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Sample records for single-molecule interfacial electron

  1. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics at Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter; Wang, Yuanmin; He, Yufan

    2009-03-01

    Interfacial electron transfer dynamics is important for environmental and catalytic reactions. Extensive ensemble-averaged studies have indicated inhomogeneous and complex dynamics of interfacial ET reaction. To characterize the inhomogeniety and the complex mechanism, we have applied single-molecule spectroscopy and correlated AFM/STM imaging to study the Interfacial ET dynamics of dye molecules adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles. The interfacial ET activity of individual dye molecules showed fluctuations and intermittency at time scale of milliseconds to seconds. The fluctuation dynamics were found to be inhomogeneous from molecule to molecule and from time to time, showing significant static and dynamic disorders in the dynamics. Furthermore, we have applied site-specific AFM-Raman spectroscopy on analyzing ET associated mode-specific vibrational reorganization energy barriers. Our experiments revealed site-to-site variations in the vibrational reorganization energy barriers in the interfacial ET systems. Our recent experiments on single-molecule metal-to-ligand electron transfer (3) and single-molecule STM manipulation will also be discussed.

  2. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  3. Probing Driving Force and Electron Accepting State Density Dependent Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics: Suppressed Fluorescence Blinking of Single Molecules on Indium Tin Oxide Semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Govind Rao, Vishal; Dhital, Bharat; Lu, H Peter

    2016-03-01

    Photoinduced, interfacial electron transfer (ET) dynamics between m-ZnTCPP and Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) film has been studied using single-molecule photon-stamping spectroscopy. The observed ET dynamics of single m-ZnTCPP adsorbed on ITO was compared with that of m-ZnTCPP adsorbed on TiO2 NPs with and without applied electric potential. Compared to m-ZnTCPP on the TiO2 NP surface, m-ZnTCPP on the ITO surface shows a reduced lifetime as well as suppressed blinking and a quasi-continuous distribution of fluorescence intensities, presumably due to higher electron density in ITO. The higher electron density leads to the occupancy of CB acceptor states/trap states, which supports a higher backward electron transfer (BET) rate that results in a quasi-continuous distribution of fluorescence intensities. The dependence of BET rate on electron density and charge trapping is consistent with our previous observations of quasi-continuous distribution of fluorescence intensities of m-ZnTCPP on TiO2 NPs with applied negative potential across the dye-TiO2 interface. The quasi-continuous distribution of fluorescence intensities in both cases of m-ZnTCPP on the ITO surface and m-ZnTCPP on TiO2 NPs with applied negative potential indicates that the electron density in the semiconductor plays a dominant role in dictating the changes in rates of charge transfer, rather than the relative energetics between electrons in the semiconductor and the oxidized sensitizer. PMID:26468609

  4. Chemical principles of single-molecule electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Neupane, Madhav; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-03-01

    The field of single-molecule electronics harnesses expertise from engineering, physics and chemistry to realize circuit elements at the limit of miniaturization; it is a subfield of nanoelectronics in which the electronic components are single molecules. In this Review, we survey the field from a chemical perspective and discuss the structure–property relationships of the three components that form a single-molecule junction: the anchor, the electrode and the molecular bridge. The spatial orientation and electronic coupling between each component profoundly affect the conductance properties and functions of the single-molecule device. We describe the design principles of the anchor group, the influence of the electronic configuration of the electrode and the effect of manipulating the structure of the molecular backbone and of its substituent groups. We discuss single-molecule conductance switches as well as the phenomenon of quantum interference and then trace their fundamental roots back to chemical principles.

  5. Identifying Mechanisms of Interfacial Dynamics Using Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The “soft” (i.e. non-covalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly-varied (e.g. hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, ionic) often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e. conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to simultaneously track molecular configuration and directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including: multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more. PMID:22716995

  6. Electron Transfer-Based Single Molecule Fluorescence as a Probe for Nano-Environment Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruiyun; Wu, Ruixiang; Zhang, Guofeng; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2014-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is one of the most important elementary processes that takes place in fundamental aspects of biology, chemistry, and physics. In this review, we discuss recent research on single molecule probes based on ET. We review some applications, including the dynamics of glass-forming systems, surface binding events, interfacial ET on semiconductors, and the external field-induced dynamics of polymers. All these examples show that the ET-induced changes of fluorescence trajectory and lifetime of single molecules can be used to sensitively probe the surrounding nano-environments. PMID:24496314

  7. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance. PMID:26048551

  8. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-07-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  9. Single-Molecule Electronic Measurements with Metal Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    A review of concepts like tunneling through a metal-molecule-metal-junction, contrast with electrochemical and optical-charge injection, strong-coupling limit, calculations of tunnel transport, electron transfer through Redox-active molecules is presented. This is followed by a discussion of experimental approaches for single-molecule measurements.

  10. Electronic transport in benzodifuran single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, An; Li, Hui; Chen, Songjie; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Liao, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices.Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The fabrication procedure for BDF single-molecule transistors (Fig. S1); the temperature dependence of I-V characteristics of a BDF single-molecule device (Fig. S2); assignment of peaks of IET spectra to specific vibration modes (Fig. S3); the broadening of the ?(C-H) peak (~390 mV, C-H stretch of the phenyl ring) in IET spectra due to the AC modulation (Fig. S4); the I-V curves of pristine gold vacuum junctions (without BDF molecules) measured at different gate voltages (Fig. S5); gate leakage in BDF single-molecule transistors (Fig. S6); the histogram of the transition voltages at two bias polarities for BDF single-molecule devices (Fig. S7). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00402k

  11. Electronic transport through single molecules: effects of strain and contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacham, Helio; Batista, Ronaldo; Mazzoni, Mario; Garzon, Ignacio; Beltran, Marcela; Ordejon, Pablo; Artacho, Emilio

    2007-03-01

    We will present theoretical investigations on single-molecule electron transport. We will focus on the following systems: a) Connected Au nanoparticles: we performed a first principles study [1] of the electronic properties of lattices of Au nanoparticles functionalized by the conjugated molecules BDMT and BDCT. Distinct behaviors of the electron hopping matrix elements between particles as a function of compression are predicted for functionalized lattices. b) Current rectification with symmetric molecules: In an interesting experiment, Reichet et al. [2] measured the current through symmetric organic molecules and obtained asymmetric IV curves when the Au contacts are pulled apart. We show, by means of first-principles calculations, that this effect can originate from the formation of small Au chains between the molecule and the Au surfaces in an asymmetric way. [1] R. J. C. Batista et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 116802 (2006). [2] J. Reichet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176804 (2002).

  12. Probing Electronic and Thermoelectric Properties of Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widawsky, Jonathan R.

    In an effort to further understand electronic and thermoelectric phenomenon at the nanometer scale, we have studied the transport properties of single molecule junctions. To carry out these transport measurements, we use the scanning tunneling microscope-break junction (STM-BJ) technique, which involves the repeated formation and breakage of a metal point contact in an environment of the target molecule. Using this technique, we are able to create gaps that can trap the molecules, allowing us to sequentially and reproducibly create a large number of junctions. By applying a small bias across the junction, we can measure its conductance and learn about the transport mechanisms at the nanoscale. The experimental work presented here directly probes the transmission properties of single molecules through the systematic measurement of junction conductance (at low and high bias) and thermopower. We present measurements on a variety of molecular families and study how conductance depends on the character of the linkage (metal-molecule bond) and the nature of the molecular backbone. We start by describing a novel way to construct single molecule junctions by covalently connecting the molecular backbone to the electrodes. This eliminates the use of linking substituents, and as a result, the junction conductance increases substantially. Then, we compare transport across silicon chains (silanes) and saturated carbon chains (alkanes) while keeping the linkers the same and find a stark difference in their electronic transport properties. We extend our studies of molecular junctions by looking at two additional aspects of quantum transport -- molecular thermopower and molecular current-voltage characteristics. Each of these additional parameters gives us further insight into transport properties at the nanoscale. Evaluating the junction thermopower allows us to determine the nature of charge carriers in the system and we demonstrate this by contrasting the measurement of amine-terminated and pyridine-terminated molecules (which exhibit hole transport and electron transport, respectively). We also report the thermopower of the highly conducting, covalently bound molecular junctions that we have recently been able to form, and learn that, because of their unique transport properties, the junction power factors, GS2, are extremely high. Finally, we discuss the measurement of molecular current-voltage curves and consider the electronic and physical effects of applying a large bias to the system. We conclude with a summary of the work discussed and an outlook on related scientific studies.

  13. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Shanlin

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an electrochemical cell. For example, we are able to use this technique to track electroluminescence of single Au NPs, and the electrodeposition of individual Ag NPs in-situ. These metallic NPs are useful to enhance light harvesting in organic photovoltaic systems. The scattering at the surface of an indium tin oxide (ITO) working electrode was measured during a potential sweep. Utilizing Mie scattering theory and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the scattering data were used to calculate current-potential curves depicting the electrodeposition of individual Ag NPs. The oxidation of individual presynthesized and electrodeposited Ag NPs was also investigated using fluorescence and DFS microscopies. Our work has produced 1 US provisional patent, 15 published manuscripts, 1 submitted and two additional in-writing manuscripts. 5 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral student, 1 visiting professor, and two undergraduate students have received research training in the area of electrochemistry and optical spectroscopy under support of this award.

  14. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging of Interfacial DNA Hybridization Kinetics at Selective Capture Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric M; Manhart, Michael W; Harris, Joel M

    2016-01-19

    Accurate knowledge of the kinetics of complementary oligonucleotide hybridization is integral to the design and understanding of DNA-based biosensors. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence imaging is applied to measuring rates of hybridization between fluorescently labeled target ssDNA and unlabeled probe ssDNA immobilized on glass surfaces. In the absence of probe site labeling, the capture surface must be highly selective to avoid the influence of nonspecific adsorption on the interpretation of single-molecule imaging results. This is accomplished by increasing the probe molecule site densities by a factor of ?100 compared to optically resolvable sites so that nonspecific interactions compete with a much greater number of capture sites and by immobilizing sulfonate groups to passivate the surface between probe strands. The resulting substrates exhibit very low nonspecific adsorption, and the selectivity for binding a complementary target sequence exceeds that of a scrambled sequence by nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The population of immobilized DNA probe sites is quantified by counting individual DNA duplexes at low target concentrations, and those results are used to calibrate fluorescence intensities on the same sample at much higher target concentrations to measure a full binding isotherm. Dissociation rates are determined from interfacial residence times of individual DNA duplexes. Equilibrium and rate constants of hybridization, Ka = 38 (±1) ?M(-1), kon = 1.64 (±0.06) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), and koff = 4.3 (±0.1) × 10(-2) s(-1), were found not to change with surface density of immobilized probe DNA, indicating that hybridization events at neighboring probe sites are independent. To test the influence of probe-strand immobilization on hybridization, the kinetics of the probe target reaction at the surface were compared with the same reaction in free solution, and the equilibrium constants and dissociation and association rates were found to be nearly equivalent. The selectivity of these capture surfaces should facilitate sensitive investigations of DNA hybridization at the limit of counting molecules. Because the immobilized probe DNA on these surfaces is unlabeled, photobleaching of a probe label is not an issue, allowing capture substrates to be used for long periods of time or even reused in multiple experiments. PMID:26695617

  15. Tools for Studying Electron and Spin Transport in Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Daniel C.

    2005-03-01

    Experiments in the field of single-molecule electronics are challenging in part because it can be very difficult to control and characterize the device structure. Molecules contacted by metal electrodes cannot easily be imaged by microscopy techniques. Moreover, if one attempts to characterize the device structure simply by measuring a current-voltage curve, it is easy to mistake nonlinear transport across a bare tunnel junction or a metallic short for a molecular signal. I will discuss the development of a set of experimental test structures that enable the properties of a molecular device to be tuned controllably in-situ, so that the transport mechanisms can be studied more systematically and compared with theoretical predictions. My collaborators and I are developing the means to use several different types of such experimental "knobs" in coordination: electrostatic gating to shift the energy levels in a molecule, mechanical motion to adjust the molecular configuration or the molecule-electrode coupling strength, illumination with light to promote electrons to excited states or to make and break chemical bonds, and the use of ferromagnetic electrodes to study spin-polarized transport. Our work so far has provided new insights into Kondo physics, the coupling between a molecule's electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom, and spin transport through a molecule between magnetic electrodes. Collaborators: Radek Bialczak, Alex Champagne, Luke Donev, Jonas Goldsmith, Jacob Grose, Janice Guikema, Jiwoong Park, Josh Parks, Abhay Pasupathy, Jason Petta, Sara Slater, Burak Ulgut, Alexander Soldatov, H'ector Abruña, and Paul McEuen.

  16. Basic concepts of quantum interference and electron transport in single-molecule electronics.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C J

    2015-02-21

    This tutorial outlines the basic theoretical concepts and tools which underpin the fundamentals of phase-coherent electron transport through single molecules. The key quantity of interest is the transmission coefficient T(E), which yields the electrical conductance, current-voltage relations, the thermopower S and the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of single-molecule devices. Since T(E) is strongly affected by quantum interference (QI), three manifestations of QI in single-molecules are discussed, namely Mach-Zehnder interferometry, Breit-Wigner resonances and Fano resonances. A simple MATLAB code is provided, which allows the novice reader to explore QI in multi-branched structures described by a tight-binding (Hückel) Hamiltonian. More generally, the strengths and limitations of materials-specific transport modelling based on density functional theory are discussed. PMID:25255961

  17. Statistics of single molecule rotation driven by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Charles

    2013-03-01

    In stark contrast to nature, current manmade devices, with the exception of liquid crystals, make no use of nanoscale molecular motion. In order for molecules to be used as components in molecular machines, methods are required to couple individual molecules to external energy sources and to selectively excite motion in a given direction. Recently a new, stable and robust system of molecular rotors consisting of thioether molecules bound to metal surfaces has offered a method with which to study the rotation of individual molecules as a function of temperature, molecular chemistry, proximity of neighboring molecules, and surface structure. Arrhenius plots for the rotation of dibutyl sulfide yielded a rotational barrier of 1.2 kJ per mol. While these results reveal that small amounts of thermal energy are capable of inducing rotation, thermodynamics dictates that thermal energy alone cannot be used to perform useful work in the absence of a temperature gradient. Electrical excitation of individual thioether molecular rotors is performed using with electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Experimental data for the electrically excited motion of asymmetric thioether molecules is presented and the statistics of and mechanism for directed motion is discussed.

  18. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions. PMID:27004879

  19. Two-photon-induced hot-electron transfer to a single molecule in a scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2010-08-15

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photoexcited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron-transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization measurement. Spatial dependence of the electron-transfer rate exhibits atomic-scale variations. A two-pulse correlation experiment reveals the ultrafast dynamic nature of photoinduced charging process in the STM junction. Results from these experiments are important for understanding photoinduced interfacial charge transfer in many nanoscale inorganic-organic structures.

  20. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The field of molecular electronics has grown significantly since the first measurements of single molecule conductance. The single molecule junction, a device in which two conducting leads are spanned by a single molecule, has become a powerful tool for studying charge transfer at the molecular level. While early experiments were focused on elastic electron conductance, today measurements of vibronic effects, molecular optical response, spintronics, thermal conductance, and quantum interference and decoherence effects are prominent areas of research. These new experimental advancements demand improved theoretical treatments which properly account for the interactions between different degrees of freedom: charge, electronic, vibrational, spin, etc.; all in physically relevant parameter ranges. This talk focuses on using a many-body states based approach to investigate the regime of strong interaction between these degrees of freedom, with relatively weak coupling between the molecule and the electric reservoirs created by the conducting leads. We focused on three related processes, electron transfer, electronic energy transfer and molecular excitation. In collaboraton with Boris Fainberg, Faculty of Sciences, Holon Institute of Technology; Sergei Tretiak, Theoretical Division, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory; and Michael Galperin, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego.

  1. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    SciTech Connect

    Fratalocchi, A.; Ruocco, G.

    2011-03-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratalocchi, A.; Ruocco, G.

    2011-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  3. Effect of nonadiabatic electronic-vibrational interactions on the transport properties of single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, A.; Härtle, R.; Thoss, M.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in single-molecule junctions may result from the dependence of the electronic energies or the electronic states of the molecular bridge on the nuclear displacement. The latter mechanism leads to a direct coupling between different electronic states and is referred to as nonadiabatic electronic-vibrational coupling. Employing a perturbative nonequilibrium Green's function approach, we study the influence of nonadiabatic electronic-vibrational coupling in model molecular junctions. Thereby, we distinguish between systems with well-separated and quasidegenerate electronic levels. The results show that the nonadiabatic electronic-vibrational interaction can have a significant influence on the transport properties. The underlying mechanisms, in particular the difference between nonadiabatic and adiabatic electronic-vibrational couplings, are analyzed in some detail.

  4. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sotthewes, Kai; Heimbuch, René Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Geskin, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  5. Single-Molecule Measurements of T4 Lysozyme using Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Because of their unique electronic and chemical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for label-free, single-molecule sensing and detection applications. In this work, a field-effect transistor (FET) architecture comprised of an individual SWNT is used to transduce the conformational motion of a single T4 lysozyme protein, conjugated to the SWNT side wall, into a corresponding electrical current signal. The SWNTs are grown using chemical vapor deposition, and metal electrical contacts are formed using electron beam evaporation. Using N-(1-Pyrene)maleimide, the protein is conjugated to the SWNT side wall. After conjugation, the sensing area of the device is submerged in an electrolyte solution, and the source-drain current is measured while applying an electrolyte-gate. Analysis of the signal provided single-molecule resolution of the dynamical activity of lysozyme as it hydrolyzes macromolecular peptidoglycan, a component of bacterial cell walls. This analysis revealed seven different independent time scales that govern the activity of lysozyme, the pH dependence of these time scales, and a lower limit on the number rate-limiting steps in lysozyme's hinge opening and closing motions. Furthermore, the signals elucidated differences in how lysozyme traverses and catalyzes structurally varying peptidoglycan constructs.

  6. Site-Selection in Single-Molecule Junction for Highly Reproducible Molecular Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Murai, Daigo; Marqués-González, Santiago; Nakamura, Hisao; Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption sites of molecules critically determine the electric/photonic properties and the stability of heterogeneous molecule-metal interfaces. Then, selectivity of adsorption site is essential for development of the fields including organic electronics, catalysis, and biology. However, due to current technical limitations, site-selectivity, i.e., precise determination of the molecular adsorption site, remains a major challenge because of difficulty in precise selection of meaningful one among the sites. We have succeeded the single site-selection at a single-molecule junction by performing newly developed hybrid technique: simultaneous characterization of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The I-V response of 1,4-benzenedithiol junctions reveals the existence of three metastable states arising from different adsorption sites. Notably, correlated SERS measurements show selectivity toward one of the adsorption sites: "bridge sites". This site-selectivity represents an essential step toward the reliable integration of individual molecules on metallic surfaces. Furthermore, the hybrid spectro-electric technique reveals the dependence of the SERS intensity on the strength of the molecule-metal interaction, showing the interdependence between the optical and electronic properties in single-molecule junctions. PMID:26728229

  7. Single-molecule spectroscopy exposes hidden states in an enzymatic electron relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Iris; Yuval Aviram, Haim; Armony, Gad; Horovitz, Amnon; Hofmann, Hagen; Haran, Gilad; Fass, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    The ability to query enzyme molecules individually is transforming our view of catalytic mechanisms. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a multidomain catalyst of disulfide-bond formation that relays electrons from substrate cysteines through two redox-active sites to molecular oxygen. The chemical steps in electron transfer have been delineated, but the conformational changes accompanying these steps are poorly characterized. Here we use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe QSOX conformation in resting and cycling enzyme populations. We report the discovery of unanticipated roles for conformational changes in QSOX beyond mediating electron transfer between redox-active sites. In particular, a state of the enzyme not previously postulated or experimentally detected is shown to gate, via a conformational transition, the entrance into a sub-cycle within an expanded QSOX kinetic scheme. By tightly constraining mechanistic models, smFRET data can reveal the coupling between conformational and chemical transitions in complex enzymatic cycles.

  8. In situ superexchange electron transfer through a single molecule: A rectifying effect

    PubMed Central

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2006-01-01

    An increasingly comprehensive body of literature is being devoted to single-molecule bridge-mediated electronic nanojunctions, prompted by their prospective applications in molecular electronics and single-molecule analysis. These junctions may operate in gas phase or electrolyte solution (in situ). For biomolecules, the latter is much closer to their native environment. Convenient target molecules are aromatic molecules, peptides, oligonucleotides, transition metal complexes, and, broadly, molecules with repetitive units, for which the conducting orbitals are energetically well below electronic levels of the solvent. A key feature for these junctions is rectification in the current–voltage relation. A common view is that asymmetric molecules or asymmetric links to the electrodes are needed to acquire rectification. However, as we show here, this requirement could be different in situ, where a structurally symmetric system can provide rectification because of the Debye screening of the electric field in the nanogap if the screening length is smaller than the bridge length. The Galvani potentials of each electrode can be varied independently and lead to a transistor effect. We explore this behavior for the superexchange mechanism of electron transport, appropriate for a wide class of molecules. We also include the effect of conformational fluctuations on the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels; that gives rise to non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the conductance, affected by the molecule length. Our study offers an analytical formula for the current–voltage characteristics that demonstrates all these features. A detailed physical interpretation of the results is given with a discussion of reported experimental data. PMID:16641101

  9. Effects of electron-vibration coupling in transport through single molecules.

    PubMed

    Franke, Katharina J; Pascual, Jose Ignacio

    2012-10-01

    Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we study the transport of electrons through C(60) molecules on different metal surfaces. When electrons tunnel through a molecule, they may excite molecular vibrations. A fingerprint of these processes is a characteristic sub-structure in the differential conductance spectra of the molecular junction reflecting the onset of vibrational excitation. Although the intensity of these processes is generally weak, they become more important as the resonant character of the transport mechanism increases. The detection of single vibrational levels crucially depends on the energy level alignment and lifetimes of excited states. In the limit of large current densities, resonant electron-vibration coupling leads to an energy accumulation in the molecule, which eventually leads to its decomposition. With our experiments on C(60) we are able to depict a molecular scale picture of how electrons interact with the vibrational degrees of freedom of single molecules in different transport regimes. This understanding helps in the development of stable molecular devices, which may also carry a switchable functionality. PMID:22964796

  10. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J.; Bryce, Martin R.; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for –OH and –CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  11. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J; Bryce, Martin R; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-01

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for -OH and -CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains. PMID:24511969

  12. Magnetic field dependent electronic transport of Mn4 single-molecule magnet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, F.; Langhirt, M.; Henderson, J. J.; Del Barco, E.; Taguchi, T.; Christou, G.

