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Sample records for sine-gordon model revisited

  1. The Dynamical Sine-Gordon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairer, Martin; Shen, Hao

    2016-02-01

    We introduce the dynamical sine-Gordon equation in two space dimensions with parameter {β}, which is the natural dynamic associated to the usual quantum sine-Gordon model. It is shown that when {β2 in (0, 16π/3)} the Wick renormalised equation is well-posed. In the regime {β2 in (0, 4π)}, the Da Prato-Debussche method [J Funct Anal 196(1):180-210, 2002; Ann Probab 31(4):1900-1916, 2003] applies, while for {β2 in [4π, 16π/3)}, the solution theory is provided via the theory of regularity structures [Hairer, Invent Math 198(2):269-504, 2014]. We also show that this model arises naturally from a class of {2 + 1} -dimensional equilibrium interface fluctuation models with periodic nonlinearities. The main mathematical difficulty arises in the construction of the model for the associated regularity structure where the role of the noise is played by a non-Gaussian random distribution similar to the complex multiplicative Gaussian chaos recently analysed in Lacoin et al. [Commun Math Phys 337(2):569-632, 2015].

  2. The sine-Gordon model in the presence of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avan, Jean; Doikou, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model in the presence of dynamical integrable defects is investigated. This is an application of the algebraic formulation introduced for integrable defects in earlier works. The quantities in involution as well as the associated Lax pairs are explicitly extracted. Integrability i also shown using certain sewing constraints, which emerge as suitable continuity conditions.

  3. Generalized universality in the massive sine-Gordon model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, S.; Sailer, K.; Nandori, I.; Polonyi, J.

    2008-01-15

    A nontrivial interplay of the UV and IR scaling laws, a generalization of the universality is demonstrated in the framework of the massive sine-Gordon model, as a result of a detailed study of the global behavior of the renormalization group flow and the phase structure.

  4. Breather-like structures in modified sine-Gordon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2016-05-01

    We report analytical and numerical results on breather-like field configurations in a theory which is a deformation of the integrable sine-Gordon model in (1  +  1) dimensions. The main motivation of our study is to test the ideas behind the recently proposed concept of quasi-integrability, which emerged from the observation that some field theories possess an infinite number of quantities which are asymptotically conserved in the scattering of solitons, and periodic in time in the case of breather-like configurations. Even though the mechanism responsible for such phenomena is not well understood yet, it is clear that special properties of the solutions under a space-time parity transformation play a crucial role. The numerical results of the present paper give support for the ideas on quasi-integrability, as it is found that extremely long-lived breather configurations satisfy these parity properties. We also report on a mechanism, particular to the theory studied here, that favours the existence of long lived breathers even in cases of significant deformations of the sine-Gordon potential. We also find numerically that our breather-like configurations decay through the gradual increase of their frequency of oscillations.

  5. Two-loop beta-functions of the sine-Gordon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, János; Hegedus, Árpád

    2000-09-01

    We recalculate the two-loop beta-functions in the two-dimensional sine-Gordon model in a two-parameter expansion around the asymptotically free point. Our results agree with those of Amit et al (Amit D J, Goldschmidt Y Y and Grinstein G 1980 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 13 585).

  6. Collective coordinate approximation to the scattering of solitons in modified NLS and sine-Gordon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, H. E.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the validity of collective coordinate approximations to the scattering of two solitons in several classes of (1+1) dimensional field theory models. We consider models which are deformations of the sine-Gordon (SG) or the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model which posses soliton solutions (which are topological (SG) or non-topological (NLS)). Our deformations preserve their topology (SG), but change their integrability properties, either completely or partially (models become `quasi-integrable').

  7. Critical dynamics of the sine-Gordon model in d=2-ɛ dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudecker, Bernhard

    1983-06-01

    The renormalization scheme of Amit, Goldschmidt and Grinstein is extended to d=2-ɛ dimensions. The exponent ν of the correlation length v -1=2ɛ+ O(ɛ2) is in agreement with the result of Kosterlitz for the Coulomb gas. The exponent η of the correlation function of the sine-Gordon field is η=ɛ+ O(ɛ2). The scaling form of the dynamical structure factor S(q,ω) of the dynamic sine-Gordon Model A is studied in d=2-ɛ dimensions. The dynamic exponent z is found to be z=2+( b-1)ɛ+ O(ɛ2) for ɛ≧0. The constant b is given by the integral b = intlimits_0^infty {dss^{ - 2} exp } left( { - 2intlimits_s^infty {dxx^{ - 1} e^{ - x} } } right) = 2,371544...

  8. Discrete translational invariance and mass-renormalization in the two-dimensional sine-Gordon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudecker, Bernhard

    1982-06-01

    We consider the sine-Gordon model as a field-theory in which the interaction has a discrete translational invariance. It is shown that apart from a Gaussian contribution the Helmholtz free-energy exhibits this symmetry as well. Thus in an originally massless theory, the insertion of a mass term can be considered as a rather “weak” symmetry-breaking. Within the Amit-Goldschmidt-Grinstein renormalization-scheme we show that mass-renormalization is trivial.

  9. Exact Mass-Coupling Relation for the Homogeneous Sine-Gordon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajnok, Zoltán; Balog, János; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2016-05-01

    We derive the exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multiscale quantum integrable model, i.e., the homogeneous sine-Gordon model with two mass scales. The relation is obtained by comparing the perturbed conformal field theory description of the model valid at short distances to the large distance bootstrap description based on the model's integrability. In particular, we find a differential equation for the relation by constructing conserved tensor currents, which satisfy a generalization of the Θ sum rule Ward identity. The mass-coupling relation is written in terms of hypergeometric functions.

  10. Exact Mass-Coupling Relation for the Homogeneous Sine-Gordon Model.

    PubMed

    Bajnok, Zoltán; Balog, János; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2016-05-01

    We derive the exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multiscale quantum integrable model, i.e., the homogeneous sine-Gordon model with two mass scales. The relation is obtained by comparing the perturbed conformal field theory description of the model valid at short distances to the large distance bootstrap description based on the model's integrability. In particular, we find a differential equation for the relation by constructing conserved tensor currents, which satisfy a generalization of the Θ sum rule Ward identity. The mass-coupling relation is written in terms of hypergeometric functions. PMID:27203313

  11. Regularization of multi-soliton form factors in sine-Gordon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálmai, T.

    2012-08-01

    A general and systematic regularization is developed for the exact solitonic form factors of exponential operators in the (1+1)-dimensional sine-Gordon model by analytical continuation of their integral representations. The procedure is implemented in Mathematica. Test results are shown for four- and six-soliton form factors. Catalogue identifier: AEMG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1462 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15 488 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica [1] Computer: PC Operating system: Cross-platform Classification: 7.7, 11.1, 23 Nature of problem: The multi-soliton form factors of the sine-Gordon model (relevant in two-dimensional physics) were given only by highly non-trivial integral representation with a limited domain of convergence. Practical applications of the form factors, e.g. calculation of correlation functions in two-dimensional condensed matter systems, were not possible in general. Solution method: Using analytic continuation techniques an efficient algorithm is found and implemented in Mathematica, which provides a general and systematic way to calculate multi-soliton form factors in the sine-Gordon model. The package contains routines to compute the two-, four- and six-soliton form factors. Running time: Strongly dependent on the desired accuracy and the number of solitons. For physical rapidities after an initialization of about 30 s, the calculation of the two-, four- and six-soliton form factors at a single point takes approximately 0.5 s, 2.5 s and 8 s, respectively. Wolfram Research, Inc., Mathematica Edition: Version 7.0, Wolfram Research, Inc., Champaign, Illinois, 2008.

  12. Numerical and analytical tests of quasi-integrability in modified sine-Gordon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2014-01-01

    Following our attempts to define quasi-integrability in which we related this concept to a particular symmetry of the two-soliton function we check this condition in three classes of modified sine-Gordon models in (1 + 1) dimensions. We find that the numerical results seen in various scatterings of two solitons and in the time evolution of breather-like structures support our ideas about the symmetry of the field configurations and its effects on the anomalies of the conservation laws of the charges.

  13. Breaking integrability at the boundary: the sine-Gordon model with Robin boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Robert; Dorey, Patrick; Parini, Robert

    2016-04-01

    We explore boundary scattering in the sine-Gordon model with a non-integrable family of Robin boundary conditions. The soliton content of the field after collision is analysed using a numerical implementation of the direct scattering problem associated with the inverse scattering method. We find that an antikink may be reflected into various combinations of an antikink, a kink, and one or more breathers, depending on the values of the initial antikink velocity and a parameter associated with the boundary condition. In addition we observe regions with an intricate resonance structure arising from the creation of an intermediate breather whose recollision with the boundary is highly dependent on the breather phase.

  14. Quench dynamics near a quantum critical point: Application to the sine-Gordon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grandi, C.; Gritsev, V.; Polkovnikov, A.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the quench dynamics near a quantum critical point focusing on the sine-Gordon model as a primary example. We suggest a unified approach to sudden and slow quenches, where the tuning parameter λ(t) changes in time as λ(t)˜υtr , based on the adiabatic expansion of the excitation probability in powers of υ . We show that the universal scaling of the excitation probability can be understood through the singularity of the generalized adiabatic susceptibility χ2r+2(λ) , which for sudden quenches (r=0) reduces to the fidelity susceptibility. In turn this class of susceptibilities is expressed through the moments of the connected correlation function of the quench operator. We analyze the excitations created after a sudden quench of the cosine potential using a combined approach of form-factors expansion and conformal perturbation theory for the low-energy and high-energy sector, respectively. We find the general scaling laws for the probability of exciting the system, the density of excited quasiparticles, the entropy and the heat generated after the quench. In the two limits where the sine-Gordon model maps to hard-core bosons and free massive fermions we provide the exact solutions for the quench dynamics and discuss the finite temperature generalizations.

  15. Nonlinear waves in networks: model reduction for the sine-Gordon equation.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Jean-Guy; Dutykh, Denys

    2014-08-01

    To study how nonlinear waves propagate across Y- and T-type junctions, we consider the two-dimensional (2D) sine-Gordon equation as a model and examine the crossing of kinks and breathers. Comparing energies for different geometries reveals that, for small widths, the angle of the fork plays no role. Motivated by this, we introduce a one-dimensional effective model whose solutions agree well with the 2D simulations for kink and breather solutions. These exhibit two different behaviors: a kink crosses if it has sufficient energy; conversely a breather crosses when v>1-ω, where v and ω are, respectively, its velocity and frequency. This methodology can be generalized to more complex nonlinear wave models. PMID:25215804

  16. Quantum quenches in the sine-Gordon model: A semiclassical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormos, M.; Zaránd, G.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the time evolution of correlation functions after quantum quenches in the sine-Gordon model within the semiclassical approximation, which is expected to yield accurate results for small and slow quenches producing slow quasiparticles with low density. We demonstrate this by reproducing results of a recent form-factor calculation of the relaxation of expectation values [B. Bertini, D. Schuricht, and F. H. L. Essler, J. Stat. Mech. (2014) P10035, 10.1088/1742-5468/2014/10/P10035]. Extending these results, we find that—in the universal limit of vanishingly small quasiparticle velocities—the expectation values of most vertex operators do not decay to zero. We give analytic expressions for the relaxation of dynamic correlation functions and show that they have diffusive behavior for large timelike separation.

  17. Quantum quenches in the sine-Gordon model: A semiclassical approach.

    PubMed

    Kormos, M; Zaránd, G

    2016-06-01

    We compute the time evolution of correlation functions after quantum quenches in the sine-Gordon model within the semiclassical approximation, which is expected to yield accurate results for small and slow quenches producing slow quasiparticles with low density. We demonstrate this by reproducing results of a recent form-factor calculation of the relaxation of expectation values [B. Bertini, D. Schuricht, and F. H. L. Essler, J. Stat. Mech. (2014) P100351742-546810.1088/1742-5468/2014/10/P10035]. Extending these results, we find that-in the universal limit of vanishingly small quasiparticle velocities-the expectation values of most vertex operators do not decay to zero. We give analytic expressions for the relaxation of dynamic correlation functions and show that they have diffusive behavior for large timelike separation. PMID:27415202

  18. Charge-varying sine-Gordon deformed defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, A. E.; Chinaglia, M.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-05-01

    Sine-Gordon deformed defects that exhibit unusual phenomenological features on the topological charge are investigated. The possibility of a smooth and continuous transition between topological (non-null charge) and non-topological (null charge) scenarios of deformed defects supported by sine-Gordon structures is evinced by the analytical calculation of topological charges and localized energy distributions. By describing cyclic deformation chains, we show that a triggering sine-Gordon model simultaneously supports kink- and lump-like defects, whose topological mass values are closed by trigonometric or hyperbolic successive deformations. In spite of preserving analytical closure relations constraining the topological masses of 3- and 4-cyclically deformed defects, the deformation chains produce kinks and lumps which exhibit non-monotonic behavior and extra inflection points. The outcome of our analysis suggests that cyclic deformations create novel scenarios of physical and mathematical applicability of defect structures supported by the sine-Gordon theory.

  19. The noncommutative sine-Gordon breather

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Andre; Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2009-09-15

    As shown by Lechtenfeld et al. [Nucl. Phys. B 705, 447 (2005)], there exists a noncommutative deformation of the sine-Gordon model which remains (classically) integrable but features a second scalar field. We employ the dressing method (adapted to the Moyal-deformed situation) for constructing the deformed kink-antikink and breather configurations. Explicit results and plots are presented for the leading noncommutativity correction to the breather. Its temporal periodicity is unchanged.

  20. Breather boundary form factors in sine-Gordon theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lencsés, M.; Takács, G.

    2011-11-01

    A previously conjectured set of exact form factors of boundary exponential operators in the sinh-Gordon model is tested against numerical results from boundary truncated conformal space approach in boundary sine-Gordon theory, related by analytic continuation to sinh-Gordon model. We find that the numerical data strongly support the validity of the form factors themselves; however, we also report a discrepancy in the case of diagonal matrix elements, which remains unresolved for the time being.

  1. Flux-flow mode in the sine-Gordon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Marek

    1998-07-01

    An inverse transformation of the theta function is derived, making it possible to investigate a multiperiodic solution of the sine-Gordon equation in the limit of a dense sequence of overlapping solitons. A special case of a unidirectional soliton train interacting with small-amplitude quasi-linear oscillations is discussed as a simple model of the flux-flow state in a long one-dimensional Josephson junction. Approximate analytical solutions for the dispersion parameters are compared with numerical results.

  2. Dynamical properties of the sine-Gordon quantum spin magnet Cu-PM at zero and finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiegel, Alexander C.; Honecker, Andreas; Pruschke, Thomas; Ponomaryov, Alexey; Zvyagin, Sergei A.; Feyerherm, Ralf; Manmana, Salvatore R.

    2016-03-01

    The material copper pyrimidine dinitrate (Cu-PM) is a quasi-one-dimensional spin system described by the spin-1/2 X X Z Heisenberg antiferromagnet with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Based on numerical results obtained by the density-matrix renormalization group, exact diagonalization, and accompanying electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments we revisit the spin dynamics of this compound in an applied magnetic field. Our calculations for momentum and frequency-resolved dynamical quantities give direct access to the intensity of the elementary excitations at both zero and finite temperature. This allows us to study the system beyond the low-energy description by the quantum sine-Gordon model. We find a deviation from the Lorentz invariant dispersion for the single-soliton resonance. Furthermore, our calculations only confirm the presence of the strongest boundary bound state previously derived from a boundary sine-Gordon field theory, while composite boundary-bulk excitations have too low intensities to be observable. Upon increasing the temperature, we find a temperature-induced crossover of the soliton and the emergence of new features, such as interbreather transitions. The latter observation is confirmed by our ESR experiments on Cu-PM over a wide range of the applied field.

  3. A new explicit solution to the lattice sine-Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Cao, Cewen

    2016-03-01

    Based on a new discrete Lax pair, an elementary explicit solution is found for the lattice sine-Gordon equation through Riemann surface method. It contains only exponential functions, quite different from the usual higher genus solutions, expressed with complicated theta functions. The solutions to the associated models, the lattice potential MKdV equation and a special H3 equation are also discussed.

  4. Sine-Gordon model coupled with a free scalar field emergent in the low-energy phase dynamics of a mixture of pseudospin-\\frac{1}{2} Bose gases with interspecies spin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Shi, Yu

    2012-10-01

    Using the approach of low-energy effective field theory, the phase diagram is studied for a mixture of two species of pseudospin-\\frac{1}{2} Bose atoms with interspecies spin exchange. There are four mean-field regimes on the parameter plane of ge and gz, where ge is the interspecies spin-exchange interaction strength, while gz is the difference between the interaction strength of interspecies scattering without spin exchange of equal spins and that of unequal spins. Two regimes, with |gz| > |ge|, correspond to ground states with the total spins of the two species parallel or antiparallel along the z direction, and the low-energy excitations are equivalent to those of two-component spinless bosons. The other two regimes, with |ge| > |gz|, correspond to ground states with the total spins of the two species parallel or antiparallel on the xy plane, and the low-energy excitations are described by a sine-Gordon model coupled with a free scalar field, where the effective fields are combinations of the phases of the original four boson fields. In (1 + 1)-dimension, they are described by Kosterlitz-Thouless renormalization group (RG) equations, and there are three sectors in the phase plane of a scaling dimension and a dimensionless parameter proportional to the strength of the cosine interaction, both depending on the densities. The gaps of these elementary excitations are experimental probes of the underlying many-body ground states.

  5. Control of antikinks of the Sine Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubov, A. V.; Bondarenkov, R. S.; Fradkov, A. L.; Andrievsky, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The control of the smoothness of an antikink profile of the Sine Gordon equation is considered. It is shown that variations in the initial conditions give rise to oscillations on the profile of the antikink. The control algorithm based on variation of one of the coefficient of the equation is developed to recover the smooth wave shape and the phase velocity of the antikink.

  6. Perspective on classical strings from complex sine-Gordon solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Keisuke; Suzuki, Ryo

    2007-02-15

    We study a family of classical string solutions with large spins on R{sub t}xS{sup 3} subspace of AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} background, which are related to Complex sine-Gordon solitons via Pohlmeyer's reduction. The equations of motion for the classical strings are cast into Lame equations and Complex sine-Gordon equations. We solve them under periodic boundary conditions, and obtain analytic profiles for the closed strings. They interpolate two kinds of known rigid configurations with two spins: on one hand, they reduce to folded or circular spinning/rotating strings in the limit where a soliton velocity goes to zero, while on the other hand, the dyonic giant magnons are reproduced in the limit where the period of a kink-array goes to infinity.

  7. Quantum Creep and Quantum-Creep Transitions in 1D Sine-Gordon Chains.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Florian R; Müser, Martin H

    2004-01-23

    Discrete sine-Gordon (SG) chains are studied with path-integral molecular dynamics. Chains commensurate with the substrate show the transition from pinning to quantum creep at bead masses slightly larger than in the continuous SG model. Within the creep regime, a field-driven transition from creep to complete depinning is identified. The effects of disorder on the chain's dynamics depend on the potential's roughness exponent H. For example, quantum fluctuations are generally too small to depin the chain if H=1/2, while an H=0 chain can be pinned or unpinned depending on the bead masses. Thermal fluctuations always depin the chain. PMID:14753858

  8. Generalized Sine-Gordon equation and dislocation dynamics of superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Muying; Chen, Guihua; Luo, Shiyu

    2013-07-01

    By introducing a damping term, the Seeger equation describing the dislocations motion is reduced to the generalized Sine-Gordon equation, which is further reduced to the pendulum equation for the traveling wave solutions. The characteristics of the phase plane of the unperturbated system is analyzed and the chaotic behavior of the system is discussed with Melnikov method. It is shown that the energy of dislocation wave can efficiently transfer and release to the superlattice for appropriately chosen parameters, such that the stability of the superlattice can be improved.

  9. Quantum sine-Gordon dynamics on analogue curved spacetime in a weakly imperfect scalar Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkoff, T. J.; Fischer, Uwe R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the coherent state functional integral expression of the partition function, we show that the sine-Gordon model on an analogue curved spacetime arises as the effective quantum field theory for phase fluctuations of a weakly imperfect Bose gas on an incompressible background superfluid flow when these fluctuations are restricted to a subspace of the single-particle Hilbert space. We consider bipartitions of the single-particle Hilbert space relevant to experiments on ultracold bosonic atomic or molecular gases, including, e.g., restriction to high- or low-energy sectors of the dynamics and spatial bipartition corresponding to tunnel-coupled planar Bose gases. By assuming full unitary quantum control in the low-energy subspace of a trapped gas, we show that (1) appropriately tuning the particle number statistics of the lowest-energy mode partially decouples the low- and high-energy sectors, allowing any low-energy single-particle wave function to define a background for sine-Gordon dynamics on curved spacetime and (2) macroscopic occupation of a quantum superposition of two states of the lowest two modes produces an analogue curved spacetime depending on two background flows, with respective weights continuously dependent on the corresponding weights of the superposed quantum states.

  10. Conservation laws and Hamiltonian structures of the generalized sine-Gordon hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Xue, Bo; Li, Yan

    2014-12-01

    By introducing a 2 × 2 matrix spectral problem, a new hierarchy of nonlinear evolution equations is proposed. A typical equation in this hierarchy is the generalization of sine-Gordon equation. With the aid of trace identity, the Hamiltonian structures of the hierarchy are constructed. In addition, the infinite sequence of conserved quantities of the generalized sine-Gordon equation are obtained.

  11. Conservation laws, Korteweg--de Vries and sine-Gordon systems, and the role of supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, B.; Lahiri, A.; Roy, P.K.

    1989-02-15

    It is shown that the eigenvalue problem of the L operator for the sine-Gordon equation can be put in a supersymmetric form. We comment on the connection between the conserved quantities of the Korteweg--de Vries and sine-Gordon systems.

  12. Resurgence in sine-Gordon quantum mechanics: exact agreement between multi-instantons and uniform WKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Nitta, Muneto; Sakai, Norisuke

    2015-09-01

    We compute multi-instanton amplitudes in the sine-Gordon quantum mechanics (periodic cosine potential) by integrating out quasi-moduli parameters corresponding to separations of instantons and anti-instantons. We propose an extension of Bogomolnyi-Zinn-Justin prescription for multi-instanton configurations and an appropriate subtraction scheme. We obtain the multi-instanton contributions to the energy eigenvalue of the lowest band at the zeroth order of the coupling constant. For the configurations with only instantons (anti-instantons), we obtain unambiguous results. For those with both instantons and anti-instantons, we obtain results with imaginary parts, which depend on the path of analytic continuation. We show that the imaginary parts of the multi-instanton amplitudes precisely cancel the imaginary parts of the Borel resummation of the perturbation series, and verify that our results completely agree with those based on the uniform-WKB calculations, thus confirming the resurgence structure: divergent perturbation series combined with the nonperturbative multi-instanton contributions conspire to give unambiguous results. We also study the neutral bion contributions in the {C}{P}^{N-1} model on {{R}}^1× {S}^1 with a small circumference, taking account of the relative phase moduli between the fractional instanton and anti-instanton. We find that the sign of the interaction potential depends on the relative phase moduli, and that both the real and imaginary parts resulting from quasi-moduli integral of the neutral bion get quantitative corrections compared to the sine-Gordon quantum mechanics.

  13. What happens to linear properties as we move from the Klein-Gordon equation to the sine-Gordon equation

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalyov, Mikhail

    2010-06-15

    In this article the sets of solutions of the sine-Gordon equation and its linearization the Klein-Gordon equation are discussed and compared. It is shown that the set of solutions of the sine-Gordon equation possesses a richer structure which partly disappears during linearization. Just like the solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation satisfy the linear superposition principle, the solutions of the sine-Gordon equation satisfy a nonlinear superposition principle.

  14. Integrals of motion of the classical lattice sine-Gordon system

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, B.; Feigin, B.L. |

    1995-12-01

    We compute the local integrals of motions of the classical limit of the lattice sine-Gordon system, using a geometrical interpretation of the local sine-Gordon variables. Using an analogous description of the screened local variables, we show that these integrals are in involution. We present some remarks on relations with the situation at the roots of 1 and results on another latticization (linked to the principal subalgebra of s{ell}{sub 2} rather than the homogeneous one). Finally, we analyze a module of {open_quotes}screened semilocal variables, {close_quotes} on which the whole s{ell}{sub 2} acts.

  15. Symmetries and soliton solutions of the Galilean complex Sine-Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, G. R.; de Montigny, M.; Pinfold, J.; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a new equation, the Galilean version of the complex Sine-Gordon equation in 1 + 1 dimensions, Ψxx (1 -Ψ* Ψ) + 2 imΨt +Ψ* Ψx2- Ψ(1 -Ψ* Ψ) 2 = 0, derived from its relativistic counterpart via Galilean covariance. We determine its Lie point symmetries, discuss some group-invariant solutions, and examine some soliton solutions. The reduction under Galilean symmetry leads to an equation similar to the stationary Gross-Pitaevskii equation. This work is motivated in part by recent applications of the relativistic complex Sine-Gordon equation to the dynamics of Q-balls.

  16. {pi} kinks in the parametrically driven sine-Gordon equation and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zharnitsky, V.; Mitkov, I.

    1997-07-08

    Parametrically driven sine-Gordon equation with a mean-zero forcing is considered. It is shown that the system is well approximated by the double sine-Gordon equation using the normal form technique. The reduced equation possesses {pi}-kink solutions, which are also observed numerically in the original system. This result is applied to domain walls dynamics in one-dimensional easy-plane ferromagnets. For such system the existence of {pi}-kinks implies the true domain structure in the presence of high-frequency magnetic field.

  17. Spectral averaging of small-amplitude sine-Gordon wave trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, J. W.; Tracy, E. R.

    1988-11-01

    It is well known that the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is the generic envelope description of nonlinear wave trains in the small-amplitude limit. V. E. Zakharov and E. A. Kuznetsov [Physica 18D, 455 (1986)] have shown that for many systems integrable via inverse-scattering techniques it is possible, through the use of multiscale techniques, to derive the nonlinear Schrödinger Lax pair from the Lax pair of the system that is being modulated. It will be shown that this technique of ``multiscale averaging'' can be applied to the sine-Gordon theory to obtain not only the nonlinear Schrödinger Lax pair from the sine-Gordon Lax pair, but also the nonlinear Schrödinger spectral data, conservation laws, Θ-function solutions, and reality constraint from their sine-Gordon counterparts. This allows a physical interpretation of the mathematical elements of the nonlinear Schrödinger envelope in terms of the physical characteristics of the sine-Gordon system that is being modulated.

  18. Multifrequency and edge breathers in the discrete sine-Gordon system via subharmonic driving: Theory, computation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmero, F.; Han, J.; English, L. Q.; Alexander, T. J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2016-01-01

    We consider a chain of torsionally-coupled, planar pendula shaken horizontally by an external sinusoidal driver. It has been known that in such a system, theoretically modeled by the discrete sine-Gordon equation, intrinsic localized modes, also known as discrete breathers, can exist. Recently, the existence of multifrequency breathers via subharmonic driving has been theoretically proposed and numerically illustrated by Xu et al. (2014) [21]. In this paper, we verify this prediction experimentally. Comparison of the experimental results to numerical simulations with realistic system parameters (including a Floquet stability analysis), and wherever possible to analytical results (e.g. for the subharmonic response of the single driven-damped pendulum), yields good agreement. Finally, we report the period-1 and multifrequency edge breathers which are localized at the open boundaries of the chain, for which we have again found good agreement between experiments and numerical computations.

  19. Darboux Transformation for the Vector Sine-Gordon Equation and Integrable Equations on a Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander V.; Papamikos, Georgios; Wang, Jing Ping

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method for construction of Darboux transformations, which is a new development of the dressing method for Lax operators invariant under a reduction group. We apply the method to the vector sine-Gordon equation and derive its Bäcklund transformations. We show that there is a new Lax operator canonically associated with our Darboux transformation resulting an evolutionary differential-difference system on a sphere. The latter is a generalised symmetry for the chain of Bäcklund transformations. Using the re-factorisation approach and the Bianchi permutability of the Darboux transformations, we derive new vector Yang-Baxter map and integrable discrete vector sine-Gordon equation on a sphere.

  20. Dressing method for the vector sine-Gordon equation and its soliton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander V.; Papamikos, Georgios; Wang, Jing Ping

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop the dressing method to study the exact solutions for the vector sine-Gordon equation. The explicit formulas for one kink and one breather are derived. The method can be used to construct multi-soliton solutions. Two soliton interactions are also studied. The formulas for position shift of the kink and position and phase shifts of the breather are given. These quantities only depend on the pole positions of the dressing matrices.

  1. On the solution of the generalized wave and generalized sine-Gordon equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ablowitz, M. J.; Beals, R.; Tenenblat, K.

    1986-01-01

    The generalized wave equation and generalized sine-Gordon equations are known to be natural multidimensional differential geometric generalizations of the classical two-dimensional versions. In this paper, a system of linear differential equations is associated with these equations, and it is shown how the direct and inverse problems can be solved for appropriately decaying data on suitable lines. An initial-boundary value problem is solved for these equations.

