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Sample records for single protein revealed

  1. Single-molecule imaging reveals the mechanism of Exo1 regulation by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Fade; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wold, Marc S.; Miller, Kyle M.; Paull, Tanya T.

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) is a 5′→3′ exonuclease and 5′-flap endonuclease that plays a critical role in multiple eukaryotic DNA repair pathways. Exo1 processing at DNA nicks and double-strand breaks creates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, which are rapidly bound by replication protein A (RPA) and other single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging and quantitative cell biology approaches to reveal the interplay between Exo1 and SSBs. Both human and yeast Exo1 are processive nucleases on their own. RPA rapidly strips Exo1 from DNA, and this activity is dependent on at least three RPA-encoded single-stranded DNA binding domains. Furthermore, we show that ablation of RPA in human cells increases Exo1 recruitment to damage sites. In contrast, the sensor of single-stranded DNA complex 1—a recently identified human SSB that promotes DNA resection during homologous recombination—supports processive resection by Exo1. Although RPA rapidly turns over Exo1, multiple cycles of nuclease rebinding at the same DNA site can still support limited DNA processing. These results reveal the role of single-stranded DNA binding proteins in controlling Exo1-catalyzed resection with implications for how Exo1 is regulated during DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26884156

  2. Slowing down single-molecule trafficking through a protein nanopore reveals intermediates for peptide translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereuta, Loredana; Roy, Mahua; Asandei, Alina; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Yoonkyung; Andricioaei, Ioan; Luchian, Tudor

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic details of how peptides translocate one at a time through nanopores are crucial determinants for transport through membrane pores and important in developing nano-technologies. To date, the translocation process has been too fast relative to the resolution of the single molecule techniques that sought to detect its milestones. Using pH-tuned single-molecule electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate how peptide passage through the α-hemolysin protein can be sufficiently slowed down to observe intermediate single-peptide sub-states associated to distinct structural milestones along the pore, and how to control residence time, direction and the sequence of spatio-temporal state-to-state dynamics of a single peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptide translocation reveal the time- dependent ordering of intermediate structures of the translocating peptide inside the pore at atomic resolution. Calculations of the expected current ratios of the different pore-blocking microstates and their time sequencing are in accord with the recorded current traces.

  3. Concentration-Dependent Exchange of Replication Protein A on Single-Stranded DNA Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Bryan; Ye, Ling F.; Gergoudis, Stephanie C.; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein necessary for all aspects of DNA metabolism involving an ssDNA intermediate, including DNA replication, repair, recombination, DNA damage response and checkpoint activation, and telomere maintenance [1], [2], [3]. The role of RPA in most of these reactions is to protect the ssDNA until it can be delivered to downstream enzymes. Therefore a crucial feature of RPA is that it must bind very tightly to ssDNA, but must also be easily displaced from ssDNA to allow other proteins to gain access to the substrate. Here we use total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and nanofabricated DNA curtains to visualize the behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPA on individual strands of ssDNA in real-time. Our results show that RPA remains bound to ssDNA for long periods of time when free protein is absent from solution. In contrast, RPA rapidly dissociates from ssDNA when free RPA is present in solution allowing rapid exchange between the free and bound states. In addition, the S. cerevisiae DNA recombinase Rad51 and E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB) also promote removal of RPA from ssDNA. These results reveal an unanticipated exchange between bound and free RPA suggesting a binding mechanism that can confer exceptionally slow off rates, yet also enables rapid displacement through a direct exchange mechanism that is reliant upon the presence of free ssDNA-binding proteins in solution. Our results indicate that RPA undergoes constant microscopic dissociation under all conditions, but this is only manifested as macroscopic dissociation (i.e. exchange) when free proteins are present in solution, and this effect is due to mass action. We propose that the dissociation of RPA from ssDNA involves a partially dissociated intermediate, which exposes a small section of ssDNA allowing other proteins to access to the DNA. PMID:24498402

  4. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Hidden Complexity in a Protein Energy Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M.; Rowling, Pamela J.E.; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured “safety pin” or “staple” from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated. PMID:25565106

  5. QUANTUM DOT SINGLE MOLECULE TRACKING REVEALS A WIDE RANGE OF DIFFUSIVE MOTIONS OF MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    Crane, Jonathan M; Haggie, Peter M; Verkman, A S

    2009-03-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation. PMID:24386532

  6. Quantum dot single molecule tracking reveals a wide range of diffusive motions of membrane transport proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Haggie, Peter M.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-02-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation.

  7. Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis Reveals Abnormal Oligomerization of Proteins in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Rappaz, Benjamin; Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Kennedy, Timothy E; De Koninck, Yves; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-08-18

    Knowledge of membrane receptor organization is essential for understanding the initial steps in cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms, but quantitative analysis of receptor interactions at the single-cell level and in different cellular compartments has remained highly challenging. To achieve this, we apply a quantitative image analysis technique-spatial intensity distribution analysis (SpIDA)-that can measure fluorescent particle concentrations and oligomerization states within different subcellular compartments in live cells. An important technical challenge faced by fluorescence microscopy-based measurement of oligomerization is the fidelity of receptor labeling. In practice, imperfect labeling biases the distribution of oligomeric states measured within an aggregated system. We extend SpIDA to enable analysis of high-order oligomers from fluorescence microscopy images, by including a probability weighted correction algorithm for nonemitting labels. We demonstrated that this fraction of nonemitting probes could be estimated in single cells using SpIDA measurements on model systems with known oligomerization state. Previously, this artifact was measured using single-step photobleaching. This approach was validated using computer-simulated data and the imperfect labeling was quantified in cells with ion channels of known oligomer subunit count. It was then applied to quantify the oligomerization states in different cell compartments of the proteolipid protein (PLP) expressed in COS-7 cells. Expression of a mutant PLP linked to impaired trafficking resulted in the detection of PLP tetramers that persist in the endoplasmic reticulum, while no difference was measured at the membrane between the distributions of wild-type and mutated PLPs. Our results demonstrate that SpIDA allows measurement of protein oligomerization in different compartments of intact cells, even when fractional mislabeling occurs as well as photobleaching during the imaging process, and

  8. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  9. Protein Configuration Landscape Fluctuations Revealed by Exciton Transition Polarizations in Single Light Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Tubasum, Sumera; Torbjörnsson, Magne; Yadav, Dheerendra; Camacho, Rafael; Söderlind, Gustaf; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-02-01

    Protein is a flexible material with broad distribution of conformations forming an energy landscape of quasi-stationary states. Disentangling the system dynamics along this landscape is the key for understanding the functioning of the protein. Here we studied a photosynthetic antenna pigment-protein complex LH2 with single molecule two-dimensional polarization imaging. Modeling based on the Redfield relaxation theory well describes the observed polarization properties of LH2 fluorescence and fluorescence excitation, strongly suggesting that at 77 K the conformational subspace of the LH2 is limited to about three configurations with relatively frequent switching among each other. At room temperature the next level of fluctuations determines the conformational dynamics. The results support the multitier model of the energy landscape of proteins and demonstrate the potential of the method for the studies of structural dynamics in proteins. PMID:26741912

  10. Single-cell protein induction dynamics reveals a period of vulnerability to antibiotics in persister bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Orit; Gabay, Chana; Mumcuoglu, Michael; Engel, Giora; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2008-04-22

    Phenotypic variability in populations of cells has been linked to evolutionary robustness to stressful conditions. A remarkable example of the importance of cell-to-cell variability is found in bacterial persistence, where subpopulations of dormant bacteria, termed persisters, were shown to be responsible for the persistence of the population to antibiotic treatments. Here, we use microfluidic devices to monitor the induction of fluorescent proteins under synthetic promoters and characterize the dormant state of single persister bacteria. Surprisingly, we observe that protein production does take place in supposedly dormant bacteria, over a narrow time window after the exit from stationary phase. Only thereafter does protein production stop, suggesting that differentiation into persisters fully develops over this time window and not during starvation, as previously believed. In effect, we observe that exposure of bacteria to antibiotics during this time window significantly reduces persistence. Our results point to new strategies to fight persistent bacterial infections. The quantitative measurement of single-cell induction presented in this study should shed light on the processes leading to the dormancy of subpopulations in different systems, such as in subpopulations of viable but nonculturable bacteria, or those of quiescent cancer cells. PMID:18427112

  11. Structural dynamics of E. coli single-stranded DNA binding protein reveal DNA wrapping and unwrapping pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suksombat, Sukrit; Khafizov, Rustem; Kozlov, Alexander G; Lohman, Timothy M; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein mediates genome maintenance processes by regulating access to ssDNA. This homotetrameric protein wraps ssDNA in multiple distinct binding modes that may be used selectively in different DNA processes, and whose detailed wrapping topologies remain speculative. Here, we used single-molecule force and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate E. coli SSB binding to ssDNA. Stretching a single ssDNA-SSB complex reveals discrete states that correlate with known binding modes, the likely ssDNA conformations and diffusion dynamics in each, and the kinetic pathways by which the protein wraps ssDNA and is dissociated. The data allow us to construct an energy landscape for the ssDNA-SSB complex, revealing that unwrapping energy costs increase the more ssDNA is unraveled. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which proteins gain access to ssDNA bound by SSB, as demonstrated by experiments in which SSB is displaced by the E. coli recombinase RecA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08193.001 PMID:26305498

  12. Single molecule compression reveals intra-protein forces drive cytotoxin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Sun, Jielin; Shen, Yi; Shao, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a prototypical member of a large family of pore-forming proteins that undergo a significant reduction in height during the transition from the membrane-assembled prepore to the membrane-inserted pore. Here, we show that targeted application of compressive forces can catalyze this conformational change in individual PFO complexes trapped at the prepore stage, recapitulating this critical step of the spontaneous process. The free energy landscape determined from these measurements is in good agreement with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations showing that an equivalent internal force is generated by the interaction of the exposed hydrophobic residues with the membrane. This hydrophobic force is transmitted across the entire structure to produce a compressive stress across a distant, otherwise stable domain, catalyzing its transition from an extended to compact conformation. Single molecule compression is likely to become an important tool to investigate conformational transitions in membrane proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08421.001 PMID:26652734

  13. Chorismatase Mechanisms Reveal Fundamentally Different Types of Reaction in a Single Conserved Protein Fold.

    PubMed

    Hubrich, Florian; Juneja, Puneet; Müller, Michael; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram; Andexer, Jennifer N

    2015-09-01

    Chorismatases are a class of chorismate-converting enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathways of different natural products, many of them with interesting pharmaceutical characteristics. So far, three subfamilies of chorismatases are described that convert chorismate into different (dihydro-)benzoate derivatives (CH-FkbO, CH-Hyg5, and CH-XanB2). Until now, the detailed enzyme mechanism and the molecular basis for the different reaction products were unknown. Here we show that the CH-FkbO and CH-Hyg5 subfamilies share the same protein fold, but employ fundamentally different reaction mechanisms. While the FkbO reaction is a typical hydrolysis, the Hyg5 reaction proceeds intramolecularly, most likely via an arene oxide intermediate. Two nonconserved active site residues were identified that are responsible for the different reaction mechanisms in CH-FkbO and CH-Hyg5. Further, we propose an additional amino acid residue to be responsible for the discrimination of the CH-XanB2 subfamily, which catalyzes the formation of two different hydroxybenzoate regioisomers, likely in a single active site. A multiple sequence alignment shows that these three crucial amino acid positions are located in conserved motifs and can therefore be used to assign unknown chorismatases to the corresponding subfamily. PMID:26247872

  14. A single-molecule view of DNA replication: the dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes revealed.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Hylkje J; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in the development of single-molecule approaches have made it possible to study the dynamics of biomolecular systems in great detail. More recently, such tools have been applied to study the dynamic nature of large multi-protein complexes that support multiple enzymatic activities. In this review, we will discuss single-molecule studies of the replisome, the protein complex responsible for the coordinated replication of double-stranded DNA. In particular, we will focus on new insights obtained into the dynamic nature of the composition of the DNA-replication machinery and how the dynamic replacement of components plays a role in the regulation of the DNA-replication process. PMID:23890728

  15. Direct observation of single stationary-phase bacteria reveals a surprisingly long period of constant protein production activity

    PubMed Central

    Gefen, Orit; Fridman, Ofer; Ronin, Irine; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2014-01-01

    Exponentially growing bacteria are rarely found in the wild, as microorganisms tend to spend most of their lifetime at stationary phase. Despite this general prevalence of stationary-phase bacteria, they are as yet poorly characterized. Our goal was to quantitatively study this phase by direct observation of single bacteria as they enter into stationary phase and by monitoring their activity over several days during growth arrest. For this purpose, we devised an experimental procedure for starving single Escherichia coli bacteria in microfluidic devices and measured their activity by monitoring the production rate of fluorescent proteins. When amino acids were the sole carbon source, the production rate decreased by an order of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase. We found that, even while growth-arrested, bacteria continued to produce proteins at a surprisingly constant rate over several days. Our identification of this newly observed period of constant activity in nongrowing cells, designated as constant activity stationary phase, makes possible the conduction of assays that require constant protein expression over time, and are therefore difficult to perform under exponential growth conditions. Moreover, we show that exogenous protein expression bears no fitness cost on the regrowth of the population when starvation ends. Further characterization of constant activity stationary phase—a phase where nongrowing bacteria can be quantitatively studied over several days in a reproducible manner—should contribute to a better understanding of this ubiquitous but overlooked physiological state of bacteria in nature. PMID:24344288

  16. Confined Diffusion Without Fences of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor as Revealed by Single Particle Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Daumas, Frédéric; Destainville, Nicolas; Millot, Claire; Lopez, André; Dean, David; Salomé, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool for probing the organization and dynamics of the plasma membrane constituents. We used this technique to study the μ-opioid receptor belonging to the large family of the G-protein-coupled receptors involved with other partners in a signal transduction pathway. The specific labeling of the receptor coupled to a T7-tag at its N-terminus, stably expressed in fibroblastic cells, was achieved by colloidal gold coupled to a monoclonal anti T7-tag antibody. The lateral movements of the particles were followed by nanovideomicroscopy at 40 ms time resolution during 2 min with a spatial precision of 15 nm. The receptors were found to have either a slow or directed diffusion mode (10%) or a walking confined diffusion mode (90%) composed of a long-term random diffusion and a short-term confined diffusion, and corresponding to a diffusion confined within a domain that itself diffuses. The results indicate that the confinement is due to an effective harmonic potential generated by long-range attraction between the membrane proteins. A simple model for interacting membrane proteins diffusion is proposed that explains the variations with the domain size of the short-term and long-term diffusion coefficients. PMID:12524289

  17. Single-Molecule Microscopy Reveals Plasma Membrane Microdomains Created by Protein-Protein Networks that Exclude or Trap Signaling Molecules in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Adam D.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Membrane subdomains have been implicated in T cell signaling, although their properties and mechanisms of formation remain controversial. Here, we have used single-molecule and scanning confocal imaging to characterize the behavior of GFP-tagged signaling proteins in Jurkat T cells. We show that the coreceptor CD2, the adaptor protein LAT, and tyrosine kinase Lck cocluster in discrete microdomains in the plasma membrane of signaling T cells. These microdomains require protein-protein interactions mediated through phosphorylation of LAT and are not maintained by interactions with actin or lipid rafts. Using a two color imaging approach that allows tracking of single molecules relative to the CD2/LAT/Lck clusters, we demonstrate that these microdomains exclude and limit the free diffusion of molecules in the membrane but also can trap and immobilize specific proteins. Our data suggest that diffusional trapping through protein-protein interactions creates microdomains that concentrate or exclude cell surface proteins to facilitate T cell signaling. PMID:15960980

  18. Single-molecule imaging of Hedgehog pathway protein Smoothened in primary cilia reveals binding events regulated by Patched1

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Weiss, Lucien E.; Yoon, Joshua; Roth, Theodore L.; Su, YouRong S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Scott, Matthew P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of the signaling protein Smoothened (Smo) in the membrane of primary cilia is an essential step in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, yet the molecular mechanisms of Smo movement and localization are poorly understood. Using ultrasensitive single-molecule tracking with high spatial/temporal precision (30 nm/10 ms), we discovered that binding events disrupt the primarily diffusive movement of Smo in cilia at an array of sites near the base. The affinity of Smo for these binding sites was modulated by the Hh pathway activation state. Activation, by either a ligand or genetic loss of the negatively acting Hh receptor Patched-1 (Ptch), reduced the affinity and frequency of Smo binding at the base. Our findings quantify activation-dependent changes in Smo dynamics in cilia and highlight a previously unknown step in Hh pathway activation. PMID:26100903

  19. Revealing G-protein-coupled receptor oligomerization at the single-molecule level through a nanoscopic lens: methods, dynamics and biological function.

    PubMed

    Scarselli, Marco; Annibale, Paolo; McCormick, Peter J; Kolachalam, Shivakumar; Aringhieri, Stefano; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Corsini, Giovanni U; Maggio, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has allowed the visualization of single proteins in their biological environment. Recently, these techniques have been applied to determine the organization of class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and to determine whether they exist as monomers, dimers and/or higher-order oligomers. On this subject, this review highlights recent evidence from photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), which allows the visualization of single molecules in dense samples, and single-molecule tracking (SMT), which determines how GPCRs move and interact in living cells in the presence of different ligands. PALM has demonstrated that GPCR oligomerization depends on the receptor subtype, the cell type, the actin cytoskeleton, and other proteins. Conversely, SMT has revealed the transient dynamics of dimer formation, whereby receptors show a monomer-dimer equilibrium characterized by rapid association and dissociation. At steady state, depending on the subtype, approximately 30-50% of receptors are part of dimeric complexes. Notably, the existence of many GPCR dimers/oligomers is also supported by well-known techniques, such as resonance energy transfer methodologies, and by approaches that exploit fluorescence fluctuations, such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Future research using single-molecule methods will deepen our knowledge related to the function and druggability of homo-oligomers and hetero-oligomers. PMID:26509747

  20. Single-molecule Force Spectroscopy Reveals the Calcium Dependence of the Alternative Conformations in the Native State of a βγ-Crystallin Protein.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Li, Qing; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2016-08-26

    Although multidomain proteins predominate the proteome of all organisms and are expected to display complex folding behaviors and significantly greater structural dynamics as compared with single-domain proteins, their conformational heterogeneity and its impact on their interaction with ligands are poorly understood due to a lack of experimental techniques. The multidomain calcium-binding βγ-crystallin proteins are particularly important because their deterioration and misfolding/aggregation are associated with melanoma tumors and cataracts. Here we investigate the mechanical stability and conformational dynamics of a model calcium-binding βγ-crystallin protein, Protein S, and elaborate on its interactions with calcium. We ask whether domain interactions and calcium binding affect Protein S folding and potential structural heterogeneity. Our results from single-molecule force spectroscopy show that the N-terminal (but not the C-terminal) domain is in equilibrium with an alternative conformation in the absence of Ca(2+), which is mechanically stable in contrast to other proteins that were observed to sample a molten globule under similar conditions. Mutagenesis experiments and computer simulations reveal that the alternative conformation of the N-terminal domain is caused by structural instability produced by the high charge density of a calcium binding site. We find that this alternative conformation in the N-terminal domain is diminished in the presence of calcium and can also be partially eliminated with a hitherto unrecognized compensatory mechanism that uses the interaction of the C-terminal domain to neutralize the electronegative site. We find that up to 1% of all identified multidomain calcium-binding proteins contain a similarly highly charged site and therefore may exploit a similar compensatory mechanism to prevent structural instability in the absence of ligand. PMID:27378818

  1. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Lawler, Stephanie N.; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses. PMID:26217327

  2. Single-Nucleotide Mutations in FMR1 Reveal Novel Functions and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Fragile X Syndrome Protein FMRP

    PubMed Central

    Suhl, Joshua A.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a monogenic disorder and a common cause of intellectual disability. Despite nearly 25 years of research on FMR1, the gene underlying the syndrome, very few pathological mutations other than the typical CGG-repeat expansion have been reported. This is in contrast to other X-linked, monogenic, intellectual disability disorders, such as Rett syndrome, where many point mutations have been validated as causative of the disorder. As technology has improved and significantly driven down the cost of sequencing, allowing for whole genes to be sequenced with relative ease, in-depth sequencing studies on FMR1 have recently been performed. These studies have led to the identification of novel variants in FMR1, where some of which have been functionally evaluated and are likely pathogenic. In this review, we discuss recently identified FMR1 variants, the ways these novel variants cause dysfunction, and how they reveal new regulatory mechanisms and functionalities of the gene. PMID:26819560

  3. α- and β-Tubulin Lattice of the Axonemal Microtubule Doublet and Binding Proteins Revealed by Single Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditi; Obbineni, Jagan Mohan; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shibata, Keitaro; Toyoshima, Yoko Y; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Microtubule doublet (MTD) is the main skeleton of cilia/flagella. Many proteins, such as dyneins and radial spokes, bind to MTD, and generate or regulate force. While the structure of the reconstituted microtubule has been solved at atomic resolution, nature of the axonemal MTD is still unclear. There are a few hypotheses of the lattice arrangement of its α- and β-tubulins, but it has not been described how dyneins and radial spokes bind to MTD. In this study, we analyzed the three-dimensional structure of Tetrahymena MTD at ∼19 Å resolution by single particle cryo-electron microscopy. To identify α- and β-tubulins, we combined image analysis of MTD with specific kinesin decoration. This work reveals that α- and β-tubulins form a B-lattice arrangement in the entire MTD with a seam at the outer junction. We revealed the unique way in which inner arm dyneins, radial spokes, and proteins inside MTD bind and bridge protofilaments. PMID:26211611

  4. Single-cell proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.

    1983-02-11

    Both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic microorganisms, grown on various carbon and energy sources, are used in fermentation processes for the production of single-cell proteins. Commercial-scale production has been limited to two algal processes, one bacterial process, and several yeast and fungal processes. High capital and operating costs and the need for extensive nutritional and toxicological assessments have limited the development and commercialization of new processes. Any increase in commercial-scale production appears to be limited to those regions of the world where low-cost carbon and energy sources are available and conventional animal feedstuff proteins, such as soybean meal or fish meal, are in short supply. (Refs. 59).

  5. Single Molecule Analysis of Functionally Asymmetric G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Oligomers Reveals Diverse Spatial and Structural Assemblies*♦

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Kim C.; Fanelli, Francesca; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher order oligomers represents a key mechanism in pleiotropic signaling, yet how individual protomers function within oligomers remains poorly understood. We present a super-resolution imaging approach, resolving single GPCR molecules to ∼8 nm resolution in functional asymmetric dimers and oligomers using dual-color photoactivatable dyes and localization microscopy (PD-PALM). PD-PALM of two functionally defined mutant luteinizing hormone receptors (LHRs), a ligand-binding deficient receptor (LHRB−) and a signaling-deficient (LHRS−) receptor, which only function via intermolecular cooperation, favored oligomeric over dimeric formation. PD-PALM imaging of trimers and tetramers revealed specific spatial organizations of individual protomers in complexes where the ratiometric composition of LHRB− to LHRS− modulated ligand-induced signal sensitivity. Structural modeling of asymmetric LHR oligomers strongly aligned with PD-PALM-imaged spatial arrangements, identifying multiple possible helix interfaces mediating inter-protomer associations. Our findings reveal that diverse spatial and structural assemblies mediating GPCR oligomerization may acutely fine-tune the cellular signaling profile. PMID:25516594

  6. Secreted protein gene derived-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SP-SNPs) reveal population diversity and differentiation of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in the United States.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chongjing; Wan, Anmin; Wang, Meinan; Jiwan, Derick A; See, Deven R; Chen, Xianming

    2016-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a powerful molecular marker technique that has been widely used in population genetics and molecular mapping studies for various organisms. However, the technique has not been used for studying Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the wheat stripe rust pathogen. In this study, we developed over a hundred secreted protein gene-derived SNP (SP-SNP) markers and used 92 markers to study the population structure of Pst. From 352 isolates collected in the United States, we identified 242 multi-locus genotypes. The SP-SNP genotypes had a moderate, but significant correlation with the virulence phenotype data. Clustering of the multi-locus genotypes was consistent by various analyses, revealing distinct genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance detected significant differences between the eastern and western US Pst populations. High heterozygosity was found in the US population with significant differences identified among epidemiological regions. Analysis of population differentiation revealed that populations between the eastern and western US were highly differentiated while moderate differentiation was found in populations within the western or eastern US. Isolates from the western US were more diverse than isolates from the eastern US. The information is useful for guiding the disease management in different epidemiological regions. PMID:27109369

  7. Single-molecule analysis reveals human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) dimerizes on DNA via multiple kinetic intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ghodke, Harshad; Wang, Hong; Hsieh, Ching L.; Woldemeskel, Selamawit; Watkins, Simon C.; Rapić-Otrin, Vesna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2014-01-01

    How human DNA repair proteins survey the genome for UV-induced photoproducts remains a poorly understood aspect of the initial damage recognition step in nucleotide excision repair (NER). To understand this process, we performed single-molecule experiments, which revealed that the human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) performs a 3D search mechanism and displays a remarkable heterogeneity in the kinetics of damage recognition. Our results indicate that UV-DDB examines sites on DNA in discrete steps before forming long-lived, nonmotile UV-DDB dimers (DDB1-DDB2)2 at sites of damage. Analysis of the rates of dissociation for the transient binding molecules on both undamaged and damaged DNA show multiple dwell times over three orders of magnitude: 0.3–0.8, 8.1, and 113–126 s. These intermediate states are believed to represent discrete UV-DDB conformers on the trajectory to stable damage detection. DNA damage promoted the formation of highly stable dimers lasting for at least 15 min. The xeroderma pigmentosum group E (XP-E) causing K244E mutant of DDB2 found in patient XP82TO, supported UV-DDB dimerization but was found to slide on DNA and failed to stably engage lesions. These findings provide molecular insight into the loss of damage discrimination observed in this XP-E patient. This study proposes that UV-DDB recognizes lesions via multiple kinetic intermediates, through a conformational proofreading mechanism. PMID:24760829

  8. Single-molecule analyses of fully functional fluorescent protein-tagged follitropin receptor reveal homodimerization and specific heterodimerization with lutropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Herrick-Davis, Katharine; Barroso, Margarida; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Thomas, Richard M; Dias, James A

    2015-04-01

    We have previously shown that the carboxyl terminus (cT) of human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, follitropin) receptor (FSHR) is clipped before insertion into the plasma membrane. Surprisingly, several different constructs of FSHR fluorescent fusion proteins (FSHR-FPs) failed to traffic to the plasma membrane. Subsequently, we discovered that substituting the extreme cT of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) to create an FSHR-LHRcT chimera has no effect on FSHR functionality. Therefore, we used this approach to create an FSHR-LHRcT-FP fusion. We found this chimeric FSHR-LHRcT-FP was expressed in HEK293 cells at levels similar to reported values for FSHR in human granulosa cells, bound FSH with high affinity, and transduced FSH binding to produce cAMP. Quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis of FSHR-LHRcT-YFP/FSHR-LHRcT-mCherry pairs revealed an average FRET efficiency of 12.9 ± 5.7. Advanced methods in single-molecule analyses were applied in order to ascertain the oligomerization state of the FSHR-LHRcT. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy coupled with photon-counting histogram analyses demonstrated that the FSHR-LHRcT-FP fusion protein exists as a freely diffusing homodimer in the plasma membrane. A central question is whether LHR could oligomerize with FSHR, because both receptors are coexpressed in differentiated granulosa cells. Indeed, FRET analysis revealed an average FRET efficiency of 14.4 ± 7.5 when the FSHR-LHR cT-mCherry was coexpressed with LHR-YFP. In contrast, coexpression of a 5-HT2cVSV-YFP with FSHR-LHR cT-mCherry showed only 5.6 ± 3.2 average FRET efficiency, a value indistinguishable from the detection limit using intensity-based FRET methods. These data demonstrate that coexpression of FSHR and LHR can lead to heterodimerization, and we hypothesize that it is possible for this to occur during granulosa cell differentiation. PMID:25761594

  9. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single “Calponin Family Member” Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23 kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of “sphincter proteome.” Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled “idiopathic” and facilitating practice of precision medicine. PMID:26151053

  10. Single-molecule studies reveal that DEAD box protein DDX1 promotes oligomerization of HIV-1 Rev on the Rev response element.

    PubMed

    Robertson-Anderson, Rae M; Wang, Jun; Edgcomb, Stephen P; Carmel, Andrew B; Williamson, James R; Millar, David P

    2011-07-29

    Oligomeric assembly of Rev on the Rev response element (RRE) is essential for the nuclear export of unspliced and singly spliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral mRNA transcripts. Several host factors, including the human DEAD box protein DDX1, are also known to be required for efficient Rev function. In this study, spontaneous assembly and dissociation of individual Rev-RRE complexes in the presence or absence of DDX1 were observed in real time via single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Binding of up to eight fluorescently labeled Rev monomers to a single RRE molecule was visualized, and the event frequencies and corresponding binding and dissociation rates for the different Rev-RRE stoichiometries were determined. The presence of DDX1 eliminated a second kinetic phase present during the initial Rev binding step, attributed to nonproductive nucleation events, resulting in increased occurrence of higher-order Rev-RRE stoichiometries. This effect was further enhanced upon the addition of a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (adenylyl-imidophosphate), whereas ADP had no effect beyond that of DDX1 alone. Notably, the first three Rev monomer binding events were accelerated in the presence of DDX1 and adenylyl-imidophosphate, while the dissociation rates remained unchanged. Measurements performed across a range of DDX1 concentrations suggest that DDX1 targets Rev rather than the RRE to promote oligomeric assembly. Moreover, DDX1 is able to restore the oligomerization activity of a Rev mutant that is otherwise unable to assemble on the RRE beyond a monomeric complex. Taken together, these results suggest that DDX1 acts as a cellular cofactor by promoting oligomerization of Rev on the RRE. PMID:21763499

  11. Watching Single Proteins Using Engineered Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Movileanu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in the area of single-molecule detection of proteins with nanopores show a great promise in fundamental science, bionanotechnology and proteomics. In this mini-review, I discuss a comprehensive array of examinations of protein detection and characterization using protein and solid-state nanopores. These investigations demonstrate the power of the single-molecule nanopore measurements to reveal a broad range of functional, structural, biochemical and biophysical features of proteins, such as their backbone flexibility, enzymatic activity, binding affinity as well as their concentration, size and folding state. Engineered nanopores in organic materials and in inorganic membranes coupled with surface modification and protein engineering might provide a new generation of sensing devices for molecular biomedical diagnosis. PMID:24370252

  12. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Noncovalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-12-01

    "Native" mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven to be increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode, and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD of the hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chains) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains.

  13. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Non-Covalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    “Native” mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD MS hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chain) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD+/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD+/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains. PMID:24912433

  14. Prions: Beyond a Single Protein.

    PubMed

    Das, Alvin S; Zou, Wen-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Since the term protein was first coined in 1838 and protein was discovered to be the essential component of fibrin and albumin, all cellular proteins were presumed to play beneficial roles in plants and mammals. However, in 1967, Griffith proposed that proteins could be infectious pathogens and postulated their involvement in scrapie, a universally fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in goats and sheep. Nevertheless, this novel hypothesis had not been evidenced until 1982, when Prusiner and coworkers purified infectious particles from scrapie-infected hamster brains and demonstrated that they consisted of a specific protein that he called a "prion." Unprecedentedly, the infectious prion pathogen is actually derived from its endogenous cellular form in the central nervous system. Unlike other infectious agents, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, prions do not contain genetic materials such as DNA or RNA. The unique traits and genetic information of prions are believed to be encoded within the conformational structure and posttranslational modifications of the proteins. Remarkably, prion-like behavior has been recently observed in other cellular proteins-not only in pathogenic roles but also serving physiological functions. The significance of these fascinating developments in prion biology is far beyond the scope of a single cellular protein and its related disease. PMID:27226089

  15. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  16. Multifunctional proteins revealed by overlapping clustering in protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Guénoche, Alain; Brun, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Multifunctional proteins perform several functions. They are expected to interact specifically with distinct sets of partners, simultaneously or not, depending on the function performed. Current graph clustering methods usually allow a protein to belong to only one cluster, therefore impeding a realistic assignment of multifunctional proteins to clusters. Results: Here, we present Overlapping Cluster Generator (OCG), a novel clustering method which decomposes a network into overlapping clusters and which is, therefore, capable of correct assignment of multifunctional proteins. The principle of OCG is to cover the graph with initial overlapping classes that are iteratively fused into a hierarchy according to an extension of Newman's modularity function. By applying OCG to a human protein–protein interaction network, we show that multifunctional proteins are revealed at the intersection of clusters and demonstrate that the method outperforms other existing methods on simulated graphs and PPI networks. Availability: This software can be downloaded from http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/welcome/spip.php?rubrique197 Contact: brun@tagc.univ-mrs.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22080466

  17. Single molecule studies reveal new mechanisms for microtubule severing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Diaz-Valencia, Juan Daniel; Morelli, Margaret; Zhang, Dong; Sharp, David

    2011-03-01

    Microtubule-severing enzymes are hexameric complexes made from monomeric enzyme subunits that remove tubulin dimers from the microtubule lattice. Severing proteins are known to remodel the cytoskeleton during interphase and mitosis, and are required in proper axon morphology and mammalian bone and cartilage development. We have performed the first single molecule imaging to determine where and how severing enzymes act to cut microtubules. We have focused on the original member of the group, katanin, and the newest member, fidgetin to compare their biophysical activities in vitro. We find that, as expected, severing proteins localize to areas of activity. Interestingly, the association is very brief: they do not stay bound nor do they bind cooperatively at active sites. The association duration changes with the nucleotide content, implying that the state in the catalytic cycle dictates binding affinity with the microtubule. We also discovered that, at lower concentrations, both katanin and fidgetin can depolymerize taxol-stabilized microtubules by removing terminal dimers. These studies reveal the physical regulation schemes to control severing activity in cells, and ultimately regulate cytoskeletal architecture. This work is supported by the March of Dimes Grant #5-FY09-46.

  18. Protein folding at single-molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M.; Deniz, Ashok A.

    2011-01-01

    The protein folding reaction carries great significance for cellular function and hence continues to be the research focus of a large interdisciplinary protein science community. Single-molecule methods are providing new and powerful tools for dissecting the mechanisms of this complex process by virtue of their ability to provide views of protein structure and dynamics without associated ensemble averaging. This review briefly introduces common FRET and force methods, and then explores several areas of protein folding where single-molecule experiments have yielded insights. These include exciting new information about folding landscapes, dynamics, intermediates, unfolded ensembles, intrinsically disordered proteins, assisted folding and biomechanical unfolding. Emerging and future work is expected to include advances in single-molecule techniques aimed at such investigations, and increasing work on more complex systems from both the physics and biology standpoints, including folding and dynamics of systems of interacting proteins and of proteins in cells and organisms. PMID:21303706

  19. Protein mechanics: from single molecules to functional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Cao, Yi

    2010-10-19

    Elastomeric proteins act as the essential functional units in a wide variety of biomechanical machinery and serve as the basic building blocks for biological materials that exhibit superb mechanical properties. These proteins provide the desired elasticity, mechanical strength, resilience, and toughness within these materials. Understanding the mechanical properties of elastomeric protein-based biomaterials is a multiscale problem spanning from the atomistic/molecular level to the macroscopic level. Uncovering the design principles of individual elastomeric building blocks is critical both for the scientific understanding of multiscale mechanics of biomaterials and for the rational engineering of novel biomaterials with desirable mechanical properties. The development of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques has provided methods for characterizing mechanical properties of elastomeric proteins one molecule at a time. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) is uniquely suited to this purpose. Molecular dynamic simulations, protein engineering techniques, and single-molecule AFM study have collectively revealed tremendous insights into the molecular design of single elastomeric proteins, which can guide the design and engineering of elastomeric proteins with tailored mechanical properties. Researchers are focusing experimental efforts toward engineering artificial elastomeric proteins with mechanical properties that mimic or even surpass those of natural elastomeric proteins. In this Account, we summarize our recent experimental efforts to engineer novel artificial elastomeric proteins and develop general and rational methodologies to tune the nanomechanical properties of elastomeric proteins at the single-molecule level. We focus on general design principles used for enhancing the mechanical stability of proteins. These principles include the development of metal-chelation-based general methodology, strategies to control the unfolding hierarchy of

  20. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Greg Hura

    2010-01-08

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  1. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Hura, Greg

    2013-05-29

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  2. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  3. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Hura

    2009-07-09

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  4. Protein imaging. Single-protein spin resonance spectroscopy under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fazhan; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Pengfei; Sun, Hongbin; Wang, Jiarong; Rong, Xing; Chen, Ming; Ju, Chenyong; Reinhard, Friedemann; Chen, Hongwei; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Wang, Junfeng; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance is essential in revealing the structure and dynamics of biomolecules. However, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules has remained an elusive goal. We demonstrate the detection of the electron spin resonance signal from a single spin-labeled protein under ambient conditions. As a sensor, we use a single nitrogen vacancy center in bulk diamond in close proximity to the protein. We measure the orientation of the spin label at the protein and detect the impact of protein motion on the spin label dynamics. In addition, we coherently drive the spin at the protein, which is a prerequisite for studies involving polarization of nuclear spins of the protein or detailed structure analysis of the protein itself. PMID:25745170

  5. Growth of shaped single crystals of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Abel; Rondón, Deyanira; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    1996-09-01

    We present a procedure for obtaining protein single crystals that fill the capillary tubes in which they grow. The implementation was typical of the gel acupuncture method and the four different proteins are used as examples: lysozyme (HEW), thaumatin I, ferritin and insulin. Rod- and prismatic-shaped protein single crystals of these four proteins were grown inside capillary tubes of 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 mm in diameter and, for the case of lysozyme, up to 1.2 mm in diameter. The maximum length measured along the long axes of the rod crystals was 1.6 mm again for lysozyme crystals. It was observed that, once the capillary tube was filled, the crystal continues to grow by diffusion of the precipitating agent throughout the porous network formed by the protein crystal structure. We also discuss the possibility of growing these cylinders of crystalline proteins by the addition of protein solution to the mother liquor through the upper end of the glass capillary while the precipitating agent diffuses through the protein crystal itself. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single crystal character of the protein rods.

  6. Revealing protein dynamics by photobleaching techniques.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used tools to visualize proteins and study their intracellular distribution. One feature of working with GFP variants, photobleaching, has recently been combined with an older technique known as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study protein kinetics in vivo. During photobleaching, fluorochromes get destroyed irreversibly by repeated excitation with an intensive light source. When the photobleaching is applied to a restricted area or structure, recovery of fluorescence will be the result of active or passive diffusion from fluorescent molecules from unbleached surrounding areas. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) is a variant of FRAP where an area is bleached, and loss of fluorescence in surrounding areas is observed. FLIP can be used to study the dynamics of different pools of a protein or can show how a protein diffuses, or is transported through a cell or cellular structure. Here, we discuss these photobleaching fluorescent imaging techniques, illustrated with examples of these techniques applied to proteins of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone response MAPK pathway. PMID:15173624

  7. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  8. Single Filaments to Reveal the Multiple Flavors of Actin.

    PubMed

    Jégou, Antoine; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume

    2016-05-24

    A number of key cell processes rely on specific assemblies of actin filaments, which are all constructed from nearly identical building blocks: the abundant and extremely conserved actin protein. A central question in the field is to understand how different filament networks can coexist and be regulated. Discoveries in science are often related to technical advances. Here, we focus on the ongoing single filament revolution and discuss how these techniques have greatly contributed to our understanding of actin assembly. In particular, we highlight how they have refined our understanding of the many protein-based regulatory mechanisms that modulate actin assembly. It is now becoming apparent that other factors give filaments a specific identity that determines which proteins will bind to them. We argue that single filament techniques will play an essential role in the coming years as we try to understand the many ways actin filaments can take different flavors and unveil how these flavors modulate the action of regulatory proteins. We discuss different factors known to make actin filaments distinguishable by regulatory proteins and speculate on their possible consequences. PMID:27224479

  9. Nanoscience of single polymer chains revealed by nanofishing.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ken; Nishi, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    The invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) enabled us to study the statistical properties of single polymer chains by a method called "nanofishing," which stretches a single polymer chain adsorbed on a substrate with its one end by picking it at the other end. A force-extension curve obtained for a single polystyrene chain in a Theta solvent (cyclohexane) shows good agreement with a worm-like chain model and, therefore, gives microscopic information about entropic elasticity. Furthermore, the nanofishing technique can be used for dynamic viscoelastic measurement of single polymer chains. An AFM cantilever is mechanically oscillated at its resonant frequency during the stretching process. This technique enables the estimation of quantitative and simultaneous elongation-dependent changes of stiffness and viscosity of a single chain with the use of a phenomenological model. In this study, the effect of solvent on viscosity in low extension regions reveals that the viscosity is attributed to monomer-solvent friction. Thus, static and dynamic nanofishing techniques are shown to give powerful experimental proofs for several basic questions in polymer physics. The techniques are expected to reveal hidden properties of polymer chains or polymer solutions by any types of macroscopic measurements in the future. PMID:17099889

  10. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  11. Single prenyl-binding site on protein prenyl transferases

    PubMed Central

    Desnoyers, Luc; Seabra, Miguel C.

    1998-01-01

    Three distinct protein prenyl transferases, one protein farnesyl transferase (FTase) and two protein geranylgeranyl transferases (GGTase), catalyze prenylation of many cellular proteins. One group of protein substrates contains a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X is a variety of amino acids) in which the single cysteine residue is modified with either farnesyl or geranylgeranyl (GG) by FTase or GGTase type-I (GGTase-I), respectively. Rab proteins constitute a second group of substrates that contain a C-terminal double-cysteine motif (such as XXCC in Rab1a) in which both cysteines are geranylgeranylated by Rab GG transferase (RabGGTase). Previous characterization of CAAX prenyl transferases showed that the enzymes form stable complexes with their prenyl pyrophosphate substrates, acting as prenyl carriers. We developed a prenyl-binding assay and show that RabGGTase has a prenyl carrier function similar to the CAAX prenyl transferases. Stable RabGGTase:GG pyrophosphate (GGPP), FTase:GGPP, and GGTase-I:GGPP complexes show 1:1 (enzyme:GGPP) stoichiometry. Chromatographic analysis of prenylated products after single turnover reactions by using isolated RabGGTase:GGPP complex revealed that Rab is mono-geranylgeranylated. This study establishes that all three protein prenyl transferases contain a single prenyl-binding site and suggests that RabGGTase transfers two GG groups to Rabs in independent and consecutive reactions. PMID:9770475

  12. Real-time Redox Measurements during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Reveal Interlinked Protein Folding Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merksamer, Philip I.; Trusina, Ala; Papa, Feroz R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes unfolded proteins to accumulate, triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR outputs in turn decrease ER unfolded proteins to close a negative feedback loop. However, because it is infeasible to directly measure the concentration of unfolded proteins in vivo, cells are generically described as experiencing “ER stress” whenever the UPR is active. Because ER redox potential is optimized for oxidative protein folding, we reasoned that measureable redox changes should accompany unfolded protein accumulation. To test this concept, we employed fluorescent protein reporters to dynamically measure ER redox status and UPR activity in single cells. Using these tools, we show that diverse stressors, both experimental and physiological, compromise ER protein oxidation when UPR-imposed homeostatic control is lost. Using genetic analysis we uncovered redox heterogeneities in isogenic cell populations, and revealed functional interlinks between ER protein folding, modification, and quality control systems. PMID:19026441

  13. Value-added food: single cell protein.

    PubMed

    Anupama; Ravindra, P

    2000-10-01

    The alarming rate of population growth has increased the demand for food production in third-world countries leading to a yawning gap in demand and supply. This has led to an increase in the number of hungry and chronically malnourished people. This situation has created a demand for the formulation of innovative and alternative proteinaceous food sources. Single cell protein (SCP) production is a major step in this direction. SCP is the protein extracted from cultivated microbial biomass. It can be used for protein supplementation of a staple diet by replacing costly conventional sources like soymeal and fishmeal to alleviate the problem of protein scarcity. Moreover, bioconversion of agricultural and industrial wastes to protein-rich food and fodder stocks has an additional benefit of making the final product cheaper. This would also offset the negative cost value of wastes used as substrate to yield SCP. Further, it would make food production less dependent upon land and relieve the pressure on agriculture. This article reviews diversified aspects of SCP as an alternative protein-supplementing source. Various potential strains and substrates that could be utilized for SCP production are described. Nutritive value and removal of nucleic acids and toxins from SCP as a protein-supplementing source are discussed. New processes need to be exploited to improve yield. In that direction the solid state fermentation (SSF) method and its advantages for SCP production are highlighted. PMID:14538097

  14. Molecular force modulation spectroscopy revealing the dynamic response of single bacteriorhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Müller, Daniel J; Humphris, Andrew D L

    2005-02-01

    Recent advances in atomic force microscopy allowed globular and membrane proteins to be mechanically unfolded on a single-molecule level. Presented is an extension to the existing force spectroscopy experiments. While unfolding single bacteriorhodopsins from native purple membranes, small oscillation amplitudes (6-9 nm) were supplied to the vertical displacement of the cantilever at a frequency of 3 kHz. The phase and amplitude response of the cantilever-protein system was converted to reveal the elastic (conservative) and viscous (dissipative) contributions to the unfolding process. The elastic response (stiffness) of the extended parts of the protein were in the range of a few tens pN/nm and could be well described by the derivative of the wormlike chain model. Discrete events in the viscous response coincided with the unfolding of single secondary structure elements and were in the range of 1 microNs/m. In addition, these force modulation spectroscopy experiments revealed novel mechanical unfolding intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin. We found that kinks result in a loss of unfolding cooperativity in transmembrane helices. Reconstructing force-distance spectra by the integration of amplitude-distance spectra verified their position, offering a novel approach to detect intermediates during the forced unfolding of single proteins. PMID:15574708

  15. Single-cell chromatin accessibility reveals principles of regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Jason D; Wu, Beijing; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Ruff, Dave; Gonzales, Michael L; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-07-23

    Cell-to-cell variation is a universal feature of life that affects a wide range of biological phenomena, from developmental plasticity to tumour heterogeneity. Although recent advances have improved our ability to document cellular phenotypic variation, the fundamental mechanisms that generate variability from identical DNA sequences remain elusive. Here we reveal the landscape and principles of mammalian DNA regulatory variation by developing a robust method for mapping the accessible genome of individual cells by assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) integrated into a programmable microfluidics platform. Single-cell ATAC-seq (scATAC-seq) maps from hundreds of single cells in aggregate closely resemble accessibility profiles from tens of millions of cells and provide insights into cell-to-cell variation. Accessibility variance is systematically associated with specific trans-factors and cis-elements, and we discover combinations of trans-factors associated with either induction or suppression of cell-to-cell variability. We further identify sets of trans-factors associated with cell-type-specific accessibility variance across eight cell types. Targeted perturbations of cell cycle or transcription factor signalling evoke stimulus-specific changes in this observed variability. The pattern of accessibility variation in cis across the genome recapitulates chromosome compartments de novo, linking single-cell accessibility variation to three-dimensional genome organization. Single-cell analysis of DNA accessibility provides new insight into cellular variation of the 'regulome'. PMID:26083756

  16. Photocurrent of a single photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerster, Daniel; Reichert, Joachim; Bi, Hai; Barth, Johannes V.; Kaniber, Simone M.; Holleitner, Alexander W.; Visoly-Fisher, Iris; Sergani, Shlomi; Carmeli, Itai

    2012-10-01

    Photosynthesis is used by plants, algae and bacteria to convert solar energy into stable chemical energy. The initial stages of this process--where light is absorbed and energy and electrons are transferred--are mediated by reaction centres composed of chlorophyll and carotenoid complexes. It has been previously shown that single small molecules can be used as functional components in electric and optoelectronic circuits, but it has proved difficult to control and probe individual molecules for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. Here, we show that the photocurrent generated by a single photosynthetic protein--photosystem I--can be measured using a scanning near-field optical microscope set-up. One side of the protein is anchored to a gold surface that acts as an electrode, and the other is contacted by a gold-covered glass tip. The tip functions as both counter electrode and light source. A photocurrent of ~10 pA is recorded from the covalently bound single-protein junctions, which is in agreement with the internal electron transfer times of photosystem I.