    2010-03-01

    We have performed single-electron transport measurements on a Mn4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) in where amino groups were added to electrically protect the magnetic core and to increase the stability of the molecule when deposited on the single-electron transistor (SET) chip. A three-terminal SET with nano-gap electro-migrated gold electrodes and a naturally oxidized Aluminum back gate. Experiments were conducted at temperatures down to 230mK in the presence of high magnetic fields generated by a superconducting vector magnet. Mn4 molecules were deposited from solution to form a mono-layer. The optimum deposition time was determined by AFM analysis on atomically flat gold surfaces. We have observed Coulomb blockade an electronic excitations that curve with the magnetic field and present zero-field splitting, which represents evidence of magnetic anisotropy. Level anticrossings and large excitations slopes are associated with the behavior of molecular states with high spin values (S ˜ 9), as expected from Mn4.

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy exposes hidden states in an enzymatic electron relay

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Iris; Yuval Aviram, Haim; Armony, Gad; Horovitz, Amnon; Hofmann, Hagen; Haran, Gilad; Fass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The ability to query enzyme molecules individually is transforming our view of catalytic mechanisms. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a multidomain catalyst of disulfide-bond formation that relays electrons from substrate cysteines through two redox-active sites to molecular oxygen. The chemical steps in electron transfer have been delineated, but the conformational changes accompanying these steps are poorly characterized. Here we use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe QSOX conformation in resting and cycling enzyme populations. We report the discovery of unanticipated roles for conformational changes in QSOX beyond mediating electron transfer between redox-active sites. In particular, a state of the enzyme not previously postulated or experimentally detected is shown to gate, via a conformational transition, the entrance into a sub-cycle within an expanded QSOX kinetic scheme. By tightly constraining mechanistic models, smFRET data can reveal the coupling between conformational and chemical transitions in complex enzymatic cycles. PMID:26468675

  14. Manipulation and characterization of thin-film interfacial chemistry: Sol-gel deposition and single molecule tracking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoum, Moussa

    Single molecule trajectories of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbo - cyanine perchlorate (DiI) fluorophores diffusing on planar supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-snglycero- 3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid bilayers imaged through total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at different temperatures are investigated. The spatial resolution limit for detecting molecular motion is evaluated by characterizing the apparent motion which arises from the limited signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of imaged and simulated stationary DiI molecules. Statistical criteria for reliably distinguishing molecular motion from stationary molecules using F-test statistics, including the computation of local signal-to-noise ratios are then established and used for reliably detecting subdiffraction motion of DiI molecules on DMPC. The same single molecule tracking concept is used in investigating the temperature dependence of subdiffraction diffusional confinement of single Rhodamine 6G molecules in polymer brushes of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), pNIPAAm, above and below its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 32°C. Reliably distinguishing subdiffraction molecular motion from stationary events is crucial in validating the application of single molecule tracking experiment in probing nanometersized hydrophobic environments of polymer structure. A versatile and rapid sol-gel technique for the fabrication of high quality one-dimensional photonic bandgap materials was developed. Silica/titania multilayer materials are fabricated by a sol-gel chemistry route combined with dip-coating onto planar or curved substrate. A shock-cooling step immediately following the thin film heat-treatment process is introduced. The versatility of this sol-gel method is demonstrated by the fabrication of various Bragg stack-type materials with fine-tuned optical properties. Measured optical properties show good agreement with theoretical simulations confirming the high quality of these sol-gel fabricated optical materials. Finally, magnetic functionalization studies of sol-gel derived Co-ion doped titania thin films using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and an attempt to measure their magneto-optical properties using a home-built Faraday rotation setup are discussed. The experimental limitations in reliably measuring magnetization responses of these thin films are introduced and discussed in detail. The summary and outlook chapters summarize the scientific significance of each research project and briefly introduce ongoing research based on the work and the results presented in this dissertation.

  15. Electron transport in endohedral metallofullerene Ce@C{sub 82} single-molecule transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Naoya; Yoshida, Kenji; Sakata, Shuichi; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-26

    We have investigated the electron transport in endohedral metallofullerene Ce@C{sub 82} single-molecule transistors (SMTs) together with that in reference C{sub 84} SMTs. The vibrational modes (bending and stretching) of the encapsulated single Ce atom in the C{sub 82} cage appear in Coulomb stability diagrams for the single-electron tunneling through Ce@C{sub 82} molecules, demonstrating the single-atom sensitivity of the transport measurements. When a bias voltage larger than 100 mV is applied across the source/drain electrodes, large hysteretic behavior is observed in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. At the same time, the pattern in the Coulomb stability diagram is changed. No such hysteretic behavior is observed in the I-V curves of hollow-cage C{sub 84} SMTs, even when the bias voltage exceeds 500 mV. This hysteretic change in the I-V characteristics is induced by a nanomechanical change in the configuration of the Ce@C{sub 82} molecule in the nanogap electrode due to the electric dipole that exists in Ce@C{sub 82}.

  16. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  17. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics

    PubMed Central

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Tarkuç, Simge; Galán, Elena; Perrin, Mickael L; Eelkema, Rienk; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (OPE3), while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc), methyl sulfide (SMe), pyridyl (Py) and amine (NH2). The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current–voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green’s function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings. PMID:26425407

  18. Electronic measurements of single-molecule processing by DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment).

    PubMed

    Olsen, Tivoli J; Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C; Gul, O Tolga; Corso, Brad L; Dong, Chengjun; Brown, William A; Collins, Philip G; Weiss, Gregory A

    2013-05-29

    Bioconjugating single molecules of the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I into electronic nanocircuits allowed electrical recordings of enzymatic function and dynamic variability with the resolution of individual nucleotide incorporation events. Continuous recordings of DNA polymerase processing multiple homopolymeric DNA templates extended over 600 s and through >10,000 bond-forming events. An enzymatic processivity of 42 nucleotides for a template of the same length was directly observed. Statistical analysis determined key kinetic parameters for the enzyme's open and closed conformations. Consistent with these nanocircuit-based observations, the enzyme's closed complex forms a phosphodiester bond in a highly efficient process >99.8% of the time, with a mean duration of only 0.3 ms for all four dNTPs. The rate-limiting step for catalysis occurs during the enzyme's open state, but with a nearly 2-fold longer duration for dATP or dTTP incorporation than for dCTP or dGTP into complementary, homopolymeric DNA templates. Taken together, the results provide a wealth of new information complementing prior work on the mechanism and dynamics of DNA polymerase I. PMID:23631761

  19. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics.

    PubMed

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Tarkuç, Simge; Galán, Elena; Perrin, Mickael L; Eelkema, Rienk; Grozema, Ferdinand C; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (OPE3), while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc), methyl sulfide (SMe), pyridyl (Py) and amine (NH2). The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current-voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green's function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings. PMID:26425407

  20. Electron transport in single molecule magnet transistors and optical transitions in the 15nitrogen-vacancy- center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel

    This thesis presents theoretical studies dealing with quantum interference effects in electron transport through single molecule magnet transistors and a study on optical ? transitions in the 15NV - center in diamond. The thesis starts with a brief general introduction to the physics of quantum transport through single electron transistors. Afterwards, the main body of the thesis is divided into three studies: (i) In chapter (2) we describe the properties of single molecule magnets and the Berry phase interference present in these nanomagnets. We then propose a way to detect quantum interference experimentally in the current of a single molecule magnet transistor using polarized leads. We apply our theoretical results to the newly synthesized nanomagnet Ni4. (ii) In chapter (3) we review the Kondo effect and present a microscopic derivation of the Kondo Hamiltonian suitable for full and half-integer spin nanomagnets. We then calculate the conductance of the single molecule magnet transistor in the presence of the Kondo effect for Ni4 and show how the Berry phase interference becomes temperature dependent. (iii) We conclude in chapter (4) with a theoretical study of the single Nitrogen vacancy defect center in diamond. We show that it is possible to have spin non-conserving transitions via the hyperfine interaction and propose a way to write and read quantum information using circularly polarized light by means of optical ? transitions in this solid state system.

  1. Fine-tuning of single-molecule conductance by tweaking both electronic structure and conformation of side substituents.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Darwish, Nadim; Im, JongOne; Lim, Boram; Choi, Jeongae; Koo, Sangho; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2015-05-18

    Herein, we describe a method to fine-tune the conductivity of single-molecule wires by employing a combination of chemical composition and geometrical modifications of multiple phenyl side groups as conductance modulators embedded along the main axis of the electronic pathway. We have measured the single-molecule conductivity of a novel series of phenyl-substituted carotenoid wires whose conductivity can be tuned with high precision over an order of magnitude range by modulating both the electron-donating character of the phenyl substituent and its dihedral angle. It is demonstrated that the electronic communication between the phenyl side groups and the molecular wire is maximized when the phenyl groups are twisted closer to the plane of the conjugated molecular wire. These findings can be refined to a general technique for precisely tuning the conductivity of molecular wires. PMID:25847688

  2. Nonequilibrium electronic structure of interacting single-molecule nanojunctions: vertex corrections and polarization effects for the electron-vibron coupling.

    PubMed

    Dash, L K; Ness, H; Godby, R W

    2010-03-14

    We consider the interaction between electrons and molecular vibrations in the context of electronic transport in nanoscale devices. We present a method based on nonequilibrium Green's functions to calculate both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electronic properties of a single-molecule junction in the presence of electron-vibron interactions. We apply our method to a model system consisting of a single electronic level coupled to a single vibration mode in the molecule, which is in contact with two electron reservoirs. Higher-order diagrams beyond the usual self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA) are included in the calculations. In this paper we consider the effects of the double-exchange diagram and the diagram in which the vibron propagator is renormalized by one electron-hole bubble. We study in detail the effects of the first- and second-order diagrams on the spectral functions for a large set of parameters and for different transport regimes (resonant and off-resonant cases), both at equilibrium and in the presence of a finite applied bias. We also study the linear response (linear conductance) of the nanojunction for all the different regimes. We find that it is indeed necessary to go beyond the SCBA in order to obtain correct results for a wide range of parameters. PMID:20232953

  3. Nonequilibrium electronic structure of interacting single-molecule nanojunctions: Vertex corrections and polarization effects for the electron-vibron coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, L. K.; Ness, H.; Godby, R. W.

    2010-03-01

    We consider the interaction between electrons and molecular vibrations in the context of electronic transport in nanoscale devices. We present a method based on nonequilibrium Green's functions to calculate both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electronic properties of a single-molecule junction in the presence of electron-vibron interactions. We apply our method to a model system consisting of a single electronic level coupled to a single vibration mode in the molecule, which is in contact with two electron reservoirs. Higher-order diagrams beyond the usual self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA) are included in the calculations. In this paper we consider the effects of the double-exchange diagram and the diagram in which the vibron propagator is renormalized by one electron-hole bubble. We study in detail the effects of the first- and second-order diagrams on the spectral functions for a large set of parameters and for different transport regimes (resonant and off-resonant cases), both at equilibrium and in the presence of a finite applied bias. We also study the linear response (linear conductance) of the nanojunction for all the different regimes. We find that it is indeed necessary to go beyond the SCBA in order to obtain correct results for a wide range of parameters.

  4. Quantitative Connection between Ensemble Thermodynamics and Single-Molecule Kinetics: A Case Study Using Cryogenic Electron Microscopy and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Investigations of the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kinz-Thompson, Colin D; Sharma, Ajeet K; Frank, Joachim; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-08-27

    At equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic information can be extracted from biomolecular energy landscapes by many techniques. However, while static, ensemble techniques yield thermodynamic data, often only dynamic, single-molecule techniques can yield the kinetic data that describe transition-state energy barriers. Here we present a generalized framework based upon dwell-time distributions that can be used to connect such static, ensemble techniques with dynamic, single-molecule techniques, and thus characterize energy landscapes to greater resolutions. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by applying it to cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies of the bacterial ribosomal pre-translocation complex. Among other benefits, application of this framework to these data explains why two transient, intermediate conformations of the pre-translocation complex, which are observed in a cryo-EM study, may not be observed in several smFRET studies. PMID:25785884

  5. Electronic measurements of single-molecule processing by DNA polymerase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli; Gul, Tolga; Corso, Brad; Dong, Chengjun; Brown, William; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip

    2013-03-01

    A single-molecule nanocircuit technique is applied to continuously monitor DNA replication activity by the enzyme DNA polymerase I (Pol I). Using single copies of Pol I bound to a single-walled carbon nanotube device, an electrical signal was generated to reveal enzymatic function and dynamic variability. Continuous, single-molecule-resolution recordings were obtained for Pol I processing homopolymeric DNA templates over 10 minutes and through >10,000 DNA replication events. Processivity of up to 40 nucleotide bases was directly observed, and statistical analysis of the recordings determined key kinetic parameters for the enzyme's open and closed conformations. We observe that the closed complex forms a phosphodiester bond in a highly efficient process >99.8% of the time, with a mean duration of only 0.3 ms for all four dNTPs. The rate-limiting step for replication occurs during the enzyme's open state, but with a duration that is nearly twice as long for dATP or dTTP incorporation than for dCTP or dGTP. Taken together, the results provide a wealth of new information complementing prior work on the mechanism and dynamics of DNA polymerase.

  6. Electron transport through Ni/1,4-benzenedithiol/Ni single-molecule junctions under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Kazunori; Sagisaka, Takami; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2013-04-01

    We have studied electron transport through Ni/1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)/Ni single molecule junctions at cryogenic temperatures under magnetic field up to 250 mT. Instead of examining magnetoresistance (MR) of individual junctions, we measured the conductance of many junctions under a constant magnetic field and investigated how a single-molecule peak in a conductance histogram shifts with the field strength. We found that the single-molecule resistance at 77 K, deduced from the conductance peak position, shows a hysteresis against the field strength and takes a maximum around 50 mT when the magnetic field increases from 0 T to 150 mT. The observed resistance change yields a MR of ˜(80-90)% for Ni/BDT/Ni single molecule junctions. This MR is higher than experimental MR reported for non-conjugating molecules but consistent with high theoretical MR predicted for ?-conjugated molecules such as BDT. We have also investigated the nonlinearity of the current-voltage (I -V) characteristics of Ni/BDT/Ni junctions under 0 T and 150 mT and found that the nonlinearity changes its sign from negative at 0 T to positive at 150 mT. This result suggests that the junction transmission spectrum at 0 T should have a low-lying peak within ±0.1 eV from the Fermi level, but the peak moves out of the bias window when the magnetic field increases to 150 mT. The observed field-induced change in the I -V nonlinearity is qualitatively consistent with theoretical I -V curves of Ni/BDT/Ni calculated for magnetized and non-magnetized Ni electrodes.

  7. Charge localization on a redox-active single-molecule junction and its influence on coherent electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastlunger, Georg; Stadler, Robert

    2013-07-01

    To adjust the charging state of a molecular metal complex in the context of a density functional theory description of coherent electron transport through single-molecule junctions, we correct for self-interaction effects by fixing the charge on a counterion, which in our calculations mimics the effect of the gate in an electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope setup, with two competing methods, namely, the generalized ?self consistent field (?SCF) technique and screening with solvation shells. One would expect a transmission peak to be pinned at the Fermi energy for a nominal charge of +1 on the molecule in the junction, but we find a more complex situation in this multicomponent system defined by the complex, the leads, the counterion, and the solvent. In particular the equilibrium charge transfer between the molecule and the leads plays an important role, which we investigate in relation to the total external charge in the context of electronegativity theory.

  8. Strongly correlated electrons in the [Ni(hmp)(ROH)X]4 single molecule magnet: a DFT+U study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chao; Hill, Stephen; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2008-04-25

    The single-molecule magnet [Ni(hmp)(MeOH)Cl]4 (hmp denotes the anion of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine and Me denotes methyl) is studied using both density functional theory (DFT) and the DFT+U method, and the results are compared. By incorporating a Hubbard-U like term for both the nickel and oxygen atoms, the experimentally determined ground state is successfully obtained, and the exchange coupling constants derived from the DFT+U calculation agree with experiment very well. The results show that the nickel 3d and oxygen 2p electrons in this molecule are strongly correlated, and thus the inclusion of on site Coulomb energies is crucial to obtaining the correct results. PMID:18518243

  9. Observing magnetic anisotropy in electronic transport through individual single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Burzurí, E; Gaudenzi, R; van der Zant, H S J

    2015-03-25

    We review different electron transport methods to probe the magnetic properties, such as the magnetic anisotropy, of an individual Fe4 SMM. The different approaches comprise first and higher order transport through the molecule. Gate spectroscopy, focusing on the charge degeneracy-point, is presented as a robust technique to quantify the longitudinal magnetic anisotropy of the SMM in different redox states. We provide statistics showing the robustness and reproducibility of the different methods. In addition, conductance measurements typically show high-energy excited states well beyond the ground spin multiplet of SMM. Some of these excitations have their origin in excited spin multiplets, others in vibrational modes of the molecule. The interplay between vibrations, charge and spin may yield a new approach for spin control. PMID:25721135

  10. Density functional theory based direct comparison of coherent tunneling and electron hopping in redox-active single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastlunger, Georg; Stadler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    To define the conductance of single-molecule junctions with a redox functionality in an electrochemical cell, two conceptually different electron transport mechanisms, namely, coherent tunneling and vibrationally induced hopping, compete with each other, where implicit parameters of the setup such as the length of the molecule and the applied gate voltage decide which mechanism is the dominant one. Although coherent tunneling is most efficiently described within Landauer theory and the common theoretical treatment of electron hopping is based on Marcus theory, both theories are adequate for the processes they describe without introducing accuracy-limiting approximations. For a direct comparison, however, it has to be ensured that the crucial quantities obtained from electronic structure calculations, i.e., the transmission function T (E ) in Landauer theory and the transfer integral V , the reorganization energy ? , and the driving force ? G0 in Marcus theory, are derived from similar grounds, as pointed out by Nitzan and coworkers in a series of publications. In this paper our framework is a single-particle picture, for which we perform density functional theory calculations for the conductance corresponding to both transport mechanisms for junctions with the central molecule containing one, two, or three Ruthenium centers, from which we extrapolate our results in order to define the critical length of the transition point of the two regimes which we identify at 5.76nm for this type of molecular wire. We also discuss trends in the dependence on an electrochemically induced gate potential.

  11. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. PMID:25687733

  12. Site-dependent electronic structures of a single molecule on a metal surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katano, Satoshi; Hori, Masafumi; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2014-10-01

    Single-molecule observation of the electronic structures of para-cyanobenzoate (pCB) adsorbed on Cu(1 1 0) has been performed using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). We found that pCB has two types of the adsorption site on Cu(1 1 0); i.e., two oxygen atoms of pCB are bridged between adjacent Cu atoms at the short- or long-bridge sites. STS and STS mapping revealed that the pCB adsorbed at the short-bridge site has a resonant peak at 2.0 V above the Fermi level, which is assigned to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of pCB. However, the LUMO state is shifted toward lower voltage (1.2 V) when the pCB molecule is adsorbed at the long-bridge site. The energy levels of the LUMO state, depending on the adsorption site of pCB, can thus be ascribed to the degree of the electronic interaction between pCB and the Cu substrate. The site transformation of pCB induced by the injection of tunneling electrons from the STM tip has also been presented.

  13. Single-molecule transistors.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Mickael L; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-02-21

    The use of a gate electrode allows us to gain deeper insight into the electronic structure of molecular junctions. It is widely used for spectroscopy of the molecular levels and its excited states, for changing the charge state of the molecule and investigating higher order processes such as co-tunneling and the Kondo effect. Gate electrodes have been implemented in several types of nanoscale devices such as electromigration junctions, mechanically controllable break junctions, and devices with carbon-based electrodes. Here we review the state-of-the-art in the field of single-molecule transitors. We discuss the experimental challenges and describe the advances made for the different approaches. PMID:25310767

  14. Clay Nanoparticle-Supported Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Hu, Dehong; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2009-02-11

    We report single-molecule fluorescence spectroelectrochemistry on a clay-modified ITO electrode using cresyl violet as a redox fluorescent probe. Ensemble averaged experiments show that cresyl violet displays well-defined cyclic voltammograms when adsorbed on the clay-modified electrode. By probing the fluorescence intensity of a single cresyl violet molecule absorbed on clay surface, we can trace the redox reaction of individual molecules induced by the cyclic voltammetric potential scanning. Inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics of the immobilized single cresyl violet molecules on the clay-modified surface were observed.

  15. Single-molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Sheila Marie Josee

    This thesis discusses the syntheses and magnetization studies of several single-molecule magnets. These single- molecule magnets are also shown to display resonant magnetization tunneling. In chapter 1 an introduction into this area of research and similar areas of research are presented. In chapter 2 several complexes from a family of molecules with [ Mn4O3X]6+ cores are shown to behave as single-molecule magnets based on AC magnetic susceptibility measurements on microcrystalline and dilute frozen solution samples. In chapter 3 more detailed magnetic studies are reported for one complex from the Mn4 family of molecules-[ Mn4O3Cl(O2CCH3)3(dbm)3], where dbm is dibenzoylmethane. It is shown that this Mn4 complex exhibits resonant magnetization tunneling based on the observation of steps on magnetic hysteresis loops, ac magnetic susceptibility studies and the observation of a temperature-independent rate of magnetization relaxation below 0.6 K. In chapters 4 through 6 the syntheses and magnetization studies of several new Mn12 molecules with general composition [ Mn12O12(O2CR)16(H2O)4] are reported. From ac susceptibility measurements it is shown that some of these complexes exhibit much faster magnetic relaxation than others. Also, steps are observed at constant intervals of field on the magnetization hysteresis loops collected on some of these Mn12 complexes. This is evidence of field-tuned resonant magnetization tunneling.

  16. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less travel distance when in smaller ones.

