in both petroleum exploration and refining operations. Modeling the thermal cracking of kerogen under basinal heating conditions improves the predrill prediction of oil and gas yields and quality, thereby ultimately lowering the exploration risk. Modeling the chemical structure and reactivity of asphaltene from petroleum vacuum residues enables prediction of coke formation and properties in refinery processes, thereby lowering operating cost. The chemical structure-chemical yield modeling (CS-CYM) developed by Freund et al. is more rigorous, time-consuming, and requires a great deal of chemical insight into reaction network and reaction kinetics. The present work explores the applicability of a more fundamental atomistic simulation using the quantum mechanically based reactive force field to predict the product yield and overall kinetics of decomposition of two biopolymers, namely, the Kukersite and Gutternberg. Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations were performed on systems consisting of 10(4) to 10(5) atoms at different densities and temperatures to derive the overall kinetic parameters and a lumped kinetic model for pyrolysis. The kinetic parameters derived from the simulated pyrolysis of an individual component and the mixture of all four components in Guttenberg reveal the role of cross-talk between the fragments and enhanced reactivity of component A by radicals from other components. The Arrhenius extrapolation of the model yields reasonable prediction for the overall barrier for cracking. Because simulations were run at very high temperature (T > 1500 K) to study cracking within the simulation time of up to 1 ns, it, however, led to the entropically favored ethylene formation as a dominant decomposition route. Future work will focus on evaluating the applicability of accelerated reactive MD approaches to study cracking. PMID:24821589

  19. Degradation modeling of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells using dual time scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, E.; Maximini, M.; Bauschulte, A.; vom Schloß, J.; Hermanns, R. T. E.

    2015-02-01

    HT-PEM fuel cells suffer from performance losses due to degradation effects. Therefore, the durability of HT-PEM is currently an important factor of research and development. In this paper a novel approach is presented for an integrated short term and long term simulation of HT-PEM accelerated lifetime testing. The physical phenomena of short term and long term effects are commonly modeled separately due to the different time scales. However, in accelerated lifetime testing, long term degradation effects have a crucial impact on the short term dynamics. Our approach addresses this problem by applying a novel method for dual time scale simulation. A transient system simulation is performed for an open voltage cycle test on a HT-PEM fuel cell for a physical time of 35 days. The analysis describes the system dynamics by numerical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, a performance assessment is performed in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach. The presented approach reduces the simulation time by approximately 73% compared to conventional simulation approach without losing too much accuracy. The approach promises a comprehensive perspective considering short term dynamic behavior and long term degradation effects.

  20. Simulating Martian Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Randy K.

    2003-09-01

    The Mars Electrostatic Chamber (MEC) was designed to provide for research and testing relative to future missions to Mars. Environmental characteristics of Mars were emulated, including pressure, atmospheric composition, and temperature. Existing and newly acquired hardware were integrated with a centralized controller to bring about successful near-autonomous operation and temperature control. The MEC is principally comprised of systems that control atmospheric pressure, atmospheric content, and chamber temperature. The temperature control system is used to replicate temperatures within actual minimum and maximum values as would be experienced on Mars. Cryogenic liquid/gaseous nitrogen supplies as well as various heating techniques were used to obtain this temperature range. Fundamental to the stabilization of temperature within the chamber was the instrumentation of multiple temperature measurements and optimal control of extremely cold nitrogen. Through testing and characterization, cooling design modifications, and controller instrumentation revisions, the cryogenic supply was successfully throttled by a programmable controller system with appropriate programming. Stable temperature control was ultimately achieved and automated diurnal cycling provided.

  1. High-temperature erosion of plasma-sprayed, yttria-stabilized zirconia in a simulated turbine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanschuh, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    A series of rig calibration and high temperature tests simulating gas path seal erosion in turbine engines were performed at three impingement angles and at three downstream locations. Plasma sprayed, yttria stablized zirconia specimens were tested. Steady state erosion curves presented for 19 test specimens indicate a brittle type of material erosion despite scanning electron microscopy evidence of plastic deformation. Steady state erosion results were not sensitive to downstream location but were sensitive to impingement angle. At difference downstream locations specimen surface temperature varied from 1250 to 1600 C (2280 to 2900 F) and particle velocity varied from 260 to 320 m/s (850 to 1050 ft/s). The mass ratio of combustion products to erosive grit material was typically 240.

  2. High-temperature erosion of plasma-sprayed, yttria-stabilized zirconia in a simulated turbine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of rig calibration and high temperature tests simulating gas path seal erosion in turbine engines were performed at three impingement angles and at three downstream locations. Plasma sprayed, yttria stabilized zirconia specimens were tested. Steady state erosion curves presented for 19 test specimens indicate a brittle type of material erosion despite scanning electron microscopy evidence of plastic deformation. Steady state erosion results were not sensitive to downstream location but were sensitive to impingement angle. At different downstream locations specimen surface temperature varied from 1250 to 1600 C (2280 to 2900 F) and particle velocity varied from 260 to 320 m/s (850 to 1050 ft/s). The mass ratio of combustion products to erosive grit material was typically 240.

  3. MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.

  4. Simulation of space radiation effects on polyimide film materials for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogdall, L. B.; Cannaday, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    Space environment effects on candidate materials for the solar sail film are determined. Polymers, including metallized polyimides that might be suitable solar radiation receivers, were exposed to combined proton and solar electromagnetic radiation. Each test sample was weighted, to simulate the tension on the polymer when it is stretched into near-planar shape while receiving solar radiation. Exposure rates up to 16 times that expected in Earth orbit were employed, to simulate near-sun solar sailing conditions. Sample appearance, elongation, and shrinkage were monitored, noted, and documented in situ. Thermosetting polyimides showed less degradation or visual change in appearance than thermoplastics.

  5. The Impact of High-Resolution Sea Surface Temperatures on the Simulated Nocturnal Florida Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaCasse, Katherine M.; Splitt, Michael E.; Lazarus, Steven M.; Lapenta, William M.

    2008-01-01

    High- and low-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis products are used to initialize the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model for May 2004 for short-term forecasts over Florida and surrounding waters. Initial and boundary conditions for the simulations were provided by a combination of observations, large-scale model output, and analysis products. The impact of using a 1-km Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) SST composite on subsequent evolution of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) is assessed through simulation comparisons and limited validation. Model results are presented for individual simulations, as well as for aggregates of easterly- and westerly-dominated low-level flows. The simulation comparisons show that the use of MODIS SST composites results in enhanced convergence zones. earlier and more intense horizontal convective rolls. and an increase in precipitation as well as a change in precipitation location. Validation of 10-m winds with buoys shows a slight improvement in wind speed. The most significant results of this study are that 1) vertical wind stress divergence and pressure gradient accelerations across the Florida Current region vary in importance as a function of flow direction and stability and 2) the warmer Florida Current in the MODIS product transports heat vertically and downwind of this heat source, modifying the thermal structure and the MABL wind field primarily through pressure gradient adjustments.

  6. High cycle fatigue behavior of Incoloy 800H in a simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Sabatini, R.L.; Epel, L.G.; Hare, J.R. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    The current study was an attempt to evaluate the high cycle fatigue strength of Incoloy 800H in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor helium environment containing significant quantities of moisture. As-heat-treated and thermally-aged materials were tested to determine the effects of long term corrosion in the helium test gas. Results from in-helium tests were compared to those from a standard air environment. It was found that the mechanisms of fatigue failure were very complex and involved recovery/recrystallization of the surface ground layer on the specimens, sensitization, hardness changes, oxide scale integrity, and oxidation at the tips of propagation cracks. For certain situations a corrosion-fatigue process seems to be controlling. However, for the helium environment studied, there was usually no aging or test condition for which air gave a higher fatigue strength.

  7. High-temperature high-pressure phases of lithium from electron force field (eFF) quantum electron dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjun; Su, Julius T.; Goddard, William A.

    2011-01-01

    We recently developed the electron force field (eFF) method for practical nonadiabatic electron dynamics simulations of materials under extreme conditions and showed that it gave an excellent description of the shock thermodynamics of hydrogen from molecules to atoms to plasma, as well as the electron dynamics of the Auger decay in diamondoids following core electron ionization. Here we apply eFF to the shock thermodynamics of lithium metal, where we find two distinct consecutive phase changes that manifest themselves as a kink in the shock Hugoniot, previously observed experimentally, but not explained. Analyzing the atomic distribution functions, we establish that the first phase transition corresponds to (i) an fcc-to-cI16 phase transition that was observed previously in diamond anvil cell experiments at low temperature and (ii) a second phase transition that corresponds to the formation of a new amorphous phase (amor) of lithium that is distinct from normal molten lithium. The amorphous phase has enhanced valence electron-nucleus interactions due to localization of electrons into interstitial locations, along with a random connectivity distribution function. This indicates that eFF can characterize and compute the relative stability of states of matter under extreme conditions (e.g., warm dense matter). PMID:21873210

  8. Application of high-temperature simulated distillation to the residuum oil supercritical extraction process in petroleum refining

    PubMed

    Raia; Villalanti; Subramanian; Williams

    2000-01-01

    The gas chromatographic method of high-temperature simulated distillation (HTSD) is described, and the results are presented for the application of HTSD to the characterization of petroleum refinery feed and products from solvent deasphalting operations. Results are presented for refinery residual feed, deasphalted oil, and asphaltene fractions from the residual oil supercritical extraction process. Asphaltene removal from petroleum residuum using solvent deasphalting results in the improved quality and high recovery of deasphalted oil product for use as lube oil, fluid catalytic cracking, or hydrocracker feedstocks. The HTSD procedure presented here proves valuable for characterizing the fractions from the deasphalting process to obtain the percentage yield with boiling point data over the range from approximately 36 degrees C (97 degrees F) to 733 degrees C (1352 degrees F), which covers the boiling range of n-paraffins of carbon number C5 to C108. PMID:10654784

  9. High-Temperature Jet Spray Reactor for the Preparation of Rare Earth Oxides by Pyrolysis: Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiu-yue; Lv, Chao; Zhang, Zi-mu; Dou, Zhi-he; Zhang, Ting-an; Liu, Yan; Lv, Guo-zhi

    2014-09-01

    A new type of high-temperature jet spray pyrolysis (SP) reactor is investigated in this article as part of studies on the preparation of rare earth oxides at Northeastern University (NEU), Shenyang, China. The jet spray reactor examined here is a horizontal, tubular reactor conveying the hot products of the combustion of methane and oxygen with a converging-diverging jet section in an arrangement that provides for inspiration of LaCl3 solution to pyrolyze to La2O3 with the hot gas. The present article is concerned with a computer simulation using a computational fluid dynamic model to develop the velocity, temperature, and pressure profiles in the jet reactor since direct measurement is difficult. The article includes brief comments on a room-temperature model designed to examine the flow characteristics of the jet SP reactor. It was found that the velocity decreased at first, and then it increased near the jet throat. The highest velocity occurred at the throat of jet SP reactor where the LaCl3 enters the unit. Along the reactor axis, the temperature decreases with distance from the gas inlet. The lowest temperature zone was near the wall before the throat of the reactor due to wall heat losses. The temperature was estimated to be close to 1700 K at the throat of the reactor, and it was about 1300 K toward the exit of the reactor. It was shown that a reaction would take place mainly in the throat and in the vicinity of first contact between gas and induced spray. A negative pressure was produced as gas passes through the converging-diverging throat of the jet SP reactor that causes the LaCl3 solution to enter the throat of the reactor. While the investigations of this type of reactor are at an early stage, the results look promising. NEU continues to investigate this approach for the preparation of La2O3 based on high-temperature testwork and physical modeling techniques.