  17. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types.

    PubMed

    Kippner, Linda E; Kim, Jinhee; Gibson, Greg; Kemp, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription profiling provides

  18. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1's role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  19. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1’s role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  20. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  1. Osmolyte perturbation reveals conformational equilibria in spin-labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    López, Carlos J; Fleissner, Mark R; Guo, Zhefeng; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that proteins at equilibrium can exist in a manifold of conformational substates, and that these substates play important roles in protein function. Therefore, there is great interest in identifying regions in proteins that are in conformational exchange. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of spin-labeled proteins containing the nitroxide side chain (R1) often consist of two (or more) components that may arise from slow exchange between conformational substates (lifetimes > 100 ns). However, crystal structures of proteins containing R1 have shown that multicomponent spectra can also arise from equilibria between rotamers of the side chain itself. In this report, it is shown that these scenarios can be distinguished by the response of the system to solvent perturbation with stabilizing osmolytes such as sucrose. Thus, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) emerges as a new tool to explore slow conformational exchange in proteins of arbitrary size, including membrane proteins in a native-like environment. Moreover, equilibrium between substates with even modest differences in conformation is revealed, and the simplicity of the method makes it suitable for facile screening of multiple proteins. Together with previously developed strategies for monitoring picosecond to millisecond backbone dynamics, the results presented here expand the timescale over which SDSL can be used to explore protein flexibility. PMID:19585559

  2. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  3. Osmolyte perturbation reveals conformational equilibria in spin-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    López, Carlos J; Fleissner, Mark R; Guo, Zhefeng; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that proteins at equilibrium can exist in a manifold of conformational substates, and that these substates play important roles in protein function. Therefore, there is great interest in identifying regions in proteins that are in conformational exchange. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of spin-labeled proteins containing the nitroxide side chain (R1) often consist of two (or more) components that may arise from slow exchange between conformational substates (lifetimes > 100 ns). However, crystal structures of proteins containing R1 have shown that multicomponent spectra can also arise from equilibria between rotamers of the side chain itself. In this report, it is shown that these scenarios can be distinguished by the response of the system to solvent perturbation with stabilizing osmolytes such as sucrose. Thus, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) emerges as a new tool to explore slow conformational exchange in proteins of arbitrary size, including membrane proteins in a native-like environment. Moreover, equilibrium between substates with even modest differences in conformation is revealed, and the simplicity of the method makes it suitable for facile screening of multiple proteins. Together with previously developed strategies for monitoring picosecond to millisecond backbone dynamics, the results presented here expand the timescale over which SDSL can be used to explore protein flexibility. PMID:19585559

  4. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  5. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  6. Single cell protein as an occupational hazard.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Dölling, B; Göthe, C J; Ebbinghaus, L; von Stedingk, L V; Wasserman, J

    1983-01-01

    Single cell protein (SCP) intended for animal feed purposes was produced in a pilot plant. The SCP consisted of Methylomonas methanolica, a pseudomonas species which is an obligate methanol user. The SCP was cultured in fermenters and later dewatered and dried in a spray-drier. Seven of eight research workers had febrile reactions 6-12 hours after exposure to SCP dust. All workers had high titres of IgG and IgM antibodies against the pseudomonas species as measured with indirect ELISA and passive haemagglutination techniques. The mechanism behind the febrile reaction is judged to be a non-immunological reaction caused by endotoxins. By increasing the particle size of the SCP through using different drying procedures, a product which generated less dust was obtained. PMID:6830720

  7. Single-molecule imaging reveals a collapsed conformational state for DNA-bound cohesin

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Johannes; Çamdere, Gamze Ö.; Koshland, Douglas E.; Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Cohesin is essential for the hierarchical organization of the eukaryotic genome and plays key roles in many aspects of chromosome biology. The conformation of cohesin bound to DNA remains poorly defined, leaving crucial gaps in our understanding of how cohesin fulfills its biological functions. Here we use single molecule microscopy to directly observe the dynamic and functional characteristics of cohesin bound to DNA. We show that cohesin can undergo rapid one-dimensional (1D) diffusion along DNA, but individual nucleosomes, nucleosome arrays, and other protein obstacles significantly restrict its mobility. We further demonstrate that DNA motor proteins can readily push cohesin along DNA, but they cannot pass through the interior of the cohesin ring. Together, our results reveal that DNA-bound cohesin has a central pore that is substantially smaller than anticipated. These findings have direct implications for understanding how cohesin and other SMC proteins interact with and distribute along chromatin. PMID:27117417

  8. Mechanically Untying a Protein Slipknot: Multiple Pathways Revealed by Force Spectroscopy and Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    He, Chengzhi; Genchev, Georgi Z.; Lu, Hui; Li, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is highly diverse when considering a wide range of protein types, helping to give rise to the multitude of functions that proteins perform. In particular, certain proteins are known to adopt a knotted or slipknotted fold. How such proteins undergo mechanical unfolding was investigated utilizing a combination of single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM), protein engineering and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to show the mechanical unfolding mechanism of the slipknotted protein AFV3-109. Our results reveal that the mechancial unfolding of AFV3-109 can proceed via multiple parallel unfolding pathways that all cause the protein slipknot to untie, and the polypeptide chain to completely extend. These distinct unfolding pathways proceed either via a two-state or three-state unfolding process involving the formation of a well-defined, stable intermediate state. SMD simulations predict the same contour length increments for different unfolding pathways as single molecule AFM results, thus provding a plausible molecular mechanism for the mechanical unfolding of AFV3-109. These SMD simulations also reveal that two-state unfolding is initiated from both the N- and C-termini, while three-state unfolding is initiated only from the C-terminus. In both pathways, the protein slipknot was untied during unfolding, and no tightened slipknot conformation observed. Detailed analysis revealed that interactions between key structural elements lock the knotting loop in place, preventing it from shrinking and the formation of a tightened slipknot conformation. Our results demonstrate the bifurcation of the mechancial unfolding pathway of AFV3-109, and point to the generality of a kinetic partitioning mechanism for protein folding/unfolding. PMID:22626004

  9. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles

    PubMed Central

    Wruck, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA–protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG)-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp) were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG) beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot–streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein–DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular recognition

  10. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  11. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  12. Silk protein aggregation kinetics revealed by Rheo-IR.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Terry, Ann E; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris

    2014-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of silk fibres stem from a multi-scale hierarchical structure created when an aqueous protein "melt" is converted to an insoluble solid via flow. To directly relate a silk protein's structure and function in response to flow, we present the first application of a Rheo-IR platform, which couples cone and plate rheology with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. This technique provides a new window into silk processing by linking shear thinning to an increase in molecular alignment, with shear thickening affecting changes in the silk protein's secondary structure. Additionally, compared to other static characterization methods for silk, Rheo-IR proved particularly useful at revealing the intrinsic difference between natural (native) and reconstituted silk feedstocks. Hence Rheo-IR offers important novel insights into natural silk processing. This has intrinsic academic merit, but it might also be useful when designing reconstituted silk analogues alongside other polymeric systems, whether natural or synthetic. PMID:24200713

  13. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  14. Single exosome study reveals subpopulations distributed among cell lines with variability related to membrane content

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit; Saari, Heikki; Ibañez, Elisa Lazaro; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Current analysis of exosomes focuses primarily on bulk analysis, where exosome-to-exosome variability cannot be assessed. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy to study the chemical composition of single exosomes. We measured spectra of individual exosomes from 8 cell lines. Cell-line-averaged spectra varied considerably, reflecting the variation in total exosomal protein, lipid, genetic, and cytosolic content. Unexpectedly, single exosomes isolated from the same cell type also exhibited high spectral variability. Subsequent spectral analysis revealed clustering of single exosomes into 4 distinct groups that were not cell-line specific. Each group contained exosomes from multiple cell lines, and most cell lines had exosomes in multiple groups. The differences between these groups are related to chemical differences primarily due to differing membrane composition. Through a principal components analysis, we identified that the major sources of spectral variation among the exosomes were in cholesterol content, relative expression of phospholipids to cholesterol, and surface protein expression. For example, exosomes derived from cancerous versus non-cancerous cell lines can be largely separated based on their relative expression of cholesterol and phospholipids. We are the first to indicate that exosome subpopulations are shared among cell types, suggesting distributed exosome functionality. The origins of these differences are likely related to the specific role of extracellular vesicle subpopulations in both normal cell function and carcinogenesis, and they may provide diagnostic potential at the single exosome level. PMID:26649679

  15. Designed protein reveals structural determinants of extreme kinetic stability

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Aron; Ma, S. Martha; Xia, Ke; Rafalia, Hitesh; Trainor, Kyle; Colón, Wilfredo; Gosavi, Shachi; Meiering, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The design of stable, functional proteins is difficult. Improved design requires a deeper knowledge of the molecular basis for design outcomes and properties. We previously used a bioinformatics and energy function method to design a symmetric superfold protein composed of repeating structural elements with multivalent carbohydrate-binding function, called ThreeFoil. This and similar methods have produced a notably high yield of stable proteins. Using a battery of experimental and computational analyses we show that despite its small size and lack of disulfide bonds, ThreeFoil has remarkably high kinetic stability and its folding is specifically chaperoned by carbohydrate binding. It is also extremely stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate that the kinetic stability can be predicted and modeled using absolute contact order (ACO) and long-range order (LRO), as well as coarse-grained simulations; the stability arises from a topology that includes many long-range contacts which create a large and highly cooperative energy barrier for unfolding and folding. Extensive data from proteomic screens and other experiments reveal that a high ACO/LRO is a general feature of proteins with strong resistances to denaturation and degradation. These results provide tractable approaches for predicting resistance and designing proteins with sufficient topological complexity and long-range interactions to accommodate destabilizing functional features as well as withstand chemical and proteolytic challenge. PMID:26554002

  16. Dual-Color Monitoring Overcomes the Limitations of Single Bioluminescent Reporters in Fast-Growing Microbes and Reveals Phase-Dependent Protein Productivity during the Metabolic Rhythms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Luciferase is a useful, noninvasive reporter of gene regulation that can be continuously monitored over long periods of time; however, its use is problematic in fast-growing microbes like bacteria and yeast because rapidly changing cell numbers and metabolic states also influence bioluminescence, thereby confounding the reporter's signal. Here we show that these problems can be overcome in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring bioluminescence from two different colors of beetle luciferase, where one color (green) reports activity of a gene of interest, while a second color (red) is stably expressed and used to continuously normalize green bioluminescence for fluctuations in signal intensity that are unrelated to gene regulation. We use this dual-luciferase strategy in conjunction with a light-inducible promoter system to test whether different phases of yeast respiratory oscillations are more suitable for heterologous protein production than others. By using pulses of light to activate production of a green luciferase while normalizing signal variation to a red luciferase, we show that the early reductive phase of the yeast metabolic cycle produces more luciferase than other phases. PMID:26162874

  17. Bringing single-molecule spectroscopy to macromolecular protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chirlmin; Fareh, Mohamed; Kim, V. Narry

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers real-time, nanometer-resolution information. Over the past two decades, this emerging single-molecule technique has been rapidly adopted to investigate the structural dynamics and biological functions of proteins. Despite this remarkable achievement, single-molecule fluorescence techniques must be extended to macromolecular protein complexes that are physiologically more relevant for functional studies. In this review, we present recent major breakthroughs for investigating protein complexes within cell extracts using single-molecule fluorescence. We outline the challenges, future prospects and potential applications of these new single-molecule fluorescence techniques in biological and clinical research. PMID:23200186

  18. Quantitative Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Reveals a 1000-Fold Increase in Lifetime of Protein Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianwen; Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated dilute protein solutions with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and have observed that a rapid loss of proteins occurs from solution. It is commonly assumed that such a loss is the result of protein adsorption to interfaces. A protocol was developed in which this mode of protein loss can be prevented. However, FCS on fluorescent protein (enhanced green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mStrawberry) solutions enclosed by adsorption-protected interfaces still reveals a decrease of the fluorescent protein concentration, while the diffusion time is stable over long periods of time. We interpret this decay as a loss of protein functionality, probably caused by denaturation of the fluorescent proteins. We show that the typical lifetime of protein functionality in highly dilute, approximately single molecule per femtoliter solutions can be extended more than 1000-fold (typically from a few hours to >40 days) by adding compounds with surfactant behavior. No direct interactions between the surfactant and the fluorescent proteins were observed from the diffusion time measured by FCS. A critical surfactant concentration of more than 23 μM was required to achieve the desired protein stabilization for Triton X-100. The surfactant does not interfere with DNA-protein binding, because similar observations were made using DNA-cutting restriction enzymes. We associate the occurrence of denaturation of proteins with the activity of water at the water-protein interface, which was recently proposed in terms of the “water attack model”. Our observations suggest that soluble biomolecules can extend an influence over much larger distances than suggested by their actual volume. PMID:18586843

  19. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yingang; Song, Xiaxia; Lin, Jinzhong; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  20. Single-cell transcriptomics reveals receptor transformations during olfactory neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanchate, Naresh K; Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Kuang, Donghui; Ye, Xiaolan; Qiu, Xiaojie; Pachter, Lior; Trapnell, Cole; Buck, Linda B

    2015-12-01

    The sense of smell allows chemicals to be perceived as diverse scents. We used single-neuron RNA sequencing to explore the developmental mechanisms that shape this ability as nasal olfactory neurons mature in mice. Most mature neurons expressed only one of the ~1000 odorant receptor genes (Olfrs) available, and at a high level. However, many immature neurons expressed low levels of multiple Olfrs. Coexpressed Olfrs localized to overlapping zones of the nasal epithelium, suggesting regional biases, but not to single genomic loci. A single immature neuron could express Olfrs from up to seven different chromosomes. The mature state in which expression of Olfr genes is restricted to one per neuron emerges over a developmental progression that appears to be independent of neuronal activity involving sensory transduction molecules. PMID:26541607

  1. Single muscle fiber proteomics reveals unexpected mitochondrial specialization

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Deshmukh, Atul S; Zeiler, Marlis; Cancellara, Pasqua; Moretti, Irene; Reggiani, Carlo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are composed of multinucleated cells termed slow or fast fibers according to their contractile and metabolic properties. Here, we developed a high-sensitivity workflow to characterize the proteome of single fibers. Analysis of segments of the same fiber by traditional and unbiased proteomics methods yielded the same subtype assignment. We discovered novel subtype-specific features, most prominently mitochondrial specialization of fiber types in substrate utilization. The fiber type-resolved proteomes can be applied to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions and illustrate the utility of single cell type analysis for dissecting proteomic heterogeneity. PMID:25643707

  2. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  3. Semisynthetic protein nanoreactor for single-molecule chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joongoo; Bayley, Hagan

    2015-01-01

    The covalent chemistry of individual reactants bound within a protein pore can be monitored by observing the ionic current flow through the pore, which acts as a nanoreactor responding to bond-making and bond-breaking events. In the present work, we incorporated an unnatural amino acid into the α-hemolysin (αHL) pore by using solid-phase peptide synthesis to make the central segment of the polypeptide chain, which forms the transmembrane β-barrel of the assembled heptamer. The full-length αHL monomer was obtained by native chemical ligation of the central synthetic peptide to flanking recombinant polypeptides. αHL pores with one semisynthetic subunit were then used as nanoreactors for single-molecule chemistry. By introducing an amino acid with a terminal alkyne group, we were able to visualize click chemistry at the single-molecule level, which revealed a long-lived (4.5-s) reaction intermediate. Additional side chains might be introduced in a similar fashion, thereby greatly expanding the range of single-molecule covalent chemistry that can be investigated by the nanoreactor approach. PMID:26504203

  4. Multimodular biosensors reveal a novel platform for activation of G proteins by growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna K.; Aznar, Nicolas; Laederich, Melanie B.; Ma, Gary S.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Newton, Alexandra C.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Environmental cues are transmitted to the interior of the cell via a complex network of signaling hubs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two such major signaling hubs in eukaryotes. Conventionally, canonical signal transduction via trimeric G proteins is thought to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors. Here we used molecular engineering to develop modular fluorescent biosensors that exploit the remarkable specificity of bimolecular recognition, i.e., of both G proteins and RTKs, and reveal the workings of a novel platform for activation of G proteins by RTKs in single living cells. Comprised of the unique modular makeup of guanidine exchange factor Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/girdin, a guanidine exchange factor that links G proteins to a variety of RTKs, these biosensors provide direct evidence that RTK–GIV–Gαi ternary complexes are formed in living cells and that Gαi is transactivated within minutes after growth factor stimulation at the plasma membrane. Thus, GIV-derived biosensors provide a versatile strategy for visualizing, monitoring, and manipulating the dynamic association of Gαi with RTKs for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins in cells and illuminate a fundamental signaling event regulated by GIV during diverse cellular processes and pathophysiologic states. PMID:25713130

  5. Single-molecule Studies of Origin Licensing Reveal Mechanisms Ensuring Bidirectional Helicase Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ticau, Simina; Friedman, Larry J.; Ivica, Nikola A.; Gelles, Jeff; Bell, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Loading of the ring-shaped Mcm2-7 replicative helicase around DNA licenses eukaryotic origins of replication. During loading, Cdc6, Cdt1 and the origin-recognition complex (ORC) assemble two heterohexameric Mcm2-7 complexes into a head-to-head double hexamer that facilitates bidirectional replication initiation. Using multi-wavelength single-molecule fluorescence to monitor the events of helicase loading, we demonstrate that double-hexamer formation is the result of sequential loading of individual Mcm2-7 complexes. Loading of each Mcm2-7 molecule involves the ordered association and dissociation of distinct Cdc6 and Cdt1 proteins. In contrast, one ORC molecule directs loading of both helicases in each double hexamer. Based on single-molecule FRET, arrival of the second Mcm2-7 results in rapid double-hexamer formation that anticipates Cdc6 and Cdt1 release, suggesting Mcm-Mcm interactions recruit the second helicase. Our findings reveal the complex protein dynamics that coordinate helicase loading and indicate that distinct mechanisms load the oppositely oriented helicases that are central to bidirectional replication initiation. PMID:25892223

  6. Analysis of protein transport in the Brassica oleracea vasculature reveals protein-specific destinations.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chenxing; Anstead, James; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the vascular transport properties of exogenously applied proteins to Brassica oleracea plants and compared their delivery to various aerial parts of the plant with carboxy fluorescein (CF) dye. We identified unique properties for each protein. Alexafluor-tagged bovine serum albumin (Alexa-BSA) and Alexafluor-tagged Histone H1 (Alexa-Histone) moved slower than CF dye throughout the plant. Interestingly, Alexa-Histone was retained in the phloem and phloem parenchyma while Alexa-BSA moved into the apoplast. One possibility is that Alexa-Histone sufficiently resembles plant endogenous proteins and is retained in the vascular stream, while Alexa-BSA is exported from the cell as a foreign protein. Both proteins diffuse from the leaf veins into the leaf lamina. Alexa-BSA accumulated in the leaf epidermis while Alexa-Histone accumulated mainly in the mesophyll layers. Fluorescein-tagged hepatitis C virus core protein (fluorescein-HCV) was also delivered to B. oleracea plants and is larger than Alexa-BSA. This protein moves more rapidly than BSA through the plant and was restricted to the leaf veins. Fluorescein-HCV failed to unload to the leaf lamina. These combined data suggest that there is not a single default pathway for the vascular transfer of exogenous proteins in B. oleracea plants. Specific protein properties appear to determine their destination and transport properties within the phloem. PMID:22476467

  7. Single-Cell RNA-Seq with Waterfall Reveals Molecular Cascades underlying Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaehoon; Berg, Daniel A; Zhu, Yunhua; Shin, Joseph Y; Song, Juan; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Enikolopov, Grigori; Nauen, David W; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-09-01

    Somatic stem cells contribute to tissue ontogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration through sequential processes. Systematic molecular analysis of stem cell behavior is challenging because classic approaches cannot resolve cellular heterogeneity or capture developmental dynamics. Here we provide a comprehensive resource of single-cell transcriptomes of adult hippocampal quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) and their immediate progeny. We further developed Waterfall, a bioinformatic pipeline, to statistically quantify singe-cell gene expression along a de novo reconstructed continuous developmental trajectory. Our study reveals molecular signatures of adult qNSCs, characterized by active niche signaling integration and low protein translation capacity. Our analyses further delineate molecular cascades underlying qNSC activation and neurogenesis initiation, exemplified by decreased extrinsic signaling capacity, primed translational machinery, and regulatory switches in transcription factors, metabolism, and energy sources. Our study reveals the molecular continuum underlying adult neurogenesis and illustrates how Waterfall can be used for single-cell omics analyses of various continuous biological processes. PMID:26299571

  8. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darmanis, Spyros; Gallant, Caroline Julie; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Niklasson, Mia; Segerman, Anna; Flamourakis, Georgios; Fredriksson, Simon; Assarsson, Erika; Lundberg, Martin; Nelander, Sven; Westermark, Bengt; Landegren, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Summary Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment. PMID:26748716

  9. Single-cell dynamics reveals sustained growth during diauxic shifts.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Sarah; Tostevin, Filipe; Kiviet, Daniel J; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J

    2013-01-01

    Stochasticity in gene regulation has been characterized extensively, but how it affects cellular growth and fitness is less clear. We study the growth of E. coli cells as they shift from glucose to lactose metabolism, which is characterized by an obligatory growth arrest in bulk experiments that is termed the lag phase. Here, we follow the growth dynamics of individual cells at minute-resolution using a single-cell assay in a microfluidic device during this shift, while also monitoring lac expression. Mirroring the bulk results, the majority of cells displays a growth arrest upon glucose exhaustion, and resume when triggered by stochastic lac expression events. However, a significant fraction of cells maintains a high rate of elongation and displays no detectable growth lag during the shift. This ability to suppress the growth lag should provide important selective advantages when nutrients are scarce. Trajectories of individual cells display a highly non-linear relation between lac expression and growth, with only a fraction of fully induced levels being sufficient for achieving near maximal growth. A stochastic molecular model together with measured dependencies between nutrient concentration, lac expression level, and growth accurately reproduces the observed switching distributions. The results show that a growth arrest is not obligatory in the classic diauxic shift, and underscore that regulatory stochasticity ought to be considered in terms of its impact on growth and survival. PMID:23637881

  10. Single-cell imaging of inflammatory caspase dimerization reveals differential recruitment to inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Sanders, M G; Parsons, M J; Howard, A G A; Liu, J; Fassio, S R; Martinez, J A; Bouchier-Hayes, L

    2015-01-01

    The human inflammatory caspases, including caspase-1, -4, -5 and -12, are considered as key regulators of innate immunity protecting from sepsis and numerous inflammatory diseases. Caspase-1 is activated by proximity-induced dimerization following recruitment to inflammasomes but the roles of the remaining inflammatory caspases in inflammasome assembly are unclear. Here, we use caspase bimolecular fluorescence complementation to visualize the assembly of inflammasomes and dimerization of inflammatory caspases in single cells. We observed caspase-1 dimerization induced by the coexpression of a range of inflammasome proteins and by lipospolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in primary macrophages. Caspase-4 and -5 were only dimerized by select inflammasome proteins, whereas caspase-12 dimerization was not detected by any investigated treatment. Strikingly, we determined that certain inflammasome proteins could induce heterodimerization of caspase-1 with caspase-4 or -5. Caspase-5 homodimerization and caspase-1/-5 heterodimerization was also detected in LPS-primed primary macrophages in response to cholera toxin subunit B. The subcellular localization and organization of the inflammasome complexes varied markedly depending on the upstream trigger and on which caspase or combination of caspases were recruited. Three-dimensional imaging of the ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain)/caspase-1 complexes revealed a large spherical complex of ASC with caspase-1 dimerized on the outer surface. In contrast, NALP1 (NACHT leucine-rich repeat protein 1)/caspase-1 complexes formed large filamentous structures. These results argue that caspase-1, -4 or -5 can be recruited to inflammasomes under specific circumstances, often leading to distinctly organized and localized complexes that may impact the functions of these proteases. PMID:26158519

  11. Single-cell imaging of inflammatory caspase dimerization reveals differential recruitment to inflammasomes

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, M G; Parsons, M J; Howard, A G A; Liu, J; Fassio, S R; Martinez, J A; Bouchier-Hayes, L

    2015-01-01

    The human inflammatory caspases, including caspase-1, -4, -5 and -12, are considered as key regulators of innate immunity protecting from sepsis and numerous inflammatory diseases. Caspase-1 is activated by proximity-induced dimerization following recruitment to inflammasomes but the roles of the remaining inflammatory caspases in inflammasome assembly are unclear. Here, we use caspase bimolecular fluorescence complementation to visualize the assembly of inflammasomes and dimerization of inflammatory caspases in single cells. We observed caspase-1 dimerization induced by the coexpression of a range of inflammasome proteins and by lipospolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in primary macrophages. Caspase-4 and -5 were only dimerized by select inflammasome proteins, whereas caspase-12 dimerization was not detected by any investigated treatment. Strikingly, we determined that certain inflammasome proteins could induce heterodimerization of caspase-1 with caspase-4 or -5. Caspase-5 homodimerization and caspase-1/-5 heterodimerization was also detected in LPS-primed primary macrophages in response to cholera toxin subunit B. The subcellular localization and organization of the inflammasome complexes varied markedly depending on the upstream trigger and on which caspase or combination of caspases were recruited. Three-dimensional imaging of the ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain)/caspase-1 complexes revealed a large spherical complex of ASC with caspase-1 dimerized on the outer surface. In contrast, NALP1 (NACHT leucine-rich repeat protein 1)/caspase-1 complexes formed large filamentous structures. These results argue that caspase-1, -4 or -5 can be recruited to inflammasomes under specific circumstances, often leading to distinctly organized and localized complexes that may impact the functions of these proteases. PMID:26158519

  12. Single molecule techniques for the study of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    García-Sáez, Ana J; Schwille, Petra

    2007-08-01

    Single molecule techniques promise novel information about the properties and behavior of individual particles, thus enabling access to molecular heterogeneities in biological systems. Their recent developments to accommodate membrane studies have significantly deepened the understanding of membrane proteins. In this short review, we will describe the basics of the three most common single-molecule techniques used on membrane proteins: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single particle tracking, and atomic force microscopy. We will discuss the most relevant findings made during the recent years and their contribution to the membrane protein field. PMID:17497147

  13. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters. PMID:26371748

  14. Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrew Stephen, Timothy Veenstra, and Gordon Whiteley, Guest Writers, and Ken Michaels, Staff Writer The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

  15. Brain phosphoproteome obtained by a FASP-based method reveals plasma membrane protein topology.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Zougman, Alexandre; Gnad, Florian; Mann, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Taking advantage of the recently developed Filter Assisted Sample Preparation (FASP) method for sample preparation, we performed an in-depth analysis of phosphorylation sites in mouse brain. To maximize the number of detected phosphorylation sites, we fractionated proteins by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) or separated tryptic peptides on an anion exchanger (SAX) prior or after the TiO(2)-based phosphopeptide enrichment, respectively. SEC allowed analysis of minute tissue samples (1 mg total protein), and resulted in identification of more than 4000 sites in a single experiment, comprising eight fractions. SAX in a pipet tip format offered a convenient and rapid way to fractionate phosphopeptides and mapped more than 5000 sites in a single six fraction experiment. To enrich peptides containing phosphotyrosine residues, we describe a filter aided antibody capturing and elution (FACE) method that requires only the uncoupled instead of resin-immobilized capture reagent. In total, we identified 12,035 phosphorylation sites on 4579 brain proteins of which 8446 are novel. Gene Ontology annotation reveals that 23% of identified sites are located on plasma membrane proteins, including a large number of ion channels and transporters. Together with the glycosylation sites from a recent large-scale study, they can confirm or correct predicted membrane topologies of these proteins, as we show for the examples calcium channels and glutamate receptors. PMID:20415495

  16. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Chin, Emily N; Jackson, Shawn S; Strotman, Lindsay N; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E; Alexander, Caroline M; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R; Beebe, David J

    2014-02-15

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, which gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes compared to current wash-based protocols, which require reequilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible-phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of nonspecific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  17. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; Chin, Emily N.; Jackson, Shawn S.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, that gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes as compared to current wash-based protocols, which require re-equilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of non-specific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb) to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein-binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  18. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  19. Adsorption and Unfolding of a Single Protein Triggers Nanoparticle Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The response of living systems to nanoparticles is thought to depend on the protein corona, which forms shortly after exposure to physiological fluids and which is linked to a wide array of pathophysiologies. A mechanistic understanding of the dynamic interaction between proteins and nanoparticles and thus the biological fate of nanoparticles and associated proteins is, however, often missing mainly due to the inadequacies in current ensemble experimental approaches. Through the application of a variety of single molecule and single particle spectroscopic techniques in combination with ensemble level characterization tools, we identified different interaction pathways between gold nanorods and bovine serum albumin depending on the protein concentration. Overall, we found that local changes in protein concentration influence everything from cancer cell uptake to nanoparticle stability and even protein secondary structure. We envision that our findings and methods will lead to strategies to control the associated pathophysiology of nanoparticle exposure in vivo. PMID:26751094

  20. Protein expression analyses at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masae; Karagiannis, Peter; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level. PMID:25197931

  1. Adsorption and Unfolding of a Single Protein Triggers Nanoparticle Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kisley, Lydia; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Hoggard, Anneli; Shuang, Bo; D S Indrasekara, A Swarnapali; Chen, Sishan; Wang, Lin-Yung; Derry, Paul J; Liopo, Anton; Zubarev, Eugene R; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2016-02-23

    The response of living systems to nanoparticles is thought to depend on the protein corona, which forms shortly after exposure to physiological fluids and which is linked to a wide array of pathophysiologies. A mechanistic understanding of the dynamic interaction between proteins and nanoparticles and thus the biological fate of nanoparticles and associated proteins is, however, often missing mainly due to the inadequacies in current ensemble experimental approaches. Through the application of a variety of single molecule and single particle spectroscopic techniques in combination with ensemble level characterization tools, we identified different interaction pathways between gold nanorods and bovine serum albumin depending on the protein concentration. Overall, we found that local changes in protein concentration influence everything from cancer cell uptake to nanoparticle stability and even protein secondary structure. We envision that our findings and methods will lead to strategies to control the associated pathophysiology of nanoparticle exposure in vivo. PMID:26751094

  2. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  3. Phenotypic mixing between different hepadnavirus nucleocapsid proteins reveals C protein dimerization to be cis preferential.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Zhou, S; Ganem, D; Standring, D N

    1994-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses encode a single core (C) protein which assembles into a nucleocapsid containing the polymerase (P) protein and pregenomic RNA during viral replication in hepatocytes. We examined the ability of heterologous hepadnavirus C proteins to cross-oligomerize. Using a two-hybrid assay in HepG2 cells, we observed cross-oligomerization among the core proteins from hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus, and ground squirrel hepatitis virus. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, in which hepadnavirus C proteins form capsids, the C polypeptides from woodchuck hepatitis virus and ground squirrel hepatitis virus, but not duck hepatitis B virus, can efficiently coassemble with an epitope-tagged HBV core polypeptide to form mixed capsids. However, when two different core mRNAs are coexpressed in oocytes the core monomers show a strong preference for forming homodimers rather than heterodimers. This holds true even for coexpression of two HBV C proteins differing only by an epitope tag, suggesting that core monomers are not free to diffuse and associate with other monomers. Thus, mixed capsids result from aggregation of different species of homodimers. Images PMID:7518533

  4. Dynamic Coupling among Protein Binding, Sliding, and DNA Bending Revealed by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2016-07-13

    Protein binding to DNA changes the DNA's structure, and altered DNA structure can, in turn, modulate the dynamics of protein binding. This mutual dependency is poorly understood. Here we investigated dynamic couplings among protein binding to DNA, protein sliding on DNA, and DNA bending by applying a coarse-grained simulation method to the bacterial architectural protein HU and 14 other DNA-binding proteins. First, we verified our method by showing that the simulated HU exhibits a weak preference for A/T-rich regions of DNA and a much higher affinity for gapped and nicked DNA, consistent with biochemical experiments. The high affinity was attributed to a local DNA bend, but not the specific chemical moiety of the gap/nick. The long-time dynamic analysis revealed that HU sliding is associated with the movement of the local DNA bending site. Deciphering single sliding steps, we found the coupling between HU sliding and DNA bending is akin to neither induced-fit nor population-shift; instead they moved concomitantly. This is reminiscent of a cation transfer on DNA and can be viewed as a protein version of polaron-like sliding. Interestingly, on shorter time scales, HU paused when the DNA was highly bent at the bound position and escaped from pauses once the DNA spontaneously returned to a less bent structure. The HU sliding is largely regulated by DNA bending dynamics. With 14 other proteins, we explored the generality and versatility of the dynamic coupling and found that 6 of the 15 assayed proteins exhibit the polaron-like sliding. PMID:27309278

  5. Tracking single Kv2.1 channels in live cells reveals anomalous subdiffusion and ergodicity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Aubrey; Simon, Blair; Tamkun, Michael; Krapf, Diego

    2011-03-01

    The dynamic organization of the plasma membrane is responsible for essential cellular processes, such as receptor trafficking and signaling. By studying the dynamics of transmembrane proteins a greater understanding of these processes as a whole can be achieved. It is broadly observed that the diffusion pattern of membrane protein displays anomalous subdiffusion. However, the mechanisms responsible for this behavior are not yet established. We explore the dynamics of the voltage gated potassium channel Kv2.1 by using single-particle tracking. We analyze Kv2.1 channel trajectories in terms of the time and ensemble distributions of square displacements. Our results reveal that all Kv2.1 channels experience anomalous subdiffusion and we observe that the Kv2.1 diffusion pattern is non-ergodic. We further investigated the role of the actin cytoskeleton in these channel dynamics by applying actin depolymerizing drugs. It is seen that with the breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton the Kv2.1 channel trajectories recover ergodicity.

  6. A novel hybrid single molecule approach reveals spontaneous DNA motion in the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sijie; Falk, Samantha J.; Black, Ben E.; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Structural dynamics of nucleic acid and protein is an important physical basis of their functions. These motions are often very difficult to synchronize and too fast to be clearly resolved with the currently available single molecule methods. Here we demonstrate a novel hybrid single molecule approach combining stochastic data analysis with fluorescence correlation that enables investigations of sub-ms unsynchronized structural dynamics of macromolecules. Based on the method, we report the first direct evidence of spontaneous DNA motions at the nucleosome termini. The nucleosome, comprising DNA and a histone core, is the fundamental packing unit of eukaryotic genes that must be accessed during various genome transactions. Spontaneous DNA opening at the nucleosome termini has long been hypothesized to enable gene access in the nucleosome, but has yet to be directly observed. Our approach reveals that DNA termini in the nucleosome open and close repeatedly at 0.1–1 ms−1. The kinetics depends on salt concentration and DNA–histone interactions but not much on DNA sequence, suggesting that this dynamics is universal and imposes the kinetic limit to gene access. These results clearly demonstrate that our method provides an efficient and robust means to investigate unsynchronized structural changes of DNA at a sub-ms time resolution. PMID:26013809

  7. Efficient nanoplasmonic antennas for fabricating single protein molecule detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sharmistha; Dantham, Venkata Ramanaiah; Hussain, Sahid

    2015-06-01

    Real time (label-free) detection and sizing of single protein molecule at its natural state is "holy grail" in biosensing field. This non-destructive technique is useful for predicting the dangerous diseases at very early-stage. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of efficient nanoplasmonic antennas, which could be useful to fabricate an ultrasensitive nanoplasmonic-whispering gallery mode hybrid microresonator for the real time detection and sizing of single protein molecule. This hybrid microresonator could be easily converted as an ultrasensitive single molecule biosensor by anchoring suitable anti-bodies on the surface of the plasmonic nanoantenna.

  8. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  9. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A; Leckband, Deborah E

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  10. Distinct single amino acid replacements in the control of virulence regulator protein differentially impact streptococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Nicola; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Suber, Bryce; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Olsen, Randall J; Flores, Anthony; Musser, James M; Brennan, Richard G; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2011-10-01

    Sequencing of invasive strains of group A streptococci (GAS) has revealed a diverse array of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular mechanisms by which CovR single amino acid replacements impact GAS pathogenesis. The crystal structure of the CovR C-terminal DNA-binding domain was determined to 1.50 Å resolution and revealed a three-stranded β-sheet followed by a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Modeling of the CovR protein-DNA complex indicated that CovR single amino acid replacements observed in clinical GAS isolates could directly alter protein-DNA interaction and impact protein structure. Isoallelic GAS strains that varied by a single amino acid replacement in the CovR DNA binding domain had significantly different transcriptomes compared to wild-type and to each other. Similarly, distinct recombinant CovR variants had differential binding affinity for DNA from the promoter regions of several virulence factor-encoding genes. Finally, mice that were challenged with GAS CovR isoallelic strains had significantly different survival times, which correlated with the transcriptome and protein-DNA binding studies. Taken together, these data provide structural and functional insights into the critical and distinct effects of variation in the CovR protein on GAS pathogenesis. PMID:22028655

  11. Distinct Single Amino Acid Replacements in the Control of Virulence Regulator Protein Differentially Impact Streptococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Nicola; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Suber, Bryce; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Olsen, Randall J.; Flores, Anthony; Musser, James M.; Brennan, Richard G.; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing of invasive strains of group A streptococci (GAS) has revealed a diverse array of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular mechanisms by which CovR single amino acid replacements impact GAS pathogenesis. The crystal structure of the CovR C-terminal DNA-binding domain was determined to 1.50 Å resolution and revealed a three-stranded β-sheet followed by a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Modeling of the CovR protein-DNA complex indicated that CovR single amino acid replacements observed in clinical GAS isolates could directly alter protein-DNA interaction and impact protein structure. Isoallelic GAS strains that varied by a single amino acid replacement in the CovR DNA binding domain had significantly different transcriptomes compared to wild-type and to each other. Similarly, distinct recombinant CovR variants had differential binding affinity for DNA from the promoter regions of several virulence factor-encoding genes. Finally, mice that were challenged with GAS CovR isoallelic strains had significantly different survival times, which correlated with the transcriptome and protein-DNA binding studies. Taken together, these data provide structural and functional insights into the critical and distinct effects of variation in the CovR protein on GAS pathogenesis. PMID:22028655

  12. Single Molecule Approaches in RNA-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Serebrov, Victor; Moore, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions govern every aspect of RNA metabolism, and aberrant RNA-binding proteins are the cause of hundreds of genetic diseases. Quantitative measurements of these interactions are necessary in order to understand mechanisms leading to diseases and to develop efficient therapies. Existing methods of RNA-protein interactome capture can afford a comprehensive snapshot of RNA-protein interaction networks but lack the ability to characterize the dynamics of these interactions. As all ensemble methods, their resolution is also limited by statistical averaging. Here we discuss recent advances in single molecule techniques that have the potential to tackle these challenges. We also provide a thorough overview of single molecule colocalization microscopy and the essential protein and RNA tagging and detection techniques. PMID:27256383

  13. Single-molecule imaging studies of protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareh, Shannon Kian G.

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for studying biological events. The work of this thesis primarily focuses on single molecule studies of the dynamics of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and other fluorescent-labeled proteins by utilizing Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and imaging. The single molecule experiments of this thesis covered three broad topics. First, the adsorption mechanisms of proteins onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic fused silica surfaces were imaged and reversible and irreversible adsorption mechanisms were observed. The second topic covered a new technique for measuring the diffusion coefficient of Brownian diffusing proteins, in particular GFP, in solution via a single image. The corresponding experiments showed a relationship between the intensity profile width and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing molecules. The third topic covered an in vivo experiment involving imaging and quantifying prokaryotic cell metabolism protein dynamics inside the Bacillus subtilis bacteria, in which a helical diffusion pattern for the protein was observed. These topics are presented in the chronological order of the experiments conducted.

  14. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging SM advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display6 or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide (PAA) thin film to construct a random SM array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies)7 and analyzed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimeter. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured based on the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and antibody binding profiling, were demonstrated. SMI-Seq enables “library vs. library” screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity. PMID:25252978

  15. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Christopher P; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A J; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach termed RNA Tagging that enables the user to identify protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or cross-linking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA via high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The results showed that although RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also 'sample' RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We used the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. RNA Tagging is well suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  16. Real-time single-molecule observations of proteins at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Blake Brianna

    Non-specific protein adsorption to solid surfaces is pervasive and observed across a broad spectrum of applications including biomaterials, separations, pharmaceuticals, and biosensing. Despite great interest in and considerable literature dedicated to the phenomena, a mechanistic understanding of this complex phenomena is lacking and remains controversial, partially due to the limits of ensemble-averaging techniques used to study it. Single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods allow us to study distinct protein dynamics (e.g. adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and intermolecular associations) on a molecule-by-molecule basis revealing the protein population and spatial heterogeneity inherent in protein interfacial behavior. By employing single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM-TIRFM), we have developed SMT methods to directly observe protein interfacial dynamics at the solid-liquid interface to build a better mechanistic understanding of protein adsorption. First, we examined the effects of surface chemistry (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bonding capacity), temperature, and electrostatics on isolated protein desorption and interfacial diffusion for fibrinogen (Fg) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Next, we directly and indirectly probed the effects of protein-protein interactions on interfacial desorption, diffusion, aggregation, and surface spatial heterogeneity on model and polymeric thin films. These studies provided many useful insights into interfacial protein dynamics including the following observations. First, protein adsorption was reversible, with the majority of proteins desorbing from all surface chemistries within seconds. Isolated protein-surface interactions were relatively weak on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces (apparent desorption activation energies of only a few kBT). However, proteins could dynamically and reversibly associate at the interface, and these interfacial associations led to proteins remaining on the

  17. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chait, Brian T.; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P.; Shi, Yi

    2016-04-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope.

  18. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering. PMID:26659058

  19. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chait, Brian T.; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P.; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope.