  17. Single Molecule Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Galburt, Eric A.; Grill, Stephan W.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule optical trapping assays have now been applied to a great number of macromolecular systems including DNA, RNA, cargo motors, restriction enzymes, DNA helicases, chromosome remodelers, DNA polymerases and both viral and bacterial RNA polymerases. The advantages of the technique are the ability to observe dynamic, unsynchronized molecular processes, to determine the distributions of experimental quantities and to apply force to the system while monitoring the response over time. Here, we describe the application of these powerful techniques to study the dynamics of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19426807

  18. Single Molecule Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    Single-molecule manipulation studies open a door for a close-up investigation of complex biological interactions at the molecular level. In these studies, single biomolecules are pulled while their force response is being monitored. The process is often nonequilibrium, and interpretation of the results has been challenging. We used the atomic force microscope to pull proteins and DNA, and determined the equilibrium properties of the molecules using the recently derived nonequilibrium work theorem. I will present applications of the technique in areas ranging from fundamental biological problems such as DNA mechanics, to complex medical processes such as the mechanical activation of von Willebrand Factor, a key protein in blood coagulation.

  19. Electronic and magnetic study of polycationic Mn(12) single-molecule magnets with a ground spin state S = 11.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Coronado, Eugenio; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Giménez-Saiz, Carlos; Romero, Francisco M; Wernsdorfer, W; Biagi, R; Corradini, V

    2010-01-18

    The preparation, magnetic characterization, and X-ray structures of two polycationic Mn(12) single-molecule magnets [Mn(12)O(12)(bet)(16)(EtOH)(4)](PF(6))(14).4CH(3)CN.H(2)O (1) and [Mn(12)O(12)(bet)(16)(EtOH)(3)(H(2)O)](PF(6))(13)(OH).6CH(3)CN.EtOH.H(2)O (2) (bet = betaine = (CH(3))(3)N(+)-CH(2)-CO(2)(-)) are reported. 1 crystallizes in the centrosymmetric P2/c space group and presents a (0:2:0:2) arrangement of the EtOH molecules in its structure. 2 crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric P4 space group with two distinct Mn(12) polycations, [Mn(12)O(12)(bet)(16)(EtOH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](14+) (2A) and [Mn(12)O(12)(bet)(16)(EtOH)(4)](14+) (2B) per unit cell. 2A and 2B show a (1:1:1:1) distribution of the coordinated solvent molecules. Interestingly, bond valence sum calculations extracted from X-ray diffraction data indicate the presence of two Mn(2+) ions in the Mn(12) core for both 1 and 2. This finding is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. A complete magnetic characterization, including subkelvin micro-SQUID magnetometry and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements, permits to extract the parameters of the giant spin Hamiltonian of these polycations. Compared with the archetypal Mn(12) acetate, an increase in the value of the ground spin state from S = 10 to S = 11 together with a decrease in the effective energy barrier, is observed for 1 and 2. Such a result is consistent with the reduction of two Mn(3+) to the less anisotropic Mn(2+) ion in the structures. PMID:19877595

  20. Single molecule sensing with carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C.; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Iftikhar, Mariam; Corso, Brad L.; Gul, O. Tolga; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-09-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes have the requisite sensitivity to detect single molecule events and sufficient bandwidth to directly monitor single molecule dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the dynamic, single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. In each case, recordings resolved detailed trajectories of tens of thousands of individual chemical events and provided excellent statistics for single-molecule events. This electronic technique has a temporal resolution approaching 1 microsecond, which provides a new window for observing brief, intermediate transition states. In addition, the devices are indefinitely stable, so that the same molecule can be observed for minutes and hours. The extended recordings provide new insights into rare events like transitions to chemically-inactive conformations.

  1. A new approach to extract multiple distinct conformers and co-existing distinct electronic properties of a single molecule by point-contact method.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Anirban; Sahu, Satyajit; Fujita, Daisuke; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2010-03-01

    Conventionally, it is assumed that a single molecule has only one absolute electronic property. Molecular electronics, molecular machines, intelligent drugs are some of the fields that require atomic scale control of molecular properties. In spite of remarkable achievements in the last two decades, absolute control of molecular properties has not been achieved. Here, experimental evidences argue against assigning a fixed property to a molecule. A molecule might structurally accommodate itself to the new environment and its electronic properties might change accordingly. By isolating electronic properties of all the conformers of a Rose Bengal molecule one by one, a map of its complete electronic properties is drawn here. The existing concept of one absolute electronic property of a molecule is true only for those molecules, which have only one stable conformer. For others, depending on the conformer, multiple distinct electronic properties may co-exist, leading to a variable output in an electronic characterization. Thus, we present a generalized method for characterizing/resolving collective electronic properties that emerge statistically. The method could be used for designing molecular switches for collective and evolutionary information processing. PMID:20165769

  2. Nonadiabatic effects on surfaces: Kohn anomaly, electronic damping of adsorbate vibrations, and local heating of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, J.

    2008-06-01

    Three aspects of electron-phonon coupling at metal surfaces are reviewed. One aspect is the Kohn effect, which describes an anomalous dispersion relation of surface phonons due to quasi-one-dimensional nesting of Fermi surface contours. The combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to unambiguously characterize Kohn anomaly systems. A second aspect is the nonadiabatic damping of adsorbate vibrations. Characteristic spectroscopic line shapes of vibrational modes allow us to estimate the amount of energy transfer between the vibrational mode and electron-hole pairs. Case studies of a Kohn anomaly and nonadiabatic damping are provided by the hydrogen- and deuterium-covered Mo(110) surface. As a third aspect of interaction between electrons and phonons, local heating of a C60 molecule adsorbed on Cu(100) and in contact with the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope is covered.

  3. Towards single molecule DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao

    Single molecule DNA Sequencing technology has been a hot research topic in the recent decades because it holds the promise to sequence a human genome in a fast and affordable way, which will eventually make personalized medicine possible. Single molecule differentiation and DNA translocation control are the two main challenges in all single molecule DNA sequencing methods. In this thesis, I will first introduce DNA sequencing technology development and its application, and then explain the performance and limitation of prior art in detail. Following that, I will show a single molecule DNA base differentiation result obtained in recognition tunneling experiments. Furthermore, I will explain the assembly of a nanofluidic platform for single strand DNA translocation, which holds the promised to be integrated into a single molecule DNA sequencing instrument for DNA translocation control. Taken together, my dissertation research demonstrated the potential of using recognition tunneling techniques to serve as a general readout system for single molecule DNA sequencing application.

  4. Electronic transport in biphenyl single-molecule junctions with carbon nanotubes electrodes: The role of molecular conformation and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Granhen, E. R.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Del Nero, J.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate, by means of ab initio calculations, electronic transport in molecular junctions composed of a biphenyl molecule attached to metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance is proportional to cos{sup 2} {theta}, with {theta} the angle between phenyl rings, when the Fermi level of the contacts lies within the frontier molecular orbitals energy gap. This result, which agrees with experiments in biphenyl junctions with nonorganic contacts, suggests that the cos{sup 2} {theta} law has a more general applicability, irrespective of the nature of the electrodes. We calculate the geometrical degree of chirality of the junction, which only depends on the atomic positions, and demonstrate that it is not only proportional to cos{sup 2} {theta} but also is strongly correlated with the current through the system. These results indicate that molecular conformation plays the preponderant role in determining transport properties of biphenyl-carbon nanotubes molecular junctions.

  5. Long-range interfacial electron transfer of metalloproteins based on molecular wiring assemblies.

    PubMed

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Jensen, Palle S; Christensen, Hans E M; Ulstrup, Jens

    2006-01-01

    We address some physical features associated with long-range interfacial electron transfer (ET) of metalloproteins in both electrochemical and electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) configurations, which offer a brief foundation for understanding of the ET mechanisms. These features are illustrated experimentally by new developments of two systems with the blue copper protein azurin and enzyme nitrite reductase as model metalloproteins. Azurin and nitrite reductase were assembled on Au(111) surfaces by molecular wiring to establish effective electronic coupling between the redox centers in the proteins and the electrode surface for ET and biological electrocatalysis. With such assemblies, interfacial ET proceeds through chemically defined and well oriented sites and parallels biological ET. In the case of azurin, the ET properties can be characterized comprehensively and even down to the single-molecule level with direct observation of redox-gated electron tunnelling resonance. Molecular wiring using a pi-conjugated thiol is suitable for assembling monolayers of the enzyme with catalytic activity well-retained. The catalytic mechanism involves multiple-ET steps including both intramolecular and interfacial processes. Interestingly, ET appears to exhibit a substrate-gated pattern observed preliminarily in both voltammetry and ECSTM. PMID:16512372

  6. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-01

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 105 atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained.

  7. Nanochannel Based Single Molecule Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Lesoine, John F.; Venkataraman, Prahnesh A.; Maloney, Peter C.; Dumont, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the fluorescence from a single molecule hundreds of times without surface immobilization. The approach is based on the use of electroosmosis to repeatedly drive a single target molecule in a fused silica nanochannel through a stationary laser focus. Single molecule fluorescence detected during the transit time through the laser focus is used to repeatedly reverse the electrical potential controlling the flow direction. Our method does not rely on continuous observation and therefore is less susceptible to fluorescence blinking than existing fluorescence-based trapping schemes. The variation in the turnaround times can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient on a single molecule level. We demonstrate the ability to recycle both proteins and DNA in nanochannels and show that the procedure can be combined with single-pair Förster energy transfer. Nanochannel-based single molecule recycling holds promise for studying conformational dynamics on the same single molecule in solution and without surface tethering. PMID:22662745

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Brinks, Daan; Hildner, Richard; van Dijk, Erik M H P; Stefani, Fernando D; Nieder, Jana B; Hernando, Jordi; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-04-21

    The detection of individual molecules has found widespread application in molecular biology, photochemistry, polymer chemistry, quantum optics and super-resolution microscopy. Tracking of an individual molecule in time has allowed identifying discrete molecular photodynamic steps, action of molecular motors, protein folding, diffusion, etc. down to the picosecond level. However, methods to study the ultrafast electronic and vibrational molecular dynamics at the level of individual molecules have emerged only recently. In this review we present several examples of femtosecond single molecule spectroscopy. Starting with basic pump-probe spectroscopy in a confocal detection scheme, we move towards deterministic coherent control approaches using pulse shapers and ultra-broad band laser systems. We present the detection of both electronic and vibrational femtosecond dynamics of individual fluorophores at room temperature, showing electronic (de)coherence, vibrational wavepacket interference and quantum control. Finally, two colour phase shaping applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is presented, which allows investigation of the persistent coherence in photosynthetic complexes under physiological conditions at the level of individual complexes. PMID:24473271

  9. Measuring single molecule conductance with break junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Lee, Myeong; Tao, Nongjian; Li, Xiulan; Lindsay, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Single-molecule conductance measurements made under potential control provide a critical link between chemical and molecular electronic data. These measurements are made possible by the STM break-junction method introduced recently, but questions remain about its reliability. Here we report the use of a logarithmic current-to-voltage converter to examine a wide range of currents in an STM break junction study of octanedithiol, clearly showing both the gold-quantum wire regime and the single molecule conductance regime. We find two sets of molecular currents that we tentatively ascribe to different bonding geometries of the molecules in the break junction. PMID:16512369

  10. Single Molecule Recordings of Lysozyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yongki; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule bioelectronic circuits provide an opportunity to study chemical kinetics and kinetic variability with bond-by-bond resolution. To demonstrate this approach, we examined the catalytic activity of T4 lysozyme processing peptidoglycan substrates. Monitoring a single lysozyme molecule through changes in a circuit’s conductance helped elucidate unexplored and previously invisible aspects of lysozyme’s catalytic mechanism and demonstrated lysozyme to be a processive enzyme governed by 9 independent time constants. The variation of each time constant with pH or substrate crosslinking provided different insights into catalytic activity and dynamic disorder. Overall, ten lysozyme variants were synthesized and tested in single molecule circuits to dissect the transduction of chemical activity into electronic signals. Measurements show that a single amino acid with the appropriate properties is sufficient for good signal generation, proving that the single molecule circuit technique can be easily extended to other proteins. PMID:23752924

  11. Cryo-electron microscopy and single molecule fluorescent microscopy detect CD4 receptor induced HIV size expansion prior to cell entry.

    PubMed

    Pham, Son; Tabarin, Thibault; Garvey, Megan; Pade, Corinna; Rossy, Jérémie; Monaghan, Paul; Hyatt, Alex; Böcking, Till; Leis, Andrew; Gaus, Katharina; Mak, Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Viruses are often thought to have static structure, and they only remodel after the viruses have entered target cells. Here, we detected a size expansion of virus particles prior to viral entry using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single molecule fluorescence imaging. HIV expanded both under cell-free conditions with soluble receptor CD4 (sCD4) targeting the CD4 binding site on the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) and when HIV binds to receptor on cellular membrane. We have shown that the HIV Env is needed to facilitate receptor induced virus size expansions, showing that the 'lynchpin' for size expansion is highly specific. We demonstrate that the size expansion required maturation of HIV and an internal capsid core with wild type stability, suggesting that different HIV compartments are linked and are involved in remodelling. Our work reveals a previously unknown event in HIV entry, and we propose that this pre-entry priming process enables HIV particles to facilitate the subsequent steps in infection. PMID:26432024

  12. A systematic study of influence of ligand substitutions on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Mn4 single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Katayama, Shin-ichi; Chi, Dam Hieu

    2009-01-28

    We present a density-functional theory study of the influence of ligand substitutions on the geometric structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties of Mn4 single-molecule magnets (SMMs), in order to investigate the role of ligands in controlling these features, as well as in developing new SMMs and single-chain magnets (SCMs). Our results show that the peripheral ligands play an important role in controlling the magnetic ground-state of Mn4 SMMs. A new model is proposed to explain the spin state of manganese ions in Mn4 molecules. This model shows that the saving energy from distortion, which can be controlled by peripheral-ligand substitutions, plays a crucial role in determining the spin state of manganese ions in Mn4 molecules. The mechanism of strong exchange couplings between manganese ions in Mn4 SMMs is revealed. The strength of exchange-couplings between manganese ions in Mn4 SMMs as a function of their charge and spin state can be also controlled by substituting peripheral-ligands. The results demonstrate the possibilities of developing new Mn4-based SMMs. In addition, strong spin polarizations on peripheral ligands containing sp2-hybridized carbon sites show that using ligands containing sp2-hybridized carbon sites can enhance exchange couplings between Mn4 building blocks to develop new SMMs and SCMs which operate at high temperatures. PMID:19835095

  13. Cyanide-bridged [Fe8M6] clusters displaying single-molecule magnetism (M=Ni) and electron-transfer-coupled spin transitions (M=Co).

    PubMed

    Mitsumoto, Kiyotaka; Oshiro, Emiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Shiga, Takuya; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazuya; Oshio, Hiroki

    2011-08-22

    Cyanide-bridged metal complexes of [Fe(8)M(6)(?-CN)(14)(CN)(10)(tp)(8)(HL)(10)(CH(3)CN)(2)][PF(6)](4)?n?CH(3)CN?m?H(2)O (HL=3-(2-pyridyl)-5-[4-(diphenylamino)phenyl]-1H-pyrazole), tp(-) =hydrotris(pyrazolylborate), 1: M=Ni with n=11 and m=7, and 2: M=Co with n=14 and m=5) were prepared. Complexes 1 and 2 are isomorphous, and crystallized in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. They have tetradecanuclear cores composed of eight low-spin (LS) Fe(III) and six high-spin (HS) M(II) ions (M=Ni and Co), all of which are bridged by cyanide ions, to form a crown-like core structure. Magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that intramolecular ferro- and antiferromagnetic interactions are operative in 1 and in a fresh sample of 2, respectively. Ac magnetic susceptibility measurements of 1 showed frequency-dependent in- and out-of-phase signals, characteristic of single-molecule magnetism (SMM), while desolvated samples of 2 showed thermal- and photoinduced intramolecular electron-transfer-coupled spin transition (ETCST) between the [(LS-Fe(II))(3) (LS-Fe(III))(5)(HS-Co(II))(3)(LS-Co(III))(3)] and the [(LS-Fe(III))(8)(HS-Co(II))(6)] states. PMID:21830241

  14. Geometric, electronic and magnetic structures of S = 19/2 and S = 20/2 thiophene-2-carboxylate functionalized Mn12 single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jorge H; Ziegler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The geometric and magnetic structures of two structurally related, but magnetically inequivalent, single molecule magnets (SMMs) have been computationally characterized. The first SMM, with formula [Mn12O12(O2CC4H3S)16(H2O)2](-1) (I), has a half-integer spin (S(I) = 19/2) due to ferrimagnetic ordering. The second SMM, with formula Mn12O12(O2CC4H3S)16(H2O)4 (II), has an integer spin (S(II) = 20/2) and its geometric structure has been computationally predicted. Both SMMs include thiophene-2-carboxylate functional groups for potential use in molecular electronics. To determine structural and electronic differences between both SMMs, spin polarized density functional theory was applied to I and II. Hydrogen bonding of two and four Mn-bound water molecules in I and II, respectively, to thiophene-2-carboxylate oxygen atoms and inner cubane oxygen atoms is essential for structural stabilization of both complexes. The one-electron-reduction of I is concomitant with a structural asymmetry within its cubane whereby two ions, of nominal Mn(4+)(Si = 3/2) character, are inequivalent to the other two and acquire an incipient Mn(3+)(Si = 4/2) character. The geometric asymmetry in I provides an extra, albeit small, contribution to its zero field splitting and anisotropy barrier to spin reversal. Thus, despite its lower spin state, the anisotropy barrier of I is only slightly lower than that of II. PMID:25360814

  15. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  16. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong ? conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene ? bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  17. Photon and electron stimulated surface dynamics of single molecules. Final report on D.O.E. No. DE-FG0295ER14563

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Ian

    2001-05-01

    The initial goal of this work was to build up an entirely new low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ultrahigh vacuum system to examine the electron- and photon-induced chemistry of single molecules at low surface temperatures where thermal diffusion would be quenched. The photochemistry of methyl bromide on Pt(111) was first examined at 90 K using liquid nitrogen cooling. Br atoms were quite mobile even at 90 K, and were only visible by STM when coalesced along Pt step edges or in Br islands structures. The 193 nm photofragmentation of methyl bromide efficiently created monovacancies in the substrate at 90 K. It was found that at elevated temperatures there is considerable restructuring and reactive attack of the Pt surface by halogens, but for traditional, lower temperature studies of alkyl radicals prepared by thermal dissociative adsorption of alkyl iodides there is probably no problem with adsorbing I generating monovacancies on the surface. The dynamics of the ho t Br atoms formed by dissociative adsorption of Br{sub 2} was also examined. It was discovered that hot Br atoms from Br{sub 2} dissociative adsorption travel farther than hot O atoms from O{sub 2} dissociative adsorption; hot atom motion from different dissociative adsorption systems had not previously been compared for the same metal substrate. The experimental results strengthened the theoretical case that corrugation of the adsorbate/substrate potential is the key issue in determining hot atom travel. In addition, the data provided strong evidence for the transient existence of a weakly adsorbed and mobile Br{sub 2} precursor to dissociative adsorption. Some experiments imaging individual molecules at 15 K were also conducted.

  18. IPET and FETR: experimental approach for studying molecular structure dynamics by cryo-electron tomography of a single-molecule structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic personalities and structural heterogeneity of proteins are essential for proper functioning. Structural determination of dynamic/heterogeneous proteins is limited by conventional approaches of X-ray and electron microscopy (EM) of single-particle reconstruction that require an average from thousands to millions different molecules. Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) is an approach to determine three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of a single and unique biological object such as bacteria and cells, by imaging the object from a series of tilting angles. However, cconventional reconstruction methods use large-size whole-micrographs that are limited by reconstruction resolution (lower than 20 Å), especially for small and low-symmetric molecule (<400 kDa). In this study, we demonstrated the adverse effects from image distortion and the measuring tilt-errors (including tilt-axis and tilt-angle errors) both play a major role in limiting the reconstruction resolution. Therefore, we developed a "focused electron tomography reconstruction" (FETR) algorithm to improve the resolution by decreasing the reconstructing image size so that it contains only a single-instance protein. FETR can tolerate certain levels of image-distortion and measuring tilt-errors, and can also precisely determine the translational parameters via an iterative refinement process that contains a series of automatically generated dynamic filters and masks. To describe this method, a set of simulated cryoET images was employed; to validate this approach, the real experimental images from negative-staining and cryoET were used. Since this approach can obtain the structure of a single-instance molecule/particle, we named it individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) as a new robust strategy/approach that does not require a pre-given initial model, class averaging of multiple molecules or an extended ordered lattice, but can tolerate small tilt-errors for high-resolution single "snapshot" molecule structure determination. Thus, FETR/IPET provides a completely new opportunity for a single-molecule structure determination, and could be used to study the dynamic character and equilibrium fluctuation of macromolecules. PMID:22291925

  19. Electrical, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Nongjian

    2014-08-20

    The specific aims of the prior DOE grant are to determine the stability of a single molecule bound to two electrodes, study local heating in single molecule junctions due to electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, measure electron-phonon interactions in single molecule wires; and explore piezoelectric properties of single molecules. We have completed all the major tasks, and also expanded naturally the scope of the project to address several other critical issues in single molecule properties, developed new experimental capabilities, and observed a number of unexpected phenomena. We summarized here some of the findings that are most relevant to the present renewal proposal. More details can be found in the publications resulted from this grant and annual progress reports.

  20. Nanodevices for Single Molecule Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, H. G.; Stavis, S. M.; Samiee, K. T.

    During the last two decades, biotechnology research has resulted in progress in fields as diverse as the life sciences, agriculture and healthcare. While existing technology enables the analysis of a variety of biological systems, new tools are needed for increasing the efficiency of current methods, and for developing new ones altogether. Interest has grown in single molecule analysis for these reasons.

  1. Manipulating transport through a single-molecule junction

    SciTech Connect

    Sotthewes, Kai; Heimbuch, René; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.

    2013-12-07

    Molecular Electronics deals with the realization of elementary electronic devices that rely on a single molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a single molecule is its conductance. Here we show how the conductance of a single octanethiol molecule can be measured and manipulated by varying the contact's interspace. This mechanical gating of the single molecule junction leads to a variation of the conductance that can be understood in terms of a tunable image charge effect. The image charge effect increases with a decrease of the contact's interspace due to a reduction of the effective potential barrier height of 1.5 meV/pm.