  10. High-Temperature Jet Spray Reactor for the Preparation of Rare Earth Oxides by Pyrolysis: Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiu-yue; Lv, Chao; Zhang, Zi-mu; Dou, Zhi-he; Zhang, Ting-an; Liu, Yan; Lv, Guo-zhi

    2014-08-01

    A new type of high-temperature jet spray pyrolysis (SP) reactor is investigated in this article as part of studies on the preparation of rare earth oxides at Northeastern University (NEU), Shenyang, China. The jet spray reactor examined here is a horizontal, tubular reactor conveying the hot products of the combustion of methane and oxygen with a converging-diverging jet section in an arrangement that provides for inspiration of LaCl3 solution to pyrolyze to La2O3 with the hot gas. The present article is concerned with a computer simulation using a computational fluid dynamic model to develop the velocity, temperature, and pressure profiles in the jet reactor since direct measurement is difficult. The article includes brief comments on a room-temperature model designed to examine the flow characteristics of the jet SP reactor. It was found that the velocity decreased at first, and then it increased near the jet throat. The highest velocity occurred at the throat of jet SP reactor where the LaCl3 enters the unit. Along the reactor axis, the temperature decreases with distance from the gas inlet. The lowest temperature zone was near the wall before the throat of the reactor due to wall heat losses. The temperature was estimated to be close to 1700 K at the throat of the reactor, and it was about 1300 K toward the exit of the reactor. It was shown that a reaction would take place mainly in the throat and in the vicinity of first contact between gas and induced spray. A negative pressure was produced as gas passes through the converging-diverging throat of the jet SP reactor that causes the LaCl3 solution to enter the throat of the reactor. While the investigations of this type of reactor are at an early stage, the results look promising. NEU continues to investigate this approach for the preparation of La2O3 based on high-temperature testwork and physical modeling techniques.

  11. Temperature- and voltage-dependent trap generation model in high-k metal gate MOS device with percolation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Yang, Hong; Wang, Yan-Rong; Wang, Wen-Wu; Luo, Wei-Chun; Qi, Lu-Wei; Li, Jun-Feng; Zhao, Chao; Chen, Da-Peng; Ye, Tian-Chun

    2016-08-01

    High-k metal gate stacks are being used to suppress the gate leakage due to tunneling for sub-45 nm technology nodes. The reliability of thin dielectric films becomes a limitation to device manufacturing, especially to the breakdown characteristic. In this work, a breakdown simulator based on a percolation model and the kinetic Monte Carlo method is set up, and the intrinsic relation between time to breakdown and trap generation rate R is studied by TDDB simulation. It is found that all degradation factors, such as trap generation rate time exponent m, Weibull slope β and percolation factor s, each could be expressed as a function of trap density time exponent α. Based on the percolation relation and power law lifetime projection, a temperature related trap generation model is proposed. The validity of this model is confirmed by comparing with experiment results. For other device and material conditions, the percolation relation provides a new way to study the relationship between trap generation and lifetime projection. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. SS2015AA010601), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176091 and 61306129), and the Opening Project of Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of MicroElectronics of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. High-Fidelity Simulation and Analysis of Ignition Regimes and Mixing Characteristics for Low Temperature Combustion Engine Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Saurabh

    Computational singular perturbation (CSP) technique is applied as an automated diagnostic tool to classify ignition regimes, especially spontaneous ignition front and deflagration in low temperature combustion (LTC) engine environments. Various model problems representing LTC are simulated using high-fidelity computation with detailed chemistry for hydrogen-air, and the simulation data are then analyzed by CSP. The active reaction zones are first identified by the locus of minimum number of fast exhausted time scales. Subsequently, the relative importance of transport and chemistry is determined in the region ahead of the reaction zone. A new index IT, defined as the sum of the absolute values of the importance indices of diffusion and convection of temperature to the slow dynamics of temperature, serves as a criterion to differentiate spontaneous ignition from deflagration regimes. The same strategy is then used to gain insights into classification of ignition regimes in n-heptane air mixtures. Parametric studies are conducted using high-fidelity simulations with detailed chemistry and transport. The mixture at non-NTC conditions shows initially a deflagration front which is subsequently transitioned into a spontaneous ignition front. For the mixtures at the NTC conditions which exhibit two-stage ignition behavior, the 1 st stage ignition front is found to be more likely in the deflagration regime. On the other hand, the 2nd stage ignition front occurs almost always in the spontaneous regime because the upstream mixture contains active radical species produced by the preceding 1st stage ignition front. The effects of differently correlated equivalence ratio stratification are also considered and the results are shown to be consistent with previous findings. 2D turbulent auto-ignition problems corresponding to NTC and non-NTC chemistry yield similar qualitative results. Finally, we look into the modeling of turbulent mixing, in particular, the

  13. Nitrous Acid under high temperature and pressure ? from atomistic simulations to equation of state for thermochemical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A; Bastea, S; Howard, M; Fried, L

    2008-10-13

    The modeling of the complex thermochemistry that takes place in the wake of a detonation or shock propagation in an energetic material requires accurate equations of state (EOS) for the resulting chemical species under conditions of high temperature and pressure. Nitrous Acid (HONO or HNO{sub 2}) has been shown to be an important post-detonation product on short and intermediate time scales for many energetic compounds. Given that its EOS has not been determined so far, either experimentally or theoretically, we develop an accurate force field to model both conformers (i.e. cis and trans) of HONO, and compute the EOS using classical molecular dynamics simulations. We then show that this EOS can be very well represented within a thermodynamics theory framework previously applied to other polar fluids.

  14. I. Molecular Simulations of Buckyball Fullerenes. I. Quantum Chemistry Studies on High Critical Transition Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuejin

    1992-01-01

    Part I. In order to interpret and predict the unusual chemical and physical properties of the C _{60} and related fullerenes, fullerites, and molecular/solid state derivatives, we started with the graphite force field (GraFF) developed for sp ^2 carbon centers (based on fitting experimental lattice parameters, elastic constants, phonon frequencies for graphite and alkali-intercalated graphite), and successfully predicted vibrational frequencies, fullerite and alkali -doped fullerite crystal structure, density, heat of sublimation, and compressibility, etc., for C_{60 }, C_{70} and their derivatives. We also developed a highly accurate force field for C_{60} in excellent agreement with all 14 experimental frequencies within abs error 3.0 cm^{-1}. Part II. We develop the GVB superexchange CI (GVB-X-CI) method to study the superexchange coupling interaction of high-Tc materials. Using this method, we can calculate the J_{rm dd} from the first principle at about the same accuracy as experiment. Our results indicate that the superconductivity in Cu-O plane of these cuprates arise from a essentially magnetically induced interaction, that is, (i) all Cu have a Cu^{rm II} d ^9 oxidation state with one unpaired spin that is coupled antiferromagnetically to the spins of adjacent Cu^{rm II} sites; (ii) reduction below the cupric Cu^{ rm II} state leads to Cu^ {rm I} d^{10 } sites with a highly mobile Cu(3d) electron, and these extra electrons hop from site to site (while the oxygen remains in the O^{2-} state). The hopping of these extra electrons causes the flipping of the local spin moment of the antiferromagnetic background; (iii) oxidation beyond the cupric Cu ^{rm II} state leads not to Cu^{rm III} but rather to oxidized oxygen atoms with an highly mobile Op hole, which is ferromagnetically coupled to the adjacent Cu^{rm II} d electrons despite the fact that this is opposed by the direct dd exchange. This coupling induces an attractive interaction between conduction

  15. Simulating intracrater ash recycling during mid-intensity explosive activity: high temperature laboratory experiments on natural basaltic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Pompilio, Massimo; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pichavant, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Direct observations of mid-intensity eruptions, in which a huge amount of ash is generated, indicate that ash recycling is quite common. The recognition of juvenile vs. recycled fragments is not straightforward, and no unequivocal, widely accepted criteria exist to support this. The presence of recycled glassy fragments can hide primary magmatic information, introducing bias in the interpretations of the ongoing magmatic and volcanic activity. High temperature experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure on natural samples to investigate the effects of reheating on morphology, texture and composition of volcanic ash. Experiments simulate the transformation of juvenile glassy fragments that, falling into the crater or in the upper part of the conduit, are recycled by following explosions. Textural and compositional modifications obtained in laboratory are compared with similar features observed in natural samples in order to identify some main general criteria to be used for the discrimination of recycled material. Experiments were carried out on tephra produced during Strombolian activity, fire fountains and continuous ash emission at Etna, Stromboli and Vesuvius. Coarse glassy clasts were crushed in a nylon mortar in order to create an artificial ash, and then sieved to select the size interval of 1-0.71 mm. Ash shards were put in a sealed or open quartz tube, in order to prevent or to reproduce effects of air oxidation. The tube was suspended in a HT furnace at INGV-Pisa and kept at different temperatures (up to to 1110°C) for increasing time (0.5-12 hours). Preliminary experiments were also performed under gas flux conditions. Optical and electron microscope observations indicate that high temperature and exposure to the air induce large modifications on clast surface, ranging from change in color, to incipient plastic deformation till complete sintering. Significant change in color of clasts is strictly related to the presence of air, irrespective of

  16. Low-temperature lithium diffusion in simulated high-level boroaluminosilicate nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gin, Stephane; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-12-01

    Ion exchange is recognized as an integral, if underrepresented, mechanism influencing glass corrosion. However, due to the formation of various alteration layers in the presence of water, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the mechanisms of ion exchange from other processes occurring simultaneously during corrosion. In this work, an operationally inert non-aqueous solution was used as an alkali source material to isolate ion exchange and study the solid-state diffusion of lithium. Specifically, the experiments involved contacting glass coupons relevant to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste, SON68 and CJ-6, which contained Li in natural isotope abundance, with a non-aqueous solution of 6LiCl dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at 90 °C for various time periods. The depth profiles of major elements in the glass coupons were measured using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lithium interdiffusion coefficients, DLi, were then calculated based on the measured depth profiles. The results indicate that the penetration of 6Li is rapid in both glasses with the simplified CJ-6 glass (D6Li ≈ 4.0-8.0 × 10-21 m2/s) exhibiting faster exchange than the more complex SON68 glass (DLi ≈ 2.0-4.0 × 10-21 m2/s). Additionally, sodium ions present in the glass were observed to participate in ion exchange reactions; however, different diffusion coefficients were necessary to fit the diffusion profiles of the two alkali ions. Implications of the diffusion coefficients obtained in the absence of alteration layers to the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a geological repository system are also discussed.

  17. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  18. Lattice thermal conductivity of ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2} from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.

    2011-10-15

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2}. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations, which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Results for temperatures from 300K to 1000K are presented.

  19. Investigation of hydrothermal activity at Campi Flegrei caldera using 3D simulations: extension to high temperature processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Costa, Antonio; Chiodini, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity at Campi Flegrei caldera is simulated by using the multiphase code MUFITS (www.mufits.imec.msu.ru). We provide a brief description of the simulator covering the mathematical formulation and its applicability at elevated supercritical temperatures. Then we apply, for the first time, the code to hydrothermal systems investigating the Campi Flegrei caldera case. We consider both shallow subcritical regions and deep supercritical regions of the hydrothermal system. We impose sophisticated boundary conditions at the surface to provide a better description of the reservoir interactions with the atmosphere and the sea. Finally we carry out a parametric study and compare the simulation results with gas temperature and composition, gas and heat fluxes, and temperature measurements in the wells of that area. Results of the parametric study show that flow rate, composition, and temperature of the hot gas mixture injected at depth, and the initial geothermal gradient strongly control parameters monitored at Solfatara. Comparisons with observations show a very good match and suggest that the best guesses for the injected hot (~700 C) fluid mass flow rate is about 50-100 kg/s and the initial geothermal gradient is 120 C/km. Of particular interest resulted the comparison between the simulated thermal profiles and those measured in geothermal wells. Keeping in mind the uncertainties due to the heterogeneities of the system, the good match obtained for the wells in the eastern and north sectors of the caldera (located some km far from Solfatara) suggest that the model can reproduce the gross features of the Campi Flegrei hydrothermal system and implicitly support the hypothesis of a single (or major) deep source of magmatic fluid located close to the centre of the caldera. Surprising results were also obtained by comparing simulated and observed (Agnano well) temperature profiles in a zone close to the gas plume: in this case the simulations clearly suggested

  20. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  1. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Tressler, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter {times} 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  2. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M. . Science and Technology Center); Tressler, R.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter [times] 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  3. Computational simulation of probabilistic lifetime strength for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.; Trimble, Greg A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a fourth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are presented. The research included on-going development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to a number of effects or primitive variables. These primitive variables may include high temperature, fatigue, or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation was randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above-described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with regression analysis of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constants for each effect or primitive variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from industry and the open literature for materials typically for applications in aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 was analyzed using the developed methodology.