  20. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chait, Brian T; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27080007

  1. Single molecule surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C.; Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2004-06-01

    One of the most intriguing findings in single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) is the observation of Raman spectra of individual molecules, despite the small cross section of the transitions involved. The observation of the spectra can be explained by the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERRS) effect. At the single-molecule level, the SERRS-spectra recorded as a function of time reveal inhomogeneous behaviour such as on/off blinking, spectral diffusion, intensity fluctuations of vibrational line, and even splitting of some lines within the spectrum of one molecule. Single-molecule SERRS (SM-SERRS) spectroscopy opens up exciting opportunities in the field of biophysics and biomedical spectroscopy. The first example of single protein SERRS was performed on hemoglobin. However, the possibility of extracting the heme group by silver sols can not be excluded. Here we report on SM-SERRS spectra of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in which the chromophore is kept in the protein. The time series of SM-SERRS spectra suggest the conversion of the EGFP chromophore between the deprotonated and the protonated form. Autocorrelation analysis of SM-SERRS trajectory reveals the presence of fast dynamics taking place in the protein. Our findings show the potential of the technique to study structural dynamics of protein molecules.

  2. Electrophoretic analysis of proteins from single bovine muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Young, O A; Davey, C L

    1981-01-01

    A number of single fibres were isolated by dissection of four bovine masseter (ma) muscles, three rectus abdominis (ra) muscles and eight sternomandibularis (sm) muscles. By histochemical criteria these muscles contain respectively, solely slow fibres (often called type I), predominantly fast fibres (type II), and a mixture of fast and slow. The fibres were analysed by conventional sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and the gels stained with Coomassie Blue. Irrespective of the muscle, every fibre could be classed into one of two broad groups based on the mobility of proteins in the range 135000-170000 daltons. When zones containing myosin heavy chain were cut from the single-fibre gel tracks and 'mapped' [Cleveland, Fischer, Kirschner & Laemmli (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 1102-1106] with Staphylococcus proteinase, it was found that one group always contained fast myosin heavy chain, whereas the second group always contained the slow form. Moreover, a relatively fast-migrating alpha-tropomyosin was associated with the fast myosin group and a slow-migrating form with the slow myosin group. All fibres also contained beta-tropomyosin; the coexistence of alpha- and beta-tropomyosin is at variance with evidence that alpha-tropomyosin is restricted to fast fibres [Dhoot & Perry (1979) Nature (London) 278, 714-718]. Fast fibres containing the expected fast light chains and troponins I and C fast were identified in the three ra muscles, but in only four sm muscles. In three other sm muscles, all the fast fibres contained two troponins I and an additional myosin light chain that was more typical of myosin light chain 1 slow. The remaining sm muscle contained a fast fibre type that was similar to the first type, except that its myosin light chain 1 was more typical of the slow polymorph. Troponin T was bimorphic in all fast fibres from a ra muscles and in at least some fast fibres from one sm muscle. Peptide 'mapping' revealed two forms of fast myosin

  3. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  4. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  5. Complement activation and cytokine response by BioProtein, a bacterial single cell protein.

    PubMed

    Sikkeland, L I B; Thorgersen, E B; Haug, T; Mollnes, T E

    2007-04-01

    The bacterial single cell protein (BSCP), BioProtein, is dried bacterial mass derived from fermentation of the gram negative bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus, used for animal and fish feed. Workers in this industry suffer frequently from pulmonary and systemic symptoms which may be induced by an inflammatory reaction. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BSCP on inflammation in vitro as evaluated by complement activation and cytokine production. Human serum was incubated with BSCP and complement activation products specific for all pathways were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Human whole blood anti-coagulated with lepirudin was incubated with BSCP and a panel of 27 biological mediators was measured using multiplex technology. BSCP induced a dose-dependent complement activation as revealed by a pronounced increase in alternative and terminal pathway activation (fivefold and 20-fold, respectively) at doses from 1 microg BSCP/ml serum and a similar, but less extensive (two- to fourfold) increase in activation of the lectin and classical pathways at doses from 100 and 1000 microg BSCP/ml serum, respectively. Similarly, BSCP induced a dose-dependent production of a number of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in human whole blood. At doses as low as 0 x 05-0 x 5 microg BSCP/ml blood a substantial increase was seen for tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1-beta, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, IL-4, IL-9, IL-17, IL-1Ra, granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, BSCP induced a substantial activation of all three initial complement pathways as well as a pronounced cytokine response in vitro, indicating a potent inflammatory property of this agent. PMID:17302729

  6. Graphlet-based edge clustering reveals pathogen-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Solava, R. W.; Michaels, R. P.; Milenković, T.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Prediction of protein function from protein interaction networks has received attention in the post-genomic era. A popular strategy has been to cluster the network into functionally coherent groups of proteins and assign the entire cluster with a function based on functions of its annotated members. Traditionally, network research has focused on clustering of nodes. However, clustering of edges may be preferred: nodes belong to multiple functional groups, but clustering of nodes typically cannot capture the group overlap, while clustering of edges can. Clustering of adjacent edges that share many neighbors was proposed recently, outperforming different node clustering methods. However, since some biological processes can have characteristic ‘signatures’ throughout the network, not just locally, it may be of interest to consider edges that are not necessarily adjacent. Results: We design a sensitive measure of the ‘topological similarity’ of edges that can deal with edges that are not necessarily adjacent. We cluster edges that are similar according to our measure in different baker's yeast protein interaction networks, outperforming existing node and edge clustering approaches. We apply our approach to the human network to predict new pathogen-interacting proteins. This is important, since these proteins represent drug target candidates. Availability: Software executables are freely available upon request. Contact: tmilenko@nd.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22962470

  7. Single molecule analysis reveals reversible and irreversible steps during spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Aaron A; Rodgers, Margaret L; Friedman, Larry J; Gelles, Jeff; Moore, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome is a complex machine composed of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and accessory proteins that excises introns from pre-mRNAs. After assembly the spliceosome is activated for catalysis by rearrangement of subunits to form an active site. How this rearrangement is coordinated is not well-understood. During activation, U4 must be released to allow U6 conformational change, while Prp19 complex (NTC) recruitment is essential for stabilizing the active site. We used multi-wavelength colocalization single molecule spectroscopy to directly observe the key events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome activation. Following binding of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP, the spliceosome either reverses assembly by discarding tri-snRNP or proceeds to activation by irreversible U4 loss. The major pathway for NTC recruitment occurs after U4 release. ATP stimulates both the competing U4 release and tri-snRNP discard processes. The data reveal the activation mechanism and show that overall splicing efficiency may be maintained through repeated rounds of disassembly and tri-snRNP reassociation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14166.001 PMID:27244240

  8. Single Nucleus Genome Sequencing Reveals High Similarity among Nuclei of an Endomycorrhizal Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Ivanov, Sergey; Saunders, Diane G. O.; Mu, Desheng; Pang, Erli; Cao, Huifen; Cha, Hwangho; Lin, Tao; Zhou, Qian; Shang, Yi; Li, Ying; Sharma, Trupti; van Velzen, Robin; de Ruijter, Norbert; Aanen, Duur K.; Win, Joe; Kamoun, Sophien; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René; Huang, Sanwen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi have been described as highly diverse due to their asexual nature and absence of a single cell stage with only one nucleus. This has raised fundamental questions concerning speciation, selection and transmission of the genetic make-up to next generations. Although this concept has become textbook knowledge, it is only based on studying a few loci, including 45S rDNA. To provide a more comprehensive insight into the genetic makeup of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi, we applied de novo genome sequencing of individual nuclei of Rhizophagus irregularis. This revealed a surprisingly low level of polymorphism between nuclei. In contrast, within a nucleus, the 45S rDNA repeat unit turned out to be highly diverged. This finding demystifies a long-lasting hypothesis on the complex genetic makeup of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi. Subsequent genome assembly resulted in the first draft reference genome sequence of an arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungus. Its length is 141 Mbps, representing over 27,000 protein-coding gene models. We used the genomic sequence to reinvestigate the phylogenetic relationships of Rhizophagus irregularis with other fungal phyla. This unambiguously demonstrated that Glomeromycota are more closely related to Mucoromycotina than to its postulated sister Dikarya. PMID:24415955

  9. Single-molecule protein sequencing through fingerprinting: computational assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Docter, Margreet; van Ginkel, Jetty; de Ridder, Dick; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-10-01

    Proteins are vital in all biological systems as they constitute the main structural and functional components of cells. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have brought the promise of complete proteomics by helping draft the human proteome. Yet, this commonly used protein sequencing technique has fundamental limitations in sensitivity. Here we propose a method for single-molecule (SM) protein sequencing. A major challenge lies in the fact that proteins are composed of 20 different amino acids, which demands 20 molecular reporters. We computationally demonstrate that it suffices to measure only two types of amino acids to identify proteins and suggest an experimental scheme using SM fluorescence. When achieved, this highly sensitive approach will result in a paradigm shift in proteomics, with major impact in the biological and medical sciences.

  10. Revealing divergent evolution, identifying circular permutations and detecting active-sites by protein structure comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luonan; Wu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein structure comparison is one of the most important problems in computational biology and plays a key role in protein structure prediction, fold family classification, motif finding, phylogenetic tree reconstruction and protein docking. Results We propose a novel method to compare the protein structures in an accurate and efficient manner. Such a method can be used to not only reveal divergent evolution, but also identify circular permutations and further detect active-sites. Specifically, we define the structure alignment as a multi-objective optimization problem, i.e., maximizing the number of aligned atoms and minimizing their root mean square distance. By controlling a single distance-related parameter, theoretically we can obtain a variety of optimal alignments corresponding to different optimal matching patterns, i.e., from a large matching portion to a small matching portion. The number of variables in our algorithm increases with the number of atoms of protein pairs in almost a linear manner. In addition to solid theoretical background, numerical experiments demonstrated significant improvement of our approach over the existing methods in terms of quality and efficiency. In particular, we show that divergent evolution, circular permutations and active-sites (or structural motifs) can be identified by our method. The software SAMO is available upon request from the authors, or from and . Conclusion A novel formulation is proposed to accurately align protein structures in the framework of multi-objective optimization, based on a sequence order-independent strategy. A fast and accurate algorithm based on the bipartite matching algorithm is developed by exploiting the special features. Convergence of computation is shown in experiments and is also theoretically proven. PMID:16948858

  11. Protein interactome reveals converging molecular pathways among autism disorders.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasunari; Shaw, Chad A; Dawson, Brian C; Dugas, Diana V; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina; Hill, David E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2011-06-01

    To uncover shared pathogenic mechanisms among the highly heterogeneous autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), we developed a protein interaction network that identified hundreds of new interactions among proteins encoded by ASD-associated genes. We discovered unexpectedly high connectivity between SHANK and TSC1, previously implicated in syndromic autism, suggesting that common molecular pathways underlie autistic phenotypes in distinct syndromes. ASD patients were more likely to harbor copy number variations that encompass network genes than were control subjects. We also identified, in patients with idiopathic ASD, three de novo lesions (deletions in 16q23.3 and 15q22 and one duplication in Xq28) that involve three network genes (NECAB2, PKM2, and FLNA). The protein interaction network thus provides a framework for identifying causes of idiopathic autism and for understanding molecular pathways that underpin both syndromic and idiopathic ASDs. PMID:21653829

  12. Single molecule fluorescence experiments determine protein folding transition path times

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoi Sung; McHale, Kevin; Louis, John M.; Eaton, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free-energy barrier between two states. It is a single-molecule property that contains all the mechanistic information on how a process occurs. As a step toward observing transition paths in protein folding we determined the average transition-path time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule Förster-resonance-energy-transfer experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by a factor of 10,000, the transition-path times differ by less than a factor of 5, showing that a fast-and a slow-folding protein take almost the same time to fold when folding actually happens. A very simple model based on energy landscape theory can explain this result. PMID:22363011

  13. Retention of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein on single-stranded DNA columns requires the HSV-1 ICP8 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, L S; Albright, A G; Ruyechan, W T; Jenkins, F J

    1994-01-01

    The UL37 and ICP8 proteins present in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected-cell extracts produced at 24 h postinfection coeluted from single-stranded-DNA-cellulose columns. Experiments carried out with the UL37 protein expressed by a vaccinia virus recombinant (V37) revealed that the UL37 protein did not exhibit DNA-binding activity in the absence of other HSV proteins. Analysis of extracts derived from cells coinfected with V37 and an ICP8-expressing vaccinia virus recombinant (V8) and analysis of extracts prepared from cells infected with the HSV-1 ICP8 deletion mutants d21 and n10 revealed that the retention of the UL37 protein on single-stranded DNA columns required a DNA-binding-competent ICP8 protein. Images PMID:8254765

  14. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  15. Surface Passivation for Single-molecule Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chandradoss, Stanley D.; Haagsma, Anna C.; Lee, Young Kwang; Hwang, Jae-Ho; Nam, Jwa-Min; Joo, Chirlmin

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be instrumental in understanding a wide range of biological phenomena at the nanoscale. Important examples of what this technique can yield to biological sciences are the mechanistic insights on protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. When interactions of proteins are probed at the single-molecule level, the proteins or their substrates are often immobilized on a glass surface, which allows for a long-term observation. This immobilization scheme may introduce unwanted surface artifacts. Therefore, it is essential to passivate the glass surface to make it inert. Surface coating using polyethylene glycol (PEG) stands out for its high performance in preventing proteins from non-specifically interacting with a glass surface. However, the polymer coating procedure is difficult, due to the complication arising from a series of surface treatments and the stringent requirement that a surface needs to be free of any fluorescent molecules at the end of the procedure. Here, we provide a robust protocol with step-by-step instructions. It covers surface cleaning including piranha etching, surface functionalization with amine groups, and finally PEG coating. To obtain a high density of a PEG layer, we introduce a new strategy of treating the surface with PEG molecules over two rounds, which remarkably improves the quality of passivation. We provide representative results as well as practical advice for each critical step so that anyone can achieve the high quality surface passivation. PMID:24797261

  16. Genetically targeted single-channel optical recording reveals multiple Orai1 gating states and oscillations in calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Dynes, Joseph L; Amcheslavsky, Anna; Cahalan, Michael D

    2016-01-12

    Orai1 comprises the pore-forming subunit of the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel. When bound and activated by stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium sensor, Orai1 channels possess high selectivity for calcium but extremely small conductance that has precluded direct recording of single-channel currents. We have developed an approach to visualize Orai1 activity by fusing Orai1 to fluorescent, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). The GECI-Orai1 probes reveal local Ca(2+) influx at STIM1-Orai1 puncta. By whole cell recording, these fusions are fully functional as CRAC channels. When GECI-Orai1 and the CRAC-activating domain (CAD) of STIM1 were coexpressed at low levels and imaged using a total internal reflectance fluorescence microscope, cells exhibited sporadic fluorescence transients the size of diffraction-limited spots and the brightness of a few activated GECI proteins. Transients typically rose rapidly and fell into two classes according to duration: briefer "flickers" lasting only a few hundred milliseconds, and longer "pulses" lasting one to several seconds. The size, intensity, trace shape, frequency, distribution, physiological characteristics, and association with CAD binding together demonstrate that GECI-Orai1 fluorescence transients correspond to single-channel Orai1 responses. Single Orai1 channels gated by CAD, and small Orai1 puncta gated by STIM1, exhibit repetitive fluctuations in single-channel output. CAD binding supports a role in open state maintenance and reveals a second phase of CAD/STIM1 binding after channel opening. These first recordings of single-channel Orai1 currents reveal unexpected dynamics, and when paired with CAD association, support multiple single-channel states. PMID:26712003

  17. Genetically targeted single-channel optical recording reveals multiple Orai1 gating states and oscillations in calcium influx

    PubMed Central

    Dynes, Joseph L.; Amcheslavsky, Anna; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Orai1 comprises the pore-forming subunit of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel. When bound and activated by stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium sensor, Orai1 channels possess high selectivity for calcium but extremely small conductance that has precluded direct recording of single-channel currents. We have developed an approach to visualize Orai1 activity by fusing Orai1 to fluorescent, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). The GECI–Orai1 probes reveal local Ca2+ influx at STIM1–Orai1 puncta. By whole cell recording, these fusions are fully functional as CRAC channels. When GECI–Orai1 and the CRAC-activating domain (CAD) of STIM1 were coexpressed at low levels and imaged using a total internal reflectance fluorescence microscope, cells exhibited sporadic fluorescence transients the size of diffraction-limited spots and the brightness of a few activated GECI proteins. Transients typically rose rapidly and fell into two classes according to duration: briefer “flickers” lasting only a few hundred milliseconds, and longer “pulses” lasting one to several seconds. The size, intensity, trace shape, frequency, distribution, physiological characteristics, and association with CAD binding together demonstrate that GECI–Orai1 fluorescence transients correspond to single-channel Orai1 responses. Single Orai1 channels gated by CAD, and small Orai1 puncta gated by STIM1, exhibit repetitive fluctuations in single-channel output. CAD binding supports a role in open state maintenance and reveals a second phase of CAD/STIM1 binding after channel opening. These first recordings of single-channel Orai1 currents reveal unexpected dynamics, and when paired with CAD association, support multiple single-channel states. PMID:26712003

  18. Rational engineering of single-chain polypeptides into protein-only, BBB-targeted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Serna, Naroa; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Saccardo, Paolo; Xu, Zhikun; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Roldán, Mónica; Mangues, Ramón; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2016-07-01

    A single chain polypeptide containing the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) ligand Seq-1 with blood-brain barrier (BBB) crossing activity has been successfully modified by conventional genetic engineering to self-assemble into stable protein-only nanoparticles of 30nm. The nanoparticulate presentation dramatically enhances in vitro, LDLR-dependent cell penetrability compared to the parental monomeric version, but the assembled protein does not show any enhanced brain targeting upon systemic administration. While the presentation of protein drugs in form of nanoparticles is in general advantageous regarding correct biodistribution, this principle might not apply to brain targeting that is hampered by particular bio-physical barriers. Irrespective of this fact, which is highly relevant to the nanomedicine of central nervous system, engineering the cationic character of defined protein stretches is revealed here as a promising and generic approach to promote the controlled oligomerization of biologically active protein species as still functional, regular nanoparticles. PMID:26949165

  19. A single amino acid substitution results in a retinoblastoma protein defective in phosphorylation and oncoprotein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.J.; Gerster, J.L. Uniformed Services Univ. of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD ); Kratzke, R.A. ); Horowitz, J.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have previously identified a small-cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H209) that expresses an aberrant, underphosphorylated form of the retinoblastoma protein RB1. Molecular analysis of RB1 mRNA from this cell line revealed a single point mutation within exon 21 that resulted in a nonconservative amino acid substitution (cysteine to phenylalanine) at codon 706. Stable expression of this mutant RB1 cDNA in a human cell line lacking endogenous RB1 demonstrated that this amino acid change was sufficient to inhibit phosphorylation. In addition, this cysteine-to-phenylalanine substitution also resulted in loss of RB1 binding to the simian virus 40 large tumor and adenovirus E1A transforming proteins. These results confirm the importance of exon 21 coding sequences and suggest that the cysteine residue at codon 706 may play a role in achieving a specific protein conformation essential for protein-protein interactions.

  20. Single-molecule analysis reveals self assembly and nanoscale segregation of two distinct cavin subcomplexes on caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Gambin, Yann; Ariotti, Nicholas; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Bastiani, Michele; Sierecki, Emma; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Magenau, Astrid; Jung, WooRam; Okano, Satomi; Zhou, Yong; Leneva, Natalya; Mureev, Sergey; Johnston, Wayne; Gaus, Katharina; Hancock, John F; Collins, Brett M; Alexandrov, Kirill; Parton, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells three closely related cavin proteins cooperate with the scaffolding protein caveolin to form membrane invaginations known as caveolae. Here we have developed a novel single-molecule fluorescence approach to directly observe interactions and stoichiometries in protein complexes from cell extracts and from in vitro synthesized components. We show that up to 50 cavins associate on a caveola. However, rather than forming a single coat complex containing the three cavin family members, single-molecule analysis reveals an exquisite specificity of interactions between cavin1, cavin2 and cavin3. Changes in membrane tension can flatten the caveolae, causing the release of the cavin coat and its disassembly into separate cavin1-cavin2 and cavin1-cavin3 subcomplexes. Each of these subcomplexes contain 9 ± 2 cavin molecules and appear to be the building blocks of the caveolar coat. High resolution immunoelectron microscopy suggests a remarkable nanoscale organization of these separate subcomplexes, forming individual striations on the surface of caveolae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01434.001 PMID:24473072

  1. Single-molecule studies reveal the function of a third polymerase in the replisome

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Kurth, Isabel; O'Donnell, Mike E

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli replisome contains three polymerases, one more than necessary to duplicate the two parental strands. Using single-molecule studies, we reveal two advantages conferred by the third polymerase. First, dipolymerase replisomes are inefficient at synthesizing lagging strands, leaving single-strand gaps, whereas tripolymerase replisomes fill strands almost to completion. Second, tripolymerase replisomes are much more processive than dipolymerase replisomes. These features account for the unexpected three-polymerase-structure of bacterial replisomes. PMID:22157955

  2. Single chromosome transcriptional profiling reveals chromosome-level regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Marshall J.; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Here we report iceFISH, a multiplex imaging method for measuring gene expression and chromosome structure simultaneously on single chromosomes. We demonstrate that chromosomal translocations can alter transcription chromosome-wide, finding substantial differences in transcriptional frequency between genes located on a translocated chromosome in comparison to the normal chromosome in the same cell. Examination of correlations between genes on a single chromosome revealed a cis chromosome-level transcriptional interaction spanning 14.3 megabases. PMID:23416756

  3. The dark energy of proteins comes to light: conformational entropy and its role in protein function revealed by NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wand, A Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Historically it has been virtually impossible to experimentally determine the contribution of residual protein entropy to fundamental protein activities such as the binding of ligands. Recent progress has illuminated the possibility of employing NMR relaxation methods to quantitatively determine the role of changes in conformational entropy in molecular recognition by proteins. The method rests on using fast internal protein dynamics as a proxy. Initial results reveal a large and variable role for conformational entropy in the binding of ligands by proteins. Such a role for conformational entropy in molecular recognition has significant implications for enzymology, signal transduction, allosteric regulation and the development of protein-directed pharmaceuticals. PMID:23246280

  4. Spin-dependent electron transport in protein-like single-helical molecules

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of spin-dependent electron transport through single-helical molecules connected by two nonmagnetic electrodes, and explain the experiment of significant spin-selective phenomenon observed in α-helical protein and the contradictory results between the protein and single-stranded DNA. Our results reveal that the α-helical protein is an efficient spin filter and the spin polarization is robust against the disorder. These results are in excellent agreement with recent experiments [Mishra D, et al. (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(37):14872–14876; Göhler B, et al. (2011) Science 331(6019):894–897] and may facilitate engineering of chiral-based spintronic devices. PMID:25071198

  5. Single-cell genomics reveal low recombination frequencies in freshwater bacteria of the SAR11 clade

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The SAR11 group of Alphaproteobacteria is highly abundant in the oceans. It contains a recently diverged freshwater clade, which offers the opportunity to compare adaptations to salt- and freshwaters in a monophyletic bacterial group. However, there are no cultivated members of the freshwater SAR11 group and no genomes have been sequenced yet. Results We isolated ten single SAR11 cells from three freshwater lakes and sequenced and assembled their genomes. A phylogeny based on 57 proteins indicates that the cells are organized into distinct microclusters. We show that the freshwater genomes have evolved primarily by the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions and that they have among the lowest ratio of recombination to mutation estimated for bacteria. In contrast, members of the marine SAR11 clade have one of the highest ratios. Additional metagenome reads from six lakes confirm low recombination frequencies for the genome overall and reveal lake-specific variations in microcluster abundances. We identify hypervariable regions with gene contents broadly similar to those in the hypervariable regions of the marine isolates, containing genes putatively coding for cell surface molecules. Conclusions We conclude that recombination rates differ dramatically in phylogenetic sister groups of the SAR11 clade adapted to freshwater and marine ecosystems. The results suggest that the transition from marine to freshwater systems has purged diversity and resulted in reduced opportunities for recombination with divergent members of the clade. The low recombination frequencies of the LD12 clade resemble the low genetic divergence of host-restricted pathogens that have recently shifted to a new host. PMID:24286338

  6. Charged single alpha-helices in proteomes revealed by a consensus prediction approach.

    PubMed

    Gáspári, Zoltán; Süveges, Dániel; Perczel, András; Nyitray, László; Tóth, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    Charged single α-helices (CSAHs) constitute a recently recognized protein structural motif. Its presence and role is characterized in only a few proteins. To explore its general features, a comprehensive study is necessary. We have set up a consensus prediction method available as a web service (at http://csahserver.chem.elte.hu) and downloadable scripts capable of predicting CSAHs from protein sequences. Using our method, we have performed a comprehensive search on the UniProt database. We found that the motif is very rare but seems abundant in proteins involved in symbiosis and RNA binding/processing. Although there are related proteins with CSAH segments, the motif shows no deep conservation in protein families. We conclude that CSAH-containing proteins, although rare, are involved in many key biological processes. Their conservation pattern and prevalence in symbiosis-associated proteins suggest that they might be subjects of relatively rapid molecular evolution and thus can contribute to the emergence of novel functions. PMID:22310480

  7. Quantification of protein copy number in single mitochondria: The Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoxiang; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Xu, Jingyi; Zheng, Yan; Han, Jinyan; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-12-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins, represented by antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and proapoptotic protein Bax, are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. To build a quantitative model of how Bcl-2 family protein interactions control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent cytochrome c release, it is essential to know the number of proteins in individual mitochondria. Here, we report an effective method to quantify the copy number and distribution of proteins in single mitochondria via immunofluorescent labeling and sensitive detection by a laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Mitochondria isolated from HeLa cells were stained with Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488)-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically targeting Bcl-2 or Bax and with nucleic acid dye. A series of fluorescent nanospheres with fluorescence intensity calibrated in the unit of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF)-AF488 were used to construct a calibration curve for converting the immunofluorescence of a single mitochondrion to the number of antibodies bound to it and then to the number of proteins per mitochondrion. Under the normal condition, the measured mean copy numbers were 1300 and 220 per mitochondrion for Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. A significant variation in protein copy number was identified, which ranged from 130 to 6000 (2.5-97.5%) for Bcl-2 and from 65 to 700 (2.5-97.5%) for Bax, respectively. We observed an approximately 4.4 fold increase of Bax copy number per mitochondrion upon 9h of apoptosis stimulation while the abundance of Bcl-2 remained almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bcl-2 family protein copy number and variance in single mitochondria. Collectively, we demonstrate that the HSFCM-based immunoassay provides a rapid and sensitive method for determining protein copy number distribution in single mitochondria. PMID:26176207

  8. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, P.A.; Pebay-Peyroula, E.

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  9. Electrochemical atomic force microscopy imaging of redox-immunomarked proteins on native potyviruses: from subparticle to single-protein resolution.

    PubMed

    Nault, Laurent; Taofifenua, Cécilia; Anne, Agnès; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Besong-Ndika, Jane; Cardinale, Daniela; Carette, Noëlle; Michon, Thierry; Walter, Jocelyne

    2015-05-26

    We show herein that electrochemical atomic force microscopy (AFM-SECM), operated in molecule touching (Mt) mode and combined with redox immunomarking, enables the in situ mapping of the distribution of proteins on individual virus particles and makes localization of individual viral proteins possible. Acquisition of a topography image allows isolated virus particles to be identified and structurally characterized, while simultaneous acquisition of a current image allows the sought after protein, marked by redox antibodies, to be selectively located. We concomitantly show that Mt/AFM-SECM, due to its single-particle resolution, can also uniquely reveal the way redox functionalization endowed to viral particles is distributed both statistically among the viruses and spatially over individual virus particles. This possibility makes Mt/AFM-SECM a unique tool for viral nanotechnology. PMID:25905663

  10. Monitoring protein synthesis in single live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengyi; Santo, Loredana; Mishima, Yuko; Raje, Noopur; Smilansky, Zeev; Zoldan, Janet

    2016-05-16

    Protein synthesis is generally under sophisticated and dynamic regulation to meet the ever-changing demands of a cell. Global up or down-regulation of protein synthesis and the shift of protein synthesis location (as shown, for example, during cellular stress or viral infection) are recognized as cellular responses to environmental changes such as nutrient/oxygen deprivation or to alterations such as pathological mutations in cancer cells. Monitoring protein synthesis in single live cells can be a powerful tool for cancer research. Here we employed a microfluidic platform to perform high throughput delivery of fluorescent labeled tRNAs into multiple myeloma cells with high transfection efficiency (∼45%) and high viability (>80%). We show that the delivered tRNAs were actively recruited to the ER for protein synthesis and that treatment with puromycin effectively disrupted this process. Interestingly, we observed the scattered distribution of tRNAs in cells undergoing mitosis, which has not been previously reported. Fluorescence lifetime analysis detected extensive FRET signals generated from tRNAs labeled as FRET pairs, further confirming that the delivered tRNAs were used by active ribosomes for protein translation. Our work demonstrates that the microfluidic delivery of FRET labeled tRNAs into living cancer cells can provide new insights into basic cancer metabolism and has the potential to serve as a platform for drug screening, diagnostics, or personalized medication. PMID:26956582

  11. Diffusion of human Replication Protein A along single stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Sokoloski, Joshua; Galletto, Roberto; Elson, Elliot L.; Wold, Marc S.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single stranded (ss) DNA binding protein that plays critical roles in most aspects of genome maintenance, including replication, recombination and repair. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, destabilizes DNA secondary structure and facilitates binding of other proteins to ssDNA. However, RPA must be removed from or redistributed along ssDNA during these processes. To probe the dynamics of RPA-DNA interactions, we combined ensemble and single molecule fluorescence approaches to examine human RPA diffusion along ssDNA and find that an hRPA hetero-trimer can diffuse rapidly along ssDNA. Diffusion of hRPA is functional in that it provides the mechanism by which hRPA can transiently disrupt DNA hairpins by diffusing in from ssDNA regions adjacent to the DNA hairpin. hRPA diffusion was also monitored by the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity of a Cy3 fluorophore attached to the end of ssDNA. Using a novel method to calibrate the Cy3 fluorescence intensity as a function of hRPA position on the ssDNA, we estimate a one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of hRPA on ssDNA of D1 ~5000 nucleotide2s−1 at 37°C. Diffusion of hRPA while bound to ssDNA enables it to be readily repositioned to allow other proteins access to ssDNA. PMID:25058683

  12. Atomic force microscopy reveals a dual collagen-binding activity for the staphylococcal surface protein SdrF.

    PubMed

    Herman-Bausier, Philippe; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis causes nosocomial infections by colonizing and forming biofilms on indwelling medical devices. This process involves specific interactions between cell wall-anchored (CWA) proteins and host proteins adsorbed onto the biomaterial. Here, we have explored the molecular forces by which the S. epidermidis CWA protein serine-aspartate repeat protein F (SdrF) binds to type I collagen, by means of advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we found that SdrF mediates bacterial adhesion to collagen-coated substrates through both weak and strong bonds. Single-molecule force spectroscopy demonstrated that these bonds involve the A and B regions of SdrF, thus revealing that the protein is capable of dual ligand-binding activity. Both weak and strong bonds showed high dissociation rates, indicating they are much less stable than those formed by the well-characterized 'dock, lock and latch' mechanism. Collectively, our results show that CWA proteins can bind to ligands by novel mechanisms. We anticipate that AFM will greatly contribute to the identification of novel binding partners and binding mechanisms in staphylococcal CWA proteins. PMID:26481199

  13. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  14. Transcriptional abundance is not the single force driving the evolution of bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Results Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Conclusions Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution. PMID:23914835

  15. Proteomic Approach to Reveal the Proteins Associated with Encystment of the Ciliate Euplotes encysticus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiwu; Gao, Xiuxia; Wang, Bangzheng; Chen, Fenfen; Wu, Na; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify and reveal the proteins related to encystment of the ciliate Euplotes encysticus, we analyzed variation in the abundance of the proteins isolated from the resting cyst comparing with proteins in the vegetative cell. 2-D electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF MS techniques and Bioinformatics were used for proteome separation, quantification and identification. The comparative proteomics studies revealed 26 proteins with changes on the expression in the resting cysts, including 12 specific proteins and 14 differential proteins. 12 specific proteins and 10 out of the 14 differential proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The identified specific proteins with known functions included type II cytoskeletal 1, keratin, Nop16 domain containing protein, protein arginine n-methyltransferase, epsilon-trimethyllysine hydroxylase and calpain-like protein. The identified differential proteins with known functions included Lysozyme C, keratinocyte growth factor, lysozyme homolog AT-2, formate acetyltransferase, alpha S1 casein and cold-shock protein. We discussed the functions of these proteins as well as their contribution in the process of encystment. These identified proteins covered a wide range of molecular functions, including gene regulation, RNA regulation, proteins degradation and oxidation resistance, stress response, material transport and cytoskeleton organization. Therefore, differential expression of these proteins was essential for cell morphological and physiological changes during encystment. This suggested that the peculiar proteins and differential proteins might play important roles in the process of the vegetative cells transforming into the resting cysts. These observations may be novel findings that bring new insights into the detailed mechanisms of dormancy. PMID:24837719

  16. Single-Axonal Organelle Analysis Method Reveals New Protein–Motor Associations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Axonal transport of synaptic vesicle proteins is required to maintain neurons’ ability to communicate via synaptic transmission. Neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles are assembled at synaptic terminals via highly regulated endocytosis of membrane proteins. These synaptic vesicle membrane proteins are synthesized in the cell body and transported to synapses in carrier vesicles that make their way down axons via microtubule-based transport utilizing kinesin molecular motors. Identifying the cargos that each kinesin motor protein carries from the cell bodies to the synapse is key to understanding both diseases caused by motor protein dysfunction and how synaptic vesicles are assembled. However, obtaining a bulk sample of axonal transport complexes from central nervous system (CNS) neurons to use for identification of their contents has posed a challenge to researchers. To obtain axonal carrier vesicles from primary cultured neurons, we fabricated a microfluidic chip designed to physically isolate axons from dendrites and cell bodies and developed a method to remove bulk axonal samples and label their contents. Synaptic vesicle protein carrier vesicles in these samples were labeled with antibodies to the synaptic vesicle proteins p38, SV2A, and VAMP2, and the anterograde axonal transport motor KIF1A, after which antibody overlap was evaluated using single-organelle TIRF microscopy. This work confirms a previously discovered association between KIF1A and p38 and shows that KIF1A also transports SV2A- and VAMP2-containing carrier vesicles. PMID:23421679

  17. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: in search for new functions.

    PubMed

    Tomáska, L; Nosek, J; Kucejová, B

    2001-02-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, genes encoding proteins involved in the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been transferred from the endosymbiont into the host genome. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding (mtSSB) proteins serve as an excellent argument supporting this aspect of the endosymbiotic theory. The crystal structure of the human mtSSB, together with an abundance of biochemical and genetic data, revealed several exciting features of mtSSB proteins and enabled a detailed comparison with their prokaryotic counterparts. Moreover, identification of a novel member of the mtSSB family, mitochondrial telomere-binding protein of the yeast Candida parapsilosis, has raised interesting questions regarding mtDNA metabolism and evolution. PMID:11308016

  18. Single-cell ChIP-seq reveals cell subpopulations defined by chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Assaf; Ram, Oren; Shoresh, Noam; Sperling, Ralph A.; Goren, Alon; Weitz, David A.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin profiling provides a versatile means to investigate functional genomic elements and their regulation. However, current methods yield ensemble profiles that are insensitive to cell-to-cell variation. Here we combine microfluidics, DNA barcoding and sequencing to collect chromatin data at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate the utility of the technology by assaying thousands of individual cells, and using the data to deconvolute a mixture of ES cells, fibroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors into high-quality chromatin state maps for each cell type. The data from each single cell is sparse, comprising on the order of 1000 unique reads. However, by assaying thousands of ES cells, we identify a spectrum of sub-populations defined by differences in chromatin signatures of pluripotency and differentiation priming. We corroborate these findings by comparison to orthogonal single-cell gene expression data. Our method for single-cell analysis reveals aspects of epigenetic heterogeneity not captured by transcriptional analysis alone. PMID:26458175

  19. Single molecule imaging reveals a major role for diffusion in the exploration of ciliary space by signaling receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fan; Breslow, David K; Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J; Nelson, W James; Nachury, Maxence V

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic organization of signaling cascades inside primary cilia is key to signal propagation. Yet little is known about the dynamics of ciliary membrane proteins besides a possible role for motor-driven Intraflagellar Transport (IFT). To characterize these dynamics, we imaged single molecules of Somatostatin Receptor 3 (SSTR3, a GPCR) and Smoothened (Smo, a Hedgehog signal transducer) in the ciliary membrane. While IFT trains moved processively from one end of the cilium to the other, single SSTR3 and Smo underwent mostly diffusive behavior interspersed with short periods of directional movements. Statistical subtraction of instant velocities revealed that SSTR3 and Smo spent less than a third of their time undergoing active transport. Finally, SSTR3 and IFT movements could be uncoupled by perturbing either membrane protein diffusion or active transport. Thus ciliary membrane proteins move predominantly by diffusion, and attachment to IFT trains is transient and stochastic rather than processive or spatially determined. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00654.001 PMID:23930224

  20. Single molecule imaging reveals a major role for diffusion in the exploration of ciliary space by signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fan; Breslow, David K; Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J; Nelson, W James; Nachury, Maxence V

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic organization of signaling cascades inside primary cilia is key to signal propagation. Yet little is known about the dynamics of ciliary membrane proteins besides a possible role for motor-driven Intraflagellar Transport (IFT). To characterize these dynamics, we imaged single molecules of Somatostatin Receptor 3 (SSTR3, a GPCR) and Smoothened (Smo, a Hedgehog signal transducer) in the ciliary membrane. While IFT trains moved processively from one end of the cilium to the other, single SSTR3 and Smo underwent mostly diffusive behavior interspersed with short periods of directional movements. Statistical subtraction of instant velocities revealed that SSTR3 and Smo spent less than a third of their time undergoing active transport. Finally, SSTR3 and IFT movements could be uncoupled by perturbing either membrane protein diffusion or active transport. Thus ciliary membrane proteins move predominantly by diffusion, and attachment to IFT trains is transient and stochastic rather than processive or spatially determined. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00654.001. PMID:23930224

  1. Shrimp single WAP domain (SWD)-containing protein exhibits proteinase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Amparyup, Piti; Donpudsa, Suchao; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2008-01-01

    Single WAP domain (SWD)-containing proteins are small proteins with a C-terminal region containing a single whey acidic protein (WAP) domain. In the present study, the cDNAs representing three isoforms of SWD proteins (SWDPm1, SWDPm2 and SWDPm3) were identified from hemocytes of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The deduced peptides revealed that they contain a putative signal peptide of 24 amino acids and encode for a mature peptide of 69, 68 and 56 amino acids, respectively, which contain typical characters similar to those of the shrimp SWD proteins (type III crustin) with a Pro-Arg region and a WAP domain towards the C-terminus. Tissue distribution analysis by RT-PCR showed that all three SWDPm transcripts were primarily found in hemocytes. Transcript expression of SWDPm1 was down-regulated upon injection with Staphylococcus aureus whilst there was no change of SWDPm2 and SWDPm3 expression. In contrast, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) injection resulted in a biphasic response with up-regulation of SWDPm1 and SWDPm2 transcripts at 6h followed by significant down-regulation by 24h after infection. Genomic organization of the SWDPm2 gene revealed the presence of three exons interrupted by two introns. To characterize the biological functions of the SWD protein, the mature SWDPm2 protein encoding cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant (r)SWDPm2 exhibits antibacterial activity against several Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative, bacteria and is a competitive inhibitor of subtilisin A with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 1.98nM. Thus, rSWDPm2 may contribute to the inhibitory regulation of subtilisin A from bacterial infection and P. monodon SWD protein likely function as immune effectors in defense against invasion of shrimp pathogens. PMID:18602420

  2. From protein structure to function via single crystal optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Luca; Bruno, Stefano; Bettati, Stefano; Storici, Paola; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The more than 100,000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic “artifacts,” including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density maps, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures, no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in infereing protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms. PMID:25988179

  3. Survey of activated kinase proteins reveals potential targets for cholangiocarcinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Dokduang, Hasaya; Juntana, Sirinun; Techasen, Anchalee; Namwat, Nisana; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Khuntikeo, Narong; Riggins, Gregory J; Loilome, Watcharin

    2013-12-01

    Improving therapy for patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) presents a significant challenge. This is made more difficult by a lack of a clear understanding of potential molecular targets, such as deregulated kinases. In this work, we profiled the activated kinases in CCA in order to apply them as the targets for CCA therapy. Human phospho-receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and phospho-kinase array analyses revealed that multiple kinases are activated in both CCA cell lines and human CCA tissues that included cell growth, apoptosis, cell to cell interaction, movement, and angiogenesis RTKs. Predominately, the kinases activated downstream were those in the PI3K/Akt, Ras/MAPK, JAK/STAT, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Western blot analysis confirms that Erk1/2 and Akt activation were increased in CCA tissues when compared with their normal adjacent tissue. The inhibition of kinase activation using multi-targeted kinase inhibitors, sorafenib and sunitinib led to significant cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction via suppression of Erk1/2 and Akt activation, whereas drugs with specificity to a single kinase showed less potency. In conclusion, our study reveals the involvement of multiple kinase proteins in CCA growth that might serve as therapeutic targets for combined kinase inhibition. PMID:23812726

  4. Single-point single-molecule FRAP distinguishes inner and outer nuclear membrane protein distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Schirmer, Eric C; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The normal distribution of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) is disrupted in several human diseases. NETs are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Quantitative determination of the distribution of NETs on the ONM and INM is limited in available approaches, which moreover provide no information about translocation rates in the two membranes. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule FRAP microscopy technique that enables determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. PMID:27558844

  5. Single-point single-molecule FRAP distinguishes inner and outer nuclear membrane protein distribution.

    PubMed

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Schirmer, Eric C; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The normal distribution of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) is disrupted in several human diseases. NETs are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Quantitative determination of the distribution of NETs on the ONM and INM is limited in available approaches, which moreover provide no information about translocation rates in the two membranes. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule FRAP microscopy technique that enables determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. PMID:27558844

  6. Single Molecule Mechanical Probing of the SNARE Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W.; Montana, Vedrana; Bai, Jihong; Chapman, Edwin R.; Mohideen, U.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Exocytotic release of neurotransmitters is mediated by the ternary soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) complex, comprised of syntaxin (Sx), synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25), and synaptobrevin 2 (Sb2). Since exocytosis involves the nonequilibrium process of association and dissociation of bonds between molecules of the SNARE complex, dynamic measurements at the single molecule level are necessary for a detailed understanding of these interactions. To address this issue, we used the atomic force microscope in force spectroscopy mode to show from single molecule investigations of the SNARE complex, that Sx1A and Sb2 are zippered throughout their entire SNARE domains without the involvement of SNAP25. When SNAP25B is present in the complex, it creates a local interaction at the 0 (ionic) layer by cuffing Sx1A and Sb2. Force loading rate studies indicate that the ternary complex interaction is more stable than the Sx1A-Sb2 interaction. PMID:16648158

  7. Network Analysis of Circular Permutations in Multidomain Proteins Reveals Functional Linkages for Uncharacterized Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Adjeroh, Donald; Jiang, Yue; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Lin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have implicated different multidomain proteins in cancer. However, there has been little or no detailed study on the role of circular multidomain proteins in the general problem of cancer or on specific cancer types. This work represents an initial attempt at investigating the potential for predicting linkages between known cancer-associated proteins with uncharacterized or hypothetical multidomain proteins, based primarily on circular permutation (CP) relationships. First, we propose an efficient algorithm for rapid identification of both exact and approximate CPs in multidomain proteins. Using the circular relations identified, we construct networks between multidomain proteins, based on which we perform functional annotation of multidomain proteins. We then extend the method to construct subnetworks for selected cancer subtypes, and performed prediction of potential link-ages between uncharacterized multidomain proteins and the selected cancer types. We include practical results showing the performance of the proposed methods. PMID:25741177

  8. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  9. Single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    An, B.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Egashira, M.; Korai, Y.; Mochida, I.

    2001-06-04

    The electronic structure of a single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice has been revealed on an atomic scale by scanning tunneling microscopy. The pentagon is located at the apex of the conical protuberance of the graphitic particle. The enhanced charge density localized at each carbon atom in the pentagon is identified, and the ringlike pattern of the ({radical}3{times}{radical}3)R30{degree} superstructure of graphite is clearly observed around the pentagon. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Production and feeding of single-cell protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ferranti, M.P.; Fiechter, A.

    1983-01-01

    This book addresses the technical and economic factors which must be considered when evaluating plans for the production of animal feed proteins from agricultural and forestry wastes. The work is divided into three parts, the first focusing on pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulostic materials, the second on upgrading of whey and the third on nutrition and toxicology. The presentation concludes with a Round Table discussion including evaluations and recommendations for submission to the Commission of the European Communities. CONTENTS: Special Section: Pretreatment and Degradation of Lignocellulosic Materials. Subject Area 1: Production of SCP Enriched Substrate from Cellulosic Materials. Lignin and Lignocellulose. Process Development. Carbohydrates. Subject Area 2: Single Cell Protein from Whey. Subject Area 3: Nutrition and Toxicology. Round Table Discussion: Evaluation and Recommendations. List of Participants. Index of Authors.