  2. Correlated Single Quantum Dot Blinking and Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shengye; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Zhu, Haiming; Song, Nianhui; Dickson, Robert M.; Lian, Tianquan

    2011-01-01

    The electron transfer (ET) dynamics from core/multi-shell (CdSe/CdS3MLZnCdS2MLZnS2ML) quantum dots (QDs) to adsorbed Fluorescein (F27) molecules have been studied by single particle spectroscopy to probe the relationship between single QD interfacial electron transfer and blinking dynamics. Electron transfer from the QD to F27 and the subsequent recombination were directly observed by ensemble-averaged transient absorption spectroscopy. Single QD-F27 complexes show correlated fluctuation of fluorescence intensity and lifetime, similar to those observed in free QDs. With increasing ET rate (controlled by F27-to-QD ratio), the lifetime of on states decreases and relative contribution of off states increases. It was shown that ET is active for QDs in on states, the excited state lifetime of which reflects the ET rate, whereas in the off state QD excitons decay by Auger relaxation and ET is not a competitive quenching pathway. Thus, the blinking dynamics of single QDs modulate their interfacial ET activity. Furthermore, interfacial ET provides an additional pathway for generating off states, leading to correlated single QD interfacial ET and blinking dynamics in QD-acceptor complexes. Because blinking is a general phenomenon of single QDs, it appears that the correlated interfacial ET and blinking and the resulting intermittent ET activity are general phenomena for single QDs. PMID:21915369

  3. Recording Single Molecule Dynamics and Function using Carbon Nanotube Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick; Moody, Issa; Olsen, Tivoli; Corso, Brad L.; Tolga Gul, O.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors (FETs) have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have the requisite sensitivity to detect single molecule events, and have sufficient bandwidth to directly monitor single molecule dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the dynamic, single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of polymerase I. Initial successes in each case indicate the generality and attractiveness of SWNT FETs as a new tool to complement other single molecule techniques. Furthermore, our focused research on transduction mechanisms provides the design rules necessary to further generalize this SWNT FET technique. This presentation will summarize these rules, and demonstrate how the purposeful incorporation of just one amino acid is sufficient to fabricate effective, single molecule nanocircuits from a wide range of enzymes or proteins.

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: The effect of doped ions on single-molecule magnets of the Mn12-Ac family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Rong; He, Lun-Hua; Cao, Hui-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei; Zhang, Pan-Lin

    2008-11-01

    This paper investigates the single-molecule magnets of pure and Cr/Fe-doped Mn12-Ac. The components of the mixed crystals are identified by AC susceptibility technique. The ground-state spin and anisotropy parameters of doped Mn12-Ac are obtained: (i) Mn11Cr-Ac (S = 19/2, D = 0.62K, B = 0.0009 K, ? = 63K), and (ii) Mn11Fe-Ac (S = 21/2, D = 0.39K, B = 0.001 K, ? = 55K). The single-ion origin of the magnetic anisotropy is discussed.

  5. Single molecule Raman spectra of porphycene isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Pszona, Maria; Gorski, Alexandr; Niedziółka-Jönsson, Joanna; Kamińska, Izabela; Nogala, Wojciech; Waluk, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    Single molecule surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra have been obtained for the parent porphycene (Pc-d0) and its deuterated isotopologue (Pc-d12), located on gold and silver nanoparticles. Equal populations of ``hot spots'' by the two isotopologues are observed for 1 : 1 mixtures in a higher concentration range of the single molecule regime (5 × 10-9 M). For decreasing concentrations, hot spots are preferentially populated by undeuterated molecules. This is interpreted as an indication of a lower surface diffusion coefficient of Pc-d12. The photostability of single Pc molecules placed on nanoparticles is strongly increased in comparison with polymer environments. Trans tautomeric species dominate the spectra, but the analysis of time traces reveals transient intermediates, possibly due to rare cis tautomeric forms.Single molecule surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra have been obtained for the parent porphycene (Pc-d0) and its deuterated isotopologue (Pc-d12), located on gold and silver nanoparticles. Equal populations of ``hot spots'' by the two isotopologues are observed for 1 : 1 mixtures in a higher concentration range of the single molecule regime (5 × 10-9 M). For decreasing concentrations, hot spots are preferentially populated by undeuterated molecules. This is interpreted as an indication of a lower surface diffusion coefficient of Pc-d12. The photostability of single Pc molecules placed on nanoparticles is strongly increased in comparison with polymer environments. Trans tautomeric species dominate the spectra, but the analysis of time traces reveals transient intermediates, possibly due to rare cis tautomeric forms. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of estimation of the enhancement factors, additional Raman, SERS, fluorescence, and absorption spectra and maps. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08627b

  6. Silicon/molecule interfacial electronic modifications.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Ding, Huanjun; Peor, Naama; Lu, Meng; Corley, David A; Chen, Bo; Ofir, Yuval; Gao, Yongli; Yitzchaik, Shlomo; Tour, James M

    2008-02-01

    Electronic structures at the silicon/molecule interface were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy, and Kelvin probe techniques. The heterojunctions were fabricated by direct covalent grafting of a series of molecules (-C6H4-X, with X = NMe2, NH2, NO2, and Mo6 oxide cluster) onto the surface of four types of silicon substrates (both n- and p-type with different dopant densities). The electronic structures at the interfaces were thus systematically tuned in accordance with the electron-donating ability, redox capability, and/or dipole moment of the grafted molecules. The work function of each grafted surface is determined by a combination of the surface band bending and electron affinity. The surface band bending is dependent on the charge transfer between the silicon substrate and the grafted molecules, whereas electron affinity is dependent on the dipole moment of the grafted molecules. The contribution of each to the work function can be separated by a combination of the aforementioned analytical techniques. In addition, because of the relatively low molecular coverage on the surface, the contribution from the unreacted H-terminated surface to the work function was considered. The charge-transfer barrier of silicon substrates attached to different molecules exhibits a trend analogous to surface band bending effects, whereas the surface potential step exhibits properties analogous to electron affinity effects. These results provide a foundation for the utilization of organic molecule surface grafting as a means to tune the electronic properties of semiconductors and, consequently, to achieve controllable modulation of electronic characteristics in small semiconductor devices at future technology nodes. PMID:18181625

  7. Mechanical studies on single molecules: general considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Elements of molecular biology * Advantages and drawbacks of single molecule studies * Order of magnitude of the relevant parameters at the single molecule level * Single molecule manipulation techniques * Comparison of the different techniques * DNA mechanical properties * Conclusion * Bibliography

  8. Impact of Anchoring Groups on Ballistic Transport: Single Molecule vs Monolayer Junctions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tuning the transport properties of molecular junctions by chemically modifying the molecular structure is one of the key challenges for advancing the field of molecular electronics. In the present contribution, we investigate current–voltage characteristics of differently linked metal–molecule–metal systems that comprise either a single molecule or a molecular assembly. This is achieved by employing density functional theory in conjunction with a Green’s function approach. We show that the conductance of a molecular system with a specific anchoring group is fundamentally different depending on whether a single molecule or a continuous monolayer forms the junction. This is a consequence of collective electrostatic effects that arise from dipolar elements contained in the monolayer and from interfacial charge rearrangements. As a consequence of these collective effects, the “ideal” choice for an anchoring group is clearly different for monolayer and single molecule devices. A particularly striking effect is observed for pyridine-docked systems. These are subject to Fermi-level pinning at high molecular packing densities, causing an abrupt increase of the junction current already at small voltages. PMID:26401191

  9. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  10. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction to sample similar conformers. This work demonstrates that the conductance of bithiophene displays a strong dependence on the conformational fluctuations accessible within a given junction configuration, and that the symmetry of such small molecules can significantly influence their conductance behavior. Next, the single-molecule conductance of a family of oligothiophenes comprising one to six thiophene units was measured. An anomalous behavior was found: the peak of the conductance histogram distribution did not follow a clear exponential decay with increasing number of thiophene units in the chain. The electronic properties of the materials were characterized by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry to gain an understanding of the factors affecting the conductance of these molecules. Different conformers in the junction were postulated to be a contributing factor to the anomalous trend in the observed conductance as a function of molecule length. Then, the electronic properties of the thiophene-1,1-dioxide unit were investigated. These motifs have become synthetically accessible in the last decade, due to Rozen's unprecedentedly potent oxidizing reagent - HOF˙CH 3CN - which has been shown to be powerful yet selective enough to oxidize thiophenes in various environments. The resulting thiophene-1,1-dioxides show great promise for electronic devices. The oxidation chemistry of thiophenes was expanded and tuning of the frontier energy levels was demonstrated through combining electron poor and electron rich units. Finally, charge carriers in single-molecule junctions were shown to be tunable within a family of molecules containing these thiophene-1,1-dioxide (TDO) building blocks. Oligomers of TDO were designed in order to increase electron affinity, maintain delocalized frontier orbitals, while significantly decreasing the transport gap. Through thermopower measurements, the dominant charge carriers were shown to change from holes to electrons as the number of TDO units was increased. This resulted in a unique system in which the charge carrier depends on backbone length, providing a new means to tune p- and n-type transport in organic materials. Taken together, the results presented in this thesis offer an insight into how molecular symme- try and the accessible conformers within a junction have important consequences on conductance behavior. Additionally, thiophene-1,1-dioxide is shown to be an exciting unit for single molecule devices, especially when combined with electron rich thiophene flanking groups. By demon- strating, for the first time, a change in conductance pathway with molecular length, this work provides a framework for using frontier orbital levels to strategically design electronic building blocks.

  11. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya

    2010-04-02

    The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can change dramatically even under constant laser excitation. The phenomenon is frequently called "blinking" and involves molecules switching between high and low intensity states.[1-3] In additional to spontaneous blinking, the fluorescence of some special fluorophores, such as cyanine dyes and photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, can be switched on and off by choice using a second laser. Recent single-molecule spectroscopy investigations have shed light on mechanisms of single molecule blinking and photoswitching. This ability to controllably switch single molecules led to the invention of a novel fluorescence microscopy with nanometer spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit.

  12. Coupling Single Molecule Magnets to Ferromagnetic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodi Rizzini, A.; Krull, C.; Balashov, T.; Kavich, J. J.; Mugarza, A.; Miedema, P. S.; Thakur, P. K.; Sessi, V.; Klyatskaya, S.; Ruben, M.; Stepanow, S.; Gambardella, P.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the interaction of TbPc2 single molecule magnets (SMMs) with ferromagnetic Ni substrates. Using element-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, we show that TbPc2 couples antiferromagnetically to Ni films through ligand-mediated superexchange. This coupling is strongly anisotropic and can be manipulated by doping the interface with electron acceptor or donor atoms. We observe that the relative orientation of the substrate and molecule anisotropy axes critically affects the SMM magnetic behavior. TbPc2 complexes deposited on perpendicularly magnetized Ni films exhibit enhanced magnetic remanence compared to SMMs in the bulk. Contrary to paramagnetic molecules pinned to a ferromagnetic support layer, we find that TbPc2 can be magnetized parallel or antiparallel to the substrate, opening the possibility to exploit SMMs in spin valve devices.

  13. Distributed response analysis of conductive behavior in single molecules

    PubMed Central

    in het Panhuis, Marc; Munn, Robert W.; Popelier, Paul L. A.; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Foley, Brian; Blau, Werner J.

    2002-01-01

    The ab initio computational approach of distributed response analysis is used to quantify how electrons move across conjugated molecules in an electric field, in analogy to conduction. The method promises to be valuable for characterizing the conductive behavior of single molecules in electronic devices. PMID:11983925

  14. Single Molecule Approaches Embrace Molecular Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Enormous mechanistic insight has been gained by studying the behavior of single molecules. The same approaches used to study proteins in isolation are now being leveraged to examine the changes in functional behavior that emerge when single molecules have company. PMID:23953107

  15. Electron-induced damage of biotin studied in the gas phase and in the condensed phase at a single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Adrian; Kopyra, Janina; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Bald, Ilko

    2013-08-01

    Biotin is an essential vitamin that is, on the one hand, relevant for the metabolism, gene expression and in the cellular response to DNA damage and, on the other hand, finds numerous applications in biotechnology. The functionality of biotin is due to two particular sub-structures, the ring structure and the side chain with carboxyl group. The heterocyclic ring structure results in the capability of biotin to form strong intermolecular hydrogen and van der Waals bonds with proteins such as streptavidin, whereas the carboxyl group can be employed to covalently bind biotin to other complex molecules. Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to biotin results in a decomposition of the ring structure and the carboxyl group, respectively, within resonant features in the energy range 0-12 eV, thereby preventing the capability of biotin for intermolecular binding and covalent coupling to other molecules. Specifically, the fragment anions (M-H)-, (M-O)-, C3N2O-, CH2O2-, OCN-, CN-, OH- and O- are observed, and exemplarily the DEA cross section of OCN- formation is determined to be 3 × 10-19 cm2. To study the response of biotin to electrons within a complex condensed environment, we use the DNA origami technique and determine a dissociation yield of (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10-14 cm2 at 18 eV electron energy, which represents the most relevant energy for biomolecular damage induced by secondary electrons. The present results thus have important implications for the use of biotin as a label in radiation experiments.

  16. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jens; Raikh, M E; von Oppen, Felix

    2006-02-10

    By a polaronic energy shift, the effective charging energy of molecules can become negative, favoring ground states with even numbers of electrons. Here we show that charge transport through such molecules near ground-state degeneracies is dominated by tunneling of electron pairs which coexists with (featureless) single-electron cotunneling. Because of the restricted phase space for pair tunneling, the current-voltage characteristics exhibit striking differences from the conventional Coulomb blockade. In asymmetric junctions, pair tunneling can be used for gate-controlled current rectification and switching. PMID:16486970

  17. Investigations on interfacial dynamics with ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdick, Ryan A.

    An ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV) technique is introduced, extended from ultrafast electron diffraction, to investigate the ultrafast charge transport dynamics at interfaces and in nanostructures. Rooted in Coulomb-induced refraction, formalisms are presented to quantitatively deduce the transient surface voltages (TSVs), caused by photoinduced charge redistributions at interfaces, and are applied to examine a prototypical Si/SiO2 interface, known to be susceptible to photoinduced interfacial charging The ultrafast time resolution and high sensitivity to surface charges of this electron diffractive approach allows direct elucidation of the transient effects of photoinduced hot electron transport at nanometer (˜2 nm) interfaces. Two distinctive regimes are uncovered, characterized by the time scales associated with charge separation. At the low fluence regime, the charge transfer is described by a thermally-mediated process with linear dependence on the excitation fluence. Theoretical analysis of the transient thermal properties of the carriers show that it is well-described by a direct tunneling of the laser heated electrons through the dielectric oxide layer to surface states. At higher fluences, a coherent multiphoton absorption process is invoked to directly inject electrons into the conduction band of SiO2, leading to a more efficient surface charge accumulation. A quadratic fluence dependence on this coherent, 3-photon lead electron injection is characterized by the rapid dephasing of the intermediately generated hot electrons from 2-photon absorption, limiting the yield of the consecutive 1-photon absorption by free carriers. The TSV formalism is extended beyond the simple slab geometry associated with planar surfaces (Si/SiO2), to interfaces with arbitrary geometrical features, by imposing a corrective scheme to the slab model. The validity of this treatment is demonstrated in an investigation of the charge transfer dynamics at a metal nanoparticle/self-assembled monolayer (SAM)/semiconductor interconnected structure, allowing for the elucidation of the photo-initiated charging processes (forward and backward) through the SAM, by monitoring the deflection of the associated Bragg peaks in conjunction with the UEDV extended formalism to interpret the surface voltage. The design, calibration, and implementation of a molecular beam doser (MBD), capable of layer-by-layer coverage is also presented, with preliminary investigations on interfacial ice. With the development of UEDV and implementation of the MBD, continued investigations of charge transfer in more complex interfaces can be explored, such as those pertinent to novel solar-cell device technology, as their quantum efficiencies are usually strongly dependent on an interfacial charge transfer process. As UEDV is inherently capable of probing charge and atomic motion simultaneously, systems that exhibit phenomena that are attributable to strong coupling of the atomic and electronic degrees of freedom are of particular interest for future investigations with UEDV, such as optically induced electronic phase transitions and colossal field switching in functional oxides.

  18. Ligand ?-radical interaction with f-shell unpaired electrons in phthalocyaninato-lanthanoid single-molecule magnets: a solution NMR spectroscopic and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Damjanovi?, Marko; Morita, Takaumi; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Enders, Markus

    2015-10-01

    The phthalocyaninato double-decker complexes [M(obPc)2 ](0) (M= Y(III) , Tb(III) , Dy(III) ; obPc=2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octabutoxyphthalocyaninato), along with their reduced ([M(obPc)2 ](-) [P(Ph)4 ](+) ; M=Tb(III) , Dy(III) ) and oxidized ([M(obPc)2 ](+) [SbCl6 ](-) (M=Y(III) , Tb(III) ) counterparts were studied with (1) H, (13) C and 2D NMR. From the NMR data of the neutral (i.e., with one unpaired electron in the ligands) and anionic Tb(III) complexes, along with the use of dispersion corrected DFT methods, it was possible to separate the metal-centered and ligand-centered contributions to the hyperfine NMR shift. These contributions to the (1) H and (13) C hyperfine NMR shifts were further analyzed in terms of pseudocontact and Fermi contact shifts. Furthermore, from a combination of NMR data and DFT calculations, we have determined the spin multiplicity of the neutral complexes [M(obPc)2 ](0) (M=Tb(III) and Dy(III) ) at room temperature. From the NMR data of the cationic Tb(III) complex, for which actually no experimental structure determination is available, we have analyzed the structural changes induced by oxidation from its neutral/anionic species and shown that the interligand distance decreases upon oxidation. The fast electron exchange process between the neutral and anionic Tb(III) double-decker complexes was also studied. PMID:26288225

  19. Solution-Processable Carbon Nanoelectrodes for Single-Molecule Investigations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyuan; McMorrow, Joseph; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Gillin, William P; Palma, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    Here we present a solution-based assembly method for producing molecular transport junctions employing metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes as nanoelectrodes. The molecular junction conductance of a series of oligophenyls was successfully measured, highlighting the potential of an all-carbon based approach for the fabrication of solution-processable single-molecule junctions for molecular electronics. PMID:26854787

  20. Low-energy cross-section calculations of single molecules by electron impact: a classical Monte Carlo transport approach with quantum mechanical description.

    PubMed

    Madsen, J R; Akabani, G

    2014-05-01

    The present state of modeling radio-induced effects at the cellular level does not account for the microscopic inhomogeneity of the nucleus from the non-aqueous contents (i.e. proteins, DNA) by approximating the entire cellular nucleus as a homogenous medium of water. Charged particle track-structure calculations utilizing this approximation are therefore neglecting to account for approximately 30% of the molecular variation within the nucleus. To truly understand what happens when biological matter is irradiated, charged particle track-structure calculations need detailed knowledge of the secondary electron cascade, resulting from interactions with not only the primary biological component-water--but also the non-aqueous contents, down to very low energies. This paper presents our work on a generic approach for calculating low-energy interaction cross-sections between incident charged particles and individual molecules. The purpose of our work is to develop a self-consistent computational method for predicting molecule-specific interaction cross-sections, such as the component molecules of DNA and proteins (i.e. nucleotides and amino acids), in the very low-energy regime. These results would then be applied in a track-structure code and thereby reduce the homogenous water approximation. The present methodology-inspired by seeking a combination of the accuracy of quantum mechanics and the scalability, robustness, and flexibility of Monte Carlo methods-begins with the calculation of a solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation and proceeds to use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the perturbations in the internal electron field to determine the interaction processes, such as ionization and excitation. As a test of our model, the approach is applied to a water molecule in the same method as it would be applied to a nucleotide or amino acid and compared with the low-energy cross-sections from the GEANT4-DNA physics package of the Geant4 simulation toolkit for the energy ranges of 7 eV to 1 keV. PMID:24731979

  1. Interfacial Electron Transfer into Functionalized Crystalline Polyoxotitanate Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Snoeberger, Robert C.; Young, Karin J.; Tang, Jiji; Allen, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer (IET) between a chromophore and a semi-conductor nanoparticle is one of the key processes in a dye sensitized solar cell. Theoretical simulations of the electron transfer in polyoxotitanate nanoclusters Ti17O24(OPri)20 (Ti17) functionalized with four para-nitrophenyl acetylacetone (NPA-H) adsorbates, of which the atomic structure has been fully established by X-ray diffraction measurements, are presented. Complementary experimental information showing IET has been obtained by EPR spectroscopy. Evolution of the time-dependent photoexcited electron during the initial 5 fs after instantaneous excitation to the NPA LUMO+1 has been evaluated. Evidence for delocalization of the excitation over multiple chromophoresafter excitation to the NPA LUMO+2 state on a 15 fs timescale is also obtained. While chromophores are generally considered electronically isolated with respect to neighboring sensitizers, our calculations show that this is not necessarily the case. The present work is the most comprehensive study to date of a sensitized semiconductor nanoparticle in which the structure of the surface and the mode of molecular adsorption are precisely defined. PMID:22548416

  2. Interfacial electron transfer into functionalized crystalline polyoxotitanate nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Snoeberger, Robert C; Young, Karin J; Tang, Jiji; Allen, Laura J; Crabtree, Robert H; Brudvig, Gary W; Coppens, Philip; Batista, Victor S; Benedict, Jason B

    2012-05-30

    Interfacial electron transfer (IET) between a chromophore and a semiconductor nanoparticle is one of the key processes in a dye-sensitized solar cell. Theoretical simulations of the electron transfer in polyoxotitanate nanoclusters Ti(17)O(24)(OPr(i))(20) (Ti(17)) functionalized with four p-nitrophenyl acetylacetone (NPA-H) adsorbates, of which the atomic structure has been fully established by X-ray diffraction measurements, are presented. Complementary experimental information showing IET has been obtained by EPR spectroscopy. Evolution of the time-dependent photoexcited electron during the initial 5 fs after instantaneous excitation to the NPA LUMO + 1 has been evaluated. Evidence for delocalization of the excitation over multiple chromophores after excitation to the NPA LUMO + 2 state on a 15 fs time scale is also obtained. While chromophores are generally considered electronically isolated with respect to neighboring sensitizers, our calculations show that this is not necessarily the case. The present work is the most comprehensive study to date of a sensitized semiconductor nanoparticle in which the structure of the surface and the mode of molecular adsorption are precisely defined. PMID:22548416

  3. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  4. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  5. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  6. Electronic structures of interfacial states formed at polymeric semiconductor heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-shih; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Avilov, Igor; Sreearunothai, Paiboon; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Deleener, Caroline; Friend, Richard H; Beljonne, David

    2008-06-01

    Heterojunctions between organic semiconductors are central to the operation of light-emitting and photovoltaic diodes, providing respectively for electron-hole capture and separation. However, relatively little is known about the character of electronic excitations stable at the heterojunction. We have developed molecular models to study such interfacial excited electronic excitations that form at the heterojunction between model polymer donor and polymer acceptor systems: poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) with poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT), and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine) (TFB) with F8BT. We find that for stable ground-state geometries the excited state has a strong charge-transfer character. Furthermore, when partly covalent, modelled radiative lifetimes (approximately 10(-7) s) and off-chain axis polarization (30 degrees) match observed 'exciplex' emission. Additionally for the PFB:F8BT blend, geometries with fully ionic character are also found, thus accounting for the low electroluminescence efficiency of this system. PMID:18438413

  7. Electronic structures of interfacial states formed at polymeric semiconductor heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Shih; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Avilov, Igor; Sreearunothai, Paiboon; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Deleener, Caroline; Friend, Richard H.; Beljonne, David

    2008-06-01

    Heterojunctions between organic semiconductors are central to the operation of light-emitting and photovoltaic diodes, providing respectively for electron-hole capture and separation. However, relatively little is known about the character of electronic excitations stable at the heterojunction. We have developed molecular models to study such interfacial excited electronic excitations that form at the heterojunction between model polymer donor and polymer acceptor systems: poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) with poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT), and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine) (TFB) with F8BT. We find that for stable ground-state geometries the excited state has a strong charge-transfer character. Furthermore, when partly covalent, modelled radiative lifetimes (~10-7s) and off-chain axis polarization (30?) match observed `exciplex' emission. Additionally for the PFB:F8BT blend, geometries with fully ionic character are also found, thus accounting for the low electroluminescence efficiency of this system.