  2. Stochastic D-bifurcation for a damped sine-Gordon equation with noise

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiongwei; Xue, Changfeng; Tang, Jiashi

    2015-04-15

    We investigate the stochastic bifurcation of a damped sine-Gordon equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions under the influence of multiplicative Gaussian white noise. Introducing a slow time scale, we derive the amplitude equations near the trivial solution by multiscale analysis. And the stationary probability density functions are formulated analytically using the stochastic averaging of energy envelope. The numerical calculations show that the system undergoes a stochastic D-bifurcation of energy envelope from a delta measure to new stationary measures when the control parameter crosses a critical point.

  3. Nonlinear quantum-mechanical system associated with Sine-Gordon equation in (1 + 2) dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Zarmi, Yair

    2014-10-15

    Despite the fact that it is not integrable, the (1 + 2)-dimensional Sine-Gordon equation has N-soliton solutions, whose velocities are lower than the speed of light (c = 1), for all N ≥ 1. Based on these solutions, a quantum-mechanical system is constructed over a Fock space of particles. The coordinate of each particle is an angle around the unit circle. U, a nonlinear functional of the particle number-operators, which obeys the Sine-Gordon equation in (1 + 2) dimensions, is constructed. Its eigenvalues on N-particle states in the Fock space are the slower-than-light, N-soliton solutions of the equation. A projection operator (a nonlinear functional of U), which vanishes on the single-particle subspace, is a mass-density generator. Its eigenvalues on multi-particle states play the role of the mass density of structures that emulate free, spatially extended, relativistic particles. The simplicity of the quantum-mechanical system allows for the incorporation of perturbations with particle interactions, which have the capacity to “annihilate” and “create” solitons – an effect that does not have an analog in perturbed classical nonlinear evolution equations.

  4. Sine-Gordon modulation solutions: application to macroscopic friction, regular and slow earthquakes and fault dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum; Bambakidis, Gust

    2014-05-01

    The Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model and its continuum approximation, the sine-Gordon (SG) equation, are widely used for modeling various phenomena. In many practical applications the wave-train solution, which includes many solitons, is required. In such cases the system of Whitham's modulation equations, superimposed on the SG equation, provides such a solution. Here we consider several applications which use the SG modulation solutions [1-3]. Fault dynamics in the earth's crust, i.e. the nucleation and development of regular and slow earthquakes, is a complicated multidisciplinary problem which has been investigated using diverse approaches. Our approach, inspired by dislocation dynamics in crystals, is based on the FK model introduced to describe plasticity. In the model we propose, sliding occurs due to the movement of defects of a certain type (i.e. areas on the frictional surface with locally stressed material, known as a macroscopic dislocation or slip pulse) nucleated by shear stress in the presence of asperities. The spatial translation of a dislocation requires only a small fraction of the stress necessary for the uniform relative displacement of frictional surfaces. This is a fundamental distinction between our approach to macroscopic dry friction and those of others such as the Burridge-Knopoff and rate-and-state types of models. We show how this model can be applied to the qualitative and quantitative description of fault dynamics in general, and slow and regular earthquakes in particular. The three fundamental speeds of plate movement, earthquake migration, and seismic waves are shown to be connected in the FK model. The velocity of nonelastic stress propagation along faults is a function of accumulated stress. It changes from a few km/s during earthquakes to a few dozen km per day, month, or year during afterslip and inter-earthquake periods. The distribution of aftershocks in this model is consistent with both the Omori law for temporal distribution

  5. Effects of Lévy noise on the dynamics of sine-Gordon solitons in long Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Valenti, Davide; Carollo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2016-05-01

    We numerically investigate the generation of solitons in current-biased long Josephson junctions in relation to the superconducting lifetime and the voltage drop across the device. The dynamics of the junction is modelled with a sine-Gordon equation driven by an oscillating field and subject to an external non-Gaussian noise. A wide range of $\\alpha$-stable L\\'evy distributions is considered as noise source, with varying stability index $\\alpha$ and asymmetry parameter $\\beta$. In junctions longer than a critical length, the mean switching time (MST) from superconductive to the resistive state assumes a values independent of the device length. Here, we demonstrate that such a value is directly related to the mean density of solitons which move into or from the washboard potential minimum corresponding to the initial superconductive state. Moreover, we observe: (i) a connection between the total mean soliton density and the mean potential difference across the junction; (ii) an inverse behavior of the mean voltage in comparison with the MST, with varying the junction length; (iii) evidences of non-monotonic behaviors, such as stochastic resonant activation and noise enhanced stability, of MST versus the driving frequency and noise intensity for different values of $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$; (iv) finally, these non-monotonic behaviors are found to be related to the mean density of solitons formed along the junction.

  6. New exact solutions for fractional Sine-Gordon equation by using the new version of generalized F-expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandir, Yusuf; Duzgun, Hasan Huseyin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigate some new analytical solutions to the fractional Sine-Gordon equation by using the new version of generalized F-expansion method. The fractional derivatives are defined in the modified Riemann-Liouville context. As a result, new analytical solutions were obtained in terms Jacobi elliptic functions.

  7. Spatially Extended Relativistic Particles Out of Traveling Front Solutions of Sine-Gordon Equation in (1+2) Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarmi, Yair

    2016-01-01

    Slower-than-light multi-front solutions of the Sine-Gordon in (1+2) dimensions, constructed through the Hirota algorithm, are mapped onto spatially localized structures, which emulate free, spatially extended, massive relativistic particles. A localized structure is an image of the junctions at which the fronts intersect. It propagates together with the multi-front solution at the velocity of the latter. The profile of the localized structure obeys the linear wave equation in (1+2) dimensions, to which a term that represents interaction with a slower-than-light, Sine-Gordon-multi-front solution has been added. This result can be also formulated in terms of a (1+2)-dimensional Lagrangian system, in which the Sine-Gordon and wave equations are coupled. Expanding the Euler-Lagrange equations in powers of the coupling constant, the zero-order part of the solution reproduces the (1+2)-dimensional Sine-Gordon fronts. The first-order part is the spatially localized structure. PACS: 02.30.Ik, 03.65.Pm, 05.45.Yv, 02.30.Ik. PMID:26930077

  8. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics and solitons of the sine-Gordon and nonlinear Schroedinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Andrew; Olshanii, Maxim

    2011-12-15

    We present a case demonstrating the connection between supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), reflectionless scattering, and soliton solutions of integrable partial differential equations. We show that the members of a class of reflectionless Hamiltonians, namely, Akulin's Hamiltonians, are connected via supersymmetric chains to a potential-free Hamiltonian, explaining their reflectionless nature. While the reflectionless property in question has been mentioned in the literature for over two decades, the enabling algebraic mechanism was previously unknown. Our results indicate that the multisoliton solutions of the sine-Gordon and nonlinear Schroedinger equations can be systematically generated via the supersymmetric chains connecting Akulin's Hamiltonians. Our findings also explain a well-known but little-understood effect in laser physics: when a two-level atom, initially in the ground state, is subjected to a laser pulse of the form V(t)=(n({h_bar}/2{pi})/{tau})/cosh(t/{tau}), with n being an integer and {tau} being the pulse duration, it remains in the ground state after the pulse has been applied, for any choice of the laser detuning.

  9. Edge binding of sine-Gordon solitons in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Mireles, Francisco; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2015-02-01

    In recent experiments with ultracold gases a Raman coupling scheme is used to produce both spin-orbit (SO) and Zeeman-type couplings [Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature (London) 471, 83 (2011), 10.1038/nature09887]. Their competition drives a phase transition to a magnetized state with broken Z2 symmetry. Using a hydrodynamic approach we study a confined binary condensate subject to both SO and Zeeman-type couplings. We find that in the limit of small healing length and in the phase with unbroken symmetry, the boundary magnetization profile has an analytical solution in the form of a sine-Gordon soliton. The soliton is bound to the edge of the system by the nontrivial boundary condition resulting from the combined effect of the SO coupling and the drop in the particle density. The same boundary condition is important in the magnetized phase as well, where we characterize numerically the boundary spin structure. We further discuss how the nontrivial magnetization structure affects the density profile near the boundary, yet another prediction that can be tested in current experiments of spin-orbit-coupled condensates.

  10. Specific sine-Gordon soliton dynamics in the presence of external driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Gilbert; Fernandez, Jean Claude

    1981-07-01

    We consider the acceleration of a single sine-Gordon (SG) soliton kink wave by an external time-dependent force χ(t), first without any dissipation, and then in the presence of a weak damping effect. We use the method of Fogel, Trullinger, Bishop, and Krumhansl [FTBK,

    Phys. Rev. B 45, 1578 (1977)]
    which consists in perturbing the SG equation about its kink solution and solving the resulting linear inhomogeneous equation for the perturbation function by expanding it in the complete set of eigenfunctions of the Schrödinger operator with potential 1-2 2x. Our results concerning the accelerated soliton dynamics strongly disagree with the FTBK conclusion that the soliton should undergo an acceleration proportional to χ (this is the so-called Newtonian dynamical behavior of SG soliton, which is also predicted by all existing perturbation theories dealing with the perturbed SG equation). On the contrary, we find that this Newtonian acceleration is exactly balanced by a reaction effect of the continuous phonon spectrum excited by the external force χ, upon the moving kink, so that there is no soliton acceleration at all within the frame of this linear perturbation theory, i.e., for small time values. Actually, we show by the simple example of a static external force that the acceleration of an initially static kink is a higher-order effect (proportional to χt2, where t is the time, instead of being constant and proportional to χ). We emphasize that this last result has already been checked by numerical experiments and show, both by theory and by numerical simulations, that it does not qualitatively change when a small damping effect is taken into account.

  11. A numerical scheme and some theoretical aspects for the cylindrically and spherically symmetric sine-Gordon equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lu Trong Khiem

    2016-07-01

    A finite difference formula based on the predictor-corrector technique is presented to integrate the cylindrically and spherically symmetric sine-Gordon equations numerically. Based on various numerical observations, one property of the waves of kink type is conjectured and used to explain their returning effect. Several numerical experiments are carried out and they are in excellent agreement with the existing results. In addition, the corresponding modulation solution for the two-dimensional ring-shaped kink is extended to that in three-dimension. Both numerical and theoretical aspects are utilized to verify the reliability of the proposed numerical scheme and thus the analytical modulation solutions.

  12. Linear stability of spherically symmetric and wormhole solutions supported by the sine-Gordon ghost scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2010-08-15

    In this paper we investigate wormhole and spherically symmetric solutions in four-dimensional gravity plus a matter source consisting of a ghost scalar field with a sine-Gordon potential. For the wormhole solutions we also include the possibility of electric and/or magnetic charges. For both types of solutions we perform a linear stability analysis and show that the wormhole solutions are stable and that when one turns on the electric and/or magnetic field the solution remains stable. The linear stability analysis of the spherically symmetric solutions indicates that they can be stable or unstable depending on one of the parameters of the system. This result for the spherically symmetric solution is nontrivial since a previous investigation of four-dimensional gravity plus a ghost scalar field with a {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} interaction found only unstable spherically symmetric solutions. Both the wormhole and spherically symmetric solutions presented here asymptotically go to anti-de Sitter space-time.

  13. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics and solitons of the sine-Gordon and nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

    PubMed

    Koller, Andrew; Olshanii, Maxim

    2011-12-01

    We present a case demonstrating the connection between supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), reflectionless scattering, and soliton solutions of integrable partial differential equations. We show that the members of a class of reflectionless Hamiltonians, namely, Akulin's Hamiltonians, are connected via supersymmetric chains to a potential-free Hamiltonian, explaining their reflectionless nature. While the reflectionless property in question has been mentioned in the literature for over two decades, the enabling algebraic mechanism was previously unknown. Our results indicate that the multisoliton solutions of the sine-Gordon and nonlinear Schrödinger equations can be systematically generated via the supersymmetric chains connecting Akulin's Hamiltonians. Our findings also explain a well-known but little-understood effect in laser physics: when a two-level atom, initially in the ground state, is subjected to a laser pulse of the form V(t) = (nh/τ)/cosh(t/τ), with n being an integer and τ being the pulse duration, it remains in the ground state after the pulse has been applied, for any choice of the laser detuning. PMID:22304205

  14. Studies of Kink-AntiKink Collisions in 1+1 D in φ^4 and Double Sine Gordon Nonlinear Wave Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, Christopher G.

    1996-11-01

    The manner in which kink and antikink solutions interact in nonlinear systems is strongly dependent upon the velocities in the collision. In certain velocity regions, the kink and antikink annihilate, while in other regions they bounce off of one another. We present studies of multiple bounce solutions for the collision of kinks and antikinks in a 1 + 1 dimensional φ^4 and Double Sine-Gordon systems. We confirm the existence of a repeated level structure for velocities at which 3, 4, 5, and 6 bounce solutions occur φ^4 as presented by previous authors ( Michael Peyrard and David K. Campbell, Physica 9D) (1983) 33, Peter Anninos, Samuel Oliveira, and Richard A. Matzner, Phys. Rev. D44 (1991) 1147 and we characterize the onset of each multiple bounce solution. The positions of these levels may be described by a simple extension of previous works, and imply that the system follows a specific ``route'' to ``chaotic'' annihilation. An analysis of kink-antinkink collisions in the Double-Sine Gordon equation will also be presented. This analysis reveals both interesting similarities and differences when compared to φ^4

  15. Sine-Gordon Equation in (1+2) and (1+3) dimensions: Existence and Classification of Traveling-Wave Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zarmi, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The (1+1)-dimensional Sine-Gordon equation passes integrability tests commonly applied to nonlinear evolution equations. Its kink solutions (one-dimensional fronts) are obtained by a Hirota algorithm. In higher space-dimensions, the equation does not pass these tests. Although it has been derived over the years for quite a few physical systems that have nothing to do with Special Relativity, the Sine-Gordon equation emerges as a non-linear relativistic wave equation. This opens the way for exploiting the tools of the Theory of Special Relativity. Using no more than the relativistic kinematics of tachyonic momentum vectors, from which the solutions are constructed through the Hirota algorithm, the existence and classification of N-moving-front solutions of the (1+2)- and (1+3)-dimensional equations for all N ≥ 1 are presented. In (1+2) dimensions, each multi-front solution propagates rigidly at one velocity. The solutions are divided into two subsets: Solutions whose velocities are lower than a limiting speed, c = 1, or are greater than or equal to c. To connect with concepts of the Theory of Special Relativity, c will be called “the speed of light.” In (1+3)-dimensions, multi-front solutions are characterized by spatial structure and by velocity composition. The spatial structure is either planar (rotated (1+2)-dimensional solutions), or genuinely three-dimensional – branes. Planar solutions, propagate rigidly at one velocity, which is lower than, equal to, or higher than c. Branes must contain clusters of fronts whose speed exceeds c = 1. Some branes are “hybrids”: different clusters of fronts propagate at different velocities. Some velocities may be lower than c but some must be equal to, or exceed, c. Finally, the speed of light cannot be approached from within the subset of slower-than-light solutions in both (1+2) and (1+3) dimensions. PMID:26020922

  16. Sine-Gordon Equation in (1+2) and (1+3) dimensions: Existence and Classification of Traveling-Wave Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zarmi, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The (1+1)-dimensional Sine-Gordon equation passes integrability tests commonly applied to nonlinear evolution equations. Its kink solutions (one-dimensional fronts) are obtained by a Hirota algorithm. In higher space-dimensions, the equation does not pass these tests. Although it has been derived over the years for quite a few physical systems that have nothing to do with Special Relativity, the Sine-Gordon equation emerges as a non-linear relativistic wave equation. This opens the way for exploiting the tools of the Theory of Special Relativity. Using no more than the relativistic kinematics of tachyonic momentum vectors, from which the solutions are constructed through the Hirota algorithm, the existence and classification of N-moving-front solutions of the (1+2)- and (1+3)-dimensional equations for all N ≥ 1 are presented. In (1+2) dimensions, each multi-front solution propagates rigidly at one velocity. The solutions are divided into two subsets: Solutions whose velocities are lower than a limiting speed, c = 1, or are greater than or equal to c. To connect with concepts of the Theory of Special Relativity, c will be called "the speed of light." In (1+3)-dimensions, multi-front solutions are characterized by spatial structure and by velocity composition. The spatial structure is either planar (rotated (1+2)-dimensional solutions), or genuinely three-dimensional--branes. Planar solutions, propagate rigidly at one velocity, which is lower than, equal to, or higher than c. Branes must contain clusters of fronts whose speed exceeds c = 1. Some branes are "hybrids": different clusters of fronts propagate at different velocities. Some velocities may be lower than c but some must be equal to, or exceed, c. Finally, the speed of light cannot be approached from within the subset of slower-than-light solutions in both (1+2) and (1+3) dimensions. PMID:26020922

  17. Shape and wobbling wave excitations in Josephson junctions: Exact solutions of the (2+1)-dimensional sine-Gordon model

    SciTech Connect

    Gulevich, D. R.; Savel'ev, Sergey; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Yampol'skii, V. A.; Nori, Franco

    2009-09-01

    We predict a class of excitations propagating along a Josephson vortex in two-dimensional Josephson junctions. These excitations are associated with the distortion of a Josephson vortex line of an arbitrary profile. We derive a universal analytical expression for the energy of arbitrary-shape excitations, investigate their influence on the dynamics of a vortex line, and discuss conditions where such excitations can be created. Finally, we show that such excitations play the role of a clock for a relativistically-moving Josephson vortex and suggest an experiment to measure a time-dilation effect analogous to that in special relativity. The position of the shape excitation on a Josephson vortex acts like a 'minute hand' showing the time in the rest frame associated with the vortex. Remarkably, at some conditions, the shape wave can carry negative energy: a vortex with the shape excitation can have less energy than the same vortex without it.

  18. The abelian confinement mechanism revisited: New aspects of the Georgi-Glashow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, Mohamed M.

    2014-02-01

    The confinement problem remains one of the most difficult problems in theoretical physics. An important step toward the solution of this problem is Polyakov's work on abelian confinement. The Georgi-Glashow model is a natural testing ground for this mechanism which has been surprising us by its richness and wide applicability. In this work, we shed light on two new aspects of this model in 2+1 D. First, we develop a many-body description of the effective degrees of freedom. Namely, we consider a non-relativistic gas of W-bosons in the background of monopole-instanton plasma. Many-body treatment is a standard toolkit in condensed matter physics. However, we add a new twist by supplying the monopole-instantons as external background field. Using this construction along with a mean-field approximation, we calculate the form of the potential between two electric probes as a function of their separation. This potential is expressed in terms of the Meijer-G function which interpolates between logarithmic and linear behavior at small and large distances, respectively. Second, we develop a systematic approach to integrate out the effect of the W-bosons at finite temperature in the range 0≤Tmodel. Using a heat kernel expansion that takes into account the non-trivial thermal holonomy, we show that the partition function describes a three-dimensional two-component Coulomb gas. We repeat our analysis using the many-body description which yields the same result and provides a check on our formalism. At temperatures close to the deconfinement temperature, the gas becomes essentially two-dimensional recovering the partition function of the dual sine-Gordon model that was considered in a previous work.

  19. Quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Livne, H. )

    1993-02-01

    The quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model has been calculated from all nonzero modes. The calculations were carried out using a method applied earlier to the sine-Gordon model. The mass shifts do not depend on the baryonic spin, therefore they are the same for the nucleon and the [Delta]. Our model parameters are the pion decay constant [ital F][sub [pi

  20. Conceptual Foundations of Soliton Versus Particle Dualities Toward a Topological Model for Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouneiher, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The idea that fermions could be solitons was actually confirmed in theoretical models in 1975 in the case when the space-time is two-dimensional and with the sine-Gordon model. More precisely S. Coleman showed that two different classical models end up describing the same fermions particle, when the quantum theory is constructed. But in one model the fermion is a quantum excitation of the field and in the other model the particle is a soliton. Hence both points of view can be reconciliated.The principal aim in this paper is to exhibit a solutions of topological type for the fermions in the wave zone, where the equations of motion are non-linear field equations, i.e. using a model generalizing sine- Gordon model to four dimensions, and describe the solutions for linear and circular polarized waves. In other words, the paper treat fermions as topological excitations of a bosonic field.

  1. Revisiting the R νMDM models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Combining neutrino mass generation and a dark matter candidate in a unified model has always been intriguing. We revisit the class of R νMDM models, which incorporate minimal dark matter in radiative neutrino mass models based on the one-loop ultraviolet completions of the Weinberg operator. The possibility of an exact accidental Z 2 is completely ruled out in this scenario. We study the phenomenology of one of the models with an approximate Z 2 symmetry. In addition to the Standard Model particles, it contains two real scalar quintuplets, one vector-like quadruplet fermion and a fermionic quintuplet. The neutral component of the fermionic quintuplet serves as a good dark matter candidate which can be tested by the future direct and indirect detection experiments. The constraints from flavor physics and electroweak-scale naturalness are also discussed.

  2. Long-range interactions and wave patterns in a DNA model.

    PubMed

    Tabi, C B; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2010-07-01

    We propose a spin-like model of DNA nonlinear dynamics with long-range interactions between adjacent base pairs. We show that the model equation is a modified sine-Gordon equation. We perform the linear stability analysis of a plane wave, which predicts high-amplitude and extended oscillating waves for high values of the long-range parameter. This is confirmed numerically and biological implications of the obtained patterns are suggested. PMID:20676723

  3. Isgur-Karl model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Galeta, Leonardo; Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2009-12-01

    We show how to match the Isgur-Karl model to the spin-flavor quark operator expansion used in the 1/N{sub c} studies of the nonstrange negative parity L=1 excited baryons. Using the transformation properties of states and interactions under the permutation group S{sub 3} we are able to express the operator coefficients as overlap integrals, without making any assumption on the spatial dependence of the quark wave functions. The general mass operator leads to parameter free mass relations and constraints on the mixing angles that are valid beyond the usual harmonic oscillator approximation. The Isgur-Karl model with harmonic oscillator wave functions provides a simple counterexample that demonstrates explicitly that the alternative operator basis for the 1/N{sub c} expansion for excited baryons recently proposed by Matagne and Stancu is incomplete.

  4. The sausage sigma model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suneeta, Vardarajan

    2015-06-01

    Fateev’s sausage sigma models in two and three dimensions are known to be integrable. We study their stability under renormalization group (RG) flow in the target space by using results from the mathematics of Ricci flow. We show that the three-dimensional sausage is unstable, whereas the two-dimensional sausage appears to be stable at least at leading order as it approaches the sphere. We speculate that the stability results obtained are linked to the classification of ancient solutions to Ricci flow (i.e., sigma models that are nonperturbative in the infrared regime) in two and three dimensions. We also describe a class of perturbations of the three-dimensional sausage (with the same continuous symmetries) which remarkably decouple. This indicates that there could be a new solution to RG flow, which is described at least perturbatively as a deformation of the sausage.

  5. Lambert's multiple reflection model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    In last years paper on the idea of Lambertian reflection we gave a partial translation of an almost lost chapter by Lambert on multiple reflection as a gimmick. The problem of multiple reflections is of special interest in scatterometric devices. The present paper is dedicated to a deeper discussion of the model proposed by J.H. Lambert or, better to say, a derivation using the matrix method of paraxial optics. Further some examples and special cases - especially the consequences for scatterometer design - are discussed. For easy handling it would be desirable to derive some simplified formulas describing the effective higher order refraction qualities of thick lenses, which might support the choice of lenses for certain applications.

  6. Q kink of the nonlinear O(3) {sigma} model involving an explicitly broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Loginov, A. Yu.

    2011-05-15

    The (1 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear O(3) {sigma} model involving an explicitly broken symmetry is considered. Sphalerons are known to exist in this model. These sphalerons are of a topological origin and are embedded kinks of the sine-Gordon model. In the case of a compact spatial manifold S{sup 1}, sine-Gordon multikinks exist in the model. It is shown that the model admits a nonstatic generalization of the sine-Gordon kink/multikink, Q kink/multikink. Explicit expressions are obtained for the dependence of the Q kink energy and charge on the phase frequency of rotation. The Q kink is studied for stability, and expressions are obtained for the eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of the operator of quadratic fluctuations. It is shown that the Q kink is unstable over the entire admissible frequency range {omega} Element-Of [-1, 1]. The one-loop quantum correction to the static-kink mass is calculated, and the Q-kink zero mode is quantized. It is shown that, in a general static case, the field equations of the model are integrable in quadratures.

  7. The abelian confinement mechanism revisited: New aspects of the Georgi–Glashow model

    SciTech Connect

    Anber, Mohamed M.

    2014-02-15

    The confinement problem remains one of the most difficult problems in theoretical physics. An important step toward the solution of this problem is Polyakov’s work on abelian confinement. The Georgi–Glashow model is a natural testing ground for this mechanism which has been surprising us by its richness and wide applicability. In this work, we shed light on two new aspects of this model in 2+1 D. First, we develop a many-body description of the effective degrees of freedom. Namely, we consider a non-relativistic gas of W-bosons in the background of monopole–instanton plasma. Many-body treatment is a standard toolkit in condensed matter physics. However, we add a new twist by supplying the monopole–instantons as external background field. Using this construction along with a mean-field approximation, we calculate the form of the potential between two electric probes as a function of their separation. This potential is expressed in terms of the Meijer-G function which interpolates between logarithmic and linear behavior at small and large distances, respectively. Second, we develop a systematic approach to integrate out the effect of the W-bosons at finite temperature in the range 0≤Tmodel. Using a heat kernel expansion that takes into account the non-trivial thermal holonomy, we show that the partition function describes a three-dimensional two-component Coulomb gas. We repeat our analysis using the many-body description which yields the same result and provides a check on our formalism. At temperatures close to the deconfinement temperature, the gas becomes essentially two-dimensional recovering the partition function of the dual sine-Gordon model that was considered in a previous work. -- Highlights: • We consider the problem of abelian confinement in the Georgi–Glashow model from a new perspective. • We develop a many

  8. A Multi-Level Model of Moral Functioning Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Don Collins

    2009-01-01

    The model of moral functioning scaffolded in the 2008 "JME" Special Issue is here revisited in response to three papers criticising that volume. As guest editor of that Special Issue I have formulated the main body of this response, concerning the dynamic systems approach to moral development, the problem of moral relativism and the role of…

  9. Topological Twisted Sigma Model with H-flux Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen

    2006-08-18

    In this paper we revisit the topological twisted sigma model with H-flux. We explicitly expand and then twist the worldsheet Lagrangian for bi-Hermitian geometry. we show that the resulting action consists of a BRST exact term and pullback terms, which only depend on one of the two generalized complex structures and the B-field. We then discuss the topological feature of the model.

  10. Mathematical modeling of intrinsic Josephson junctions with capacitive and inductive couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Sarhadov, I.; Andreeva, O.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the current voltage characteristics (CVC) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) with two types of couplings between junctions: capacitive and inductive. The IJJ model is described by a system of coupled sine-Gordon equations which is solved numerically by the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The method of numerical simulation and numerical results are presented. The magnetic field distribution is calculated as the function of coordinate and time at different values of the bias current. The influence of model parameters on the CVC is studied. The behavior of the IJJ in dependence on coupling parameters is discussed.

  11. Revisiting the minimal chaotic inflation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-05-01

    We point out that the prediction of the minimal chaotic inflation model is altered if a scalar field takes a large field value close to the Planck scale during inflation due to a negative Hubble induced mass. In particular, we show that the inflaton potential is effectively flattened at a large inflaton field value in the presence of such a scalar field. The scalar field may be identified with the standard model Higgs field or super partners of standard model fermions. With such Hubble-induced flattening, we find that the minimal chaotic inflation model, especially the model with a quadratic potential, is consistent with recent observations of the cosmic microwave background fluctuation without modifying the inflation model itself.

  12. Kuwaiti oil fires—Modeling revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Tahir

    Just after the invasion of Kuwait, scientists began predictions on the environmental disaster due to threat by the Iraqi regime to blow out oil wells in the Kuwaiti oil fields. The findings with the speculations ranging from a nuclear winter to super-acid rain and global warming were presented in the World Climate Conference in Geneva in November 1990. Just before the war erupted in the middle of January 1991, a conference in London was called to discuss the potential risks to human life and ecological systems in case of blow out of oil fields. The scientists, using modeling techniques, raised the speculations about the global impact which, however, was discounted at a later stage. This paper presents an overview of the selected models used to assess the local, regional, and global impacts. The paper also highlights the model and data limitations and suggests future research directions to respond more effectively under emergency situations.

  13. Potts-model critical manifolds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullard, Christian R.; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We compute critical polynomials for the q-state Potts model on the Archimedean lattices, using a parallel implementation of the algorithm of Jacobsen (2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor 47 135001) that gives us access to larger sizes than previously possible. The exact polynomials are computed for bases of size 6 × 6 unit cells, and the root in the temperature variable v={{{e}}}K-1 is determined numerically at q = 1 for bases of size 8 × 8. This leads to improved results for bond percolation thresholds, and for the Potts-model critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane. In the two most favourable cases, we find now the kagome-lattice threshold to eleven digits and that of the (3,{12}2) lattice to thirteen. Our critical manifolds reveal many interesting features in the antiferromagnetic region of the Potts model, and determine accurately the extent of the Berker-Kadanoff phase for the lattices studied.