  11. Interaction of DNA and Proteins with Single Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasianowicz, J. J.

    2006-03-01

    The bacterial toxins Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin and Bacillus anthracis protective antigen kill cells in part by forming ion channels in target membranes. We are using electrophysiology, molecular biology/protein biochemistry and computer modeling to study how biopolymers (e.g., single-stranded DNA and proteins) bind to and transport through these nanometer-scale pores. The results provide insight into the mechanism by which these toxins work and are the basis for several potential nanobiotechnology applications including ultra-rapid DNA sequencing, the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes and high throughput screening of therapeutic agents against several anthrax toxins. In collaboration with V.M. Stanford, M. Misakian, B. Nablo, S.E. Henrickson, NIST, EEEL, Gaithersburg, MD; T. Nguyen, R. Gussio, NCI, Ft. Detrick, MD; and K.M. Halverson, S. Bavari, R.G. Panchal, USAMRIID, Ft. Detrick, MD.

  12. Pheromone binding proteins of Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are encoded at a single locus.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, R D; Sirey, T M; Rassam, M; Greenwood, D R

    2002-11-01

    The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) uses a blend of (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate and (E,E)-9,11-tetradecadienyl acetate as its sex pheromone. Odorant binding proteins, abundant in the antennae of male and female E. postvittana, were separated by native PAGE to reveal four major proteins with distinct mobilities. Microsequencing of their N-terminal residues showed that two were general odorant binding proteins (GOBPs) while two were pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). Full length cDNAs encoding these proteins were amplified using a combination of PCR and RACE-PCR. Sequence of the GOBPs revealed two genes (EposGOBP1, EposGOBP2), similar to orthologues in other species of Lepidoptera. Eleven cDNAs of the PBP gene were amplified, cloned and sequenced revealing two major phylogenetic clusters of PBP sequences differing by six amino acid substitutions. The position of the six amino acid differences on the protein was predicted by mapping onto the three-dimensional structure of PBP of Bombyx mori. All six substitutions were predicted to fall on the outside of the protein away from the inner pheromone binding pocket. One substitution does fall close to the putative dimerisation region of the protein (Ser63Thr). Expression of three of the cDNAs in a baculovirus expression system revealed that one class encodes an electrophoretically slow form (EposPBP1-12) while the other encodes a fast form (EposPBP1-2, EposPBP1-3). A native Western of these expressed proteins compared with antennal protein extracts demonstrated that PBP is also expressed in female antennae and that PBP may be present as a dimer as well as a monomer in E. postvittana. The fast and slow forms of EposPBP1 are allelic. Westerns on single antennal pair protein extracts and allele-specific PCR from genomic DNA both show a segregating pattern of inheritance in laboratory and wild populations. Radio labelled (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate binds to both fast and slow PBP forms in

  13. Lipid Interaction Networks of Peripheral Membrane Proteins Revealed by Data-Driven Micelle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Dancea, Felician; Kami, Keiichiro; Overduin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Many signaling and trafficking proteins contain modular domains that bind reversibly to cellular membranes. The structural basis of the intermolecular interactions which mediate these membrane-targeting events remains elusive since protein-membrane complexes are not directly accessible to standard structural biology techniques. Here we report a fast protein-micelle docking methodology that yields three-dimensional model structures of proteins inserted into micelles, revealing energetically favorable orientations, convergent insertion angles, and an array of protein-lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The method is applied to two peripheral membrane proteins, the early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) FYVE (a zinc finger domain found in the proteins Fab1, YOTB/ZK632.12, Vac1, and EEA1) and Vam7p phagocyte oxidase homology domains, which are revealed to form extensive networks of interactions with multiple phospholipid headgroups and acyl chains. The resulting structural models explain extensive published mutagenesis data and reveal novel binding determinants. The docking restraints used here were based on NMR data, but can be derived from any technique that detects insertion of protein residues into a membrane, and can be applied to virtually any peripheral membrane protein or membrane-like structure. PMID:17890395

  14. Radiation Damage and Racemic Protein Crystallography Reveal the Unique Structure of the GASA/Snakin Protein Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Ho; Squire, Christopher J; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Panjikar, Santosh; López, Gemma; Molina, Antonio; Baker, Edward N; Harris, Paul W R; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Proteins from the GASA/snakin superfamily are common in plant proteomes and have diverse functions, including hormonal crosstalk, development, and defense. One 63-residue member of this family, snakin-1, an antimicrobial protein from potatoes, has previously been chemically synthesized in a fully active form. Herein the 1.5 Å structure of snakin-1, determined by a novel combination of racemic protein crystallization and radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP), is reported. Racemic crystals of snakin-1 and quasi-racemic crystals incorporating an unnatural 4-iodophenylalanine residue were prepared from chemically synthesized d- and l-proteins. Breakage of the C-I bonds in the quasi-racemic crystals facilitated structure determination by RIP. The crystal structure reveals a unique protein fold with six disulfide crosslinks, presenting a distinct electrostatic surface that may target the protein to microbial cell surfaces. PMID:27145301

  15. Knotting and unknotting of a protein in single molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Fabian; Lim, Nicole C H; Mandal, Soumit Sankar; Pelz, Benjamin; Ng, Wei-Ping; Schlierf, Michael; Jackson, Sophie E; Rief, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous folding of a polypeptide chain into a knotted structure remains one of the most puzzling and fascinating features of protein folding. The folding of knotted proteins is on the timescale of minutes and thus hard to reproduce with atomistic simulations that have been able to reproduce features of ultrafast folding in great detail. Furthermore, it is generally not possible to control the topology of the unfolded state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy is an ideal tool for overcoming this problem: by variation of pulling directions, we controlled the knotting topology of the unfolded state of the 52-knotted protein ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isoenzyme L1 (UCH-L1) and have therefore been able to quantify the influence of knotting on its folding rate. Here, we provide direct evidence that a threading event associated with formation of either a 31 or 52 knot, or a step closely associated with it, significantly slows down the folding of UCH-L1. The results of the optical tweezers experiments highlight the complex nature of the folding pathway, many additional intermediate structures being detected that cannot be resolved by intrinsic fluorescence. Mechanical stretching of knotted proteins is also of importance for understanding the possible implications of knots in proteins for cellular degradation. Compared with a simple 31 knot, we measure a significantly larger size for the 52 knot in the unfolded state that can be further tightened with higher forces. Our results highlight the potential difficulties in degrading a 52 knot compared with a 31 knot. PMID:27339135

  16. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex with their respective ssRNA targets. The dPPR repeats are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral shell that embraces the ssRNA. Interactions between different PPR codes and RNA bases are observed at the atomic level, revealing the molecular basis for the modular and specific recognition patterns of the RNA bases U, C, A and G. These structures not only provide insights into the functional study of PPR proteins but also open a path towards the potential design of synthetic sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27088764

  17. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex with their respective ssRNA targets. The dPPR repeats are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral shell that embraces the ssRNA. Interactions between different PPR codes and RNA bases are observed at the atomic level, revealing the molecular basis for the modular and specific recognition patterns of the RNA bases U, C, A and G. These structures not only provide insights into the functional study of PPR proteins but also open a path towards the potential design of synthetic sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27088764

  18. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  19. Insight into the Assembly of Viruses with Vertical Single β-barrel Major Capsid Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gil-Carton, David; Jaakkola, Salla T; Charro, Diego; Peralta, Bibiana; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Oksanen, Hanna M; Bamford, Dennis H; Abrescia, Nicola G A

    2015-10-01

    Archaeal viruses constitute the least explored niche within the virosphere. Structure-based approaches have revealed close relationships between viruses infecting organisms from different domains of life. Here, using biochemical and cryo-electron microscopy techniques, we solved the structure of euryarchaeal, halophilic, internal membrane-containing Haloarcula hispanica icosahedral virus 2 (HHIV-2). We show that the density of the two major capsid proteins (MCPs) recapitulates vertical single β-barrel proteins and that disulfide bridges stabilize the capsid. Below, ordered density is visible close to the membrane and at the five-fold vertices underneath the host-interacting vertex complex underpinning membrane-protein interactions. The HHIV-2 structure exemplifies the division of conserved architectural elements of a virion, such as the capsid, from those that evolve rapidly due to selective environmental pressure such as host-recognizing structures. We propose that in viruses with two vertical single β-barrel MCPs the vesicle is indispensable, and membrane-protein interactions serve as protein-railings for guiding the assembly. PMID:26320579

  20. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Phan, Nguyen; Chen, Jay; Panstruga, Ralph; Uhrig, Joachim; Jones, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of G{alpha}, G{beta}, and G{gamma} subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

  1. Single-virus tracking approach to reveal the interaction of Dengue virus with autophagy during the early stage of infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Li-Wei; Huang, Yi-Lung; Lee, Jin-Hui; Huang, Long-Ying; Chen, Wei-Jun; Lin, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Jyun-Yu; Xiang, Rui; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Ping, Yueh-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the major infectious pathogens worldwide. DENV infection is a highly dynamic process. Currently, no antiviral drug is available for treating DENV-induced diseases since little is known regarding how the virus interacts with host cells during infection. Advanced molecular imaging technologies are powerful tools to understand the dynamics of intracellular interactions and molecular trafficking. This study exploited a single-virus particle tracking technology to address whether DENV interacts with autophagy machinery during the early stage of infection. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis, we showed that DENV triggered the formation of green fluorescence protein-fused microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) puncta, and DENV-induced autophagosomes engulfed DENV particles within 15-min postinfection. Moreover, single-virus particle tracking revealed that both DENV particles and autophagosomes traveled together during the viral infection. Finally, in the presence of autophagy suppressor 3-methyladenine, the replication of DENV was inhibited and the location of DENV particles spread in cytoplasma. In contrast, the numbers of newly synthesized DENV were elevated and the co-localization of DENV particles and autophagosomes was detected while the cells were treated with autophagy inducer rapamycin. Taken together, we propose that DENV particles interact with autophagosomes at the early stage of viral infection, which promotes the replication of DENV.

  2. Analysis and Interpretation of Single Molecule Protein Unfolding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of protein unfolding under a stretching force has been extensively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) over the past decade [1]. Experimental artifacts at the single molecule level introduce uncertainties in the data analysis that have led to several competing physical models for the unfolding process. For example, the unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin under constant force has been described by probability distributions as diverse as exponential [2,3], a sum of exponentials, log-normal [4], and more recently a function describing static disorder in the Arrhenius model [5]. A new method for data analysis is presented that utilizes maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) combined with other traditional statistical tests to unambiguously rank the consistency of these and other models with the experimental data. These techniques applied to the ubiquitin unfolding data shows that the probability of unfolding is best fit with a stretched exponential distribution, with important implications on the complexity of the mechanism of protein unfolding. [4pt] [1] Carrion-Vazquez, et. al. Springer Series in Biophys. 2006 [0pt] [2] Fernandez et. al. Science 2004 [0pt] [3] Brujic et. al. Nat. Phys 2006 [0pt] [4] Garcia-Manyes et. al. Biophys. J. 2007 [0pt] [5] Kuo et. al. PNAS 2010

  3. Nuclear RNA-seq of single neurons reveals molecular signatures of activation

    PubMed Central

    Lacar, Benjamin; Linker, Sara B.; Jaeger, Baptiste N.; Krishnaswami, Suguna; Barron, Jerika; Kelder, Martijn; Parylak, Sarah; Paquola, Apuã; Venepally, Pratap; Novotny, Mark; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Erwin, Jennifer; Hsu, Jonathan Y.; Husband, David; McConnell, Michael J.; Lasken, Roger; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing methods have emerged as powerful tools for identification of heterogeneous cell types within defined brain regions. Application of single-cell techniques to study the transcriptome of activated neurons can offer insight into molecular dynamics associated with differential neuronal responses to a given experience. Through evaluation of common whole-cell and single-nuclei RNA-sequencing (snRNA-seq) methods, here we show that snRNA-seq faithfully recapitulates transcriptional patterns associated with experience-driven induction of activity, including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos, Arc and Egr1. SnRNA-seq of mouse dentate granule cells reveals large-scale changes in the activated neuronal transcriptome after brief novel environment exposure, including induction of MAPK pathway genes. In addition, we observe a continuum of activation states, revealing a pseudotemporal pattern of activation from gene expression alone. In summary, snRNA-seq of activated neurons enables the examination of gene expression beyond IEGs, allowing for novel insights into neuronal activation patterns in vivo. PMID:27090946

  4. Nuclear RNA-seq of single neurons reveals molecular signatures of activation.

    PubMed

    Lacar, Benjamin; Linker, Sara B; Jaeger, Baptiste N; Krishnaswami, Suguna; Barron, Jerika; Kelder, Martijn; Parylak, Sarah; Paquola, Apuã; Venepally, Pratap; Novotny, Mark; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Erwin, Jennifer; Hsu, Jonathan Y; Husband, David; McConnell, Michael J; Lasken, Roger; Gage, Fred H

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing methods have emerged as powerful tools for identification of heterogeneous cell types within defined brain regions. Application of single-cell techniques to study the transcriptome of activated neurons can offer insight into molecular dynamics associated with differential neuronal responses to a given experience. Through evaluation of common whole-cell and single-nuclei RNA-sequencing (snRNA-seq) methods, here we show that snRNA-seq faithfully recapitulates transcriptional patterns associated with experience-driven induction of activity, including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos, Arc and Egr1. SnRNA-seq of mouse dentate granule cells reveals large-scale changes in the activated neuronal transcriptome after brief novel environment exposure, including induction of MAPK pathway genes. In addition, we observe a continuum of activation states, revealing a pseudotemporal pattern of activation from gene expression alone. In summary, snRNA-seq of activated neurons enables the examination of gene expression beyond IEGs, allowing for novel insights into neuronal activation patterns in vivo. PMID:27090946

  5. Mpath maps multi-branching single-cell trajectories revealing progenitor cell progression during development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmiao; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chakarov, Svetoslav; Ginhoux, Florent; Poidinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing offers unprecedented resolution of the continuum of state transition during cell differentiation and development. However, tools for constructing multi-branching cell lineages from single-cell data are limited. Here we present Mpath, an algorithm that derives multi-branching developmental trajectories using neighborhood-based cell state transitions. Applied to mouse conventional dendritic cell (cDC) progenitors, Mpath constructs multi-branching trajectories spanning from macrophage/DC progenitors through common DC progenitor to pre-dendritic cells (preDC). The Mpath-generated trajectories detect a branching event at the preDC stage revealing preDC subsets that are exclusively committed to cDC1 or cDC2 lineages. Reordering cells along cDC development reveals sequential waves of gene regulation and temporal coupling between cell cycle and cDC differentiation. Applied to human myoblasts, Mpath recapitulates the time course of myoblast differentiation and isolates a branch of non-muscle cells involved in the differentiation. Our study shows that Mpath is a useful tool for constructing cell lineages from single-cell data. PMID:27356503

  6. Mpath maps multi-branching single-cell trajectories revealing progenitor cell progression during development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmiao; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chakarov, Svetoslav; Ginhoux, Florent; Poidinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing offers unprecedented resolution of the continuum of state transition during cell differentiation and development. However, tools for constructing multi-branching cell lineages from single-cell data are limited. Here we present Mpath, an algorithm that derives multi-branching developmental trajectories using neighborhood-based cell state transitions. Applied to mouse conventional dendritic cell (cDC) progenitors, Mpath constructs multi-branching trajectories spanning from macrophage/DC progenitors through common DC progenitor to pre-dendritic cells (preDC). The Mpath-generated trajectories detect a branching event at the preDC stage revealing preDC subsets that are exclusively committed to cDC1 or cDC2 lineages. Reordering cells along cDC development reveals sequential waves of gene regulation and temporal coupling between cell cycle and cDC differentiation. Applied to human myoblasts, Mpath recapitulates the time course of myoblast differentiation and isolates a branch of non-muscle cells involved in the differentiation. Our study shows that Mpath is a useful tool for constructing cell lineages from single-cell data. PMID:27356503

  7. Interconvertible lac repressor-DNA loops revealed by single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Kwan; Guthold, Martin; Erie, Dorothy A; Gelles, Jeff

    2008-09-30

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by Escherichia coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small ( approximately 150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein-DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic "V" conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions. PMID:18828671

  8. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Single Nucleotide Variants in Longer-Kernel Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Zhu, Zibo; Zhou, Xiaobian; Yan, Yan; Dong, Zhongdong; Cui, Dangqun

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptomes of bread wheat Yunong 201 and its ethyl methanesulfonate derivative Yunong 3114 were obtained by next-sequencing technology. Single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the wheat strains were explored and compared. A total of 5907 and 6287 non-synonymous SNVs were acquired for Yunong 201 and 3114, respectively. A total of 4021 genes with SNVs were obtained. The genes that underwent non-synonymous SNVs were significantly involved in ATP binding, protein phosphorylation, and cellular protein metabolic process. The heat map analysis also indicated that most of these mutant genes were significantly differentially expressed at different developmental stages. The SNVs in these genes possibly contribute to the longer kernel length of Yunong 3114. Our data provide useful information on wheat transcriptome for future studies on wheat functional genomics. This study could also help in illustrating the gene functions of the non-synonymous SNVs of Yunong 201 and 3114. PMID:27551288

  9. Interconvertible Lac Repressor--DNA Loops Revealed by Single-Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthold, Martin

    2009-03-01

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by E. coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small (150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein--DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic ``V'' conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions.

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Single Nucleotide Variants in Longer-Kernel Bread Wheat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhu, Zibo; Zhou, Xiaobian; Yan, Yan; Dong, Zhongdong; Cui, Dangqun

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptomes of bread wheat Yunong 201 and its ethyl methanesulfonate derivative Yunong 3114 were obtained by next-sequencing technology. Single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the wheat strains were explored and compared. A total of 5907 and 6287 non-synonymous SNVs were acquired for Yunong 201 and 3114, respectively. A total of 4021 genes with SNVs were obtained. The genes that underwent non-synonymous SNVs were significantly involved in ATP binding, protein phosphorylation, and cellular protein metabolic process. The heat map analysis also indicated that most of these mutant genes were significantly differentially expressed at different developmental stages. The SNVs in these genes possibly contribute to the longer kernel length of Yunong 3114. Our data provide useful information on wheat transcriptome for future studies on wheat functional genomics. This study could also help in illustrating the gene functions of the non-synonymous SNVs of Yunong 201 and 3114. PMID:27551288

  11. Stoichiometry of a regulatory splicing complex revealed by single-molecule analyses.

    PubMed

    Cherny, Dmitry; Gooding, Clare; Eperon, Giles E; Coelho, Miguel B; Bagshaw, Clive R; Smith, Christopher W J; Eperon, Ian C

    2010-07-01

    Splicing is regulated by complex interactions of numerous RNA-binding proteins. The molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive, in large part because of ignorance regarding the numbers of proteins in regulatory complexes. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), which regulates tissue-specific splicing, represses exon 3 of alpha-tropomyosin through distant pyrimidine-rich tracts in the flanking introns. Current models for repression involve either PTB-mediated looping or the propagation of complexes between tracts. To test these models, we used single-molecule approaches to count the number of bound PTB molecules both by counting the number of bleaching steps of GFP molecules linked to PTB within complexes and by analysing their total emissions. Both approaches showed that five or six PTB molecules assemble. Given the domain structures, this suggests that the molecules occupy primarily multiple overlapping potential sites in the polypyrimidine tracts, excluding propagation models. As an alternative to direct looping, we propose that repression involves a multistep process in which PTB binding forms small local loops, creating a platform for recruitment of other proteins that bring these loops into close proximity. PMID:20502437

  12. A novel single-cell screening platform reveals proteome plasticity during yeast stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Breker, Michal; Gymrek, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering the mechanisms underlying robust responses of cells to stress is crucial for our understanding of cellular physiology. Indeed, vast amounts of data have been collected on transcriptional responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, only a handful of pioneering studies describe the dynamics of proteins in response to external stimuli, despite the fact that regulation of protein levels and localization is an essential part of such responses. Here we characterized unprecedented proteome plasticity by systematically tracking the localization and abundance of 5,330 yeast proteins at single-cell resolution under three different stress conditions (DTT, H2O2, and nitrogen starvation) using the GFP-tagged yeast library. We uncovered a unique “fingerprint” of changes for each stress and elucidated a new response arsenal for adapting to radical environments. These include bet-hedging strategies, organelle rearrangement, and redistribution of protein localizations. All data are available for download through our online database, LOQATE (localization and quantitation atlas of yeast proteome). PMID:23509072

  13. Single-molecule studies of SNARE complex assembly reveal parallel and antiparallel configurations

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Keith; Bowen, Mark E.; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T.

    2003-01-01

    Vesicle fusion in eukaryotes is thought to involve the assembly of a highly conserved family of proteins termed soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) into a highly stable parallel four-helix bundle. We have used intermolecular single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to characterize preassembled neuronal SNARE complexes consisting of syntaxin, synaptobrevin, and synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa on deposited lipid bilayers. Surprisingly, we found a mixture of parallel as well as antiparallel configurations involving the SNARE motifs of syntaxin and synaptobrevin as well as those of syntaxin and synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa. The subpopulation with the parallel four-helix bundle configuration could be greatly enriched by an additional purification step in the presence of denaturant, indicating that the parallel configuration is the energetically most favorable state. Interconversion between the configurations was not observed. From this observation, we infer the conversion rate to be <1.5 h–1. The existence of antiparallel configurations suggests a regulatory role of chaperones, such as N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, or the membrane environment during SNARE complex assembly in vivo, and it could be a partial explanation for the relatively slow rates of vesicle fusion observed by reconstituted fusion experiments in vitro. PMID:14657376

  14. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  15. Single-molecule protein unfolding and translocation by an ATP-fueled proteolytic machine

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Olivares, Adrian O.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    All cells employ ATP-powered proteases for protein-quality control and regulation. In the ClpXP protease, ClpX is a AAA+ machine that recognizes specific protein substrates, unfolds these molecules, and then translocates the denatured polypeptide through a central pore and into ClpP for degradation. Here, we use optical-trapping nanometry to probe the mechanics of enzymatic unfolding and translocation of single molecules of a multidomain substrate. Our experiments demonstrate the capacity of ClpXP and ClpX to perform mechanical work under load, reveal very fast and highly cooperative unfolding of individual substrate domains, suggest a translocation step size of 5–8 amino acids, and support a power-stroke model of denaturation in which successful enzyme-mediated unfolding of stable domains requires coincidence between mechanical pulling by the enzyme and a transient stochastic reduction in protein stability. We anticipate that single-molecule studies of the mechanical properties of other AAA+ proteolytic machines will reveal many shared features with ClpXP. PMID:21496645

  16. Energy Landscape of All-Atom Protein-Protein Interactions Revealed by Multiscale Enhanced Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape. PMID:25340714

  17. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  18. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  19. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  1. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lake, Blue B; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Salathia, Neeraj S; Yung, Yun C; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-06-24

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from a postmortem brain, generating 3227 sets of single-neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish previously unknown and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity and transcriptomic heterogeneity within the human brain. PMID:27339989

  2. Structural dynamics of potassium channel gating revealed by single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Borschel, William F.; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights to ion channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites, and examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single molecule FRET. We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and for cation channels in general. PMID:26641713

  3. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  4. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  5. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli. PMID:27555592

  6. Mass spectrometry-based absolute quantification reveals rhythmic variation of mouse circadian clock proteins.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Ode, Koji L; Kanda, Genki N; Shinohara, Yuta; Sato, Aya; Matsumoto, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-06-14

    Absolute values of protein expression levels in cells are crucial information for understanding cellular biological systems. Precise quantification of proteins can be achieved by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of enzymatic digests of proteins in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards. Thus, development of a simple and easy way for the preparation of internal standards is advantageous for the analyses of multiple target proteins, which will allow systems-level studies. Here we describe a method, termed MS-based Quantification By isotope-labeled Cell-free products (MS-QBiC), which provides the simple and high-throughput preparation of internal standards by using a reconstituted cell-free protein synthesis system, and thereby facilitates both multiplexed and sensitive quantification of absolute amounts of target proteins. This method was applied to a systems-level dynamic analysis of mammalian circadian clock proteins, which consist of transcription factors and protein kinases that govern central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals. Sixteen proteins from 20 selected circadian clock proteins were successfully quantified from mouse liver over a 24-h time series, and 14 proteins had circadian variations. Quantified values were applied to detect internal body time using a previously developed molecular timetable method. The analyses showed that single time-point data from wild-type mice can predict the endogenous state of the circadian clock, whereas data from clock mutant mice are not applicable because of the disappearance of circadian variation. PMID:27247408

  7. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood. PMID:27015767

  8. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  9. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsinmore » kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.« less

  10. Conformational Selection in a Protein-Protein Interaction revealed by Dynamic Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding. PMID:26725117

  11. Rhabdovirus Matrix Protein Structures Reveal a Novel Mode of Self-Association

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Gholami, Alireza; Talbi, Chiraz; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus) and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus), revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins. PMID:19112510

  12. Protein engineering: single or multiple site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Chung; Vaisvila, Romualdas

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis techniques are invaluable tools in molecular biology to study the structural and functional properties of a protein. To expedite the time required and simplify methods for mutagenesis, we recommend two protocols in this chapter. The first method for single site-directed mutagenesis, which includes point mutations, insertions, or deletions, can be achieved by an inverse PCR strategy with mutagenic primers and the high-fidelity Phusion(®) DNA Polymerase to introduce a site-directed mutation with exceptional efficiency. The second method is for engineering multiple mutations into a gene of interest. This can be completed in one step by PCR with mutagenic primers and by assembling all mutagenized PCR products using the Gibson Assembly™ Master Mix. This method allows multiple nucleotides to be changed simultaneously, which not only saves time but also reagents compared to traditional methods of mutagenesis. PMID:23423897

  13. Structure and mechanics of proteins from single molecules to cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre E.

    2009-07-01

    Physical factors drive evolution and play important roles in motility and attachment as well as in differentiation. As animal cells adhere to survive, they generate force and "feel" various mechanical features of their surroundings and respond to externally applied forces. This mechanosensitivity requires a substrate for cells to adhere to and a mechanism for cells to apply force, followed by a cellular response to the mechanical properties of the substrate. We have taken an outside-in approach to characterize several aspects of cellular mechanosensitivity. First, we used single molecule force spectroscopy to measure how fibrinogen, an extracellular matrix protein that forms the scaffold of blood clots, responds to applied force and found that it rapidly unfolds in 23 nm steps at forces around 100 pN. Second, we used tensile testing to measure the force-extension behavior of fibrin gels and found that they behave almost linearly to strains of over 100%, have extensibilities of 170 +/- 15%, and undergo a large volume decrease that corresponds to a large and negative peak in compressibility at low strain, which indicates a structural transition. Using electron microscopy and X-ray scattering we concluded that these properties are likely due to coiled-coil unfolding, as observed at the single molecule level in fibrinogen. Moving inside cells, we used total internal reflection fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to image self-assembled myosin filaments. These filaments of motor proteins that are responsible for cell and muscle contractility were found to be asymmetric, with an average of 32% more force generating heads on one half than the other. This could imply a force imbalance, so that rather than being simply contractile, myosin filaments may also be motile in cells.

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals That Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, William E.; Jolly, Samson M.; Moore, Melissa J.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization: a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals that Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides.

    PubMed

    Salomon, William E; Jolly, Samson M; Moore, Melissa J; Zamore, Phillip D; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization—a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  16. Design principles of natural light-harvesting as revealed by single molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2016-01-01

    Biology offers a boundless source of adaptation, innovation, and inspiration. A wide range of photosynthetic organisms exist that are capable of harvesting solar light in an exceptionally efficient way, using abundant and low-cost materials. These natural light-harvesting complexes consist of proteins that strongly bind a high density of chromophores to capture solar photons and rapidly transfer the excitation energy to the photochemical reaction centre. The amount of harvested light is also delicately tuned to the level of solar radiation to maintain a constant energy throughput at the reaction centre and avoid the accumulation of the products of charge separation. In this Review, recent developments in the understanding of light-harvesting by plants will be discussed, based on results obtained from single molecule spectroscopy studies. Three design principles of the main light-harvesting antenna of plants will be highlighted: (a) fine, photoactive control over the intrinsic protein disorder to efficiently use intrinsically available thermal energy dissipation mechanisms; (b) the design of the protein microenvironment of a low-energy chromophore dimer to control the amount of shade absorption; (c) the design of the exciton manifold to ensure efficient funneling of the harvested light to the terminal emitter cluster.

  17. Revealing nonergodic dynamics in living cells from a single particle trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanoiselée, Yann; Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-05-01

    We propose the improved ergodicity and mixing estimators to identify nonergodic dynamics from a single particle trajectory. The estimators are based on the time-averaged characteristic function of the increments and can thus capture additional information on the process as compared to the conventional time-averaged mean-square displacement. The estimators are first investigated and validated for several models of anomalous diffusion, such as ergodic fractional Brownian motion and diffusion on percolating clusters, and nonergodic continuous-time random walks and scaled Brownian motion. The estimators are then applied to two sets of earlier published trajectories of mRNA molecules inside live Escherichia coli cells and of Kv2.1 potassium channels in the plasma membrane. These statistical tests did not reveal nonergodic features in the former set, while some trajectories of the latter set could be classified as nonergodic. Time averages along such trajectories are thus not representative and may be strongly misleading. Since the estimators do not rely on ensemble averages, the nonergodic features can be revealed separately for each trajectory, providing a more flexible and reliable analysis of single-particle tracking experiments in microbiology.

  18. A single double-strand break system reveals repair dynamics and mechanisms in heterochromatin and euchromatin.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Aniek; Breuer, Gregory A; Brinkman, Eva K; van der Meulen, Annelot I; Borden, Sean V; van Steensel, Bas; Bindra, Ranjit S; LaRocque, Jeannine R; Karpen, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be properly orchestrated in diverse chromatin regions to maintain genome stability. The choice between two main DSB repair pathways, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), is regulated by the cell cycle as well as chromatin context.Pericentromeric heterochromatin forms a distinct nuclear domain that is enriched for repetitive DNA sequences that pose significant challenges for genome stability. Heterochromatic DSBs display specialized temporal and spatial dynamics that differ from euchromatic DSBs. Although HR is thought to be the main pathway used to repair heterochromatic DSBs, direct tests of this hypothesis are lacking. Here, we developed an in vivo single DSB system for both heterochromatic and euchromatic loci in Drosophila melanogaster Live imaging of single DSBs in larval imaginal discs recapitulates the spatio-temporal dynamics observed for irradiation (IR)-induced breaks in cell culture. Importantly, live imaging and sequence analysis of repair products reveal that DSBs in euchromatin and heterochromatin are repaired with similar kinetics, employ both NHEJ and HR, and can use homologous chromosomes as an HR template. This direct analysis reveals important insights into heterochromatin DSB repair in animal tissues and provides a foundation for further explorations of repair mechanisms in different chromatin domains. PMID:27474442

  19. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-05-19

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal. PMID:27067544

  20. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal. PMID:27067544

  1. A novel nuclear localization signal in the human single-minded proteins SIM1 and SIM2.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Akiko; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2004-01-16

    Human Single-minded 1 (SIM1) and SIM2 genes were found as homologs of Drosophila sim gene which plays a key role in the midline cell lineage of the central nervous system. SIM proteins belong to a family of transcription factors, called bHLH/PAS. Here we examined the intracellular localization of SIM proteins using the expression constructs of whole SIM2 or SIM1 protein fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The transient expression analysis revealed the nuclear localization of SIM proteins in the cultured cells. To identify the nuclear localization signal, we made expression constructs of EGFP-fusion protein consisting of various portions of SIM proteins. Transfection assay showed the presence of NLS activity in the small region of 23 and 21 amino acid residues at the central part of SIM2 and SIM1 proteins, respectively. Further analysis with amino acid substitution of this small region of SIM2 protein revealed the critical role of five amino acid residues (Arg367, Lys373, Pro385, Tyr386, and Gln389) in NLS activity. The consensus sequence of RKxxKx[K/R]xxxxKxKxRxxPY was estimated as a presumptive NLS in SIM proteins from various species. Thus, the NLS consisting of a cluster of basic amino acids with Pro and Tyr at the C-terminal end is novel and well conserved in the SIM proteins during evolution. PMID:14697214

  2. Super-resolution Microscopy of Clickable Amino Acids Reveals the Effects of Fluorescent Protein Tagging on Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Vreja, Ingrid C; Nikić, Ivana; Göttfert, Fabian; Bates, Mark; Kröhnert, Katharina; Outeiro, Tiago F; Hell, Stefan W; Lemke, Edward A; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-11-24

    The advent of super-resolution microscopy (nanoscopy) has set high standards for fluorescence tagging. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are convenient tags in conventional imaging, but their use in nanoscopy has been questioned due to their relatively large size and propensity to form multimers. Here, we compared the nanoscale organization of proteins with or without FP tags by introducing the unnatural amino acid propargyl-L-lysine (PRK) in 26 proteins known to form multimolecular arrangements and into their FP-tagged variants. We revealed the proteins by coupling synthetic fluorophores to PRK via click chemistry and visualized them using ground-state depletion microscopy followed by individual molecule return, as well as stimulated emission depletion microscopy. The arrangements formed by the FP-tagged and nontagged proteins were similar. Mild, but statistically significant differences were observed for only six proteins (23% of all proteins tested). This suggests that FP-based nanoscopy is generally reliable. Unnatural amino acids should be a reliable alternative for the few proteins that are sensitive to FP tagging. PMID:26498474

  3. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  4. Putative protein partners for the human CPI-17 protein revealed by bacterial two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-mi; Adyshev, Djanybek M; Kása, Anita; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Kolosova, Irina A; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of protein phosphatase-1 (CPI-17) is expressed in lung endothelium. CPI-17, a specific inhibitor of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), is involved in the endothelial cytoskeletal and barrier regulation. In this paper, we report the identification of fourteen putative CPI-17 interacting proteins in the lung using BacterioMatch Two-Hybrid System. Five of them: plectin 1 isoform 1, alpha II spectrin, OK/SW-CL.16, gelsolin isoform a, and junction plakoglobin are involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell adhesion, suggesting possible significance of these binding partners in CPI-17-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the specific interaction between plakoglobin and CPI-17, which is affected by the phosphorylation status of CPI-17 in human lung microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:23583905

  5. Single-Molecule Kinetics Reveal Cation-Promoted DNA Duplex Formation Through Ordering of Single-Stranded Helices

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of short, fully complementary oligonucleotides are investigated at the single-molecule level. Constructs 6–9 bp in length exhibit single exponential kinetics over 2 orders of magnitude time for both forward (kon, association) and reverse (koff, dissociation) processes. Bimolecular rate constants for association are weakly sensitive to the number of basepairs in the duplex, with a 2.5-fold increase between 9 bp (k′on = 2.1(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) and 6 bp (k′on = 5.0(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) sequences. In sharp contrast, however, dissociation rate constants prove to be exponentially sensitive to sequence length, varying by nearly 600-fold over the same 9 bp (koff = 0.024 s−1) to 6 bp (koff = 14 s−1) range. The 8 bp sequence is explored in more detail, and the NaCl dependence of kon and koff is measured. Interestingly, konincreases by >40-fold (kon = 0.10(1) s−1 to 4.0(4) s−1 between [NaCl] = 25 mM and 1 M), whereas in contrast, koffdecreases by fourfold (0.72(3) s−1 to 0.17(7) s−1) over the same range of conditions. Thus, the equilibrium constant (Keq) increases by ≈160, largely due to changes in the association rate, kon. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements reveal that increased [NaCl] reduces the overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) of duplex formation, albeit by an amount smaller than the reduction in entropic penalty (−TΔΔS° < 0). This reduced entropic cost is attributed to a cation-facilitated preordering of the two single-stranded species, which lowers the association free-energy barrier and in turn accelerates the rate of duplex formation. PMID:23931323

  6. An optimized isolation of biotinylated cell surface proteins reveals novel players in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Ravela, Suvi; Laakso, Marko; Ritamo, Ilja; Tatti, Olga; Mäkinen, Selina; Goodison, Steve; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Hölttä, Erkki; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Valmu, Leena; Lehti, Kaisa; Laakkonen, Pirjo

    2012-01-01

    Details of metastasis, the deadliest aspect of cancer, are unclear. Cell surface proteins play central roles in adhesive contacts between the tumor cell and the stroma during metastasis. We optimized a fast, small-scale isolation of biotinylated cell surface proteins to reveal novel metastasis-associated players froman isogenic pair of human MDA-MB-435 cancer cells with opposite metastatic phenotypes. Isolated proteins were trypsin digested and analyzed using LC–MS/MS followed by quantitation with the Progenesis LC–MS software. Sixteen proteins displayed over twofold expression differences between the metastatic and non-metastatic cells. Interestingly, overexpression of most of them (14/16) in the metastatic cells indicates a gain of novel surface protein profile as compared to the non-metastatic one. All five validated, differentially expressed proteins showed higher expression in the metastatic cells in culture, and four of these were further validated in vivo. Moreover, we analyzed the expression of two of the identified proteins, CD109 and ITGA6 in 3-dimensional cultures of six melanoma cell lines. Both proteins marked the surface of cells derived from melanoma metastasis over cells derived from primary melanoma. These unbiased identification and validation of both known and novel metastasis-associated proteins indicate a reliable approach for the identification of differentially expressed surface proteins. PMID:22813880

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Cereal Aphid Saliva Reveals Both Ubiquitous and Adaptive Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Tom L.

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113. PMID:23460852

  8. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  9. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  10. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  11. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongbin; Wang, Qilei; Zhang, Long; Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  12. Single Chromatin Fiber Stretching Reveals Physically Distinct Populations of Disassembly Events

    PubMed Central

    Pope, L. H.; Bennink, M. L.; van Leijenhorst-Groener, K. A.; Nikova, D.; Greve, J.; Marko, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged into the cell nucleus as a nucleoprotein complex, chromatin. Despite this condensed state, access to the DNA sequence must occur during gene expression and other essential genetic events. Here we employ optical tweezers stretching of reconstituted chromatin fibers to investigate the release of DNA from its protein-bound structure. Analysis of fiber length increase per unbinding event revealed discrete values of ∼30 and ∼60 nm. Furthermore, a loading rate analysis of the disruption forces revealed three individual energy barriers. The heights of these barriers were found to be ∼20 kBT, ∼25 kBT, and ∼28 kBT. For subsequent stretches of the fiber it was found that events corresponding to the ∼28 kBT energy barrier were significantly reduced. No correlation between energy barrier crossed and DNA length release was found. These studies clearly demonstrate that optical tweezers stretching of chromatin provides insight into the energetic penalties imposed by chromatin structure. Furthermore these studies reveal possible pathways via which chromatin may be disrupted during genetic code access. PMID:15695630

  13. Metagenome, metatranscriptome and single-cell sequencing reveal microbial response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Olivia U; Hazen, Terry C; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S G; Dubinsky, Eric A; Fortney, Julian L; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M; Jansson, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea. PMID:22717885

  14. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  15. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J; Vander Wall, Todd A; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the structure

  16. Homologous Expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA Reveals that the Extracellular Protein Is Glycosylated

    PubMed Central

    Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the structure

  17. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-03-23

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm formore » cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. Finally, it will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role

  18. The dynamics and regulators of cell fate decisions are revealed by pseudotemporal ordering of single cells.

    PubMed

    Trapnell, Cole; Cacchiarelli, Davide; Grimsby, Jonna; Pokharel, Prapti; Li, Shuqiang; Morse, Michael; Lennon, Niall J; Livak, Kenneth J; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Rinn, John L

    2014-04-01

    Defining the transcriptional dynamics of a temporal process such as cell differentiation is challenging owing to the high variability in gene expression between individual cells. Time-series gene expression analyses of bulk cells have difficulty distinguishing early and late phases of a transcriptional cascade or identifying rare subpopulations of cells, and single-cell proteomic methods rely on a priori knowledge of key distinguishing markers. Here we describe Monocle, an unsupervised algorithm that increases the temporal resolution of transcriptome dynamics using single-cell RNA-Seq data collected at multiple time points. Applied to the differentiation of primary human myoblasts, Monocle revealed switch-like changes in expression of key regulatory factors, sequential waves of gene regulation, and expression of regulators that were not known to act in differentiation. We validated some of these predicted regulators in a loss-of function screen. Monocle can in principle be used to recover single-cell gene expression kinetics from a wide array of cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation and oncogenic transformation. PMID:24658644

  19. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analyses revealed molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal maturation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoying; Zhang, Kunshan; Zhou, Liqiang; Gao, Xinpei; Wang, Junbang; Yao, Yinan; He, Fei; Luo, Yuping; Yu, Yongchun; Li, Siguang; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E

    2016-03-01

    The mammalian brain is heterogeneous, containing billions of neurons and trillions of synapses forming various neural circuitries, through which sense, movement, thought, and emotion arise. The cellular heterogeneity of the brain has made it difficult to study the molecular logic of neural circuitry wiring, pruning, activation, and plasticity, until recently, transcriptome analyses with single cell resolution makes decoding of gene regulatory networks underlying aforementioned circuitry properties possible. Here we report success in performing both electrophysiological and whole-genome transcriptome analyses on single human neurons in culture. Using Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analyses (WGCNA), we identified gene clusters highly correlated with neuronal maturation judged by electrophysiological characteristics. A tight link between neuronal maturation and genes involved in ubiquitination and mitochondrial function was revealed. Moreover, we identified a list of candidate genes, which could potentially serve as biomarkers for neuronal maturation. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analysis will serve as powerful tools in the future to unveil molecular logics for neural circuitry functions. PMID:26883038

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis reveals heterogeneity within a seedling tree population of a polyembryonic mango cultivar.

    PubMed

    Winterhagen, Patrick; Wünsche, Jens-Norbert

    2016-05-01

    Within a polyembryonic mango seedling tree population, the genetic background of individuals should be identical because vigorous plants for cultivation are expected to develop from nucellar embryos representing maternal clones. Due to the fact that the mango cultivar 'Hôi' is assigned to the polyembryonic ecotype, an intra-cultivar variability of ethylene receptor genes was unexpected. Ethylene receptors in plants are conserved, but the number of receptors or receptor isoforms is variable regarding different plant species. However, it is shown here that the ethylene receptor MiETR1 is present in various isoforms within the mango cultivar 'Hôi'. The investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms revealed that different MiETR1 isoforms can not be discriminated simply by individual single nucleotide exchanges but by the specific arrangement of single nucleotide polymorphisms at certain positions in the exons of MiETR1. Furthermore, an MiETR1 isoform devoid of introns in the genomic sequence was identified. The investigation demonstrates some limitations of high resolution melting and ScreenClust analysis and points out the necessity of sequencing to identify individual isoforms and to determine the variability within the tree population. PMID:27093244

  1. Genetic programs in human and mouse early embryos revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhigang; Huang, Kevin; Cai, Chaochao; Cai, Lingbo; Jiang, Chun-yan; Feng, Yun; Liu, Zhenshan; Zeng, Qiao; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Liu, Jia-yin; Horvath, Steve; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian pre-implantation development is a complex process involving dramatic changes in the transcriptional architecture1–4. We report here a comprehensive analysis of transcriptome dynamics from oocyte to morula in both human and mouse embryos, using single-cell RNA sequencing. Based on single-nucleotide variants in human blastomere messenger RNAs and paternal-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we identify novel stage-specific monoallelic expression patterns for a significant portion of polymorphic gene transcripts (25 to 53%). By weighted gene co-expression network analysis5,6, we find that each developmental stage can be delineated concisely by a small number of functional modules of co-expressed genes. This result indicates a sequential order of transcriptional changes in pathways of cell cycle, gene regulation, translation and metabolism, acting in a step-wise fashion from cleavage to morula. Cross-species comparisons with mouse pre-implantation embryos reveal that the majority of human stage-specific modules (7out of 9) are notably preserved, but developmental specificity and timing differ between human and mouse. Furthermore, we identify conserved key members (or hub genes) of the human and mouse networks. These genes represent novel candidates that are likely to be key in driving mammalian pre-implantation development. Together, the results provide a valuable resource to dissect gene regulatory mechanisms underlying progressive development of early mammalian embryos. PMID:23892778

  2. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect

    Arpino, James A. J.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2014-08-01

    The beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion variants EGFP{sup D190Δ} and EGFP{sup A227Δ} have been studied. Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP{sup D190Δ} containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP{sup A227Δ} revealed that a ‘flipping’ mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a β-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  3. A Library of Plasmodium vivax Recombinant Merozoite Proteins Reveals New Vaccine Candidates and Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Wright, Gavin J.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Rayner, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A vaccine targeting Plasmodium vivax will be an essential component of any comprehensive malaria elimination program, but major gaps in our understanding of P. vivax biology, including the protein-protein interactions that mediate merozoite invasion of reticulocytes, hinder the search for candidate antigens. Only one ligand-receptor interaction has been identified, that between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) and the erythrocyte Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC), and strain-specific immune responses to PvDBP make it a complex vaccine target. To broaden the repertoire of potential P. vivax merozoite-stage vaccine targets, we exploited a recent breakthrough in expressing full-length ectodomains of Plasmodium proteins in a functionally-active form in mammalian cells and initiated a large-scale study of P. vivax merozoite proteins that are potentially involved in reticulocyte binding and invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected 39 P. vivax proteins that are predicted to localize to the merozoite surface or invasive secretory organelles, some of which show homology to P. falciparum vaccine candidates. Of these, we were able to express 37 full-length protein ectodomains in a mammalian expression system, which has been previously used to express P. falciparum invasion ligands such as PfRH5. To establish whether the expressed proteins were correctly folded, we assessed whether they were recognized by antibodies from Cambodian patients with acute vivax malaria. IgG from these samples showed at least a two-fold change in reactivity over naïve controls in 27 of 34 antigens tested, and the majority showed heat-labile IgG immunoreactivity, suggesting the presence of conformation-sensitive epitopes and native tertiary protein structures. Using a method specifically designed to detect low-affinity, extracellular protein-protein interactions, we confirmed a predicted interaction between P. vivax 6-cysteine proteins P12 and P41, further

  4. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process—a search state and a recognition state—facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state. PMID:26027871

  5. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2015-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process--a search state and a recognition state--facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state.