  8. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  9. Binding Configurations and Intramolecular Strain in Single-Molecule Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascon-Ramos, Habid

    The development of molecular-scale electronic devices has made considerable progress over the last decade, and single-molecule transistors, diodes, and wires have all been demonstrated1,2. However, despite this remarkable progress, the agreement between theoretically predicted conductance values and those measured experimentally remains limited3. One of the primary reasons for these discrepancies is that it has been difficult to determine experimentally the contact geometry and binding configuration of a single-molecule junction. In this thesis, a small-amplitude, high frequency, sinusoidal, mechanical signal is applied to a series of single-molecule devices during junction formation and breakdown. By measuring the current response at this frequency, it is possible to obtain information about the mechanical properties of the system. From these results, it is possible to determine the most likely binding and contact configurations for the molecular junction at room temperature in solution, and to obtain information about how an applied strain is distributed within the molecular junction. These results provide new insights into the complex configuration of single-molecule devices, and are in excellent agreement with previous predictions from theoretical models 4-8. *Please refer to dissertation for footnotes.

  10. Single-molecule magnets: high-field electron paramagnetic resonance evaluation of the single-ion zero-field interaction in a Zn(II)3Ni(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, En-Che; Kirman, Cem; Lawrence, Jon; Zakharov, Lev N; Rheingold, Arnold L; Hill, Stephen; Hendrickson, David N

    2005-05-30

    High-field electron paramagnetic resonance spectra were collected at several frequencies for a single crystal of [Zn3.91Ni0.09(hmp)4(dmb)4Cl4] (1), where dmb is 3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol and hmp- is the monoanion of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine. This crystal is isostructural to [Ni4(hmp)4(dmb)4Cl4] (2), which has been characterized to be a single-molecule magnet (SMM) with fast quantum tunneling of its magnetization (QTM). The single Ni(II) ion zero-field-splitting (zfs) parameters Di [= -5.30(5) cm(-1)] and Ei [= +/-1.20(2) cm(-1)] in the doped complex 1 were evaluated by rotation of a crystal in three planes. The easy-axes of magnetization associated with the single-ion zfs interactions were also found to be tilted 15 degrees away from the crystallographic c direction. This inclination provides a possible explanation for the fast QTM observed for complex 2. The single-ion zfs parameters are then related to the zfs parameters for the Ni4 molecule by irreducible tensor methods to give D = -0.69 cm(-1) for the S = 4 ground state of the SMM, where the axial zfs interaction is given by DS(Z)2. PMID:15907107

  11. Single molecule nanometry for biological physics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurement is a hallmark of physics but the small length scale (~ nanometer) of elementary biological components and thermal fluctuations surrounding them challenge our ability to visualize their action. Here, we highlight the recent developments in single molecule nanometry where the position of a single fluorescent molecule can be determined with nanometer precision, reaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, and the relative motion between two molecules can be determined with ~ 0.3 nm precision at ~ 1 millisecond time resolution, and how these new tools are providing fundamental insights on how motor proteins move on cellular highways. We will also discuss how interactions between three and four fluorescent molecules can be used to measure three and six coordinates, respectively, allowing us to correlate movements of multiple components. Finally, we will discuss recent progress in combining angstrom precision optical tweezers with single molecule fluorescent detection, opening new windows for multi-dimensional single molecule nanometry for biological physics. PMID:23249673

  12. A Practical Guide to Single Molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rahul; Hohng, Sungchul

    2013-01-01

    Despite the explosive growth in the biological applications of single molecule methods over the last decade, these techniques have thus far been practiced mostly by researchers who are biophysically oriented. This is partly because of the lack of commercial instruments in many cases and also because of the perceived steep learning curve and need for expensive equipments. We wish to provide a practical guide to using Förster (or Fluorescence) Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) at the single molecule level, focusing on the study of immobilized molecules that allow measurements of single molecule reaction trajectories from about 1 millisecond to many minutes. An instrument can be built at a reasonable cost using various off-the-shelf components and operated reliably using current well-established protocols and freely available software. PMID:18511918

  13. Sample preparation for single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allen, John R; Ross, Stephen T; Davidson, Michael W

    2013-11-21

    Single molecule localization-based optical nanoscopy was introduced in 2006, surpassing traditional diffraction-limited resolutions by an order of magnitude. Seven years later, this superresolution technique is continuing to follow a trend of increasing popularity and pervasiveness, with the proof-of-concept work long finished and commercial implementations now available. However one important aspect that tends to become lost in translation is the importance of proper sample preparation, with very few resources addressing the considerations that must be made when preparing samples for imaging with single molecule level sensitivity. Presented here is a an in-depth analysis of all aspects of sample preparation for single molecule superresolution, including both live and fixed cell preparation, choice of fluorophore, fixation and staining techniques, and imaging buffer considerations. PMID:24084850

  14. Life at the Single Molecule Level

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunny

    2011-03-04

    In a living cell, gene expression—the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA followed by translation to protein—occurs stochastically, as a consequence of the low copy number of DNA and mRNA molecules involved. Can one monitor these processes in a living cell in real time? How do cells with identical genes exhibit different phenotypes? Recent advances in single-molecule imaging in living bacterial cells allow these questions to be answered at the molecular level in a quantitative manner. It was found that rare events of single molecules can have important biological consequences.

  15. The art of catching and probing single molecules.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2012-01-01

    Probing the electronic properties of an individual molecule is a far from trivial task. In order to measure, for instance, the conductance of a single molecule, the molecule must be contacted by two nanoscopic electrodes. Here we will give two examples of how a single molecule can be caught between two metallic electrodes. In the first example the conductance of a single octanethiol molecule is measured by trapping the molecule between an atomic Pt chain on a semiconductor surface and the apex of a scanning tunneling microscope tip. In the second example a Cu-phthalocyanine molecule is caught between two adjacent nanowires on a semiconductor surface. In this 'bridge' adsorption configuration the core of the CuPc molecule, i.e. the Cu atom, is fully decoupled from the underlying substrate. The electronic properties of the core of Cu-phthalocyanine molecule are probed with scanning tunneling spectroscopy. PMID:22546191

  16. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-07-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment.

  17. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak ?-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  18. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  19. Near-field single molecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.S.; Dunn, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    The high spatial resolution and sensitivity of near-field fluorescence microscopy allows one to study spectroscopic and dynamical properties of individual molecules at room temperature. Time-resolved experiments which probe the dynamical behavior of single molecules are discussed. Ground rules for applying near-field spectroscopy and the effect of the aluminum coated near-field probe on spectroscopic measurements are presented.

  20. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  1. Single Molecule Approaches for Two Dimensional Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Thomas; Guo, Shajun; Koh, Weon-Kyu; Makarov, Nikolay; Fiddler, Andrew; Robel, Istvan; Klimov, Victor

    2014-03-01

    A variety of two dimensional semiconductor nanostructures have been synthesized recently by a number of different groups. Of these, nanoplatelets made of a single to few layers of material have shown interesting promise due to confinement in only a single direction. The photophysics of these types of structures show large exciton binding energies and narrow emission widths in ensemble measurements. Only a few single molecule experiments have been reported in the literature and we hope to expand the insights that single molecule techniques can provide in the understanding of these new materials. Our group has recently extended our synthetic expertise gained from quantum dots into these 2D nanoplatelets including CdSe, MoS2 and graphene. Time correlated single photon counting experiments at the single molecule level provide information on the homogenous linewidths, quantum yield variations, and fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, two photon correlations at zero time delay allow us to confirm the single molecule nature of the emission and potentially determine biexciton quantum yields and lifetimes.

  2. Single-molecule methods to quantify adsorptive separations (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2015-08-01

    Interfacial adsorption and transport are the chemical and physical processes that underlie separations. Although separations technology accounts for hundreds of billions of dollars in the global economy, the process is not well-understood at the mechanistic level and instead is almost always optimized empirically. One of the reasons is that access to the underlying molecular phenomena has only been available recently via single-molecule methods. There are still interesting challenges because adsorption, desorption, and transport are all dynamic processes, whereas much of the advances in super-resolution imaging have focused on imaging static materials. Our lab has focused in recent years on developing and optimizing data analysis methods for quantifying the dynamics of adsorption and transport in porous materials at nanometer-resolution spatial scales. Our methods include maximizing information content in dynamic single-molecule data and developing methods to detect change-points in binned data. My talk will outline these methods, and will address how and when they can be applied to extract dynamic details in heterogeneous materials such as porous membranes.

  3. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations. Based on invited talk at the International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology 2006.

  4. Single-Molecule Analysis of Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    Biomembranes are more than just a cell's envelope - as the interface to the surrounding of a cell they carry key signalling functions. Consequentially, membranes are highly complex organelles: they host about thousand different types of lipids and about half of the proteome, whose interaction has to be orchestrated appropriately for the various signalling purposes. In particular, knowledge on the nanoscopic organization of the plasma membrane appears critical for understanding the regulation of interactions between membrane proteins. The high localization precision of ˜20 nm combined with a high time resolution of ˜1 ms made single molecule tracking an excellent technology to obtain insights into membrane nanostructures, even in a live cell context. In this chapter, we will highlight concepts to achieve superresolution by single molecule imaging, summarize tools for data analysis, and review applications on artificial and live cell membranes.

  5. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  6. Single molecule Raman spectra of porphycene isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Pszona, Maria; Gorski, Alexandr; Niedzió?ka-Jönsson, Joanna; Kami?ska, Izabela; Nogala, Wojciech; Waluk, Jacek

    2016-02-14

    Single molecule surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra have been obtained for the parent porphycene (Pc-d0) and its deuterated isotopologue (Pc-d12), located on gold and silver nanoparticles. Equal populations of "hot spots" by the two isotopologues are observed for 1?:?1 mixtures in a higher concentration range of the single molecule regime (5 × 10(-9) M). For decreasing concentrations, hot spots are preferentially populated by undeuterated molecules. This is interpreted as an indication of a lower surface diffusion coefficient of Pc-d12. The photostability of single Pc molecules placed on nanoparticles is strongly increased in comparison with polymer environments. Trans tautomeric species dominate the spectra, but the analysis of time traces reveals transient intermediates, possibly due to rare cis tautomeric forms. PMID:26731569

  7. Modeling of Single Molecule Cytoplasmic Dynein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Clare

    2010-03-01

    A living cell has an infrastructure much like that of a city. We will describe the transportation system that consists of roads (filaments) and molecular motors (proteins) that haul cargo along these roads. Dynein is one type of motor protein that walks along microtubules towards the nucleus of the cell. Dynein is more complicated in its structure and function than other motors. Experiments have found that, unlike other motors, dynein can take different size steps along microtubules depending on load and ATP concentration. We use Monte Carlo simulations to model the molecular motor function of cytoplasmic dynein at the single molecule level. The theory relates dynein's enzymatic properties to its mechanical force production. Our simulations reproduce the main features of recent single molecule experiments. We make testable predictions that should guide future experiments related to dynein function.

  8. Single-molecule Studies of Riboswitch Folding

    PubMed Central

    Savinov, Andrew; Perez, Christian F.; Block, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The folding dynamics of riboswitches are central to their ability to modulate gene expression in response to environmental cues. In most cases, a structural competition between the formation of a ligand-binding aptamer and an expression platform (or some other competing off-state) determines the regulatory outcome. Here, we review single-molecule studies of riboswitch folding and function, predominantly carried out using single-molecule FRET or optical trapping approaches. Recent results have supplied new insights into riboswitch folding energy landscapes, the mechanisms of ligand binding, the roles played by divalent ions, the applicability of hierarchical folding models, and kinetic vs. thermodynamic control schemes. We anticipate that future work, based on improved data sets and potentially combining multiple experimental techniques, will enable the development of more complete models for complex RNA folding processes. PMID:24727093

  9. Lanthanide single molecule magnets: progress and perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-03-01

    The last few years have seen a huge renaissance in the study of single molecule magnets (SMMs) thanks to the extensive applications of lanthanide ions with large inherent anisotropy in molecular magnetism. Particularly, the recent theoretical developments and the experimental expansion into the organometallic avenue have led to an eye-catching boost in this field. Here we highlight the recent progress in this fascinating and challenging field, with emphasis on several combined experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:25641200

  10. Detection of single molecules in microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Ng, K.C.; Arnold, S.

    1993-07-01

    We have investigated the use of micron-sized liquid droplets as sample medium to detect single fluorescent molecules in solution. The use of microdroplets (5--15 {mu}m diameter) offers several powerful advantages over single-molecule detection schemes involving measurements on bulk liquids where the probe volume is defined by the laser beam. In addition, cavity-quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects have been observed which influence both spontaneous emission rates and fluorescence yields of dye molecules in these microspheres.

  11. Multichannel conductance of folded single-molecule wires aided by through-space conjugation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Wang, Ya-Hao; He, Bairong; Nie, Han; Hu, Rongrong; Huang, Fei; Qin, Anjun; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Zhao, Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-03-27

    Deciphering charge transport through multichannel pathways in single-molecule junctions is of high importance to construct nanoscale electronic devices and deepen insight into biological redox processes. Herein, we report two tailor-made folded single-molecule wires featuring intramolecular π-π stacking interactions. The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) based break-junction technique and theoretical calculations show that through-bond and through-space conjugations are integrated into one single-molecule wire, allowing for two simultaneous conducting channels in a single-molecule junction. These folded molecules with stable π-π stacking interaction offer conceptual advances in single-molecule multichannel conductance, and are perfect models for conductance studies in biological systems, organic thin films, and π-stacked columnar aggregates. PMID:25694026

  12. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  13. Graphical models for inferring single molecule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The recent explosion of experimental techniques in single molecule biophysics has generated a variety of novel time series data requiring equally novel computational tools for analysis and inference. This article describes in general terms how graphical modeling may be used to learn from biophysical time series data using the variational Bayesian expectation maximization algorithm (VBEM). The discussion is illustrated by the example of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) versus time data, where the smFRET time series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM) with Gaussian observables. A detailed description of smFRET is provided as well. Results The VBEM algorithm returns the model’s evidence and an approximating posterior parameter distribution given the data. The former provides a metric for model selection via maximum evidence (ME), and the latter a description of the model’s parameters learned from the data. ME/VBEM provide several advantages over the more commonly used approach of maximum likelihood (ML) optimized by the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm, the most important being a natural form of model selection and a well-posed (non-divergent) optimization problem. Conclusions The results demonstrate the utility of graphical modeling for inference of dynamic processes in single molecule biophysics. PMID:21034427

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  15. Silicon nanowire based single-molecule SERS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Han, Xuemei; Ou, Xuemei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2013-08-01

    One-dimensional nanowire (NW) optical sensors have attracted great attention as promising nanoscale tools for applications such as probing inside living cells. However, achieving single molecule detection on NW sensors remains an interesting and unsolved problem. In the present paper, we investigate single-molecule detection (SMD) on a single SiNW based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor, fabricated by controllably depositing silver nanoparticles on a SiNW (AgNP-SiNW). Both Raman spectral blinking and bi-analyte approaches are performed in aqueous solution to investigate SMD on individual SiNW SERS sensors. The results extend the functions of the SiNW sensor to SMD and provide insight into the molecule level illustration on the sensing mechanism of the nanowire sensor.One-dimensional nanowire (NW) optical sensors have attracted great attention as promising nanoscale tools for applications such as probing inside living cells. However, achieving single molecule detection on NW sensors remains an interesting and unsolved problem. In the present paper, we investigate single-molecule detection (SMD) on a single SiNW based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor, fabricated by controllably depositing silver nanoparticles on a SiNW (AgNP-SiNW). Both Raman spectral blinking and bi-analyte approaches are performed in aqueous solution to investigate SMD on individual SiNW SERS sensors. The results extend the functions of the SiNW sensor to SMD and provide insight into the molecule level illustration on the sensing mechanism of the nanowire sensor. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information on the experimental details, quantitative evaluation of the enhancement factor, and stability of the sensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01879b

  16. Interplay between magnetic anisotropy and vibron-assisted tunneling in a single-molecule magnet transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzuri, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre

    2015-03-01

    Molecules trapped in single-molecule devices vibrate with discrete frequencies characteristic to the molecules, and the molecular vibrations can couple to electronic charge and/or spin degrees of freedom. For a significant electron-vibron coupling, electrons may tunnel via the vibrational excitations unique to the molecules. Recently, electron transport via individual anisotropic magnetic molecules (referred to as single-molecule magnets) has been observed in single-molecule transistors. A single-molecule magnet has a large spin moment and a large magnetic anisotropy barrier. So far, studies of electron-vibron coupling effects in single-molecule devices, are mainly for isotropic molecules. Here we investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via a single-molecule magnet Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (arXiv:1411.2677). We show that the magnetic anisotropy of the Fe4 induces new features in vibrational conductance peaks and creates vibrational satellite peaks. The main and satellite peak heights have a strong, unusual dependence on the direction and magnitude of applied magnetic field, because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is comparable to vibrational energies. Funding from NSF DMR-1206354, EU FP7 program project 618082 ACMOL, advanced ERC grant (Mols@Mols). Computer resources from SDSC Trestles under DMR060009N and VT ARC.

  17. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + 66-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs. PMID:22230259

  18. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-12-12

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1(st) floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives. PMID:26606461

  19. Single-molecule electrophoresis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1996-05-22

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer-simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required by individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed beforehand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method, and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented.

  20. Promising anchoring groups for single-molecule conductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Rudnev, Alexander V; Moreno-García, Pavel; Baghernejad, Masoud; Huang, Cancan; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2014-11-21

    The understanding of the charge transport through single molecule junctions is a prerequisite for the design and building of electronic circuits based on single molecule junctions. However, reliable and robust formation of such junctions is a challenging task to achieve. In this topical review, we present a systematic investigation of the anchoring group effect on single molecule junction conductance by employing two complementary techniques, namely scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (STM-BJ) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) techniques, based on the studies published in the literature and important results from our own work. We compared conductance studies for conventional anchoring groups described earlier with the molecular junctions formed through ?-interactions with the electrode surface (Au, Pt, Ag) and we also summarized recent developments in the formation of highly conducting covalent Au-C ?-bonds using oligophenyleneethynylene (OPE) and an alkane molecular backbone. Specifically, we focus on the electron transport properties of diaryloligoyne, oligophenyleneethynylene (OPE) and/or alkane molecular junctions composed of several traditional anchoring groups, (dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene (BT), 5-benzothienyl analogue (BTh), thiol (SH), pyridyl (PY), amine (NH2), cyano (CN), methyl sulphide (SMe), nitro (NO2)) and other anchoring groups at the solid/liquid interface. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of the results obtained with different anchoring groups reveals structural and mechanistic details of the different types of single molecular junctions. The results reported in this prospective may serve as a guideline for the design and synthesis of molecular systems to be used in molecule-based electronic devices. PMID:25285778

  1. Spin coherence in a Mn3 single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywardana, Chathuranga; Mowson, Andrew M.; Christou, George; Takahashi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Spin coherence in single crystals of the spin S = 6 single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Mn3O(O2CEt)3(mpko)3]+ (abbreviated Mn3) has been investigated using 230 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Coherence in Mn3 was uncovered by significantly suppressing dipolar contribution to the decoherence with complete spin polarization of Mn3 SMMs. The temperature dependence of spin decoherence time (T2) revealed that the dipolar decoherence is the dominant source of decoherence in Mn3 and T2 can be extended up to 267 ns by quenching the dipolar decoherence.

  2. Hybrid photodetector for single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Cheng, Adrian; Antelman, Joshua; Suyama, Motohiro; Arisaka, Katsushi; Weiss, Shimon

    2008-02-01

    We report benchmark tests of a new single-photon counting detector based on a GaAsP photocathode and an electron-bombarded avalanche photodiode developed by Hamamatsu Photonics. We compare its performance with those of standard Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. We show its advantages for FCS due to the absence of after-pulsing and for fluorescence lifetime measurements due to its excellent time resolution. Its large sensitive area also greatly simplifies setup alignment. Its spectral sensitivity being similar to that of recently introduced CMOS SPADs, this new detector could become a valuable tool for single-molecule fluorescence measurements, as well as for many other applications.

  3. Spin Manipulation by Creation of Single-Molecule Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Karan, Sujoy; Li, Na; Zhang, Yajie; He, Yang; Hong, I-Po; Song, Huanjun; Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Yongfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Wu, Kai; Michelitsch, Georg S; Maurer, Reinhard J; Diller, Katharina; Reuter, Karsten; Weismann, Alexander; Berndt, Richard

    2016-01-15

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ReA), a closed-shell organic molecule comprising only C, H, and O atoms, is investigated on a Au(111) substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. In dense arrays single ReA molecules are switched to a number of states, three of which carry a localized spin as evidenced by conductance spectroscopy in high magnetic fields. The spin of a single molecule may be reversibly switched on and off without affecting its neighbors. We suggest that ReA on Au is readily converted to a radical by the abstraction of an electron. PMID:26824562

  4. Theoretical investigation on single-molecule chiroptical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, M.; Yokojima, S.; Fukaminato, T.; Ogata, K.; Nakamura, S.