  4. Computational simulation of probabilistic lifetime strength for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.; Trimble, Greg A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a fourth year effort of a research program, conducted for NASA-LeRC by the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subject to a number of effects or primitive variables. These primitive variables may include high temperature, fatigue or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation has been randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISS. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above-described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with regression analysis of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constants for each effect or primitive variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from industry and the open literature for materials typically for applications in aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 has been analyzed using the developed methodology.

  5. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  6. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  7. Simulating thermal stress features on hot planetary surfaces in vacuum at high temperature facility in the PEL laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Ferrari, S.; Helbert, J.; D'Incecco, P.; D'Amore, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) at the Institute for Planetary Research of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin, we set-up a simulation chamber for the spectroscopic investigation of minerals separates under Mercurial conditions. The chamber can be evacuated to 10-4 bar and the target samples heated to 700 K within few minutes, thanks to the innovative inductive heating system. While developing the protocol for the high temperature spectroscopy measurements we discovered interesting "morphologies" on the sample surfaces. The powders are poured into stainless steel cups of 50 mm internal diameter, 8 mm height and 3 mm depth, having a 5 mm thick base (thus leaving 3 mm free space for the minerals), and rim 1 mm thick. We selected several minerals of interest for Mercurial surface composition and for each of them we analyzed various grain size separates, to study the influence of grain dimensions to the process of thermal stressing. We observed that for the smaller grain size separate (0-25 μm) the thermal stress mainly induces large depressions and fractures, while on larger grain sizes (125-250 μm) small depressions and a cratered surface. Our current working hypothesis is that these features are mainly caused by thermal stress induced by a radiatively quickly cooling surface layer covering the much hotter bulk material. Further investigation is ongoing to understand the processes better. The observed morphologies exhibit surprising similarities to features observed at planetary scale size for example on Mercury and even on Venus. Especially the high resolution images provided currently from MESSENGER'S Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) instrument has revealed plains dominated by polygonal fractures whose origin still have to be determined. Our laboratory analogue studies might in the future provide some insight into the processes creating those features

  8. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  9. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  10. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, JOhn W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 are candidate materials for applications in extreme environments because of their high melting point, good mechanical properties and reasonable oxidation resistance. Unlike many ceramics, these materials have high thermal conductivity which can be advantageous, for example, to reduce thermal shock. Recently, we developed Tersoff style interatomic potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  11. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  12. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  13. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  14. A molecular dynamics simulation study of the pressure-volume-temperature behavior of polymers under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Justin B; Bedrov, Dmitry; Smith, Grant D; Hanson, Ben; Borodin, Oleg; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Kober, Edward M

    2009-04-14

    Isothermal compression of poly (dimethylsiloxane), 1,4-poly(butadiene), and a model Estane (in both pure form and a nitroplasticized composition similar to PBX-9501 binder) at pressures up to 100 kbars has been studied using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Comparison of predicted compression, bulk modulus, and U(s)-u(p) behavior with experimental static and dynamic compression data available in the literature reveals good agreement between experiment and simulation, indicating that MD simulations utilizing simple quantum-chemistry-based potentials can be used to accurately predict the behavior of polymers at relatively high pressure. Despite their very different zero-pressure bulk moduli, the compression, modulus, and U(s)-u(p) behavior (including low-pressure curvature) for the three polymers could be reasonably described by the Tait equation of state (EOS) utilizing the universal C parameter. The Tait EOS was found to provide an excellent description of simulation PVT data when the C parameter was optimized for each polymer. The Tait EOS parameters, namely, the zero-pressure bulk modulus and the C parameter, were found to correlate well with free volume for these polymers as measured in simulations by a simple probe insertion algorithm. Of the polymers studied, PDMS was found to have the most free volume at low pressure, consistent with its lower ambient pressure bulk modulus and greater increase in modulus with increasing pressure (i.e., crush-up behavior). PMID:19368468

  15. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  16. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  17. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-02-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  18. A Personal Computer-Based Simulation-and-Control-Integrated Platform for 10-MW High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei; Liu Haibin; Yang Xiaojing; Gao Zuying; Dong Yujie; Zhang Zuoyi

    2004-02-15

    A personal computer-based simulation-and-control-integrated platform for the 10-MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10), HTRSIMU, has been developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China to meet the requirements of safety analysis, operator training, and control system design. The HTRSIMU runs on a personal computer Windows2000 operating system and consists of three parts: simulation computing system (SCS), man/machine interface (MMI) system, and control system design platform (CDP). Simulation models and equations of the SCS are given, including models of the reactor core, the fuel ball, the primary loop, and the steam generator. Furthermore, functions and characteristics of the MMI and CDP are also described in detail. Moreover, steady state, several typical accidents, and a power control process of HTR-10 are simulated by using the HTRSIMU to demonstrate its simulation and control system design capability.

  19. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  20. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  1. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  2. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  3. High temperature electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, J. C.; Hurtle, D. E.

    1984-03-01

    This report summarizes the barrier metallization developments accomplished in a program intended to develop 300 C electronic controls capability for potential on-engine aircraft engine application. In addition, this report documents preliminary life test results at 300 C and above and discusses improved design practices required for high temperature integrated injection logic semiconductors. Previous Phase 1 activities focused on determining the viability of operating silicon semiconductor devices over the -55 C to +300 C temperature range. This feasibility was substantiated but the need for additional design work and process development was indicated. Phase 2 emphasized the development of a high temperature metallization system as the primary development need for high temperature silicon semiconductor applications.

  4. High temperature breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in a computer simulated Cu-Zr melt.

    PubMed

    Han, X J; Li, J G; Schober, H R

    2016-03-28

    Transport properties and the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation in liquid Cu8Zr3 are studied by molecular dynamics simulation with a modified embedded atom potential. The critical temperature Tc of mode coupling theory (MCT) is derived as 930 K from the self-diffusion coefficient D and viscosity η. The SE relation breaks down around TSE = 1900 K, which is far above Tc. At temperatures below TSE, the product of D and η fluctuates around a constant value, similar to the prediction of MCT near Tc. The influence of the microscopic atomic motion on macroscopic properties is investigated by analyzing the time dependent liquid structure and the self-hole filling process. The self-holes for the two components are preferentially filled by atoms of the same component. The self-hole filling dynamics explains the different breakdown behaviors of the SE relation in Zr-rich liquid CuZr2 compared to Cu-rich Cu8Zr3. At TSE, a kink is found in the temperature dependence of both partial and total coordination numbers for the three atomic pair combinations and of the typical time of self-hole filling. This indicates a strong correlation between liquid structure, atomic dynamics, and the breakdown of SE relation. The previously suggested usefulness of the parameter d(D1/D2)/dT to predict TSE is confirmed. Additionally we propose a viscosity criterion to predict TSE in the absence of diffusion data. PMID:27036459

  5. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  6. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  7. High temperature hydraulic seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. R.

    1993-05-01

    This program investigated and evaluated high temperature hydraulic sealing technology, including seals, fluids, and actuator materials. Test limits for fluid pressure and temperature were 8000 psi and 700 F respectively. The original plan to investigate CTFE fluid at 350 F as well as other fluids at higher temperatures was reduced in scope to include only the higher temperature investigation. Seals were obtained from 11 manufacturers. Design requirements including materials, dimensions, clearances, and tolerances were established and test modules were constructed from the detail designs which were produced. Nine piston seals and one rod seal were tested at temperatures ranging from -65 to +600 F and pressures to 6000 psi. Fluid performance under these conditions was evaluated. Details of this activity and results of the effort are summarized in this report.

  8. Temperature optimization of high con

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, M.

    2016-06-01

    Active cooling is essential for solar cells operating under high optical concentration ratios. A system comprises four solar cells that are in thermal contact on top of a copper tube is proposed. Water is flowing inside the tube in order to reduce solar cells temperature for increasing their performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of such system has been performed in order to investigate the effect of water flow rate, tube internal diameter, and convective heat transfer coefficient on the temperature of the solar cells. It is found that increasing convective heat transfer coefficient has a significant effect on reducing solar cells temperatures operating at low flow rates and high optical concentration ratios. Also, a further increase of water flow rate has no effect on reducing cells temperatures.

  9. WRF-simulated sensitivity to land surface schemes in short and medium ranges for a high-temperature event in East China: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Min; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yang; Zheng, Yiqun; Zhou, Zugang; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chaohui; Liu, Huaqiang

    2015-09-01

    We designed simulations for the high-temperature event that occurred on 23 July 2003 in East China using a series of forecast lead times, from short-range to medium-range, and four land surface schemes (LSSs) (i.e., SLAB, NOAH, RUC, and PX) in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Version 3. The sensitivities of short and medium-range simulations to the LSSs systematically varied with the lead times. In general, the model reproduced short-range, high-temperature distributions. The simulated weather was sensitive to the LSSs, and the LSS-induced sensitivity was higher in the medium range than in the short-range. Furthermore, the LSS performances were complex, i.e., the PX errors apparently increased in the medium range (longer than 6 days), RUC produced the maximum errors, and SLAB and NOAH had approximately equivalent errors that slightly increased. Additional sensitivity simulations revealed that the WRF modeling system assigns relatively low initial soil moisture for RUC and that soil moisture initialization plays an important role that is comparable to the LSS choice in the simulations. LSS-induced negative feedback between surface air temperature (SAT) and atmospheric circulation in the lower atmosphere was found in the medium range. These sensitivities were mainly caused by the LSS-induced differences in surface sensible heat flux and by errors associated with the lead times. Using the SAT equation, further diagnostic analyses revealed LSS deficiencies in simulating surface fluxes and physical processes that modify the SAT and indicated the main reasons for these deficiencies. These results have implications for model improvement and application.

  10. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  12. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  13. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  14. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-11-01

    In recent years, there was a growing need for electronics capable of sustained high-temperature operation for aerospace propulsion system instrumentation, control and condition monitoring, and integrated sensors. The desired operating temperature in some applications exceeds 600 C, which is well beyond the capability of currently available semiconductor devices. Silicon carbide displays a number of properties which make it very attractive as a semiconductor material, one of which is the ability to retain its electronic integrity at temperatures well above 600 C. An IR-100 award was presented to NASA Lewis in 1983 for developing a chemical vapor deposition process to grow single crystals of this material on standard silicon wafers. Silicon carbide devices were demonstrated above 400 C, but much work remains in the areas of crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication before the full potential of silicon carbide can be realized. The presentation will conclude with current and future high-temperature electronics program plans. Although the development of silicon carbide falls into the category of high-risk research, the future looks promising, and the potential payoffs are tremendous.

  15. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  16. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  17. Accurate Monte Carlo simulations on FCC and HCP Lennard-Jones solids at very low temperatures and high reduced densities up to 1.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adidharma, Hertanto; Tan, Sugata P.

    2016-07-01

    Canonical Monte Carlo simulations on face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal closed packed (HCP) Lennard-Jones (LJ) solids are conducted at very low temperatures (0.10 ≤ T∗ ≤ 1.20) and high densities (0.96 ≤ ρ∗ ≤ 1.30). A simple and robust method is introduced to determine whether or not the cutoff distance used in the simulation is large enough to provide accurate thermodynamic properties, which enables us to distinguish the properties of FCC from that of HCP LJ solids with confidence, despite their close similarities. Free-energy expressions derived from the simulation results are also proposed, not only to describe the properties of those individual structures but also the FCC-liquid, FCC-vapor, and FCC-HCP solid phase equilibria.