  14. The Bonn nuclear quark model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Providencia, Constanca; Providencia, Joao da Cordeiro, Flavio; Yamamura, Masatoshi; Tsue, Yasuhiko; Nishiyama, Seiya

    2009-08-15

    We present the exact solutions to the equations of the lowest energy states of the colored and color-symmetric sectors of the Bonn quark model, which is SU(3) symmetric and is defined in terms of an effective pairing force with su(4) algebraic structure. We show that the groundstate of the model is not color symmetrical except for a narrow interval in the range of possible quark numbers. We also study the performance of the Glauber coherent state, as well as of superconducting states of the BCS type, with respect to the description, not only of the absolute (colored) groundstate, but also of the minimum energy state of the color-symmetrical sector, finding that it is remarkably good. We use the model to discuss, in a schematic context, some controversial aspects of the conventional treatment of color superconductivity.

  15. The Hopfield model revisited: covariance and quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgiorno, F.; Cacciatori, S. L.; Dalla Piazza, F.

    2016-01-01

    There are several possible applications of quantum electrodynamics in dielectric media which require a quantum description for the electromagnetic field interacting with matter fields. The associated quantum models can refer to macroscopic electromagnetic fields or, alternatively, to mesoscopic fields (polarization fields) describing an effective interaction between electromagnetic field and matter fields. We adopt the latter approach, and focus on the Hopfield model for the electromagnetic field in a dielectric dispersive medium in a framework in which space-time dependent mesoscopic parameters occur, like susceptibility, matter resonance frequency, and also coupling between electromagnetic field and polarization field. Our most direct goal is to describe in a phenomenological way a space-time varying dielectric perturbation induced by means of the Kerr effect in nonlinear dielectric media. This extension of the model is implemented by means of a Lorentz-invariant Lagrangian which, for constant microscopic parameters, and in the rest frame, coincides with the standard one. Moreover, we deduce a covariant scalar product and provide a canonical quantization scheme which takes into account the constraints implicit in the model. Examples of viable applications are indicated.

  16. The Motive--Strategy Congruence Model Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, David; Hattie, John

    1992-01-01

    Research with 1,266 Australian secondary school students supports 2 propositions critical to the motive-strategy congruence model of J. B. Biggs (1985). Students tend to use learning strategies congruent with motivation for learning, and congruent motive-strategy combinations are associated with higher average school grades. (SLD)

  17. Density waves in the Calogero model - revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bardek, V. Feinberg, J. Meljanac, S.

    2010-03-15

    The Calogero model bears, in the continuum limit, collective excitations in the form of density waves and solitary modulations of the density of particles. This sector of the spectrum of the model was investigated, mostly within the framework of collective-field theory, by several authors, over the past 15 years or so. In this work we shall concentrate on periodic solutions of the collective BPS-equation (also known as 'finite amplitude density waves'), as well as on periodic solutions of the full static variational equations which vanish periodically (also known as 'large amplitude density waves'). While these solutions are not new, we feel that our analysis and presentation add to the existing literature, as we explain in the text. In addition, we show that these solutions also occur in a certain two-family generalization of the Calogero model, at special points in parameter space. A compendium of useful identities associated with Hilbert transforms, including our own proofs of these identities, appears in Appendix A. In Appendix B we also elucidate in the present paper some fine points having to do with manipulating Hilbert-transforms, which appear ubiquitously in the collective field formalism. Finally, in order to make this paper self-contained, we briefly summarize in Appendix C basic facts about the collective field formulation of the Calogero model.

  18. Neural network modelling of CIMIS-ET0 (revisited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahart, R. J.; Ghani, N. Ab

    2009-04-01

    This paper will revisit the use of four independent hydrometeorological variables to predict 'reference crop evapotranspiration' in a neural network model - calculated as CIMIS-ET0 (Kisi, 2006; Aytek et al., 2008). The two earlier studies are coalesced and their published findings positioned in a broader environmental modelling context. Four models developed on similar datasets are compared and contrasted in the current exercise: a multiple linear regression model (MLIN: Pearson, 1896), a piecewise multiple linear regression model (M5 Model Tree; M5MT: Quinlan, 1992; Wang & Witten, 1997) and two neural network models developed on different optimisation algorithms - Conjugate Gradient (CGNN: Hestenes & Stiefel, 1952) and Levenberg-Marquet (LMNN: Levenberg, 1944; Marquardt, 1963). The results are presented using residual scatterplots so that the exact nature of the each individual modelling solution can be determined: permitting outputs to be interpreted in terms of structures, symmetries, orientations, local features and outliers. The reported inspection and interpretation of plots is matched against a selection of traditional numerical modelling statistics that were computed on HydroTest (http://www.hydrotest.org.uk; Dawson et al., 2007). The reported closeness of earlier neurocomputing outputs to predicted values estimated using a counterpart multiple linear regression model is explained in detail.

  19. The maternal deprivation animal model revisited.

    PubMed

    Marco, Eva M; Llorente, Ricardo; López-Gallardo, Meritxell; Mela, Virginia; Llorente-Berzal, Álvaro; Prada, Carmen; Viveros, María-Paz

    2015-04-01

    Early life stress, in the form of MD (24h at pnd 9), interferes with brain developmental trajectories modifying both behavioral and neurobiochemical parameters. MD has been reported to enhance neuroendocrine responses to stress, to affect emotional behavior and to impair cognitive function. More recently, changes in body weight gain, metabolic parameters and immunological responding have also been described. Present data give support to the fact that neuronal degeneration and/or astrocyte proliferation are present in specific brain regions, mainly hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and hypothalamus, which are particularly vulnerable to the effects of neonatal stress. The MD animal model arises as a valuable tool for the investigation of the brain processes occurring at the narrow time window comprised between pnd 9 and 10 that are critical for the establishment of brain circuitries critical for the regulation of behavior, metabolism and energy homeostasis. In the present review we will discuss three possible mechanisms that might be crucial for the effects of MD, namely, the rapid increase in glucocorticoids, the lack of the neonatal leptin surge, and the enhanced endocannabinoid signaling during the specific critical period of MD. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the detrimental consequences of MD is a concern for public health and may provide new insights into mental health prevention strategies and into novel therapeutic approaches in neuropsychiatry. PMID:25616179

  20. The Mantel-Haenszel procedure revisited: models and generalizations.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Vaclav; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Several statistical methods have been developed for adjusting the Odds Ratio of the relation between two dichotomous variables X and Y for some confounders Z. With the exception of the Mantel-Haenszel method, commonly used methods, notably binary logistic regression, are not symmetrical in X and Y. The classical Mantel-Haenszel method however only works for confounders with a limited number of discrete strata, which limits its utility, and appears to have no basis in statistical models. Here we revisit the Mantel-Haenszel method and propose an extension to continuous and vector valued Z. The idea is to replace the observed cell entries in strata of the Mantel-Haenszel procedure by subject specific classification probabilities for the four possible values of (X,Y) predicted by a suitable statistical model. For situations where X and Y can be treated symmetrically we propose and explore the multinomial logistic model. Under the homogeneity hypothesis, which states that the odds ratio does not depend on Z, the logarithm of the odds ratio estimator can be expressed as a simple linear combination of three parameters of this model. Methods for testing the homogeneity hypothesis are proposed. The relationship between this method and binary logistic regression is explored. A numerical example using survey data is presented. PMID:23516463

  1. Alleviating the non-ultralocality of coset σ-models through a generalized Faddeev-Reshetikhin procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delduc, F.; Magro, M.; Vicedo, B.

    2012-08-01

    The Faddeev-Reshetikhin procedure corresponds to a removal of the non-ultralocality of the classical SU(2) principal chiral model. It is realized by defining another field theory, which has the same Lax pair and equations of motion but a different Poisson structure and Hamiltonian. Following earlier work of M. Semenov-Tian-Shansky and A. Sevostyanov, we show how it is possible to alleviate in a similar way the non-ultralocality of symmetric space σ-models. The equivalence of the equations of motion holds only at the level of the Pohlmeyer reduction of these models, which corresponds to symmetric space sine-Gordon models. This work therefore shows indirectly that symmetric space sine-Gordon models, defined by a gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action with an integrable potential, have a mild non-ultralocality. The first step needed to construct an integrable discretization of these models is performed by determining the discrete analogue of the Poisson algebra of their Lax matrices.

  2. On a family of (1+1)-dimensional scalar field theory models: Kinks, stability, one-loop mass shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Mateos Guilarte, J.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper we construct a one-parametric family of (1+1)-dimensional one-component scalar field theory models supporting kinks. Inspired by the sine-Gordon and {phi}{sup 4} models, we look at all possible extensions such that the kink second-order fluctuation operators are Schroedinger differential operators with Poeschl-Teller potential wells. In this situation, the associated spectral problem is solvable and therefore we shall succeed in analyzing the kink stability completely and in computing the one-loop quantum correction to the kink mass exactly. When the parameter is a natural number, the family becomes the hierarchy for which the potential wells are reflectionless, the two first levels of the hierarchy being the sine-Gordon and {phi}{sup 4} models. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct a family of scalar field theory models supporting kinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second-order kink fluctuation operators involve Poeschl-Teller potential wells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compute the one-loop quantum correction to the kink mass with different methods.

  3. Revisiting rodent models: Octodon degus as Alzheimer's disease model?

    PubMed

    Steffen, Johannes; Krohn, Markus; Paarmann, Kristin; Schwitlick, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Korth, Carsten; Braun, Katharina; Pahnke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease primarily occurs as sporadic disease and is accompanied with vast socio-economic problems. The mandatory basic research relies on robust and reliable disease models to overcome increasing incidence and emerging social challenges. Rodent models are most efficient, versatile, and predominantly used in research. However, only highly artificial and mostly genetically modified models are available. As these 'engineered' models reproduce only isolated features, researchers demand more suitable models of sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. One very promising animal model was the South American rodent Octodon degus, which was repeatedly described as natural 'sporadic Alzheimer's disease model' with 'Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology'. To unveil advantages over the 'artificial' mouse models, we re-evaluated the age-dependent, neurohistological changes in young and aged Octodon degus (1 to 5-years-old) bred in a wild-type colony in Germany. In our hands, extensive neuropathological analyses of young and aged animals revealed normal age-related cortical changes without obvious signs for extensive degeneration as seen in patients with dementia. Neither significant neuronal loss nor enhanced microglial activation were observed in aged animals. Silver impregnation methods, conventional, and immunohistological stains as well as biochemical fractionations revealed neither amyloid accumulation nor tangle formation. Phosphoepitope-specific antibodies against tau species displayed similar intraneuronal reactivity in both, young and aged Octodon degus.In contrast to previous results, our study suggests that Octodon degus born and bred in captivity do not inevitably develop cortical amyloidosis, tangle formation or neuronal loss as seen in Alzheimer's disease patients or transgenic disease models. PMID:27566602

  4. Freight Network Equilibrium Model revisited: the Freight Network Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Freight Network Equilibrium Model (FNEM) was developed to study potential coal transportation impacts that could result from widespread conversion of boilers to use coal for fuel, as mandated under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. Continued improvement of FNEM and creation of auxiliary software and data during applications of the model in various transportation analyses led to the development of the Freight Network Modeling System, a general and flexible modeling system designed to have wide applicability to a variety of freight transportation analyses. It consists of compatible network data bases, data management software, models of freight transportation, report generators, and graphics output. The network data include US rail, water, highway, and pipeline systems. Data management software automates the task of setting up a study network of appropriate detail in appropriate regions of the country. The major analytical tools in the system are FNEM and Shortest Path Analysis and Display (SPAD); FNEM is predictive and simulates decisions of both shippers and carriers, taking into account the competition for transportation facilities; SPAD is a simpler model that optimizes routings of single shipments. Output for both FNEM and SPAD includes detailed routings, cost and delay estimates for all shipments, and data on total traffic levels. SPAD can be used interactively with routes displayed graphically. 13 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Statistical mechanics of nonlinear wave equations. 3. Metric transitivity for hyperbolic sine-gordon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, H. P.

    1995-05-01

    McKean and Vaninsky proved that the canonical measure e - H d ∞ Q d ∞ P based upon the HamiltonianH = int [tfrac{1}{2}P^2 + tfrac{1}{2}(Q')^2 + F(Q)]dx of the wave equation ∂2 Q/∂ t 2 - ∂2 Q/∂ x 2 + f( Q) = 0 with restoring force f(Q)=F'(Q) is preserved by the associated flow of Q and P = Q ṡ, and they conjectured that metric transitivity prevails, always on the whole line, and likewise on the circle unless f(Q)=Q or f(Q)=sh Q. Here, the metric transitivity is proved for the whole line in the second case. The proof employs the beautiful "d'Alembert formula" of Krichever.

  6. The Gate Theory of Pain Revisited: Modeling Different Pain Conditions with a Parsimonious Neurocomputational Model.

    PubMed

    Ropero Peláez, Francisco Javier; Taniguchi, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    The gate control theory of pain proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 is revisited through two mechanisms of neuronal regulation: NMDA synaptic plasticity and intrinsic plasticity. The Melzack and Wall circuit was slightly modified by using strictly excitatory nociceptive afferents (in the original arrangement, nociceptive afferents were considered excitatory when they project to central transmission neurons and inhibitory when projecting to substantia gelatinosa). The results of our neurocomputational model are consistent with biological ones in that nociceptive signals are blocked on their way to the brain every time a tactile stimulus is given at the same locus where the pain was produced. In the computational model, the whole set of parameters, independently of their initialization, always converge to the correct values to allow the correct computation of the circuit. To test the model, other painful conditions were analyzed: phantom limb pain, wind-up and wind-down pain, breakthrough pain, and demyelinating syndromes like Guillain-Barré and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27088014

  7. The Gate Theory of Pain Revisited: Modeling Different Pain Conditions with a Parsimonious Neurocomputational Model

    PubMed Central

    Ropero Peláez, Francisco Javier; Taniguchi, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    The gate control theory of pain proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 is revisited through two mechanisms of neuronal regulation: NMDA synaptic plasticity and intrinsic plasticity. The Melzack and Wall circuit was slightly modified by using strictly excitatory nociceptive afferents (in the original arrangement, nociceptive afferents were considered excitatory when they project to central transmission neurons and inhibitory when projecting to substantia gelatinosa). The results of our neurocomputational model are consistent with biological ones in that nociceptive signals are blocked on their way to the brain every time a tactile stimulus is given at the same locus where the pain was produced. In the computational model, the whole set of parameters, independently of their initialization, always converge to the correct values to allow the correct computation of the circuit. To test the model, other painful conditions were analyzed: phantom limb pain, wind-up and wind-down pain, breakthrough pain, and demyelinating syndromes like Guillain-Barré and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27088014

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for generalized nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Huilin; Ma, Changfeng

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a lattice Boltzmann model is developed to solve a class of the nonlinear wave equations. Through selecting equilibrium distribution function and an amending function properly, the governing evolution equation can be recovered correctly according to our proposed scheme, in which the Chapman-Enskog expansion is employed. We validate the algorithm on some problems where analytic solutions are available, including the second-order telegraph equation, the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation, and the damped, driven sine-Gordon equation. It is found that the numerical results agree well with the analytic solutions, which indicates that the present algorithm is very effective and can be used to solve more general nonlinear problems.

  9. On the mass-coupling relation of multi-scale quantum integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajnok, Zoltán; Balog, János; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    We determine exactly the mass-coupling relation for the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model, the homogenous sine-Gordon model with two independent mass-scales. We first reformulate its perturbed coset CFT description in terms of the perturbation of a projected product of minimal models. This representation enables us to identify conserved tensor currents on the UV side. These UV operators are then mapped via form factor perturbation theory to operators on the IR side, which are characterized by their form factors. The relation between the UV and IR operators is given in terms of the sought-for mass-coupling relation. By generalizing the Θ sum rule Ward identity we are able to derive differential equations for the mass-coupling relation, which we solve in terms of hypergeometric functions. We check these results against the data obtained by numerically solving the thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations, and find a complete agreement.

  10. LISREL Modeling: Genetic and Environmental Influences on IQ Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipuer, Heather M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A model-fitting analysis of the covariance structure of an intelligence quotient (IQ) data set is reported using a model that considers additive and nonadditive genetic parameters and shared and nonshared environment parameters that permit different estimates for different types of relatives. The use of LISREL for such purposes is reviewed. (SLD)

  11. Revisiting "Discrepancy Analysis in Continuing Medical Education: A Conceptual Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Based upon a review and analysis of selected literature, the author presents a conceptual model of discrepancy analysis evaluation for planning, implementing, and assessing the impact of continuing medical education (CME). The model is described in terms of its value as a means of diagnosing errors in the development and implementation of CME. The…

  12. Terrestrial nitrogen cycling in Earth system models revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stocker, Benjamin D; Prentice, I Colin; Cornell, Sarah; Davies-Barnard, T; Finzi, Adrien; Franklin, Oskar; Janssens, Ivan; Larmola, Tuula; Manzoni, Stefano; Näsholm, Torgny; Raven, John; Rebel, Karin; Reed, Sasha C.; Vicca, Sara; Wiltshire, Andy; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the degree to which nitrogen (N) availability limits land carbon (C) uptake under global environmental change represents an unresolved challenge. First-generation ‘C-only’vegetation models, lacking explicit representations of N cycling,projected a substantial and increasing land C sink under rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This prediction was questioned for not taking into account the potentially limiting effect of N availability, which is necessary for plant growth (Hungate et al.,2003). More recent global models include coupled C and N cycles in land ecosystems (C–N models) and are widely assumed to be more realistic. However, inclusion of more processes has not consistently improved their performance in capturing observed responses of the global C cycle (e.g. Wenzel et al., 2014). With the advent of a new generation of global models, including coupled C, N, and phosphorus (P) cycling, model complexity is sure to increase; but model reliability may not, unless greater attention is paid to the correspondence of model process representations ande mpirical evidence. It was in this context that the ‘Nitrogen Cycle Workshop’ at Dartington Hall, Devon, UK was held on 1–5 February 2016. Organized by I. Colin Prentice and Benjamin D. Stocker (Imperial College London, UK), the workshop was funded by the European Research Council,project ‘Earth system Model Bias Reduction and assessing Abrupt Climate change’ (EMBRACE). We gathered empirical ecologists and ecosystem modellers to identify key uncertainties in terrestrial C–N cycling, and to discuss processes that are missing or poorly represented in current models.

  13. Revisiting the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford B; D'Amore, Patricia A; Connor, Kip M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration. Numerous refinements to the model have been made since its inception in the 1950s, and technological advancements have expanded the use of the model across multiple scientific fields. In this review, we explore the historical developments that have led to the mouse OIR model utilized today, essential concepts of OIR, limitations of the model, and a representative selection of key findings from OIR, with particular emphasis on current research progress. PMID:27499653

  14. Revisiting the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sridevi; Brenet, Gilles; Caliste, Damien; Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry; Pochet, Pascal

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, we study the stability of the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite in stages III and II by means of Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the domain model is either thermodynamically or kinetically stable when compared to the standard model in stages III and II. The existence of domains in the intercalation sequence is well supported by recent high resolution transmission electron microscope observations in lithiated graphite. Moreover, we predict that such domain staging sequences leads to a wide range of diffusivity as reported in experiments.

  15. Electromagnetic braking revisited with a magnetic point dipole model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Sara; McGuire, Patrick; Bumb, Nikhil; Mann, Brian P.; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the trajectory of magnetized spheres falling through a copper pipe. The derive magnetic point dipole model agrees well with the experimental trajectories for NdFeB spherical magnets of varying diameter, which are embedded inside 3D printed shells with fixed outer dimensions. This demonstration of electrodynamic phenomena and Lenz's law serves as a good laboratory exercise for physics, electromagnetics, and dynamics classes at the undergraduate level.

  16. Zwislocki's model of the middle ear re-visited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnell, Robert H.; Fields, Taylor N.

    2015-12-01

    Zwislocki's circuit model of the middle ear [11] has been used, in original or modified form, in subsequent studies modeling the ear [4, 6]. The model includes two eardrum modes of vibration, a shunt for flexible coupling between the incus and stapes, and a single tuned oscillator for ossicular vibration. The contribution of each of these mechanisms was examined by fitting a model of the ear to acoustic input impedance data from healthy human ears. The circuit elements for a non-ossicular eardrum vibration and a flexible coupling between the incus and stapes were found to be detrimental or non-essential for the model-fit-to-data. A single mode of eardrum vibration for sound transmission to the middle ear is consistent with the eardrum acting as an impedance-matching device, with pars-tensa eardrum vibration coupled to the ossicles [1]. A single-tuned oscillator was insufficient to account for the bandwidth of the ear. The frequency response of the ear suggests multiple resonant modes of ossicular vibration.

  17. The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

    1989-01-01

    As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Energy-economy interactions revisited within a comprehensive sectoral model

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D. A.; Laitner, J. A.

    2000-07-24

    This paper describes a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with considerable sector and technology detail, the ``All Modular Industry Growth Assessment'' Model (AMIGA). It is argued that a detailed model is important to capture and understand the several rolls that energy plays within the economy. Fundamental consumer and industrial demands are for the services from energy; hence, energy demand is a derived demand based on the need for heating, cooling mechanical, electrical, and transportation services. Technologies that provide energy-services more efficiently (on a life cycle basis), when adopted, result in increased future output of the economy and higher paths of household consumption. The AMIGA model can examine the effects on energy use and economic output of increases in energy prices (e.g., a carbon charge) and other incentive-based policies or energy-efficiency programs. Energy sectors and sub-sector activities included in the model involve energy extraction conversion and transportation. There are business opportunities to produce energy-efficient goods (i.e., appliances, control systems, buildings, automobiles, clean electricity). These activities are represented in the model by characterizing their likely production processes (e.g., lighter weight motor vehicles). Also, multiple industrial processes can produce the same output but with different technologies and inputs. Secondary recovery, i.e., recycling processes, are examples of these multiple processes. Combined heat and power (CHP) is also represented for energy-intensive industries. Other modules represent residential and commercial building technologies to supply energy services. All sectors of the economy command real resources (capital services and labor).

  19. Re-visiting the trans insertion model for complexin clamping.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Li, Feng; Coleman, Jeff; Schauder, Curtis M; Kümmel, Daniel; Pincet, Frederic; Rothman, James E; Reinisch, Karin M

    2015-01-01

    We have previously proposed that complexin cross-links multiple pre-fusion SNARE complexes via a trans interaction to function as a clamp on SNARE-mediated neurotransmitter release. A recent NMR study was unable to detect the trans clamping interaction of complexin and therefore questioned the previous interpretation of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer and isothermal titration calorimetry data on which the trans clamping model was originally based. Here we present new biochemical data that underscore the validity of our previous interpretation and the continued relevancy of the trans insertion model for complexin clamping. PMID:25831964

  20. The Thirring-Wess model revisited: a functional integral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2005-06-01

    We consider the Wess-Zumino-Witten theory to obtain the functional integral bosonization of the Thirring-Wess model with an arbitrary regularization parameter. Proceeding a systematic of decomposing the Bose field algebra into gauge-invariant- and gauge-non-invariant field subalgebras, we obtain the local decoupled quantum action. The generalized operator solutions for the equations of motion are reconstructed from the functional integral formalism. The isomorphism between the QED {sub 2} (QCD {sub 2}) with broken gauge symmetry by a regularization prescription and the Abelian (non-Abelian) Thirring-Wess model with a fixed bare mass for the meson field is established.

  1. Simulating runoff under changing climatic conditions: Revisiting an apparent deficiency of conceptual rainfall-runoff models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Keirnan J. A.; Peel, Murray C.; Western, Andrew W.; Zhang, Lu; Peterson, Tim J.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrologic models have potential to be useful tools in planning for future climate variability. However, recent literature suggests that the current generation of conceptual rainfall runoff models tend to underestimate the sensitivity of runoff to a given change in rainfall, leading to poor performance when evaluated over multiyear droughts. This research revisited this conclusion, investigating whether the observed poor performance could be due to insufficient model calibration and evaluation techniques. We applied an approach based on Pareto optimality to explore trade-offs between model performance in different climatic conditions. Five conceptual rainfall runoff model structures were tested in 86 catchments in Australia, for a total of 430 Pareto analyses. The Pareto results were then compared with results from a commonly used model calibration and evaluation method, the Differential Split Sample Test. We found that the latter often missed potentially promising parameter sets within a given model structure, giving a false negative impression of the capabilities of the model. This suggests that models may be more capable under changing climatic conditions than previously thought. Of the 282[347] cases of apparent model failure under the split sample test using the lower [higher] of two model performance criteria trialed, 155[120] were false negatives. We discuss potential causes of remaining model failures, including the role of data errors. Although the Pareto approach proved useful, our aim was not to suggest an alternative calibration strategy, but to critically assess existing methods of model calibration and evaluation. We recommend caution when interpreting split sample results.

  2. What drives health care expenditure?--Baumol's model of 'unbalanced growth' revisited.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Jochen

    2008-05-01

    The share of health care expenditure in GDP rises rapidly in virtually all OECD countries, causing increasing concern among politicians and the general public. Yet, economists have to date failed to reach an agreement on what the main determinants of this development are. This paper revisits Baumol's [Baumol, W.J., 1967. Macroeconomics of unbalanced growth: the anatomy of urban crisis. American Economic Review 57 (3), 415-426] model of 'unbalanced growth', showing that the latter offers a ready explanation for the observed inexorable rise in health care expenditure. The main implication of Baumol's model in this context is that health care expenditure is driven by wage increases in excess of productivity growth. This hypothesis is tested empirically using data from a panel of 19 OECD countries. Our tests yield robust evidence in favor of Baumol's theory. PMID:18164773

  3. Laws of reflection and Snell's law revisited by video modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-07-01

    Video modelling is being used, nowadays, as a tool for teaching and learning several topics in Physics. Most of these topics are related to kinematics. In this work we show how video modelling can be used for demonstrations and experimental teaching in optics, namely the laws of reflection and the well-known Snell's Law of light. Videos were recorded with a photo camera at 30 frames/s, and analysed with the open source software Tracker. Data collected from several frames was treated with the Data Tool module, and graphs were built to obtain relations between incident, reflected and refraction angles, as well as to determine the refractive index of Perspex. These videos can be freely distributed in the web and explored with students within the classroom, or as a homework assignment to improve student's understanding on specific contents. They present a large didactic potential for teaching basic optics in high school with an interactive methodology.

  4. MRAC Revisited: Guaranteed Performance with Reference Model Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmaje

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents modification of the conventional model reference adaptive control (MRAC) architecture in order to achieve guaranteed transient performance both in the output and input signals of an uncertain system. The proposed modification is based on the tracking error feedback to the reference model. It is shown that approach guarantees tracking of a given command and the ideal control signal (one that would be designed if the system were known) not only asymptotically but also in transient by a proper selection of the error feedback gain. The method prevents generation of high frequency oscillations that are unavoidable in conventional MRAC systems for large adaptation rates. The provided design guideline makes it possible to track a reference command of any magnitude form any initial position without re-tuning. The benefits of the method are demonstrated in simulations.

  5. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  6. The comfortable driving model revisited: traffic phases and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-07-01

    We study the spatiotemporal patterns resulting from different boundary conditions for a microscopic traffic model and contrast them with empirical results. By evaluating the time series of local measurements, the local traffic states are assigned to the different traffic phases of Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory. For this classification we use the rule-based FOTO-method, which provides ‘hard’ rules for this assignment. Using this approach, our analysis shows that the model is indeed able to reproduce three qualitatively different traffic phases: free flow (F), synchronized traffic (S), and wide moving jams (J). In addition, we investigate the likelihood of transitions between the three traffic phases. We show that a transition from free flow to a wide moving jam often involves an intermediate transition: first from free flow to synchronized flow and then from synchronized flow to a wide moving jam. This is supported by the fact that the so-called F → S transition (from free flow to synchronized traffic) is much more likely than a direct F → J transition. The model under consideration has a functional relationship between traffic flow and traffic density. The fundamental hypothesis of the three-phase traffic theory, however, postulates that the steady states of synchronized flow occupy a two-dimensional region in the flow-density plane. Due to the obvious discrepancy between the model investigated here and the postulate of the three-phase traffic theory, the good agreement that we found could not be expected. For a more detailed analysis, we also studied vehicle dynamics at a microscopic level and provide a comparison of real detector data with simulated data of the identical highway segment.

  7. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Revisiting absolute and relative judgments in the WITNESS model.