  6. Identification of novel peptide substrates for protein farnesyltransferase reveals two substrate classes with distinct sequence selectivities

    PubMed Central

    Hougland, James L.; Hicks, Katherine A.; Hartman, Heather L.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Watt, Terry J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Prenylation is a post-translational modification essential for the proper localization and function of many proteins. Farnesylation, the attachment of a 15-carbon farnesyl group near the C-terminus of protein substrates, is catalyzed by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase). Farnesylation has received significant interest as a target for pharmaceutical development and farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics. However, as the total complement of prenylated proteins is unknown, the FTase substrates responsible for FTI efficacy are not yet understood. Identifying novel prenylated proteins within the human proteome constitutes an important step towards understanding prenylation-dependent cellular processes. Based on sequence preferences for FTase derived from analysis of known farnesylated proteins, we selected and screened a library of small peptides representing the C-termini of 213 human proteins for activity with FTase. We identified 77 novel FTase substrates that exhibit multiple-turnover reactivity within this library; our library also contained 85 peptides that can be farnesylated by FTase only under single-turnover conditions. Based on these results, a second library was designed that yielded an additional 29 novel multiple-turnover FTase substrates and 45 single-turnover substrates. The two classes of substrates exhibit different specificity requirements. Efficient multiple-turnover reactivity correlates with the presence of a nonpolar amino acid at the a2 position and a Phe, Met, or Gln at the terminal X residue, consistent with the proposed Ca1a2X sequence model. In contrast, the sequences of the single-turnover substrates vary significantly more at both the a2 and X residues and are not well-described by current farnesylation algorithms. These results improve the definition of prenyltransferase substrate specificity, test the efficacy of substrate algorithms, and provide valuable information about therapeutic targets

  7. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  8. Massively parallel sampling of lattice proteins reveals foundations of thermal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Venev, Sergey V; Zeldovich, Konstantin B

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of proteins in bacteria and archaea living in different conditions leads to significant correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature. The origins of these correlations are poorly understood, and an important question of protein theory, physics-based prediction of types of amino acids overrepresented in highly thermostable proteins, remains largely unsolved. Here, we extend the random energy model of protein folding by weighting the interaction energies of amino acids by their frequencies in protein sequences and predict the energy gap of proteins designed to fold well at elevated temperatures. To test the model, we present a novel scalable algorithm for simultaneous energy calculation for many sequences in many structures, targeting massively parallel computing architectures such as graphics processing unit. The energy calculation is performed by multiplying two matrices, one representing the complete set of sequences, and the other describing the contact maps of all structural templates. An implementation of the algorithm for the CUDA platform is available at http://www.github.com/kzeldovich/galeprot and calculates protein folding energies over 250 times faster than a single central processing unit. Analysis of amino acid usage in 64-mer cubic lattice proteins designed to fold well at different temperatures demonstrates an excellent agreement between theoretical and simulated values of energy gap. The theoretical predictions of temperature trends of amino acid frequencies are significantly correlated with bioinformatics data on 191 bacteria and archaea, and highlight protein folding constraints as a fundamental selection pressure during thermal adaptation in biological evolution. PMID:26254668

  9. Screening proteinSingle stranded RNA complexes by NMR spectroscopy for structure determination☆

    PubMed Central

    Foot, Jaelle N.; Feracci, Mikael; Dominguez, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, RNA molecules have been revealed to be at the center of numerous biological processes. Long considered as passive molecules transferring genetic information from DNA to proteins, it is now well established that RNA molecules play important regulatory roles. Associated with that, the number of identified RNA binding proteins (RBPs) has increased considerably and mutations in RNA molecules or RBP have been shown to cause various diseases, such as cancers. It is therefore crucial to understand at the molecular level how these proteins specifically recognise their RNA targets in order to design new generation drug therapies targeting protein–RNA complexes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a particularly well-suited technique to study such protein–RNA complexes at the atomic level and can provide valuable information for new drug discovery programs. In this article, we describe the NMR strategy that we and other laboratories use for screening optimal conditions necessary for structural studies of protein-single stranded RNA complexes, using two proteins, Sam68 and T-STAR, as examples. PMID:24096002

  10. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  11. Boolean modeling of transcriptome data reveals novel modes of heterotrimeric G-protein action.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sona; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Wilson, Liza; Li, Song; Zhao, Zhixin; Gookin, Timothy E; Assmann, Sarah M; Albert, Réka

    2010-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate crucial and diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we generate and analyze microarray data from guard cells and leaves of G-protein subunit mutants of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with or without treatment with the stress hormone, abscisic acid. Although G-protein control of the transcriptome has received little attention to date in any system, transcriptome analysis allows us to search for potentially uncommon yet significant signaling mechanisms. We describe the theoretical Boolean mechanisms of G-protein x hormone regulation, and then apply a pattern matching approach to associate gene expression profiles with Boolean models. We find that (1) classical mechanisms of G-protein signaling are well represented. Conversely, some theoretical regulatory modes of the G-protein are not supported; (2) a new mechanism of G-protein signaling is revealed, in which Gbeta regulates gene expression identically in the presence or absence of Galpha; (3) guard cells and leaves favor different G-protein modes in transcriptome regulation, supporting system specificity of G-protein signaling. Our method holds significant promise for analyzing analogous 'switch-like' signal transduction events in any organism. PMID:20531402

  12. Boolean modeling of transcriptome data reveals novel modes of heterotrimeric G-protein action

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sona; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Wilson, Liza; Li, Song; Zhao, Zhixin; Gookin, Timothy E; Assmann, Sarah M; Albert, Réka

    2010-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate crucial and diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we generate and analyze microarray data from guard cells and leaves of G-protein subunit mutants of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with or without treatment with the stress hormone, abscisic acid. Although G-protein control of the transcriptome has received little attention to date in any system, transcriptome analysis allows us to search for potentially uncommon yet significant signaling mechanisms. We describe the theoretical Boolean mechanisms of G-protein × hormone regulation, and then apply a pattern matching approach to associate gene expression profiles with Boolean models. We find that (1) classical mechanisms of G-protein signaling are well represented. Conversely, some theoretical regulatory modes of the G-protein are not supported; (2) a new mechanism of G-protein signaling is revealed, in which Gβ regulates gene expression identically in the presence or absence of Gα; (3) guard cells and leaves favor different G-protein modes in transcriptome regulation, supporting system specificity of G-protein signaling. Our method holds significant promise for analyzing analogous ‘switch-like' signal transduction events in any organism. PMID:20531402

  13. The interactome of a PTB domain-containing adapter protein, Odin, revealed by SILAC

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are tightly controlled by positive and negative regulators. We have previously identified Odin (also known as ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 1A; gene symbol AKNS1A) as a negative regulator of growth factor signaling; however, the mechanisms through which Odin regulates these pathways remain to be elucidated. To determine how Odin negatively regulates growth factor signaling, we undertook a proteomic approach to systematically identify proteins that interact with Odin using the SILAC strategy. In this study, we identified 18 molecules that were specifically associated in a protein complex with Odin. Our study established that the complete family of 14-3-3 proteins occur in a protein complex with Odin, which is also supported by earlier reports that identified a few members of the 14-3-3 family as Odin interactors. Among the novel protein interactors of Odin were CD2-associated protein, SH3 domain kinase binding protein 1 and DAB2 interacting protein. We confirmed 8 of the eighteen interactions identified in the Odin protein complex by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Finally, a literature-based network analysis revealed that Odin interacting partners are involved in various cellular processes, some of which are key molecules in regulating receptor endocytosis. PMID:21081186

  14. Function of the hydration layer around an antifreeze protein revealed by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, David; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanism by which the antifreeze protein from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, binds to ice. Comparison of structural and dynamic properties of the water around the three faces of the triangular prism-shaped protein in aqueous solution reveals that at low temperature the water structure is ordered and the dynamics slowed down around the ice-binding face of the protein, with a disordering effect observed around the other two faces. These results suggest a dual role for the solvation water around the protein. The preconfigured solvation shell around the ice-binding face is involved in the initial recognition and binding of the antifreeze protein to ice by lowering the barrier for binding and consolidation of the protein:ice interaction surface. Thus, the antifreeze protein can bind to the molecularly rough ice surface by becoming actively involved in the formation of its own binding site. Also, the disruption of water structure around the rest of the protein helps prevent the adsorbed protein becoming covered by further ice growth.

  15. Cardiomyocyte degeneration with calpain deficiency reveals a critical role in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Diwan, Abhinav; Odley, Amy M; Hahn, Harvey S; Osinska, Hanna; Melendez, Jaime G; Robbins, Jeffrey; Lynch, Roy A; Marreez, Yehia; Dorn, Gerald W

    2007-04-13

    Regulating the balance between synthesis and proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins is essential for tissue growth and maintenance, but the critical pathways regulating protein ubiquitination and degradation are incompletely defined. Although participation of calpain calcium-activated proteases in post-necrotic myocardial autolysis is well characterized, their importance in homeostatic turnover of normal cardiac tissue is controversial. Hence, we evaluated the consequences of physiologic calpain (calcium-activated protease) activity in cultured cardiomyocytes and unstressed mouse hearts. Comparison of in vitro proteolytic activities of cardiac-expressed calpains 1 and 2 revealed calpain 1, but not calpain 2, activity at physiological calcium concentrations. Physiological calpain 1 activation was evident in adenoviral transfected cultured cardiomyocytes as proteolysis of specific substrates, generally increased protein ubiquitination, and accelerated protein turnover, that were each inhibited by coexpression of the inhibitor protein calpastatin. Conditional forced expression of calpain 1, but not calpain 2, in mouse hearts demonstrated substrate-specific proteolytic activity under basal conditions, with hyperubiquitination of cardiac proteins and increased 26S proteasome activity. Loss of myocardial calpain activity by forced expression of calpastatin diminished ubiquitination of 1 or more specific myocardial proteins, without affecting overall ubiquitination or proteasome activity, and resulted in a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by accumulation of intracellular protein aggregates, formation of autophagosomes, and degeneration of sarcomeres. Thus, calpain 1 is upstream of, and necessary for, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of a subset of myocardial proteins whose abnormal accumulation produces autophagosomes and degeneration of cardiomyocytes with functional decompensation. PMID:17332428

  16. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  17. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals distinct injury responses in different types of DRG sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ganlu; Huang, Kevin; Hu, Youjin; Du, Guizhen; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to various injury-induced responses in sensory neurons including physiological pain, neuronal cell death, and nerve regeneration. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of mouse nonpeptidergic nociceptors (NP), peptidergic nociceptors (PEP), and large myelinated sensory neurons (LM) under both control and injury conditions at 3 days after sciatic nerve transection (SNT). After performing principle component and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we categorized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into different subtypes and discovered co-regulated injury-response genes including novel regeneration associated genes (RAGs) in association with neuronal development, protein translation and cytoplasm transportation. In addition, we found significant up-regulation of the genes associated with cell death such as Pdcd2 in a subset of NP neurons after axotomy, implicating their actions in neuronal cell death upon nerve injury. Our study revealed the distinctive and sustained heterogeneity of transcriptomic responses to injury at single neuron level, implicating the involvement of different gene regulatory networks in nerve regeneration, neuronal cell death and neuropathy in different population of DRG neurons. PMID:27558660

  18. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals distinct injury responses in different types of DRG sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ganlu; Huang, Kevin; Hu, Youjin; Du, Guizhen; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to various injury-induced responses in sensory neurons including physiological pain, neuronal cell death, and nerve regeneration. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of mouse nonpeptidergic nociceptors (NP), peptidergic nociceptors (PEP), and large myelinated sensory neurons (LM) under both control and injury conditions at 3 days after sciatic nerve transection (SNT). After performing principle component and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we categorized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into different subtypes and discovered co-regulated injury-response genes including novel regeneration associated genes (RAGs) in association with neuronal development, protein translation and cytoplasm transportation. In addition, we found significant up-regulation of the genes associated with cell death such as Pdcd2 in a subset of NP neurons after axotomy, implicating their actions in neuronal cell death upon nerve injury. Our study revealed the distinctive and sustained heterogeneity of transcriptomic responses to injury at single neuron level, implicating the involvement of different gene regulatory networks in nerve regeneration, neuronal cell death and neuropathy in different population of DRG neurons. PMID:27558660

  19. Transcriptome analysis revealed chimeric RNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms and allele-specific expression in porcine prenatal skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yalan; Tang, Zhonglin; Fan, Xinhao; Xu, Kui; Mu, Yulian; Zhou, Rong; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal skeletal muscle development genetically determines postnatal muscle characteristics such as growth and meat quality in pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development remain unclear. Here, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of chimeric RNAs, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and allele-specific expression (ASE) in prenatal skeletal muscle in pigs. We identified 14,810 protein coding genes and 163 high-confidence chimeric RNAs expressed in prenatal skeletal muscle. More than 94.5% of the chimeric RNAs obeyed the canonical GT/AG splice rule and were trans-splicing events. Ten and two RNAs were aligned to human and mouse chimeric transcripts, respectively. We detected 106,457 high-quality SNPs (6,955 novel), which were mostly (89.09%) located within QTLs for production traits. The high proportion of non-exonic SNPs revealed the incomplete annotation status of the current swine reference genome. ASE analysis revealed that 11,300 heterozygous SNPs showed allelic imbalance, whereas 131 ASE variants were located in the chimeric RNAs. Moreover, 4 ASE variants were associated with various economically relevant traits of pigs. Taken together, our data provide a source for studies of chimeric RNAs and biomarkers for pig breeding, while illuminating the complex transcriptional events underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development in mammals. PMID:27352850

  20. Transcriptome analysis revealed chimeric RNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms and allele-specific expression in porcine prenatal skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yalan; Tang, Zhonglin; Fan, Xinhao; Xu, Kui; Mu, Yulian; Zhou, Rong; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal skeletal muscle development genetically determines postnatal muscle characteristics such as growth and meat quality in pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development remain unclear. Here, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of chimeric RNAs, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and allele-specific expression (ASE) in prenatal skeletal muscle in pigs. We identified 14,810 protein coding genes and 163 high-confidence chimeric RNAs expressed in prenatal skeletal muscle. More than 94.5% of the chimeric RNAs obeyed the canonical GT/AG splice rule and were trans-splicing events. Ten and two RNAs were aligned to human and mouse chimeric transcripts, respectively. We detected 106,457 high-quality SNPs (6,955 novel), which were mostly (89.09%) located within QTLs for production traits. The high proportion of non-exonic SNPs revealed the incomplete annotation status of the current swine reference genome. ASE analysis revealed that 11,300 heterozygous SNPs showed allelic imbalance, whereas 131 ASE variants were located in the chimeric RNAs. Moreover, 4 ASE variants were associated with various economically relevant traits of pigs. Taken together, our data provide a source for studies of chimeric RNAs and biomarkers for pig breeding, while illuminating the complex transcriptional events underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development in mammals. PMID:27352850

  1. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  2. Multi-scale perturbations of protein interactomes reveal their mechanisms of regulation, robustness and insights into genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Vignaud, Hélène; Rochette, Samuel; Diss, Guillaume; Chrétien, Andrée-Ève; Berger, Caroline M; Landry, Christian R

    2016-03-01

    Cellular architectures and signaling machineries are organized through protein-protein interactions (PPIs). High-throughput methods to study PPIs in yeast have opened a new perspective on the organization of the cell by allowing the study of whole protein interactomes. Recent investigations have moved from the description of this organization to the analysis of its dynamics by experimenting how protein interaction networks (PINs) are rewired in response to perturbations. Here we review studies that have used the budding yeast as an experimental system to explore these altered networks. Given the large space of possible PPIs and the diversity of potential genetic and environmental perturbations, high-throughput methods are an essential requirement to survey PIN perturbations on a large scale. Network perturbations are typically conceptualized as the removal of entire proteins (nodes), the modification of single PPIs (edges) or changes in growth conditions. These studies have revealed mechanisms of PPI regulation, PIN architectural organization, robustness and sensitivity to perturbations. Despite these major advances, there are still inherent limits to current technologies that lead to a trade-off between the number of perturbations and the number of PPIs that can be considered simultaneously. Nevertheless, as we exemplify here, targeted approaches combined with the existing resources remain extremely powerful to explore the inner organization of cells and their responses to perturbations. PMID:26476431

  3. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  4. Analysis of Protein Phosphatase-1 and Aurora Protein Kinase Suppressors Reveals New Aspects of Regulatory Protein Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anuprita; Cannon, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) controls many processes in eukaryotic cells. Modulation of mitosis by reversing phosphorylation of proteins phosphorylated by aurora protein kinase is a critical function for PP1. Overexpression of the sole PP1, Glc7, in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is lethal. This work shows that lethality requires the function of Glc7 regulatory proteins Sds22, Reg2, and phosphorylated Glc8. This finding shows that Glc7 overexpression induced cell death requires a specific subset of the many Glc7-interacting proteins and therefore is likely caused by promiscuous dephosphorylation of a variety of substrates. Additionally, suppression can occur by reducing Glc7 protein levels by high-copy Fpr3 without use of its proline isomerase domain. This divulges a novel function of Fpr3. Most suppressors of GLC7 overexpression also suppress aurora protein kinase, ipl1, temperature-sensitive mutations. However, high-copy mutant SDS22 genes show reciprocal suppression of GLC7 overexpression induced cell death or ipl1 temperature sensitivity. Sds22 binds to many proteins besides Glc7. The N-terminal 25 residues of Sds22 are sufficient to bind, directly or indirectly, to seven proteins studied here including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein, Bub3. These data demonstrate that Sds22 organizes several proteins in addition to Glc7 to perform functions that counteract Ipl1 activity or lead to hyper Glc7 induced cell death. These data also emphasize that Sds22 targets Glc7 to nuclear locations distinct from Ipl1 substrates. PMID:23894419

  5. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  6. Nanomechanical Behavior of Single Crystalline SiC Nanotubes Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2008-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff potentials were used to study the response of single crystalline SiC nanotubes under tensile, compressive, torsional, combined tension-torsional and combined compression-torsional strains. The simulation results reveal that the nanotubes deform through bond-stretching and breaking and exhibit brittle properties under uniaxial tensile strain, except for the thinnest nanotube at high temperatures, which fails in a ductile manner. Under uniaxial compressive strain, the SiC nanotubes buckle with two modes, i.e. shell buckling and column buckling, depending on the length of the nanotubes. Under torsional strain, the nanotubes buckle either collapse in the middle region into a dumbbell-like structure for thinner wall thicknesses or fail by bond breakage for the largest wall thickness. Both the tensile failure stress and buckling stress decrease under combined tension-torsional and combined compression-torsional strain, and they decrease with increasing torsional rate under combined loading.

  7. Cellular Taxonomy of the Mouse Striatum as Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Ozgun; Stanley, Geoffrey M; Treutlein, Barbara; Neff, Norma F; Camp, J Gray; Malenka, Robert C; Rothwell, Patrick E; Fuccillo, Marc V; Südhof, Thomas C; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-07-26

    The striatum contributes to many cognitive processes and disorders, but its cell types are incompletely characterized. We show that microfluidic and FACS-based single-cell RNA sequencing of mouse striatum provides a well-resolved classification of striatal cell type diversity. Transcriptome analysis revealed ten differentiated, distinct cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal, immune, and vascular cells, and enabled the discovery of numerous marker genes. Furthermore, we identified two discrete subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that have specific markers and that overexpress genes linked to cognitive disorders and addiction. We also describe continuous cellular identities, which increase heterogeneity within discrete cell types. Finally, we identified cell type-specific transcription and splicing factors that shape cellular identities by regulating splicing and expression patterns. Our findings suggest that functional diversity within a complex tissue arises from a small number of discrete cell types, which can exist in a continuous spectrum of functional states. PMID:27425622

  8. Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal signals to activate dormant neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Coskun, Volkan; Liang, Aibing; Yu, Juehua; Cheng, Liming; Ge, Weihong; Shi, Zhanping; Zhang, Kunshan; Li, Chun; Cui, Yaru; Lin, Haijun; Luo, Dandan; Wang, Junbang; Lin, Connie; Dai, Zachary; Zhu, Hongwen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hailiang; deVellis, Jean; Horvath, Steve; Sun, Yi Eve; Li, Siguang

    2015-05-21

    The scarcity of tissue-specific stem cells and the complexity of their surrounding environment have made molecular characterization of these cells particularly challenging. Through single-cell transcriptome and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), we uncovered molecular properties of CD133(+)/GFAP(-) ependymal (E) cells in the adult mouse forebrain neurogenic zone. Surprisingly, prominent hub genes of the gene network unique to ependymal CD133(+)/GFAP(-) quiescent cells were enriched for immune-responsive genes, as well as genes encoding receptors for angiogenic factors. Administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activated CD133(+) ependymal neural stem cells (NSCs), lining not only the lateral but also the fourth ventricles and, together with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), elicited subsequent neural lineage differentiation and migration. This study revealed the existence of dormant ependymal NSCs throughout the ventricular surface of the CNS, as well as signals abundant after injury for their activation. PMID:26000486

  9. Ideal probe single-molecule experiments reveal the intrinsic dynamic heterogeneity of a supercooled liquid

    PubMed Central

    Paeng, Keewook; Park, Heungman; Hoang, Dat Tien; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of dynamic heterogeneity and the picture of the supercooled liquid as a mosaic of environments with distinct dynamics that interchange in time have been invoked to explain the nonexponential relaxations measured in these systems. The spatial extent and temporal persistence of these regions of distinct dynamics have remained challenging to identify. Here, single-molecule fluorescence measurements using a probe similar in size and mobility to the host o-terphenyl unambiguously reveal exponential relaxations distributed in time and space and directly demonstrate ergodicity of the system down to the glass transition temperature. In the temperature range probed, at least 200 times the structural relaxation time of the host is required to recover ensemble-averaged relaxation at every spatial region in the system. PMID:25825739

  10. Single-Cell RNA-Sequencing Reveals a Continuous Spectrum of Differentiation in Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Iain C.; Svensson, Valentine; Labalette, Charlotte; Ferreira, Lauren; Hamey, Fiona; Voet, Thierry; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Cvejic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transcriptional programs that govern hematopoiesis have been investigated primarily by population-level analysis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which cannot reveal the continuous nature of the differentiation process. Here we applied single-cell RNA-sequencing to a population of hematopoietic cells in zebrafish as they undergo thrombocyte lineage commitment. By reconstructing their developmental chronology computationally, we were able to place each cell along a continuum from stem cell to mature cell, refining the traditional lineage tree. The progression of cells along this continuum is characterized by a highly coordinated transcriptional program, displaying simultaneous suppression of genes involved in cell proliferation and ribosomal biogenesis as the expression of lineage specific genes increases. Within this program, there is substantial heterogeneity in the expression of the key lineage regulators. Overall, the total number of genes expressed, as well as the total mRNA content of the cell, decreases as the cells undergo lineage commitment. PMID:26804912

  11. Heterogeneity of Mesp1+ mesoderm revealed by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Chan, Howe H W; Kyba, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Mesp1 is a transcription factor that promotes differentiation of pluripotent cells into different mesoderm lineages including hematopoietic, cardiac and skeletal myogenic. This occurs via at least two transient cell populations: a common hematopoietic/cardiac progenitor population and a common cardiac/skeletal myogenic progenitor population. It is not established whether Mesp1-induced mesoderm cells are intrinsically heterogeneous, or are simply capable of multiple lineage decisions. In the current study, we applied single-cell RNA-seq to analyze Mesp1+ mesoderm. Initial whole transcriptome analysis showed a surprising homogeneity among Mesp1-induced mesoderm cells. However, this apparent global homogeneity masked an intrinsic heterogeneity revealed by interrogating a panel of early mesoderm patterning factors. This approach enabled discovery of subpopulations primed for hematopoietic or cardiac development. These studies demonstrate the heterogeneic nature of Mesp1+ mesoderm. PMID:27131741

  12. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C.; Wagner, Daniel E.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ζ (zeta) and σ (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings present a new view of planarian neoblasts, in which the population is comprised of two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. PMID:25017721

  13. Hydra meiosis reveals unexpected conservation of structural synaptonemal complex proteins across metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Fraune, Johanna; Alsheimer, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Busch, Karoline; Fraune, Sebastian; Bosch, Thomas C. G.; Benavente, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a key structure of meiosis, mediating the stable pairing (synapsis) of homologous chromosomes during prophase I. Its remarkable tripartite structure is evolutionarily well conserved and can be found in almost all sexually reproducing organisms. However, comparison of the different SC protein components in the common meiosis model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Mus musculus revealed no sequence homology. This discrepancy challenged the hypothesis that the SC arose only once in evolution. To pursue this matter we focused on the evolution of SYCP1 and SYCP3, the two major structural SC proteins of mammals. Remarkably, our comparative bioinformatic and expression studies revealed that SYCP1 and SYCP3 are also components of the SC in the basal metazoan Hydra. In contrast to previous assumptions, we therefore conclude that SYCP1 and SYCP3 form monophyletic groups of orthologous proteins across metazoans. PMID:23012415

  14. Local Geometry and Evolutionary Conservation of Protein Surfaces Reveal the Multiple Recognition Patches in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Elodie; Carbone, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential to all biological processes and they represent increasingly important therapeutic targets. Here, we present a new method for accurately predicting protein-protein interfaces, understanding their properties, origins and binding to multiple partners. Contrary to machine learning approaches, our method combines in a rational and very straightforward way three sequence- and structure-based descriptors of protein residues: evolutionary conservation, physico-chemical properties and local geometry. The implemented strategy yields very precise predictions for a wide range of protein-protein interfaces and discriminates them from small-molecule binding sites. Beyond its predictive power, the approach permits to dissect interaction surfaces and unravel their complexity. We show how the analysis of the predicted patches can foster new strategies for PPIs modulation and interaction surface redesign. The approach is implemented in JET2, an automated tool based on the Joint Evolutionary Trees (JET) method for sequence-based protein interface prediction. JET2 is freely available at www.lcqb.upmc.fr/JET2. PMID:26690684

  15. Origin of worldwide cultivated barley revealed by NAM-1 gene and grain protein content

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Ren, Xifeng; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    The origin, evolution, and distribution of cultivated barley provides powerful insights into the historic origin and early spread of agrarian culture. Here, population-based genetic diversity and phylogenetic analyses were performed to determine the evolution and origin of barley and how domestication and subsequent introgression have affected the genetic diversity and changes in cultivated barley on a worldwide scale. A set of worldwide cultivated and wild barleys from Asia and Tibet of China were analyzed using the sequences for NAM-1 gene and gene-associated traits-grain protein content (GPC). Our results showed Tibetan wild barley distinctly diverged from Near Eastern barley, and confirmed that Tibet is one of the origin and domestication centers for cultivated barley, and in turn supported a polyphyletic origin of domesticated barley. Comparison of haplotype composition among geographic regions revealed gene flow between Eastern and Western barley populations, suggesting that the Silk Road might have played a crucial role in the spread of genes. The GPC in the 118 cultivated and 93 wild barley accessions ranged from 6.73 to 12.35% with a mean of 9.43%. Overall, wild barley had higher averaged GPC (10.44%) than cultivated barley. Two unique haplotypes (Hap2 and Hap7) caused by a base mutations (at position 544) in the coding region of the NAM-1 gene might have a significant impact on the GPC. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of NAM-1 associated with GPC in barley could provide a useful method for screening GPC in barley germplasm. The Tibetan wild accessions with lower GPC could be useful for malt barley breeding. PMID:26483818

  16. Protein-Protein Interaction Network could reveal the relationship between the breast and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Rahmati-Rad, Sara; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaei Tavirani, Majid; Seyyedi, Samaneh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study is aimed to elicit the possible correlation between breast and colon cancer from molecular prospective by analyzing and comparing pathway-based biomarkers. Background: Breast and colon cancer are known to be frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in men and women around the world. There is some evidence that while the incident of breast cancer in young women is high, it is reported lower in the aged women. In fact, aged women are more prone to colorectal cancer than older men. . In addition, many studies showed that several biomarkers are common among these malignancies. Patients and methods: The genes were retrieved and compared from KEGG database and WikiPathway, and subsequently, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed and analyzed using Cytoscape v:3.2.1 software and related algorithms. Results: More than forty common genes were identified among these malignancies; however, by pathways comparison, twenty genes are related to both breast and colon cancer. Centrality and cluster screening identified hub genes, including SMAD2, SMAD3, (SMAD4, MYC), JUN, BAD, TP53. These seven genes are enriched in regulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor signaling pathway, positive regulation of Rac protein signal transduction, positive regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization involved in apoptotic signaling pathway, and positive regulation of mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition respectively. Conclusion: As there are numerous genes frequent between colorectal cancer and breast cancer, there may be a common molecular origin for these malignancies occurrences. It seems that breast cancer in females interferes with the rate of colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:26328044

  17. Integration and oligomerization of Bax protein in lipid bilayers characterized by single molecule fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Dongxiang

    2014-11-14

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein. The activated Bax translocates to mitochondria, where it forms pore and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane. This process requires the BH3-only activator protein (i.e. tBid) and can be inhibited by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bcl-xL. Here by using single molecule fluorescence techniques, we studied the integration and oligomerization of Bax in lipid bilayers. Our study revealed that Bax can bind to lipid membrane spontaneously in the absence of tBid. The Bax pore formation undergoes at least two steps: pre-pore formation and membrane insertion. The activated Bax triggered by tBid or BH3 domain peptide integrates on bilayers and tends to form tetramers, which are termed as pre-pore. Subsequent insertion of the pre-pore into membrane is highly dependent on the composition of cardiolipin in lipid bilayers. Bcl-xL can translocate Bax from membrane to solution and inhibit the pore formation. The study of Bax integration and oligomerization at the single molecule level provides new evidences that may help elucidate the pore formation of Bax and its regulatory mechanism in apoptosis. PMID:25288797

  18. Systematic Analysis of Essential Genes Reveals New Regulators of G protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cappell, Steven D.; Baker, Rachael; Skowyra, Dorota; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The yeast pheromone pathway consists of a canonical heterotrimeric G protein and MAP kinase cascade. To identify new signaling components we systematically evaluated 870 essential genes using a library of repressible-promoter strains. Quantitative transcription-reporter and MAPK activity assays were used to identify strains that exhibit altered pheromone sensitivity. Of the 92 newly identified essential genes required for proper G protein signaling, those involved with protein degradation were most highly-represented. Included in this group are members of the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-Box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that SCFCdc4 acts together with the Cdc34 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme at the level of the G protein, promotes degradation of the G protein α subunit, Gpa1, in vivo and catalyzes Gpa1 ubiquitination in vitro. These new insights to the G protein signaling network reveal the essential-genome as an untapped resource for identifying new components and regulators of signal transduction pathways. PMID:20542006

  19. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  20. Quantitative proteomics reveals the effect of protein glycosylation in soybean root under flooding stress

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Flooding stress has a negative impact on soybean cultivation because it severely impairs growth and development. To understand the flooding responsive mechanism in early stage soybeans, a glycoproteomic technique was used. Two-day-old soybeans were treated with flooding for 2 days and roots were collected. Globally, the accumulation level of glycoproteins, as revealed by cross-reaction with concanavalin A decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. Glycoproteins were enriched from total protein extracts using concanavalin A lectin resin and analyzed using a gel-free proteomic technique. One-hundred eleven and 69 glycoproteins were identified without and with 2 days of flooding stress, respectively. Functional categorization of these identified glycoproteins indicated that the accumulation level of proteins related to protein degradation, cell wall, and glycolysis increased, while stress-related proteins decreased under flooding stress. Also the accumulation level of glycoproteins localized in the secretory pathway decreased under flooding stress. Out of 23 common glycoproteins between control and flooding conditions, peroxidases and glycosyl hydrolases were decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. mRNA expression levels of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and N-glycosylation related proteins were downregulated by flooding stress. These results suggest that flooding might negatively affect the process of N-glycosylation of proteins related to stress and protein degradation; however glycoproteins involved in glycolysis are activated. PMID:25477889

  1. Proteomics Reveals Plastid- and Periplastid-Targeted Proteins in the Chlorarachniophyte Alga Bigelowiella natans

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Spencer, David F.; Laboissiere, Sylvie; Neilson, Jonathan A.D.; Eveleigh, Robert J.M.; Durnford, Dion G.; Gray, Michael W.; Archibald, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are unicellular marine algae with plastids (chloroplasts) of secondary endosymbiotic origin. Chlorarachniophyte cells retain the remnant nucleus (nucleomorph) and cytoplasm (periplastidial compartment, PPC) of the green algal endosymbiont from which their plastid was derived. To characterize the diversity of nucleus-encoded proteins targeted to the chlorarachniophyte plastid, nucleomorph, and PPC, we isolated plastid–nucleomorph complexes from the model chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans and subjected them to high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Our proteomic analysis, the first of its kind for a nucleomorph-bearing alga, resulted in the identification of 324 proteins with 95% confidence. Approximately 50% of these proteins have predicted bipartite leader sequences at their amino termini. Nucleus-encoded proteins make up >90% of the proteins identified. With respect to biological function, plastid-localized light-harvesting proteins were well represented, as were proteins involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that many, but by no means all, of the proteins identified in our proteomic screen are of apparent green algal ancestry, consistent with the inferred evolutionary origin of the plastid and nucleomorph in chlorarachniophytes. PMID:23221610

  2. Essential Strategies for Revealing Nanoscale Protein Dynamics by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2016-01-01

    Determining the internal motions of a protein on nanosecond-to-microsecond timescales and on nanometer length scales is challenging by experimental biophysical techniques. Neutron spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) offers a unique opportunity to determine such nanoscale protein domain motions. However, the major hurdle in applying NSE to determine nanoscale protein motion is that the time and length scales of internal protein motions tend to be comparable to that of the global motions of a protein. The signals detected by NSE tend to be dominated by rigid-body translational and rotational diffusion. Using theoretical analyses, our laboratory showed that selective deuteration of a protein domain or a subunit can enhance the capability of NSE to reveal the internal motions in a protein complex. Here, we discuss the essential theoretical analysis and experimental methodology in detail. Protein nanomachines are far more complex than any molecular motors that have been artificially constructed, and their skillful utilization likely represents the future of medicine. With selective deuteration, NSE will allow us to see these nanomachines in motion. PMID:26791982

  3. Single-cell analysis reveals a novel uncultivated magnetotactic bacterium within the candidate division OP3.

    PubMed

    Kolinko, Sebastian; Jogler, Christian; Katzmann, Emanuel; Wanner, Gerhard; Peplies, Jörg; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a diverse group of prokaryotes that orient along magnetic fields using membrane-coated magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) or greigite (Fe(3) S(4) ), the magnetosomes. Previous phylogenetic analysis of MTB has been limited to few cultivated species and most abundant members of natural populations, which were assigned to Proteobacteria and the Nitrospirae phyla. Here, we describe a single cell-based approach that allowed the targeted phylogenetic and ultrastructural analysis of the magnetotactic bacterium SKK-01, which was low abundant in sediments of Lake Chiemsee. Morphologically conspicuous single cells of SKK-01 were micromanipulated from magnetically collected multi-species MTB populations, which was followed by whole genome amplification and ultrastructural analysis of sorted cells. Besides intracellular sulphur inclusions, the large ovoid cells of SKK-01 harbour ∼175 bullet-shaped magnetosomes arranged in multiple chains that consist of magnetite as revealed by TEM and EDX analysis. Sequence analysis of 16 and 23S rRNA genes from amplified genomic DNA as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization assigned SKK-01 to the candidate division OP3, which so far lacks any cultivated representatives. SKK-01 represents the first morphotype that can be assigned to the OP3 group as well as the first magnetotactic member of the PVC superphylum. PMID:22003954

  4. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation.

    PubMed

    Shalek, Alex K; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S; Gaublomme, Jellert T; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-19

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a 'core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few 'precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced 'peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses. PMID:24919153

  5. De novo genetic variation revealed in somatic sectors of single Arabidopsis plants

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Marianne T; Khalid, Aaron M; Chang, Pei-Chun; Vanderhoek, Karen C; Lai, Dulcie; Doerr, Meghan D; Lolle, Susan J

    2013-01-01

    Concern over the tremendous loss of genetic diversity among many of our most important crops has prompted major efforts to preserve seed stocks derived from cultivated species and their wild relatives.  Arabidopsis thaliana propagates mainly by self-fertilizing, and therefore, like many crop plants, theoretically has a limited potential for producing genetically diverse offspring. Despite this, inbreeding has persisted in Arabidopsis for over a million years suggesting that some underlying adaptive mechanism buffers the deleterious consequences of this reproductive strategy. Using presence-absence molecular markers we demonstrate that single Arabidopsis plants can have multiple genotypes. Sequence analyses reveal single nucleotide changes, loss of sequences and, surprisingly, acquisition of unique genomic insertions. Estimates based on quantitative analyses suggest that these genetically discordant sectors are very small but can have a complex genetic makeup. In ruling out more trivial explanations for these data, our findings raise the possibility that intrinsic drivers of genetic variation are responsible for the targeted sequence changes we detect. Given the evolutionary advantage afforded to populations with greater genetic diversity, we hypothesize that organisms that primarily self-fertilize or propagate clonally counteract the genetic cost of such reproductive strategies by leveraging a cryptic reserve of extra-genomic information. PMID:24555023

  6. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J.; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S.; Gaublomme, Jellert T.; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P.; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-01

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a `core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few `precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced `peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses.

  7. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  8. Global phospholipidomics analysis reveals selective pulmonary peroxidation profiles upon inhalation of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kisin, Elena R; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kapralova, Valentina I; Sparvero, Louis J; Amoscato, Andrew A; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-09-27

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause nonspecific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in the two most abundant phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol, whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This nonrandom peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H(2)O(2)/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria-targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  9. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-09

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3­-type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra­-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  10. Human stem cells from single blastomeres reveal pathways of embryonic or trophoblast fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Zdravkovic, Tamara; Nazor, Kristopher L.; Larocque, Nicholas; Gormley, Matthew; Donne, Matthew; Hunkapillar, Nathan; Giritharan, Gnanaratnam; Bernstein, Harold S.; Wei, Grace; Hebrok, Matthias; Zeng, Xianmin; Genbacev, Olga; Mattis, Aras; McMaster, Michael T.; Krtolica, Ana; Valbuena, Diana; Simón, Carlos; Laurent, Louise C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of initial cell fate decisions differ among species. To gain insights into lineage allocation in humans, we derived ten human embryonic stem cell lines (designated UCSFB1-10) from single blastomeres of four 8-cell embryos and one 12-cell embryo from a single couple. Compared with numerous conventional lines from blastocysts, they had unique gene expression and DNA methylation patterns that were, in part, indicative of trophoblast competence. At a transcriptional level, UCSFB lines from different embryos were often more closely related than those from the same embryo. As predicted by the transcriptomic data, immunolocalization of EOMES, T brachyury, GDF15 and active β-catenin revealed differential expression among blastomeres of 8- to 10-cell human embryos. The UCSFB lines formed derivatives of the three germ layers and CDX2-positive progeny, from which we derived the first human trophoblast stem cell line. Our data suggest heterogeneity among early-stage blastomeres and that the UCSFB lines have unique properties, indicative of a more immature state than conventional lines. PMID:26483210

  11. Oxidant Signaling in Cells Revealed by Single Rare-Earth Based Nanoparticle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzigues, Cedric; Abdesselem, Mouna; Ramodiharilafy, Rivo; Gacoin, Thierry; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    The spatio-temporal organization of signaling pathways controls the cell response. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are second messengers involved in the control of numerous normal and pathological processes and their local concentration is thus tightly regulated. However, the dynamics of ROS production and organization is mostly unknown, due to the lack of efficient probes. We developed single ROS sensitive Eu3+-doped nanoparticle imaging to quantitatively probed the intracellular ROS response. We revealed specific temporal patterns of ROS production under different types of stimulation (PDGF and ET-1) and quantitatively identified mechanisms of transactivation, which notably control the dynamics of the cell response. By using a microfluidic system, we apply spatially controlled stimulations and displayed the maintenance of asymmetric ROS concentration in the cell under a PDGF gradient. We then developed a ratiometric method using a nanoparticle mix, to quantitatively detect ROS with a 500 ms temporal resolution. We thus elucidate molecular mechanisms responsible for the control of the oxidant production kinetics. Altogether, our results reveal regulation mechanisms controlling ROS spatio-temporal organization, which can be crucial for the buildup of the cell response.

  12. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of β1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of β1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and β1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  13. A Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma Revealed by a Single Bone Lesion with No Poor Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Godbert, Yann; Henriques-Figueiredo, Benedicte; Cazeau, Anne-Laure; Carrat, Xavier; Stegen, Marc; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Bonichon, Francoise

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Thyroid carcinomas incidence, in particular papillary variants, is increasing. These cancers are generally considered to have excellent prognosis, and papillary microcarcinomas are usually noninvasive. Many prognostic histopathology factors have been described to guide therapeutic decisions. Most patients are treated with total thyroidectomy without radioiodine treatment or partial surgery. Case Summary. A 65-year-old man with no significant medical history presented with pain in the left chest wall that had been present for several months. A computed tomography (CT) found a large tissue mass of 4 cm responsible for lysis of the middle arch of the 4th rib on the left. It was a single lesion, highly hypermetabolic on the 18-FDG PET/CT. The histology analysis of the biopsy and surgical specimen favored an adenocarcinoma with immunostaining positive for TTF1 and thyroglobulin (Tg). The total thyroidectomy carried out subsequently revealed a 4 mm papillary microcarcinoma with vesicular architecture of the right lobe, well delimited and distant from the capsule without vascular embolisms. After two radioiodine treatments, the patient is in complete clinical, biological, and radiological remission. Conclusion. This extremely rare case of a singular bone metastasis revealing a papillary thyroid microcarcinoma illustrates the necessity of further research to better characterize the forms of papillary thyroid microcarcinomas with potentially poor prognosis. PMID:23509641

  14. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M.; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons. PMID:26047845

  15. Structural basis for the modular recognition of single-stranded RNA by PPR proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ping; Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Liu, Ying; Liu, Junjie; Yu, Feng; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; He, Jianhua; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Shi, Yigong; Yan, Nieng

    2013-12-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins represent a large family of sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins that are involved in multiple aspects of RNA metabolism. PPR proteins, which are found in exceptionally large numbers in the mitochondria and chloroplasts of terrestrial plants, recognize single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in a modular fashion. The maize chloroplast protein PPR10 binds to two similar RNA sequences from the ATPI-ATPH and PSAJ-RPL33 intergenic regions, referred to as ATPH and PSAJ, respectively. By protecting the target RNA elements from 5' or 3' exonucleases, PPR10 defines the corresponding 5' and 3' messenger RNA termini. Despite rigorous functional characterizations, the structural basis of sequence-specific ssRNA recognition by PPR proteins remains to be elucidated. Here we report the crystal structures of PPR10 in RNA-free and RNA-bound states at resolutions of 2.85 and 2.45Å, respectively. In the absence of RNA binding, the nineteen repeats of PPR10 are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral. PPR10 forms an antiparallel, intertwined homodimer and exhibits considerable conformational changes upon binding to its target ssRNA, an 18-nucleotide PSAJ element. Six nucleotides of PSAJ are specifically recognized by six corresponding PPR10 repeats following the predicted code. The molecular basis for the specific and modular recognition of RNA bases A, G and U is revealed. The structural elucidation of RNA recognition by PPR proteins provides an important framework for potential biotechnological applications of PPR proteins in RNA-related research areas.