  18. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amit; More, D. Greg

    2002-10-01

    A high temperature static seal capable of long term operation at temperature ranging from 1400 F to 1800 F is presented. The contents include: 1) Development approach; 2) Stress relaxation curves; 3) High temperature seal test rig; 4) High temperature seal design; and 5) High temperature seal testing. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  19. High temperature future

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  20. High Temperature Thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoset or network polymer is an organic material where the molecules are tied together through chemical bonds (crosslinks) and therefore they cannot move past one another. As a result, these materials exhibit a certain degree of dimensional stability. The chemical composition and the degree of crosslink density of the thermoset have a pronounced effect upon the properties. High temperature thermosets offer a favorable combination of properties that makes them attractive for many applications. Their most important features are the excellent processability particularly of the low molecular weight precusor forms, the chemical and solvent resistance and the dimensional stability. The market for high temperature thermosets will increase as new uses for them are uncovered and new thermosets with better combinations of properties are developed.

  1. High-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Ken C.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and near-term prospects are briefly reviewed with particular reference to Lockheed's experience. Emphasis is placed on an integrated approach to systems applications of HTSC thin films, which hold the greatest near-term promise. These new materials are applied in the production of smaller, more sensitive, and more efficient electronic components to meet the ever-increasing demands for higher-performance signal acquisition and processing systems, communications systems, and computers.

  2. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of spinels: LiMn2O4 and Li4Mn5O12 at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwaba, R. S.; Matshaba, M. G.; Ngoepe, P. E.

    2015-04-01

    Energy storage technologies are critical in addressing the global challenge of clean sustainable energy. Spinel lithium manganates have attracted attention due to their electrochemical properties and also as promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The current study focused on the effects of high temperatures on the materials, in order to understand the sustainability in cases where the battery heats up to high temperature and analysis of lithium diffusion aids in terms of intercalation host compatibility. It is also essential to understand the high temperature behaviour and lithium ion host capability of these materials in order to perform the armorphization and recrystalization of spinel nano-architectures. Molecular dynamics simulations carried out to predict high temperature behaviour of the spinel systems. The NVE ensemble was employed, in the range 300 - 3000K. The melting temperature, lithium-ion diffusion and structural behaviour were monitored in both supercell systems. LiMn2O4 indicated a diffusion rate that increased rapidly above 1500K, just before melting (˜1700K) and reached its maximum diffusion at 2.756 × 10-7 cm2s-1 before it decreased. Li4Mn5O12 indicated an exponential increase above 700K reaching 8.303 × 10-7 cm2s-1 at 2000K and allowing lithium intercalation even above its melting point of around 1300K. This indicated better structural stability of Li4Mn5O12 and capability to host lithium ions at very high temperatures (up to 3000 K) compared to LiMn2O4.

  4. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  5. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  6. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  7. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  8. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  9. High temperature drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stong, R.E.; Walinsky, S.W.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes an aqueous drilling fluid suitable for high-temperature use. This fluid is composed of a water base. Clay is suspended in the base and from about 0.01-25 pounds per barrel total composition of a hydrolyzed terpolymer of maleic anhydride, styrene and a third monomer selected from acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid and metacrylic acid. The molar ratio of maleic anhydride to styrene to the third monomer is from about 30:10:60 to 50:40:10, and the alkali metal, ammonium and lower aliphatic amine salts thereof, the weight-average molecular weight of the hydrolyzed terpolymer is from about 500-10,000.

  10. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  11. Driving Down HB-LED Costs. Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, William

    2012-04-30

    . Programmatically, improvements made in Phase I are applied to developments of Phase II when applicable. Phase three is the culmination of the individual tasks from both phases one and two applied to proposed production platforms. We selectively combine previously demonstrated tasks and other options to develop a high-volume production-worthy MOCVD system demonstrating >3x throughput, 1.3x capital efficiency, and 0.7x cost of ownership. In a parallel demonstration we validate the concept of an improved, larger deposition system which utilizes the predictive modeling of chemistry-based flow analysis and extensions of the improvements demonstrated on the current platforms. This validation includes the build and testing of a prototype version of the hardware and demonstration of 69% reduction in the cost of ownership. Also, in this phase we present a stand-alone project to develop a high-temperature system which improves source efficiency by 30% while concurrently increasing growth rate by 1.3x. The material quality is held to the same material quality specifications of our existing baseline processes. The merits of other line item tasks in phase three are discussed for inclusion on next-generation platforms.

  12. High-temperature distillation and consolidation of U-Zr cathode product from molten salt electrorefining of simulated metallic fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Masatoshi; Akagi, Masaaki; Koyama, Tadafumi

    2014-05-01

    High-temperature distillation experiments were performed using U-Zr cathode products of various compositions to obtain knowledge on suitable operation conditions and equipment design such as the container material. The LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte adhering to the U-Zr cathode products was almost completely vaporized at 1273-1573 K, under pressure of 10-300 Pa. Massive ingots were obtained from the remaining cathode products by heating them at 1573-1673 K. Three different phases were identified in a distillation product of a higher Zr content. A U-rich bulk (3.9 wt% Zr) and a deposit of a relatively low Zr content (17.2 wt% Zr) were considered to be formed during the cooling process of the distillation product. Another Zr-rich deposit (64.7 wt% Zr), which might cause the inhomogeneity of product ingots, was expected to result from Zr-rich spots that originally existed in the cathode product. The Cl content in the cathode product was decreased by distillation to less than 1/200 of that after electrorefining, while it was markedly larger at a higher Zr concentration. To limit the amount of Zr-rich deposit and the Cl content, the amount of Zr in the distillation product should be controlled to a sufficiently low level by optimization of the operating procedures and conditions in the electrorefining and distillation steps. The zirconia coating material developed in this study showed superior performance in inhibiting reaction between the melted U-Zr alloy melt and the graphite crucible and also in the easy release of the U-Zr ingot from the crucible.

  13. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  14. High Temperature Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C.W.

    1999-01-26

    The Remote and Specialty Equipment Section (RSES) of the Savannah River Technology Center has developed a High Temperature Inspection System (HTIS) for remotely viewing the interior of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter pour spout. The DWPF is a vitrification facility at the Savannah River Site where radioactive waste is processed, mixed and melted with glass frit in an electrically heated melter, and poured into canisters for long-term storage. The glass mixture is transferred from the melter to the canisters via the pour spout, a vertical interface between the melter and the canisters. During initial operation of the melter, problems were experienced with wicking of the glass stream to the sides of the pour spout resulting in pluggage of the pour spout. A removable insert was developed to eliminate the wicking problem. Routine cleaning of the pour spout and replacement of the insert requires that the pour spout interior be inspected on a regular basis. The HTIS was developed to perform the inspection. The HTIS provides two video images: one view for aligning the HTIS with the pour spout and the other for inspecting the pour spout wall condition and other surfaces. The HTIS is carried into the melter cell using an overhead crane and is remotely connected to the cell's telerobotic manipulator (TRM). An operator uses the TRM to insert the HTIS into the 2-inch (5.08 cm) diameter pour spout, rotate it 360 degrees, and then remove it. This application created many challenges for the inspection device, especially regarding size and temperature. The HTIS design allows the video cameras to stay below a safe operating temperature during use in the 1100 degrees C environment. Many devices are designed to penetrate a wall and extend into a heated chamber only a few inches, but the HTIS is inserted into the heated chamber 22 inches (55.88 cm). Other devices can handle the insertion length and small diameter, but they are not designed to handle the high

  15. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  16. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  17. High-temperature resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    The basic chemistry, cure processes, properties, and applications of high temperature resins known as polyimides are surveyed. Condensation aromatic polymides are prepared by reacting aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides, aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, or with dialkyl esters of aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, depending on the intended end use. The first is for coatings or films while the latter two are more suitable for polyimide matrix resins. Prepreg solutions are made by dissolving reactants in an aprotic solvent, and advances in the addition of a diamine on the double bond and radical polymerization of the double bond are noted to have yielded a final cure product with void-free characteristics. Attention is given to properties of the Skybond, Pyralin, and NR-150B polyimide prepreg materials and characteristics of aging in the NP-150 polyimides. Finally, features of the NASA-developed PMR polyimides are reviewed.

  18. High Temperature Hybrid Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Kerry Anthony

    Conventional high temperature elastomers are produced by chain polymerization of olefinic or fluorinated olefinic monomers. Ultimate thermal stabilities are limited by backbone bond strengths, lower thermal stability of cross-link sites relative to backbone bonds, and depolymerization or "unzipping" at high temperatures. In order to develop elastomers with enhanced thermal stability, hybrid thermally cross-linkable polymers that consisted only of organic-inorganic and aromatic bonds were synthesized and evaluated. The addition of phenylethynyl or phenylacetylinic functional groups to these polymers resulted in conversion of the polymers into high temperature elastomers when cross-linked by thermal curing. Polyphenyoxydiphenylsilanes were synthesized via several different condensation reactions. Results of these synthetic reactions, which utilized both hydroquinone and biphenol as monomers, were systematically evaluated to determine the optimal synthetic conditions for subsequent endcapping reactions. It was determined that dichlorodiphenylsilane condensations with biphenol in toluene or THF were best suited for this work. Use of excess dichlorodiphenylsilane yielded polymers of appropriate molecular weights with terminal reactive chlorosilane groups that could be utilized for coupling with phenylethynyl reagents in a subsequent reaction. Two new synthetic routes were developed to endcap biphenoxysilanes with ethynyl containing substituents, to yield polymers with cross-linkable end groups. Endcapping by lithiumphenylacetylide and 4[(4-fluorophenylethynyl))phenol yielded two new polymers that could be thermally cross-linked on heating above 300 °C. Successful endcapping was verified chemically by 13C NMR, FTIR and Raman analysis. Exothermic peaks consistent with ethynyl curing reactions were observed in endcapped polymers by DSC. A new diacetylinic polymer was prepared through reaction of 4,4'-buta-1,3-diyne-1,4-diyldiphenol and dichlorodiphenylsilane. This

  19. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  20. HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING OF SOLIDS THROUGH SOLAR NEBULAR BOW SHOCKS: 3D RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Morris, M. A.; Desch, S. J.

    2013-10-20

    A fundamental, unsolved problem in solar system formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks have been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H{sub 2} is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulations and their thermal histories are recorded. Adiabatic expansion creates rapid cooling of the gas, and tail shocks behind the embryo can cause secondary heating events. Radiative transport is efficient, and bow shocks around planetoids can have luminosities ∼few× 10{sup –8} L{sub ☉}. While barred and radial chondrule textures could be produced in the radiative shocks explored here, porphyritic chondrules may only be possible in the adiabatic limit. We present a series of predicted cooling curves that merit investigation in laboratory experiments to determine whether the solids produced by bow shocks are represented in the meteoritic record by chondrules or other solids.

  1. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  2. First high temperature safety tests of AGR-1 TRISO fuel with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Scates, Dawn M.; Scott, Les; Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-09-01

    Three TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment were subjected to safety tests at 1600 and 1800 °C for approximately 300 h to evaluate the fission product retention characteristics. Silver behavior was dominated by rapid release of an appreciable fraction of the compact inventory (3–34%) at the beginning of the tests, believed to be from inventory residing in the compact matrix and outer pyrocarbon (OPyC) prior to the safety test. Measurable release of silver from intact particles appears to become apparent only after ~60 h at 1800 °C. The release rate for europium and strontium was nearly constant for 300 h at 1600 °C (reaching maximum values of approximately 2×10⁻³ and 8×10⁻⁴ respectively), and at this temperature the release may be mostly limited to inventory in the compact matrix and OPyC prior to the safety test. The release rate for both elements increased after approximately 120 h at 1800 °C, possibly indicating additional measurable release through the intact particle coatings. Cesium fractional release from particles with intact coatings was <10⁻⁶ after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C, but release from the rare particles that experienced SiC failure during the test could be significant. However, Kr release was still very low for 300 h 1600 °C (<2 × 10⁻⁶). At 1800 °C, krypton release increased noticeably after SiC failure, reflecting transport through the intact outer pyrocarbon layer. Nonetheless, the krypton and cesium release fractions remained less than approximately 10⁻³ after 277 h at 1800 °C.