    PubMed

    Fife, Dustin; Perry, Colton; Gronlund, Scott D

    2014-04-01

    The WITNESS model (Clark in Applied Cognitive Psychology 17:629-654, 2003) provides a theoretical framework with which to investigate the factors that contribute to eyewitness identification decisions. One key factor involves the contributions of absolute versus relative judgments. An absolute contribution is determined by the degree of match between an individual lineup member and memory for the perpetrator; a relative contribution involves the degree to which the best-matching lineup member is a better match to memory than the remaining lineup members. In WITNESS, the proportional contributions of relative versus absolute judgments are governed by the values of the decision weight parameters. We conducted an exploration of the WITNESS model's parameter space to determine the identifiability of these relative/absolute decision weight parameters, and compared the results to a restricted version of the model that does not vary the decision weight parameters. This exploration revealed that the decision weights in WITNESS are difficult to identify: Data often can be fit equally well by setting the decision weights to nearly any value and compensating with a criterion adjustment. Clark, Erickson, and Breneman (Law and Human Behavior 35:364-380, 2011) claimed to demonstrate a theoretical basis for the superiority of lineup decisions that are based on absolute contributions, but the relationship between the decision weights and the criterion weakens this claim. These findings necessitate reconsidering the role of the relative/absolute judgment distinction in eyewitness decision making. PMID:23943556

  9. Animal models of neuropsychiatry revisited: a personal tribute to Teitelbaum.

    PubMed

    Robbins, T W

    2012-06-01

    Several themes and principles of behavioural neuroscience are evident in the work of Phillip Teitelbaum. He has emphasised the importance of studying behaviour in simple preparations, of re-synthesising complex behavioural patterns from these elemental 'building-blocks' and understanding their often hierarchical organisation. He also more recently has become interested in the possible power of behavioural endophenotypes. His work has resulted in a new emphasis on animal neuropsychology which is highly relevant to human psychopathology. This article illustrates these themes from examples taken from animal models of sensory neglect, drug addiction and cognitive syndromes associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22440232

  10. Experimental model of myocardial infarction: Histopathology and reperfusion damage revisited.

    PubMed

    Kren, Leos; Meluzin, Jaroslav; Pavlovsky, Zdenek; Mayer, Jiri; Kala, Petr; Groch, Ladislav; Hornacek, Ivan; Rauser, Petr; Vlasin, Michal

    2010-09-15

    The goal of this pilot study was to create an experimental model of myocardial infarction (for subsequent evaluation of the effectiveness of an alternative way of stem cell application - intracoronary cell infusion in the management of acute myocardial infarction). Four experimental animals, female pigs weighing between 30 and 40 kg, were used in the initial phase of this study to create an experimental model of acute myocardial infarction. An experimental myocardial infarction was performed via occlusion of the interventricular arm of the left coronary artery for 90 min. The hearts were examined 1 h, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after the procedure. Macroscopically, red infarction characteristic of reperfusion was found. Microscopically, the healing process with granulation tissue production/collagen deposition was remarkably accelerated compared to literature data. Repair processes in reperfused experimental myocardial infarction and/or reperfused autopsy specimens should not be evaluated on the basis of literature data only. Large collections of extracellular calcium were present. This phenomenon is not well described in the literature and probably has the potential for significantly interfering with the repair process. The histopathology of reperfused acute myoardial infarction deserves to be studied in further investigations. PMID:20451332

  11. Tail Lobe Revisited: Magnetic Field Modeling Based on Plasma Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, S. B. P.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma data from the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft during 1977-1980 have been used to determine the distribution of data points in the magnetotail in the range of distances -20 < XGSM < --15, i.e. which of the records that were located in the current sheet, in the tail lobe, in the magnetosheath and in the boundary layers respectively. The ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field data for the records in the tail lobe were then used to model the tail lobe magnetic field dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure, on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and on the Dst index. The tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be dependent on the square root of the dynamic pressure based on the balance between the total magnetic pressure in the tail lobes and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. The IMF dependent terms, added to the pressure term, were sought in many different forms while the Dst dependence of the tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be linear. The field shows a strong dependence on the square root of the dynamic pressure and the different IMF dependent terms all constitute a significant contribution to the total field. However, the dependence on the Dst index turned out to be very weak at those down-tail distances. The results of this study are intended to be used for parameterizing future versions of the data-based models of the global magnetospheric magnetic field.

  12. The Zipf Law revisited: An evolutionary model of emerging classification

    SciTech Connect

    Levitin, L.B.; Schapiro, B.; Perlovsky, L.

    1996-12-31

    Zipf`s Law is a remarkable rank-frequency relationship observed in linguistics (the frequencies of the use of words are approximately inversely proportional to their ranks in the decreasing frequency order) as well as in the behavior of many complex systems of surprisingly different nature. We suggest an evolutionary model of emerging classification of objects into classes corresponding to concepts and denoted by words. The evolution of the system is derived from two basic assumptions: first, the probability to recognize an object as belonging to a known class is proportional to the number of objects in this class already recognized, and, second, there exists a small probability to observe an object that requires creation of a new class ({open_quotes}mutation{close_quotes} that gives birth to a new {open_quotes}species{close_quotes}). It is shown that the populations of classes in such a system obey the Zipf Law provided that the rate of emergence of new classes is small. The model leads also to the emergence of a second-tier structure of {open_quotes}super-classes{close_quotes} - groups of classes with almost equal populations.

  13. Critical rotation of general-relativistic polytropic models revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroyannis, V.; Karageorgopoulos, V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a perturbation method for computing the critical rotational parameter as a function of the equatorial radius of a rigidly rotating polytropic model in the "post-Newtonia approximation" (PNA). We treat our models as "initial value problems" (IVP) of ordinary differential equations in the complex plane. The computations are carried out by the code dcrkf54.f95 (Geroyannis and Valvi 2012 [P1]; modified Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg code of fourth and fifth order for solving initial value problems in the complex plane). Such a complex-plane treatment removes the syndromes appearing in this particular family of IVPs (see e.g. P1, Sec. 3) and allows continuation of the numerical integrations beyond the surface of the star. Thus all the required values of the Lane-Emden function(s) in the post-Newtonian approximation are calculated by interpolation (so avoiding any extrapolation). An interesting point is that, in our computations, we take into account the complete correction due to the gravitational term, and this issue is a remarkable difference compared to the classical PNA. We solve the generalized density as a function of the equatorial radius and find the critical rotational parameter. Our computations are extended to certain other physical characteristics (like mass, angular momentum, rotational kinetic energy, etc). We find that our method yields results comparable with those of other reliable methods. REFERENCE: V.S. Geroyannis and F.N. Valvi 2012, International Journal of Modern Physics C, 23, No 5, 1250038:1-15.

  14. Paris basin petroleum systems revisited by two-dimensional modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaulier, J.M.; Burrus, J.; Poulet, M. ); Barlier, J. , Pau )

    1991-03-01

    The authors investigate the history of petroleum generation, expulsion, and migration along two E-W and N-W cross sections in the Paris basin. Source rocks, represented by Liassic marine shales (merely Hetangian-Sinemurian and Toarcian) reach the top of the oil window around 2,000 m and begin effective expulsion around 2,400 m. Reservoirs are essentially found in the subtle structures in the Dogger (carbonates) and Triassic (sandstones). These levels are normally separated from the source rocks by several hundred meters of impervious marls or shales. Regional faults are often viewed as major conduits that allow both expulsion and migration to the reservoirs. This petroleum system is seen by the use of two-dimensional modeling techniques: (1) The generation history is derived from an investigation of thermal history and kinetic modeling. They show that the present subsurface temperatures are influenced by regional convective discharge linked to the uplift of eastern and southeastern basin edges and that this cooling postdates the maturity. They also show that, in the eastern basin, the basement heat flow could have been increased since the Tertiary, at a time when Tertiary erosion had nearly frozen the maturity development. (2) The expulsion and migration are analyzed by coupling numerically the compaction history, the generation history, and the regional hydrodynamics. They show that expulsion efficiency is very much dependent on parameters not well constrained, but a sensitivity analysis confirms the prominent role of vertical faults as well as the influence of regional water flow on the distribution of accumulations.

  15. Temperature Effect on Micelle Formation: Molecular Thermodynamic Model Revisited.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Lukanov, Boris; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Temperature affects the aggregation of macromolecules such as surfactants, polymers, and proteins in aqueous solutions. The effect on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is often nonmonotonic. In this work, the effect of temperature on the micellization of ionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions is studied using a molecular thermodynamic model. Previous studies based on this technique have predicted monotonic behavior for ionic surfactants. Our investigation shows that the choice of tail transfer energy to describe the hydrophobic effect between the surfactant tails and the polar solvent molecules plays a key role in the predicted CMC. We modify the tail transfer energy by taking into account the effect of the surfactant head on the neighboring methylene group. The modification improves the description of the CMC and the predicted micellar size for aqueous solutions of sodium n-alkyl sulfate, dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), and n-alkyl polyoxyethylene. The new tail transfer energy describes the nonmonotonic behavior of CMC versus temperature. In the DTAB-water system, we redefine the head size by including the methylene group, next to the nitrogen, in the head. The change in the head size along with our modified tail transfer energy improves the CMC and aggregation size prediction significantly. Tail transfer is a dominant energy contribution in micellar and microemulsion systems. It also promotes the adsorption of surfactants at fluid-fluid interfaces and affects the formation of adsorbed layer at fluid-solid interfaces. Our proposed modifications have direct applications in the thermodynamic modeling of the effect of temperature on molecular aggregation, both in the bulk and at the interfaces. PMID:26854650

  16. Specificity in Transition State Binding: The Pauling Model Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Linus Pauling proposed that the large rate accelerations for enzymes are due to the high specificity of the protein catalyst for binding the reaction transition state. The observation that stable analogs of the transition states for enzymatic reactions often act as tight-binding binding inhibitors provided early support for this simple and elegant proposal. We review experimental results which support the proposal that Pauling’s model provides a satisfactory explanation for the rate accelerations for many heterolytic enzymatic reactions through high energy reaction intermediates, such as proton transfer and decarboxylation. Specificity in transition state binding is obtained when the total intrinsic binding energy of the substrate is significantly larger than the binding energy observed at the Michaelis complex. The results of recent studies to characterize the specificity in binding of the enolate oxygen at the transition state for the 1,3-isomerization reaction catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase are reviewed. Interactions between pig heart succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid coenzyme A transferase (SCOT) and the nonreacting portions of CoA are responsible for a rate increase of 3 × 1012-fold, which is close to the estimated total 5 × 1013-fold enzymatic rate acceleration. Studies that partition the interactions between SCOT and CoA into their contributing parts are reviewed. Interactions of the protein with the substrate phosphodianion group provide a ca. 12 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for the reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase, orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase and α-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase. The interactions of these enzymes with the substrate piece phosphite dianion provide a 6 – 8 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for reaction of the appropriate truncated substrate. Enzyme activation by phosphite dianion reflects the higher dianion affinity for binding to the enzyme-transition state complex compared

  17. Microscopic theory of Brownian motion revisited: The Rayleigh model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changho; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-03-01

    We investigate three force autocorrelation functions , , and and the friction coefficient γ for the Rayleigh model (a massive particle in an ideal gas) by analytic methods and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, F and F+ are the total force and the Mori fluctuating force, respectively, whereas F0 is the force on the Brownian particle under the frozen dynamics, where the Brownian particle is held fixed and the solvent particles move under the external potential due to the presence of the Brownian particle. By using ensemble averaging and the ray representation approach, we obtain two expressions for in terms of the one-particle trajectory and corresponding expressions for γ by the time integration of these expressions. Performing MD simulations of the near-Brownian-limit (NBL) regime, we investigate the convergence of and and compare them with . We show that for a purely repulsive potential between the Brownian particle and a solvent particle, both expressions for produce in the NBL regime. On the other hand, for a potential containing an attractive component, the ray representation expression produces only the contribution of the nontrapped solvent particles. However, we show that the net contribution of the trapped particles to γ disappears, and hence we confirm that both the ensemble-averaged expression and the ray representation expression for γ are valid even if the potential contains an attractive component. We also obtain a closed-form expression of γ for the square-well potential. Finally, we discuss theoretical and practical aspects for the evaluation of and γ.

  18. Yukawa Meson, Sakata Model and Baryon-Lepton Symmetry Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, R. E.

    It is difficult for me to grasp that this symposium is celebrating the jubilee of meson theory since I was a junior at Columbia College in 1935. I recall hearing a colloquium by Paul Dirac that year telling an enraptured audience about the infinite sea of negative energy states but I do not recall any special note being taken of the birth of an equally revolutionary concept, the Yukawa meson. Perhaps the reason was the publication of Hideki Yukawa's paper in an inaccessible Japanese journal, perhaps Dirac's electron theory was dealing with the well-known electromagnetic force whereas Yukawa' meson theory was put forth to understand the nature of two new forces - the nuclear and the weak. Whatever the reason, the situation changed drastically when I migrated to Cornell (to do my thesis under Hans Bethe during the years 1937sim39) and found a deep interest in meson theory. Thus, my own scientific career has almost spanned the period since the birth of meson theory but, what is more to the point, it has been strongly influenced by the work of Yukawa and his collaborators. It therefore gives me great pleasure to be able to talk at this MESON 50 symposium. As one of the oldest speakers, I shall respond in a loose way to Professor Maki's invitation to cover ``topics concerning the historical developments of hadron physics''. I shall select several major themes from the Japanese work that have had special interest for me. My remarks will fall under the four headings: (A) Yukawa Meson; (B) Sakata Model; (C) Baryon-Lepton Symmetry; and (D) Extensions of Baryon-Lepton Symmetry.

  19. Revisiting food-based models of territoriality in solitary predators.

    PubMed

    López-Bao, José V; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Delibes, Miguel; Fedriani, José M; Calzada, Javier; Ferreras, Pablo; Palomares, Francisco

    2014-07-01

    Food availability is considered a major factor determining spacing behaviour in territorial species, especially for females. Theoretically, spatial overlap (considered the opposite of territoriality) and food availability are related in a nonlinear manner (hypothesized inverted-U function), with high overlap levels at the extremes of a food availability gradient and low overlap at intermediate levels of this gradient. Similar patterns are expected for encounter frequencies owing to its expected correlation with spatial overlap. However, these predictions have rarely been tested in highly structured social systems on a broad gradient of food availability, which implicitly requires experimental manipulation. We test these predictions in a solitary, territorial and trophic specialist, the Iberian lynx Lynx pardinus, taking advantage of a three-decade data set of spatial behaviour in different scenarios of food availability (i.e. rabbit density). In contrast with expectations, home range overlap among resident females was low (median overlap index = 0.08, range 0-0.57) and core area overlap was nearly nil (median overlap index = 0, range 0-0.22) throughout the entire gradient of prey availability. Furthermore, spatial associations between pairs of females were negligible regardless marked variation in prey availability. Therefore, we did not find support for a model of flexible lynx territoriality driven by food availability. Our results suggest that the exclusive use of space in the Iberian lynx was not related to food. Lack of influence of prey availability on lynx territoriality may be adaptive to cope with the consequences of frequent drought-induced periods of prey scarcity or other disturbance typically affecting wild rabbit populations in Mediterranean environments. Thus, lynx would adopt an obstinate strategy of territoriality that consists in defending exclusive areas across a broad range of resource availability ensuring an exclusive access to the minimum

  20. Mindless reading revisited: an analysis based on the SWIFT model of eye-movement control.

    PubMed

    Nuthmann, Antje; Engbert, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    In this article, we revisit the mindless reading paradigm from the perspective of computational modeling. In the standard version of the paradigm, participants read sentences in both their normal version as well as the transformed (or mindless) version where each letter is replaced with a z. z-String scanning shares the oculomotor requirements with reading but none of the higher-level lexical and semantic processes. Here we use the z-string scanning task to validate the SWIFT model of saccade generation [Engbert, R., Nuthmann, A., Richter, E., & Kliegl, R. (2005). SWIFT: A dynamical model of saccade generation during reading. Psychological Review, 112(4), 777-813] as an example for an advanced theory of eye-movement control in reading. We test the central assumption of spatially distributed processing across an attentional gradient proposed by the SWIFT model. Key experimental results like prolonged average fixation durations in z-string scanning compared to normal reading and the existence of a string-length effect on fixation durations and probabilities were reproduced by the model, which lends support to the model's assumptions on visual processing. Moreover, simulation results for patterns of regressive saccades in z-string scanning confirm SWIFT's concept of activation field dynamics for the selection of saccade targets. PMID:19026673

  1. A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Wilson; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupancy modeling is important for exploring species distribution patterns and for conservation monitoring. Within this framework, explicit attention is given to species detection probabilities estimated from replicate surveys to sample units. A central assumption is that replicate surveys are independent Bernoulli trials, but this assumption becomes untenable when ecologists serially deploy remote cameras and acoustic recording devices over days and weeks to survey rare and elusive animals. Proposed solutions involve modifying the detection-level component of the model (e.g., first-order Markov covariate). Evaluating whether a model sufficiently accounts for correlation is imperative, but clear guidance for practitioners is lacking. Currently, an omnibus goodnessof- fit test using a chi-square discrepancy measure on unique detection histories is available for occupancy models (MacKenzie and Bailey, Journal of Agricultural, Biological, and Environmental Statistics, 9, 2004, 300; hereafter, MacKenzie– Bailey test). We propose a join count summary measure adapted from spatial statistics to directly assess correlation after fitting a model. We motivate our work with a dataset of multinight bat call recordings from a pilot study for the North American Bat Monitoring Program. We found in simulations that our join count test was more reliable than the MacKenzie–Bailey test for detecting inadequacy of a model that assumed independence, particularly when serial correlation was low to moderate. A model that included a Markov-structured detection-level covariate produced unbiased occupancy estimates except in the presence of strong serial correlation and a revisit design consisting only of temporal replicates. When applied to two common bat species, our approach illustrates that sophisticated models do not guarantee adequate fit to real data, underscoring the importance of model assessment. Our join count test provides a widely applicable goodness-of-fit test and

  2. Modelling crystal plasticity by 3D dislocation dynamics and the finite element method: The Discrete-Continuous Model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vattré, A.; Devincre, B.; Feyel, F.; Gatti, R.; Groh, S.; Jamond, O.; Roos, A.

    2014-02-01

    A unified model coupling 3D dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations with the finite element (FE) method is revisited. The so-called Discrete-Continuous Model (DCM) aims to predict plastic flow at the (sub-)micron length scale of materials with complex boundary conditions. The evolution of the dislocation microstructure and the short-range dislocation-dislocation interactions are calculated with a DD code. The long-range mechanical fields due to the dislocations are calculated by a FE code, taking into account the boundary conditions. The coupling procedure is based on eigenstrain theory, and the precise manner in which the plastic slip, i.e. the dislocation glide as calculated by the DD code, is transferred to the integration points of the FE mesh is described in full detail. Several test cases are presented, and the DCM is applied to plastic flow in a single-crystal Nickel-based superalloy.

  3. Revisiting the Slichter mode of Mercury in the context of differentiated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, A.; Fukushima, T.

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the Slichter mode of a set of differentiated Mercury models that were considered previously. We apply a different and independent formalism, based on variational principles of mechanics, to analytically model the internal translations of a body with a global internal perfect fluid layer limited by two differentiated rigid solid constituents that have a spherical symmetric mass distribution. The Slichter mode is specified by providing the time evolution of the barycenters of the solid constituents, the amplitude ratio of the mantle to the inner core, and the period of the oscillatory motion. All these parameters only depend on the mass of the body, the mass of the inner core, the density of the fluid, and the mean density of the inner core. For previously developed Mercury models we find, in contrast to other results, that there are no discontinuities in the Slichter period when passing from undifferentiated to differentiated inner cores. Hence, in a general situation, a potential detection of the Slichter mode cannot determine the differentiation of the inner core. We also find that the BepiColombo mission may be able to detect the Slichter mode caused by an impactor meteroid with a mass of about 1012 kg in the most favorable of circumstances. This shows that a measurable excitation of the mode by this mechanism is even more unlikely than was previously established, where a mass about 1010 kg was found. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Revisiting Hartle's model using perturbed matching theory to second order: amending the change in mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Borja; Vera, Raül

    2015-08-01

    Hartle's model describes the equilibrium configuration of a rotating isolated compact body in perturbation theory up to second order in general relativity. The interior of the body is a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state, no convective motions and rigid rotation. That interior is matched across its surface to an asymptotically flat vacuum exterior. Perturbations are taken to second order around a static and spherically symmetric background configuration. Apart from the explicit assumptions, the perturbed configuration is constructed upon some implicit premises, in particular the continuity of the functions describing the perturbation in terms of some background radial coordinate. In this work we revisit the model within a modern general and consistent theory of perturbative matchings to second order, which is independent of the coordinates and gauges used to describe the two regions to be joined. We explore the matching conditions up to second order in full. The main particular result we present is that the radial function m0 (in the setting of the original work) of the second order perturbation tensor, contrary to the original assumption, presents a jump at the surface of the star, which is proportional to the value of the energy density of the background configuration there. As a consequence, the change in mass δ M needed by the perturbed configuration to keep the value of the central energy density unchanged must be amended. We also discuss some subtleties that arise when studying the deformation of the star.

  5. Radiative transfer model for aerosols at infrared wavelengths for passive remote sensing applications: revisited.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E; Embury, Janon F

    2008-11-01

    We introduced a two-dimensional radiative transfer model for aerosols in the thermal infrared [Appl. Opt.45, 6860-6875 (2006)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.45.006860]. In that paper we superimposed two orthogonal plane-parallel layers to compute the radiance due to a two-dimensional (2D) rectangular aerosol cloud. In this paper we revisit the model and correct an error in the interaction of the two layers. We derive new expressions relating to the signal content of the radiance from an aerosol cloud based on the concept of five directional thermal contrasts: four for the 2D diffuse radiance and one for direct radiance along the line of sight. The new expressions give additional insight on the radiative transfer processes within the cloud. Simulations for Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG) bioaerosol and dustlike kaolin aerosol clouds are compared and contrasted for two geometries: an airborne sensor looking down and a ground-based sensor looking up. Simulation results suggest that aerosol cloud detection from an airborne platform may be more challenging than for a ground-based sensor and that the detection of an aerosol cloud in emission mode (negative direct thermal contrast) is not the same as the detection of an aerosol cloud in absorption mode (positive direct thermal contrast). PMID:19122735

  6. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  7. A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits.

    PubMed

    Wright, Wilson J; Irvine, Kathryn M; Rodhouse, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    Occupancy modeling is important for exploring species distribution patterns and for conservation monitoring. Within this framework, explicit attention is given to species detection probabilities estimated from replicate surveys to sample units. A central assumption is that replicate surveys are independent Bernoulli trials, but this assumption becomes untenable when ecologists serially deploy remote cameras and acoustic recording devices over days and weeks to survey rare and elusive animals. Proposed solutions involve modifying the detection-level component of the model (e.g., first-order Markov covariate). Evaluating whether a model sufficiently accounts for correlation is imperative, but clear guidance for practitioners is lacking. Currently, an omnibus goodness-of-fit test using a chi-square discrepancy measure on unique detection histories is available for occupancy models (MacKenzie and Bailey, Journal of Agricultural, Biological, and Environmental Statistics, 9, 2004, 300; hereafter, MacKenzie-Bailey test). We propose a join count summary measure adapted from spatial statistics to directly assess correlation after fitting a model. We motivate our work with a dataset of multinight bat call recordings from a pilot study for the North American Bat Monitoring Program. We found in simulations that our join count test was more reliable than the MacKenzie-Bailey test for detecting inadequacy of a model that assumed independence, particularly when serial correlation was low to moderate. A model that included a Markov-structured detection-level covariate produced unbiased occupancy estimates except in the presence of strong serial correlation and a revisit design consisting only of temporal replicates. When applied to two common bat species, our approach illustrates that sophisticated models do not guarantee adequate fit to real data, underscoring the importance of model assessment. Our join count test provides a widely applicable goodness-of-fit test and

  8. Revisiting the monopole components of effective interactions for the shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Dong, G. X.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we revisit the monopole components of effective interactions for the shell model. Without going through specific nuclei or shell gaps, universal roles of central, tensor, and spin-orbit forces can be proved, reflecting the intrinsic features of shell model effective interactions. For monopole matrix elements, even and odd channels of central force often have a canceling effect. However, for the contributions to the shell evolution, its even and odd channels could have both positive or negative contributions, enhancing the role of central force on the shell structure. Tensor force is generally weaker than central force. However, for the effect on shell evolutions, tensor force can dominate or play a competitive role. A different systematics has been discovered between T = 1 and 0 channels. For example, tensor force, well established in the T = 0 channel, becomes uncertain in the T = 1 channel. We calculate the properties of neutron-rich oxygen and calcium isotopes in order to study T = 1 channel interactions further. It is learned that the main improvements of empirical interactions are traced to the central force. For non-central forces, antisymmetric spin-orbit (ALS) force, originated from many-body perturbations or three-body force, could also play an explicit role. T = 1 tensor forces are less constrained so their effect can differ in different empirical interactions. The influence of tensor force may sometimes be canceled by many-body effects. For T = 0 channels of effective interactions, which is the main source of neutron-proton correlations, central and tensor forces are the leading components. For T = 1 channels, which can act between like-particles, the request for many-body correlations could be more demanding, so that the monopole anomaly of the T = 1 channel might be more serious.

  9. Making Productive Use of Four Models of School English: A Case Study Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macken-Horarik, Mary

    2014-01-01

    At a time when political leaders and media pundits seek to narrow the English curriculum and reduce its knowledge structure to the "basics," it is helpful to revisit the potential of different approaches to learning in English that have evolved over time. In this paper I reflect on the semantic features of personal growth, cultural…

  10. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Casas, Laura; Szűcs, Réka; Vij, Shubha; Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Németh, Sándor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsényi, Miklós; Orbán, László

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. PMID:24386179

  11. Disappearing Scales in Carps: Re-Visiting Kirpichnikov's Model on the Genetics of Scale Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Németh, Sándor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsényi, Miklós; Orbán, László

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the ‘S’ gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called ‘N’ has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. PMID:24386179

  12. Minimal Model of Plankton Systems Revisited with Spatial Diffusion and Maturation Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiantao; Tian, Jianjun Paul; Wei, Junjie

    2016-03-01

    This study revisits the minimal model for a plankton ecosystem proposed by Scheffer with spatial diffusion of plankton and the delay of the maturation period of herbivorous zooplankton. It deepens our understanding of effects of the nutrients and the predation of fish upon zooplankton on the dynamical patterns of the plankton system and also presents new phenomena induced by the delay with spatial diffusion. When the nutrient level is sufficient low, the zooplankton population collapses and the phytoplankton population reaches its carrying capacity. Mathematically, the global stability of the boundary equilibrium is proved. As the nutrient level increases, the system switches to coexistent equilibria or oscillations depending on the maturation period of zooplankton and the predation rate of fish on herbivorous zooplankton. Under an eutrophic condition, there is a unique coexistent homogeneous equilibrium, and the equilibrium density of phytoplankton increases, while the equilibrium density of herbivorous zooplankton decreases as the fish predation rate on herbivorous zooplankton is increasing. The study shows that the system will never collapses under the eutrophic condition unless the fish predation rate approaches infinite. The study also finds a functional bifurcation relation between the delay parameter of the maturation period of herbivorous zooplankton and the fish predation rate on herbivorous zooplankton that, above a critical value of the fish predation rate, the system stays at the coexistent equilibrium, and below that value, the system switches its dynamical patterns among stable and unstable equilibria and oscillations. The oscillations emerge from Hopf bifurcations, and a detailed mathematical analysis about the Hopf bifurcations is carried out to give relevant ecological predications. PMID:26934887

  13. Solitons of electric polarization in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. V.; Raskovalov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Complete analysis of the properties of breathers in spiral multiferroic structures in the sine-Gordon model has been presented. The methods of the excitation and detection of the breathers in the external electric and magnetic fields have been discussed.

  14. Revisiting an interdisciplinary hydrological modelling project. A socio-hydrology (?) example from the early 2000s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Roman; Barthel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Interdisciplinary scientific and societal knowledge plays an increasingly important role in global change research. Also, in the field of water resources interdisciplinarity as well as cooperation with stakeholders from outside academia have been recognized as important. In this contribution, we revisit an integrated regional modelling system (DANUBIA), which was developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers and relied on stakeholder participation in the framework of the GLOWA-Danube project from 2001 to 2011 (Mauser and Prasch 2016). As the model was developed before the current increase in literature on participatory modelling and interdisciplinarity, we ask how a socio-hydrology approach would have helped and in what way it would have made the work different. The present contribution firstly presents the interdisciplinary concept of DANUBIA, mainly with focus on the integration of human behaviour in a spatially explicit, process-based numerical modelling system (Roland Barthel, Janisch, Schwarz, Trifkovic, Nickel, Schulz, and Mauser 2008; R. Barthel, Nickel, Meleg, Trifkovic, and Braun 2005). Secondly, we compare the approaches to interdisciplinarity in GLOWA-Danube with concepts and ideas presented by socio-hydrology. Thirdly, we frame DANUBIA and a review of key literature on socio-hydrology in the context of a survey among hydrologists (N = 184). This discussion is used to highlight gaps and opportunities of the socio-hydrology approach. We show that the interdisciplinary aspect of the project and the participatory process of stakeholder integration in DANUBIA were not entirely successful. However, important insights were gained and important lessons were learnt. Against the background of these experiences we feel that in its current state, socio-hydrology is still lacking a plan for knowledge integration. Moreover, we consider necessary that socio-hydrology takes into account the lessons learnt from these earlier examples of knowledge integration

  15. Soliton models for thick branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyravi, Marzieh; Riazi, Nematollah; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present new soliton solutions for thick branes in 4+1 dimensions. In particular, we consider brane models based on the sine-Gordon (SG), φ 4 and φ 6 scalar fields, which have broken Z2 symmetry in some cases and are responsible for supporting and stabilizing the thick branes. The origin of the symmetry breaking in these models resides in the fact that the modified scalar field potential may have non-degenerate vacua. These vacua determine the cosmological constant on both sides of the brane. We also study the geodesic equations along the fifth dimension, in order to explore the particle motion in the neighborhood of the brane. Furthermore, we examine the stability of the thick branes, by determining the sign of the w^2 term in the expansion of the potential for the resulting Schrödinger-like equation, where w is the five-dimensional coordinate. It turns out that the φ ^4 brane is stable, while there are unstable modes for certain ranges of the model parameters in the SG and φ ^6 branes.