    2013-12-10

    Some experimental results of chiroptical response of single molecule have already reported. In those experiments, dissymmetry parameter, g was used as an indicator of the relative circular dichroism intensity. The parameter for individual molecules was measured. For the purpose of giving an interpretation or explanation to the experimental result, the dissymmetry parameter is formulated on the basis of Fermi’s golden rule. Subsequently, the value of individual molecules is evaluated as a function of the direction of light propagation to the orientationary fixed molecules. The ground and excited wavefunction of electrons in the molecule and transition moments needed are culculated using the density functional theory.

  5. Hybrid photodetector for single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Cheng, Adrian; Antelman, Joshua; Suyama, Motohiro; Arisaka, Katsushi; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    We report benchmark tests of a new single-photon counting detector based on a GaAsP photocathode and an electron-bombarded avalanche photodiode developed by Hamamatsu Photonics. We compare its performance with those of standard Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. We show its advantages for FCS due to the absence of after-pulsing and for fluorescence lifetime measurements due to its excellent time resolution. Its large sensitive area also greatly simplifies setup alignment. Its spectral sensitivity being similar to that of recently introduced CMOS SPADs, this new detector could become a valuable tool for single-molecule fluorescence measurements, as well as for many other applications. PMID:21822361

  6. Spin Manipulation by Creation of Single-Molecule Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Sujoy; Li, Na; Zhang, Yajie; He, Yang; Hong, I.-Po; Song, Huanjun; Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Yongfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Wu, Kai; Michelitsch, Georg S.; Maurer, Reinhard J.; Diller, Katharina; Reuter, Karsten; Weismann, Alexander; Berndt, Richard

    2016-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ReA), a closed-shell organic molecule comprising only C, H, and O atoms, is investigated on a Au(111) substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. In dense arrays single ReA molecules are switched to a number of states, three of which carry a localized spin as evidenced by conductance spectroscopy in high magnetic fields. The spin of a single molecule may be reversibly switched on and off without affecting its neighbors. We suggest that ReA on Au is readily converted to a radical by the abstraction of an electron.

  7. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  8. Single Molecule Studies of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Li-Chun; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm of eukaryotic cells is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Hundreds, if not thousands, of molecules interact with and transit through each NPC every second. The pore is blocked by a permeability barrier, which consists of a network of intrinsically unfolded polypeptides containing thousands of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat motifs. This FG-network rejects larger molecules and admits smaller molecules or cargos bound to nuclear transport receptors (NTRs). For a cargo transport complex, minimally consisting of a cargo molecule plus an NTR, access to the permeability barrier is provided by interactions between the NTR and the FG repeat motifs. Numerous models have been postulated to explain the controlled accessibility and the transport characteristics of the FG-network, but the amorphous, flexible nature of this structure has hindered characterization. A relatively recent development is the ability to monitor the real-time movement of single molecules through individual NPCs via single molecule fluorescence (SMF) microscopy. A major advantage of this approach is that it can be used to continuously monitor a series of specific molecular interactions in an active pore with millisecond time resolution, which therefore allows one to distinguish between kinetic and thermodynamic control. Novel insights and prospects for the future are outlined in this review. PMID:21167872

  9. Single Molecule and Single Cell Epigenomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; McElwee, John L.; Soloway, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamically regulated changes in chromatin states are vital for normal development and can produce disease when they go awry. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted to characterizing these states under normal and pathological conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method to characterize where in the genome transcription factors, modified histones, modified nucleotides and chromatin binding proteins are found; bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) and its variants are commonly used to characterize the locations of DNA modifications. Though very powerful, these methods are not without limitations. Notably, they are best at characterizing one chromatin feature at a time, yet chromatin features arise and function in combination. Investigators commonly superimpose separate ChIP-seq or BS-seq datasets, and then infer where chromatin features are found together. While these inferences might be correct, they can be misleading when the chromatin source has distinct cell types, or when a given cell type exhibits any cell to cell variation in chromatin state. These ambiguities can be eliminated by robust methods that directly characterize the existence and genomic locations of combinations of chromatin features in very small inputs of cells or ideally, single cells. Here we review single molecule epigenomic methods under development to overcome these limitations, the technical challenges associated with single molecule methods and their potential application to single cells. PMID:25204781

  10. PREFACE: Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM) is dedicated to Professor Stuart M Lindsay on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in recognition of his outstanding contributions to multiple research areas, including light scattering spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, biophysics, solid-liquid interfaces and molecular and nanoelectronics. It contains a collection of 14 papers in some of these areas, including a feature article by Lindsay. Each paper was subject to the normal rigorous review process of JPCM. In Lindsay's paper, he discusses the next generations of hybrid chemical-CMOS devices for low cost and personalized medical diagnosis. The discussion leads to several papers on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. Kawaguchi et al report on the detection of single pollen allergen particles using electrode embedded microchannels. Stern et al describe a structural study of three-dimensional DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. Hihath et al measure the conductance of methylated DNA, and discuss the possibility of electrical detection DNA methylation. Portillo et al study the electrostatic effects on the aggregation of prion proteins and peptides with atomic force microscopy. In an effort to understand the interactions between nanostructures and cells, Lamprecht et al report on the mapping of the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes with a confocal Raman imaging technique, and Wang et al focus on the intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles using fluorescence microscopy. Park and Kristic provide theoretical analysis of micro- and nano-traps and their biological applications. This section also features several papers on the fundamentals of electron transport in single atomic wires and molecular junctions. The papers by Xu et al and by Wandlowksi et al describe new methods to measure conductance and forces in single molecule junctions and metallic atomic wires. Scullion et al report on the conductance of molecules with similar lengths but different energy barrier profiles in order to elucidate electron transport in the molecular junctions. Kiguchi and Murakoshi study metallic atomic wires under electrochemical potential control. Asai reports on a theoretical study of rectification in substituted atomic wires. Finally, Weiss et al report on a new method to pattern and functionalize oxide-free germanium surfaces with self-assembled organic monolayers, which provides interfaces between inorganic semiconductors and organic molecules. Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics contents Biochemistry and semiconductor electronics—the next big hit for silicon?Stuart Lindsay Electrical detection of single pollen allergen particles using electrode-embedded microchannelsChihiro Kawaguchi, Tetsuya Noda, Makusu Tsutsui, Masateru Taniguchi, Satoyuki Kawano and Tomoji Kawai Quasi 3D imaging of DNA-gold nanoparticle tetrahedral structuresAvigail Stern, Dvir Rotem, Inna Popov and Danny Porath Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA charge transportJoshua Hihath, Shaoyin Guo, Peiming Zhang and Nongjian Tao Effect of electrostatics on aggregation of prion protein Sup35 peptideAlexander M Portillo, Alexey V Krasnoslobodtsev and Yuri L Lyubchenko Mapping the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes after targeted delivery to carcinoma cells using confocal Raman imaging as a label-free techniqueC Lamprecht, N Gierlinger, E Heister, B Unterauer, B Plochberger, M Brameshuber, P Hinterdorfer, S Hild and A Ebner Caveolae-mediated endocytosis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles in living Hela cellsXian Hao, Jiazhen Wu, Yuping Shan, Mingjun Cai, Xin Shang, Junguang Jiang and Hongda Wang Stability of an aqueous quadrupole micro-trapJae Hyun Park and Predrag S Krstić Electron transport properties of single molecular junctions under mechanical modulationsJianfeng Zhou, Cunlan Guo and Bingqian Xu An approach to measure electromechanical properties of atomic and molecular junctionsIlya V Pobelov, Gábor Mészáros, Koji Yoshida, Artem Mishchenko, Murat Gulcur, Martin R Bryce and Thomas Wandlowski Single-molecule conductance determinations on HS(CH2)4O(CH2)4SH and HS(CH2)2O(CH2)2O(CH2)2SH, and comparison with alkanedithiols of the same lengthLisa E Scullion, Edmund Leary, Simon J Higgins and Richard J Nichols Metal atomic contact under electrochemical potential controlManabu Kiguchi and Kei Murakoshi Rectification in substituted atomic wires: a theoretical insightYoshihiro Asai High-fidelity chemical patterning on oxide-free germaniumJ Nathan Hohman, Moonhee Kim, Jeffrey A Lawrence, Patrick D McClanahan and Paul S Weiss

  11. Single-Molecule Microscopy of Nanocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticles are important catalysts. Understanding their structure-activity correlation is paramount for developing better catalysts, but hampered by their inherent inhomogeneity: individual nanoparticles differ from one to another, and for every nanoparticle, it can change from time to time, especially during catalysis. Furthermore, each nanoparticle presents on its surface various types of sites, which are often unequal in catalytic activity. I will present our work of using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to overcome these challenges and study single-nanoparticle catalysis at the single-turnover resolution and nanometer precision. I will present how we interrogate the catalytic activity and dynamics of individual metal nanoparticles, map the reactivity of different surface sites, and uncover surprising spatial reactivity patterns within single facets at the nanoscale. This spatiotemporally resolved catalysis mapping also enables us to probe the communication between catalytic reactions at different locations on a single nanocatalyst, in much relation to allosteric effects in enzymes.

  12. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-07

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive “detection” based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  13. Actinide-based single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Meihaus, Katie R; Long, Jeffrey R

    2015-02-14

    Actinide single-molecule magnetism has experienced steady growth over the last five years since the first discovery of slow magnetic relaxation in the mononuclear complex U(Ph(2)BPz(2))(3). Given their large spin-orbit coupling and the radial extension of the 5f orbitals, the actinides are well-suited for the design of both mononuclear and exchange-coupled molecules, and indeed at least one new system has emerged every year. By some measures, the actinides are already demonstrating promise for one day exceeding the performance characteristics of transition metal and lanthanide complexes. However, much further work is needed to understand the nature of the slow relaxation in mononuclear actinide complexes, as well as the influence of magnetic exchange on slow relaxation in multinuclear species. This perspective seeks to summarize the successes in the field and to address some of the many open questions in this up and coming area of research. PMID:25352033

  14. Single-Molecule Gold-Nanoparticle Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Alexander R.; Spudich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles, like single fluorophores, can be used to locate single molecules with nanometer accuracy. Unlike an optical trap, the gold particle label does not exert an external load, which is important for studying diffusive processes. Thus, a gold particle can be used analogously to a single fluorophore, providing similar information but with submillisecond time resolution. The features of gold-nanoparticle tracking (high temporal resolution, small label size, and lack of applied force) facilitate the characterization of structural properties of short-lived intermediates, as shown by our work with myosin V. This protocol provides details for gold-nanoparticle-tracking experiments, including flow cell construction, microscopy, and data analysis, along with a brief outline of actin and myosin preparation. Although details particular to our experiment are given, the approach should be generally applicable. PMID:22135665

  15. Nanogap Electrodes towards Solid State Single-Molecule Transistors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ajuan; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2015-12-01

    With the establishment of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-based integrated circuit technology, it has become more difficult to follow Moore's law to further downscale the size of electronic components. Devices based on various nanostructures were constructed to continue the trend in the minimization of electronics, and molecular devices are among the most promising candidates. Compared with other candidates, molecular devices show unique superiorities, and intensive studies on molecular devices have been carried out both experimentally and theoretically at the present time. Compared to two-terminal molecular devices, three-terminal devices, namely single-molecule transistors, show unique advantages both in fundamental research and application and are considered to be an essential part of integrated circuits based on molecular devices. However, it is very difficult to construct them using the traditional microfabrication techniques directly, thus new fabrication strategies are developed. This review aims to provide an exclusive way of manufacturing solid state gated nanogap electrodes, the foundation of constructing transistors of single or a few molecules. Such single-molecule transistors have the potential to be used to build integrated circuits. PMID:26450402

  16. Variation in the Single-Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, Brian; Dell, Emma; Dubay, Kateri; Moreno, Jose; Berkelbach, Timothy; Reichman, David; Campos, Luis; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-03-01

    Thiophenes are ubiquitous in organic electronic and photovoltaic applications; yet, they have received minimal attention in single molecule transport studies. Here, we carry out single molecule conductance measurements on a family of methyl sulfide-terminated oligothiophenes using the scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. We find a non-exponential decay in conductance with the number of thiophene units (2 through 6) in the chain, which cannot be explained by a simple tunneling or hopping mechanism. We also find that the oligothiophenes exhibit a rather broad conductance distribution when compared to oligophenyls. Using a combination of experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that this increased breadth is most likely due to different thiophene confomers sampled in the experiments, which do not necessarily maintain conjugation along the backbone. These measurements therefore reinforce the importance of conformation and conjugation effects in thiophene-based organic electronic devices where highly conducting molecular components are required. The experimental work was funded by NSF-DMR-1206202 and the theory was funded by the EFRC program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DESC0001085.

  17. High throughput single molecule detection for monitoring biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Okagbare, Paul I; Soper, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    The design, performance and application of a novel optical system for high throughput single molecule detection (SMD) configured in a continuous flow format using microfluidics is reported. The system consisted of a microfabricated polymer-based multi-channel fluidic network situated within the optical path of a laser source (lambda(ex) = 660 nm) with photon transduction accomplished using an electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) operated in a frame transfer mode that allowed tracking single molecules as they passed through a large field-of-view (FoV) illumination zone. The microfluidic device consisted of 30 microchannels possessing dimensions of 30 microm (width) x 20 microm (depth) with a 25 microm pitch. Individual molecules were electrokinetically driven through the fluidic network and excited within the wide-field illumination area with the resulting fluorescence collected via an objective and imaged onto the EMCCD camera. The detection system demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to detect single DNA molecules labeled with a fluorescent tag (AlexaFluor 660) identified through their characteristic emission wavelength and the burst of photons produced during their transit through the excitation volume. In its present configuration and fluidic architecture, the sample processing throughput was approximately 4.02 x 10(5) molecules s(-1), but could be increased dramatically through the use of narrower channels and a smaller pitch. The system was further evaluated using a single molecule-based fluorescence quenching assay for measuring the population differences between duplexed and single-stranded DNA molecules as a function of temperature for determining the duplex melting temperature, T(m). PMID:19082181

  18. Single-Molecule STM Studies on Atomically-Flat Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahayanaka, D. H.; Kelle, D. W.; Wasielewski, D. J.; Day, E. S.; White, D. R.; Bumm, L. A.; Waite, C. M.; Moore, J. L.; Halterman, R. L.

    2006-03-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been broadly applied to measure electronic characteristics of individual molecules supported in an inert monolayer matrix, which is typically grown on gold thin films on mica or bulk single crystal substrates. Although these substrates are excellent for electronic measurements, they have serious disadvantages for optical measurements because they are not optically transparent and the metal surface can quench the molecular excited state. We demonstrate that single molecule electronic measurements can also be performed using atomically-flat gold nanoparticles (FGNPs) supported on indium tin oxide coated glass as a replacement for the typical gold substrate. These substrates are optically transparent and each of the FGNP ``nanosubstrates'' is an optically resonant photonic antenna, thus they have the added advantage that optical measurements can be performed.

  19. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes. PMID:26679007

  20. Combining nanofluidics and plasmonics for single molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Melanie M.

    Single molecule detection is limited by the small scattering cross-section of molecules which leads to weak optical signals that can be obscured by background noise. The combination of plasmonics and nanofluidics in an integrated nano-device has the potential to provide the signal enhancement necessary for the detection of single molecules. The purpose of this investigation was to optimize the fabrication of an optofluidic device that integrates a nanochannel with a plasmonic bowtie antenna. The fluidic structure of the device was fabricated using UV-nanoimprint lithography, and the gold plasmonic antennas were fabricated using a shadow evaporation and lift-off process. The effect of electron beam lithography doses on the resolution of antenna-nanochannel configurations was studied to minimize antenna gap size while maintaining the integrity of the imprinted features. The smallest antenna gap size that was achieved was 46 nm. The antennas were characterized using dark field spectroscopy to find the resonance shift, which indicated the appropriate range for optical signal enhancement. The dark field scattering results showed antennas with a broad and well-defined resonance shift that ranged from 650--800 nm. The Raman scattering results showed the highest enhancement factor (EF = 2) for antennas with an "inverted configuration," which involved having the triangles of the antenna facing back-to-back rather than the more conventional tip-to-tip bowtie arrangement.

  1. Visualizing electromagnetic fields at the nanoscale by single molecule localization.

    PubMed

    Steuwe, Christian; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szekeres, G; Csete, M; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Mahajan, Sumeet; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-05-13

    Coupling of light to the free electrons at metallic surfaces allows the confinement of electric fields to subwavelength dimensions, far below the optical diffraction limit. While this is routinely used to manipulate light at the nanoscale, in electro-optic devices and enhanced spectroscopic techniques, no characterization technique for imaging the underlying nanoscopic electromagnetic fields exists, which does not perturb the field or employ complex electron beam imaging. Here, we demonstrate the direct visualization of electromagnetic fields on patterned metallic substrates at nanometer resolution, exploiting a strong "autonomous" fluorescence-blinking behavior of single molecules within the confined fields allowing their localization. Use of DNA-constructs for precise positioning of fluorescence dyes on the surface induces this distance-dependent autonomous blinking thus completely obviating the need for exogenous agents or switching methods. Mapping such electromagnetic field distributions at nanometer resolution aids the rational design of nanometals for diverse photonic applications. PMID:25915093

  2. Single molecule force spectroscopy of asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Long, Jun; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2007-05-22

    Asphaltene aggregation and deposition cause severe problems in nearly all phases of petroleum processing. To resolve those problems, understanding the aggregation mechanisms is a prerequisite and has attracted the interest of a great number of investigators. However, to date, the nature and extent of asphaltene aggregation remain widely debated. In the present study, we attempt to investigate asphaltene aggregation from a completely new perspective. The technique of single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to investigate the response of single asphaltene aggregates under an external pulling force. Force curves representing the stretching of single asphaltene aggregates were obtained in simple electrolyte solutions (KCl and calcium) and organic solvents (toluene and heptane). These force curves were well-fitted by the modified worm-like chain model, indicating that those asphaltene aggregates acted like long-chain polymers under pulling by an external force. It was found that lower solution pH values and the presence of divalent cations resulted in a lower bending rigidity of the formed aggregates. The information retrieved from the force curves suggests that asphaltene molecules with a structure featuring small aromatic clusters connected by aliphatic chains do exist and that asphaltene aggregation could occur through a linear polymerization mechanism. The current study extends the application scope of SMFS. PMID:17441741

  3. Tracking Nanocars Using Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Stephan; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Claytor, Kevin; Guerrero, Jason; Tour, James

    2008-03-01

    Nanocars belong to an exciting new class of molecules known as molecular machines. They consist of four fullerene or carborane wheels attached to a chassis consisting of a stiff aromatic backbone. The nanocars are designed to roll over a solid surface making them potential candidates for nano-cargo transporters. Here, we present our results on tracking of nanocars by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. By attaching the fluorescent tag tetramethylrhodamin isothiocyanate to the nanocars, we were able to visualize and track individual nanocars using confocal sample scanning microscopy. Fluorescence images were analyzed for directional movement as opposed to random diffusion or stage drift. We had to overcome 2 major problems in our image analysis: 1) fluorescence photo-blinking and 2) photo-bleaching. We developed routines that are capable of tracking individual fluorescent molecules while accounting for photo-blinking and photo-bleaching. The ability to track individual nanocars is checked independently by simulations. Our method is not limited to tracking of nanocars however, and can be extended to follow individual molecules in biological or mechanical systems as well.

  4. Theory of the Control of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew Musso

    This dissertation describes the theoretial exploration of electron transfer (ET) processes at the interface between bulk and molecular or nanoscale materials. Analysis of simple model Hamiltonians, those for the two- and three-level electronic systems as well as for a single electronic level coupled to a continuum, inform an understanding of electron transfer in nontrivial systems. A new treatment of the three-level system at an undergraduate level encapsulates the hopping and superexchange mechanisms of electron transfer. The elegance of the behavior of ET from a single-level/continuum system precedes a treatment of the reverse process---quasicontinuum-to-discrete level ET. This reverse process, relevant to ET from a bulk material to a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) offers a handle for the coherent control of ET at an interface: the shape of an electronic wavepacket within the quasicontinuum. An extension of the single-level-to-continuum ET process is the injection of an electron from a QD to a wide-bandgap semiconductor nanoparticle (NP). We construct a minimal model to explain trends in ET rates at the QD/NP interface as a function of QD size. Finally, we propose a scheme to gate ET through a molecular junction via the coherent control of the torsional mode(s) of a linking molecule within the junction.

  5. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C.; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform.

  6. From single molecule to single tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chin-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems often make decisions upon conformational changes and assembly of single molecules. In vivo, epithelial cells (such as the mammary gland cells) can respond to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, type I collagen (COL), and switch their morphology from a lobular lumen (100-200 micron) to a tubular lumen (1mm-1cm). However, how cells make such a morphogenetic decision through interactions with each other and with COL is unclear. Using a temporal control of cell-ECM interaction, we find that epithelial cells, in response to a fine-tuned percentage of type I collagen (COL) in ECM, develop various linear patterns. Remarkably, these patterns allow cells to self-assemble into a tubule of length ˜ 1cm and diameter ˜ 400 micron in the liquid phase (i.e., scaffold-free conditions). In contrast with conventional thought, the linear patterns arise through bi-directional transmission of traction force, but not through diffusible biochemical factors secreted by cells. In turn, the transmission of force evokes a long-range (˜ 600 micron) intercellular mechanical interaction. A feedback effect is encountered when the mechanical interaction modifies cell positioning and COL alignment. Micro-patterning experiments further reveal that such a feedback is a novel cell-number-dependent, rich-get-richer process, which allows cells to integrate mechanical interactions into long-range (> 1mm) linear coordination. Our results suggest a mechanism cells can use to form and coordinate long-range tubular patterns, independent of those controlled by diffusible biochemical factors, and provide a new strategy to engineer/regenerate epithelial organs using scaffold-free self-assembly methods.