  3. First high temperature safety tests of AGR-1 TRISO fuel with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Scates, Dawn M.; Scott, Les; Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-09-01

    Three TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment were subjected to safety tests at 1600 and 1800 °C for approximately 300 h to evaluate the fission product retention characteristics. Silver behavior was dominated by rapid release of an appreciable fraction of the compact inventory (3-34%) at the beginning of the tests, believed to be from inventory residing in the compact matrix and outer pyrocarbon (OPyC) prior to the safety test. Measurable release of silver from intact particles appears to become apparent only after ∼60 h at 1800 °C. The release rate for europium and strontium was nearly constant for 300 h at 1600 °C (reaching maximum values of approximately 2 × 10-3 and 8 × 10-4 respectively), and at this temperature the release may be mostly limited to inventory in the compact matrix and OPyC prior to the safety test. The release rate for both elements increased after approximately 120 h at 1800 °C, possibly indicating additional measurable release through the intact particle coatings. Cesium fractional release from particles with intact coatings was <10-6 after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C, but release from the rare particles that experienced SiC failure during the test could be significant. However, Kr release was still very low for 300 h 1600 °C (<2 × 10-6). At 1800 °C, krypton release increased noticeably after SiC failure, reflecting transport through the intact outer pyrocarbon layer. Nonetheless, the krypton and cesium release fractions remained less than approximately 10-3 after 277 h at 1800 °C.

  4. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.W.; Shell, T.E.

    1979-10-04

    It has been difficult to provide adequate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface, such as in an engine being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining the following steps: a gas phase is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant; the gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface; the load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant; and the solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  5. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  6. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  7. High temperature LSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dening, D. C.; Ragonese, L. J.; Lee, C. Y.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated injection logic (1,2) technology for reliable operation under a -55 C to +300 C, temperature range is discussed. Experimental measurements indicate that an 80 mv signal swing is available at 300 C with 100 micro A injection current per gate. In addition, modeling results predict how large gate fan-ins can decrease the maximum thermal operational limits. These operational limits and the longterm reliability factors associated with device metallization are evaluated via specialized test mask.

  8. Investigation of a recent extreme-high temperature event in the Tokyo metropolitan are using numerical simulations: the potential role of a 'hybrid' foehn wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yuya; Kusaka, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    A record-breaking high surface air temperature in Japan of 39.8 °C occurred at 1420 Japan Standard Time (JST) 24 June 2011 in Kumagaya located 60-km northwest of central Tokyo. This extreme temperature, the third-highest ever recorded in Kumagaya, forced 70 people in the local prefecture to be rushed to hospitals due to heat stroke. The day had westerly winds in the inland area of Tokyo and localized rainfall in the windward direction over the Chubu Mountains. Thus, the extreme high temperature (EHT) may have been influenced by a traditional foehn wind. But, as in Takane and Kusaka (2011), other EHT event occurred in 2007 may have been caused by a complex mechanism involving a combination of several types of foehn winds. Determining the mechanism requires the use of extensive observations and numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to clarify quantitatively the mechanism of the EHT event on 24 June 2011, with a particular focus on the possible contributions of several combinations of foehn wind types. The contributions to temperature increase are analysed using a heat budget analysis of the control volume, a backward trajectory analysis, a Lagrangian energy budget analysis, an Eulerian forward tracer analysis, and an analysis of diabatic heating from the surface. In 2011 EHT event, surface air temperatures exceeding 37.0 °C were recorded in and around Kumagaya, an area just north of the convergence line between westerly winds from the Chubu Mountains (complex terrains) and southwesterly sea breeze from the Pacific Ocean. To determine the mechanism of this EHT event, we applied various analyses using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model Version 3.1.1. The WRF model successfully reproduces the physical features of the wind and temperature distributions and diurnal variations. To quantitatively evaluate the mechanism underlying the temperature change in the mixed layer on high-temperature area, we analyze the heat budget of a control volume

  9. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  10. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  11. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  12. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  13. High-temperature gas filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, H.P.; Laux, S.; Renz, U. . Lehrstuhl fuer Waermeuebertragung und Klimatechnik)

    1992-10-01

    High-temperature, high-pressure filtration is important to the development of fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology. This volume describes the commissioning and testing of a pilot-scale filter module rated at 1 to 4 bar pressure and up to 900[degrees]C. The module consists of an array of six porous sintered silicon carbide filter elements, designed to be cleaned on-line by jet pulses of compressed air. More than 2000 hours of exposure were achieved with FBC combustion gas with inlet dust concentrations of 500 to 40,000 ppM[sub w] at 200 to 650[degrees]C. Another 3500 hours of operation were achieved with simulated gas and injected dust. The filter elements were subjected to 60,000 cleaning cycles. No dust penetration through the filter modules was detected. After an initial stabilizing period, pressure drop remained moderate at less that 50 mbar (0.7 psi). The energy expended in pulse cleaning was negligible. No crusty deposits of dust were found on the filter elements during inspections, and no irreversible blinding occurred.

  14. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  15. Atomic scale modelling of chromium diffusion and melting in α-iron and iron-chromium alloys using high-temperature molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, Dmitri A.; Malerba, Lorenzo; Olsson, Par; Hou, Marc

    2004-04-01

    EAM interatomic potential to be used for radiation effect simulations in the Fe-Cr system has been recently proposed. In the present work, this potential is used to calculate by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) the diffusivity of solute Cr atoms in Fe-12%Cr random alloy. Fe self-diffusivity is calculated as well, both in the alloy and in the pure metal, for comparison. In addition, the melting point for both the pure metal and the alloy, as predicted by the potential, has been determined and a comparison between the efficiency of vacancy and interstitial mechanisms for diffusion has been performed. This study allows the validity of the potential to be checked against experimental data outside its fitting range, while providing some insight into the description that this potential gives of irradiation effects. A correct prediction of the diffusivity of solute atoms at high temperature and the melting point are indeed an important pre-requisite for a correct prediction of ion mixing and point defect clustering within a displacement cascade during the thermal spike phase. The conclusion of the study is that the present potential is capable of reproducing with excellent accuracy both the diffusion coefficient and the melting point in Fe and in the Fe-Cr alloy. Atomic diffusion through interstitials is also seen to be a more efficient mechanism than through vacancies in the materials considered.

  16. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  17. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  18. Numerical simulations of mixing under supercritical pressures of a shear coaxial injector using a high-order method: effect of outer jet temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, H.; Koshi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation of N2/H2 mixing for a coaxial injector under a supercritical pressure of 10 MPa is conducted using a highorder numerical method. Two outer H2 jets with injection temperatures of approximately 52 and 462 K are applied while an inner N2 jet with an injection temperature of approximately 97 K is applied. The mean and fluctuation properties and instantaneous flow fields are discussed in order to characterize the detailed mixing features for the two injection conditions. A clear dependence of dense-core length on the momentum flux ratio is also demonstrated.

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  20. Fast vortex core switching at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Legut, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Fast ferromagnetic vortex core switching is investigated employing micromagnetic simulations. Short pulse (in the range of a few hundreds of picoseconds) of an in-plane oscillating magnetic field is applied to a thin disk (diameter 200 nm and thickness 20 nm) with material parameters resembling permalloy. Fundamental frequency of this excitation field is close to the resonance with the material spin waves. Thermal effects are introduced by replacing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. Temperature from 300 K to 850 K is considered, just below the Curie temperature TC = 870 K. Calculations are done within the OOMMF simulation framework. We find that: (i) Period of the field necessary to switch the vortex increases approximately from 141 ps at 300 K to 572 ps for the high-temperature limit. (ii) Amplitude of the field necessary to switch the vortex core decreases roughly from 60 mT to 15 mT - even at high temperatures this amplitude is nonzero, contrary to the case of quasi-static switching. (iii) Time span between the excitation and switching (switching time) seems not to depend on the temperature. (iv) Duration of the switching itself (movement of the Bloch point in the sample) increases from a few picoseconds at low temperatures to tens of picoseconds at high temperatures.

  1. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  2. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  3. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  4. Containerless high temperature calorimeter apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A calorimeter apparatus for measuring high temperature thermophysical properties of materials is disclosed which includes a containerless heating apparatus in which the specimen is suspended and heated by electron bombardment.

  5. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  6. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  7. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. PMID:26716881

  8. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  9. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  10. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOEpatents

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J.; Schulze, Gerald K.

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  11. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  12. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop high temperature (> 300/sup 0/C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs and GaP is made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to > 500/sup 0/C. An LPE process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers have been cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below 10/sup -3/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 400/sup 0/C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  13. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  14. Containerless high-temperature calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B.; Robinson, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Samples are heated by electron bombardment in high-temperature calorimeter that operates from 1,000 to 3,600 C yet consumes less that 100 watts at temperatures less than 2,500 C. Contamination of samples is kept to minimum by suspending them from wire in vacuum chamber. Various sample slopes such as wires, dishs, spheres, rods, or irregular bodies can be accommodated and only about 100 nq of samples are needed for accurate measurements.

  15. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  16. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  17. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  18. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  19. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  20. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  1. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  2. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  3. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  4. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  5. High-Temperature Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1994-01-01

    High-temperature electrostatic levitator provides independent control of levitation and heating of sample in vacuum. Does not cause electromagnetic stirring in molten sample (such stirring causes early nucleation in undercooling). Maintenance of levitating force entails control of electrostatic field and electrical charge on sample.

  6. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  7. A solar high temperature kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettenhoelscher, N.; Bergmann, K.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using solar energy in developing countries for baking ceramic construction materials was investigated. The solar high temperature kiln is described. It uses two parabolic concentrators which direct available radiation into the baking chamber. The Sun tracker has only one axis. Preliminary test results with the prototype kiln were satisfactory.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  9. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  10. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  11. Containerless high temperature property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Anderson, Collin D.

    1991-01-01

    Containerless processing in the low gravity environment of space provides the opportunity to increase the temperature at which well controlled processing of and property measurements on materials is possible. This project was directed towards advancing containerless processing and property measurement techniques for application to materials research at high temperatures in space. Containerless high temperature material property studies include measurements of the vapor pressure, melting temperature, optical properties, and spectral emissivities of solid boron. The reaction of boron with nitrogen was also studied by laser polarimetric measurement of boron nitride film growth. The optical properties and spectral emissivities were measured for solid and liquid silicon, niobium, and zirconium; liquid aluminum and titanium; and liquid Ti-Al alloys of 5 to 60 atomic pct. titanium. Alternative means for noncontact temperature measurement in the absence of material emissivity data were evaluated. Also, the application of laser induced fluorescence for component activity measurements in electromagnetic levitated liquids was studied, along with the feasibility of a hybrid aerodynamic electromagnetic levitation technique.

  12. High-temperature containerless calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.; Lacy, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    A high-temperature (greater than 1500 K) containerless calorimeter is described and its usefulness demonstrated. The calorimeter uses the technique of omnidirectional electron bombardment of pendant drops to achieve an isothermal test environment. The small heat input into the sample (i.e., 15-50 W) can be controlled and measured. The apparatus can be used to determine the total hemispherical emissivity, specific heat, heat of fusion, surface tension, and equilibrium melting temperature of small molten drops in the temperature range of 1500 to 3500 K. The total hemispherical emissivity and specific heat of pure niobium and two alloys of niobium-germanium have been measured in the temperature range of 1700 to 2400 K. As reported in the literature, the total hemispherical emissivity varied as a function of temperature. However, specific heat values for both the pure metal and alloys seem to be independent of temperature. Specific heat for the liquid alloy phase was also measured and compared to the solid phase.