  16. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social sciences as…

  17. Modeling Anti-HIV Activity of HEPT Derivatives Revisited. Multiregression Models Are Not Inferior Ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bašic, Ivan; Nadramija, Damir; Flajšlik, Mario; Amić, Dragan; Lučić, Bono

    2007-12-01

    Several quantitative structure-activity studies for this data set containing 107 HEPT derivatives have been performed since 1997, using the same set of molecules by (more or less) different classes of molecular descriptors. Multivariate Regression (MR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were developed and in each study the authors concluded that ANN models are superior to MR ones. We re-calculated multivariate regression models for this set of molecules using the same set of descriptors, and compared our results with the previous ones. Two main reasons for overestimation of the quality of the ANN models in previous studies comparing with MR models are: (1) wrong calculation of leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated (CV) correlation coefficient for MR models in Luco et al., J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 37 392-401 (1997), and (2) incorrect estimation/interpretation of leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated and predictive performance and power of ANN models. More precise and fairer comparison of fit and LOO CV statistical parameters shows that MR models are more stable. In addition, MR models are much simpler than ANN ones. For real testing the predictive performance of both classes of models we need more HEPT derivatives, because all ANN models that presented results for external set of molecules used experimental values in optimization of modeling procedure and model parameters.

  18. Modeling Anti-HIV Activity of HEPT Derivatives Revisited. Multiregression Models Are Not Inferior Ones

    SciTech Connect

    Basic, Ivan; Nadramija, Damir; Flajslik, Mario; Amic, Dragan; Lucic, Bono

    2007-12-26

    Several quantitative structure-activity studies for this data set containing 107 HEPT derivatives have been performed since 1997, using the same set of molecules by (more or less) different classes of molecular descriptors. Multivariate Regression (MR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were developed and in each study the authors concluded that ANN models are superior to MR ones. We re-calculated multivariate regression models for this set of molecules using the same set of descriptors, and compared our results with the previous ones. Two main reasons for overestimation of the quality of the ANN models in previous studies comparing with MR models are: (1) wrong calculation of leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated (CV) correlation coefficient for MR models in Luco et al., J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 37 392-401 (1997), and (2) incorrect estimation/interpretation of leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated and predictive performance and power of ANN models. More precise and fairer comparison of fit and LOO CV statistical parameters shows that MR models are more stable. In addition, MR models are much simpler than ANN ones. For real testing the predictive performance of both classes of models we need more HEPT derivatives, because all ANN models that presented results for external set of molecules used experimental values in optimization of modeling procedure and model parameters.

  19. ETHICAL MODELS OF PHYSICIAN--PATIENT RELATIONSHIP REVISITED WITH REGARD TO PATIENT AUTONOMY, VALUES AND PATIENT EDUCATION.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Stockman, René

    2015-01-01

    The present paper revisits the ethical models of patient--physician relationship from the perspective of patient autonomy and values. It seems that the four traditional models of physician--patient relationship proposed by Emanuel & Emanuel in 1992 closely link patient values and patient autonomy. On the other hand, their reinterpretation provided by Agarwal & Murinson twenty years later emphasizes the independent expression of values and autonomy in individual patients. Additionally, patient education has been assumed to join patient values and patient autonomy. Moreover, several authors have noted that, over the past few decades, patient autonomy has gradually replaced the paternalistic approach based on the premise that the physician knows what is best for the patient. Neither the paternalistic model of physician-patient relationship, nor the informative model is considered to be satisfactory, as the paternalistic model excludes patient values from decision making, while the informative model excludes physician values from decision making. However, the deliberative model of patient-physician interaction represents an adequate alternative to the two unsatisfactory approaches by promoting shared decision making between the physician and the patient. It has also been suggested that the deliberative model would be ideal for exercising patient autonomy in chronic care and that the ethical role of patient education would be to make the deliberative model applicable to chronic care. In this regard, studies have indicated that the use of decision support interventions might increase the deliberative capacity of chronic patients. PMID:26204658

  20. Revisiting Runoff Model Calibration: Airborne Snow Observatory Results Allow Improved Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deterministic snow accumulation and ablation simulation models are widely used by runoff managers throughout the world to predict runoff quantities and timing. Model fitting is typically based on matching modeled runoff volumes and timing with observed flow time series at a few points in the basin. In recent decades, sparse networks of point measurements of the mountain snowpacks have been available to compare with modeled snowpack, but the comparability of results from a snow sensor or course to model polygons of 5 to 50 sq. km is suspect. However, snowpack extent, depth, and derived snow water equivalent have been produced by the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) mission for spring of 20013 and 2014 in the Tuolumne River basin above Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. These high-resolution snowpack data have exposed the weakness in a model calibration based on runoff alone. The U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) calibration that was based on 30-years of inflow to Hetch Hetchy produces reasonable inflow results, but modeled spatial snowpack location and water quantity diverged significantly from the weekly measurements made by ASO during the two ablation seasons. The reason is that the PRMS model has many flow paths, storages, and water transfer equations, and a calibrated outflow time series can be right for many wrong reasons. The addition of a detailed knowledge of snow extent and water content constrains the model so that it is a better representation of the actual watershed hydrology. The mechanics of recalibrating PRMS to the ASO measurements will be described, and comparisons in observed versus modeled flow for both a small subbasin and the entire Hetch Hetchy basin will be shown. The recalibrated model provided a bitter fit to the snowmelt recession, a key factor for water managers as they balance declining inflows with demand for power generation and ecosystem releases during the final months of snow melt runoff.

  1. SeaRISE experiments revisited: potential sources of spread in multi-model projections of the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, F.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Takahashi, K.; Blatter, H.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper revisits the future surface-climate experiments on the Greenland ice sheet proposed by the Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE; Bindschadler et al., 2013) study. The projections of the different SeaRISE participants show dispersion, which has not been examined in detail to date. A series of sensitivity experiments are conducted and analyzed using the ice-sheet model for integrated Earth-system studies (IcIES) by replacing one or more formulations of the model parameters with those adopted in other model(s). The results show that large potential sources of the dispersion among the projections of the different SeaRISE participants are differences in the initialization methods and in the surface mass balance methods, and both aspects have almost equal impact on the results. The treatment of ice-sheet margins in the simulation has a secondary impact on the dispersion. We conclude that spinning up the model using fixed topography through the spin-up period while the temperature is allowed to evolve according to the surface temperature history is the preferred representation, at least for the experiment configuration examined in the present paper. A benchmark model experimental setup that most of the numerical models can perform is proposed for future intercomparison projects, in order to evaluate the uncertainties relating to pure ice-sheet model flow characteristics.

  2. Revisiting topological properties and models of protein-protein interaction networks from the perspective of dataset evolution.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mingyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Guan, Jihong

    2015-08-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are crucial for organisms. Many research efforts have thus been devoted to the study on the topological properties and models of PPI networks. However, existing studies did not always report consistent results on the topological properties of PPI networks. Although a number of PPI network models have been introduced, yet in the literature there is no convincing conclusion on which model is best for describing PPI networks. This situation is primarily caused by the incompleteness of current PPI datasets. To solve this problem, in this study, the authors propose to revisit the topological properties and models of PPI networks from the perspective of PPI dataset evolution. Concretely, they used 12 PPI datasets of Arabidopsis thaliana and 10 PPI datasets of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from different Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) database versions, and compared the topological properties of these datasets and the fitting capabilities of five typical PPI network models over these datasets. PMID:26243826

  3. Benzophenone Ultrafast Triplet Population: Revisiting the Kinetic Model by Surface-Hopping Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marazzi, Marco; Mai, Sebastian; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Delcey, Mickaël G; Lindh, Roland; González, Leticia; Monari, Antonio

    2016-02-18

    The photochemistry of benzophenone, a paradigmatic organic molecule for photosensitization, was investigated by means of surface-hopping ab initio molecular dynamics. Different mechanisms were found to be relevant within the first 600 fs after excitation; the long-debated direct (S1 → T1) and indirect (S1 → T2 → T1) mechanisms for population of the low-lying triplet state are both possible, with the latter being prevalent. Moreover, we established the existence of a kinetic equilibrium between the two triplet states, never observed before. This fact implies that a significant fraction of the overall population resides in T2, eventually allowing one to revisit the usual spectroscopic assignment proposed by transient absorption spectroscopy. This finding is of particular interest for photocatalysis as well as for DNA damages studies because both T1 and T2 channels are, in principle, available for benzophenone-mediated photoinduced energy transfer toward DNA. PMID:26821061

  4. Benzophenone Ultrafast Triplet Population: Revisiting the Kinetic Model by Surface-Hopping Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The photochemistry of benzophenone, a paradigmatic organic molecule for photosensitization, was investigated by means of surface-hopping ab initio molecular dynamics. Different mechanisms were found to be relevant within the first 600 fs after excitation; the long-debated direct (S1 → T1) and indirect (S1 → T2 → T1) mechanisms for population of the low-lying triplet state are both possible, with the latter being prevalent. Moreover, we established the existence of a kinetic equilibrium between the two triplet states, never observed before. This fact implies that a significant fraction of the overall population resides in T2, eventually allowing one to revisit the usual spectroscopic assignment proposed by transient absorption spectroscopy. This finding is of particular interest for photocatalysis as well as for DNA damages studies because both T1 and T2 channels are, in principle, available for benzophenone-mediated photoinduced energy transfer toward DNA. PMID:26821061

  5. Local conformational perturbations of the DNA molecule in the SG-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnobaeva, L. A.; Shapovalov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Within the formalism of the Fokker-Planck equation, the influence of nonstationary external force, random force, and dissipation effects on dynamics local conformational perturbations (kink) propagating along the DNA molecule is investigated. Such waves have an important role in the regulation of important biological processes in living systems at the molecular level. As a dynamic model of DNA was used a modified sine-Gordon equation, simulating the rotational oscillations of bases in one of the chains DNA. The equation of evolution of the kink momentum is obtained in the form of the stochastic differential equation in the Stratonovich sense within the framework of the well-known McLaughlin and Scott energy approach. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the momentum distribution function coincides with the equation describing the Ornstein-Uhlenbek process with a regular nonstationary external force. The influence of the nonlinear stochastic effects on the kink dynamics is considered with the help of the Fokker- Planck nonlinear equation with the shift coefficient dependent on the first moment of the kink momentum distribution function. Expressions are derived for average value and variance of the momentum. Examples are considered which demonstrate the influence of the external regular and random forces on the evolution of the average value and variance of the kink momentum. Within the formalism of the Fokker-Planck equation, the influence of nonstationary external force, random force, and dissipation effects on the kink dynamics is investigated in the sine-Gordon model. The equation of evolution of the kink momentum is obtained in the form of the stochastic differential equation in the Stratonovich sense within the framework of the well-known McLaughlin and Scott energy approach. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the momentum distribution function coincides with the equation describing the Ornstein-Uhlenbek process with a regular nonstationary

  6. Revisiting a model of ontogenetic growth: estimating model parameters from theory and data.

    PubMed

    Moses, Melanie E; Hou, Chen; Woodruff, William H; West, Geoffrey B; Nekola, Jeffery C; Zuo, Wenyun; Brown, James H

    2008-05-01

    The ontogenetic growth model (OGM) of West et al. provides a general description of how metabolic energy is allocated between production of new biomass and maintenance of existing biomass during ontogeny. Here, we reexamine the OGM, make some minor modifications and corrections, and further evaluate its ability to account for empirical variation on rates of metabolism and biomass in vertebrates both during ontogeny and across species of varying adult body size. We show that the updated version of the model is internally consistent and is consistent with other predictions of metabolic scaling theory and empirical data. The OGM predicts not only the near universal sigmoidal form of growth curves but also the M(1/4) scaling of the characteristic times of ontogenetic stages in addition to the curvilinear decline in growth efficiency described by Brody. Additionally, the OGM relates the M(3/4) scaling across adults of different species to the scaling of metabolic rate across ontogeny within species. In providing a simple, quantitative description of how energy is allocated to growth, the OGM calls attention to unexplained variation, unanswered questions, and opportunities for future research. PMID:18419571

  7. Ising tricriticality in the extended Hubbard model with bond dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejima, Satoshi; Essler, Fabian H. L.; Lange, Florian; Fehske, Holger

    2016-06-01

    We explore the quantum phase transition between Peierls and charge-density-wave insulating states in the one-dimensional, half-filled, extended Hubbard model with explicit bond dimerization. We show that the critical line of the continuous Ising transition terminates at a tricritical point, belonging to the universality class of the tricritical Ising model with central charge c =7 /10 . Above this point, the quantum phase transition becomes first order. Employing a numerical matrix-product-state based (infinite) density-matrix renormalization group method we determine the ground-state phase diagram, the spin and two-particle charge excitations gaps, and the entanglement properties of the model with high precision. Performing a bosonization analysis we can derive a field description of the transition region in terms of a triple sine-Gordon model. This allows us to derive field theory predictions for the power-law (exponential) decay of the density-density (spin-spin) and bond-order-wave correlation functions, which are found to be in excellent agreement with our numerical results.

  8. Quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Hillel

    1993-02-01

    The quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model has been calculated from all nonzero modes. The calculations were carried out using a method applied earlier to the sine-Gordon model. The mass shifts do not depend on the baryonic spin, therefore they are the same for the nucleon and the Δ. Our model parameters are the pion decay constant Fπ, with its experimental value, and the pionic mass mπ, once in the chiral limit mπ=0 and also with the experimental value. We justify taking for the Skyrme parameter e the experimental value of gρππ, the mesonic ρ-pion coupling constant. The results depend on the vibrational energy. In this case an energy cutoff must be introduced. Using renormalization considerations as in the nonlinear σ model, we have chosen this cutoff to be eFπ=1136 MeV. Our results (for e=gρππ=6.11 and Fπ=186 MeV) are MN=996 MeV, MΔ=1593 MeV for mπ=0 MN=857 MeV, MΔ=1641 MeV for mπ=138 MeV. The spin dependence and the energy contribution of the coupling term between vibrations and rotations are being considered here only in a qualitative way.

  9. Bottomonium spectrum revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, Jorge; Ortega, Pablo G.; Entem, David R.; Fernández, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the bottomonium spectrum motivated by the recently exciting experimental progress in the observation of new bottomonium states, both conventional and unconventional. Our framework is a nonrelativistic constituent quark model which has been applied to a wide range of hadronic observables from the light to the heavy quark sector, and thus the model parameters are completely constrained. Beyond the spectrum, we provide a large number of electromagnetic, strong and hadronic decays in order to discuss the quark content of the bottomonium states and give more insights about a better way to determine their properties experimentally.

  10. Revisiting Mednick's Model on Creativity-Related Differences in Associative Hierarchies. Evidence for a Common Path to Uncommon Thought.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Mathias; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2013-12-01

    Fifty years ago, Mednick [Psychological Review, 69 (1962) 220] proposed an elaborate model that aimed to explain how creative ideas are generated and why creative people are more likely to have creative ideas. The model assumes that creative people have flatter associative hierarchies and as a consequence can more fluently retrieve remote associative elements, which can be combined to form creative ideas. This study aimed at revisiting Mednick's model and providing an extensive test of its hypotheses. A continuous free association task was employed and association performance was compared between groups high and low in creativity, as defined by divergent thinking ability and self-report measures. We found that associative hierarchies do not differ between low and high creative people, but creative people showed higher associative fluency and more uncommon responses. This suggests that creativity may not be related to a special organization of associative memory, but rather to a more effective way of accessing its contents. The findings add to the evidence associating creativity with highly adaptive executive functioning. PMID:24532853

  11. The concept of quasi-integrability for modified non-linear Schrödinger models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Luchini, G.; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2012-09-01

    We consider modifications of the nonlinear Schrödinger model (NLS) to look at the recently introduced concept of quasi-integrability. We show that such models possess an infinite number of quasi-conserved charges which present intriguing properties in relation to very specific space-time parity transformations. For the case of two-soliton solutions where the fields are eigenstates of this parity, those charges are asymptotically conserved in the scattering process of the solitons. Even though the charges vary in time their values in the far past and the far future are the same. Such results are obtained through analytical and numerical methods, and employ adaptations of algebraic techniques used in integrable field theories. Our findings may have important consequences on the applications of these models in several areas of non-linear science. We make a detailed numerical study of the modified NLS potential of the form V ~ (| ψ|2)2+ ɛ , with ɛ being a perturbation parameter. We perform numerical simulations of the scattering of solitons for this model and find a good agreement with the results predicted by the analytical considerations. Our paper shows that the quasi-integrability concepts recently proposed in the context of modifications of the sine-Gordon model remain valid for perturbations of the NLS model.

  12. The population genetics of Trypanosoma cruzi revisited in the light of the predominant clonal evolution model.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    Comparing the population structure of Trypanosoma cruzi with that of other pathogens, including parasitic protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses, shows that the agent of Chagas disease shares typical traits with many other species, related to a predominant clonal evolution (PCE) pattern: statistically significant linkage disequilibrium, overrepresented multilocus genotypes, near-clades (genetic subdivisions somewhat blurred by occasional genetic exchange/hybridization) and "Russian doll" patterns (PCE is observed, not only at the level of the whole species, but also, within the near-clades). Moreover, T. cruzi population structure exhibits linkage with the diversity of several strongly selected genes, with gene expression profiles, and with some major phenotypic traits. We discuss the evolutionary significance of these results, and their implications in terms of applied research (molecular epidemiology/strain typing, analysis of genes of interest, vaccine and drug design, immunological diagnosis) and of experimental evolution. Lastly, we revisit the long-term debate of describing new species within the T. cruzi taxon. PMID:26188332

  13. Effects from switching on PIC simulations: Geospace Environmental Modeling (GEM) reconnection setup revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, P. A.; Nakamura, T.; Narita, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic Parcile-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are widely used to study plasma phenomena where kinetic scales are coupled to fluid scales. One of these phenomena is the evolution of magnetic reconnection. Switch-on effects have been described earlier for magneto-/hydrodynamic (MHD and HD) simulations, where oscillations are ignited by the initial condition and the usual instantaneous way of starting a simulation run. Here we revisit the GEM setup (a Harris current sheet) and demonstrate the immediate generation of oscillations propagating perpendicular to the magnetic shear layer (in Bz). Also we show how these oscillations do not dissipate quickly and will later be mode-converted to generate wave power, first in By, much later also in Bx (pointing along the shear direction). One needs to take care not to interpret these oscillations as physical wave modes associated with the nature of reconnection. We propose a method to prevent such switch-on effects from the beginning, that should be considered for implementation in other PIC simulation codes as well.

  14. Revisiting B_s rightarrow μ ^+μ ^- in the two-Higgs doublet models with Z_2 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Ya-Dong; Yuan, Xing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    We revisit the rare leptonic decay B_s rightarrow μ ^+ μ ^- in the two-Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a softly broken Z_2 symmetry, namely type-I, type-II, type-X and type-Y 2HDMs. We have derived the relevant full one-loop Wilson coefficients of the four 2HDMs from the recent calculation in the aligned 2HDM by Li, Lu and Pich, which could be mapped to all the four 2HDMs for both large and small tan β . It is found that a new term associated with the soft Z_2 symmetry breaking parameter M can be enhanced by tan ^2β in the type-II 2HDM, which has not been considered in the literature. Imposing both theoretical and experimental constraints, we have renewed the bounds on the parameter spaces of the four 2HDMs. Different from our previous paper, however, we find that all the four 2HDMs give sizable and similar contributions to overline{B}(B_s rightarrow μ ^+ μ ^-) within the stringently restricted parameter spaces, but very tiny as regards the mass-eigenstate rate asymmetry A_{Δ Γ }; this makes it unfeasible to discriminate the four types of 2HDM with the correlations between the observables in B_s rightarrow μ ^+ μ ^- decay.

  15. Revisiting reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, Jerome; Smirnov, Roman; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    Plasma-material interactions may strongly influence plasma performance and life-time of future magnetic fusion devices. Understanding the multifaceted physics of hydrogen retention in plasma-facing components (PFC) is thus crucial, but remains challenging due to the wide spectrum of retention processes on PFC surface and in PFC bulk induced by long-time exposure of PFC to high flux of energy and particles. We revisit here some aspects of reaction-diffusion models used to investigate hydrogen retention in material. We focus on analysis of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiment considering only one type of traps in material and first neglecting surface effects. We show that solute hydrogen concentration in retention region usually remains in equilibrium during TDS experiments. In this regime, analytic description of thermal desorption spectra indicates that trapping of solute hydrogen during TDS cannot be ignored. Main features of thermal desorption are then analytically described and refined interpretation of Arrhenius plots is proposed. Effects of surface processes on hydrogen outgassing during TDS experiments are then introduced and surface-limited outgassing regimes are discussed.

  16. Revisiting Fixed- and Random-Effects Models: Some Considerations for Policy-Relevant Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Paul; Crawford, Claire; Steele, Fiona; Vignoles, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The use of fixed (FE) and random effects (RE) in two-level hierarchical linear regression is discussed in the context of education research. We compare the robustness of FE models with the modelling flexibility and potential efficiency of those from RE models. We argue that the two should be seen as complementary approaches. We then compare both…

  17. Revisiting a Statistical Shortcoming When Fitting the Langmuir Model to Sorption Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Langmuir model is commonly used for describing sorption behavior of reactive solutes to surfaces. Fitting the Langmuir model to sorption data requires either the use of nonlinear regression or, alternatively, linear regression using one of the linearized versions of the model. Statistical limit...

  18. Revisiting single photon avalanche diode current-voltage modeling and transient characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Javitt, M.; Savuskan, V. Merhav, T.; Nemirovsky, Y.

    2014-05-28

    A model for the current-voltage and transient behavior of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) based on device physics is presented. The results of the model are compared to actual measurements and a reasonable fit is seen. Additionally, the model provides a useful tool for designing quenching circuitry and determining optimal operation conditions of the SPAD.

  19. Revisiting Aerosol Effects in Global Climate Models Using an Aerosol Lidar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P. L.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D. M.; Ghan, S.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects are considered a major source of uncertainty in global climate models and the direct and indirect radiative forcings have strong model dependency. These forcings are routinely evaluated (and calibrated) against observations, among them satellite retrievals are greatly used for their near-global coverage. However, the forcings calculated from model output are not directly comparable with those computed from satellite retrievals since sampling and algorithmic differences (such as cloud screening, noise reduction, and retrieval) between models and observations are not accounted for. It is our hypothesis that the conventional model validation procedures for comparing satellite observations and model simulations can mislead model development and introduce biases. Hence, we have developed an aerosol lidar simulator for global climate models that simulates the CALIOP lidar signal at 532nm. The simulator uses the same algorithms as those used to produce the "GCM-oriented CALIPSO Aerosol Product" to (1) objectively sample lidar signal profiles; and (2) derive aerosol fields (e.g., extinction profile, aerosol type, etc) from lidar signals. This allows us to sample and derive aerosol fields in the model and real atmosphere in identical ways. Using the Department of Energy's ACME model simulations, we found that the simulator-retrieved aerosol distribution and aerosol-cloud interactions are significantly different from those computed from conventional approaches, and that the model is much closer to satellite estimates than previously believed.

  20. Perfect plastic approximation revisited: a flowline network model for calving glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ultee, E.; Bassis, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate modeling of outlet glacier dynamics requires knowledge of many factors—ice thickness, bed topography, air/ocean temperature, precipitation rate—specific to individual glaciers, and for which only limited data exists. Furthermore, key processes such as iceberg calving remain poorly understood and difficult to include in models. In light of these challenges to even the most sophisticated models, there is great value in simple, computationally efficient models that can capture first-order effects. Many of the simplest models currently in use produce glacier profiles along a central flowline, either ignoring the contribution of tributaries or relying on a measure of "equivalent width" to handle those contributions. Here, we present a simple model that generalizes Nye's 1953 perfect plastic approximation so that it also predicts the position of the glacier terminus based on the yield strength. Moreover, our model simulates not only a central flowline, but the interactions of a network of tributaries. The model requires only minimal information: glacier geometry (network structure and bed topography, available from observation for select glaciers) and basal shear strength (a reasonably-constrained parameter). We apply the model to Columbia Glacier, Alaska and show that, despite its simplicity, the model is able to reproduce observed centerline profiles and terminus retreat for the main branch as well as selected tributaries. Finally, we illustrate how our model can be applied to constrain the calving contribution of individual glaciers to 21st century sea level rise.

  1. Revisiting Gaussian Process Regression Modeling for Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Philipp; Toledano-Ayala, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Signal strength-based positioning in wireless sensor networks is a key technology for seamless, ubiquitous localization, especially in areas where Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals propagate poorly. To enable wireless local area network (WLAN) location fingerprinting in larger areas while maintaining accuracy, methods to reduce the effort of radio map creation must be consolidated and automatized. Gaussian process regression has been applied to overcome this issue, also with auspicious results, but the fit of the model was never thoroughly assessed. Instead, most studies trained a readily available model, relying on the zero mean and squared exponential covariance function, without further scrutinization. This paper studies the Gaussian process regression model selection for WLAN fingerprinting in indoor and outdoor environments. We train several models for indoor/outdoor- and combined areas; we evaluate them quantitatively and compare them by means of adequate model measures, hence assessing the fit of these models directly. To illuminate the quality of the model fit, the residuals of the proposed model are investigated, as well. Comparative experiments on the positioning performance verify and conclude the model selection. In this way, we show that the standard model is not the most appropriate, discuss alternatives and present our best candidate. PMID:26370996

  2. Re-visiting projections of PCBs in Lower Hudson River fish using model emulation.

    PubMed

    Field, L Jay; Kern, John W; Rosman, Lisa B

    2016-07-01

    Remedial decision making at large contaminated sediment sites with bioaccumulative contaminants often relies on complex mechanistic models to forecast future concentrations and compare remedial alternatives. Remedial decision-making for the Hudson River PCBs Superfund site involved predictions of future levels of PCBs in Upper Hudson River (UHR) and Lower Hudson River (LHR) fish. This study applied model emulation to evaluate the impact of updated sediment concentrations on the original mechanistic model projections of time to reach risk-based target thresholds in fish in the LHR under Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and the selected dredging remedy. The model emulation approach used a combination of nonlinear and linear regression models to estimate UHR water PCBs as a function of UHR sediment PCBs and to estimate fish concentrations in the LHR as a function of UHR water PCBs, respectively. Model emulation captured temporal changes in sediment, water, and fish PCBs predicted by the mechanistic model over the emulation period. The emulated model, using updated sediment concentrations and a revised estimate of recovery rate, matched the trend in annual monitoring data for white perch and largemouth bass in the LHR between 1997 and 2014. Our best predictions based on the emulated model indicate that the projected time to reach fish tissue risk-based thresholds in the LHR will take decades longer than the original mechanistic model projections. PMID:27017079

  3. Revisiting Gaussian Process Regression Modeling for Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Richter, Philipp; Toledano-Ayala, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Signal strength-based positioning in wireless sensor networks is a key technology for seamless, ubiquitous localization, especially in areas where Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals propagate poorly. To enable wireless local area network (WLAN) location fingerprinting in larger areas while maintaining accuracy, methods to reduce the effort of radio map creation must be consolidated and automatized. Gaussian process regression has been applied to overcome this issue, also with auspicious results, but the fit of the model was never thoroughly assessed. Instead, most studies trained a readily available model, relying on the zero mean and squared exponential covariance function, without further scrutinization. This paper studies the Gaussian process regression model selection for WLAN fingerprinting in indoor and outdoor environments. We train several models for indoor/outdoor- and combined areas; we evaluate them quantitatively and compare them by means of adequate model measures, hence assessing the fit of these models directly. To illuminate the quality of the model fit, the residuals of the proposed model are investigated, as well. Comparative experiments on the positioning performance verify and conclude the model selection. In this way, we show that the standard model is not the most appropriate, discuss alternatives and present our best candidate. PMID:26370996

  4. Quantum duel revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Paiva, Milena M.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the quantum two-person duel. In this problem, both Alice and Bob each possess a spin-1/2 particle which models dead and alive states for each player. We review the Abbott and Flitney result—now considering non-zero α1 and α2 in order to decide if it is better for Alice to shoot or not the second time—and we also consider a duel where players do not necessarily start alive. This simple assumption allows us to explore several interesting special cases, namely how a dead player can win the duel shooting just once, or how can Bob revive Alice after one shot, and the better strategy for Alice—being either alive or in a superposition of alive and dead states—fighting a dead opponent.