  7. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mure?an, Leila; Jacak, Jaros?aw; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  8. 'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    At scales below micrometers, Brownian motion dictates most of the behaviors. The simple observation of a colloid is striking: a permanent and random motion is seen, whereas inertial forces play a negligible role. This Physics, where velocity is proportional to force, has opened new horizons in biology. The random feature is challenged in living systems where some proteins - molecular motors - have a directed motion whereas their passive behaviors of colloid should lead to a Brownian motion. Individual proteins, polymers of living matter such as DNA, RNA, actin or microtubules, molecular motors, all these objects can be viewed as chains of colloids. They are submitted to shocks from molecules of the solvent. Shapes taken by these biopolymers or dynamics imposed by motors can be measured and modeled from single molecules to their collective effects. Thanks to the development of experimental methods such as optical tweezers, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micropipettes, and quantitative fluorescence (such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, FRET), it is possible to manipulate these individual biomolecules in an unprecedented manner: experiments allow to probe the validity of models; and a new Physics has thereby emerged with original biological insights. Theories based on statistical mechanics are needed to explain behaviors of these systems. When force-extension curves of these molecules are extracted, the curves need to be fitted with models that predict the deformation of free objects or submitted to a force. When velocity of motors is altered, a quantitative analysis is required to explain the motions of individual molecules under external forces. This lecture will give some elements of introduction to the lectures of the session 'Nanophysics for Molecular Biology'. PMID:24565227

  9. n and p type character of single molecule diodes

    PubMed Central

    Zoldan, Vinícius Claudio; Faccio, Ricardo; Pasa, André Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Looking for single molecule electronic devices, we have investigated the charge transport properties of individual tetra-phenylporphyrin molecules on different substrates by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and by first-principles calculations. The tetra-phenylporphyrins with a Co atom (Co-TPP) or 2 hydrogens (H2-TPP) in the central macrocycle when deposited on Cu3Au(100) substrates showed a diode-like behavior with p and n type character, respectively. After removing the central hydrogens of H2-TPP molecule with the STM tip an ohmic behavior was measured. The rectifying effect was understood from the theoretical point of view by assuming for Co-TPP HOMO conduction and for H2-TPP LUMO conduction, both selectively elected by the hybridization of states between molecule and substrate surface. PMID:25666850

  10. Nonlinear coherent spectroscopy in the single molecule limit (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals from signal molecules is a longstanding experimental challenge. Driving the vibrational CARS response with surface plasmon fields has proven notoriously difficult due to strong background contributions, unfavorable heat dissipation and the phase dispersion of the plasmon modes in the ensemble. In this work we overcome previous experimental limitations and demonstrate time-resolved, vibrational CARS from molecules in the low copy number limit, down to the single molecule level. Our measurements, which are performed under ambient and non-electronic resonance conditions, establish that the coherent response from vibrational modes of individual molecules can be studied experimentally, opening up a new realm of molecular spectroscopic investigations.

  11. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to the porphyrin ring and degree of fluorination of ring substituents were analyzed. Due to the high reduction potentials of these sensitizers, injection into TiO2 was generally not observed. Injection timescales from the porphyrins into SnO2 depended strongly on the identity of the central substituent and were affected by competition with excited-state deactivation processes. The carboxylate anchoring group is commonly used to bind DSSC sensitizers to metal oxide surfaces but is typically not stable under the aqueous and oxidative conditions required for water oxidation. Electron injection efficiency and water stability of several alternative anchoring groups, including phosphonic acid, hydroxamic acid, acerylacetone, and boronic acid, were evaluated. While all of the anchoring groups exhibited water stability superior to carboxylate, the hydroxamate anchor had the best combination of ease of handling and electron injection efficiency. The effects on photoconductivity due to metal oxide morphology and the addition of dopants were also analyzed. Mixtures of anatase and rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles are known to exhibit cooperative effects which increase the efficiency of DSSCs and photocatalysis relative to the pure-phase materials. Through analysis of TRTS measurements, the mechanism of this synergistic effect was found to involve electron transfer from the lower-mobility, higher surface area rutile nanoparticles to anatase particles, resulting in a higher charge collection efficiency. In addition to morphology, doping has been investigated as a means of expanding the spectral range of visible absorption of photocatalysts. Doping ZnO nanowires with manganese(II) was found to significantly decrease the electron mobility, and doping with cobalt(II) increased the timescale for electron trapping. These differences can be understood by considering the changes to the band structure of ZnO effected by the dopants. Preliminary analyses of the solvent and electrolyte dependence on the electron injection rate and efficiency suggest that electron injection can be affected by several components of a DSSC or water oxidation cell in addition to the sensitizer and metal oxide. Performing TRTS studies on fully assembled devices will therefore be essential for determining the relationship between electron injection and device efficiency.

  12. Interfacial electron transfer as a significant step in photoelectrochemical reactions on some semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockris, J. O'M.; Uosaki, K.; Kita, H.

    1981-02-01

    Photoelectrochemical kinetics at the semiconductor-solution interface has been considered in all treatments in the literature, except one, to be rate controlled by processes inside the semiconductor. Evidence is presented which suggest that, at least for cathodic reactions on p-CdTe, the rate determining step is interfacial electron transfer, and a part of the total potential difference at the interface exists in the Helmholtz layer.

  13. Action spectroscopy for single-molecule reactions - Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Motobayashi, K.; Frederiksen, T.; Ueba, H.; Kawai, M.

    2015-05-01

    We review several representative experimental results of action spectroscopy (AS) of single molecules on metal surfaces using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by M. Kawai's group over last decade. The experimental procedures to observe STM-AS are described. A brief description of a low-temperature STM and experimental setup are followed by key experimental techniques of how to determine an onset bias voltage of a reaction and how to measure a current change associated with reactions and finally how to observe AS for single molecule reactions. The experimental results are presented for vibrationally mediated chemical transformation of trans-2-butene to 1.3-butadiene molecule and rotational motion of a single cis-2-butene molecule among four equivalent orientations on Pd(1 1 0). The AS obtained from the motion clearly detects more vibrational modes than inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with an STM. AS is demonstrated as a useful and novel single molecule vibrational spectroscopy. The AS for a lateral hopping of water dimer on Pt(1 1 1) is presented as an example of novelty. Several distinct vibrational modes are detected as the thresholds in the AS. The assignment of the vibrational modes determined from the analysis of the AS is made from a view of the adsorption geometry of hydrogen-bond donor or acceptor molecules in water dimer. A generic theory of STM-AS, i.e., a reaction rate or yield as a function of bias voltage, is presented using a single adsorbate resonance model for single molecule reactions induced by the inelastic tunneling current. Formulas for the reaction rate R (V) and Y (V) , i.e., reaction yield per electron Y (V) = eR (V) / I are derived. It provides a versatile framework to analyze any vibrationally mediated reactions of single adsorbates on metal surfaces. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate generic features of the vibrational generation rate and Y (V) at different levels of approximations and to show how the effective broadening of the vibrational density of states (as described by Gaussian or Lorentzian functions) manifest themselves in Y (V) near the threshold bias voltage corresponding to a vibrational excitation responsible for reactions. A prefactor of Y (V) is explicitly derived for various types of elementary processes. Our generic formula of Y (V) also underlines the need to observe Y (V) at both bias voltage polarities, which can provide additional insight into the adsorbate projected density of states near the Fermi level within a span of the vibrational energy. The theory is applied to analysis of some highlights of the experimental results: Xe transfer, hopping of a single CO molecule on Pd(1 1 0), a dissociation of a single dimethyl disulfide (CH3S)2 and a hopping of a dissociated product, i.e., single methyl thiolate CH3S on Cu(1 1 1). It underlines that an observation of Y (V) at both bias polarities permits us to certain insight into the molecular alignment with respect to the Fermi level.

  14. Microscopes for Fluorimeters: The Era of Single Molecule Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    As transforming as the first atomic resolution view of myoglobin in the late 1950s, scientists can now use a suite of single molecule technologies to watch protein macromolecular machines executing their functions “in real time.” This Essay highlights applications and challenges of single molecule studies in structural biology, cell biology, and biotechnology. PMID:19041739

  15. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles

    PubMed Central

    Wruck, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA–protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG)-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp) were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG) beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot–streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein–DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular recognition in time-critical molecular motor studies. PMID:26925362

  16. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vivek S; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Wruck, Florian; Hegner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA-protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG)-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp) were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG) beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot-streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein-DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular recognition in time-critical molecular motor studies. PMID:26925362

  17. Reversible Tuning of Interfacial and Intramolecular Charge Transfer in Individual MnPc Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Zhunzhun; Zhang, Jia Lin; Wright, Christopher A; Yuan, Kaidi; Gu, Chengding; Tadich, Anton; Qi, Dongchen; Li, He Xing; Lai, Min; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Hu, Wenping; Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The reversible selective hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of individual manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecules has been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements, and supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is shown conclusively that interfacial and intramolecular charge transfer arises during the hydrogenation process. The electronic energetics upon hydrogenation is identified, enabling a greater understanding of interfacial and intramolecular charge transportation in the field of single-molecule electronics. PMID:26528623

  18. Analyzing Single-Molecule Time Series via Nonparametric Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Keegan E.; Bankston, John R.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to measure the properties of proteins at the single-molecule level offers an unparalleled glimpse into biological systems at the molecular scale. The interpretation of single-molecule time series has often been rooted in statistical mechanics and the theory of Markov processes. While existing analysis methods have been useful, they are not without significant limitations including problems of model selection and parameter nonidentifiability. To address these challenges, we introduce the use of nonparametric Bayesian inference for the analysis of single-molecule time series. These methods provide a flexible way to extract structure from data instead of assuming models beforehand. We demonstrate these methods with applications to several diverse settings in single-molecule biophysics. This approach provides a well-constrained and rigorously grounded method for determining the number of biophysical states underlying single-molecule data. PMID:25650922

  19. Gating a single-molecule transistor with individual atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Blanco, Jesús; Nacci, Christophe; Erwin, Steven C.; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Locane, Elina; Thomas, Mark; von Oppen, Felix; Brouwer, Piet W.; Fölsch, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Transistors, regardless of their size, rely on electrical gates to control the conductance between source and drain contacts. In atomic-scale transistors, this conductance is sensitive to single electrons hopping via individual orbitals. Single-electron transport in molecular transistors has been previously studied using top-down approaches to gating, such as lithography and break junctions. But atomically precise control of the gate--which is crucial to transistor action at the smallest size scales--is not possible with these approaches. Here, we used individual charged atoms, manipulated by a scanning tunnelling microscope, to create the electrical gates for a single-molecule transistor. This degree of control allowed us to tune the molecule into the regime of sequential single-electron tunnelling, albeit with a conductance gap more than one order of magnitude larger than observed previously. This unexpected behaviour arises from the existence of two different orientational conformations of the molecule, depending on its charge state. Our results show that strong coupling between these charge and conformational degrees of freedom leads to new behaviour beyond the established picture of single-electron transport in atomic-scale transistors.

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy and imaging over the decades.

    PubMed

    Moerner, W E; Shechtman, Yoav; Wang, Quan

    2015-12-12

    As of 2015, it has been 26 years since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter. This area of science has expanded far beyond the early low temperature studies in crystals to include single molecules in cells, polymers, and in solution. The early steps relied upon high-resolution spectroscopy of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral fine structure arising directly from the position-dependent fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, a variety of fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, including imaging of the light from single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency. In the room temperature regime, researchers showed that bursts of light from single molecules could be detected in solution, leading to imaging and microscopy by a variety of methods. Studies of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. All of these early steps provided important fundamentals underpinning the development of super-resolution microscopy based on single-molecule localization and active control of emitting concentration. Current thrust areas include extensions to three-dimensional imaging with high precision, orientational analysis of single molecules, and direct measurements of photodynamics and transport properties for single molecules trapped in solution by suppression of Brownian motion. Without question, a huge variety of studies of single molecules performed by many talented scientists all over the world have extended our knowledge of the nanoscale and many microscopic mechanisms previously hidden by ensemble averaging. PMID:26616210

  1. Selectivity in vibrationally mediated single-molecule chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J I; Lorente, N; Song, Z; Conrad, H; Rust, H-P

    2003-05-29

    The selective excitation of molecular vibrations provides a means to directly influence the speed and outcome of chemical reactions. Such mode-selective chemistry has traditionally used laser pulses to prepare reactants in specific vibrational states to enhance reactivity or modify the distribution of product species. Inelastic tunnelling electrons may also excite molecular vibrations and have been used to that effect on adsorbed molecules, to cleave individual chemical bonds and induce molecular motion or dissociation. Here we demonstrate that inelastic tunnelling electrons can be tuned to induce selectively either the translation or desorption of individual ammonia molecules on a Cu(100) surface. We are able to select a particular reaction pathway by adjusting the electronic tunnelling current and energy during the reaction induction such that we activate either the stretching vibration of ammonia or the inversion of its pyramidal structure. Our results illustrate the ability of the scanning tunnelling microscope to probe single-molecule events in the limit of very low yield and very low power irradiation, which should allow the investigation of reaction pathways not readily amenable to study by more conventional approaches. PMID:12774118

  2. Real-time single-molecule observations of proteins at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Blake Brianna

    Non-specific protein adsorption to solid surfaces is pervasive and observed across a broad spectrum of applications including biomaterials, separations, pharmaceuticals, and biosensing. Despite great interest in and considerable literature dedicated to the phenomena, a mechanistic understanding of this complex phenomena is lacking and remains controversial, partially due to the limits of ensemble-averaging techniques used to study it. Single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods allow us to study distinct protein dynamics (e.g. adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and intermolecular associations) on a molecule-by-molecule basis revealing the protein population and spatial heterogeneity inherent in protein interfacial behavior. By employing single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM-TIRFM), we have developed SMT methods to directly observe protein interfacial dynamics at the solid-liquid interface to build a better mechanistic understanding of protein adsorption. First, we examined the effects of surface chemistry (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bonding capacity), temperature, and electrostatics on isolated protein desorption and interfacial diffusion for fibrinogen (Fg) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Next, we directly and indirectly probed the effects of protein-protein interactions on interfacial desorption, diffusion, aggregation, and surface spatial heterogeneity on model and polymeric thin films. These studies provided many useful insights into interfacial protein dynamics including the following observations. First, protein adsorption was reversible, with the majority of proteins desorbing from all surface chemistries within seconds. Isolated protein-surface interactions were relatively weak on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces (apparent desorption activation energies of only a few kBT). However, proteins could dynamically and reversibly associate at the interface, and these interfacial associations led to proteins remaining on the surface for longer time intervals. Surface chemistry and surface spatial heterogeneity (i.e. surface sites with different binding strengths) were shown to influence adsorption, desorption, and interfacial protein-protein associations. For example, faster protein diffusion on hydrophobic surfaces increased protein-protein associations and, at higher protein surface coverage, led to proteins remaining on hydrophobic surfaces longer than on hydrophilic surfaces. Ultimately these studies suggested that surface properties (chemistry, heterogeneity) influence not only protein-surface interactions but also interfacial mobility and protein-protein associations, implying that surfaces that better control protein adsorption can be designed by accounting for these processes.

  3. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Yuya; Habuka, Satoru; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices. PMID:26665080

  4. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Yuya; Habuka, Satoru; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices. PMID:26665080

  5. Evidence on single-molecule transport in electrostatically-gated molecular transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bâldea, Ioan; Köppel, Horst

    2012-03-01

    We show that, if adequately formulated for molecular electronics, the barrier picture can quantitatively reproduce the currents and describe the orbital gating in the molecular transistors fabricated by Song et al. [H. Song, Y. Kim, Y.H. Jang, H. Jeong, M.A. Reed, T. Lee, Nature 462 (2009) 1039]. Based on our results, we demonstrate (i) that the measured current represents the contribution of a single molecule, and (ii) the linear dependence of the molecular orbital energy offset ?g on the voltage Vt at the Fowler-Nordheim minimum, validating thereby the transition voltage spectroscopy for the gated single molecule devices of Song et al.

  6. Superconducting molybdenum-rhenium electrodes for single-molecule transport studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudenzi, R.; Island, J. O.; Bruijckere, J. de; Burzurí, E.; Zant, H. S. J. van der; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate that electronic transport through single molecules or molecular ensembles, commonly based on gold (Au) electrodes, can be extended to superconducting electrodes by combining gold with molybdenum-rhenium (MoRe). This combination induces proximity-effect superconductivity in the gold to temperatures of at least 4.6 K and magnetic fields of 6 T, improving on previously reported aluminum based superconducting nanojunctions. As a proof of concept, we show three-terminal superconductive transport measurements through an individual Fe{sub 4} single-molecule magnet.

  7. Measurement and understanding of single-molecule break junction rectification caused by asymmetric contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun; Zhou, Jianfeng; Hamill, Joseph M.; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-08-07

    The contact effects of single-molecule break junctions on rectification behaviors were experimentally explored by a systematic control of anchoring groups of 1,4-disubstituted benzene molecular junctions. Single-molecule conductance and I-V characteristic measurements reveal a strong correlation between rectifying effects and the asymmetry in contacts. Analysis using energy band models and I-V calculations suggested that the rectification behavior is mainly caused by asymmetric coupling strengths at the two contact interfaces. Fitting of the rectification ratio by a modified Simmons model we developed suggests asymmetry in potential drop across the asymmetric anchoring groups as the mechanism of rectifying I-V behavior. This study provides direct experimental evidence and sheds light on the mechanisms of rectification behavior induced simply by contact asymmetry, which serves as an aid to interpret future single-molecule electronic behavior involved with asymmetric contact conformation.

  8. Synthesis of 1,2-biphenylethane based single-molecule diodes.

    PubMed

    Galán, Elena; Perrin, Mickael L; Lutz, Martin; van der Zant, Herre S J; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-02-16

    We have described the synthesis of novel biphenylethane-based wires for molecular electronics. Exceptional single-molecule diode behavior was predicted for unsymmetrically substituted biphenylethane derivatives, synthesized here using the so far unexplored unsymmetrically substituted 1,2-bis(4-bromophenyl)ethanes as key intermediates, which were obtained from the corresponding tolane precursor by selective hydrogenation. PMID:26809645

  9. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging of nanocatalytic processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Zhou, Xiaochun; Shen, Hao; Andoy, Nesha May; Choudhary, Eric; Han, Kyu-Sung; Liu, Guokun; Meng, Weilin

    2010-12-01

    This tutorial review covers recent developments in using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study nanoscale catalysis. The single-molecule approach enables following catalytic and electrocatalytic reactions on nanocatalysts, including metal nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, at single-reaction temporal resolution and nanometer spatial precision. Real-time, in situ, multiplexed measurements are readily achievable under ambient solution conditions. These studies provide unprecedented insights into catalytic mechanism, reactivity, selectivity, and dynamics in spite of the inhomogeneity and temporal variations of catalyst structures. Prospects, generality, and limitations of the single-molecule fluorescence approach for studying nanocatalysis are also discussed. PMID:20886166

  10. Single-molecule detection: applications to ultrasensitive biochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alonso; Shera, E. Brooks

    1995-06-01

    Recent developments in laser-based detection of fluorescent molecules have made possible the implementation of very sensitive techniques for biochemical analysis. We present and discuss our experiments on the applications of our recently developed technique of single-molecule detection to the analysis of molecules of biological interest. These newly developed methods are capable of detecting and identifying biomolecules at the single-molecule level of sensitivity. In one case, identification is based on measuring fluorescence brightness from single molecules. In another, molecules are classified by determining their electrophoretic velocities.

  11. Single Molecule Detection and Imaging in Single Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2002-03-01

    Direct observation of single molecules and single molecular events inside living cells could dramatically improve our understanding of basic cellular processes (e.g., signal transduction and gene transcription) as well as improving our knowledge on the intracellular transport and fate of therapeutic agents (e.g., antisense RNA and gene therapy vectors). This talk will focus on using single-molecule fluorescence and luminescent quantum dots to examine the dynamics and spatial distribution of RNA and proteins inside living cells and on the surface membrane surface. These single-molecule studies yield a detailed description of molecular events and cellular structures under physiological conditions.

  12. Interfacial Electron Transfer in TiO2 Surfaces Sensitized with Ru(II)-Polypyridine Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubikova, Elena; Snoeberger, Robert C., III; Batista, Victor S.; Martin, Richard L.; Batista, Enrique R.

    2009-07-01

    Studies of interfacial electron transfer (IET) in TiO2 surfaces functionalized with (1) pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, (2) [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO3H2))]2+, and (3) [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H2O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO3H2))]4+ (tpy = 2,2':6,2''-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) are reported. We characterize the electronic excitations, electron injection time scales, and interfacial electron transfer (IET) mechanisms through phosphonate anchoring groups. These are promising alternatives to the classic carboxylates of conventional dye-sensitized solar cells since they bind more strongly to TiO2 surfaces and form stable covalent bonds that are unaffected by humidity. Density functional theory calculations and quantum dynamics simulations of IET indicate that electron injection in 1-TiO2 can be up to 1 order of magnitude faster when 1 is attached to TiO2 in a bidentate mode (? ˜ 60 fs) than when attached in a monodentate motif (? ˜ 460 fs). The IET time scale also depends strongly on the properties of the sensitizer as well as on the nature of the electronic excitation initially localized in the adsorbate molecule. We show that IET triggered by the visible light excitation of 2-TiO2 takes 1-10 ps when 2 is attached in a bidentate mode, a time comparable to the lifetime of the excited electronic state. IET due to visible-light photoexcitation of 3-TiO2 is slower, since the resulting electronic excitation remains localized in the tpy-tpy bridge that is weakly coupled to the electronic states of the conduction band of TiO2. These results are particularly valuable to elucidate the possible origin of IET efficiency drops during photoconversion in solar cells based on Ru(II)-polypyridine complexes covalently attached to TiO2 thin films with phosphonate linkers.