  13. Solute strengthening at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyson, G. P. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high temperature behavior of solute strengthening has previously been treated approximately using various scaling arguments, resulting in logarithmic and power-law scalings for the stress-dependent energy barrier Δ E(τ ) versus stress τ. Here, a parameter-free solute strengthening model is extended to high temperatures/low stresses without any a priori assumptions on the functional form of Δ E(τ ) . The new model predicts that the well-established low-temperature, with energy barrier Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and zero temperature flow stress {τy0} , transitions to a near-logarithmic form for stresses in the regime 0.2<τ /{τy0}≤slant 0.5 and then transitions to a power-law form at even lower stresses τ /{τy0}<0.03 . Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and {τy0} remains as the reference energy and stress scales over the entire range of stresses. The model is applied to literature data on solution strengthening in Cu alloys and captures the experimental results quantitatively and qualitatively. Most importantly, the model accurately captures the transition in strength from the low-temperature to intermediate-temperature and the associated transition for the activation volume. Overall, the present analysis unifies the different qualitative models in the literature and, when coupled with the previous parameter-free solute strengthening model, provides a single predictive model for solute strengthening as a function of composition, temperature, and strain rate over the full range of practical utility.

  14. High temperature sorbents for oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C comprising a porous alumina silicate support, such as zeolite, containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal, such as copper or cobalt ions, and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum is described. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption, and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  15. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  16. High-Temperature Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.; Chazen, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Two rocket engines that operate at temperature of 2,500 K designed to provide thrust for station-keeping adjustments of geosynchronous satellites, for raising and lowering orbits, and for changing orbital planes. Also useful as final propulsion stages of launch vehicles delivering small satellites to low orbits around Earth. With further development, engines used on planetary exploration missions for orbital maneuvers. High-temperature technology of engines adaptable to gas-turbine combustors, ramjets, scramjets, and hot components of many energy-conversion systems.

  17. High temperature drilling mud composition

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, W.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a composition having improved rheological properties and improved stability at high temperatures and pressure for use in a water-based drilling mud comprising a high-yield bentonite, a low-yield bentonite and leonardite, wherein the weight ratio of the high-yield bentonite to the low-yield bentonites in the range of about 10:1 to about 1:1, and the leonardite is present in the amount of about 0.1% to 1.0% by total dry weight of the composition.

  18. Sex and proximity to reproductive maturity influence the survival, final maturation, and blood physiology of Pacific salmon when exposed to high temperature during a simulated migration.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Ken M; Hinch, Scott G; Martins, Eduardo G; Clark, Timothy D; Lotto, Andrew G; Patterson, David A; Cooke, Steven J; Farrell, Anthony P; Miller, Kristina M

    2012-01-01

    Some Pacific salmon populations have been experiencing increasingly warmer river temperatures during their once-in-a-lifetime spawning migration, which has been associated with en route and prespawn mortality. The mechanisms underlying such temperature-mediated mortality are poorly understood. Wild adult pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) salmon were used in this study. The objectives were to investigate the effects of elevated water temperature on mortality, final maturation, and blood properties under controlled conditions that simulated a "cool" (13°C) and "warm" (19°C) freshwater spawning migration. After 10 d at 13°C, observed mortality was 50%-80% in all groups, which suggested that there was likely some mortality associated with handling and confinement. Observed mortality after 10 d at 19°C was higher, reaching ≥98% in male pink salmon and female pink and sockeye salmon. Thus, male sockeye salmon were the most thermally tolerant (54% observed mortality). Model selection supported the temperature- and sex-specific mortality patterns. The pink salmon were closer to reproductive maturation and farther along the senescence trajectory than sockeye salmon, which likely influenced their survival and physiological responses throughout the experiment. Females of both species held at 19°C had reduced plasma sex steroids compared with those held at 13°C, and female pink salmon were less likely to become fully mature at 19° than at 13°C. Male and female sockeye salmon held at 19°C had higher plasma chloride and osmolality than those held at 13°C, indicative of a thermally related stress response. These findings suggest that sex differences and proximity to reproductive maturity must be considered when predicting thermal tolerance and the magnitude of en route and prespawn mortality for Pacific salmon. PMID:22237290

  19. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  20. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  1. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  2. Stratospheric Temperature Changes: Observations and Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Chanin, M.-L.; Angell, J.; Barnett, J.; Gaffen, D.; Gelman, M.; Keckhut, P.; Koshelkov, Y.; Labitzke, K.; Lin, J.-J. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews observations of stratospheric temperatures that have been made over a period of several decades. Those observed temperatures have been used to assess variations and trends in stratospheric temperatures. A wide range of observation datasets have been used, comprising measurements by radiosonde (1940s to the present), satellite (1979 - present), lidar (1979 - present) and rocketsonde (periods varying with location, but most terminating by about the mid-1990s). In addition, trends have also been assessed from meteorological analyses, based on radiosonde and/or satellite data, and products based on assimilating observations into a general circulation model. Radiosonde and satellite data indicate a cooling trend of the annual-mean lower stratosphere since about 1980. Over the period 1979-1994, the trend is 0.6K/decade. For the period prior to 1980, the radiosonde data exhibit a substantially weaker long-term cooling trend. In the northern hemisphere, the cooling trend is about 0.75K/decade in the lower stratosphere, with a reduction in the cooling in mid-stratosphere (near 35 km), and increased cooling in the upper stratosphere (approximately 2 K per decade at 50 km). Model simulations indicate that the depletion of lower stratospheric ozone is the dominant factor in the observed lower stratospheric cooling. In the middle and upper stratosphere both the well-mixed greenhouse gases (such as CO) and ozone changes contribute in an important manner to the cooling.

  3. Thermometry of a high temperature high speed micro heater.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Slovin, G; Paramesh, J; Schlesinger, T E; Bain, J A

    2016-02-01

    A high temperature high-speed tungsten micro heater was fabricated and tested for application in phase change switches to indirectly heat and transform phase change material. Time domain transmissometry was used to measure heater temperature transients for given electrical inputs. Finite element modeling results on heater temperature transients show a good consistency between experiments and simulations with 0.2% mismatch in the best case and 13.1% in the worst case. The heater described in this work can reliably reach 1664 K at a rate of 1.67 × 10(10) K/s and quench to room temperature with a thermal RC time constant (time for T to fall by a factor of e) of less than 40 ns. PMID:26931881

  4. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  5. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  6. Stabilization of the high-k tetragonal phase in HfO2: The influence of dopants and temperature from ab initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Dominik; Kersch, Alfred

    2008-10-01

    By means of ab initio simulations we investigate the influence of dopants (Si, C, Ge, Sn, Ti, and Ce) on the transition from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase in HfO2. In this study we focus first on the internal energy only, an approach common to ab initio simulations. In the second step we go beyond this approach in considering the Helmholtz free energy by additionally taking into account the contribution of the phonon density of states. Finally we discuss the change in transition temperature in the regime of thin films based on an empirical model. We find that both the contributions of the internal energy and phonons can be understood in terms of a model relying on the ionic radius of the dopants. Among the investigated dopants silicon is identified to promote the tetragonal phase most efficiently. The effectiveness of the various dopants is compared on the basis of a qualitative phase diagram for doping concentrations up to ˜12%.

  7. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  8. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  9. High-temperature structural ceramics.

    PubMed

    Katz, R N

    1980-05-23

    The unique properties of ceramics based on silicon carbide and silicon nitride make them prime candidates for use in advanced energy conversion systems. These compounds are the bases for broad families of engineering materials, whose properties are reviewed. The relationships between processing, microstructure, and properties are discussed. A review and assessment of recent progress in the use of these materials in high-temperature engineering systems, and vehicular engines in particular, is presented. PMID:17772807

  10. High-temperature geothermal cableheads

    SciTech Connect

    Coquat, J.A.; Eifert, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    Two high-temperature, corrosion-resistant logging cableheads which use metal seals and a stable fluid to achieve proper electrical terminations and cable-sonde interfacings are described. A tensile bar provides a calibrated yield point, and a cone assembly anchors the cable armor to the head. Electrical problems of the sort generally ascribable to the cable-sonde interface were absent during demonstration hostile-environment loggings in which these cableheads were used.

  11. High-Temperature Polyimide Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanucci, Raymond D.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1990-01-01

    Improved polyimide resin used at continuous temperatures up to 700 degrees F (371 degrees C). PMR-II-50, serves as matrix for fiber-reinforced composites. Material combines thermo-oxidative stability with autoclave processability. Used in such turbine engine components as air-bypass ducts, vanes, bearings, and nozzle flaps. Other potential applications include wing and fuselage skins on high-mach-number aircraft and automotive engine blocks and pistons.

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  13. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  14. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  15. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  16. Changes in Temperature Extremes in High Resolution Simulations of RegCM driven by MPI-ESM2 under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 Scenarios over Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, M.; Ünal, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of climate change on temperature extremes over Turkey is investigated in high resolution climate model simulations driven by a global model outputs. MPI-ESM2 earth system model simulations are downscaled to first 50 km coarse resolution over Med-CORDEX domain and then 10 km high resolution over Turkey by regional climate model, RegCM4.3. The simulations cover the periods of 1970-2000 for the reference and 2015-2100 for the future with proposed changes under Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 (RCP4.5) and 8.5 (RCP8.5). High resolution gridded surface climate dataset is of great value for the validation phase of the high resolution climate models and the daily temperature observations are interpolated to regular grids which coincide with the simulation's grids by using PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model) approach. High resolution regional climate model performance is evaluated for the reference period by using gridded observations for both averages and extremes of temperature. The RegCM coupled with MPI-ESM2 shows negative biases over most of Turkey. Hence monthly mean value bias correction is applied to temperature simulations of reference and 2015-2100 periods. Extreme temperature climate indices such as FD0, SU25, TX10p, TN10p, TX90p, TN90p, TX35, WSDI, CSDI and DTR are calculated and compared to reference period. Bias corrected high resolution simulations show good agreement with the observations. The climate indices are calculated for the intervals of 2015-2040,2041-2070,2071-2100, for RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. FD0, TN10p, TX10p and CSDI indices decrease through the end of century for both scenarios and the most dramatic changes occur on the eastern and central part of Turkey. The rate of decrease is more pronounced in RCP8.5 scenario. On the other hand, the indices of SU25, TX90p, TN90p, TX35 and WSDI increase till 2100. 30 year averages of SU25 and SU35 over all Turkey increase from 64 days

  17. Elevated-Temperature Corrosion of CoCrCuFeNiAl0.5Bx High-Entropy Alloys in Simulated Syngas Containing H2S

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N; Nielsen, Benjamin C; Hawk, Jeffrey A

    2013-08-01

    High-entropy alloys are formed by synthesizing five or more principal elements in equimolar or near equimolar concentrations. Microstructure of the CoCrCuFeNiAl{sub 0.5}B{sub x} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1) high-entropy alloys under investigation is composed of a mixture of disordered bcc and fcc phases and borides. These alloys were tested gravimetrically for their corrosion resistance in simulated syngas containing 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 % H{sub 2}S at 500 °C. The exposed coupons were characterized using XRD and SEM. No significant corrosion was detected at 500 °C in syngas containing 0 and 0.01 % H{sub 2}S while significant corrosion was observed in syngas containing 0.1 and 1 % H{sub 2}S. Cu{sub 1.96}S was the primary sulfide in the external corrosion scale on the low-boron high-entropy alloys, whereas FeCo{sub 4}Ni{sub 4}S{sub 8} on the high-boron high-entropy alloys. Multi-phase Cu-rich regions in the low-B high-entropy alloys were vulnerable to corrosive attack.

  18. HITCAN: High temperature composite analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Lackney, Joseph J.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code, HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer) was developed to analyze/design metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is based on composite mechanics theories and computer codes developed at NASA LeRC over the last two decades. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structure level and including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model. HITCAN features and analysis capabilities (static, load stepping, modal, and buckling) are demonstrated through typical example problems.