  16. Differential Interaction Kinetics of a Bipolar Structure-Specific Endonuclease with DNA Flaps Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Rachid; Lestini, Roxane; Kühn, Joëlle; Fave, Xenia; McLeod, Lauren; Myllykallio, Hannu; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Bouzigues, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) on 5′ and 3′-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5′ or 3′ extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases. PMID:25412080

  17. A six-plex proteome quantification strategy reveals the dynamics of protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangjun; Cheng, Kai; Wei, Xiaoluan; Qin, Hongqiang; Chen, Rui; Liu, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-01-01

    MS1 full scan based quantification is one of the most popular approaches for large-scale proteome quantification. Typically only three different samples can be differentially labeled and quantified in a single experiment. Here we present a two stages stable isotope labeling strategy which allows six different protein samples (six-plex) to be reliably labeled and simultaneously quantified at MS1 level. Briefly in the first stage, isotope lysine-d0 (K0) and lysine-d4 (K4) are in vivo incorporated into different protein samples during cell culture. Then in the second stage, three of K0 and K4 labeled protein samples are digested by lysine C and in vitro labeled with light (2CH3), medium (2CD2H), and heavy (2(13)CD3) dimethyl groups, respectively. We demonstrated that this six-plex isotope labeling strategy could successfully investigate the dynamics of protein turnover in a high throughput manner. PMID:23661174

  18. Stochastic detection of Pim protein kinases reveals electrostatically enhanced association of a peptide substrate

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Leon; Cheley, Stephen; Alexander, Leila T.; Knapp, Stefan; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-01-01

    In stochastic sensing, the association and dissociation of analyte molecules is observed as the modulation of an ionic current flowing through a single engineered protein pore, enabling the label-free determination of rate and equilibrium constants with respect to a specific binding site. We engineered sensors based on the staphylococcal α-hemolysin pore to allow the single-molecule detection and characterization of protein kinase–peptide interactions. We enhanced this approach by using site-specific proteolysis to generate pores bearing a single peptide sensor element attached by an N-terminal peptide bond to the trans mouth of the pore. Kinetics and affinities for the Pim protein kinases (Pim-1, Pim-2, and Pim-3) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase were measured and found to be independent of membrane potential and in good agreement with previously reported data. Kinase binding exhibited a distinct current noise behavior that forms a basis for analyte discrimination. Finally, we observed unusually high association rate constants for the interaction of Pim kinases with their consensus substrate Pimtide (∼107 to 108 M–1⋅s–1), the result of electrostatic enhancement, and propose a cellular role for this phenomenon. PMID:24194548

  19. An extracellular interactome of Immunoglobulin and LRR proteins reveals receptor-ligand networks

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Engin; Carrillo, Robert A.; Eastman, Catharine L.; Weiszmann, Richard; Waghray, Deepa; Johnson, Karl G.; Zinn, Kai; Celniker, Susan E.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular domains of cell-surface receptors and ligands mediate cell-cell communication, adhesion, and initiation of signaling events, but most existing protein-protein “interactome” datasets lack information for extracellular interactions. We probed interactions between receptor extracellular domains, focusing on the Immunoglobulin Superfamily (IgSF), Fibronectin type-III (FnIII) and Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) families of Drosophila, a set of 202 proteins, many of which are known to be important in neuronal and developmental functions. Out of 20503 candidate protein pairs tested, we observed 106 interactions, 83 of which were previously unknown. We ‘deorphanized’ the 20-member subfamily of defective in proboscis IgSF proteins, showing that they selectively interact with an 11-member subfamily of previously uncharacterized IgSF proteins. Both subfamilies interact with a single common ‘orphan’ LRR protein. We also observed new interactions between Hedgehog and EGFR pathway components. Several of these interactions could be visualized in live-dissected embryos, demonstrating that this approach can identify physiologically relevant receptor-ligand pairs. PMID:23827685

  20. STED nanoscopy combined with optical tweezers reveals protein dynamics on densely covered DNA (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Iddo; Sitters, Gerrit; Broekmans, Onno D.; Farge, Géraldine; Menges, Carolin; Wende, Wolfgang; Hell, Stefan W.; Peterman, Erwin J.; Wuite, Gijs J.

    2014-09-01

    Dense coverage of DNA by proteins is a ubiquitous feature of cellular processes such as DNA organization, replication and repair. We present a single-molecule approach capable of visualizing individual DNA-binding proteins on densely covered DNA and in the presence of high protein concentrations. Our approach combines optical tweezers with multicolor confocal and stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy. Proteins on DNA are visualized at a resolution of 50 nm, a sixfold resolution improvement over that of confocal microscopy. High temporal resolution (<50 ms) is ensured by fast one-dimensional beam scanning. Individual trajectories of proteins translocating on DNA can thus be distinguished and tracked with high precision. We demonstrate our multimodal approach by visualizing the assembly of dense nucleoprotein filaments with unprecedented spatial resolution in real time. Experimental access to the force-dependent kinetics and motility of DNA-associating proteins at biologically relevant protein densities is essential for linking idealized in vitro experiments with the in vivo situation.

  1. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  2. Structure and function of a mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein are revealed by desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Jaquinod, Michel; Mangavel, Cécile; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Manon, Stephen; Teyssier, Emeline; Payet, Nicole; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2007-05-01

    Few organisms are able to withstand desiccation stress; however, desiccation tolerance is widespread among plant seeds. Survival without water relies on an array of mechanisms, including the accumulation of stress proteins such as the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. These hydrophilic proteins are prominent in plant seeds but also found in desiccation-tolerant organisms. In spite of many theories and observations, LEA protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that LEAM, a mitochondrial LEA protein expressed in seeds, is a natively unfolded protein, which reversibly folds into alpha-helices upon desiccation. Structural modeling revealed an analogy with class A amphipathic helices of apolipoproteins that coat low-density lipoprotein particles in mammals. LEAM appears spontaneously modified by deamidation and oxidation of several residues that contribute to its structural features. LEAM interacts with membranes in the dry state and protects liposomes subjected to drying. The overall results provide strong evidence that LEAM protects the inner mitochondrial membrane during desiccation. According to sequence analyses of several homologous proteins from various desiccation-tolerant organisms, a similar protection mechanism likely acts with other types of cellular membranes. PMID:17526751

  3. Three steps to gold: mechanism of protein adsorption revealed by Brownian and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ozboyaci, M; Kokh, D B; Wade, R C

    2016-04-21

    The addition of three N-terminal histidines to β-lactamase inhibitor protein was shown experimentally to increase its binding potency to an Au(111) surface substantially but the binding mechanism was not resolved. Here, we propose a complete adsorption mechanism for this fusion protein by means of a multi-scale simulation approach and free energy calculations. We find that adsorption is a three-step process: (i) recognition of the surface predominantly by the histidine fusion peptide and formation of an encounter complex facilitated by a reduced dielectric screening of water in the interfacial region, (ii) adsorption of the protein on the surface and adoption of a specific binding orientation, and (iii) adaptation of the protein structure on the metal surface accompanied by induced fit. We anticipate that the mechanistic features of protein adsorption to an Au(111) surface revealed here can be extended to other inorganic surfaces and proteins and will therefore aid the design of specific protein-surface interactions. PMID:27021898

  4. Proteomic analysis of a segregant population reveals candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andréa Miyasaka; Urra, Claudio; Moraga, Carol; Jego, Marcela; Flores, Alejandra; Meisel, Lee; González, Mauricio; Infante, Rodrigo; Defilippi, Bruno G; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Orellana, Ariel

    2016-01-10

    Peaches are stored at low temperatures to delay ripening and increase postharvest life. However some varieties are susceptible to chilling injury,which leads to fruit mealiness, browning and flesh bleeding. In order to identify potentialmarkers associated with chilling injury,we performed proteomic analyses on a segregating population with contrasting susceptibility to chilling-induced mealiness. Chilling-induced mealiness was assessed by measuring juiciness in fruits that have been stored in cold and then allowed to ripen. Fruitmesocarp and leaf proteome from contrasting segregants were analyzed using 2-DE gels. Comparison of protein abundance between segregants revealed 133 spots from fruit mesocarp and 36 from leaf. Thirty four fruit mesocarp proteins were identified from these spots. Most of these proteins were related to ethylene synthesis, ABA response and stress response. Leaf protein analyses identified 22 proteins, most of which related to energy metabolism. Some of the genes that code for these proteins have been previously correlated with chilling injury through transcript analyses and co-segregation with mealiness QTLs. The results from this study, further deciphers the molecular mechanisms associated with chilling response in peach fruit, and identifies candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach which may be used as putative markers for this trait. PMID:26459401

  5. Revealing Atomic-Level Mechanisms of Protein Allostery with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hertig, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a powerful and popular method for the study of protein allostery, the widespread phenomenon in which a stimulus at one site on a protein influences the properties of another site on the protein. By capturing the motions of a protein’s constituent atoms, simulations can enable the discovery of allosteric binding sites and the determination of the mechanistic basis for allostery. These results can provide a foundation for applications including rational drug design and protein engineering. Here, we provide an introduction to the investigation of protein allostery using molecular dynamics simulation. We emphasize the importance of designing simulations that include appropriate perturbations to the molecular system, such as the addition or removal of ligands or the application of mechanical force. We also demonstrate how the bidirectional nature of allostery—the fact that the two sites involved influence one another in a symmetrical manner—can facilitate such investigations. Through a series of case studies, we illustrate how these concepts have been used to reveal the structural basis for allostery in several proteins and protein complexes of biological and pharmaceutical interest. PMID:27285999

  6. Atomic water channel controlling remarkable properties of a single brain microtubule: correlating single protein to its supramolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Ghosh, Batu; Aswani, Krishna; Hirata, Kazuto; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2013-09-15

    Microtubule nanotubes are found in every living eukaryotic cells; these are formed by reversible polymerization of the tubulin protein, and their hollow fibers are filled with uniquely arranged water molecules. Here we measure single tubulin molecule and single brain-neuron extracted microtubule nanowire with and without water channel inside to unravel their unique electronic and optical properties for the first time. We demonstrate that the energy levels of a single tubulin protein and single microtubule made of 40,000 tubulin dimers are identical unlike conventional materials. Moreover, the transmitted ac power and the transient fluorescence decay (single photon count) are independent of the microtubule length. Even more remarkable is the fact that the microtubule nanowire is more conducting than a single protein molecule that constitutes the nanowire. Microtubule's vibrational peaks condense to a single mode that controls the emergence of size independent electronic/optical properties, and automated noise alleviation, which disappear when the atomic water core is released from the inner cylinder. We have carried out several tricky state-of-the-art experiments and identified the electromagnetic resonance peaks of single microtubule reliably. The resonant vibrations established that the condensation of energy levels and periodic oscillation of unique energy fringes on the microtubule surface, emerge as the atomic water core resonantly integrates all proteins around it such that the nanotube irrespective of its size functions like a single protein molecule. Thus, a monomolecular water channel residing inside the protein-cylinder displays an unprecedented control in governing the tantalizing electronic and optical properties of microtubule. PMID:23567633

  7. Genome-wide search for eliminylating domains reveals novel function for BLES03-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial phosphothreonine lyases catalyze a novel posttranslational modification involving formation of dehydrobutyrine/dehyroalanine by β elimination of the phosphate group of phosphothreonine or phosphoserine residues in their substrate proteins. Though there is experimental evidence for presence of dehydro amino acids in human proteins, no eukaryotic homologs of these lyases have been identified as of today. A comprehensive genome-wide search for identifying phosphothreonine lyase homologs in eukaryotes was carried out. Our fold-based search revealed structural and catalytic site similarity between bacterial phosphothreonine lyases and BLES03 (basophilic leukemia-expressed protein 03), a human protein with unknown function. Ligand induced conformational changes similar to bacterial phosphothreonine lyases, and movement of crucial arginines in the loop region to the catalytic pocket upon binding of phosphothreonine-containing peptides was seen during docking and molecular dynamics studies. Genome-wide search for BLES03 homologs using sensitive profile-based methods revealed their presence not only in eukaryotic classes such as chordata and fungi but also in bacterial and archaebacterial classes. The synteny of these archaebacterial BLES03-like proteins was remarkably similar to that of type IV lantibiotic synthetases which harbor LanL-like phosphothreonine lyase domains. Hence, context-based analysis reinforced our earlier sequence/structure-based prediction of phosphothreonine lyase catalytic function for BLES03. Our in silico analysis has revealed that BLES03-like proteins with previously unknown function are novel eukaryotic phosphothreonine lyases involved in biosynthesis of dehydro amino acids, whereas their bacterial and archaebacterial counterparts might be involved in biosynthesis of natural products similar to lantibiotics. PMID:25062915

  8. Systematic protein interactome analysis of glycosaminoglycans revealed YcbS as a novel bacterial virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Sutandy, Fx Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Jun-Mu; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have evolved several strategies for interacting with host cell components, such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Some microbial proteins involved in host-GAG binding have been described; however, a systematic study on microbial proteome-mammalian GAG interactions has not been conducted. Here, we used Escherichia coli proteome chips to probe four typical mammalian GAGs, heparin, heparan sulphate (HS), chondroitin sulphate B (CSB), and chondroitin sulphate C (CSC), and identified 185 heparin-, 62 HS-, 98 CSB-, and 101 CSC-interacting proteins. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the unique functions of heparin- and HS-specific interacting proteins in glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among all the GAG-interacting proteins, three were outer membrane proteins (MbhA, YcbS, and YmgH). Invasion assays confirmed that mutant E. coli lacking ycbS could not invade the epithelial cells. Introducing plasmid carrying ycbS complemented the invading defects at ycbS lacking E. coli mutant, that can be further improved by overexpressing ycbS. Preblocking epithelial cells with YcbS reduced the percentage of E. coli invasions. Moreover, we observed that whole components of the ycb operon were crucial for invasion. The displacement assay revealed that YcbS binds to the laminin-binding site of heparin and might affect the host extracellular matrix structure by displacing heparin from laminin. PMID:27323865

  9. Systematic protein interactome analysis of glycosaminoglycans revealed YcbS as a novel bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Sutandy, FX Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Jun-Mu; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have evolved several strategies for interacting with host cell components, such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Some microbial proteins involved in host–GAG binding have been described; however, a systematic study on microbial proteome–mammalian GAG interactions has not been conducted. Here, we used Escherichia coli proteome chips to probe four typical mammalian GAGs, heparin, heparan sulphate (HS), chondroitin sulphate B (CSB), and chondroitin sulphate C (CSC), and identified 185 heparin-, 62 HS-, 98 CSB-, and 101 CSC-interacting proteins. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the unique functions of heparin- and HS-specific interacting proteins in glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among all the GAG-interacting proteins, three were outer membrane proteins (MbhA, YcbS, and YmgH). Invasion assays confirmed that mutant E. coli lacking ycbS could not invade the epithelial cells. Introducing plasmid carrying ycbS complemented the invading defects at ycbS lacking E. coli mutant, that can be further improved by overexpressing ycbS. Preblocking epithelial cells with YcbS reduced the percentage of E. coli invasions. Moreover, we observed that whole components of the ycb operon were crucial for invasion. The displacement assay revealed that YcbS binds to the laminin-binding site of heparin and might affect the host extracellular matrix structure by displacing heparin from laminin. PMID:27323865

  10. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  11. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  12. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  13. Coarse grained simulation reveals antifreeze properties of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Van, Thanh Dac; Le, Ly

    2015-10-01

    The novel hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) of Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. provides a target for studying the protection of psychrophilic microgoranisms against freezing environment. Interestingly, the Colwellia sp. hyperactive antifreeze protein (ColAFP) was crystallized without the structural dynamic characteristics. Here, the result indicated, through coarse grained simulation of ColAFP under various subfreezing temperature, that ColAFP remains active at temperature of equal and greater than 275 K (∼2 °C). Extensive simulation analyses also revealed the adaptive mechanism of ColAFP in subfreezing environment. Our result provides a structural dynamic understanding of the ColAFP.

  14. Protein sequences from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asara, John M; Schweitzer, Mary H; Freimark, Lisa M; Phillips, Matthew; Cantley, Lewis C

    2007-04-13

    Fossilized bones from extinct taxa harbor the potential for obtaining protein or DNA sequences that could reveal evolutionary links to extant species. We used mass spectrometry to obtain protein sequences from bones of a 160,000- to 600,000-year-old extinct mastodon (Mammut americanum) and a 68-million-year-old dinosaur (Tyrannosaurus rex). The presence of T. rex sequences indicates that their peptide bonds were remarkably stable. Mass spectrometry can thus be used to determine unique sequences from ancient organisms from peptide fragmentation patterns, a valuable tool to study the evolution and adaptation of ancient taxa from which genomic sequences are unlikely to be obtained. PMID:17431180

  15. Interaction of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF6 Protein with Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ozgur, Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF6 is homologous to the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BALF2 proteins. Here, we describe its single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding properties. Based on previous findings with ICP8 and BALF2, a 60-amino-acid C-terminal deletion mutant of Orf6 was generated, and the protein was purified to explore the function of the C terminus in ssDNA binding. We showed that full-length ORF6 binds cooperatively to M13 ssDNA, disrupting its secondary structure and extending it to a length equivalent to that of duplex M13 DNA. The width of the ORF6-ssDNA filament is 9 nm, and a 7.3-nm repeat can be distinguished along the filament axis. Fluorescence polarization analysis revealed that the wild-type and C-terminal mutant ORF6 proteins bind equally well to short ssDNA substrates, with dissociation constant (Kd) values of 2.2 × 10−7M and 1.5 × 10−7M, respectively. These values were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) analysis, which also suggested that binding by the full-length protein may involve both monomers and small multimers. While no significant difference in affinities of binding between full-length ORF6 and the C-terminal deletion mutant were observed with the short DNAs, binding of the C-terminal mutant protein to M13 ssDNA showed a clear lack of cooperativity as seen by electron microscopy (EM). Incubation of a duplex DNA containing a long single-stranded tail with double-helical ORF6 protein filaments revealed that the ssDNA segment can be enveloped within the protein filament without disrupting the filament structure. IMPORTANCE This work describes the biochemical characterization of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of KSHV, ORF6, central to viral DNA replication in infected cells. A C-terminal deletion mutant protein was generated to aid in understanding the role of the C terminus in DNA binding. Here we analyze the binding of the wild-type and

  16. Single-molecule measurements of proteins using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) provide a promising platform for investigating proteins at the single-molecule level. Recently, we have demonstrated that SWCNT FETs have sufficient sensitivity and bandwidth to monitor the conformational motions and processivity of an individual T4 lysozyme molecule. This is accomplished by functionalizing a SWCNT FET device with a single protein and measuring the conductance versus time through the device as it is submerged in an electrolyte solution. To generalize this approach for the study of a wide variety of proteins at the single-molecule level, this dissertation investigates the conjugation process to determine and isolate the key parameters involved in functionalizing a SWCNT with a single protein, the physical basis for transducing conformational motion of a protein into an electrical signal, and finally, the general application of the technique to monitor the binary and ternary complex formation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).

  17. Heterogeneity of pancreatic cancer metastases in a single patient revealed by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Yi; Yachida, Shinichi; Rajeshkumar, N V; Abel, Melissa L; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Mudgal, Keshav; Hruban, Ralph H; Poling, Justin S; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-11-01

    Many patients with pancreatic cancer have metastases to distant organs at the time of initial presentation. Recent studies examining the evolution of pancreatic cancer at the genetic level have shown that clonal complexity of metastatic pancreatic cancer is already initiated within primary tumors, and organ-specific metastases are derived from different subclones. However, we do not yet understand to what extent the evolution of pancreatic cancer contributes to proteomic and signaling alterations. We hypothesized that genetic heterogeneity of metastatic pancreatic cancer results in heterogeneity at the proteome level. To address this, we employed a model system in which cells isolated from three sites of metastasis (liver, lung, and peritoneum) from a single patient were compared. We used a SILAC-based accurate quantitative proteomic strategy combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry to analyze the total proteome and tyrosine phosphoproteome of each of the distal metastases. Our data revealed distinct patterns of both overall proteome expression and tyrosine kinase activities across the three different metastatic lesions. This heterogeneity was significant because it led to differential sensitivity of the neoplastic cells to small molecule inhibitors targeting various kinases and other pathways. For example, R428, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets Axl receptor tyrosine kinase, was able to inhibit cells derived from lung and liver metastases much more effectively than cells from the peritoneal metastasis. Finally, we confirmed that administration of R428 in mice bearing xenografts of cells derived from the three different metastatic sites significantly diminished tumors formed from liver- and lung-metastasis-derived cell lines as compared with tumors derived from the peritoneal metastasis cell line. Overall, our data provide proof-of-principle support that personalized therapy of multiple organ metastases in a single patient should involve the

  18. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  19. Single-cell genomics reveals metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Michael J; Kennedy, David W; Castelle, Cindy J; Field, Erin K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, James K; Konopka, Allan E

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site (a largely decommissioned nuclear production complex) in eastern Washington state, USA, and have been shown to change significantly in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single-cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these micro-organisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3-type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide range of both intra- and extracellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors, which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic micro-organisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area (in the south-eastern corner of the site) subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion. PMID:24324032

  20. Functional TCR retrieval from single antigen-specific human T cells reveals multiple novel epitopes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Petra; Omokoko, Tana A; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Hebich, Lisa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Attig, Sebastian; Konur, Abdo; Britten, Cedrik M; Paret, Claudia; Dhaene, Karl; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-12-01

    The determination of the epitope specificity of disease-associated T-cell responses is relevant for the development of biomarkers and targeted immunotherapies against cancer, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. The lack of known T-cell epitopes and corresponding T-cell receptors (TCR) for novel antigens hinders the efficient development and monitoring of new therapies. We developed an integrated approach for the systematic retrieval and functional characterization of TCRs from single antigen-reactive T cells that includes the identification of epitope specificity. This is accomplished through the rapid cloning of full-length TCR-α and TCR-β chains directly from single antigen-specific CD8(+) or CD4(+) T lymphocytes. The functional validation of cloned TCRs is conducted using in vitro-transcribed RNA transfer for expression of TCRs in T cells and HLA molecules in antigen-presenting cells. This method avoids the work and bias associated with repetitive cycles of in vitro T-cell stimulation, and enables fast characterization of antigen-specific T-cell responses. We applied this strategy to viral and tumor-associated antigens (TAA), resulting in the retrieval of 56 unique functional antigen-specific TCRs from human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells (13 specific for CMV-pp65, 16 specific for the well-known TAA NY-ESO-1, and 27 for the novel TAA TPTE), which are directed against 39 different epitopes. The proof-of-concept studies with TAAs NY-ESO-1 and TPTE revealed multiple novel TCR specificities. Our approach enables the rational development of immunotherapy strategies by providing antigen-specific TCRs and immunogenic epitopes. PMID:25245536

  1. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  2. Single-Cell Tracking Reveals Antibiotic-Induced Changes in Mycobacterial Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Emre; McKinney, John D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATP is a key molecule of cell physiology, but despite its importance, there are currently no methods for monitoring single-cell ATP fluctuations in live bacteria. This is a major obstacle in studies of bacterial energy metabolism, because there is a growing awareness that bacteria respond to stressors such as antibiotics in a highly individualistic manner. Here, we present a method for long-term single-cell tracking of ATP levels in Mycobacterium smegmatis based on a combination of microfluidics, time-lapse microscopy, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ATP biosensors. Upon treating cells with antibiotics, we observed that individual cells undergo an abrupt and irreversible switch from high to low intracellular ATP levels. The kinetics and extent of ATP switching clearly discriminate between an inhibitor of ATP synthesis and other classes of antibiotics. Cells that resume growth after 24 h of antibiotic treatment maintain high ATP levels throughout the exposure period. In contrast, antibiotic-treated cells that switch from ATP-high to ATP-low states never resume growth after antibiotic washout. Surprisingly, only a subset of these nongrowing ATP-low cells stains with propidium iodide (PI), a widely used live/dead cell marker. These experiments also reveal a cryptic subset of cells that do not resume growth after antibiotic washout despite remaining ATP high and PI negative. We conclude that ATP tracking is a more dynamic, sensitive, reliable, and discriminating marker of cell viability than staining with PI. This method could be used in studies to evaluate antimicrobial effectiveness and mechanism of action, as well as for high-throughput screening. PMID:25691591

  3. Massively parallel sampling of lattice proteins reveals foundations of thermal adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venev, Sergey V.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of proteins in bacteria and archaea living in different conditions leads to significant correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature. The origins of these correlations are poorly understood, and an important question of protein theory, physics-based prediction of types of amino acids overrepresented in highly thermostable proteins, remains largely unsolved. Here, we extend the random energy model of protein folding by weighting the interaction energies of amino acids by their frequencies in protein sequences and predict the energy gap of proteins designed to fold well at elevated temperatures. To test the model, we present a novel scalable algorithm for simultaneous energy calculation for many sequences in many structures, targeting massively parallel computing architectures such as graphics processing unit. The energy calculation is performed by multiplying two matrices, one representing the complete set of sequences, and the other describing the contact maps of all structural templates. An implementation of the algorithm for the CUDA platform is available at http://www.github.com/kzeldovich/galeprot and calculates protein folding energies over 250 times faster than a single central processing unit. Analysis of amino acid usage in 64-mer cubic lattice proteins designed to fold well at different temperatures demonstrates an excellent agreement between theoretical and simulated values of energy gap. The theoretical predictions of temperature trends of amino acid frequencies are significantly correlated with bioinformatics data on 191 bacteria and archaea, and highlight protein folding constraints as a fundamental selection pressure during thermal adaptation in biological evolution.

  4. Experimental single-strain mobilomics reveals events that shape pathogen emergence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Hudson, Corey M.; Bent, Zachary W.; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.

    2016-07-04

    Virulence and resistance genes carried on mobile DNAs such as genomic islands (GIs) and plasmids promote bacterial pathogen emergence. An early step in the mobilization of GIs is their excision, which produces both a circular form of the GI and a deletion site in the chromosome; circular forms have also been described for some bacterial insertion sequences (ISs). We demonstrate that the recombinant sequence produced at the junction of such circles, and their corresponding deletion sites, can be detected sensitively in high throughput sequencing data, using new computational methods that enable empirical discovery of new mobile DNAs. Applied to themore » rich mobilome of a single strain (Kpn2146) of the emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, our approach detected circular junctions for six GIs and seven IS types (several of the latter not previously known to circularize). Our methods further revealed differential biology of multiple mobile DNAs, imprecision of integrases and transposases, and differential activity among identical IS copies for IS26, ISKpn18 and ISKpn21. Exonuclease was used to enrich for circular dsDNA molecules, and internal calibration with the native Kpn2146 plasmids showed that not all molecules bearing GI and IS circular junctions were circular dsDNAs. Transposition events were also detected, revealing replicon preference (ISKpn18 preferring a conjugative IncA/C2 plasmid), local action (IS26), regional preferences, selection (against capsule synthesis), and left-right IS end swapping. Efficient discovery and global characterization of numerous mobile elements per experiment will allow detailed accounting of bacterial evolution, explaining the new gene combinations that arise in emerging pathogens.« less

  5. Single-molecule pull-down for investigating protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Fareh, Mohamed; Loeff, Luuk; Szczepaniak, Malwina; Haagsma, Anna C; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Joo, Chirlmin

    2016-08-01

    The genome and transcriptome are constantly modified by proteins in the cell. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques allow for high spatial and temporal observations of these interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining functional protein complexes, it remains challenging to study the interactions between macromolecular protein complexes and nucleic acids. Here, we combined single-molecule fluorescence with various protein complex pull-down techniques to determine the function and stoichiometry of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Through the use of three examples of protein complexes from eukaryotic cells (Drosha, Dicer, and TUT4 protein complexes), we provide step-by-step guidance for using novel single-molecule techniques. Our single-molecule methods provide sub-second and nanometer resolution and can be applied to other nucleoprotein complexes that are essential for cellular processes. PMID:27017911

  6. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  7. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  8. Crystal Structures of Flax Rust Avirulence Proteins AvrL567-A and -D Reveal Details of the Structural Basis for Flax Disease Resistance Specificity[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-I A.; Gunčar, Gregor; Forwood, Jade K.; Teh, Trazel; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mackay, Joel P.; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Anderson, Peter A.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Kobe, Boštjan

    2007-01-01

    The gene-for-gene mechanism of plant disease resistance involves direct or indirect recognition of pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins by plant resistance (R) proteins. Flax rust (Melampsora lini) AvrL567 avirulence proteins and the corresponding flax (Linum usitatissimum) L5, L6, and L7 resistance proteins interact directly. We determined the three-dimensional structures of two members of the AvrL567 family, AvrL567-A and AvrL567-D, at 1.4- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The structures of both proteins are very similar and reveal a β-sandwich fold with no close known structural homologs. The polymorphic residues in the AvrL567 family map to the surface of the protein, and polymorphisms in residues associated with recognition differences for the R proteins lead to significant changes in surface chemical properties. Analysis of single amino acid substitutions in AvrL567 proteins confirm the role of individual residues in conferring differences in recognition and suggest that the specificity results from the cumulative effects of multiple amino acid contacts. The structures also provide insights into possible pathogen-associated functions of AvrL567 proteins, with nucleic acid binding activity demonstrated in vitro. Our studies provide some of the first structural information on avirulence proteins that bind directly to the corresponding resistance proteins, allowing an examination of the molecular basis of the interaction with the resistance proteins as a step toward designing new resistance specificities. PMID:17873095

  9. Single cell mass cytometry reveals remodeling of human T cell phenotypes by varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nandini; Mukherjee, Gourab; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-11-15

    The recent application of mass cytometry (CyTOF) to biology provides a 'systems' approach to monitor concurrent changes in multiple host cell factors at the single cell level. We used CyTOF to evaluate T cells infected with varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, documenting virus-mediated phenotypic and functional changes caused by this T cell tropic human herpesvirus. Here we summarize our findings using two complementary panels of antibodies against surface and intracellular signaling proteins to elucidate the consequences of VZV-mediated perturbations on the surface and in signaling networks of infected T cells. CyTOF data was analyzed by several statistical, analytical and visualization tools including hierarchical clustering, orthogonal scaling, SPADE, viSNE, and SLIDE. Data from the mass cytometry studies demonstrated that VZV infection led to 'remodeling' of the surface architecture of T cells, promoting skin trafficking phenotypes and associated with concomitant activation of T-cell receptor and PI3-kinase pathways. This method offers a novel approach for understanding viral interactions with differentiated host cells important for pathogenesis. PMID:26213183

  10. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  11. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Reveals the Unwinding Stepping Mechanism of Replicative Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Salman; Pandey, Manjula; Patel, Smita S.; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacteriophage T7 gp4 serves as a model protein for replicative helicases that couples deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) hydrolysis to directional movement and DNA strand separation. We employed single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer methods to resolve steps during DNA unwinding by T7 helicase. We confirm that the unwinding rate of T7 helicase decreases with increasing base pair stability. For duplexes containing >35% guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs, we observed stochastic pauses every 2–3 bp during unwinding. The dwells on each pause were distributed nonexponentially, consistent with two or three rounds of dTTP hydrolysis before each unwinding step. Moreover, we observed backward movements of the enzyme on GC-rich DNAs at low dTTP concentrations. Our data suggest a coupling ratio of 1:1 between base pairs unwound and dTTP hydrolysis, and they further support the concept that nucleic acid motors can have a hierarchy of different-sized steps or can accumulate elastic energy before transitioning to a subsequent phase. PMID:24630993

  12. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  13. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10-4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10-3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10-8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer genes

  14. Revealing the global map of protein folding space by large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Claude; Lutz, Benjamin; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The full characterization of protein folding is a remarkable long-standing challenge both for experiment and simulation. Working towards a complete understanding of this process, one needs to cover the full diversity of existing folds and identify the general principles driving the process. Here, we want to understand and quantify the diversity in folding routes for a large and representative set of protein topologies covering the full range from all alpha helical topologies towards beta barrels guided by the key question: Does the majority of the observed routes contribute to the folding process or only a particular route? We identified a set of two-state folders among non-homologous proteins with a sequence length of 40-120 residues. For each of these proteins, we ran native-structure based simulations both with homogeneous and heterogeneous contact potentials. For each protein, we simulated dozens of folding transitions in continuous uninterrupted simulations and constructed a large database of kinetic parameters. We investigate folding routes by tracking the formation of tertiary structure interfaces and discuss whether a single specific route exists for a topology or if all routes are equiprobable. These results permit us to characterize the complete folding space for small proteins in terms of folding barrier ΔG‡, number of routes, and the route specificity RT.

  15. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  16. Revealing the amino acid composition of proteins within an expanded genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Aerni, Hans R.; Shifman, Mark A.; Rogulina, Svetlana; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code can be manipulated to reassign codons for the incorporation of non-standard amino acids (NSAA). Deletion of release factor 1 in Escherichia coli enhances translation of UAG (Stop) codons, yet may also extended protein synthesis at natural UAG terminated messenger RNAs. The fidelity of protein synthesis at reassigned UAG codons and the purity of the NSAA containing proteins produced require careful examination. Proteomics would be an ideal tool for these tasks, but conventional proteomic analyses cannot readily identify the extended proteins and accurately discover multiple amino acid (AA) insertions at a single UAG. To address these challenges, we created a new proteomic workflow that enabled the detection of UAG readthrough in native proteins in E. coli strains in which UAG was reassigned to encode phosphoserine. The method also enabled quantitation of NSAA and natural AA incorporation at UAG in a recombinant reporter protein. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the fidelity and purity of the phosphoserine orthogonal translation system (OTS) and used this information to improve its performance. Our results show a surprising diversity of natural AAs at reassigned stop codons. Our method can be used to improve OTSs and to quantify amino acid purity at reassigned codons in organisms with expanded genetic codes. PMID:25378305

  17. Revealing the amino acid composition of proteins within an expanded genetic code.

    PubMed

    Aerni, Hans R; Shifman, Mark A; Rogulina, Svetlana; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code can be manipulated to reassign codons for the incorporation of non-standard amino acids (NSAA). Deletion of release factor 1 in Escherichia coli enhances translation of UAG (Stop) codons, yet may also extended protein synthesis at natural UAG terminated messenger RNAs. The fidelity of protein synthesis at reassigned UAG codons and the purity of the NSAA containing proteins produced require careful examination. Proteomics would be an ideal tool for these tasks, but conventional proteomic analyses cannot readily identify the extended proteins and accurately discover multiple amino acid (AA) insertions at a single UAG. To address these challenges, we created a new proteomic workflow that enabled the detection of UAG readthrough in native proteins in E. coli strains in which UAG was reassigned to encode phosphoserine. The method also enabled quantitation of NSAA and natural AA incorporation at UAG in a recombinant reporter protein. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the fidelity and purity of the phosphoserine orthogonal translation system (OTS) and used this information to improve its performance. Our results show a surprising diversity of natural AAs at reassigned stop codons. Our method can be used to improve OTSs and to quantify amino acid purity at reassigned codons in organisms with expanded genetic codes. PMID:25378305

  18. Single molecule atomic force microscopy of aerolysin pore complexes reveals unexpected star-shaped topography.

    PubMed

    He, Jianfeng; Wang, Jiabin; Hu, Jun; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel Mark; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-04-01

    Aerolysin is the paradigmatic member of a large family of toxins that convert from a water-soluble monomer/dimer into a membrane-spanning oligomeric pore. While there is x-ray crystallographic data of its water-soluble conformation, the most recent structural model of the membrane-inserted pore is based primarily on data of water-soluble tetradecamers of mutant protein, together with computational modeling ultimately performed in vacuum. Here we examine this pore model with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of membrane-associated wild-type complexes and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in water. In striking contrast to a disc-shaped cap region predicted by the present model, the AFM images reveal a star-shaped complex, with a central ring surrounded by seven radial projections. Further, the MD simulations suggest that the locations of the receptor-binding (D1) domains in the present model are not correct. However, a modified model in which the D1 domains, rather than localized at fixed positions, adopt a wide range of configurations through fluctuations of an intervening linker is compatible with existing data. Thus our work not only demonstrates the importance of directly resolving such complexes in their native environment but also points to a dynamic receptor binding region, which may be critical for toxin assembly on the cell surface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26537438

  19. NSP-Cas protein structures reveal a promiscuous interaction module in cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Robinson, H.; Wallez, Y.; Dobaczewska, M. K.; Lee, J. J.; Pasquale, E. B.; Riedl, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Members of the novel SH2-containing protein (NSP) and Crk-associated substrate (Cas) protein families form multidomain signaling platforms that mediate cell migration and invasion through a collection of distinct signaling motifs. Members of each family interact via their respective C-terminal domains, but the mechanism of this association has remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain from the NSP protein BCAR3 and the complex of NSP3 with p130Cas. BCAR3 adopts the Cdc25-homology fold of Ras GTPase exchange factors, but it has a 'closed' conformation incapable of enzymatic activity. The structure of the NSP3-p130Cas complex reveals that this closed conformation is instrumental for interaction of NSP proteins with a focal adhesion-targeting domain present in Cas proteins. This enzyme-to-adaptor conversion enables high-affinity, yet promiscuous, interactions between NSP and Cas proteins and represents an unprecedented mechanistic paradigm linking cellular signaling networks.

  20. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  1. Developmental Staging of Maize Microspores Reveals a Transition in Developing Microspore Proteins 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedinger, Patricia A.; Edgerton, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the preparation of developmentally staged microspores and young pollen from maize (Zea mays) has been devised. The preparations are of sufficient purity and quantity for biochemical analysis, including the analysis of steady-state protein and RNA populations associated with each stage. A major transition in protein populations occurs during the developmental period that encompasses microspore mitosis, the asymmetric nuclear division producing the vegetative and generative nuclei. Several differences between early and late stage proteins can be detected by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins reveals that over half of the steady-state proteins differ between the younger and older stages, either quantitative or qualitative. One protein that increases in relative abundance about fourfold is actin. In vitro translation of RNA isolated from staged microspores demonstrates changes in microspore gene expression during the same developmental period. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667300

  2. Protein profiles of CCL5, HPGDS, and NPSR1 in plasma reveal association with childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, C; Häggmark, A; Grundström, J; Mikus, M; Lindskog, C; Konradsen, J R; Eklund, A; Pershagen, G; Wickman, M; Grunewald, J; Melén, E; Hedlin, G; Nilsson, P; van Hage, M

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease with many different phenotypes that need to be identified. We analyzed a broad range of plasma proteins in children with well-characterized asthma phenotypes to identify potential markers of childhood asthma. Using an affinity proteomics approach, plasma levels of 362 proteins covered by antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were investigated in a total of 154 children with persistent or intermittent asthma and controls. After screening, chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) were selected for further investigation. Significantly lower levels of both CCL5 and HPGDS were found in children with persistent asthma, while NPSR1 was found at higher levels in children with mild intermittent asthma compared to healthy controls. In addition, the protein levels were investigated in another respiratory disease, sarcoidosis, showing significantly higher NPSR1 levels in sera from sarcoidosis patients compared to healthy controls. Immunohistochemical staining of healthy tissues revealed high cytoplasmic expression of HPGDS in mast cells, present in stroma of both airway epithelia, lung as well as in other organs. High expression of NPSR1 was observed in neuroendocrine tissues, while no expression was observed in airway epithelia or lung. In conclusion, we have utilized a broad-scaled affinity proteomics approach to identify three proteins with altered plasma levels in asthmatic children, representing one of the first evaluations of HPGDS and NPSR1 protein levels in plasma. PMID:27145233

  3. Coupled protein domain motion in Taq polymerase revealed by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Zimei; Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Callaway, David J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Long-range conformational changes in proteins are ubiquitous in biology for the transmission and amplification of signals; such conformational changes can be triggered by small-amplitude, nanosecond protein domain motion. Understanding how conformational changes are initiated requires the characterization of protein domain motion on these timescales and on length scales comparable to protein dimensions. Using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE), normal mode analysis, and a statistical-mechanical framework, we reveal overdamped, coupled domain motion within DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq polymerase). This protein utilizes correlated domain dynamics over 70 Å to coordinate nucleotide synthesis and cleavage during DNA synthesis and repair. We show that NSE spectroscopy can determine the domain mobility tensor, which determines the degree of dynamical coupling between domains. The mobility tensor defines the domain velocity response to a force applied to it or to another domain, just as the sails of a sailboat determine its velocity given the applied wind force. The NSE results provide insights into the nature of protein domain motion that are not appreciated by conventional biophysical techniques. PMID:16306270

  4. Proteome analysis of Paenibacillus larvae reveals the existence of a putative S-layer protein.

    PubMed

    Fünfhaus, Anne; Genersch, Elke

    2012-04-01

    Honey bee pathology has attracted much interest recently due to the problems with honey bee declines in many regions of the world. American Foulbrood (AFB) caused by Paenibacillus larvae is the most devastating bacterial brood disease of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) causing considerable economic losses to beekeepers worldwide. AFB outbreaks are mainly caused by two differentially virulent genotypes of P. larvae, P. larvae ERIC I and ERIC II. To better understand AFB pathogenesis and to complement already existing data from the genetic level we aimed at obtaining expression data from the protein level. We successfully developed a protocol for two-dimensional proteome analysis of P. larvae with subsequent mass-spectrometry based protein sequencing. Based on the obtained master protein maps of P. larvae genotypes ERIC I and II we identified the dominantly expressed cytosolic proteins of both genotypes, some of them presumably linked to pathogenesis and virulence. Comparing the master maps of both genotypes revealed differentially expressed proteins, i.e. a putative S-layer protein which is expressed by P. larvae ERIC II but absent from the proteome of P. larvae ERIC I. The implications of our findings for pathogenesis of AFB and virulence of P. larvae will be discussed. PMID:23757273

  5. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer study of protein dynamics under denaturing conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenkina, Elza V.; Heyes, Colin D.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Proteins are highly complex systems, exhibiting a substantial degree of structural variability in their folded state. In the presence of denaturants, the heterogeneity is greatly enhanced, and fluctuations among vast numbers of folded and unfolded conformations occur via many different pathways. Here, we have studied the structure and dynamics of the small enzyme ribonuclease HI (RNase H) in the presence of the chemical denaturant guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, with a particular focus on the characterization of the unfolded-state ensemble. A dye pair was specifically attached to the enzyme to measure structural changes through Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Enzyme immobilization on star-polymer surfaces that were specially developed for negligible interaction with folded and unfolded proteins enabled us to monitor conformational changes of individual proteins for several hundred seconds. FRET efficiency histograms were calculated from confocal scan images. They showed an expansion of the unfolded proteins with increasing GdmCl concentration. Cross-correlation analysis of donor and acceptor fluorescence intensity time traces from single molecules revealed reconfiguration of the polypeptide chain on a timescale of ≈20 μs at 1.7 M GdmCl. Slow conformational dynamics gave rise to characteristic, stepwise FRET efficiency changes. Transitions between folded and unfolded enzyme molecules occurred on the 100-s timescale, in excellent agreement with bulk denaturation experiments. Transitions between unfolded conformations were more frequent, with characteristic times of ≈2 s. These data were analyzed to obtain information on the free energy landscape of RNase H in the presence of chemical denaturants. PMID:16221762

  6. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Finn, Robert D.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA_OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins. PMID:20944221

  7. Phylogenomics Controlling for Base Compositional Bias Reveals a Single Origin of Eusociality in Corbiculate Bees.

    PubMed

    Romiguier, Jonathan; Cameron, Sydney A; Woodard, S Hollis; Fischman, Brielle J; Keller, Laurent; Praz, Christophe J

    2016-03-01

    As increasingly large molecular data sets are collected for phylogenomics, the conflicting phylogenetic signal among gene trees poses challenges to resolve some difficult nodes of the Tree of Life. Among these nodes, the phylogenetic position of the honey bees (Apini) within the corbiculate bee group remains controversial, despite its considerable importance for understanding the emergence and maintenance of eusociality. Here, we show that this controversy stems in part from pervasive phylogenetic conflicts among GC-rich gene trees. GC-rich genes typically have a high nucleotidic heterogeneity among species, which can induce topological conflicts among gene trees. When retaining only the most GC-homogeneous genes or using a nonhomogeneous model of sequence evolution, our analyses reveal a monophyletic group of the three lineages with a eusocial lifestyle (honey bees, bumble bees, and stingless bees). These phylogenetic relationships strongly suggest a single origin of eusociality in the corbiculate bees, with no reversal to solitary living in this group. To accurately reconstruct other important evolutionary steps across the Tree of Life, we suggest removing GC-rich and GC-heterogeneous genes from large phylogenomic data sets. Interpreted as a consequence of genome-wide variations in recombination rates, this GC effect can affect all taxa featuring GC-biased gene conversion, which is common in eukaryotes. PMID:26576851

  8. Lesion search and recognition by thymine DNA glycosylase revealed by single molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Claudia N; Maiti, Atanu; Drohat, Alexander C; Tessmer, Ingrid

    2015-03-11

    The ability of DNA glycosylases to rapidly and efficiently detect lesions among a vast excess of nondamaged DNA bases is vitally important in base excision repair (BER). Here, we use single molecule imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) supported by a 2-aminopurine fluorescence base flipping assay to study damage search by human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG), which initiates BER of mutagenic and cytotoxic G:T and G:U mispairs in DNA. Our data reveal an equilibrium between two conformational states of hTDG-DNA complexes, assigned as search complex (SC) and interrogation complex (IC), both at target lesions and undamaged DNA sites. Notably, for both hTDG and a second glycosylase, hOGG1, which recognizes structurally different 8-oxoguanine lesions, the conformation of the DNA in the SC mirrors innate structural properties of their respective target sites. In the IC, the DNA is sharply bent, as seen in crystal structures of hTDG lesion recognition complexes, which likely supports the base flipping required for lesion identification. Our results support a potentially general concept of sculpting of glycosylases to their targets, allowing them to exploit the energetic cost of DNA bending for initial lesion sensing, coupled with continuous (extrahelical) base interrogation during lesion search by DNA glycosylases. PMID:25712093

  9. Revealing growth defects in non-linear borate single crystals by chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péter, Á.; Polgár, K.; Beregi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Inorganic cyclic borates such as β-BaB 2O 4 (BBO), LiB 3O 5 (LBO), CsLiB 6O 10 (CLBO) and Li 2B 4O 7 (LTB) are excellent non-linear optical (NLO) materials, particularly in the ultraviolet region. Another type of borate is YAl 3(BO 3) 4 (YAB) which is utilized as a laser host and for self-frequency doubling. Growth imperfections causing scattering and absorption of laser beams affect the performance and the use of borate single crystals. Defects, like inclusions, twins, grain boundaries and dislocations form readily in crystals grown by both the high temperature top-seeded solution growth (HTTSSG) method (BBO, LBO, YAB) and the Czochralski technique (CLBO, LTB). Chemical etching methods have been developed on various planes of the different borate crystals, in order to reveal the nature and the distribution of these defects. These methods have successfully been used to characterize NLO borate crystals. The origins of lattice defect formation are discussed in terms of the growth parameters.