  5. Revisit to Grad's Closure and Development of Physically Motivated Closure for Phenomenological High-Order Moment Model

    SciTech Connect

    Myong, R. S.; Nagdewe, S. P.

    2011-05-20

    The Grad's closure for the high-order moment equation is revisited and, by extending his theory, a physically motivated closure is developed for the one-dimensional velocity shear gas flow. The closure is based on the physical argument of the relative importance of various terms appearing in the moment equation. Also, the closure is derived such that the resulting theory may be inclusive of the well established linear theory (Navier-Stokes-Fourier) as limiting case near local thermal equilibrium.

  6. Revisiting the Model of Creative Destruction: St. Jacobs, Ontario, a Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Clare J. A.; de Waal, Sarah B.

    2009-01-01

    Ten years ago, the model of creative destruction was developed to predict the fate of communities that base their development on the commodification of rural heritage (Mitchell, C.J.A., 1998. Entrepreneurialism, commodification and creative destruction: a model of post-modern community development. Journal of Rural Studies 14, 273-286). Its…

  7. Modeling the Information-Seeking Behavior of Social Scientists: Ellis's Study Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meho, Lokman I.; Tibbo, Helen R.

    2003-01-01

    Revises David Ellis's information-seeking behavior model of social scientists which includes six generic features: starting, chaining, browsing, differentiating, monitoring, and extracting. Suggests four new features be added: accessing, networking, verifying, and information managing; and describes a new model that includes searching, accessing,…

  8. The Two-Capacitor Problem Revisited: A Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Keeyung

    2009-01-01

    The well-known two-capacitor problem, in which exactly half the stored energy disappears when a charged capacitor is connected to an identical capacitor, is discussed based on the mechanical harmonic oscillator model approach. In the mechanical harmonic oscillator model, it is shown first that "exactly half" the work done by a constant applied…

  9. Gill's model of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, revisited: The role of latitudinal variations in wind stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David P.; Munday, David R.; Allison, Lesley C.; Hay, Russell J.; Johnson, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    Gill's (1968) model of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is reinterpreted for a stratified, reduced-gravity ocean, where the barotropic streamfunction is replaced by the pycnocline depth, and the bottom drag coefficient by the Gent and McWilliams eddy diffusivity. The resultant model gives a simple description of the lateral structure of the ACC that is consistent with contemporary descriptions of ACC dynamics. The model is used to investigate and interpret the sensitivity of the ACC to the latitudinal profile of the surface wind stress. A substantial ACC remains when the wind jet is shifted north of the model Drake Passage, even by several thousand kilometers. The integral of the wind stress over the circumpolar streamlines is found to be a useful predictor of the magnitude of the volume transport through the model Drake Passage, although it is necessary to correct for basin-wide zonal pressure gradients in order to obtain good quantitative agreement.

  10. Revisiting node-based SIR models in complex networks with degree correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Cao, Jinde; Alofi, Abdulaziz; AL-Mazrooei, Abdullah; Elaiw, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we consider two growing networks which will lead to the degree-degree correlations between two nearest neighbors in the network. When the network grows to some certain size, we introduce an SIR-like disease such as pandemic influenza H1N1/09 to the population. Due to its rapid spread, the population size changes slowly, and thus the disease spreads on correlated networks with approximately fixed size. To predict the disease evolution on correlated networks, we first review two node-based SIR models incorporating degree correlations and an edge-based SIR model without considering degree correlation, and then compare the predictions of these models with stochastic SIR simulations, respectively. We find that the edge-based model, even without considering degree correlations, agrees much better than the node-based models incorporating degree correlations with stochastic SIR simulations in many respects. Moreover, simulation results show that for networks with positive correlation, the edge-based model provides a better upper bound of the cumulative incidence than the node-based SIR models, whereas for networks with negative correlation, it provides a lower bound of the cumulative incidence.

  11. CALPUFF and AERMOD model validation study in the near field: Martins Creek revisited.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Alan L; Huizer, Robert D

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a near-field validation study involving the steady-state, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guideline model AERMOD and the nonsteady-state puff model CALPUFF. Relative model performance is compared with field measurements collected near Martins Creek, PA-a rural, hilly area along the Pennsylvania-New Jersey border. The principal emission sources in the study were two coal-fired power plants with tall stacks and buoyant plumes. Over 1 yr of sulfur dioxide measurements were collected at eight monitors located at or above the two power plants' stack tops. Concurrent meteorological data were available at two sites. Both sites collected data 10 m above the ground. One of the sites also collected sonic detection and ranging measurements up to 420 m above ground. The ability of the two models to predict monitored sulfur dioxide concentrations was assessed in a four-part model validation. Each part of the validation applied different criteria and statistics to provide a comprehensive evaluation of model performance. Because of their importance in regulatory applications, an emphasis was placed on statistics that demonstrate the model's ability to reproduce the upper end of the concentration distribution. On the basis of the combined results of the four-part validation (i.e., weight of evidence), the performance of CALPUFF was judged to be superior to that of AERMOD. PMID:21751581

  12. The Goodwin model revisited: Hopf bifurcation, limit-cycle, and periodic entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woller, Aurore; Gonze, Didier; Erneux, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The three-variable Goodwin oscillator is a minimal model demonstrating the emergence of oscillations in simple biochemical feedback systems. As a prototypical oscillator, this model was extensively studied from a theoretical point of view and applied to various biological systems, including circadian clocks. Here, we reexamine this model, derive analytically the amplitude equation near the Hopf bifurcation and investigate the effect of a periodic modulation of the oscillator. In particular, we compare the entrainment performance when the free oscillator displays either self-sustained or damped oscillations. We discuss the results in the context of circadian oscillators.

  13. Revisiting the Cape Cod Bacteria Injection Experiment Using a Stochastic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Welty, C; Harvey, R W

    2006-11-22

    Bromide and resting-cell bacteria tracer tests carried out in a sand and gravel aquifer at the USGS Cape Cod site in 1987 were reinterpreted using a three-dimensional stochastic approach and Lagrangian particle tracking numerical methods. Bacteria transport was strongly coupled to colloid filtration through functional dependence of local-scale colloid transport parameters on hydraulic conductivity and seepage velocity in a stochastic advection-dispersion/attachment-detachment model. Information on geostatistical characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field from a nearby plot was utilized as input that was unavailable when the original analysis was carried out. A finite difference model for groundwater flow and a particle-tracking model of conservative solute transport was calibrated to the bromide-tracer breakthrough data using the aforementioned geostatistical parameters. An optimization routine was utilized to adjust the mean and variance of the lnK field over 100 realizations such that a best fit of a simulated, average bromide breakthrough curve is achieved. Once the optimal bromide fit was accomplished (based on adjusting the lnK statistical parameters in unconditional simulations), a stochastic particle-tracking model for the bacteria was run without adjustments to the local-scale colloid transport parameters. Good predictions of the mean bacteria breakthrough data were achieved using several approaches for modeling components of the system. Simulations incorporating the recent Tufenkji and Elimelech [1] equation for estimating single collector efficiency were compared to those using the Rajagopalan and Tien [2] model. Both appeared to work equally well at predicting mean bacteria breakthrough using a constant mean bacteria diameter for this set of field conditions, with the Rajagopalan and Tien model yielding approximately a 30% lower peak concentration and less tailing than the Tufenkji and Elimelech formulation. Simulations using a distribution

  14. A NEW APPROACH TO HYDROLOGIC MODELING: DERIVED DISTRIBUTIONS REVISITED. (R824780)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fractal geometric procedure to model hydrologic (geophysical) phenomena is introduced. The method consists of using derived distributions, obtained by transforming arbitrary multinomial multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, to represent observed hydrologic ...

  15. The mouse gut microbiome revisited: From complex diversity to model ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Blaut, Michael; Stecher, Bärbel

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory mice are the most commonly used animal model in translational medical research. In recent years, the impact of the gut microbiota (i.e. communities of microorganisms in the intestine) on host physiology and the onset of diseases, including metabolic and neuronal disorders, cancers, gastrointestinal infections and chronic inflammation, became a focal point of interest. There is abundant evidence that mouse phenotypes in disease models vary greatly between animal facilities or commercial providers, and that this variation is associated with differences in the microbiota. Hence, there is a clear discrepancy between the widespread use of mouse models in research and the patchwork knowledge on the mouse gut microbiome. In the present manuscript, we summarize data pertaining to the diversity and functions of the mouse gut microbiota, review existing work on gnotobiotic mouse models, and discuss challenges and opportunities for current and future research in the field. PMID:26995267

  16. The consensus in the two-feature two-state one-dimensional Axelrod model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biral, Elias J. P.; Tilles, Paulo F. C.; Fontanari, José F.

    2015-04-01

    The Axelrod model for the dissemination of culture exhibits a rich spatial distribution of cultural domains, which depends on the values of the two model parameters: F, the number of cultural features and q, the common number of states each feature can assume. In the one-dimensional model with F = q = 2, which is closely related to the constrained voter model, Monte Carlo simulations indicate the existence of multicultural absorbing configurations in which at least one macroscopic domain coexist with a multitude of microscopic ones in the thermodynamic limit. However, rigorous analytical results for the infinite system starting from the configuration where all cultures are equally likely show convergence to only monocultural or consensus configurations. Here we show that this disagreement is due simply to the order that the time-asymptotic limit and the thermodynamic limit are taken in the simulations. In addition, we show how the consensus-only result can be derived using Monte Carlo simulations of finite chains.

  17. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  18. Revisiting Turbulence Model Validation for High-Mach Number Axisymmetric Compression Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Huang, George P.

    2015-01-01

    Two axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) cases are used to benchmark one- and two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models. This validation exercise was executed in the philosophy of the NASA Turbulence Modeling Resource and the AIAA Turbulence Model Benchmarking Working Group. Both SWBLI cases are from the experiments of Kussoy and Horstman for axisymmetric compression corner geometries with SWBLI inducing flares of 20 and 30 degrees, respectively. The freestream Mach number was approximately 7. The RANS closures examined are the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model and the Menter family of kappa - omega two equation models including the Baseline and Shear Stress Transport formulations. The Wind-US and CFL3D RANS solvers are employed to simulate the SWBLI cases. Comparisons of RANS solutions to experimental data are made for a boundary layer survey plane just upstream of the SWBLI region. In the SWBLI region, comparisons of surface pressure and heat transfer are made. The effects of inflow modeling strategy, grid resolution, grid orthogonality, turbulent Prandtl number, and code-to-code variations are also addressed.

  19. Revisiting the homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: β1-adrenoceptor as an example.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Li, Minyong

    2012-06-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recognized to constitute the largest family of membrane proteins. Due to the disproportion in the quantity of crystal structures and their amino acid sequences, homology modeling contributes a reasonable and feasible approach to GPCR theoretical coordinates. With the brand new crystal structures resolved recently, herein we deliberated how to designate them as templates to carry out homology modeling in four aspects: (1) various sequence alignment methods; (2) protein weight matrix; (3) different sets of multiple templates; (4) active and inactive state of templates. The accuracy of models was evaluated by comparing the similarity of stereo conformation and molecular docking results between models and the experimental structure of Meleagris gallopavo β(1)-adrenergic receptor (Mg_Adrb1) that we desired to develop as an example. Our results proposed that: (1) Cobalt and MAFFT, two algorithms of sequence alignment, were suitable for single- and multiple-template modeling, respectively; (2) Blosum30 is applicable to align sequences in the case of low sequence identity; (3) multiple-template modeling is not always better than single-template one; (4) the state of template is an influential factor in simulating the GPCR structures as well. PMID:22454032

  20. Revisit of the interacting holographic dark energy model after Planck 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lu; Zhang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the observational constraints on the interacting holographic dark energy model. We consider five typical interacting models with the interaction terms Q = 3βHρde, Q = 3βHρc, Q = 3βH(ρde+ρc), Q = 3βH√ρdeρc, and Q = 3βHρdeρc/ρde+ρc, respectively, where β is a dimensionless coupling constant. The observational data we use in this paper include the JLA compilation of type Ia supernovae data, the Planck 2015 distance priors data of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the Hubble constant direct measurement. We make a comparison for these five interacting holographic dark energy models by employing the information criteria, and we find that, within the framework of holographic dark energy, the Q = 3βHρdeρc/ρde+ρc model is most favored by current data, and the Q = 3βHρc model is relatively not favored by current data. For the Q = 3βHρde and Q = 3βHρdeρc/ρde+ρc models, a positive coupling β can be detected at more than 2σ significance.

  1. Repeat topography surveys of geomorphic changes using digital surface models deriving from Formosat-2 daily revisit stereo pair with very narrow baseline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Wen, H.; Liu, J.; Ko, M.; Yan, H.; Chang, L.

    2012-12-01

    translative offset between two similar images to be rapidly estimated. To meet the requirements in remote sensing and biomedical imaging, the technology of phase correlation has been extended to the sub-pixel level. Liu and Yan (2008) developed a robust phase correlation model using the based feature matching for image co-registration and DEM generation. Considering the fact that the Formosat-2 consecutive images are intrinsically stereo pairs with very narrow baselines, this innovative stereo-matching algorithm based on SPPC technique is employed to process Formosat-2 daily revisit stereo pairs with very narrow baselines. The detailed accuracy and efficiency analysis is investigated for the study area, Namasha, Kaohsiung, using the 50cm resolution aerial photo and the 2m resolution DEM derived from airborne LiDAR data. The archive of Formosat-2 images in Taiwan area collected from 2005 to 2012 was screened out, with the intention to select the consecutive pairs of those areas where major slope disasters occurred in the past eight years. This research encourages the repeated topography surveys of geomorphic changes using digital surface models deriving from Formosat-2 daily revisit stereo pair with very narrow baseline.

  2. 18 Years Later: Revisiting a Groundwater Model of the Cambric Site at NTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, E. J.; Wheatcraft, S. W.; Meerschaert, M. M.

    2004-12-01

    Since its advent in 1974, the Radionuclide Migration Project at the Nevada Test Site has spawned several interesting groundwater modeling ventures. Of interest to this research is the Cambric detonation site, where a tracer test was conducted from 1975 to 1991. Burbey and Wheatcraft (1986) built a groundwater/transport model of the Cambric site and at the time of calibration had achieved a good match to the measured data. Since then the predicted concentrations have diverged from the measured concentrations, which exhibit classic heavy-tailed behavior. It has been hypothesized that the Fractional Advection Dispersion Equation (FADE) will better predict these late-time high concentrations; this research will apply the FADE to the Cambric problem and aims to reach a more complete understanding of the physical significance of the coefficients contained in the FADE. We first built a preliminary groundwater model, employing the traditional Advection Dispersion Equation, in the hopes of duplicating Burbey's predicted concentrations. Burbey used the Deep Well Disposal Model, whereas this investigation used MODFLOW and MT3D. While the new model has produced a breakthrough curve fitting the peak concentration, it too fails to produce the heavy tail seen in the measured data. Also of concern is the nonuniqueness of the new model's solution; the best-fit breakthrough curve can be produced by changing either one of at least two parameters. We believe that both of these shortcomings (under predicted late-time concentrations and non-uniqueness) may be resolved by using the FADE. Not only does fractional theory permit heavy tails, but also it effectively replaces aquifer heterogeneity with fractional derivatives, thereby reducing the probability of a nonunique solution. Future work includes modeling the Cambric problem with Tadjeran and Meerschaert's numerical, fractional, radial-flow transport code (2003) and evaluating the code's applicability to varied flow and transport

  3. The raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. I. Periodic arrays of spheres and dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lukas P.; Peter, Toni; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and Langevin molecular dynamics scheme for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. This technique has been used in many simulation studies on the behavior of colloids. However, there are fundamental questions with regards to the use of this model. In this paper, we examine the accuracy with which the raspberry method is able to reproduce Stokes-level hydrodynamic interactions when compared to analytic expressions for solid spheres in simple-cubic crystals. To this end, we consider the quality of numerical experiments that are traditionally used to establish these properties and we discuss their shortcomings. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobility reproduced by the simple raspberry model and present a way to numerically remedy this problem by adding internal coupling points. Finally, we examine a non-convex shape, namely, a colloidal dumbbell, and show that the filled raspberry model replicates the desired hydrodynamic behavior in bulk for this more complicated shape. Our investigation is continued in de Graaf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084108 (2015)], wherein we consider the raspberry model in the confining geometry of two parallel plates.

  4. Two-ball problem revisited: Limitations of event-driven modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Patric; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2011-04-01

    The main precondition of simulating systems of hard particles by means of event-driven modeling is the assumption of instantaneous collisions. The aim of this paper is to quantify the deviation of event-driven modeling from the solution of Newton’s equation of motion using a paradigmatic example: If a tennis ball is held above a basketball with their centers vertically aligned, and the balls are released to collide with the floor, the tennis ball may rebound at a surprisingly high speed. We show in this article that the simple textbook explanation of this effect is an oversimplification, even for the limit of perfectly elastic particles. Instead, there may occur a rather complex scenario including multiple collisions which may lead to a very different final velocity as compared with the velocity resulting from the oversimplified model.

  5. Natural convection flow in a square cavity revisited: Laminar and turbulent models with wall functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakos, G.; Mitsoulis, E.; Assimacopoulos, D.

    1994-04-01

    Numerical simulations have been undertaken for the benchmark problem of natural convection flow in a square cavity. The control volume method is used to solve the conservation equations for laminar and turbulent flows for a series of Rayleigh numbers (Ra) reaching values up to 10(exp 10). The k-epsilon model has been used for turbulence modelling with and without logarithmic wall functions. Uniform and non-uniform (stretched) grids have been employed with increasing density to guarantee accurate solutions, especially near the walls for high Ra-values. ADI and SIP solvers are implemented to accelerate convergence. Excellent agreement is obtained with previous numerical solutions, while some discrepancies with others for high Ra-values may be due to a possibly different implementation of the wall functions. Comparisons with experimental data for heat transfer (Nusselt number) clearly demonstrates the limitations of the standard k-epsilon model with logarithmic wall functions, which gives significant overpredictions.

  6. Revisiting the Concept of Level of Detail in 3d City Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biljecki, F.; Zhao, J.; Stoter, J.; Ledoux, H.

    2013-09-01

    This review paper discusses the concept of level of detail in 3D city modelling, and is a first step towards a foundation for a standardised definition. As an introduction, a few level of detail specifications, outlooks and approaches are given from the industry. The paper analyses the general uncertainties and shortcomings around the concept of level of detail in 3D city modelling such as ordinality and inconsistencies, and identifies factors that constitute a specific level of detail. The paper proposes a framework for a new consistent LoD definition which would consolidate present and future LoD paradigms, gives an example of an LoD specification, discusses open questions such as the contexts for which 3D city models are used in practice, and gives prospects for a future quantification and sorting of levels of detail.

  7. Revisiting the radionuclide atmospheric dispersion event of the Chernobyl disaster - modelling sensitivity and data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustan, Yelva; Duhanyan, Nora; Bocquet, Marc; Winiarek, Victor

    2013-04-01

    A sensitivity study of the numerical model, as well as, an inverse modelling approach applied to the atmospheric dispersion issues after the Chernobyl disaster are both presented in this paper. On the one hand, the robustness of the source term reconstruction through advanced data assimilation techniques was tested. On the other hand, the classical approaches for sensitivity analysis were enhanced by the use of an optimised forcing field which otherwise is known to be strongly uncertain. The POLYPHEMUS air quality system was used to perform the simulations of radionuclide dispersion. Activity concentrations in air and deposited to the ground of iodine-131, caesium-137 and caesium-134 were considered. The impact of the implemented parameterizations of the physical processes (dry and wet depositions, vertical turbulent diffusion), of the forcing fields (meteorology and source terms) and of the numerical configuration (horizontal resolution) were investigated for the sensitivity study of the model. A four dimensional variational scheme (4D-Var) based on the approximate adjoint of the chemistry transport model was used to invert the source term. The data assimilation is performed with measurements of activity concentrations in air extracted from the Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring (REM) database. For most of the investigated configurations (sensitivity study), the statistics to compare the model results to the field measurements as regards the concentrations in air are clearly improved while using a reconstructed source term. As regards the ground deposited concentrations, an improvement can only be seen in case of satisfactorily modelled episode. Through these studies, the source term and the meteorological fields are proved to have a major impact on the activity concentrations in air. These studies also reinforce the use of reconstructed source term instead of the usual estimated one. A more detailed parameterization of the deposition process seems also to be

  8. Revisiting the cape cod bacteria injection experiment using a stochastic modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, R.M.; Welty, C.; Harvey, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Bromide and resting-cell bacteria tracer tests conducted in a sandy aquifer at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod site in 1987 were reinterpreted using a three-dimensional stochastic approach. Bacteria transport was coupled to colloid filtration theory through functional dependence of local-scale colloid transport parameters upon hydraulic conductivity and seepage velocity in a stochastic advection - dispersion/attachment - detachment model. Geostatistical information on the hydraulic conductivity (K) field that was unavailable at the time of the original test was utilized as input. Using geostatistical parameters, a groundwater flow and particle-tracking model of conservative solute transport was calibrated to the bromide-tracer breakthrough data. An optimization routine was employed over 100 realizations to adjust the mean and variance ofthe natural-logarithm of hydraulic conductivity (InK) field to achieve best fit of a simulated, average bromide breakthrough curve. A stochastic particle-tracking model for the bacteria was run without adjustments to the local-scale colloid transport parameters. Good predictions of mean bacteria breakthrough were achieved using several approaches for modeling components of the system. Simulations incorporating the recent Tufenkji and Elimelech (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2004, 38, 529-536) correlation equation for estimating single collector efficiency were compared to those using the older Rajagopalan and Tien (AIChE J. 1976, 22, 523-533) model. Both appeared to work equally well at predicting mean bacteria breakthrough using a constant mean bacteria diameter for this set of field conditions. Simulations using a distribution of bacterial cell diameters available from original field notes yielded a slight improvement in the model and data agreement compared to simulations using an average bacterial diameter. The stochastic approach based on estimates of local-scale parameters for the bacteria-transport process reasonably captured

  9. Nuclear winter revisited with a modern climate model and current nuclear arsenals: Still catastrophic consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2007-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the results of climate model simulations of the response to smoke and dust from a massive nuclear exchange between the superpowers could be summarized as "nuclear winter," with rapid temperature, precipitation, and insolation drops at the surface that would threaten global agriculture for at least a year. The global nuclear arsenal has fallen by a factor of three since then, but there has been an expansion of the number of nuclear weapons states, with additional states trying to develop nuclear arsenals. We use a modern climate model to reexamine the climate response to a range of nuclear wars, producing 50 and 150 Tg of smoke, using moderate and large portions of the current global arsenal, and find that there would be significant climatic responses to all the scenarios. This is the first time that an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model has been used for such a simulation and the first time that 10-year simulations have been conducted. The response to the 150 Tg scenario can still be characterized as "nuclear winter," but both produce global catastrophic consequences. The changes are more long-lasting than previously thought, however, because the new model, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE, is able to represent the atmosphere up to 80 km, and simulates plume rise to the middle and upper stratosphere, producing a long aerosol lifetime. The indirect effects of nuclear weapons would have devastating consequences for the planet, and continued nuclear arsenal reductions will be needed before the threat of nuclear winter is removed from the Earth.

  10. Sulfur in the early martian atmosphere revisited: Experiments with a 3-D Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Laura; Forget, François; Wordsworth, Robin

    2015-11-01

    Volcanic SO2 in the martian atmosphere has been invoked as a way to create a sustained or transient greenhouse during early martian history. Many modeling studies have been performed to test the feasibility of this hypothesis, resulting in a range of conclusions, from highly feasible to highly improbable. In this study we perform a wide range of simulations using the 3-D Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Generic Global Climate Model (GCM) in order to place earlier results into context and to explore the sensitivity of model outcomes to parameters such as SO2 mixing ratio, atmospheric H2O content, background atmospheric pressure, and aerosol size, abundance, and composition. We conclude that SO2 is incapable of creating a sustained greenhouse on early Mars, and that even in the absence of aerosols, local and daily temperatures rise above 273 K for only for limited periods with favorable background CO2 pressures. In the presence of even small amounts of aerosols, the surface is dramatically cooled for realistic aerosol sizes. Brief, mildly warm conditions require the co-occurrence of many improbable factors, while cooling is achieved for a wide range of model parameters. Instead of causing warming, sulfur in the martian atmosphere may have caused substantial cooling, leading to the end of clement climate conditions on early Mars.

  11. The Reciprocal Effects Model Revisited: Extending Its Reach to Gifted Students Attending Academically Selective Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Marjorie; Marsh, Herbert W.; Parker, Philip D.; Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The reciprocal effects model (REM) predicts a reciprocal relation between academic self-concept and academic achievement, whereby prior academic self-concept is associated with future gains in achievement, and prior achievement is related to subsequent academic self-concept. Although research in this area has been extensive, there has been a…

  12. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen. PMID:26946136

  13. The PANAS Structure Revisited: On the Validity of a Bifactor Model in Community and Forensic Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leue, Anja; Beauducel, Andre

    2011-01-01

    The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) is a widely used inventory for the assessment of affect in psychology and other applied sciences. Despite its popularity, the structure of the PANAS is still under debate. On the one hand, there is evidence of the traditional 2-factor model with Positive Affect (PA) and Negative Affect (NA) as…

  14. Revisiting the Home Literacy Model of Reading Development in an Orthographically Consistent Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolitsis, George; Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno

    2011-01-01

    We examined the applicability of the Home Literacy Model in an orthographically transparent language (Greek). Seventy Greek children were followed from kindergarten until grade 4. In kindergarten they were tested in non-verbal intelligence, vocabulary, phonological sensitivity, rapid naming, and letter knowledge. The parents of the children also…

  15. The Structure of Academic Self-Concepts Revisited: The Nested Marsh/Shavelson Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich; Dierendonck, Christophe; Reichert, Monique; Ugen, Sonja; Fischbach, Antoine; Martin, Romain

    2010-01-01

    The nested Marsh/Shavelson (NMS) model integrates structural characteristics of academic self-concepts that have proved empirically incompatible in previous studies. Specifically, it conceives of academic self-concepts to be subject specific, strongly separated across domains, and hierarchically organized, with general academic self-concept at the…

  16. Restructuring a Teacher Education Unit with P-12 Partner Schools. A Collaborative Model Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegler, Kay L.; Forester, Lyn C.

    This paper explores some of the many reasons to restructure, suggests the participants in restructuring, responds to Goodlad's (1990) postulates and essentials of restructuring and describes a model for restructuring between a teacher preparation program and P-12 schools. Reasons for restructuring can be classified into three categories: changes…

  17. Curricular Adaptations in Inpatient Child Psychiatry for the 21st Century: The Flexner Model Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Cathy K.; Guerrero, Anthony; Matsu, Courtenay; Takeshita, Junji; Haning, William; Schultz, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe curricular modifications created in response to the changing culture of medical education, health care systems, academic medicine, and generational differences. The authors propose a model child psychiatry inpatient curriculum that is sustainable within a community teaching hospital in the 21st century. Methods: The…

  18. Localization-Delocalization in Bridged Mixed-Valence Metal Clusters: Vibronic PKS Model Revisited.

    PubMed

    Palii, A; Tsukerblat, B; Clemente-Juan, J M; Aldoshin, S M

    2015-09-24

    Here we describe a new vibronic model of mixed valence (MV) dimer inspired by the conventional Piepho, Krausz, and Schatz (PKS) approach. We attempted to partially lift the main restriction of the PKS model dealing with the vibronically independent moieties of a MV molecule. The refined version of the PKS model in which the bridging ligands are included deals with the three main interactions: electron transfer (integral t0) related to the high-symmetric ligand configuration, on-site vibronic coupling (parameter υ) arising from the modulation of the crystal field on the metal sites by the breathing displacements of their nearest ligand surroundings, and intercenter vibronic coupling (parameter ζ) describing the dependence of the electron transfer on ligand positions in the course of their breathing movement. We apply the modified model to the analysis of the adiabatic potentials and electronic density distributions in the minima of their lower sheets for the cases of one-electron MV dimer with long and short bridges and for the two-electron MV dimer exhibiting a valence disproportionation effect. The inclusion of the intercenter interaction in addition to the conventional PKS coupling is shown to produce a strong effect on the degree of localization in MV dimers and, in particular, on the assignments to the Robin and Day classes and on the conditions of stabilization of valence disproportionated states in bielectron transfer systems. PMID:26305153

  19. The Raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. II. The effect of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Peter, Toni; Fischer, Lukas P.; Holm, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann (LB) and Langevin molecular dynamics schemes for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. In this paper, we present a follow up to our study of the effectiveness of the raspberry model in reproducing hydrodynamic interactions in the Stokes regime for spheres arranged in a simple-cubic crystal [Fischer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084107 (2015)]. Here, we consider the accuracy with which the raspberry model is able to reproduce such interactions for particles confined between two parallel plates. To this end, we compare our LB simulation results to established theoretical expressions and finite-element calculations. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobilities when only surface coupling points are used, as also found in Part I of our joint publication. We demonstrate that adding internal coupling points to the raspberry can be used to correct said discrepancy in confining geometries as well. Finally, we show that the raspberry model accurately reproduces hydrodynamic interactions between a spherical colloid and planar walls up to roughly one LB lattice spacing.