  19. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  20. Performance evaluation of high-resolution square parallel-hole collimators with a CZT room temperature pixelated semiconductor SPECT system: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kang, W.

    2015-07-01

    The pixelated semiconductor based on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging device that provides many benefits compared with conventional scintillation detectors. By using a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a pixelated semiconductor detector, we were able to improve both sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we present a simulation of a CZT pixleated semiconductor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator using various geometric designs of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm X-axis hole size. We performed a simulation study of the eValuator-2500 (eV Microelectronics Inc., Saxonburg, PA, U.S.A.) CZT pixelated semiconductor detector using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). To evaluate the performances of these systems, the sensitivity and spatial resolution was evaluated. Moreover, to evaluate the overall performance of the imaging system, a hot-rod phantom was designed. Our results showed that the average sensitivity of the 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 1.34, 1.95, and 3.92 times higher than that of the 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. Also, the average spatial resolution of the 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 28.69, 44.65, and 55.73% better than that of the 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. We discuss the high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator of various collimator geometric designs and our evaluations. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a CZT pixelated semiconductor SPECT system.

  1. Simulations of High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin

    Recently, a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding clouds of fast moving material within and near our Galaxy. Not only have observations revealed more clouds and enabled better distance estimates, but they have found large numbers of high velocity high ions. Observations of faint stars have revealed that our Galaxy is threaded with streams of stars, the likely remnants of subsumed dwarf galaxies. It has become apparent that the gas stripped from such galaxies likely contributed to the population of high velocity clouds (HVCs), making HVCs signposts of the Milky Way's growth via accretion. Theoretical and simulational work on this explanation for HVCs have advanced as have theoretical and simulational work on other explanations and on HVC-galaxy interactions. But, much work has yet to be done. Here, we propose a suite of multi-dimensional simulations of HVC-galaxy interactions designed to determine how HVCs affect the Galaxy and designed to determine the characteristics of the clouds and environmental gas that enable high velocity gas to be rich in high stage ions. This work will contribute toward NASA's strategic goal to discover how the universe works and evolves. The project will employ simulations and theory, while also producing results that will be helpful for deciphering vast numbers of observations taken by NASA telescopes.

  2. High temperature size selective membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.F.; Swamikannu, A.X.

    1993-09-01

    The high temperature membrane, capable of operation above 550{degree}C, is designed to be a composite membrane composed of a thin layer of a size selective membrane supported by a microporous ceramic support. The kinetic diameters of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are 2.96 {Angstrom} and 4.00 {Angstrom}. The thin layer will be made from CMS whose pore size will be controlled to be less than 4 {Angstrom}. The membrane will be truly size selective and be impermeable to carbon dioxide. The membrane will have higher selectivity than membranes which operate on Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The ceramic support will be fabricated from Allied Signal`s proprietary Blackglas{trademark} resin. The ceramic material, noted for its high thermal and oxidative resistance, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which matches closely that of CMS. The close match will insure mechanical integrity when the membrane is subjected to thermal cycles. The CMS layer will be produced by controlled pyrolysis of polymeric precursors. Pore size will be suitably modified by post-treatments to the carbon. The composite membrane will be tested for its permeation properties at 550{degree}C or higher. Thermal, mechanical and chemical stability of the membrane will be assessed. We have produced several samples of CMS from polymeric precursors. We have initiated work also on the preparation of microporous supports from Blackglas{trademark} resin. We have completed the design of the high temperature membrane pilot plant. The membrane cell was fabricated out of two kinds of stainless steel. The inner parts are made of SS 316 and the outer ring made of SS 420. The greater thermal expansion of the SS 316 will help obtain a leak free seal at the operating temperatures.

  3. High temperature sealed electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Valentin Chung, Brice Hoani; Burke, Paul J.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2015-10-06

    A cell for high temperature electrochemical reactions is provided. The cell includes a container, at least a portion of the container acting as a first electrode. An extension tube has a first end and a second end, the extension tube coupled to the container at the second end forming a conduit from the container to said first end. A second electrode is positioned in the container and extends out of the container via the conduit. A seal is positioned proximate the first end of the extension tube, for sealing the cell.

  4. High temperature drilling MUD stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.

    1985-10-15

    Aqueous drilling fluids containing a hydroxy containing alumina component such as AlO(OH) and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reaction product such as an aldehyde reacted PVA are stabilized for use at temperatures as high as 350/sup 0/ F. (177/sup 0/ C.) by adding stabilizer anions such as sulfate, tartrate and citrate to the resulting drilling fluid. The anions can be added as an acid or in the salt form with sodium and potassium salts being preferred. The salts are preferably added in 0.2 to 10% by weight of the drilling fluid. These stabilized drilling fluids can also be used in seawater.

  5. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  6. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  7. High Temperature Acoustic Liner Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Posey, Joe W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes work currently in progress at Langley on liner concepts that employ structures that may be suitable for broadband exhaust noise attenuation in high speed flow environments and at elevated temperatures characteristic of HSCT applications. Because such liners will need to provide about 10 dB suppression over a 2 to 3 octave frequency range, conventional single-degree-of-freedom resonant structures will not suffice. Bulk absorbers have the needed broadband absorption characteristic; however, at lower frequencies they tend to be inefficient.

  8. Advanced high-temperature batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    The promise of very high specific energy and power was not yet achieved for practical battery systems. Some recent approaches are discussed for new approaches to achieving high performance for lithium/DeS2 cells and sodium/metal chloride cells. The main problems for the development of successful LiAl/FeS2 cells were the instability of the FeS2 electrode, which has resulted in rapidly declining capacity, the lack of an internal mechanism for accommodating overcharge of a cell, thus requiring the use of external charge control on each individual cell, and the lack of a suitable current collector for the positive electrode other than expensive molybdenum sheet material. Much progress was made in solving the first two problems. Reduction of the operating temperatures to 400 C by a change in electrolyte composition has increased the expected life to 1000 cycles. Also, a lithium shuttle mechanism was demonstrated for selected electrode compositions that permits sufficient overcharge tolerance to adjust for the normally expected cell-to-cell deviation in coulombic efficiency. Sodium/sulfur batteries and sodium/metal chloride batteries have demonstrated good reliability and long cycle life. For applications where very high power is desired, new electrolyte coinfigurations would be required. Design work was carried out for the sodium/metal chloride battery that demonstrates the feasibility of achieving high specific energy and high power for large battery cells having thin-walled high-surface area electrolytes.

  9. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  10. Simulation of temperature field for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation using a hyperbolic bioheat equation and temperature-varied voltage calibration: a liver-mimicking phantom study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Lan; Gao, Hongjian; Feng, Yusheng

    2015-12-21

    This study aims at improving the accuracy of temperature simulation for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation (RFA). We proposed a new voltage-calibration method in the simulation and investigated the feasibility of a hyperbolic bioheat equation (HBE) in the RFA simulation with longer durations and higher power. A total of 40 RFA experiments was conducted in a liver-mimicking phantom. Four mathematical models with multipolar electrodes were developed by the finite element method in COMSOL software: HBE with/without voltage calibration, and the Pennes bioheat equation (PBE) with/without voltage calibration. The temperature-varied voltage calibration used in the simulation was calculated from an experimental power output and temperature-dependent resistance of liver tissue. We employed the HBE in simulation by considering the delay time [Formula: see text] of 16 s. First, for simulations by each kind of bioheat equation (PBE or HBE), we compared the differences between the temperature-varied voltage-calibration and the fixed-voltage values used in the simulations. Then, the comparisons were conducted between the PBE and the HBE in the simulations with temperature-varied voltage calibration. We verified the simulation results by experimental temperature measurements on nine specific points of the tissue phantom. The results showed that: (1) the proposed voltage-calibration method improved the simulation accuracy of temperature-controlled RFA for both the PBE and the HBE, and (2) for temperature-controlled RFA simulation with the temperature-varied voltage calibration, the HBE method was 0.55 °C more accurate than the PBE method. The proposed temperature-varied voltage calibration may be useful in temperature field simulations of temperature-controlled RFA. Besides, the HBE may be used as an alternative in the simulation of long-duration high-power RFA. PMID:26583919

  11. Simulation of temperature field for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation using a hyperbolic bioheat equation and temperature-varied voltage calibration: a liver-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Lan; Gao, Hongjian; Feng, Yusheng

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at improving the accuracy of temperature simulation for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation (RFA). We proposed a new voltage-calibration method in the simulation and investigated the feasibility of a hyperbolic bioheat equation (HBE) in the RFA simulation with longer durations and higher power. A total of 40 RFA experiments was conducted in a liver-mimicking phantom. Four mathematical models with multipolar electrodes were developed by the finite element method in COMSOL software: HBE with/without voltage calibration, and the Pennes bioheat equation (PBE) with/without voltage calibration. The temperature-varied voltage calibration used in the simulation was calculated from an experimental power output and temperature-dependent resistance of liver tissue. We employed the HBE in simulation by considering the delay time τ of 16 s. First, for simulations by each kind of bioheat equation (PBE or HBE), we compared the differences between the temperature-varied voltage-calibration and the fixed-voltage values used in the simulations. Then, the comparisons were conducted between the PBE and the HBE in the simulations with temperature-varied voltage calibration. We verified the simulation results by experimental temperature measurements on nine specific points of the tissue phantom. The results showed that: (1) the proposed voltage-calibration method improved the simulation accuracy of temperature-controlled RFA for both the PBE and the HBE, and (2) for temperature-controlled RFA simulation with the temperature-varied voltage calibration, the HBE method was 0.55 °C more accurate than the PBE method. The proposed temperature-varied voltage calibration may be useful in temperature field simulations of temperature-controlled RFA. Besides, the HBE may be used as an alternative in the simulation of long-duration high-power RFA.

  12. Extreme Temperatures and Their Mechanisms in NARCCAP Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, R. M.; Rosenzweig, C.; Liu, J.; Bader, D.

    2012-12-01

    Radley M. Horton, Daniel A. Bader, Jiping Liu, and Cynthia Rosenzweig Using 8 GCM-RCM pairings from NARCCAP simulations, we present evidence that for large parts of the United States, the once-per-year warmest maximum temperature and coldest minimum temperature events are projected to warm significantly more than corresponding seasonal mean temperatures (in summer and winter, respectively). We explore several possible mechanisms for the (often large) changes in extremes, including changes in local soil moisture and snow depth, and changes in regional dynamics. The relative role of the GCMs and RCMs in creating these changing patterns in once per year temperature extremes is explored by leveraging the fact that individual GCMs were paired with multiple RCMs, and vice-versa. For much of the U.S., the once per year high and/or low temperatures are associated with large societal impacts. Extreme high temperatures are associated with increased mortality, with infrastructure impacts ranging from increased energy demand to buckling of roads and rails. Extreme low temperatures are likewise associated with excess mortality, increasing energy demand for heating, and damage to transportation infrastructure. Almost by definition, once per year events happen frequently enough to be relevant for adaptation planning, and are not so rare as to require statistical techniques geared towards small sample sizes.