  10. Structural Architecture of Prothrombin in Solution Revealed by Single Molecule Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Nicola; Bystranowska, Dominika; Zuo, Xiaobing; Di Cera, Enrico

    2016-08-26

    The coagulation factor prothrombin has a complex spatial organization of its modular assembly that comprises the N-terminal Gla domain, kringle-1, kringle-2, and the C-terminal protease domain connected by three intervening linkers. Here we use single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to access the conformational landscape of prothrombin in solution and uncover structural features of functional significance that extend recent x-ray crystallographic analysis. Prothrombin exists in equilibrium between two alternative conformations, open and closed. The closed conformation predominates (70%) and features an unanticipated intramolecular collapse of Tyr(93) in kringle-1 onto Trp(547) in the protease domain that obliterates access to the active site and protects the zymogen from autoproteolytic conversion to thrombin. The open conformation (30%) is more susceptible to chymotrypsin digestion and autoactivation, and features a shape consistent with recent x-ray crystal structures. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements of prothrombin wild type stabilized 70% in the closed conformation and of the mutant Y93A stabilized 80% in the open conformation directly document two envelopes that differ 50 Å in length. These findings reveal important new details on the conformational plasticity of prothrombin in solution and the drastic structural difference between its alternative conformations. Prothrombin uses the intramolecular collapse of kringle-1 onto the active site in the closed form to prevent autoactivation. The open-closed equilibrium also defines a new structural framework for the mechanism of activation of prothrombin by prothrombinase. PMID:27435675

  11. Single Centrosome Manipulation Reveals Its Electric Charge and Associated Dynamic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Hormeño, S.; Ibarra, B.; Chichón, F.J.; Habermann, K.; Lange, B.M.H.; Valpuesta, J.M.; Carrascosa, J.L.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The centrosome is the major microtubule-organizing center in animal cells and consists of a pair of centrioles surrounded by a pericentriolar material. We demonstrate laser manipulation of individual early Drosophila embryo centrosomes in between two microelectrodes to reveal that it is a net negatively charged organelle with a very low isoelectric region (3.1 ± 0.1). From this single-organelle electrophoresis, we infer an effective charge smaller than or on the order of 103 electrons, which corresponds to a surface-charge density significantly smaller than that of microtubules. We show, however, that the charge of the centrosome has a remarkable influence over its own structure. Specifically, we investigate the hydrodynamic behavior of the centrosome by measuring its size by both Stokes law and thermal-fluctuation spectral analysis of force. We find, on the one hand, that the hydrodynamic size of the centrosome is 60% larger than its electron microscopy diameter, and on the other hand, that this physiological expansion is produced by the electric field that drains to the centrosome, a self-effect that modulates its structural behavior via environmental pH. This methodology further proves useful for studying the action of different environmental conditions, such as the presence of Ca2+, over the thermally induced dynamic structure of the centrosome. PMID:19686649

  12. Complex RNA Folding Kinetics Revealed by Single-Molecule FRET and Hidden Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hidden Markov model and optimization procedure for photon-based single-molecule FRET data, which takes into account the trace-dependent background intensities. This analysis technique reveals an unprecedented amount of detail in the folding kinetics of the Diels–Alderase ribozyme. We find a multitude of extended (low-FRET) and compact (high-FRET) states. Five states were consistently and independently identified in two FRET constructs and at three Mg2+ concentrations. Structures generally tend to become more compact upon addition of Mg2+. Some compact structures are observed to significantly depend on Mg2+ concentration, suggesting a tertiary fold stabilized by Mg2+ ions. One compact structure was observed to be Mg2+-independent, consistent with stabilization by tertiary Watson–Crick base pairing found in the folded Diels–Alderase structure. A hierarchy of time scales was discovered, including dynamics of 10 ms or faster, likely due to tertiary structure fluctuations, and slow dynamics on the seconds time scale, presumably associated with significant changes in secondary structure. The folding pathways proceed through a series of intermediate secondary structures. There exist both compact pathways and more complex ones, which display tertiary unfolding, then secondary refolding, and, subsequently, again tertiary refolding. PMID:24568646

  13. Mitochondrial specialization revealed by single muscle fiber proteomics: focus on the Krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, S; Reggiani, C; Kostrominova, T Y; Mann, M; Murgia, M

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to examine the proteome of single muscle fibers. This study revealed significant differences in the mitochondrial proteome of the four major fiber types present in mouse skeletal muscle. Here, we focus on Krebs cycle enzymes and in particular on the differential distribution of the two mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenases, IDH2 and IDH3. Type 1/slow fibers contain high levels of IDH2 and relatively low levels of IDH3, whereas fast 2X and 2B fibers show an opposite expression pattern. The findings suggest that in skeletal muscle, IDH2 functions in the forward direction of the Krebs cycle and that substrate flux along the cycle occurs predominantly via IDH2 in type 1 fibers and via IDH3 in 2X and 2B fibers. IDH2-mediated conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate leads to the generation of NADPH, which is critical to buffering the H2O2 produced by the respiratory chain. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), the other major mitochondrial enzyme involved in NADPH generation, is also more abundant in type 1 fibers. We suggest that the continuously active type 1 fibers are endowed with a more efficient H2O2 scavenging capacity to cope with the higher levels of reactive oxygen species production. PMID:26589116

  14. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4(+)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), 2) IB4(-)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato(+) cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. PMID:25525749

  15. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  16. Stepwise loading of yeast clamp revealed by ensemble and single-molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Nashine, Vishal C.; Mishra, Padmaja P.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2010-01-01

    In ensemble and single-molecule experiments using the yeast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, clamp) and replication factor C (RFC, clamp loader), we have examined the assembly of the RFC·PCNA·DNA complex and its progression to holoenzyme upon addition of polymerase δ (polδ). We obtained data that indicate (i) PCNA loading on DNA proceeds through multiple conformational intermediates and is successful after several failed attempts; (ii) RFC does not act catalytically on a primed 45-mer templated fork; (iii) the RFC·PCNA·DNA complex formed in the presence of ATP is derived from at least two kinetically distinguishable species; (iv) these species disassemble through either unloading of RFC·PCNA from DNA or dissociation of PCNA into its component subunits; and (v) in the presence of polδ only one species converts to the RFC·PCNA·DNA·polδ holoenzyme. These findings redefine and deepen our understanding of the clamp-loading process and reveal that it is surprisingly one of trial and error to arrive at a heuristic solution. PMID:21041673

  17. Secretory protein profiling reveals TNFα inactivation by selective and promiscuous Sec61 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Maifeld, Sarah V.; MacKinnon, Andrew L.; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Sharma, Ajay; Kunkel, Eric J.; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cotransins are cyclic heptadepsipeptides that bind the Sec61 translocon to inhibit cotranslational translocation of a subset of secreted and type I transmembrane proteins. The few known cotransin-sensitive substrates are all targeted to the translocon by a cleavable signal sequence, previously shown to be a critical determinant of cotransin sensitivity. By profiling two cotransin variants against a panel of secreted and transmembrane proteins, we demonstrate that cotransin side-chain differences profoundly affect substrate selectivity. Among the most sensitive substrates we identified is the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Like all type II transmembrane proteins, TNFα is targeted to the translocon by its membrane-spanning domain, indicating that a cleavable signal sequence is not strictly required for cotransin sensitivity. Our results thus reveal an unanticipated breadth of translocon substrates whose expression is inhibited by Sec61 modulators. PMID:21944747

  18. Mass Spectrometry and Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal an Abundant and Rapidly Evolving Abalone Sperm Protein

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melody R.; McDowall, Margo H.; Stewart, Lia; Ouaddi, Aleena; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Abalone, a broadcast spawning marine mollusk, is an important model for molecular interactions and positive selection in fertilization, but the focus has previously been on only two sperm proteins, lysin and sp18.We used genomic and proteomic techniques to bring new insights to this model by characterizing the testis transcriptome and sperm proteome of the Red abalone Haliotis rufescens. One pair of homologous, testis-specific proteins contains a secretion signal and is small, abundant, and associated with the acrosome. Comparative analysis revealed that homologs are extremely divergent between species, and show strong evidence for positive selection. The acrosomal localization and rapid evolution of these proteins indicates that they play an important role in fertilization, and could be involved in the species-specificity of sperm-egg interactions in abalone. Our genomic and proteomic characterization of abalone fertilization resulted in the identification of interesting, novel peptides that have eluded detection in this important model system for 20 years. PMID:23585193

  19. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  20. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26598702

  1. Targeted Protein Destabilization Reveals an Estrogen-mediated ER Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Kanak; Noblin, Devin J.; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Adams, Alison; Zhao, Connie; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells leads to an unfolded protein response (UPR) that either restores homeostasis or commits the cells to apoptosis. Tools traditionally used to study the UPR are pro-apoptotic and thus confound analysis of long-term cellular responses to ER stress. Here, we describe an Endoplasmic Reticulum-localized HaloTag (ERHT) protein that can be conditionally destabilized using a small molecule hydrophobic tag (HyT36). Treatment of ERHT-expressing cells with HyT36 induces an acute, resolvable ER stress that results in transient UPR activation without induction of apoptosis. Transcriptome analysis of late-stage responses to this UPR stimulus reveals a link between UPR activity and estrogen signaling. PMID:25242550

  2. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  3. Single-cell genome and metatranscriptome sequencing reveal metabolic interactions of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Movahedi, Narjes; Chitsaz, Hamidreza; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Microbial interactions have a key role in global geochemical cycles. Although we possess significant knowledge about the general biochemical processes occurring in microbial communities, we are often unable to decipher key functions of individual microorganisms within the environment in part owing to the inability to cultivate or study them in isolation. Here, we circumvent this shortcoming through the use of single-cell genome sequencing and a novel low-input metatranscriptomics protocol to reveal the intricate metabolic capabilities and microbial interactions of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community. This methanogenic consortium oxidizes saturated hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions through a thus-far-uncharacterized biochemical process. The genome sequence of a dominant bacterial member of this community, belonging to the genus Smithella, was sequenced and served as the basis for subsequent analysis through metabolic reconstruction. Metatranscriptomic data generated from less than 500 pg of mRNA highlighted metabolically active genes during anaerobic alkane oxidation in comparison with growth on fatty acids. These data sets suggest that Smithella is not activating hexadecane by fumarate addition. Differential expression assisted in the identification of hypothetical proteins with no known homology that may be involved in hexadecane activation. Additionally, the combination of 16S rDNA sequence and metatranscriptomic data enabled the study of other prevalent organisms within the consortium and their interactions with Smithella, thus yielding a comprehensive characterization of individual constituents at the genome scale during methanogenic alkane oxidation. PMID:24152715

  4. Single-molecule studies of the lysine riboswitch reveal effector-dependent conformational dynamics of the aptamer domain.

    PubMed

    Fiegland, Larry R; Garst, Andrew D; Batey, Robert T; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-11-13

    The lysine riboswitch is a cis-acting RNA genetic regulatory element found in the leader sequence of bacterial mRNAs coding for proteins related to biosynthesis or transport of lysine. Structural analysis of the lysine-binding aptamer domain of this RNA has revealed that it completely encapsulates the ligand and therefore must undergo a structural opening/closing upon interaction with lysine. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods are used to monitor these ligand-induced structural transitions that are central to lysine riboswitch function. Specifically, a model FRET system has been developed for characterizing the lysine dissociation constant as well as the opening/closing rate constants for the Bacillus subtilis lysC aptamer domain. These techniques permit measurement of the dissociation constant (K(D)) for lysine binding of 1.7(5) mM and opening/closing rate constants of 1.4(3) s(-1) and 0.203(7) s(-1), respectively. These rates predict an apparent dissociation constant for lysine binding (K(D,apparent)) of 0.25(9) mM at near physiological ionic strength, which differs markedly from previous reports. PMID:23067368

  5. Single-Molecule Studies of the Lysine Riboswitch Reveal Effector Dependent Conformational Dynamics of the Aptamer Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fiegland, Larry R.; Garst, Andrew D.; Batey, Robert T.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The lysine riboswitch is a cis-acting RNA genetic regulatory element found in the leader sequence of bacterial mRNAs coding for proteins related to biosynthesis or transport of lysine. Structural analysis of the lysine-binding aptamer domain of this RNA has revealed that it completely encapsulates the ligand and therefore must undergo a structural opening/closing upon interaction with lysine. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods are used to monitor these ligand-induced structural transitions that are central to lysine riboswitch function. Specifically, a model FRET system has been developed for characterizing the lysine dissociation constant, as well as the opening/closing rate constants for the Bacillus subtilis lysC aptamer domain. These techniques permit measurement of the dissociation constant (KD) for lysine binding of 1.7(5) mM, and opening/closing rate constants of 1.4(3) s−1 and 0.203(7) s−1, respectively. These rates predict an apparent dissociation constant for lysine binding (KD, apparent) of 0.25(9) mM at near physiological ionic strength, which differs markedly from previous reports. PMID:23067368

  6. Single-stranded-DNA-binding protein-dependent DNA unwinding of the yeast ARS1 region.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Ishimi, Y

    1994-01-01

    DNA unwinding of autonomously replicating sequence 1 (ARS1) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. When a negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA containing ARS1 was digested with single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease, a discrete region in the vector DNA was preferentially digested. The regions containing the core consensus A domain and the 3'-flanking B domain of ARS1 were weakly digested. When the DNA was incubated with the multisubunit single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB, also called RPA [replication protein A]) from human and yeast cells prior to mung bean nuclease digestion, the cleavage in the A and B domains was greatly increased. Furthermore, a region corresponding to the 5'-flanking C domain of ARS1 was digested. These results indicate that three domains of ARS1, each of which is important for replication in yeast cells, closely correspond to the regions where the DNA duplex is easily unwound by torsional stress. SSB may stimulate the unwinding of the ARS1 region by its preferential binding to the destabilized three domains. Mung bean nuclease digestion of the substitution mutants with mutations of ARS1 (Y. Marahrens and B. Stillman, Science 255:817-823, 1992) revealed that the sequences in the B2 and A elements are responsible for the unwinding of the B domain and the region containing the A domain, respectively. Images PMID:8007967

  7. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  8. Phaseolin expression in tobacco chloroplast reveals an autoregulatory mechanism in heterologous protein translation.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Plastid DNA engineering is a well-established research area of plant biotechnology, and plastid transgenes often give high expression levels. However, it is still almost impossible to predict the accumulation rate of heterologous protein in transplastomic plants, and there are many cases of unsuccessful transgene expression. Chloroplasts regulate their proteome at the post-transcriptional level, mainly through translation control. One of the mechanisms to modulate the translation has been described in plant chloroplasts for the chloroplast-encoded subunits of multiprotein complexes, and the autoregulation of the translation initiation of these subunits depends on the availability of their assembly partners [control by epistasy of synthesis (CES)]. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, autoregulation of endogenous proteins recruited in the assembly of functional complexes has also been reported. In this study, we revealed a self-regulation mechanism triggered by the accumulation of a soluble recombinant protein, phaseolin, in the stroma of chloroplast-transformed tobacco plants. Immunoblotting experiments showed that phaseolin could avoid this self-regulation mechanism when targeted to the thylakoids in transplastomic plants. To inhibit the thylakoid-targeted phaseolin translation as well, this protein was expressed in the presence of a nuclear version of the phaseolin gene with a transit peptide. Pulse-chase and polysome analysis revealed that phaseolin mRNA translation on plastid ribosomes was repressed due to the accumulation in the stroma of the same soluble polypeptide imported from the cytosol. We suggest that translation autoregulation in chloroplast is not limited to heteromeric protein subunits but also involves at least some of the foreign soluble recombinant proteins, leading to the inhibition of plastome-encoded transgene expression in chloroplast. PMID:26031839

  9. Single Molecule FRET of Protein-Nucleic Acid and Protein-Protein complexes: Surface Passivation and Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Rajan; Solem, Amanda; Black, Will; Rueda, David

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy reveals the real time dynamics that occur during biomolecular interactions that would otherwise be hidden by the ensemble average. It also removes the requirement to synchronize reactions, thus providing a very intuitive approach to study kinetics of biological systems. Surface immobilization is commonly used to increase observation times to the minute time scale, but it can be detrimental if the sample interacts non-specifically with the surface. Here, we review detailed protocols to prevent such interactions by passivating the surface or by trapping the molecules inside surface immobilized lipid vesicles. Finally, we discuss recent examples where these methods were applied to study the dynamics of important cellular processes at the single molecule level. PMID:20554047

  10. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Thomas, Christopher D

    2016-03-18

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  11. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  12. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  13. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its potential roles in hypercholesterolemia revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jugnam-ang, Watcharapong; Pannengpetch, Supitcha; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Thippakorn, Chadinee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Lawung, Ratana; Prachayasittiku, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of hypercholesterolemia on alterations of serum proteins have not been fully elucidated. Herein, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in conjunction with LC-MS searching has successfully been carried out to investigate the change of protein expression profiles as consequences of raised blood cholesterol at different levels (normal group: total cholesterol 200 mg/dL; borderline high group: total cholesterol 200-239 mg/dL; and high group: total cholesterol ≥ 240 mg/dL) (n = 45). Results revealed that down-regulation of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) (-2.26 fold), transthyretin (-1.25 fold) and gelsolin (-1.47 fold) was observed in the high group. Meanwhile, the other proteins such as haptoglobin, complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein were up-regulated upto +3.24, +1.96 and +2.04 fold, respectively. Confirmation by Western blotting revealed a significant reduction of RBP4 (approximately 50 %) in individual samples derived from the high group. Presumptive conclusion can be drawn that down-regulation of RBP4 might be attributable to the inflammation of adipocytes caused by the release of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) from adipose tissues. Moreover, the decrease of transthyretin might also be taken into accounts since it is known that the transthyretin usually forms complex with RBP4 to prevent glomerular filtration and excretion through the kidney. The suppressing effect on RBP4 should be potentiated by the increase of complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein, which rendered the adipose tissues to overwhelm the liberation of RBP4 to blood circulation by metabolic and inflammatory processes. Such inflammation could further modulate the induction of cytokine release (e.g. IL-6 and IL-1β), resulting in the synthesis of acute phase protein, in particular, haptoglobin and C-reactive proteins from hepatocytes. However, the mechanism of gelsolin reduction remains unclear. Among these

  14. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  15. Single step neutravidin patterning: a lithographic approach for patterning proteins.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sankalp; Belay, Mezigebu; Verma, Vivek

    2016-04-01

    Protein patterning on surfaces is studied extensively for its potential use in proteomic, nanostructures, drug delivery and sensing. Patterning of proteins at micro and nano scales is especially important not only to understand the function of patterned protein but also to study its interaction with subsequent layers of bio-molecules/cells. Micro scale protein patterning is especially difficult due to the fragile nature of proteins. The already available methods either involve complex chemistries or are specific to a few proteins. Thus, in this regard, a versatile approach to pattern proteins using neutravidin is developed. With this approach of lithography and subsequent lift-off of the photoresist, any biotinylated moiety can be patterned at micron scale resolution. Functionality of patterned neutravidin is confirmed by showing binding of biotinylated polystyrene beads and biotinylated antibodies. In addition, stronger physisorption of neutravidin on bare glass surface, as a result of acetone lift-off, helps sustain the protein layers onto the glass surface without the need of chemical immobilization. PMID:26899966

  16. Functional Constraint Profiling of a Viral Protein Reveals Discordance of Evolutionary Conservation and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nicholas C.; Olson, C. Anders; Du, Yushen; Le, Shuai; Tran, Kevin; Remenyi, Roland; Gong, Danyang; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Qi, Hangfei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses often encode proteins with multiple functions due to their compact genomes. Existing approaches to identify functional residues largely rely on sequence conservation analysis. Inferring functional residues from sequence conservation can produce false positives, in which the conserved residues are functionally silent, or false negatives, where functional residues are not identified since they are species-specific and therefore non-conserved. Furthermore, the tedious process of constructing and analyzing individual mutations limits the number of residues that can be examined in a single study. Here, we developed a systematic approach to identify the functional residues of a viral protein by coupling experimental fitness profiling with protein stability prediction using the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit as the target protein. We identified a significant number of functional residues that were influenza type-specific and were evolutionarily non-conserved among different influenza types. Our results indicate that type-specific functional residues are prevalent and may not otherwise be identified by sequence conservation analysis alone. More importantly, this technique can be adapted to any viral (and potentially non-viral) protein where structural information is available. PMID:26132554

  17. Tissue-Based Proteogenomics Reveals that Human Testis Endows Plentiful Missing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Qidan; Wu, Feilin; Zhou, Ruo; Qi, Yingzi; Su, Na; Chen, Lingsheng; Xu, Shaohang; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Chengpu; Cheng, Gang; Chen, Xinguo; Kong, Degang; Wang, Yujia; Zhang, Tao; Zi, Jin; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhen, Bei; Xiong, Zhi; Wu, Songfeng; Yang, Pengyuan; Wang, Quanhui; Wen, Bo; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping; Liu, Siqi

    2015-09-01

    Investigations of missing proteins (MPs) are being endorsed by many bioanalytical strategies. We proposed that proteogenomics of testis tissue was a feasible approach to identify more MPs because testis tissues have higher gene expression levels. Here we combined proteomics and transcriptomics to survey gene expression in human testis tissues from three post-mortem individuals. Proteins were extracted and separated with glycine- and tricine-SDS-PAGE. A total of 9597 protein groups were identified; of these, 166 protein groups were listed as MPs, including 138 groups (83.1%) with transcriptional evidence. A total of 2948 proteins are designated as MPs, and 5.6% of these were identified in this study. The high incidence of MPs in testis tissue indicates that this is a rich resource for MPs. Functional category analysis revealed that the biological processes that testis MPs are mainly involved in are sexual reproduction and spermatogenesis. Some of the MPs are potentially involved in tumorgenesis in other tissues. Therefore, this proteogenomics analysis of individual testis tissues provides convincing evidence of the discovery of MPs. All mass spectrometry data from this study have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange (data set identifier PXD002179). PMID:26282447

  18. Crystal structure of human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-2 reveals the mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Takamasa; Fujikawa, Yukari; Kawaguchi, Yoshirou; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Soejima, Masayuki; Adachi, Rumi; Nakanishi, Yuichi; Mishiro-Sato, Emi; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification by tyrosine-sulfation plays an important role in extracellular protein-protein interactions. The protein tyrosine sulfation reaction is catalyzed by the Golgi-enzyme called the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). To date, no crystal structure is available for TPST. Detailed mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction has thus remained unclear. Here we present the first crystal structure of the human TPST isoform 2 (TPST2) complexed with a substrate peptide (C4P5Y3) derived from complement C4 and 3’-phosphoadenosine-5’-phosphate (PAP) at 1.9Å resolution. Structural and complementary mutational analyses revealed the molecular basis for catalysis being an SN2-like in-line displacement mechanism. TPST2 appeared to recognize the C4 peptide in a deep cleft by using a short parallel β-sheet type interaction, and the bound C4P5Y3 forms an L-shaped structure. Surprisingly, the mode of substrate peptide recognition observed in the TPST2 structure resembles that observed for the receptor type tyrosine kinases. PMID:23481380

  19. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  20. Effects of pressure on the dynamics of a hyperthermophilic protein revealed by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, U. R.; Bhowmik, D.; Copley, J. R. D.; Tyagi, M.; Leao, J. B.; Chu, X.-Q.

    Inorganic pyrophosphatase (IPPase) from Thermococcus thioreducens is a large oligomeric protein derived from hyperthermophilic microorganism that is found near hydrothermal vents deep under the sea, where the pressure is nearly 100 MPa. Here we study the effects of pressure on the conformational flexibility and relaxation dynamics of IPPase over a wide temperature range using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. Two spectrometers were used to investigate the β-relaxation dynamics of proteins in time ranges from 2 to 25 ps, and from 100 ps to 2 ns. Our results reveal that, under the pressure of 100 MPa, IPPase displays much faster relaxation dynamics than a mesophilic model protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), opposite to what we observed previously under the ambient pressure. These contradictory observations imply that high pressure affects the dynamical properties of proteins by distorting their energy landscapes. Accordingly, we derived a general schematic denaturation phase diagram that can be used as a general picture to understand the effects of pressure on protein dynamics and activities Wayne State Univ Startup Fund.

  1. Protein structural ensembles are revealed by redefining X-ray electron density noise.

    PubMed

    Lang, P Therese; Holton, James M; Fraser, James S; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    To increase the power of X-ray crystallography to determine not only the structures but also the motions of biomolecules, we developed methods to address two classic crystallographic problems: putting electron density maps on the absolute scale of e(-)/Å(3) and calculating the noise at every point in the map. We find that noise varies with position and is often six to eight times lower than thresholds currently used in model building. Analyzing the rescaled electron density maps from 485 representative proteins revealed unmodeled conformations above the estimated noise for 45% of side chains and a previously hidden, low-occupancy inhibitor of HIV capsid protein. Comparing the electron density maps in the free and nucleotide-bound structures of three human protein kinases suggested that substrate binding perturbs distinct intrinsic allosteric networks that link the active site to surfaces that recognize regulatory proteins. These results illustrate general approaches to identify and analyze alternative conformations, low-occupancy small molecules, solvent distributions, communication pathways, and protein motions. PMID:24363322

  2. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  3. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  4. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Joachim M.; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  5. 2D IR Cross Peaks Reveal Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange with Single Residue Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using 2D IR (two dimensional infrared) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a 13C18O isotope labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min−1, which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10 labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min−1. Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements. PMID:23659731

  6. Modelling NifH2 protein of Clostridium pasteurianum reveals clues about its physiological function.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Murat

    2006-11-01

    Clostridium pasteurianum is an anaerobic free-living nitrogen fixer. As a unique feature, the organism contains five extra nifH-like genes in addition to nifH1. Detailed analysis with respect to the structure and function of the nifH-like gene products is missing due to the lack of information about the presence of their translation products in the cell. Recent work indicates that the nifH2 gene is transcribed and translated into a polypeptide of expected size in nitrogen-fixing cells of C. pasteurianum and is regulated both at the transcriptional and translational levels. However, the current data do not reveal the physiological function of the NifH2 protein. In this study, we have used computer tools and the NifH1 of C. pasteurianum as the template to predict a possible tertiary structure and assign a putative function for NifH2 protein. A comparison of the structures of the NifH1 and modelled NifH2 revealed similarities in the polypeptide conformations for both monomers. Analysis of the properties of nucleotide binding, dimer interacting and cluster containing regions did not reveal major differences between NifH1 and modelled NifH2, although minor differences were observed. Rigid docking results revealed the possibility of formation of a NifH1-NifH2 heterodimer as well as formation of a NifH2 homodimer. We, therefore, propose that NifH2 can form a dimer with NifH1, albeit less efficiently and may function as a regulatory Fe-protein. PMID:16495101

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNA Pairing by RecA Reveals a 3-Dimensional Homology Search

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Anthony L.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA breaks can be repaired with high-fidelity by homologous recombination. A ubiquitous protein that is essential for this DNA template-directed repair is RecA1. After resection of broken DNA to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), RecA assembles on this ssDNA into a filament with the unique capacity to search and find DNA sequences in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that are homologous to the ssDNA. This homology search is vital to recombinational DNA repair, and results in homologous pairing and exchange of DNA strands. Homologous pairing involves DNA sequence-specific target location by the RecA-ssDNA complex. Despite decades of study, the mechanism of this enigmatic search process remains unknown. RecA is a DNA-dependent ATPase, but ATP hydrolysis is not required for DNA pairing and strand exchange2,3, eliminating active search processes. Using dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA, and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image DNA pairing, we demonstrate that both the three-dimensional conformational state of the dsDNA target and the length of the homologous RecA-ssDNA filament play important roles in the homology search. We discovered that as the end-to-end distance of the target dsDNA molecule is increased, constraining its available 3-dimensional conformations, the rate of homologous pairing decreases. Conversely, when the length of the ssDNA in the nucleoprotein filament is increased, homology is found faster. We propose a model for the DNA homology search process termed “intersegmental contact sampling”, wherein the intrinsic multivalent nature of the RecA nucleoprotein filament is employed to search DNA sequence space within 3-dimensional domains of DNA, exploiting multiple weak contacts to rapidly search for homology. Our findings highlight the importance of the 3-dimensional conformational dynamics of DNA, reveal a previously unknown facet of the homology search, and provide insight into the mechanism of DNA target location by this member of a

  8. Protein Composition of Infectious Spores Reveals Novel Sexual Development and Germination Factors in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingwei; Hebert, Alexander S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Spores are an essential cell type required for long-term survival across diverse organisms in the tree of life and are a hallmark of fungal reproduction, persistence, and dispersal. Among human fungal pathogens, spores are presumed infectious particles, but relatively little is known about this robust cell type. Here we used the meningitis-causing fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to determine the roles of spore-resident proteins in spore biology. Using highly sensitive nanoscale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we compared the proteomes of spores and vegetative cells (yeast) and identified eighteen proteins specifically enriched in spores. The genes encoding these proteins were deleted, and the resulting strains were evaluated for discernable phenotypes. We hypothesized that spore-enriched proteins would be preferentially involved in spore-specific processes such as dormancy, stress resistance, and germination. Surprisingly, however, the majority of the mutants harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. One mutant in the cohort was defective in the spore-specific process of germination, showing a delay specifically in the initiation of vegetative growth. Thus, by using this in-depth proteomics approach as a screening tool for cell type-specific proteins and combining it with molecular genetics, we successfully identified the first germination factor in C. neoformans. We also identified numerous proteins with previously unknown functions in both sexual development and spore composition. Our findings provide the first insights into the basic protein components of infectious spores and reveal unexpected molecular connections between infectious particle production and spore composition in a pathogenic eukaryote. PMID:26313153

  9. Immobilization of two organometallic complexes into a single cage to construct protein-based microcompartments.

    PubMed

    Maity, Basudev; Fukumori, Kazuki; Abe, Satoshi; Ueno, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    Natural protein-based microcompartments containing multiple enzymes promote cascade reactions within cells. We use the apo-ferritin protein cage to mimic such biocompartments by immobilizing two organometallic Ir and Pd complexes into the single protein cage. Precise locations of the metals and their accumulation mechanism were studied by X-ray crystallography. PMID:27021005

  10. Structure and Dynamics of Four-way DNA Junctions Dynamics Revealed by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchenko, Yuri

    2004-03-01

    For-way DNA junctions (Holliday junctions) are critical intermediates for homologous, site-specific recombination, DNA repair and replication. A wealth of structural information is available for immobile four-way junctions. However, these data cannot give the answer on the mechanism of branch migration, the major property of the Holliday junction. Two models for the mechanism of branch migration were suggested. According to the early model of Alberts-Meselson-Sigal, exchanging DNA strands around the junction remain parallel during branch migration. Kinetic studies of branch migration suggest an alternative model in which the junction adopts an extended conformation. We tested these models using a Holliday junction undergoing branch migration. Note that it was the first time when the dynamics of the four-way DNA junction capable of branch migration had been analyzed. We applied time-lapse atomic force microscopy (single molecule dynamics AFM) to image directly loosely bound DNA at liquid-surface interface. These experiments show that mobile Holliday junctions adopt an unfolded conformation during branch migration. This conformation of the junction remains unchanged until strand separation. The data obtained support the model for branch migration having the extended conformation of the Holliday junction. The analysis of the Holliday junctions dynamics at conditions limiting branch migration revealed a broad movement of the arms suggesting that the range of mobility of these junctions is much wider than detected before. Further applications of the time-lapse AFM approach in attempt to resolve the subpopulations of the junctions conformers and the prospects for analyses of dynamics of complex biological systems will be discussed.

  11. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Three Conformations for the TLS Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus Genome.

    PubMed

    Vieweger, Mario; Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite-dependent conformational switching in RNA riboswitches is now widely accepted as a critical regulatory mechanism for gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar gene regulation mechanisms have been found to be important for viral systems as well. One of the most abundant and best-studied systems is the tRNA-like structure (TLS) domain, which has been found to occur in many plant viruses spread across numerous genera. In this work, folding dynamics for the TLS domain of Brome Mosaic Virus have been investigated using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. In particular, burst fluorescence methods are exploited to observe metal-ion ([M(n+)])-induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the minimal TLS element of brome mosaic virus RNA3. The results of these experiments reveal a complex equilibrium of at least three distinct populations. A stepwise, or consecutive, thermodynamic model for TLS folding is developed, which is in good agreement with the [M(n+)]-dependent evolution of conformational populations and existing structural information in the literature. Specifically, this folding pathway explains the metal-ion dependent formation of a functional TLS domain from unfolded RNAs via two consecutive steps: 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction, followed by 2) formation of a 3'-terminal pseudoknot. These two conformational transitions are well described by stepwise dissociation constants for [Mg(2+)] (K1 = 328 ± 30 μM and K2 = 1092 ± 183 μM) and [Na(+)] (K1 = 74 ± 6 mM and K2 = 243 ± 52 mM)-induced folding. The proposed thermodynamic model is further supported by inhibition studies of the long-range stem interaction using a complementary DNA oligomer, which effectively shifts the dynamic equilibrium toward the unfolded conformation. Implications of this multistep conformational folding mechanism are discussed with regard to regulation of virus replication. PMID:26682819

  12. Revealing the binding mode between respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein and benzimidazole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dingjue; Ye, Wei; Chen, HaiFeng

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major respiratory pathogen in newborn infants and young children and can also be a threat to some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. The RSV fusion (RSVF) protein has been an attractive target for vaccine and drug development. Experimental results indicate a series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors which target RSVF protein to inhibit the viral entry of RSV. To reveal the binding mode between these inhibitors and RSVF protein, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the interactions between the inhibitors and the core domain of RSVF protein. MD results suggest that the active molecules have stronger π-π stacking, cation-π, and other interactions than less active inhibitors. The binding free energy between the active inhibitor and RSVF protein is also found to be significantly lower than that of the less active one using MM/GBSA. Then, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to construct three dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) models. The cross-validated q(2) values are found to be 0.821 and 0.795 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. And the non-cross-validated r(2) values are 0.973 and 0.961. Ninety-two test set compounds validated these models. The results suggest that these models are robust with good prediction abilities. Furthermore, these models reveal possible methods to improve the bioactivity of inhibitors. PMID:25872614

  13. Geometry of a complex formed by double strand break repair proteins at a single DNA end: recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces inward translocation of Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S; Dynan, W S

    1999-12-15

    Ku protein and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) are essential components of the double-strand break repair machinery in higher eukaryotic cells. Ku protein binds to broken DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form an enzymatically active complex. To characterize the arrangement of proteins in this complex, we developed a set of photocross-linking probes, each with a single free end. We have previously used this approach to characterize the contacts in an initial Ku-DNA complex, and we have now applied the same technology to define the events that occur when Ku recruits DNA-PKcs. The new probes allow the binding of one molecule of Ku protein and one molecule of DNA-PKcs in a defined position and orientation. Photocross-linking reveals that DNA-PKcs makes direct contact with the DNA termini, occupying an approximately 10 bp region proximal to the free end. Characterization of the Ku protein cross-linking pattern in the presence and absence of DNA-PKcs suggests that Ku binds to form an initial complex at the DNA ends, and that recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces an inward translocation of this Ku molecule by about one helical turn. The presence of ATP had no effect on protein-DNA contacts, suggesting that neither DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation nor a putative Ku helicase activity plays a role in modulating protein conformation under the conditions tested. PMID:10572166

  14. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Reveals Correlated Inter-Lobe Motion in Protein Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2

    PubMed Central

    Spellmon, Nicholas; Sun, Xiaonan; Sirinupong, Nualpun; Edwards, Brian; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    SMYD proteins are an exciting field of study as they are linked to many types of cancer-related pathways. Cardiac and skeletal muscle development and function also depend on SMYD proteins opening a possible avenue for cardiac-related treatment. Previous crystal structure studies have revealed that this special class of protein lysine methyltransferases have a bilobal structure, and an open–closed motion may regulate substrate specificity. Here we use the molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the still-poorly-understood SMYD2 dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that SMYD2 exhibits a negative correlated inter-lobe motion. Principle component analysis suggests that this correlated dynamic is contributed to by a twisting motion of the C-lobe with respect to the N-lobe and a clamshell-like motion between the lobes. Dynamical network analysis defines possible allosteric paths for the correlated dynamics. There are nine communities in the dynamical network with six in the N-lobe and three in the C-lobe, and the communication between the lobes is mediated by a lobe-bridging β hairpin. This study provides insight into the dynamical nature of SMYD2 and could facilitate better understanding of SMYD2 substrate specificity. PMID:26717235

  16. The Volumetric Diversity of Misfolded Prion Protein Oligomers Revealed by Pressure Dissociation*

    PubMed Central

    Torrent, Joan; Lange, Reinhard; Rezaei, Human

    2015-01-01

    Protein oligomerization has been associated with a wide range of diseases. High pressure approaches offer a powerful tool for deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms by revealing volume changes associated with the misfolding and assembly reactions. We applied high pressure to induce conformational changes in three distinct β-sheet-rich oligomers of the prion protein PrP, a protein characterized by a variety of infectious quaternary structures that can propagate stably and faithfully and cause diseases with specific phenotypic traits. We show that pressure induces dissociation of the oligomers and leads to a lower volume monomeric PrP state that refolds into the native conformation after pressure release. By measuring the different pressure and temperature sensitivity of the tested PrP oligomers, we demonstrate significantly different void volumes in their quaternary structure. In addition, by focusing on the kinetic and energetic behavior of the pressure-induced dissociation of one specific PrP oligomer, we reveal a large negative activation volume and an increase in both apparent activation enthalpy and entropy. This suggests a transition state ensemble that is less structured and significantly more hydrated than the oligomeric state. Finally, we found that site-specific fluorescent labeling allows monitoring of the transient population of a kinetic intermediate in the dissociation reaction. Our results indicate that defects in atomic packing may deserve consideration as a new factor that influences differences between PrP assemblies and that could be relevant also for explaining the origin of prion strains. PMID:26126829

  17. Single-Cell Co-expression Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Modules, Co-regulation Mechanisms and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xia, Shuli; Arand, Brian; Zhu, Heng; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Ji, Hongkai; Qian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Co-expression analysis has been employed to predict gene function, identify functional modules, and determine tumor subtypes. Previous co-expression analysis was mainly conducted at bulk tissue level. It is unclear whether co-expression analysis at the single-cell level will provide novel insights into transcriptional regulation. Here we developed a computational approach to compare glioblastoma expression profiles at the single-cell level with those obtained from bulk tumors. We found that the co-expressed genes observed in single cells and bulk tumors have little overlap and show distinct characteristics. The co-expressed genes identified in bulk tumors tend to have similar biological functions, and are enriched for intrachromosomal interactions with synchronized promoter activity. In contrast, single-cell co-expressed genes are enriched for known protein-protein interactions, and are regulated through interchromosomal interactions. Moreover, gene members of some protein complexes are co-expressed only at the bulk level, while those of other complexes are co-expressed at both single-cell and bulk levels. Finally, we identified a set of co-expressed genes that can predict the survival of glioblastoma patients. Our study highlights that comparative analyses of single-cell and bulk gene expression profiles enable us to identify functional modules that are regulated at different levels and hold great translational potential. PMID:27100869

  18. The Structure of the BfrB-Bfd Complex Reveals Protein-Protein Interactions Enabling Iron Release from Bacterioferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Battaile, Kevin P; Vakser, Ilya A; Rivera, Mario

    2012-09-11

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis.

  19. The structure of the BfrB-Bfd complex reveals protein-protein interactions enabling iron release from bacterioferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Rivera, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage, or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis. PMID:22812654

  20. Single amino acid sequence polymorphisms in rat cardiac troponin revealed by top-down tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sancho Solis, Raquel; Ge, Ying; Walker, Jeffery W

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrimeric cardiac troponin (cTn) is a critical component of the thin filament regulatory complex in cardiac muscle. Two of the three subunits, cTnI and cTnT, are subject to post-translational modifications such as proteolysis and phosphorylation, but linking modification patterns to function remains a major challenge. To obtain a global view of the biochemical state of cTn in native tissue, we performed high resolution top-down mass spectrometry of cTn heterotrimers from healthy adult rat hearts. cTn heterotrimers were affinity purified, desalted and then directly subjected to mass spectrometry using a 7 Tesla Thermo LTQ-FT-ICR instrument equipped with an ESI source. Molecular ions for N-terminally processed and acetylated cTnI and cTnT were readily detected as were other post-translationally modified forms of these proteins. cTnI was phosphorylated with a distribution of un-, mono- and bisphosphorylated forms of 41 +/- 3%, 46 +/- 1%, 13 +/- 3%, respectively. cTnT was predominantly monophosphorylated and partially proteolyzed at the Glu(29)-Pro(30) peptide bond. Also observed in high resolution spectra were 'shadow' peaks of similar intensity to 'parent' peaks exhibiting masses of cTnI+16 Da and cTnT+128 Da, subsequently shown by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to be single amino acid polymorphisms. Intact and protease-digested cTn subunits were fragmented by electron capture dissociation or collision activated dissociation to localize an Ala/Ser polymorphism at residue 7 of cTnI. Similar analysis of cTnT localized an additional Gln within a three residue alternative splice site beginning at residue 192. Besides being able to provide unique insights into the global state of post-translational modification of cTn subunits, high resolution top-down mass spectrometry readily revealed naturally occurring single amino acid sequence variants including a genetic polymorphism at residue 7 in cTnI, and an alternative splice isoform that affects a putative hinge region

  1. Plasmonic imaging of protein interactions with single bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Syal, Karan; Wang, Wei; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-15

    Quantifying the interactions of bacteria with external ligands is fundamental to the understanding of pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion, and mechanism of antimicrobial action. Due to inherent cell-to-cell heterogeneity in a microbial population, each bacterium interacts differently with its environment. This large variability is washed out in bulk assays, and there is a need of techniques that can quantify interactions of bacteria with ligands at the single bacterium level. In this work, we present a label-free and real-time plasmonic imaging technique to measure the binding kinetics of ligand interactions with single bacteria, and perform statistical analysis of the heterogeneity. Using the technique, we have studied interactions of antibodies with single Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells and demonstrated a capability of determining the binding kinetic constants of single live bacteria with ligands, and quantify heterogeneity in a microbial population. PMID:25064821

  2. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  3. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  4. Nullspace Sampling with Holonomic Constraints Reveals Molecular Mechanisms of Protein Gαs

    PubMed Central

    Pachov, Dimitar V.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Proteins perform their function or interact with partners by exchanging between conformational substates on a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Structurally characterizing these exchanges is challenging, both experimentally and computationally. Large, diffusional motions are often on timescales that are difficult to access with molecular dynamics simulations, especially for large proteins and their complexes. The low frequency modes of normal mode analysis (NMA) report on molecular fluctuations associated with biological activity. However, NMA is limited to a second order expansion about a minimum of the potential energy function, which limits opportunities to observe diffusional motions. By contrast, kino-geometric conformational sampling (KGS) permits large perturbations while maintaining the exact geometry of explicit conformational constraints, such as hydrogen bonds. Here, we extend KGS and show that a conformational ensemble of the α subunit Gαs of heterotrimeric stimulatory protein Gs exhibits structural features implicated in its activation pathway. Activation of protein Gs by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is associated with GDP release and large conformational changes of its α-helical domain. Our method reveals a coupled α-helical domain opening motion while, simultaneously, Gαs helix α5 samples an activated conformation. These motions are moderated in the activated state. The motion centers on a dynamic hub near the nucleotide-binding site of Gαs, and radiates to helix α4. We find that comparative NMA-based ensembles underestimate the amplitudes of the motion. Additionally, the ensembles fall short in predicting the accepted direction of the full activation pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that nullspace sampling with explicit, holonomic constraints yields ensembles that illuminate molecular mechanisms involved in GDP release and protein Gs activation, and further establish conformational coupling between key structural

  5. Single Turnover Reveals Oxygenated Intermediates in Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase in the Presence of the Native Redox Partners

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Alexandria Deliz; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) is a non-heme diiron protein that activates O2 for subsequent arene oxidation. ToMO utilizes four protein components, a catalytic hydroxylase (ToMOH), a regulatory protein (To-MOD), a Rieske protein (ToMOC), and a reductase (ToMOF). Here, we examine O2 activation and substrate hydroxylation in the presence of all four-protein components. Studies of this system demonstrate the importance of ToMOC for formation of the active hydroxylating species that are not revealed when dithionite and mediators are used as the reductant. This reactivity is discussed in light of other O2-activating, non-heme diiron enzymes. PMID:26267757

  6. Hyper sensitive protein detection by Tandem-HTRF reveals Cyclin D1 dynamics in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Alexandre; Champagne, Julien; Auzemery, Baptiste; Fuentes, Ivanna; Maurel, Benjamin; Bienvenu, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present here a novel method for the semi-quantitative detection of low abundance proteins in solution that is both fast and simple. It is based on Homogenous Time Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF), between a lanthanide labeled donor antibody and a d2 or XL665 labeled acceptor antibody that are both raised against different epitopes of the same target. This novel approach we termed “Tandem-HTRF”, can specifically reveal rare polypeptides from only a few microliters of cellular lysate within one hour in a 384-well plate format. Using this sensitive approach, we observed surprisingly that the core cell cycle regulator Cyclin D1 is sustained in fully developed adult organs and harbors an unexpected expression pattern affected by environmental challenge. Thus our method, Tandem-HTRF offers a promising way to investigate subtle variations in the dynamics of sparse proteins from limited biological material. PMID:26503526

  7. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  8. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  9. Structure of the Yeast DEAD Box Protein Mss116p Reveals Two Wedges that Crimp RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Del Campo, Mark; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2010-01-12

    The yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in mitochondrial group I and II intron splicing, translational activation, and RNA end processing. Here we determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p complexed with an RNA oligonucleotide and ATP analogs AMP-PNP, ADP-BeF{sub 3}, or ADP-AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structures show the entire helicase core acting together with a functionally important C-terminal extension. In all structures, the helicase core is in a closed conformation with a wedge {alpha} helix bending RNA 3' of the central bound nucleotides, as in previous DEAD box protein structures. Notably, Mss116p's C-terminal extension also bends RNA 5' of the central nucleotides, resulting in RNA crimping. Despite reported functional differences, we observe few structural changes in ternary complexes with different ATP analogs. The structures constrain models of DEAD box protein function and reveal a strand separation mechanism in which a protein uses two wedges to act as a molecular crimper.