  20. Holland in Iceland revisited: an emic approach to evaluating U.S. vocational interest models.

    PubMed

    Einarsdóttir, Sif; Rounds, James; Su, Rong

    2010-07-01

    An emic approach was used to test the structural validity and applicability of Holland's (1997) RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) model in Iceland. Archival data from the development of the Icelandic Interest Inventory (Einarsdóttir & Rounds, 2007) were used in the present investigation. The data included an indigenous pool of occupations and work-task items representing Iceland's world of work that had been administered to a sample of 597 upper secondary school students. Multidimensional scaling analysis and property vector fitting using Prediger's (1981) work-task dimensions were applied to the item responses to test if the RIASEC model could be identified. The results indicated that a 4-dimensional solution better explains the interest space in Iceland than Holland's 2-dimensional RIASEC representation. The work-task dimension of People-Things and the Sex-Type and Prestige dimensions were located in the 1st and 2nd dimensions of the multidimensional scaling solution, but Data-Ideas, a dimension critical to the RIASEC model, was not. The 3rd and 4th dimensions did not correspond to any dimensions previously detected in structural studies in the United States and seem to be related to specific ecological, cultural, and political forces in Iceland. These results demonstrate the importance of selecting representative indigenous occupations and work tasks when evaluating the RIASEC model. The present study is an example of the next step in a comprehensive cross-cultural research program on vocational interests, an emic investigation. PMID:21133585

  1. Social Mobility and Post-Compulsory Education: Revisiting Boudon's Model of Social Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ron; Simmons, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Raymond Boudon's model of educational expansion to examine the relationship between education and social mobility, paying particular attention to post-compulsory education--an important site of social differentiation in England. The paper shows how Boudon focuses explicitly on the consequences of educational expansion, and…

  2. Paradigms Revisited: A Quantitative Investigation into a Model to Integrate Objectivism and Constructivism in Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elander, Kelly; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2016-01-01

    While learning interventions were traditionally classified as either objectivist or constructivist there has been an increasing tendency for practitioners to use elements of both paradigms in a consolidated fashion. This has meant a re-think of the two perspectives as diametrically opposite. A four-quadrant model, first proposed in this journal…

  3. Holland in Iceland Revisited: An Emic Approach to Evaluating U.S. Vocational Interest Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Sif; Rounds, James; Su, Rong

    2010-01-01

    An emic approach was used to test the structural validity and applicability of Holland's (1997) RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) model in Iceland. Archival data from the development of the Icelandic Interest Inventory (Einarsdottir & Rounds, 2007) were used in the present investigation. The data…

  4. The chemistry of C3 and C2 in cometary comae. I. Current models revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. It is widely accepted that C3 and in particular C2 play an important role in the compositional classification of comets, and the most well-established classification scheme to date is indeed based on the Haser production rates of these two radicals. A link between both C3 and C2 and their actual parent molecules would therefore be desirable to allow both a physical and chemical interpretation of the compositional classification of comets. A first detailed study was performed by Helbert and collaborators for comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), which suggested a link between these two radicals and the parent species C2H2, C2H6, and C3H4. Aims: We extend previous studies of the formation of C3 and C2 to other comets at smaller heliocentric distances. The proposed model for the formation of these two radicals is tested for these comets. Methods: We compare the observed radial column densities of C3 and C2 in the comae of the comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), and 9P/Tempel 1 with the results of a one-dimensional multi-fluid coma chemistry model. The shape of the modelled radial column density profiles are compared with the observed profiles, and the production rates of the parent species are computed by fitting the observational data with the model. Results: We do not find that C2H6 is a significant parent species of the observed cometary C2. Furthermore, electron impact reactions do not play an important role in the formation of C3. The model for the formation of C3 and C2 derived from comet Hale-Bopp is inconsistent with observations of these radicals in other comets. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO programmes 073.C-0571 and 075.C-0355).

  5. Re-visiting crash-speed relationships: A new perspective in crash modelling.

    PubMed

    Imprialou, Maria-Ioanna M; Quddus, Mohammed; Pitfield, David E; Lord, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Although speed is considered to be one of the main crash contributory factors, research findings are inconsistent. Independent of the robustness of their statistical approaches, crash frequency models typically employ crash data that are aggregated using spatial criteria (e.g., crash counts by link termed as a link-based approach). In this approach, the variability in crashes between links is explained by highly aggregated average measures that may be inappropriate, especially for time-varying variables such as speed and volume. This paper re-examines crash-speed relationships by creating a new crash data aggregation approach that enables improved representation of the road conditions just before crash occurrences. Crashes are aggregated according to the similarity of their pre-crash traffic and geometric conditions, forming an alternative crash count dataset termed as a condition-based approach. Crash-speed relationships are separately developed and compared for both approaches by employing the annual crashes that occurred on the Strategic Road Network of England in 2012. The datasets are modelled by injury severity using multivariate Poisson lognormal regression, with multivariate spatial effects for the link-based model, using a full Bayesian inference approach. The results of the condition-based approach show that high speeds trigger crash frequency. The outcome of the link-based model is the opposite; suggesting that the speed-crash relationship is negative regardless of crash severity. The differences between the results imply that data aggregation is a crucial, yet so far overlooked, methodological element of crash data analyses that may have direct impact on the modelling outcomes. PMID:26571206

  6. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  7. Microscopic Car-Following Models Revisited: From Road Works to Fundamental Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, T.; Gasser, I.; Werner, B.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the classical optimal velocity model for the case of road works. We introduce a new viewpoint, the so-called rotation solutions, which in case of an additional symmetry leads to Ponies-on-a-Merry-Go-Round-solutions (POMs) [D. G. Aronson, M. Golubitsky, and J. Mallet-Paret, Nonlinearity, 4 (1991), p. 903]. This approach, which is also useful for the case without road works, opens the possibility of analytical and numerical bifurcation studies, which show a wide variety in the possible dynamics of this very simple model. In addition, we mimic different measurement approaches and recover the famous inverse Greek lambda structure in the fundamental diagram.

  8. The Zee-Babu model revisited in the light of new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Nebot, Miguel; Rius, Nuria; Santamaria, Arcadi

    2014-08-01

    We update previous analyses of the Zee-Babu model in the light of new data, e.g., the mixing angle θ13, the rare decay μ→eγ and the LHC results. We also analyze the possibility of accommodating the deviations in Γ(H→γγ) hinted by the LHC experiments, and the stability of the scalar potential. We find that neutrino oscillation data and low energy constraints are still compatible with masses of the extra charged scalars accessible to LHC. Moreover, if any of them is discovered, the model can be falsified by combining the information on the singly and doubly charged scalar decay modes with neutrino data. Conversely, if the neutrino spectrum is found to be inverted and the CP phase δ is quite different from π, the masses of the charged scalars will be well outside the LHC reach.

  9. Direct Monte Carlo and multifluid modeling of the circumnuclear dust coma. Spherical grain dynamics revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crifo, J.-F.; Loukianov, G. A.; Rodionov, A. V.; Zakharov, V. V.

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the first computations of dust distributions in the vicinity of an active cometary nucleus, using a multidimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method (DSMC). The physical model is simplistic: spherical grains of a broad range of sizes are liberated by H 2O sublimation from a selection of nonrotating sunlit spherical nuclei, and submitted to the nucleus gravity, the gas drag, and the solar radiation pressure. The results are compared to those obtained by the previously described Dust Multi-Fluid Method (DMF) and demonstrate an excellent agreement in the regions where the DMF is usable. Most importantly, the DSMC allows the discovery of hitherto unsuspected dust coma properties in those cases which cannot be treated by the DMF. This leads to a thorough reconsideration of the properties of the near-nucleus dust dynamics. In particular, the results show that (1) none of the three forces considered here can be neglected a priori, in particular not the radiation pressure; (2) hitherto unsuspected new families of grain trajectories exist, for instance trajectories leading from the nightside surface to the dayside coma; (3) a wealth of balistic-like trajectories leading from one point of the surface to another point exist; on the dayside, such trajectories lead to the formation of "mini-volcanoes." The present model and results are discussed carefully. It is shown that (1) the neglected forces (inertia associated with a nucleus rotation, solar tidal force) are, in general, not negligible everywhere, and (2) when allowing for these additional forces, a time-dependent model will, in general, have to be used. The future steps of development of the model are outlined.

  10. Huxley's Model for Muscle Contraction Revisited: The Importance of Microscopic Reversibility.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2015-01-01

    Andrew Huxley's model for muscle contraction is the first mechanistic description of how an energy-providing chemical reaction, ATP hydrolysis, can be coupled by a molecule (myosin) to do work in the environment in a cyclic process. The model was originally used to fit experimentally obtained force vs velocity curves, and has served as a paradigm for understanding mechanochemical coupling ever since. Despite the remarkable success in fitting kinetic data, Huxley's model is thermodynamically inconsistent in several regards, most notably in its failure to include thermal noise in the description of the mechanical transitions by which motion occurs. This inconsistency has led subsequent workers to incorrect conclusions regarding the importance of mechanical transitions for determining the direction of motion, the efficiency of energy conversion, the ratio of forward to backward steps, and the applied force necessary to stop the motion of chemically driven molecular motors. In this chapter an extension of Huxley's model is described where the principle of microscopic reversibility provides a framework for developing a thermodynamically consistent description of a molecular machine. The results show clearly that mechanical strain and the so-called "power stroke" are irrelevant for determining the directionality and thermodynamic properties of any chemically driven molecular motor. Instead these properties are controlled entirely by the chemical specificity that describes how the relative rates of the ATP hydrolysis reaction depend, by allosteric interactions, on the mechanical state of the molecule. This mechanism has been termed an "information ratchet" in the literature. In contrast to the results for chemical driving, a power stroke can be a key component for the operation of an optically driven motor, the transitions of which do not obey microscopic reversibility. PMID:26122749

  11. The faint young Sun problem revisited with a 3-D climate-carbon model - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hir, G.; Teitler, Y.; Fluteau, F.; Donnadieu, Y.; Philippot, P.

    2014-04-01

    During the Archaean, the Sun's luminosity was 18 to 25% lower than the present day. One-dimensional radiative convective models (RCM) generally infer that high concentrations of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4) are required to prevent the early Earth's surface temperature from dropping below the freezing point of liquid water and satisfying the faint young Sun paradox (FYSP, an Earth temperature at least as warm as today). Using a one-dimensional (1-D) model, it was proposed in 2010 that the association of a reduced albedo and less reflective clouds may have been responsible for the maintenance of a warm climate during the Archaean without requiring high concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). More recently, 3-D climate simulations have been performed using atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM) and Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMIC). These studies were able to solve the FYSP through a large range of carbon dioxide concentrations, from 0.6 bar with an EMIC to several millibars with AGCMs. To better understand this wide range in pCO2, we investigated the early Earth climate using an atmospheric GCM coupled to a slab ocean. Our simulations include the ice-albedo feedback and specific Archaean climatic factors such as a faster Earth rotation rate, high atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and/or CH4, a reduced continental surface, a saltier ocean, and different cloudiness. We estimated full glaciation thresholds for the early Archaean and quantified positive radiative forcing required to solve the FYSP. We also demonstrated why RCM and EMIC tend to overestimate greenhouse gas concentrations required to avoid full glaciations or solve the FYSP. Carbon cycle-climate interplays and conditions for sustaining pCO2 will be discussed in a companion paper.

  12. Revisiting the thermodynamic modelling of type I gas-hydroquinone clathrates.

    PubMed

    Conde, M M; Torré, J P; Miqueu, C

    2016-04-21

    Under specific pressure and temperature conditions, certain gaseous species can be engaged in a host lattice of hydroquinone molecules, forming a supramolecular entity called a gas hydroquinone clathrate. This study is devoted to the thermodynamic modelling of type I hydroquinone clathrates. The gases considered in this work are argon, krypton, xenon, methane, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen sulphide. The basic van der Waals and Platteeuw model, which is, for example, not able to predict well the phase equilibrium properties of such clathrates at high temperature, is modified and extended by considering first the solubility of the guest in solid HQ and then the mutual interactions between the gaseous molecules inside the clathrate structure (i.e. guest-guest interactions). Other improvements of the basic theory, such as the choice of the reference state, are proposed, and a unique set of thermodynamic parameters valid for all the studied guests are finally calculated. Very good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and the experimental data available in the literature. Our results clearly demonstrate that the highest level of theory is necessary to describe well both the triphasic equilibrium line (where the HQ clathrate, the native hydroquinone HQα and the gas coexist), the occupancy of the guest in the clathrate, and the intercalation enthalpy. PMID:27004460

  13. Simultaneous calibration of surface flow and baseflow simulations: a revisit of the SWAT model calibration framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuesong; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Arnold, J. G.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Bosch, David

    2011-04-21

    Accurate analysis of water flow pathways from rainfall to streams is critical for simulating water use, climate change impact, and contaminants transport. In this study, we developed a new scheme to simultaneously calibrate surface flow (SF) and baseflow (BF) simulations of soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) by combing evolutionary multi-objective optimization (EMO) and BF separation techniques. The application of this scheme demonstrated pronounced trade-off of SWAT’s performance on SF and BF simulations. The simulated major water fluxes and storages variables (e.g. soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and groundwater) using the multiple parameters from EMO span wide ranges. Uncertainty analysis was conducted by Bayesian model averaging of the Pareto optimal solutions. The 90% confidence interval (CI) estimated using all streamflows substantially overestimate the uncertainty of low flows on BF days while underestimating the uncertainty of high flows on SF days. Despite using statistical criteria calculated based on streamflow for model selection, it is important to conduct diagnostic analysis of the agreement of SWAT behaviour and actual watershed dynamics. The new calibration technique can serve as a useful tool to explore the tradeoff between SF and BF simulations and provide candidates for further diagnostic assessment and model identification.

  14. The Educational Model of Private Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine: Revisited for 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Trends in the development of new private colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) described by the author in 2003 have accelerated in the ensuing decade. During 2003 to 2013, 10 new COMs as well as 2 remote teaching sites and 4 new branch campuses at private institutions were accredited, leading to a 98% increase in the number of students enrolled in private COMs. The key features of the private COM educational model during this period were a reliance on student tuition, the establishment of health professions education programs around the medical school, the expansion of class size, the creation of branch campuses and remote teaching sites, an environment that emphasizes teaching over research, and limited involvement in facilities providing clinical services to patients. There is institutional ownership of preclinical instruction, but clinical instruction occurs in affiliated hospitals and medical institutions where students are typically taught by volunteer and/or adjunct faculty.Between 2003 and 2013, this model attracted smaller universities and organizations, which implemented the strategies of established private COMs in initiating new private COMs, branch campuses, and remote teaching sites. The new COMs have introduced changes to the osteopathic profession and private COM model by expanding to new parts of the country and establishing the first for-profit medical school accredited in the United States in modern times. They have also increased pressure on the system of osteopathic graduate medical education, as the number of funded GME positions available to their graduates is less than the need. PMID:26039139

  15. One-dimensional Bose gas in optical lattices of arbitrary strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrakharchik, Grigory E.; Krutitsky, Konstantin V.; Lewenstein, Maciej; Mazzanti, Ferran

    2016-02-01

    One-dimensional Bose gas with contact interaction in optical lattices at zero temperature is investigated by means of the exact diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm. The results obtained from the fundamental continuous model are compared with those obtained from the lattice (discrete) Bose-Hubbard model, using exact diagonalization, and from the quantum sine-Gordon model. We map out the complete phase diagram of the continuous model and determine the regions of applicability of the Bose-Hubbard model. Various physical quantities characterizing the systems are calculated, and it is demonstrated that the sine-Gordon model used for shallow lattices is inaccurate.

  16. Lithospheric Flexure and Sedimentary Basin Evolution: the Steer's Head Model Re-visited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. D. P.; Watts, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Backstripping studies of biostratigraphic data from deep wells show that sediment loading is one of the main factors controlling the subsidence and uplift history of sedimentary basins. Previous studies based on single layer models of elastic and viscoelastic plates overlying an inviscid fluid have shown that sediment loading, together with a tectonic subsidence that decreases exponentially with time, can explain the large-scale 'architecture' of rift-type basins and, in some cases, details of their internal stratigraphy such as onlap and offlap patterns. One problem with these so-called 'steer's head' models is that they were based on a simple rheological model in which the long-term strength of the lithosphere increased with thermal age. Recent oceanic flexure studies, however, reveal that the long-term strength of the lithosphere depends not only on thermal age, but also load age. We have used the thermal structure based on plate cooling models, together with recent experimentally-derived flow laws, to compute the viscosity structure of the lithosphere and a new analytical model to compute the flexure of a multilayer viscoelastic plate by a trapezoid-shaped sediment load at different times since basin initiation. If we define the nondimensional number Dw = τm/τt, where τm is the Maxwell time constant and τt is the thermal time constant, we find that for Dw << 1 the flexure approximates that of an elastic plate and an onlap pattern forms at the edge of basin (Fig. 1), whereas for Dw >> 1 the flexure approximates that of a viscoelastic plate and an offlap pattern develops (Fig. 2). Interestingly Dw ~ 1 produces a basin in which onlap dominates its early evolution while offlap dominates its later evolution and an unconformity separates the two different stratal patterns (Fig. 3). Therefore, when consideration is given to the fact that the long-term strength of the lithosphere depends on both thermal and load age we are able to produce stratal geometries that

  17. Revisiting mechanisms underlying tree mortality induced by drought in the Amazon: from observation to modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joetzjer, E.; Poulter, B.; Ciais, P.; Sala, A.; Sack, L.; Bartlett, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, two extreme droughts experienced by the Amazon rainforest led to a perturbation of carbon cycle dynamics and forest structure, partly through an increase in tree mortality. While there is a relatively strong consensus in CMIP5 projections for an increase in both frequency and intensity of droughts across the Amazon, the potential for forest die-off constitutes a large uncertainty in projections of climate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems and carbon cycle feedbacks. Two long-term through fall exclusion experiments (TFE) provided novel observations of Amazonian ecosystem responses under drought. These experiments also provided a great opportunity to evaluate and improve models' behavior under drought by comparing simulations and observations. While current DGVM use a wide array of algorithms to represent mortality, most are associated with large uncertainty for representing drought-induced mortality, and require updating to include current information of physiological processes. During very strong droughts, the leaves desiccate and stems may undergo catastrophic embolism. However, even before that point, stomata close, to minimize excessive water loss and risk of hydraulic failure, which reduces carbon assimilation. To maintain respiration and other functions, plants may eventually deplete stored non-structural carbon compounds (NSC), which may have negative impacts on plant and eventually increase the probability of mortality.Here, we describe a new parameterization of the mortality process induced by drought using the ORCHIDEE-CAN dynamic vegetation model and test it using the two TFE results. We first updated and evaluated both the representation of hydraulic architecture and the NSC pool dynamics using in situ data. We implemented a direct climate effect on mortality through catastrophic stem embolism, based on hydraulic vulnerability curves. In addition, we explored the role of NSC on hydraulic failure and mortality by coupling in the model

  18. Revisiting the infrared spectra of active galactic nuclei with a new torus emission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Franceschini, A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.

    2006-03-01

    We describe improved modelling of the emission by dust in a toroidal-like structure heated by a central illuminating source within active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have chosen a simple but realistic torus geometry, a flared disc, and a dust grain distribution function including a full range of grain sizes. The optical depth within the torus is computed in detail taking into account the different sublimation temperatures of the silicate and graphite grains, which solves previously reported inconsistencies in the silicate emission feature in type 1 AGNs. We exploit this model to study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 58 extragalactic (both type 1 and type 2) sources using archival optical and infrared data. We find that both AGN and starburst contributions are often required to reproduce the observed SEDs, although in a few cases they are very well fitted by a pure AGN component. The AGN contribution to the far-infrared luminosity is found to be higher in type 1 sources, with all the type 2 requiring a substantial contribution from a circumnuclear starburst. Our results appear in agreement with the AGN unified scheme, because the distributions of key parameters of the torus models turn out to be compatible for type 1 and type 2 AGNs. Further support to the unification concept comes from comparison with medium-resolution infrared spectra of type 1 AGNs by the Spitzer observatory, showing evidence for a moderate silicate emission around 10 μm, which our code reproduces. From our analysis we infer accretion flows in the inner nucleus of local AGNs characterized by high equatorial optical depths (AV~= 100), moderate sizes (Rmax < 100 pc) and very high covering factors (f~= 80 per cent) on average.

  19. Revisiting ENSO Coupled Instability Theory and SST Error Growth in a Fully Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, S.; Kirtman, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to untangle certain mechanisms contributing to the initiation of ENSO events, a coupled model framework is presented to isolate coupled instability induced SST error (or anomaly) growth in the ENSO region. The modeling framework using CCSM4 allows for seasonal ensembles of initialized simulations that are utilized to quantify the spatial and temporal behavior of coupled instabilities and the associated implications for ENSO predictability. The experimental design allows for unstable growth of initial perturbations that are not prescribed and several cases exhibit sufficiently rapid growth to produce ENSO events that do not require a previous ENSO event, large-scale wind trigger, or subsurface heat content precursor. Without these precursors, however, ENSO amplitude is reduced, suggesting that a combination of processes is essential to achieving peak amplitude in CCSM4. The results imply that even without classical precursors, including western Pacific "preconditioning," ENSO events can be excited via coupled instabilities in fully coupled models. By removing the subsurface heat content precursor, however, essentially a lower bounds for ENSO predictability in CCSM4 is established, although seasonal ensembles initialized later in the calendar year retain some predictability. The initial error growth exhibits strong seasonality with fastest growth during spring and summer and also dependence on the initialization month with fastest growth occurring in the July ensemble. The error growth displays a well-defined seasonal limit with ensembles initialized in the winter or spring exhibiting a clear seasonal halt in error growth around September, consistent with increased background stability typical during fall. Overall, dynamically driven error growth in CCSM4 is deemed best characterized by strong seasonality, dependence on the initialization month, and nonlinearity. The results pose real implications for predictability because the final error structure is

  20. Revisiting models of crustal growth; the role of preservation and destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Nick; Spencer, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    The rate of growth of the continental crust remains a topic of much debate. Individual continents and cratons show apparent episodic magmatic activity and associated continental growth. Because our archive of Earth's history is locked up in the continental crust, most records of Earth history similarly have an episodic nature to them. One long-standing model has been that these episodes of continental growth are related to both large mantle upwelling and mantle overturn events. Another model that has been in and out of favour, is that continental growth was rapid in the early Earth history, and that net growth has been near-zero since at least the Mesoarchaean. Crustal growth rates based on modelling of isotopic systems tend to feature an increasing volume through time, with a faster rate up to the Meso- to Neoarchaean. As well as being derived from the mantle, continental crust can also be returned to the mantle. The net continental growth rate is a balance between this addition and loss. A problem with many crustal growth models is that they are based on the record preserved today. Although attempts have been made to account for intra-continental recycling, continental loss back into the mantle is generally unaccounted for. For this reason, many crustal growth curves can be considered a minimum. With an approach using Hf and O isotopes in zircon, it can be shown that at least 50% of the current volume of continental crust was formed by 3 Ga, and that of this current volume, at least 45% has been recycled intra-crustally. Current estimates of crustal mass-balance suggest that continental addition is similar to rates of continental loss. But how far back in time has this been the case? If plate tectonics and deep subduction have been around since the late Archaean, then it is likely that rates of reworking have been high since this time also. The hotly debated question: what style of plate tectonics and continental growth mechanisms existed throughout the Archaean

  1. Chayanov revisited: A model for the economics of complex kin units

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Chayanov's model of the peasant economy is based on autarkic nuclear family households. Expansion to the more complex households and kin groups common in peasant societies shows that the sharp changes Chayanov observed in the consumer/producer ratio over the domestic cycle are smoothed by the intergenerational structure of complex households and extended kin groups. This amelioration may be retarded by competition between constituent units. Understanding the dynamics of the developmental cycle and micropolitics of domestic groups is a useful correction to Chayanov's widely used formulation, especially in developing countries where complex kin structures are common. PMID:15867158

  2. Revisiting the nonequilibrium phase transition of the triplet-creation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardozo, G. O.; Fontanari, J. F.

    2006-06-01

    The nonequilibrium phase transition in the triplet-creation model is investigated using critical spreading and the conservative diffusive contact process. The results support the claim that at high enough diffusion the phase transition becomes discontinuous. As the diffusion probability increases the critical exponents change continuously from the ordinary directed percolation (DP) class to the compact directed percolation (CDP). The fractal dimension of the critical cluster, however, switches abruptly between those two universality classes. Strong crossover effects in both methods make it difficult, if not impossible, to establish the exact location of the tricritical point.

  3. Cats protecting birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang; Feng, Zhilan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we revisit the dynamical interaction among prey (bird), mesopredator (rat), and superpredator (cat) discussed in [Courchamp, F., Langlais, M., Sugihara, G., 1999. Cats protecting birds: modelling the mesopredator release effect. Journal of Animal Ecology 68, 282-292]. First, we develop a prey-mesopredator-superpredator (i.e., bird-rat-cat, briefly, BRC) model, where the predator's functional responses are derived based on the classical Holling's time budget arguments. Our BRC model overcomes several model construction problems in Courchamp et al. (1999), and admits richer, reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rat or the cat when the bird is endangered. We establish the existence of two types of mesopredator release phenomena: severe mesopredator release, where once superpredators are suppressed, a burst of mesopredators follows which leads their shared prey to extinction; and mild mesopredator release, where the mesopredator release could assert more negative impact on the endemic prey but does not lead the endemic prey to extinction. A sharp sufficient criterion is established for the occurrence of severe mesopredator release. We also show that, in a prey-mesopredator-superpredator trophic food web, eradication of introduced superpredators such as feral domestic cats in the BRC model, is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey. The presence of a superpredator may have a beneficial effect in such systems. PMID:15998496

  4. Limited fetch revisited: Comparison of wind input terms, in surface wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrei; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Results pertaining to numerical solutions of the Hasselmann kinetic equation (HE), for wind driven sea spectra, in the fetch limited geometry, are presented. Five versions of source functions, including the recently introduced ZRP model (Zakharov et al., 2012), have been studied, for the exact expression of Snl and high-frequency implicit dissipation, due to wave-breaking. Four of the five experiments were done in the absence of spectral peak dissipation for various Sin terms. They demonstrated the dominance of quadruplet wave-wave interaction, in the energy balance, and the formation of self-similar regimes, of unlimited wave energy growth, along the fetch. Between them was the ZRP model, which strongly agreed with dozens of field observations performed in the seas and lakes, since 1947. The fifth, the WAM3 wind input term experiment, used additional spectral peak dissipation and reproduced the results of a previous, similar, numerical simulation described in Komen et al. (1994), but only supported the field experiments for moderate fetches, demonstrating a total energy saturation at half of that of the Pierson-Moscowits limit. The alternative framework for HE numerical simulation is proposed, along with a set of tests, allowing one to select physically-justified source terms.

  5. Spectral function of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model revisited: Power laws and universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markhof, L.; Meden, V.

    2016-02-01

    We reinvestigate the momentum-resolved single-particle spectral function of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model. In particular, we focus on the role of the momentum dependence of the two-particle interaction V (q ) . Usually, V (q ) is assumed to be a constant and integrals are regularized in the ultraviolet "by hand" employing an ad hoc procedure. As the momentum dependence of the interaction is irrelevant in the renormalization group sense, this does not affect the universal low-energy properties of the model, e.g., exponents of power laws, if all energy scales are sent to zero. If, however, the momentum k is fixed away from the Fermi momentum kF, with |k - kF| setting a nonvanishing energy scale, the details of V (q ) start to matter. We provide strong evidence that any curvature of the two-particle interaction at small transferred momentum q destroys power-law scaling of the momentum-resolved spectral function as a function of energy. Even for |k - kF| much smaller than the momentum-space range of the interaction the spectral line shape depends on the details of V (q ) . The significance of our results for universality in the Luttinger liquid sense, for experiments on quasi-one-dimensional metals, and for recent results on the spectral function of one-dimensional correlated systems taking effects of the curvature of the single-particle dispersion into account ("nonlinear LL phenomenology") is discussed.

  6. Urban Morphology Influence on Urban Albedo: A Revisit with the S olene Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groleau, Dominique; Mestayer, Patrice G.