  13. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  14. Temperature dependence of the Fricke dosimeter and spur expansion time in the low-LET high-temperature radiolysis of water up to 350 °C: a Monte-Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Muroya, Yusa; Tippayamontri, Thititip; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lin, Mingzhang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2011-06-14

    Monte-Carlo simulations of the radiolysis of the ferrous sulfate (Fricke) dosimeter with low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (such as (60)Co γ-rays or fast electrons) have been performed as a function of temperature from 25 to 350 °C. The predicted yields of Fe(2+) oxidation are found to increase with increasing temperature up to ∼100-150 °C, and then tend to remain essentially constant at higher temperatures, in very good agreement with experiment. By using a simple method based on the direct application of the stoichiometric relationship that exists between the ferric ion yields so obtained G(Fe(3+)) and the sum {3 [g(e(-)(aq) + H˙) + g(HO(2)˙)] + g(˙OH) + 2 g(H(2)O(2))}, where g(e(-)(aq) + H˙), g(HO(2)˙), g(˙OH), and g(H(2)O(2)) are the primary radical and molecular yields of the radiolysis of deaerated 0.4 M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions, the lifetime (τ(s)) of the spur and its temperature dependence have been determined. In the spirit of the spur model, τ(s) is an important indicator for overlapping spurs, giving the time required for the changeover from nonhomogeneous spur kinetics to homogeneous kinetics in the bulk solution. The calculations show that τ(s) decreases by about an order of magnitude over the 25-350 °C temperature range, going from ∼4.2 × 10(-7) s at 25 °C to ∼5.7 × 10(-8) s at 350 °C. This decrease in τ(s) with increasing temperature mainly originates from the quicker diffusion of the individual species involved. Moreover, the observed dependence of G(Fe(3+)) on temperature largely reflects the influence of temperature upon the primary free-radical product yields of the radiolysis, especially the yield of H˙ atoms. Above ∼200-250 °C, the more and more pronounced intervention of the reaction of H˙ atoms with water also contributes to the variation of G(Fe(3+)), which may decrease or increase slightly, depending on the choice made for the rate constant of this reaction. All calculations reported herein use the

  15. Modeling forces in high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L. R.; Foster, M. W.

    1997-11-18

    We have developed a simple model that uses computed shielding currents to determine the forces acting on a high-temperature superconductor (HTS). The model has been applied to measurements of the force between HTS and permanent magnets (PM). Results show the expected hysteretic variation of force as the HTS moves first toward and then away from a permanent magnet, including the reversal of the sign of the force. Optimization of the shielding currents is carried out through a simulated annealing algorithm in a C++ program that repeatedly calls a commercial electromagnetic software code. Agreement with measured forces is encouraging.

  16. Simulation of SRAM SEU Sensitivity at Reduced Operating Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanathanamurthy, S.; Ramachandran, V.; Alles, M. L.; Reed, R. A.; Massengill, L. W.; Raman, A.; Turowski, M.; Mantooth, A.; Woods, B.; Barlow, M.; Moen, K.; Bellini, M.; Sutton, A.; Cressler, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    A new NanoTCAD-to-Spectre interface is applied to perform mixed-mode SEU simulations of an SRAM cell. Results using newly calibrated TCAD cold temperature substrate mobility models, and BSIM3 compact models extracted explicitly for the cold temperature designs, indicate a 33% reduction in SEU threshold for the range of temperatures simulated.

  17. Simulation of air and ground temperatures in PMIP3/CMIP5 last millennium simulations: implications for climate reconstructions from borehole temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, A.; Cuesta-Valero, F. J.; Beltrami, H.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    For climate models to simulate the continental energy storage of the Earth’s energy budget they must capture the processes that partition energy across the land-atmosphere boundary. We evaluate herein the thermal consequences of these processes as simulated by models in the third phase of the paleoclimate modelling intercomparison project and the fifth phase of the coupled model intercomparison project (PMIP3/CMIP5). We examine air and ground temperature tracking at decadal and centennial time-scales within PMIP3 last-millennium simulations concatenated to historical simulations from the CMIP5 archive. We find a strong coupling between air and ground temperatures during the summer from 850 to 2005 CE. During the winter, the insulating effect of snow and latent heat exchanges produce a decoupling between the two temperatures in the northern high latitudes. Additionally, we use the simulated ground surface temperatures as an upper boundary condition to drive a one-dimensional conductive model in order to derive synthetic temperature-depth profiles for each PMIP3/CMIP5 simulation. Inversion of these subsurface profiles yields temperature trends that retain the low-frequency variations in surface air temperatures over the last millennium for all the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations regardless of the presence of seasonal decoupling in the simulations. These results demonstrate the robustness of surface temperature reconstructions from terrestrial borehole data and their interpretation as indicators of past surface air temperature trends and continental energy storage.

  18. Influence of the temperature and strain rate on the structure and fracture mode of high-strength steels upon the simulation of the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazilova, U. A.; Il'in, A. V.; Kruglova, A. A.; Motovilina, G. D.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2015-06-01

    Structural changes and the main features of the fracture of the base metal and the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone of the welded joints of high-strength steels have been studied by simulating the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding heat treatment. The effects of the simultaneous action of heating for high-temperature tempering and of deformation allowing the estimation of the impact of residual welding stresses have been studied. The probable reasons of the formation of cracks in welds upon the postwelding tempering have been determined.

  19. Multifunctional, High-Temperature Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Working, Dennis C.; Criss, Jim M.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Ghose, Sayata

    2007-01-01

    In experiments conducted as part of a continuing effort to incorporate multifunctionality into advanced composite materials, blends of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a resin denoted gPETI-330 h (wherein gPETI h is an abbreviation for gphenylethynyl-terminated imide h) were prepared, characterized, and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330 was selected as the matrix resin in these experiments because of its low melt viscosity (<10 poise at a temperature of 280 C), excellent melt stability (lifetime >2 hours at 280 C), and high temperature performance (>1,000 hours at 288 C). The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), obtained from the University of Kentucky, were selected because of their electrical and thermal conductivity and their small diameters. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the combination of thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties achievable while still maintaining melt processability. The PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight-percent of MWCNTs by dry mixing of the constituents in a ball mill using zirconia beads. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing and thermal and rheological properties. The neat resin was found to have melt viscosity between 5 and 10 poise. At 280 C and a fixed strain rate, the viscosity was found to increase with time. At this temperature, the phenylethynyl groups do not readily react and so no significant curing of the resin occurred. For MWCNT-filled samples, melt viscosity was reasonably steady at 280 C and was greater in samples containing greater proportions of MWCNTs. The melt viscosity for 20 weightpercent of MWCNTs was found to be .28,000 poise, which is lower than the initial estimated allowable maximum value of 60,000 poise for injection molding. Hence, MWCNT loadings of as much as 20 percent were deemed to be suitable compositions for scale-up. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) showed the MWCNTs to be well

  20. Sialons as high temperature insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    Sialons were evaluated for application as high temperature electrical insulators in contact with molybdenum and tungsten components in hard vacuum applications. Both D.C. and variable frequency A.C. resistivity data indicate the sialons to have electrical resistivity similar to common oxide in the 1000 C or higher range. Metallographic evaluations indicate good bonding of the type 15R ALN polytype to molybdenum and tungsten. The beta prime or modified silicon nitride phase was unacceptable in terms of vacuum stability. Additives effect on electrical resistivity. Similar resistivity decreases were produced by additions of molybdenum or tungsten to form cermets. The use of hot pressing at 1800 C with ALN, Al2 O3 and Si3N4 starting powders produced a better product than did a combination of SiO2 and AIN staring powders. It was indicated that sialons will be suitable insulators in the 1600K range in contact with molybdenum or tungsten if they are produced as a pure ceramic and subsequently bonded to the metal components at temperatures in the 1600K range.

  1. High temperature fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Saltsman, James F.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1988-01-01

    The high temperature, creep-fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 was investigated as an element in a broader thermomechanical fatigue life prediction model development program at the NASA-Lewis. The models are still in the development stage, but the data that were generated possess intrinsic value on their own. Results generated to date is reported. Data were generated to characterize isothermal low cycle fatigue resistance at temperatures of 316, 704, and 927 C with cyclic failure lives ranging from 10 to more than 20,000. These results follow trends that would be predicted from a knowledge of tensile properties, i.e., as the tensile ductility varies with temperature, so varies the cyclic inelastic straining capacity. Likewise, as the tensile strength decreases, so does the high cyclic fatigue resistance. A few two-minute hold-time cycles at peak compressive strain were included in tests at 760 C. These results were obtained in support of a redesign effort for the Orbital Maneuverable System engine. No detrimental effects on cyclic life were noted despite the added exposure time for creep and oxidation. Finally, a series of simulated thermal fatigue tests, referred to as bithermal fatigue tests, were conducted using 316 C as the minimum and 760 C as the maximum temperature. Only out-of-phase bithermal tests were conducted to date. These test results are intended for use as input to a more general thermomechanical fatigue life prediction model based on the concepts of the total strain version of Strainrange Partitioning.

  2. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  3. Nontrivial center dominance in high temperature QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, K.-I.; Iwasaki, Y.; Nakayama, Yu; Yoshie, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the properties of quarks and gluons above the chiral phase transition temperature Tc, using the renormalization group (RG) improved gauge action and the Wilson quark action with two degenerate quarks mainly on a 323 × 16 lattice. In the one-loop perturbation theory, the thermal ensemble is dominated by the gauge configurations with effectively Z(3) center twisted boundary conditions, making the thermal expectation value of the spatial Polyakov loop take a nontrivial Z(3) center. This is in agreement with our lattice simulation of high temperature quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We further observe that the temporal propagator of massless quarks at extremely high temperature β = 100.0(T ≃ 1058T c) remarkably agrees with the temporal propagator of free quarks with the Z(3) twisted boundary condition for t/Lt ≥ 0.2, but differs from that with the Z(3) trivial boundary condition. As we increase the mass of quarks mq, we find that the thermal ensemble continues to be dominated by the Z(3) twisted gauge field configurations as long as mq ≤ 3.0T and above that the Z(3) trivial configurations come in. The transition is similar to what we found in the departure from the conformal region in the zero-temperature many-flavor conformal QCD on a finite lattice by increasing the mass of quarks.

  4. High Temperature Capacitive Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  5. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  6. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  7. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  8. Operator manual: high temperature heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.; Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.

    1980-03-04

    Experimental data is being obtained from operating a high temperature heat pump system. The use of methanol as a working fluid will necessitate careful monitoring of refrigerant temperatures and pressures with chemical analysis performed on the working fluid during scheduled down time. Materials sent to vendors by Auburn University and quotes received by Auburn concerning equipment (compressor, evaporator, condensor, air heater, dryer, two accumulator tanks, and three expansion valves) are discussed. The simulated dryer and two accumulator tanks were designed by Auburn. The detailed design and pricing estimates are included. Additional information is presented on layout and construction; start-up; testing; shut down; scheduled maintenance and inspection; safety precautions; control system; and trouble shooting.

  9. Heterogeneous metasurface for high temperature selective emission

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, D. Hensley, J.; Cederberg, J. G.; Bethke, D. T.; Grine, A. D.; Shaner, E. A.

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate selective emission from a heterogeneous metasurface that can survive repeated temperature cycling at 1300 K. Simulations, fabrication, and characterization were performed for a cross-over-a-backplane metasurface consisting of platinum and alumina layers on a sapphire substrate. The structure was stabilized for high temperature operation by an encapsulating alumina layer. The geometry was optimized for integration into a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system, and was designed to have its emissivity matched to the external quantum efficiency spectrum of 0.6 eV InGaAs TPV material. We present spectral measurements of the metasurface that result in a predicted 22% optical-to-electrical power conversion efficiency in a simplified model at 1300 K. Furthermore, this broadly adaptable selective emitter design can be easily integrated into full-scale TPV systems.

  10. Fail Safe, High Temperature Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minihan, Thomas; Palazzolo, Alan; Kim, Yeonkyu; Lei, Shu-Liang; Kenny, Andrew; Na, Uhn Joo; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Hunt, Andrew; Carter, Bart; Kiraly, L. J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper contributes to the magnetic bearing literature in two distinct areas: high temperature and redundant actuation. Design considerations and test results are given for the first published combined 538 C (1000 F) high speed rotating test performance of a magnetic bearing. Secondly, a significant extension of the flux isolation based, redundant actuator control algorithm is proposed to eliminate the prior deficiency of changing position stiffness after failure. The benefit of the novel extension was not experimentally demonstrated due to a high active stiffness requirement. In addition, test results are given for actuator failure tests at 399 C (750 F), 12,500 rpm. Finally, simulation results are presented confirming the experimental data and validating the redundant control algorithm.