  10. Proteomic Investigation of Aphid Honeydew Reveals an Unexpected Diversity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haubruge, Eric; Hance, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin; Francis, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Aphids feed on the phloem sap of plants, and are the most common honeydew-producing insects. While aphid honeydew is primarily considered to comprise sugars and amino acids, its protein diversity has yet to be documented. Here, we report on the investigation of the honeydew proteome from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Using a two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-Dige) approach, more than 140 spots were isolated, demonstrating that aphid honeydew also represents a diverse source of proteins. About 66% of the isolated spots were identified through mass spectrometry analysis, revealing that the protein diversity of aphid honeydew originates from several organisms (i.e. the host aphid and its microbiota, including endosymbiotic bacteria and gut flora). Interestingly, our experiments also allowed to identify some proteins like chaperonin, GroEL and Dnak chaperones, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and flagellin that might act as mediators in the plant-aphid interaction. In addition to providing the first aphid honeydew proteome analysis, we propose to reconsider the importance of this substance, mainly acknowledged to be a waste product, from the aphid ecology perspective. PMID:24086359

  11. A single mutation at residue 25 populates the folding intermediate of E. coli RNase H and reveals a highly dynamic partially-folded ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Katelyn B.; Horner, Geoffrey A.; Marqusee, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the nature of partially folded intermediates transiently populated during protein folding is important for understanding both protein folding and misfolding. These ephemeral species, however, often elude direct experimental characterization. The well-characterized protein ribonuclease H from E. coli populates an on-pathway intermediate identified in both bulk studies and single molecule mechanical unfolding experiments. Here, we set out to trap the transient intermediate of RNase H at equilibrium by selectively destabilizing the region of the protein known to be unfolded in this species. Surprisingly, a single change at Ile 25 (I25A) resulted in the equilibrium population of the intermediate under near-native conditions. The intermediate was undetectable in a series of HSQC's, revealing the dynamic nature of this partially unfolded form on the timescale of NMR detection. This result is in contrast to studies in which the structures of trapped intermediates are solved by NMR, indicating that the they are well-packed and native-like. The dynamic nature of the RNase H intermediate may be important for its role as an on-pathway, productive species that promotes efficient folding. PMID:19505477

  12. Purification and characterization of a mitochondrial, single-stranded-DNA-binding protein from Paracentrotus lividus eggs.

    PubMed

    Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Loguercio Polosa, P; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E; Cantatore, P

    1997-07-01

    A binding protein for single-stranded DNA was purified from Paracentrotus lividus egg mitochondria to near homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel and single-stranded-DNA-cellulose. The protein consists of a single polypeptide of about 15 kDa. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis suggested that P. lividus mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding protein exists as a homo-oligomer, possibly a tetramer, in solution. The protein shows a stronger preference for poly(dT) with respect to single-stranded M13, poly(dI) and poly(dC). Binding to poly(dA) takes place with much lower affinity. The binding-site size, determined by gel mobility-shift experiments with oligonucleotides of different length, is approximately 45 nucleotides. The binding to single-stranded DNA occurs with low or no cooperativity and is not influenced by ionic strength. The protein has a very high affinity for the DNA: its apparent macroscopic association constant is 2x10(9) M(-1), a value which is the highest among the mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins characterized to date. The lack of cooperativity and the high association constant represent distinctive features of this protein and might be related to the peculiar mechanism of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:9249008

  13. Modulating non-native aggregation and electrostatic protein-protein interactions with computationally designed single-point mutations.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C J; Blanco, M A; Costanzo, J A; Enterline, M; Fernandez, E J; Robinson, A S; Roberts, C J

    2016-06-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is a ubiquitous challenge in the production, storage and administration of protein-based biotherapeutics. This study focuses on altering electrostatic protein-protein interactions as a strategy to modulate aggregation propensity in terms of temperature-dependent aggregation rates, using single-charge variants of human γ-D crystallin. Molecular models were combined to predict amino acid substitutions that would modulate protein-protein interactions with minimal effects on conformational stability. Experimental protein-protein interactions were quantified by the Kirkwood-Buff integrals (G22) from laser scattering, and G22 showed semi-quantitative agreement with model predictions. Experimental initial-rates for aggregation showed that increased (decreased) repulsive interactions led to significantly increased (decreased) aggregation resistance, even based solely on single-point mutations. However, in the case of a particular amino acid (E17), the aggregation mechanism was altered by substitution with R or K, and this greatly mitigated improvements in aggregation resistance. The results illustrate that predictions based on native protein-protein interactions can provide a useful design target for engineering aggregation resistance; however, this approach needs to be balanced with consideration of how mutations can impact aggregation mechanisms. PMID:27160179

  14. Quantitative H2S-mediated protein sulfhydration reveals metabolic reprogramming during the integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Bederman, Ilya; Majumder, Mithu; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda; Kabil, Omer; Willard, Belinda; Banerjee, Ruma; Wang, Benlian; Bebek, Gurkan; Evans, Charles R; Fox, Paul L; Gerson, Stanton L; Hoppel, Charles L; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The sulfhydration of cysteine residues in proteins is an important mechanism involved in diverse biological processes. We have developed a proteomics approach to quantitatively profile the changes of sulfhydrated cysteines in biological systems. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that sulfhydrated cysteines are part of a wide range of biological functions. In pancreatic β cells exposed to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, elevated H2S promotes the sulfhydration of enzymes in energy metabolism and stimulates glycolytic flux. We propose that transcriptional and translational reprogramming by the integrated stress response (ISR) in pancreatic β cells is coupled to metabolic alternations triggered by sulfhydration of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. PMID:26595448

  15. Fabs enable single particle cryoEM studies of small proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shenping; Avila-Sakar, Agustin; Kim, JungMin; Booth, David S.; Greenberg, Charles H.; Rossi, Andrea; Liao, Maofu; Li, Xueming; Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Juge, Narinobu; Yu, Yadong; Mergel, Claudia M.; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier; Strop, Pavel; Tampé, Robert; Edwards, Robert H.; Stroud, Robert M.; Craik, Charles S.; Cheng, Yifan

    2012-01-01

    Summary In spite of its recent achievements, the technique of single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) has not been widely used to study proteins smaller than 100kDa, although it is a highly desirable application of this technique. One fundamental limitation is that images of small proteins embedded in vitreous ice do not contain adequate features for accurate image alignment. We describe a general strategy to overcome this limitation by selecting a fragment antigen binding (Fab) to form a stable and rigid complex with a target protein, thus providing a defined feature for accurate image alignment. Using this approach, we determined a three-dimensional structure of a ~65 kDa protein by single particle cryoEM. Because Fabs can be readily generated against a wide range of proteins by phage display, this approach is generally applicable to study many small proteins by single particle cryoEM. PMID:22483106

  16. Fabs enable single particle cryoEM studies of small proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shenping; Avila-Sakar, Agustin; Kim, JungMin; Booth, David S; Greenberg, Charles H; Rossi, Andrea; Liao, Maofu; Li, Xueming; Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Juge, Narinobu; Yu, Yadong; Mergel, Claudia M; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier; Strop, Pavel; Tampé, Robert; Edwards, Robert H; Stroud, Robert M; Craik, Charles S; Cheng, Yifan

    2012-04-01

    In spite of its recent achievements, the technique of single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) has not been widely used to study proteins smaller than 100 kDa, although it is a highly desirable application of this technique. One fundamental limitation is that images of small proteins embedded in vitreous ice do not contain adequate features for accurate image alignment. We describe a general strategy to overcome this limitation by selecting a fragment antigen binding (Fab) to form a stable and rigid complex with a target protein, thus providing a defined feature for accurate image alignment. Using this approach, we determined a three-dimensional structure of an ∼65 kDa protein by single particle cryoEM. Because Fabs can be readily generated against a wide range of proteins by phage display, this approach is generally applicable to study many small proteins by single particle cryoEM. PMID:22483106

  17. Single-cell sequencing of Thiomargarita reveals genomic flexibility for adaptation to dynamic redox conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.; Flood, Beverly E.; Bailey, Jake V.; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-06-21

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiornargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of amore » chain-forming "Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36", and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na+-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In conclusion, the genome of "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" provides additional insight into the ecology of giant sulfur

  18. Single-cell Sequencing of Thiomargarita Reveals Genomic Flexibility for Adaptation to Dynamic Redox Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.; Flood, Beverly E.; Bailey, Jake V.; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiomargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of a chain-forming “Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36”, and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na+-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In summary, the genome of “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” provides additional insight into the ecology of

  19. Single-Cell (Meta-)Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Beverly E.; Fliss, Palmer; Jones, Daniel S.; Dick, Gregory J.; Jain, Sunit; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Winkel, Matthias; Mußmann, Marc; Bailey, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsrA. The dsrA group

  20. Single-cell Sequencing of Thiomargarita Reveals Genomic Flexibility for Adaptation to Dynamic Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N; Flood, Beverly E; Bailey, Jake V; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiomargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of a chain-forming "Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36", and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na(+)-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In summary, the genome of "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" provides additional insight into the ecology of giant sulfur

  1. New Tricks for Old Proteins: Single Mutations in a Nonenzymatic Protein Give Rise to Various Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Yurii S; Dunston, Tiffany T; Makhlynets, Olga V; Moroz, Olesia V; Wu, Yibing; Yoon, Jennifer H; Olsen, Alissa B; McLaughlin, Jaclyn M; Mack, Korrie L; Gosavi, Pallavi M; van Nuland, Nico A J; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2015-12-01

    Design of a new catalytic function in proteins, apart from its inherent practical value, is important for fundamental understanding of enzymatic activity. Using a computationally inexpensive, minimalistic approach that focuses on introducing a single highly reactive residue into proteins to achieve catalysis we converted a 74-residue-long C-terminal domain of calmodulin into an efficient esterase. The catalytic efficiency of the resulting stereoselective, allosterically regulated catalyst, nicknamed AlleyCatE, is higher than that of any previously reported de novo designed esterases. The simplicity of our design protocol should complement and expand the capabilities of current state-of-art approaches to protein design. These results show that even a small nonenzymatic protein can efficiently attain catalytic activities in various reactions (Kemp elimination, ester hydrolysis, retroaldol reaction) as a result of a single mutation. In other words, proteins can be just one mutation away from becoming entry points for subsequent evolution. PMID:26555770

  2. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  3. Coronavirus receptor switch explained from the stereochemistry of protein-carbohydrate interactions and a single mutation.

    PubMed

    Bakkers, Mark J G; Zeng, Qinghong; Feitsma, Louris J; Hulswit, Ruben J G; Li, Zeshi; Westerbeke, Aniek; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Boons, Geert-Jan; Langereis, Martijn A; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2016-05-31

    Hemagglutinin-esterases (HEs) are bimodular envelope proteins of orthomyxoviruses, toroviruses, and coronaviruses with a carbohydrate-binding "lectin" domain appended to a receptor-destroying sialate-O-acetylesterase ("esterase"). In concert, these domains facilitate dynamic virion attachment to cell-surface sialoglycans. Most HEs (type I) target 9-O-acetylated sialic acids (9-O-Ac-Sias), but one group of coronaviruses switched to using 4-O-Ac-Sias instead (type II). This specificity shift required quasisynchronous adaptations in the Sia-binding sites of both lectin and esterase domains. Previously, a partially disordered crystal structure of a type II HE revealed how the shift in lectin ligand specificity was achieved. How the switch in esterase substrate specificity was realized remained unresolved, however. Here, we present a complete structure of a type II HE with a receptor analog in the catalytic site and identify the mutations underlying the 9-O- to 4-O-Ac-Sia substrate switch. We show that (i) common principles pertaining to the stereochemistry of protein-carbohydrate interactions were at the core of the transition in lectin ligand and esterase substrate specificity; (ii) in consequence, the switch in O-Ac-Sia specificity could be readily accomplished via convergent intramolecular coevolution with only modest architectural changes in lectin and esterase domains; and (iii) a single, inconspicuous Ala-to-Ser substitution in the catalytic site was key to the emergence of the type II HEs. Our findings provide fundamental insights into how proteins "see" sugars and how this affects protein and virus evolution. PMID:27185912

  4. Single-molecule DNA detection using a novel SP1 protein nanopore.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Li, Yang; Qin, Li-Xia; Heyman, Arnon; Shoseyov, Oded; Willner, Itamar; Long, Yi-Tao; Tian, He

    2013-02-28

    SP1 protein as a new type of biological nanopore is described and is utilized to distinguish single-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. Using the SP1 nanopore to investigate single molecule detection broadens the existing research areas of pore-forming biomaterials from unsymmetrical biological nanopores to symmetrical biological nanopores. This novel nanopore could provide a good candidate for single-molecule detection and characterization of biomaterial applications. PMID:23340583

  5. Photoconversion of organic materials into single-cell protein

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, P.F.

    1991-12-31

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into sterile, high-grade bacterial protein suitable for use an animal feed or human food supplements. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide, hydrogen and nitrogen products, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material, which can be high as 65% protein. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for food production under zero-gravity or extra-terrestrial conditions.

  6. Single metallic nanoparticle imaging for protein detection in cells

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L.; Tardin, C.; Boyer, D.; Choquet, D.; Tamarat, P.; Lounis, B.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a visualization of membrane proteins labeled with 10-nm gold nanoparticles in cells, using an all-optical method based on photothermal interference contrast. The high sensitivity of the method and the stability of the signals allows 3D imaging of individual nanoparticles without the drawbacks of photobleaching and blinking inherent to fluorescent markers. A simple analytical model is derived to account for the measurements of the signal amplitude and the spatial resolution. The photothermal interference contrast method provides an efficient, reproducible, and promising way to visualize low amounts of proteins in cells by optical means. PMID:13679586

  7. Photoconversion of organic materials into single-cell protein

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F.

    2001-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into sterile, high-grade bacterial protein suitable for use an animal feed or human food supplements. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide, hydrogen and nitrogen products, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material, which can be as high as 65% protein. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for food production under zero-gravity or extra-terrestrial conditions.

  8. Combination of hydrogel nanoparticles and proteomics to reveal secreted proteins associated with decidualization of human uterine stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of secreted proteins of low abundance is often limited by abundant and high molecular weight (MW) proteins. We have optimised a procedure to overcome this limitation. Results Low MW proteins in the conditioned media of cultured cells were first captured using dual-size exclusion/affinity hydrogel nanoparticles and their identities were then revealed by proteomics. Conclusions This technique enables the analysis of secreted proteins of cultured cells low MW and low abundance. PMID:21884602

  9. Systematic Analysis of Compositional Order of Proteins Reveals New Characteristics of Biological Functions and a Universal Correlate of Macroevolution

    PubMed Central

    Persi, Erez; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO) based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs) that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between ‘regularity’, ‘periodicity’ and ‘vocabulary’, to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT) in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic ‘innovation’ at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces. PMID:24278003

  10. In Planta Single-Molecule Pull-Down Reveals Tetrameric Stoichiometry of HD-ZIPIII:LITTLE ZIPPER Complexes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Husbands, Aman Y.; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Ha, Taekjip; Timmermans, Marja C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering complex biological processes markedly benefits from approaches that directly assess the underlying biomolecular interactions. Most commonly used approaches to monitor protein-protein interactions typically provide nonquantitative readouts that lack statistical power and do not yield information on the heterogeneity or stoichiometry of protein complexes. Single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) uses single-molecule fluorescence detection to mitigate these disadvantages and can quantitatively interrogate interactions between proteins and other compounds, such as nucleic acids, small molecule ligands, and lipids. Here, we establish SiMPull in plants using the HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER III (HD-ZIPIII) and LITTLE ZIPPER (ZPR) interaction as proof-of-principle. Colocalization analysis of fluorophore-tagged HD-ZIPIII and ZPR proteins provides strong statistical evidence of complex formation. In addition, we use SiMPull to directly quantify YFP and mCherry maturation probabilities, showing these differ substantially from values obtained in mammalian systems. Leveraging these probabilities, in conjunction with fluorophore photobleaching assays on over 2000 individual complexes, we determined HD-ZIPIII:ZPR stoichiometry. Intriguingly, these complexes appear as heterotetramers, comprising two HD-ZIPIII and two ZPR molecules, rather than heterodimers as described in the current model. This surprising result raises new questions about the regulation of these key developmental factors and is illustrative of the unique contribution SiMPull is poised to make to in planta protein interaction studies. PMID:27385814

  11. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P.; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-12-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  12. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P.; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-01-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole. PMID:22355710

  13. Recognition of T-rich single-stranded DNA by the cold shock protein Bs-CspB in solution

    PubMed Central

    Zeeb, Markus; Max, Klaas E.A.; Weininger, Ulrich; Löw, Christian; Sticht, Heinrich; Balbach, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSP) belong to the family of single-stranded nucleic acid binding proteins with OB-fold. CSP are believed to function as ‘RNA chaperones’ and during anti-termination. We determined the solution structure of Bs-CspB bound to the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragment heptathymidine (dT7) by NMR spectroscopy. Bs-CspB reveals an almost invariant conformation when bound to dT7 with only minor reorientations in loop β1–β2 and β3–β4 and of few aromatic side chains involved in base stacking. Binding studies of protein variants and mutated ssDNA demonstrated that Bs-CspB associates with ssDNA at almost diffusion controlled rates and low sequence specificity consistent with its biological function. A variation of the ssDNA affinity is accomplished solely by changes of the dissociation rate. 15N NMR relaxation and H/D exchange experiments revealed that binding of dT7 increases the stability of Bs-CspB and reduces the sub-nanosecond dynamics of the entire protein and especially of loop β3–β4. PMID:16956971

  14. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  15. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens*

    PubMed Central

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections. PMID:21816822

  16. Time-resolved room temperature protein phosphorescence: nonexponential decay from single emitting tryptophans.

    PubMed Central

    Schlyer, B D; Schauerte, J A; Steel, D G; Gafni, A

    1994-01-01

    The single room temperature phosphorescent (RTP) residue of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). Trp-314, and of alkaline phosphatase (AP), Trp-109, show nonexponential phosphorescence decays when the data are collected to a high degree of precision. Using the maximum entropy method (MEM) for the analysis of these decays, it is shown that AP phosphorescence decay is dominated by a single Gaussian distribution, whereas for LADH the data reveal two amplitude packets. The lifetime-normalized width of the MEM distribution for both proteins is larger than that obtained for model monoexponential chromophores (e.g., terbium in water and pyrene in cyclohexane). Experiments show that the nonexponential decay is fundamental; i.e., an intrinsic property of the pure protein. Because phosphorescence reports on the state of the emitting chromophore, such nonexponential behavior could be caused by the presence of excited state reactions. However, it is also well known that the phosphorescence lifetime of a tryptophan residue is strongly dependent on the local flexibility around the indole moiety. Hence, the nonexponential phosphorescence decay may also be caused by the presence of at least two states of different local rigidity (in the vicinity of the phosphorescing tryptophan) corresponding to different ground state conformers. The observation that in the chemically homogeneous LADH sample the phosphorescence decay kinetics depends on the excitation wavelength further supports this latter interpretation. This dependence is caused by the wavelength-selective excitation of Trp-314 in a subensemble of LADH molecules with differing hydrophobic and rigid environments. With this interpretation, the data show that interconversion of these states occurs on a time scale long compared with the phosphorescence decay (0.1-1.0 s). Further experiments reveal that with increasing temperature the distributed phosphorescence decay rates for both AP and LADH broaden, thus indicating that

  17. Conformational Switching in a Light-Harvesting Protein as Followed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Andrew; Ilioaia, Cristian; Krüger, Tjaart P.J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Among the ultimate goals of protein physics, the complete, experimental description of the energy paths leading to protein conformational changes remains a challenge. Single protein fluorescence spectroscopy constitutes an approach of choice for addressing protein dynamics, and, among naturally fluorescing proteins, light-harvesting (LH) proteins from purple bacteria constitute an ideal object for such a study. LHs bind bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, which confer on them a high intrinsic fluorescence yield. Moreover, the electronic properties of these pigment-proteins result from the strong excitonic coupling between their bound bacteriochlorophyll a molecules in combination with the large energetic disorder due to slow fluctuations in their structure. As a result, the position and probability of their fluorescence transition delicately depends on the precise realization of the disorder of the set of bound pigments, which is governed by the LH protein dynamics. Analysis of these parameters using time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy thus yields direct access to the protein dynamics. Applying this technique to the LH2 protein from Rhodovulum (Rdv.) sulfidophilum, the structure—and consequently the fluorescence properties—of which depends on pH, allowed us to follow a single protein, pH-induced, reversible, conformational transition. Hence, for the first time, to our knowledge, a protein transition can be visualized through changes in the electronic structure of the intrinsic cofactors, at a level of a single LH protein, which opens a new, to our knowledge, route for understanding the changes in energy landscape that underlie protein function and adaptation to the needs of living organisms. PMID:26039172

  18. Dynamic regulation of fluorescent proteins from a single species of coral.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hung-Teh; Sturgis, Shelby; DeSalle, Rob; Tsai, Julia; Davis, Douglas; Gruber, David F; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2007-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the natural function of fluorescent proteins, we have undertaken quantitative analyses of these proteins in a single species of coral, Montastraea cavernosa, residing around Turneffe atoll, on the Belizean Barrier Reef. We identified at least 10 members of a fluorescent protein family in this species, which consist of 4 distinct spectral classes. As much as a 10-fold change in the overall expression of fluorescent proteins was observed from specimen to specimen, suggesting that fluorescent proteins are dynamically regulated in response to environmental or physiological conditions. We found that the expression of some proteins was inversely correlated with depth, and that groups of proteins were coordinately expressed. There was no relationship between the expression of fluorescent proteins and the natural coloration of the Montastraea cavernosa specimens in this study. These findings have implications for current hypotheses regarding the properties and natural function of fluorescent proteins. PMID:17955294

  19. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  20. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging to quantify membrane protein dynamics and oligomerization in living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaojuan; Deng, Xin; Luu, Doan-Trung; Maurel, Christophe; Lin, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the mobility and interactions of proteins is key to understanding cellular signaling mechanisms; however, quantitative analysis of protein dynamics in living plant cells remains a major challenge. Here we describe an automated, single-molecule protocol based on total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) imaging that allows protein tracking and subunit counting in living plant cells. This protocol uses TIRFM to image transgenic plant tissues expressing fluorescently tagged proteins that are localized to the plasma membrane. Next, a tracking algorithm quantifies dynamic changes in fluorescent protein motion types, temporary particle displacement and protein photobleaching steps. This protocol allows researchers to study the kinetic characteristics of heterogeneously distributed proteins. The approach has potential applications for studies of protein dynamics and subunit stoichiometry for a wide variety of plasma membrane and intracellular proteins in living plant cells and other biological specimens visualized by TIRFM or other fluorescence imaging techniques. The whole protocol can be completed in 5-6 h. PMID:26584445

  1. Synaptic protein ubiquitination in rat brain revealed by antibody-based ubiquitome analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Jones, Drew R; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Yanji; Peng, Junmin

    2012-09-01

    Protein ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification regulating neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory, and its dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Here we report a systematic analysis of ubiquitinated proteome (ubiquitome) in rat brain using a newly developed monoclonal antibody that recognizes the diglycine tag on lysine residues in trypsinized peptides (K-GG peptides). Initial antibody specificity analysis showed that the antibody can distinguish K-GG peptides from linear GG peptides or pseudo K-GG peptides derived from iodoacetamide. To evaluate the false discovery rate of K-GG peptide matches during database search, we introduced a null experiment using bacterial lysate that contains no such peptides. The brain ubiquitome was then analyzed by this antibody enrichment with or without strong cation exchange (SCX) prefractionation. During SCX chromatography, although the vast majority of K-GG peptides were detected in the fractions containing at least three positive charged peptides, specific K-GG peptides with two positive charges (e.g., protein N-terminal acetylated and C-terminal non-K/R peptides) were also identified in early fractions. The reliability of C-terminal K-GG peptides was also extensively investigated. Finally, we collected a data set of 1786 K-GG sites on 2064 peptides in 921 proteins and estimated their abundance by spectral counting. The study reveals a wide range of ubiquitination events on key components in presynaptic region (e.g., Bassoon, NSF, SNAP25, synapsin, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin) and postsynaptic density (e.g., PSD-95, GKAP, CaMKII, as well as receptors for NMDA, AMPA, GABA, serotonin, and acetylcholine). We also determined ubiquitination sites on amyloid precursor protein and alpha synuclein that are thought to be causative agents in Alzhermer's and Parkinson's disorders, respectively. As K-GG peptides can also be produced from Nedd8 or ISG15 modified

  2. Dynamics of natural killer cell receptor revealed by quantitative analysis of photoswitchable protein.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Sophie V; Aquino, Gerardo; Lagrue, Kathryn; Köhler, Karsten; Endres, Robert G; Davis, Daniel M

    2013-11-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activation is dynamically regulated by numerous activating and inhibitory surface receptors that accumulate at the immune synapse. Quantitative analysis of receptor dynamics has been limited by methodologies that rely on indirect measurements such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Here, we report an apparently novel approach to study how proteins traffic to and from the immune synapse using NK cell receptors tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein tdEosFP, which can be irreversibly photoswitched from a green to red fluorescent state by ultraviolet light. Thus, after a localized switching event, the movement of the photoswitched molecules can be temporally and spatially resolved by monitoring fluorescence in two regions of interest. By comparing images with mathematical models, we evaluated the diffusion coefficient of the receptor KIR2DL1 (0.23 ± 0.06 μm(2) s(-1)) and assessed how synapse formation affects receptor dynamics. Our data conclude that the inhibitory NK cell receptor KIR2DL1 is continually trafficked into the synapse, and remains surprisingly stable there. Unexpectedly, however, in NK cells forming synapses with multiple target cells simultaneously, KIR2DL1 at one synapse can relocate to another synapse. Thus, our results reveal a previously undetected intersynaptic exchange of protein. PMID:24209843

  3. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN), an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27491084

  4. Local axonal protection by WldS as revealed by conditional regulation of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jack T; Medress, Zachary A; Vargas, Mauricio E; Barres, Ben A

    2015-08-18

    The expression of the mutant Wallerian degeneration slow (WldS) protein significantly delays axonal degeneration from various nerve injuries and in multiple species; however, the mechanism for its axonal protective property remains unclear. Although WldS is localized predominantly in the nucleus, it also is present in a smaller axonal pool, leading to conflicting models to account for the WldS fraction necessary for axonal protection. To identify where WldS activity is required to delay axonal degeneration, we adopted a method to alter the temporal expression of WldS protein in neurons by chemically regulating its protein stability. We demonstrate that continuous WldS activity in the axonal compartment is both necessary and sufficient to delay axonal degeneration. Furthermore, by specifically increasing axonal WldS expression postaxotomy, we reveal a critical period of 4-5 h postinjury during which the course of Wallerian axonal degeneration can be halted. Finally, we show that NAD(+), the metabolite of WldS/nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase enzymatic activity, is sufficient and specific to confer WldS-like axon protection and is a likely molecular mediator of WldS axon protection. The results delineate a therapeutic window in which the course of Wallerian degeneration can be delayed even after injures have occurred and help narrow the molecular targets of WldS activity to events within the axonal compartment. PMID:26209654

  5. Local axonal protection by WldS as revealed by conditional regulation of protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack T.; Medress, Zachary A.; Vargas, Mauricio E.; Barres, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of the mutant Wallerian degeneration slow (WldS) protein significantly delays axonal degeneration from various nerve injuries and in multiple species; however, the mechanism for its axonal protective property remains unclear. Although WldS is localized predominantly in the nucleus, it also is present in a smaller axonal pool, leading to conflicting models to account for the WldS fraction necessary for axonal protection. To identify where WldS activity is required to delay axonal degeneration, we adopted a method to alter the temporal expression of WldS protein in neurons by chemically regulating its protein stability. We demonstrate that continuous WldS activity in the axonal compartment is both necessary and sufficient to delay axonal degeneration. Furthermore, by specifically increasing axonal WldS expression postaxotomy, we reveal a critical period of 4–5 h postinjury during which the course of Wallerian axonal degeneration can be halted. Finally, we show that NAD+, the metabolite of WldS/nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase enzymatic activity, is sufficient and specific to confer WldS-like axon protection and is a likely molecular mediator of WldS axon protection. The results delineate a therapeutic window in which the course of Wallerian degeneration can be delayed even after injures have occurred and help narrow the molecular targets of WldS activity to events within the axonal compartment. PMID:26209654

  6. Genome-Wide Screen Reveals Valosin-Containing Protein Requirement for Coronavirus Exit from Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hui Hui; Kumar, Pankaj; Tay, Felicia Pei Ling; Moreau, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses are RNA viruses with a large zoonotic reservoir and propensity for host switching, representing a real threat for public health, as evidenced by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Cellular factors required for their replication are poorly understood. Using genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening, we identified 83 novel genes supporting infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) replication in human cells. Thirty of these hits can be placed in a network of interactions with viral proteins and are involved in RNA splicing, membrane trafficking, and ubiquitin conjugation. In addition, our screen reveals an unexpected role for valosin-containing protein (VCP/p97) in early steps of infection. Loss of VCP inhibits a previously uncharacterized degradation of the nucleocapsid N protein. This inhibition derives from virus accumulation in early endosomes, suggesting a role for VCP in the maturation of virus-loaded endosomes. The several host factors identified in this study may provide avenues for targeted therapeutics. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are RNA viruses representing a real threat for public health, as evidenced by SARS and the emerging MERS. However, cellular factors required for their replication are poorly understood. Using genome-wide siRNA screening, we identified novel genes supporting infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) replication in human cells. The several host factors identified in this study may provide directions for future research on targeted therapeutics. PMID:26311884

  7. Deletion of CFTR Translation Start Site Reveals Functional Isoforms of the Protein in CF Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Anabela S.; Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Farinha, Carlos M.; Mendes, Filipa; Gonçalves, Juan; Barreto, Celeste; Harris, Ann; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims: Mutations in the CFTR gene cause Cystic Fibrosis (CF) the most common life-threatening autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasians. We identified a CFTR mutation (c.120del23) abolishing the normal translation initiation codon, which occurs in two Portuguese CF patients. This study aims at functionally characterizing the effect of this novel mutation. Methods: RNA and protein techniques were applied to both native tissues from CF patients and recombinant cells expressing CFTR constructs to determine whether c.120del23 allows CFTR protein production through usage of alternative internal codons, and to characterize the putative truncated CFTR form(s). Results: Our data show that two shorter forms of CFTR protein are produced when the initiation translation codon is deleted indicating usage of internal initiation codons. The N-truncated CFTR generated by this mutation has decreased stability, very low processing efficiency, and drastically reduced function. Analysis of mutants of four methionine codons downstream to M1 (M82, M150, M152, M156) revealed that each of the codons M150/M152/M156 (exon 4) can mediate CFTR alternative translation. Conclusions: The CFTR N-terminus has an important role in avoiding CFTR turnover and in rendering effective its plasma membrane traffic. These data correlate well with the severe clinical phenotype of CF patients bearing the c.120del23 mutation. PMID:19910674

  8. Seeing is believing: Direct imaging of charge flow along pili proteins reveals new mechanism for bacterial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Adhikari, Ramesh; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of charge flow on the nanoscale in proteins is crucial for a fundamental understanding of several life processes. Here, we report direct visualization of charge propagation along native pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens at nanometer resolution using electrostatic force microscopy. Surprisingly, charges injected at a single point into individual, untreated pili, still attached to cells, propagate over the entire filament. The charges propagate despite a lack of cytochromes on the pili, in contrast to the dominant biochemical model that proteins are electronically insulating and must incorporate redox-active cofactors in order to achieve electron transport functionality. The mobile charge density in pili is comparable to synthetic organic conductors, increasing with proton doping, and with temperature-dependence consistent with previously discovered metallic-like transport mechanism. Conductive pili enable syntrophic bacteria to share energy by directly exchanging electrons among each other. Measurements along individual pilus using nanoelectrodes showed ohmic behavior strongly dependent on the amino acid composition of pili. Electron transfer rate measurement revealed that the pili conductivity is the decisive factor in controlling the bacterial respiration rate. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences, NSF-NSEC CHM (CMMI-1025020) and Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  9. Transport characteristics of a single C60-molecule junction revealed by multiple Andreev reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Ryoichi; Arafune, Ryuichi; Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the number of transport channels and the value of the transmission coefficients of a single molecular junction by measuring the multiple Andreev reflections (MARs) with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). By precisely positioning a Nb STM tip to a single C60 molecule on Pb(111), a single molecular junction was fabricated in which the C60 molecule connects with the two superconducting electrodes. From the subharmonic gap structures arising from MARs in the current-voltage characteristics together with the tunneling spectrum of the C60 molecule, we found that unoccupied molecular orbitals of C60 extending to the Fermi level provide three electronic transport channels in the molecular junction. We also found that the transmission coefficients depend on the contact geometry of the molecule. These results demonstrate that the combination of the STM imaging with the MARs measurement provides an effective path for investigating the electronic transport properties through a single molecule sandwiched by two superconducting electrodes.

  10. Logic implementations using a single nanoparticle-protein hybrid.

    PubMed

    Medalsy, Izhar; Klein, Michael; Heyman, Arnon; Shoseyov, Oded; Remacle, F; Levine, R D; Porath, Danny

    2010-06-01

    A Set-Reset machine is the simplest logic circuit with a built-in memory. Its output is a (nonlinear) function of the input and of the state stored in the machine's memory. Here, we report a nanoscale Set-Reset machine operating at room temperature that is based on a 5-nm silicon nanoparticle attached to the inner pore of a stable circular protein. The nanoparticle-protein hybrid can also function as a balanced ternary multiplier. Conductive atomic force microscopy is used to implement the logic input and output operations, and the processing of the logic Set and Reset operations relies on the finite capacitance of the nanoparticle provided by the good electrical isolation given by the protein, thus enabling stability of the logic device states. We show that the machine can be cycled, such that in every successive cycle, the previous state in the memory is retained as the present state. The energy cost of one cycle of computation is minimized to the cost of charging this state. PMID:20400968

  11. DNA Replication Catalyzed by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Proteins Reveals Trombone Loops at the Fork*♦

    PubMed Central

    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D.

    2015-01-01

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis. PMID:25471368

  12. Direct probe of spectral inhomogeneity reveals synthetic tunability of single-nanocrystal spectral linewidths.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Beyler, Andrew P; Marshall, Lisa F; Chen, Ou; Harris, Daniel K; Wanger, Darcy D; Brokmann, Xavier; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2013-07-01

    The spectral linewidth of an ensemble of fluorescent emitters is dictated by the combination of single-emitter linewidths and sample inhomogeneity. For semiconductor nanocrystals, efforts to tune ensemble linewidths for optical applications have focused primarily on eliminating sample inhomogeneities, because conventional single-molecule methods cannot reliably build accurate ensemble-level statistics for single-particle linewidths. Photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy in solution (S-PCFS) offers a unique approach to investigating single-nanocrystal spectra with large sample statistics and high signal-to-noise ratios, without user selection bias and at fast timescales. With S-PCFS, we directly and quantitatively deconstruct the ensemble linewidth into contributions from the average single-particle linewidth and from sample inhomogeneity. We demonstrate that single-particle linewidths vary significantly from batch to batch and can be synthetically controlled. These findings delineate the synthetic challenges facing underdeveloped nanomaterials such as InP and InAs core-shell particles and introduce new avenues for the synthetic optimization of fluorescent nanoparticles. PMID:23787751

  13. System-wide Analysis of SUMOylation Dynamics in Response to Replication Stress Reveals Novel Small Ubiquitin-like Modified Target Proteins and Acceptor Lysines Relevant for Genome Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chang, Jer-Gung; Hendriks, Ivo A.; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Olsen, Jesper V.; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic agents can cause replication fork stalling in dividing cells because of DNA lesions, eventually leading to replication fork collapse when the damage is not repaired. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers (SUMOs) are known to counteract replication stress, nevertheless, only a small number of relevant SUMO target proteins are known. To address this, we have purified and identified SUMO-2 target proteins regulated by replication stress in human cells. The developed methodology enabled single step purification of His10-SUMO-2 conjugates under denaturing conditions with high yield and high purity. Following statistical analysis on five biological replicates, a total of 566 SUMO-2 targets were identified. After 2 h of hydroxyurea treatment, 10 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation and two proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation, whereas after 24 h, 35 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation, and 13 proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation. A site-specific approach was used to map over 1000 SUMO-2 acceptor lysines in target proteins. The methodology is generic and is widely applicable in the ubiquitin field. A large subset of these identified proteins function in one network that consists of interacting replication factors, transcriptional regulators, DNA damage response factors including MDC1, ATR-interacting protein ATRIP, the Bloom syndrome protein and the BLM-binding partner RMI1, the crossover junction endonuclease EME1, BRCA1, and CHAF1A. Furthermore, centromeric proteins and signal transducers were dynamically regulated by SUMOylation upon replication stress. Our results uncover a comprehensive network of SUMO target proteins dealing with replication damage and provide a framework for detailed understanding of the role of SUMOylation to counteract replication stress. Ultimately, our study reveals how a post-translational modification is able to orchestrate a large variety of different proteins to integrate different nuclear processes with the

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of proteins and sugars at single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Satoshi; Morikawa, Mika; Kaneda, Mugiho; Nakaishi, Kazunari; Nakatsuma, Akira; Ninomiya, Masaki; Yoshimura, Teruki; Miura, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Each cell produces its own responses even if it appears identical to other cells. To analyze these individual cell characteristics, we need to measure trace amounts of molecules in a single cell. Nucleic acids in a single cell can be easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction, but single-cell measurement of proteins and sugars will require de novo techniques. In the present study, we outline the techniques we have developed toward this end. For proteins, our ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide cycling can detect proteins at subattomoles per assay. For sugars, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy coupled with glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction allows us to measure glucose at tens of nM. Our methods thus offer versatile techniques for single-cell-level analyses, and they are hoped to strongly promote single-cell biology as well as to develop noninvasive tests in clinical medicine. PMID:27064305

  15. SAXS/SANS on Supercharged Proteins Reveals Residue-Specific Modifications of the Hydration Shell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Henry S; Martel, Anne; Girard, Eric; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Madern, Dominique; Blackledge, Martin; Franzetti, Bruno; Gabel, Frank

    2016-05-24

    Water molecules in the immediate vicinity of biomacromolecules, including proteins, constitute a hydration layer characterized by physicochemical properties different from those of bulk water and play a vital role in the activity and stability of these structures, as well as in intermolecular interactions. Previous studies using solution scattering, crystallography, and molecular dynamics simulations have provided valuable information about the properties of these hydration shells, including modifications in density and ionic concentration. Small-angle scattering of x-rays (SAXS) and neutrons (SANS) are particularly useful and complementary techniques to study biomacromolecular hydration shells due to their sensitivity to electronic and nuclear scattering-length density fluctuations, respectively. Although several sophisticated SAXS/SANS programs have been developed recently, the impact of physicochemical surface properties on the hydration layer remains controversial, and systematic experimental data from individual biomacromolecular systems are scarce. Here, we address the impact of physicochemical surface properties on the hydration shell by a systematic SAXS/SANS study using three mutants of a single protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), with highly variable net charge (+36, -6, and -29). The combined analysis of our data shows that the hydration shell is locally denser in the vicinity of acidic surface residues, whereas basic and hydrophilic/hydrophobic residues only mildly modify its density. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the density modifications result from the combined effect of residue-specific recruitment of ions from the bulk in combination with water structural rearrangements in their vicinity. Finally, we find that the specific surface-charge distributions of the different GFP mutants modulate the conformational space of flexible parts of the protein. PMID:27224484

  16. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  17. High Structural Resolution Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Reveals an Extended Robo1-Heparin Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  18. IF-combined smRNA FISH reveals interaction of MCPIP1 protein with IER3 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MCPIP1 and IER3 are recently described proteins essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. IER3 is involved in the regulation of apoptosis and differentiation and has been shown lately to protect activated T cells and macrophages from apoptosis. MCPIP1 is an RNase critical for controlling inflammation-related mRNAs. MCPIP1 interacts with and degrades a set of stem-loop-containing mRNAs (including IL-6). Our results demonstrate the involvement of MCPIP1 in the regulation of IER3 mRNA levels. A dual luciferase assay revealed that over-expression of MCPIP1 resulted in a decrease of luciferase activity in the samples co-transfected with constructs containing luciferase CDS attached to IER3 3′UTR. We identified a stem-loop structure similar to that described to be important for destabilization of the IL-6 mRNA by MCPIP1. Examination of IER3 3′UTR sequence, structure and evolutionary conservation revealed that the identified stem-loop is buried within a bigger element. Deletion of this fragment abolished the regulation of IER3 3′UTR-containing transcript by MCPIP1. Finally, using immunofluorescence-combined single-molecule RNA FISH we have shown that the MCPIP1 protein co-localizes with IER3 mRNA. By this method we also proved that the presence of the wild-type NYN/PIN-like domain of MCPIP1 correlated with the decreased level of IER3 mRNA. RNA immunoprecipitation further confirmed the interaction of MCPIP1 with IER3 transcripts in vivo. PMID:27256408

  19. Imaging the recruitment and loss of proteins and lipids at single sites of calcium-triggered exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Adam J; Sochacki, Kem A; Taraska, Justin W

    2016-08-01

    How and when the dozens of molecules that control exocytosis assemble in living cells to regulate the fusion of a vesicle with the plasma membrane is unknown. Here we image with two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy the local changes of 27 proteins at single dense-core vesicles undergoing calcium-triggered fusion. We identify two broad dynamic behaviors of exocytic molecules. First, proteins enriched at exocytic sites are associated with DCVs long before exocytosis, and near the time of membrane fusion, they diffuse away. These proteins include Rab3 and Rab27, rabphilin3a, munc18a, tomosyn, and CAPS. Second, we observe a group of classical endocytic proteins and lipids, including dynamins, amphiphysin, syndapin, endophilin, and PIP2, which are rapidly and transiently recruited to the exocytic site near the time of membrane fusion. Dynamin mutants unable to bind amphiphysin were not recruited, indicating that amphiphysin is involved in localizing dynamin to the fusion site. Expression of mutant dynamins and knockdown of endogenous dynamin altered the rate of cargo release from single vesicles. Our data reveal the dynamics of many key proteins involved in exocytosis and identify a rapidly recruited dynamin/PIP2/BAR assembly that regulates the exocytic fusion pore of dense-core vesicles in cultured endocrine beta cells. PMID:27307587

  20. Antibody-based analysis reveals “filamentous vs. non-filamentous” and “cytoplasmic vs. nuclear” crosstalk of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kumeta, Masahiro; Hirai, Yuya; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-12-10

    To uncover the molecular composition and dynamics of the functional scaffold for the nucleus, three fractions of biochemically-stable nuclear protein complexes were extracted and used as immunogens to produce a variety of monoclonal antibodies. Many helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were identified as antigens, suggesting their dynamic contribution to nuclear architecture and function. Interestingly, sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform of certain cytoskeletal proteins; distinct molecular forms of keratin and actinin were found in the nucleus. Their nuclear shuttling properties were verified by the apparent nuclear accumulations under inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Nuclear keratins do not take an obvious filamentous structure, as was revealed by non-filamentous cytoplasmic keratin-specific monoclonal antibody. These results suggest the distinct roles of the helix-based cytoskeletal proteins in the nucleus. - Highlights: • A set of monoclonal antibodies were raised against nuclear scaffold proteins. • Helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were involved in nuclear scaffold. • Many cytoskeletal components shuttle into the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. • Sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform. • Nuclear keratin is soluble and does not form an obvious filamentous structure.

  1. Calcite formation in soft coral sclerites is determined by a single reactive extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-09-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called "calcite and aragonite seas." Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precip