    2013-05-01

    This heuristic study of the urban morphology influence on urban albedo is based on some 3,500 simulations with the S olene model. The studied configurations include square blocks in regular and staggered rows, rectangular blocks with different street widths, cross-shaped blocks, infinite street canyons and several actual districts in Marseilles, Toulouse and Nantes, France. The scanned variables are plan density, facade density, building height, layout orientation, latitude, date and time of the day. The sky-view factors of the ground and canopy surfaces are also considered. This study demonstrates the significance of the facade density, in addition to the built plan density, as the explanatory geometrical factor to characterize the urban morphology, rather than building height. On the basis of these albedo calculations the puzzling results of Kondo et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 100:225-242, 2001) for the influence of building height are explained, and the plan density influence is quantitatively assessed. It is shown that the albedo relationship with plan and facade densities obtained with the regular square plot configuration may be considered as a reference for all other configurations, with the exception of the infinite street canyon that shows systematic differences for the lower plan densities. The curves representing this empirical relationship may be used as a sort of abacus for all other geometries while an approximate simple mathematical model is proposed, as well as relationships between the albedo and sky-view factors.

  7. Parker's sneak-guard model revisited: why do reproductively parasitic males heavily invest in testes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Kazutaka; Kohda, Masanori; Hori, Michio; Sato, Tetsu

    2011-10-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are widespread in males and may cause intraspecific differences in testes investment. Parker's sneak-guard model predicts that sneaker males, who mate under sperm competition risk, invest in testes relatively more than bourgeois conspecifics that have lower risk. Given that sneakers are much smaller than bourgeois males, sneakers may increase testes investment to overcome their limited sperm productivity because of their small body sizes. In this study, we examined the mechanism that mediates differential testes investment across tactics in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus. In the Rumonge population of Burundi, bourgeois males are small compared with those in other populations and have a body size close to sneaky dwarf males. Therefore, if differences in relative testis investment depend on sperm competition, the rank order of relative testis investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge = bourgeois males in the other populations. If differences in relative testis investment depend on body size, the rank order of relative testes investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge > bourgeois males in the other populations. Comparisons of relative testis investment among the three male groups supported the role of sperm competition, as predicted by the sneak-guard model. Nevertheless, the effects of absolute body size on testes investment should be considered to understand the mechanisms underlying intraspecific variation in testes investment caused by alternative reproductive tactics.

  8. Columella cells revisited: novel structures, novel properties, and a novel gravisensing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staehelin, L. A.; Zheng, H. Q.; Yoder, T. L.; Smith, J. D.; Todd, P.

    2000-01-01

    A hundred years of research has not produced a clear understanding of the mechanism that transduces the energy associated with the sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplast statoliths in root cap columella cells into a growth response. Most models postulate that the statoliths interact with microfilaments (MF) to transmit signals to the plasma membrane (or ER), or that sedimentation onto these organelles produces the signals. However, no direct evidence for statolith-MF links has been reported, and no asymmetric structures of columella cells have been identified that might explain how a root turned by 90 degrees knows which side is up. To address these and other questions, we have (1) quantitatively examined the effects of microgravity on the size, number, and spatial distribution of statoliths; (2) re-evaluated the ultrastructure of columella cells in high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted roots; and (3) followed the sedimentation dynamics of statolith movements in reoriented root tips. The findings have led to the formulation of a new model for the gravity-sensing apparatus of roots, which envisages the cytoplasm pervaded by an actin-based cytoskeletal network. This network is denser in the ER-devoid central region of the cell than in the ER-rich cell cortex and is coupled to receptors in the plasma membrane. Statolith sedimentation is postulated to disrupt the network and its links to receptors in some regions of the cell cortex, while allowing them to reform in other regions and thereby produce a directional signal.

  9. Revisiting the capture velocity of a cesium magneto-optical trap: model, simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad; Magalhães, Daniel V.; Müller, Stella T.; Faisal, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we have explored ab initio the capture process in a magneto-optical trap by theory, simulation and experiment. We measured the capture velocity vc of a cesium vapor cell magneto-optical trap (VCMOT) from its capture rate R and developed an exact model for the capture rate of a VCMOT in terms of its capture velocity, background density and trap laser beam diameter. We measured the capture velocity of a cesium VCMOT for various trap laser intensities and magnetic field gradients. We observed that the capture velocity is a damping force as well as a restoring force phenomenon. We supported our findings by performing simulations for single atom trajectories in a 1D cesium MOT. Finally, we concluded that two MOTs can have the same capture velocities but very different capture rates, thereby revealing that these are two fundamentally different characteristics of the MOT.

  10. Ehrenfest urn revisited: Playing the game on a realistic fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalas, Enrico; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2007-07-01

    The Ehrenfest urn process, also known as the dogs and fleas model, is realistically simulated by molecular dynamics of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The key variable is Δz —i.e., the absolute value of the difference between the number of particles in one half of the simulation box and in the other half. This is a pure-jump stochastic process induced, under coarse graining, by the deterministic time evolution of the atomic coordinates. We discuss the Markov hypothesis by analyzing the statistical properties of the jumps and the waiting times between the jumps. In the limit of a vanishing integration time step, the distribution of waiting times becomes closer to an exponential and, therefore, the continuous-time jump stochastic process is Markovian. The random variable Δz behaves as a Markov chain and, in the gas phase, the observed transition probabilities follow the predictions of the Ehrenfest theory.

  11. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  12. Intuitive Logic Revisited: New Data and a Bayesian Mixed Model Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Kellen, David

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on syllogistic reasoning suggests that the logical status (valid vs. invalid) of even difficult syllogisms can be intuitively detected via differences in conceptual fluency between logically valid and invalid syllogisms when participants are asked to rate how much they like a conclusion following from a syllogism (Morsanyi & Handley, 2012). These claims of an intuitive logic are at odds with most theories on syllogistic reasoning which posit that detecting the logical status of difficult syllogisms requires effortful and deliberate cognitive processes. We present new data replicating the effects reported by Morsanyi and Handley, but show that this effect is eliminated when controlling for a possible confound in terms of conclusion content. Additionally, we reanalyze three studies () without this confound with a Bayesian mixed model meta-analysis (i.e., controlling for participant and item effects) which provides evidence for the null-hypothesis and against Morsanyi and Handley's claim. PMID:24755777

  13. Revisiting classic water erosion models in drylands: The strong impact of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Bala, Chaudhary V.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion and subsequent degradation has been a contributor to societal collapse in the past and is one of the major expressions of desertification in arid regions. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) models soil lost to water erosion as a function of climate erosivity (the degree to which rainfall can result in erosion), topography, soil erodibility, and land use/management. The soil erodibility factor (K) is primarily based upon inherent soil properties (those which change slowly or not at all) such as soil texture and organic matter content, while the cover/management factor (C) is based on several parameters including biological soil crust (BSC) cover. We examined the effect of two more precise indicators of BSC development, chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharides (EPS), upon soil stability, which is closely inversely related to soil loss in an erosion event. To examine the relative influence of these elements of the C factor to the K factor, we conducted our investigation across eight strongly differing soils in the 0.8 million ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. We found that within every soil group, chlorophyll a was a moderate to excellent predictor of soil stability (R2 = 0.21-0.75), and consistently better than EPS. Using a simple structural equation model, we explained over half of the variance in soil stability and determined that the direct effect of chlorophyll a was 3?? more important than soil group in determining soil stability. Our results suggest that, holding the intensity of erosive forces constant, the acceleration or reduction of soil erosion in arid landscapes will primarily be an outcome of management practices. This is because the factor which is most influential to soil erosion, BSC development, is also among the most manageable, implying that water erosion in drylands has a solution. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Revisiting the Climate Impacts of Cool Roofs around the Globe Using an Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, K.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we use the Community Earth System Model to investigate the effects of employing cool roofs (i.e. increasing roof albedo from 0.15 to 0.9) on urban, regional, and global climates. After increasing the roof albedo, urban heat islands are reduced significantly over the globe during summer, and those at low latitudes during winter; the annual- and global-mean urban minus rural air temperature decreases from 1.6 K to 1.2 K. We mainly focus on changes in energy fluxes and climates in four regions: the United States, China, India, and Europe. For each region, solar radiation reflected by surface increases proportionally to the estimated albedo increase induced by roof albedo change. Without considering clouds, the increase in reflected solar radiation at surface leads to proportional increase in outgoing shortwave radiation at top of the atmosphere, suggesting a radiative cooling effect of cool roofs. On the other hand, the variations of cloud forcing in the model are more significant than the influence of cool roofs on energy balance at top of the atmosphere in some areas. Aerosols are known to partially offset the effects of cool roofs by absorbing solar radiation, and also reflecting radiation back to surface. However, we find that additional aerosol forcing is only 5-10% of the increase in reflected solar radiation at surface. Previous studies disagree in cool roof's influence on global climate. We find that its influence on global mean temperature is negligible; the temperature decreases by 0.0015 K, with a high uncertainty of 0.026 K.

  15. Pathways from adult education to well-being: The Tuijnman model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Andrew; Wiggins, Richard D.

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing interest among researchers and policy-makers in the influence of adult learning on a range of outcomes, notably health and well-being. Much of the research to date has tended to focus on younger adults and the immediate benefits of course participation. The longer-term outcomes, such as the potential of accumulated learning experience for enriching later life, have been neglected. The study presented in this article adopts a lifecourse approach to participation in learning and the potential benefits of learning. The authors concentrate on adult education in mid-life, that is between the ages of 33 and 50, as the measure of learning participation. Their research draws upon previous work conducted by Albert Tuijnman which used Swedish data and which was published a quarter of a century ago in the pages of the International Review of Education. The authors of this paper seek to replicate and extend his pioneering work, using data from the National Child Development Study (NCDS), a large-scale survey containing information on all those born in Britain in one week in 1958. Follow-up data were collected at various points in childhood and adulthood, most recently when the cohort reached the age of 50, thus enabling insights into long-term developments. The authors analyse well-being at age 50 as an outcome in structural equation models (SEM). This approach helps to understand the pathways through which adult education has an impact on well-being. The estimated models show how adult education in mid-life has an influence on the type and quality of jobs which are accessible to individuals, and how this in turn can contribute to higher well-being at age 50.

  16. Sulfur in the Early Martian Atmosphere Revisited: Experiments with a 3-D Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L.; Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.

    2013-09-01

    Data returned from the surface of Mars during the 1970s revealed intriguing geological evidence for a warmer and wetter early martian climate. Dendritic valley networks were discovered by Mariner 9 on ancient Noachian terrain [1], indicating that liquid water had flowed across the surface in the distant past. Since this time, geological investigations into early Martian history have attempted to ascertain the nature and level of activity of the early Martian hydrological cycle [e.g. 2-5] while atmospheric modeling efforts have focused on how the atmosphere could be warmed to temperatures great enough to sustain such activity [see 6-7 for reviews]. Geological and spectroscopic investigations have refined the history and chronology of Noachian Mars over time, and circulation of liquid water has been invoked to explain several spatially and temporally distinct morphological and chemical signatures found in the geological record. Detections of iron and magnesium-rich clays are widespread in the oldest Martian terrains, suggesting a period of pH-neutral aqueous alteration [e.g., 8]. Valley network incision also took place during the Noachian period [9]. Some chains of river valleys and craters lakes extend for thousands of kilometers, suggesting temperatures at least clement enough for sustained ice-covered flow [3,10]. The commencement of valley network incision is not well constrained, but the period of Mg/Fe clay formation appears to have ended before the termination of valley network formation, as the visible fluvial systems appear to have remobilized existing clays rather than forming them [5,8]. There is also evidence that the cessation of valley network formation was abrupt [11]. Towards the end of the Noachian, erosion rates appear to have been significantly higher than during subsequent periods, a process that has also been attributed to aqueous processes [12]. A period of sulfate formation followed, likely characterized by acidic, evaporitic playa environments

  17. Blankenbach 3 revisited: intricate time-dependent patterns in a simple model of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z.; van Keken, P. E.

    2010-12-01

    We evaluate time-dependent nature of mantle convection using a simple 2D Cartesian model with internal heating based on the benchmark case 3 in Blankenbach et al. (Geophysical Journal International, 1989). We are particularly interested in the bifurcation patterns of the Vrms-Nu phase plot for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) around the benchmark value (Ra = 2.16×105), but more information is disclosed when we go to higher Ra (up to 8×105). We also investigate the role of the boundary conditions, for which we change to periodic boundary conditions for a second bifurcation study. We find an intricate pattern in the behavior of the heat flow (as measured by the Nusselt number Nu(t)) and the kinetic energy (as measured by Vrms(t)) which include period doubling, break down of periodic into episodic flow and reorganization into periodic flow at higher Ra. Two patterns of bifurcation are found. One is the period doubling pattern, described in Blankenbach et al. 1989 and referred to as P2-P4 bifurcation. The period doubling results from the differentiation of existing limit points of the time series of Nu or Vrms. The other pattern is period-preserving, which is found at higher Ra number in this study. In the period-preserving bifurcation, the new limit points (peak and valley) of the Nu and Vrms time series showed up as a twist in the monotonic intervals between a peak and valley. In this case the period doesn’t change. Both of the two patterns are observed in the models with the two types of boundary conditions (reflective and periodic). At a given Ra, different solutions can be obtained with different initial conditions. The initial condition is usually a solution with its Ra in the neighborhood, and with this neighborhood searching method, we were able to span the bifurcation plot (Ra-limit points of Nu(t) or Vrms(t)) to the range of Ra = 1×105~8×105 with both two boundary conditions. In this process, hysteresis is observed as expected in dynamic system, and the overlap of

  18. Lateral extrusion in the Eastern Alps revisited: Refining the model by thermochronological, sedimentary, and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöLfler, Andreas; Kurz, Walter; Fritz, Harald; Stüwe, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    This study comprises a reassessment of the classical model of lateral extrusion in the Eastern Alps by using recently published geochronological data, sedimentary ages from intramontane basins, ages and distribution of magmatic rocks, and information from seismic profiles. Extrusion-related faulting continuously propagated from the western toward the central eastern part of the Eastern Alps during Oligocene to Middle Miocene times. This is confined by oblique convergence between the Adriatic and European plates. During Middle Miocene times, extrusion became not only lateral in terms of parallel to the trend of the Eastern Alps, but was characterized by a displacement vector at a high angle to the strike of the orogen. This resulted in the exhumation of the Schladming and Pohorje blocks that were exhumed within extensional bridges at the northern and southern terminations of the Pöls-Lavanttal fault system, respectively. From Middle Miocene to recent times, extrusion was controlled by overall extension between the Dinaric and Carpathian subduction zones. The influence of north directed compression triggered by the northward moving Adriatic plate diminished, and the influence of the retreating Carpathian subduction zone increased. This gave rise to Miocene volcanism that is exclusively found east of the Dinaric subduction zone. We therefore consider that lateral extrusion in the Eastern Alps can be subdivided into distinct tectonic phases, with less pronounced eastward extension-related displacement between Late Oligocene and Middle Miocene times. As soon as the Eastern Alps passed the Dinaric subduction zone, the entire domain became highly extensive.

  19. Revisiting the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway using genome scale metabolic model of Oryza sativa japonica

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ankita; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll is one of the most important pigments present in green plants and rice is one of the major food crops consumed worldwide. We curated the existing genome scale metabolic model (GSM) of rice leaf by incorporating new compartment, reactions and transporters. We used this modified GSM to elucidate how the chlorophyll is synthesized in a leaf through a series of bio-chemical reactions spanned over different organelles using inorganic macronutrients and light energy. We predicted the essential reactions and the associated genes of chlorophyll synthesis and validated against the existing experimental evidences. Further, ammonia is known to be the preferred source of nitrogen in rice paddy fields. The ammonia entering into the plant is assimilated in the root and leaf. The focus of the present work is centered on rice leaf metabolism. We studied the relative importance of ammonia transporters through the chloroplast and the cytosol and their interlink with other intracellular transporters. Ammonia assimilation in the leaves takes place by the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) which is present in the cytosol (GS1) and chloroplast (GS2). Our results provided possible explanation why GS2 mutants show normal growth under minimum photorespiration and appear chlorotic when exposed to air. PMID:26443104

  20. THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Winebarger, Amy R.; Mok, Yung E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov

    2013-08-20

    The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops.

  1. Equation of State and Hugoniot locus for porous materials: P--α model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menikoff, Ralph; Kober, Edward

    1999-06-01

    Foams, porous solids and granular materials have a characteristic Hugoniot locus that for weak shocks is concave in the (particle velocity, shock velocity)-plane. An equation of state (EOS) that has this property can be constructed implicitly from a Helmholtz free energy of the form F(V,T,φ) = F_s(V,T) + B(φ) where the equilibrium volume fraction φ_eq is determined by minimizing F, phi.e., the condition partial_φ F = 0. For many cases, a Hayes EOS for the pure solid F_s(V,T) is adequate. This provides a thermodynamically consistent framework for the P--α model. For this form of EOS, we show that the volume fraction has a similar effect to an endothermic reaction in that the partial Hugoniot loci with fixed φ are shifted to the left in the (V,P)-plane with increasing φ. The equilibrium volume fraction can then be chosen to match the concavity of the principal Hugoniot locus. An example is presented for the polymer estane. A small porosity of only 1.4 per cent is required to match the experimental concavity in the Hugoniot data. This type of EOS can also be used to obtain the so-called ``universal'' Hugoniot for liquids.

  2. EQUATION OF STATE AND HUGONIOT LOCUS FOR POROUS MATERIALS: P-ALPHA MODEL REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    R. MENIKOFF; ET AL

    1999-08-01

    Foams, porous solids and granular materials have a characteristic Hugoniot locus that for weak shocks is concave in the (particle velocity, shock velocity)-plane. An equation of state (EOS) that has this property can be constructed implicitly from a Helmholtz free energy of the form {Psi}{sub s}(V,T,{phi}) = {Psi}{sub s}(V,T)+B({phi}) where the equilibrium volume fraction {phi}{sub eq} is determined by minimizing {Psi}, i.e., the condition {partial_derivative}{sub {psi}} {Psi} = 0. For many cases, a Hayes EOS for the pure solid {Psi}{sub s}(V,T) is adequate. This provides a thermodynamically consistent framework for the P-{alpha} model. For this form of EOS the volume fraction has a similar effect to an endothermic reaction in that the partial Hugoniot loci with fixed {psi} are shifted to the left in the (V,P)-plane with increasing f. The equilibrium volume fraction can then be chosen to match the concavity of the principal Hugoniot locus. An example is presented for the polymer estane. A small porosity of only 1.4 percent is required to match the experimental concavity in the Hugoniot data. This type of EOS can also be used to obtain the so-called ''universal'' Hugoniot for liquids.

  3. Revisiting the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway using genome scale metabolic model of Oryza sativa japonica.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ankita; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll is one of the most important pigments present in green plants and rice is one of the major food crops consumed worldwide. We curated the existing genome scale metabolic model (GSM) of rice leaf by incorporating new compartment, reactions and transporters. We used this modified GSM to elucidate how the chlorophyll is synthesized in a leaf through a series of bio-chemical reactions spanned over different organelles using inorganic macronutrients and light energy. We predicted the essential reactions and the associated genes of chlorophyll synthesis and validated against the existing experimental evidences. Further, ammonia is known to be the preferred source of nitrogen in rice paddy fields. The ammonia entering into the plant is assimilated in the root and leaf. The focus of the present work is centered on rice leaf metabolism. We studied the relative importance of ammonia transporters through the chloroplast and the cytosol and their interlink with other intracellular transporters. Ammonia assimilation in the leaves takes place by the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) which is present in the cytosol (GS1) and chloroplast (GS2). Our results provided possible explanation why GS2 mutants show normal growth under minimum photorespiration and appear chlorotic when exposed to air. PMID:26443104

  4. A New Model of Weak Acid Permeation through Membranes Revisited: Does Overton Still Rule?

    PubMed Central

    Saparov, Sapar M.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Pohl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    According to a recent publication by Thomae, A. V., H. Wunderli-Allenspach, and S. D. Krämer (2005. Biophys. J. 89:1802–1811), membrane bilayers are well-permeable to the charged species of aromatic carboxylic acids. At physiological pH, the anions were claimed to be the major diffusing species. In contrast, calculation of the Born energy barrier predicts a 105-fold higher permeability for the uncharged (protonated) form. To test the new model, we now have measured both the current carried by the salicylate anion through solvent-free planar membranes and the amount of protons transported by the neutral species. The corresponding membrane permeabilities of the charged and protonated forms were 4 × 10−7 cm/s and 1.2 cm/s. These data are in perfect agreement with literature data gathered in the last three decades (compare, e.g., Gutknecht, J., and D. C. Tosteson. 1973. Science. 182:1258–1261). They indicate that the report by Thomae at al. represents an experimental artifact. The well-documented role of neutral species in the permeation process of weak acids and bases across artificial and natural membranes is not in question. Overton still rules. PMID:16603491

  5. CGL description revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2016-03-01

    Solar wind observational studies have emphasized that the solar wind plasma data is bounded by the mirror and firehose instabilities, and it is often believed that these instabilities are of a purely kinetic nature. The simplest fluid model that generalizes magnetohydrodynamics with anisotropic temperatures is the Chew-Goldberger-Low model (CGL). Here we briefly revisit the CGL description and discuss its (otherwise well-documented) linear firehose and mirror instability thresholds; namely that the firehose instability threshold is identical to the one found from linear kinetic theory and that the mirror threshold contains a factor of 6 error. We consider a simple higher-order fluid model with time dependent heat flux equations and show that the mirror instability threshold is correctly reproduced. We also present fully nonlinear three-dimensional simulations of freely decaying turbulence for the Hall-CGL model with isothermal electrons. The spatial resolution of these simulations is 5123 and the formation of a spectral break in magnetic and velocity field spectra around the proton inertial length is found.

  6. Revisiting 2D numerical models for the 19th century outbursts of η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. F.; Villa, A. M.; Gómez, G. C.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; de La Fuente, E.

    2010-02-01

    We present here new results of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the eruptive events of the 1840s (the great) and the 1890s (the minor) eruptions suffered by the massive star η Carinae (Car). The two bipolar nebulae commonly known as the Homunculus and the little Homunculus (LH) were formed from the interaction of these eruptive events with the underlying stellar wind. We assume here an interacting, non-spherical multiple-phase wind scenario to explain the shape and the kinematics of both Homunculi, but adopt a more realistic parametrization of the phases of the wind. During the 1890s eruptive event, the outflow speed decreased for a short period of time. This fact suggests that the LH is formed when the eruption ends, from the impact of the post-outburst η Car wind (that follows the 1890s event) with the eruptive flow (rather than by the collision of the eruptive flow with the pre-outburst wind, as claimed in previous models; González et al.). Our simulations reproduce quite well the shape and the observed expansion speed of the large Homunculus. The LH (which is embedded within the large Homunculus) becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and develop filamentary structures that resemble the spatial features observed in the polar caps. In addition, we find that the interior cavity between the two Homunculi is partially filled by material that is expelled during the decades following the great eruption. This result may be connected with the observed double-shell structure in the polar lobes of the η Car nebula. Finally, as in previous work, we find the formation of tenuous, equatorial, high-speed features that seem to be related to the observed equatorial skirt of η Car.

  7. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modelling Revisited: Controlling for Activation Base Rates

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Robert; Rottschy, Claudia; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    Co-activation of distinct brain regions is a measure of functional interaction, or connectivity, between those regions. The co-activation pattern of a given region can be investigated using seed-based activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging data stored in databases such as BrainMap. This method reveals inter-regional functional connectivity by determining brain regions that are consistently co-activated with a given region of interest (the “seed”) across a broad range of experiments. In current implementations of this meta-analytic connectivity modelling (MACM), significant spatial convergence (i.e. consistent co-activation) is distinguished from noise by comparing it against an unbiased null-distribution of random spatial associations between experiments according to which all grey-matter voxels have the same chance of convergence. As the a priori probability of finding activation in different voxels markedly differs across the brain, computing such a quasi-rectangular null-distribution renders the detection of significant convergence more likely in those voxels that are frequently activated. Here, we propose and test a modified MACM approach that takes this activation frequency bias into account. In this new specific co-activation likelihood estimation (SCALE) algorithm, a null-distribution is generated that reflects the base rate of reporting activation in any given voxel and thus equalizes the a priori chance of finding across-study convergence in each voxel of the brain. Using four exemplary seed regions (right visual area V4, left anterior insula, right intraparietal sulcus, and subgenual cingulum), our tests corroborated the enhanced specificity of the modified algorithm, indicating that SCALE may be especially useful for delineating distinct core networks of co-activation. PMID:24945668

  8. Photons Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Grazia Pia, Maria; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of methods and data for the Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions is in progress: it concerns a wide set of theoretical modeling approaches and data libraries available for this purpose. Models and data libraries are assessed quantitatively with respect to an extensive collection of experimental measurements documented in the literature to determine their accuracy; this evaluation exploits rigorous statistical analysis methods. The computational performance of the associated modeling algorithms is evaluated as well. An overview of the assessment of photon interaction models and results of the experimental validation are presented.

  9. The Ti-Mn system revisited: experimental investigation and thermodynamic modelling.

    PubMed

    Khan, A U; Brož, P; Premović, M; Pavlů, J; Vřeštál, J; Yan, X; Maccio, D; Saccone, A; Giester, G; Rogl, P

    2016-08-17

    As the Ti-Mn phase diagram is part of numerous ternary and higher order systems of technological importance, the present paper defines phase relations which have been experimentally established throughout this work from 800 °C to the melting range based on Differential Thermal Analyses (DTA), X-ray powder diffraction, metallography and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) techniques on ∼50 alloys, which were prepared by arc melting or high frequency melting under high purity argon starting from freshly cleaned metal ingots. Novel compounds were identified and reaction isotherms were redefined accordingly. In the Ti-rich region a novel compound TiMn was detected, sandwiched between the known phases: TiMn1-x (∼45 at% Mn) and TiMn1+x (∼55 at% Mn). In the Mn-rich region the hitherto unknown crystal structure of TiMn∼3 was solved from X-ray single crystal diffraction data and found to be of a unique structure type Ti6(Ti1-xMnx)6Mn25 (x = 0.462; space group Pbam (#55); a = 0.79081(3) nm, b = 2.58557(9) nm, c = 0.47931(2) nm), which consists of two consecutive layers of the hexagonal MgZn2-type Laves phase (TiMn2) and a combined layer of alternate structure blocks of MgZn2 type and Zr4Al3 type. Whereas TiMn can be considered as a line compound (solubility range <∼1 at%), the homogeneity regions of the Ti-Mn compounds are significant (determined by EPMA): TiMn1-x (44.0 to 46.6 at% Mn), TiMn1+x (54.6 to 56.3 at% Mn), Ti1+xMn2-x (MgZn2-type, 59 to 69 at% Mn at 1000 °C: -0.08 < x < 0.23), TiMn∼3 (unique type; 74 to 76.5 at% Mn) and TiMn∼4 (R-phase: Ti8(TixMn1-x)6Mn39, 80 to 84 at% Ti). Supported by ab initio calculations of the ground state energy for the Laves phase, the new experimental results enabled thermodynamic modelling of the entire Ti-Mn phase diagram providing a complete and novel set of thermodynamic data thus providing a sound basis for future thermodynamic predictions of higher order Ti-Mn-X-Y systems. PMID:27498605

  10. Spin-bowling in cricket re-visited: model trajectories for various spin-vector angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate, via the calculation of model trajectories appropriate to slow bowling in cricket, the effects on the flight path of the ball before pitching due to changes in the angle of the spin-vector. This was accomplished by allowing the spin-vector to vary in three ways. Firstly, from off-spin, where the spin-vector points horizontally and directly down the pitch, to top-spin where it points horizontally towards the off-side of the pitch. Secondly, from off-spin to side-spin where, for side-spin, the spin-vector points vertically upwards. Thirdly, where the spin-vector points horizontally and at 45° to the pitch (in the general direction of ‘point’, as viewed by the bowler), and is varied towards the vertical, while maintaining the 45° angle in the horizontal plane. It is found that, as is well known, top-spin causes the ball to dip in flight, side-spin causes the ball to move side-ways in flight and, perhaps most importantly, off-spin can cause the ball to drift to the off-side of the pitch late in its flight as it begins to fall. At a more subtle level it is found that, if the total spin is kept constant and a small amount of top-spin is added to the ball at the expense of some off-spin, there is little change in the side-ways drift. However, a considerable reduction in the length at which the ball pitches occurs, ∼25 cm, an amount that batsmen can ignore at their peril. On the other hand, a small amount of side-spin introduced to a top-spin delivery does not alter the point of pitching significantly, but produces a considerable amount of side-ways drift, ∼10 cm or more. For pure side-spin the side-ways drift is up to ∼30 cm. When a side-spin component is added to the spin of a ball bowled with a mixture of off-spin and top-spin in equal proportions, significant movement occurs in both the side-ways direction and in the point of pitching, of the order of a few tens of centimetres.