  13. Graphene-porphyrin single-molecule transistors.

    PubMed

    Mol, Jan A; Lau, Chit Siong; Lewis, Wilfred J M; Sadeghi, Hatef; Roche, Cecile; Cnossen, Arjen; Warner, Jamie H; Lambert, Colin J; Anderson, Harry L; Briggs, G Andrew D

    2015-08-21

    We demonstrate a robust graphene-molecule-graphene transistor architecture. We observe remarkably reproducible single electron charging, which we attribute to insensitivity of the molecular junction to the atomic configuration of the graphene electrodes. The stability of the graphene electrodes allow for high-bias transport spectroscopy and the observation of multiple redox states at room-temperature. PMID:26185952

  14. Donor-Dependent Kinetics of Interfacial Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Megan N; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-03-01

    The effect of the proton donor on the kinetics of interfacial concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) to polycrystalline Au was probed indirectly by studying the rate of hydrogen evolution from trialkylammonium donors with different steric profiles, but the same pKa. Detailed kinetic studies point to a mechanism for HER catalysis that involves rate-limiting CPET from the proton donor to the electrode surface, allowing this catalytic reaction to serve as a proxy for the rate of interfacial CPET. In acetonitrile electrolyte, triethylammonium (TEAH(+)) displays up to 20-fold faster CPET kinetics than diisopropylethylammonium (DIPEAH(+)) at all measured potentials. In aqueous electrolyte, this steric constraint is largely lifted, suggesting a key role for water in mediating interfacial CPET. In acetonitrile, TEAH(+) also displays a much larger transfer coefficient (β = 0.7) than DIPEAH(+) (β = 0.4), and TEAH(+) displays a potential-dependent H/D kinetic isotope effect that is not observed for DIPEAH(+). These results demonstrate that proton donor structure strongly impacts the free energy landscape for CPET to extended solid surfaces and highlight the crucial role of the proton donor in the kinetics of electrocatalytic energy conversion reactions. PMID:26862666

  15. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of ru(II)-polypy6ridine sensitized TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubikova, Elena; Martin, Richard L; Batista, Enrique R; Snoeberger, Robert C; Batista, Victor S

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory calculations are applied to study interfacial electron transfer (IET) from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} into the (101) surface of anatase TiO{sub 2}. IET rate from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid attached to the nanoparticle in bidentate mode ({tau} {approx} 100 fs) is an order of magnitude faster than the IET rate of the adsorbate attached in the monodentate mode ({tau} {approx} 1 ps). Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} attached to TiO{sub 2} in bidentate binding mode will undergo IET with the rate of {approx} 1-10 ps, which is competitive with the excited state decay into the ground state. The probability of electron injection from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} is rather low, as the excitation with visible light localizes the excited electron in the tpy-tpy bridge, which does not have favorable coupling with the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle. The results are relevant to better understanding of the adsorbate features important for promoting efficient interfacial electron transfer into the semiconductor.

  16. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-12-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions.

  17. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  18. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  19. Large Conductance Switching in a Single-Molecule Device through Room Temperature Spin-Dependent Transport.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Cerdá, Jorge I; Acís-Castillo, Zulema; Li, Haipeng; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Hihath, Josh; Ruiz, Eliseo; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2016-01-13

    Controlling the spin of electrons in nanoscale electronic devices is one of the most promising topics aiming at developing devices with rapid and high density information storage capabilities. The interface magnetism or spinterface resulting from the interaction between a magnetic molecule and a metal surface, or vice versa, has become a key ingredient in creating nanoscale molecular devices with novel functionalities. Here, we present a single-molecule wire that displays large (>10000%) conductance switching by controlling the spin-dependent transport under ambient conditions (room temperature in a liquid cell). The molecular wire is built by trapping individual spin crossover Fe(II) complexes between one Au electrode and one ferromagnetic Ni electrode in an organic liquid medium. Large changes in the single-molecule conductance (>100-fold) are measured when the electrons flow from the Au electrode to either an α-up or a β-down spin-polarized Ni electrode. Our calculations show that the current flowing through such an interface appears to be strongly spin-polarized, thus resulting in the observed switching of the single-molecule wire conductance. The observation of such a high spin-dependent conductance switching in a single-molecule wire opens up a new door for the design and control of spin-polarized transport in nanoscale molecular devices at room temperature. PMID:26675052

  20. Negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise in single-molecule magnet junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Molecular spintroinic device based on a single-molecule magnet is one of the ultimate goals of semiconductor nanofabrication technologies. It is thus necessary to understand the electron transport properties of a single-molecule magnet junction. Here we study the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise properties of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet weakly coupled to two electrodes with either one or both of them being ferromagnetic. We predict that the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise, which can be tuned by a gate voltage, depend sensitively on the spin polarization of the source and drain electrodes. In particular, the shot noise in the negative differential conductance region can be enhanced or decreased originating from the different formation mechanisms of negative differential conductance. The effective competition between fast and slow transport channels is responsible for the observed negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise. In addition, we further discuss the skewness and kurtosis properties of transport current in the super-Poissonian shot noise regions. Our findings suggest a tunable negative differential conductance molecular device, and the predicted properties of high-order current cumulants are very interesting for a better understanding of electron transport through single-molecule magnet junctions. PMID:25736094

  1. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  2. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved. PMID:26192667

  3. Label-Free, Single-Molecule Detection with Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armani, Andrea M.; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Fraser, Scott E.; Flagan, Richard C.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2007-08-01

    Current single-molecule detection techniques require labeling the target molecule. We report a highly specific and sensitive optical sensor based on an ultrahigh quality (Q) factor (Q > 108) whispering-gallery microcavity. The silica surface is functionalized to bind the target molecule; binding is detected by a resonant wavelength shift. Single-molecule detection is confirmed by observation of single-molecule binding events that shift the resonant frequency, as well as by the statistics for these shifts over many binding events. These shifts result from a thermo-optic mechanism. Additionally, label-free, single-molecule detection of interleukin-2 was demonstrated in serum. These experiments demonstrate a dynamic range of 1012 in concentration, establishing the microcavity as a sensitive and versatile detector.

  4. Nanoscale Methods for Single-Molecule Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Canters, Gerard W.; Lemay, Serge G.

    2014-06-01

    The development of experiments capable of probing individual molecules has led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from molecular electronics to biophysics, allowing direct tests of knowledge derived from macroscopic measurements and enabling new assays that probe population heterogeneities and internal molecular dynamics. Although still somewhat in their infancy, such methods are also being developed for probing molecular systems in solution using electrochemical transduction mechanisms. Here we outline the present status of this emerging field, concentrating in particular on optical methods, metal-molecule-metal junctions, and electrochemical nanofluidic devices.

  5. Massively parallel single-molecule manipulation using centrifugal force.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2010-06-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has already led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, widespread adoption of single-molecule techniques has been impeded by equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. We have solved these issues by developing an approach that enables massively parallel single-molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in an instrument that we call the centrifuge force microscope in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force-field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Additionally, we verify the force accuracy of the instrument by measuring the well-established DNA overstretching transition at 66 +/- 3 pN. With significant benefits in efficiency, cost, simplicity, and versatility, single-molecule centrifugation has the potential to expand single-molecule experimentation to a wider range of researchers and experimental systems. PMID:20513382

  6. Nanometer-localized multiple single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wu, David; Mets, Laurens; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2004-01-01

    Fitting the image of a single molecule to the point spread function of an optical system greatly improves the precision with which single molecules can be located. Centroid localization with nanometer precision has been achieved when a sufficient number of photons are collected. However, if multiple single molecules reside within a diffraction-limited spot, this localization approach does not work. This paper demonstrates nanometer-localized multiple single-molecule (NALMS) fluorescence microscopy by using both centroid localization and photobleaching of the single fluorophores. Short duplex DNA strands are used as nanoscale “rulers” to validate the NALMS microscopy approach. Nanometer accuracy is demonstrated for two to five single molecules within a diffraction-limited area. NALMS microscopy will greatly facilitate single-molecule study of biological systems because it covers the gap between fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based (<10 nm) and diffraction-limited microscopy (>100 nm) measurements of the distance between two fluorophores. Application of NALMS microscopy to DNA mapping with <10-nm (i.e., 30-base) resolution is demonstrated. PMID:15277661

  7. Activating "Invisible" Glue: Using Electron Beam for Enhancement of Interfacial Properties of Graphene-Metal Contact.

    PubMed

    Kim, Songkil; Russell, Michael; Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Henry, Mathias; Kim, Steve; Naik, Rajesh R; Voevodin, Andrey A; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2016-01-26

    Interfacial contact of two-dimensional graphene with three-dimensional metal electrodes is crucial to engineering high-performance graphene-based nanodevices with superior performance. Here, we report on the development of a rapid "nanowelding" method for enhancing properties of interface to graphene buried under metal electrodes using a focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). High energy electron irradiation activates two-dimensional graphene structure by generation of structural defects at the interface to metal contacts with subsequent strong bonding via FEBID of an atomically thin graphitic interlayer formed by low energy secondary electron-assisted dissociation of entrapped hydrocarbon contaminants. Comprehensive investigation is conducted to demonstrate formation of the FEBID graphitic interlayer and its impact on contact properties of graphene devices achieved via strong electromechanical coupling at graphene-metal interfaces. Reduction of the device electrical resistance by ∼50% at a Dirac point and by ∼30% at the gate voltage far from the Dirac point is obtained with concurrent improvement in thermomechanical reliability of the contact interface. Importantly, the process is rapid and has an excellent insertion potential into a conventional fabrication workflow of graphene-based nanodevices through single-step postprocessing modification of interfacial properties at the buried heterogeneous contact. PMID:26741645

  8. Interfacial electronic structure of vanadyl naphthalocyanine on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Michael L.; Steele, Mary P.; Ilyas, Nahid; Monti, Oliver L. A.

    2010-09-01

    We present a core and valence region spectroscopic analysis of the interfacial electronic structure of thin films of vanadyl naphthalocyanine (VONc) deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the predominantly ionic character of the vanadyl metal center coordinated by the heterocycle and affords the bandgap in the thin VONc films. Valence band photoelectron spectroscopy points to the existence of three different adsorption geometries of VONc on the HOPG surface. The distribution of the different geometries can be systematically influenced in a simple post-deposition processing step, with an immediate effect on the interfacial electronic environment. We find spectroscopic evidence in the valence levels that VONc grows on HOPG most likely in a 2D-gas fashion rather than by nucleation and growth of islands. These data allow us to predict accurately the interface dipole in the case of a broad class of dipolar organic semiconductors, based simply on molecular dipole moment, polarizability and molecular diameter. This ability provides an important step towards rational optimization of energy level alignment in organic electronics.

  9. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and Holliday junctions and of the interactions of DNA strands with DNA origami and origami-related devices such as a DNA bipedal motor are provided. These examples demonstrate how SMF can be utilized for measurement of distances and conformational distributions and equilibrium and nonequilibrium kinetics, to monitor structural integrity and operation of DNA devices, and for isolation and investigation of minor subpopulations including malfunctioning and nonreactive devices. Utilization of a flow-cell to achieve measurements of dynamics with increased time resolution and for convenient and efficient operation of DNA devices is discussed briefly. We conclude by summarizing the various benefits provided by SMF for the development of DNA nanotechnology and suggest that the method can significantly assist in the design and manufacture and evaluation of operation of DNA devices. PMID:24828396

  10. Frustrated Rotations in Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Park,Y.S.; Hybertsen,M.; Widawsky, J.R.; Kamenetska, M.; Steigerwald, M.L.; Nuckolls, C.; Venkataraman, L.

    2009-07-17

    We compare the conductance of 1,4-bis(methylthio)benzene with that of 2,3,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b{prime}]dithiophene and the conductance of 1,4-bis(methylseleno)benzene with that of 2,3,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b{prime}]diselenophene and show explicitly that the orientation of an Au-S or Au-Se bond relative to the aromatic {pi} system controls electron transport through conjugated molecules. Specifically, we have found that the conduction pathway connects the Au electrodes to the aromatic {pi}-system via the chalcogen p lone pairs, and greater overlaps among these components lead to higher conductivity through the molecular junction.

  11. Optical spectroscopy of the bulk and interfacial hydrated electron from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Frank; Herbert, John M; Coons, Marc P; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    The optical spectrum of the hydrated (aqueous) electron, e(aq)(–), is the primary observable by means of which this species is detected, monitored, and studied. In theoretical calculations, this spectrum has most often been simulated using one-electron models. Here, we present ab initio simulations of that spectrum in both bulk water and, for the first time, at the water/vapor interface, using density functional theory and its time-dependent variant. Our results indicate that this approach provides a reliable description, and quantitative agreement with the experimental spectrum for the bulk species is obtained using a “tuned” long-range corrected functional. The spectrum of the interfacial electron is found to be very similar to the bulk spectrum. PMID:24576141

  12. Developing Single-Molecule Technique with Microsecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhterov, Maxim V.

    Molecular machines like proteins are responsible for many regulatory and catalytic functions. Specifically, molecular motions of proteins and their flexibility determine conformational states required for enzyme catalysis, signal transduction, and protein-protein interactions. However, the mechanisms for protein transitions between conformational states are often poorly understood, especially in the milli- to microsecond ranges where conventional optical techniques and computational modeling are most limited. This work describes development of an electronic single-molecule technique for monitoring microsecond motions of biological molecules. Dynamic changes of conductance through a transistor made of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT-FET) report conformational changes of a protein molecule tethered to the SWNT sidewall. In principle, the high operating speed of SWNT-FETs could allow this technique to resolve molecular events with nanosecond resolution. This project focused on improving the technique to a 200 kHz effective bandwidth in order to resolve microsecond-scale dynamics. The improvement was achieved with a home-built electrochemical flow cell. By minimizing parasitic capacitance due to liquid coupling to electrodes and eliminating noise pickup, the flow cell enabled low-noise, high bandwidth measurement of molecular events as short as 2 mus. The apparatus was used to observe closing and opening motions of lysozyme. Preliminary results suggest that lysozyme has a distribution of possible velocities with the most probable speed approaching our experimental resolution of 2 mus.

  13. Kondo effects and interference in transport through single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paaske, Jens; Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind; Hedegaard, Per

    2015-03-01

    Quantum transport through single molecules or quantum dot arrays with spin-degenerate ground states can be dominated by Kondo effects at low temperatures. In contrast to the single impurity case, quantum interference plays a significant role in such `multi-orbital' systems and may have a strong influence on the possible Kondo physics: deciding between single- or multi-channel screening and even ferromagnetic Kondo effect. We investigate a range of smaller molecules with source, and drain electrodes attached in different specific contacting geometries. The interacting pi-electron system is treated by means of exact diagonalization, and combining with a perturbative treatment of molecule-lead tunnel couplings, we calculate the zero-bias cotunneling conductance as a function of a gate-voltage shifting the molecular levels. We show that interference nodes cannot occur simultaneously in potential, and exchange scattering terms, which means that interference causes no conductance nodes. Nevertheless, interference nodes in the exchange scattering term may lead to a non-standard gate dependence of the Kondo temperature, as indicated by experiments. We discuss the flow towards strong coupling and the possibilities for two-channel, and/or ferromagnetic Kondo effect.

  14. Single-molecule diodes with high rectification ratios through environmental control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Adak, Olgun; Dell, Emma J.; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Taylor, Jeffrey C.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Campos, Luis M.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-06-01

    Molecular electronics aims to miniaturize electronic devices by using subnanometre-scale active components. A single-molecule diode, a circuit element that directs current flow, was first proposed more than 40 years ago and consisted of an asymmetric molecule comprising a donor-bridge-acceptor architecture to mimic a semiconductor p-n junction. Several single-molecule diodes have since been realized in junctions featuring asymmetric molecular backbones, molecule-electrode linkers or electrode materials. Despite these advances, molecular diodes have had limited potential for applications due to their low conductance, low rectification ratios, extreme sensitivity to the junction structure and high operating voltages. Here, we demonstrate a powerful approach to induce current rectification in symmetric single-molecule junctions using two electrodes of the same metal, but breaking symmetry by exposing considerably different electrode areas to an ionic solution. This allows us to control the junction's electrostatic environment in an asymmetric fashion by simply changing the bias polarity. With this method, we reliably and reproducibly achieve rectification ratios in excess of 200 at voltages as low as 370 mV using a symmetric oligomer of thiophene-1,1-dioxide. By taking advantage of the changes in the junction environment induced by the presence of an ionic solution, this method provides a general route for tuning nonlinear nanoscale device phenomena, which could potentially be applied in systems beyond single-molecule junctions.

  15. Single-molecule diodes with high rectification ratios through environmental control.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Adak, Olgun; Dell, Emma J; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Taylor, Jeffrey C; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Campos, Luis M; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-06-01

    Molecular electronics aims to miniaturize electronic devices by using subnanometre-scale active components. A single-molecule diode, a circuit element that directs current flow, was first proposed more than 40 years ago and consisted of an asymmetric molecule comprising a donor-bridge-acceptor architecture to mimic a semiconductor p-n junction. Several single-molecule diodes have since been realized in junctions featuring asymmetric molecular backbones, molecule-electrode linkers or electrode materials. Despite these advances, molecular diodes have had limited potential for applications due to their low conductance, low rectification ratios, extreme sensitivity to the junction structure and high operating voltages. Here, we demonstrate a powerful approach to induce current rectification in symmetric single-molecule junctions using two electrodes of the same metal, but breaking symmetry by exposing considerably different electrode areas to an ionic solution. This allows us to control the junction's electrostatic environment in an asymmetric fashion by simply changing the bias polarity. With this method, we reliably and reproducibly achieve rectification ratios in excess of 200 at voltages as low as 370 mV using a symmetric oligomer of thiophene-1,1-dioxide. By taking advantage of the changes in the junction environment induced by the presence of an ionic solution, this method provides a general route for tuning nonlinear nanoscale device phenomena, which could potentially be applied in systems beyond single-molecule junctions. PMID:26005998

  16. Magnetic anisotropy and high-spin effects in single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyazin, Alexander; van den Berg, Johan; Osorio, Edgar; Konstantinidis, Nikos; Leijnse, Martin; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea; Wegewijs, Maarten; van der Zant, Herre

    2011-03-01

    Fabrication of single-molecule transistors where electron transport occurs through an individual molecule has become possible due to the recent progress in molecular electronics. Three-terminal configuration allows charging molecules and performing transport spectroscopy in multiple redox states. Single-molecule magnets combining large spin with uniaxial anisotropy are of special interest as appealing candidates for high density memory applications and quantum information processing. We study single-molecule magnets Fe 4 . Three-terminal junctions are fabricated using electromigration of gold nanowires followed by a self-breaking. High-spin Kondo effect and inelastic cotunneling excitations show up in transport measurements. Several excitations feature the energy close to the energy of zero-field splitting (ZFS) of a ground spin multiplet in bulk. This splitting is caused by the anisotropy and is a hallmark of single-molecule magnets. We observe nonlinear Zeeman effect due to a misalignment of an anisotropy axis and a magnetic field direction. The ZFS energy is increased in oxidized and reduced states of the molecule indicating enhancement of the anisotropy in these states.

  17. Monitoring Single-Molecule Protein Dynamics with a Carbon Nanotube Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Philip G.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. Single-walled carbon nanotubes press this concept further by not just detecting molecules but also monitoring their dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. With all three enzymes, single molecules tethered to nanotube transistors were electronically monitored for 10 or more minutes, allowing us to directly observe a range of activity including rare transitions to chemically inactive and hyperactive conformations. The high bandwidth of the nanotube transistors further allow every individual chemical event to be clearly resolved, providing excellent statistics from tens of thousands of turnovers by a single enzyme. Initial success with three different enzymes indicates the generality and attractiveness of the nanotube devices as a new tool to complement other single-molecule techniques. Research on transduction mechanisms provides the design rules necessary to further generalize this architecture and apply it to other proteins. The purposeful incorporation of just one amino acid is sufficient to fabricate effective, single molecule sensors from a wide range of enzymes or proteins.

  18. Redox-Dependent Franck-Condon Blockade and Avalanche Transport in a Graphene-Fullerene Single-Molecule Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chit Siong; Sadeghi, Hatef; Rogers, Gregory; Sangtarash, Sara; Dallas, Panagiotis; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Warner, Jamie; Lambert, Colin J; Briggs, G Andrew D; Mol, Jan A

    2016-01-13

    We report transport measurements on a graphene-fullerene single-molecule transistor. The device architecture where a functionalized C60 binds to graphene nanoelectrodes results in strong electron-vibron coupling and weak vibron relaxation. Using a combined approach of transport spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations, we demonstrate center-of-mass oscillations, redox-dependent Franck-Condon blockade, and a transport regime characterized by avalanche tunnelling in a single-molecule transistor. PMID:26633125

  19. Blinking photoluminescence properties of single TiO2 nanodiscs: interfacial electron transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ki-Seok; Oh, Seung-Do; Suh, Yung Doug; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Yoon, Minjoong

    2009-01-21

    Blinking photoluminescence was observed in single TiO2 nanodiscs (NDs) by using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM)-coupled steady-state and ps-time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic system, while it was not significantly observed for TiO2 quantum dots (QDs). Analysis of the PL blinking time trajectories revealed single-exponential kinetics with the average lifetimes of on-state (approximately 286 ms) and off-state (approximately 58 ms), implying the existence of inherent surface-trap sites which can be filled by photogenerated electron or hole. The PL spectra of single TiO2 NDs exhibited broad surface emissions with four decay times, which may be due to diffusion of the energies of electron or hole trap states related to surface structural changes by modification of TiO2 QDs. These results and the surface structural analysis (IR and XPS) suggests a simple model for the PL blinking of single TiO2 NDs that is based on repetitive interfacial electron transfer to the inherent surface trap sites (4Ti4+-OH) with Auger-assisted hole trapping in the multiple surface states as modified by the diffusive coordinate model and the surface-trap-filling model. Based on this blinking mechanism and kinetics, the rates of the interfacial electron transfer and the back electron transfer in TiO2 NDs were determined to be 18 ns and 58 ms, respectively, which are slow enough to keep the polarization of e-h pairs at the surface for efficient photocatalysis and photovoltaic activities. The present methodology and results may be applicable to obtain surface exciton dynamics of various photoelectronic semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:19283271

  20. Light Harvesting in Microscale Metal-Organic Frameworks by Energy Migration and Interfacial Electron Transfer Quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Caleb A.; Liu, Demin; Ma, Liqing; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Lin, Wenbin

    2011-08-24

    Microscale metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized from photoactive Ru(II)-bpy building blocks with strong visible light absorption and long-lived triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer (³MLCT) excited states. These MOFs underwent efficient luminescence quenching in the presence of either oxidative or reductive quenchers. Up to 98% emission quenching was achieved with either an oxidative quencher (1,4-benzoquinone) or a reductive quencher (N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine), as a result of rapid energy migration over several hundred nanometers followed by efficient electron transfer quenching at the MOF/solution interface. The photoactive MOFs act as an excellent light-harvesting system by combining intraframework energy migration and interfacial electron transfer quenching.

  1. Single-molecule designs for electric switches and rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Kornilovitch, Pavel; Bratkovsky, Alexander; Williams, Stanley

    2003-12-01

    A design for molecular rectifiers is proposed. Current rectification is based on the spatial asymmetry of a molecule and requires only one resonant conducting molecular orbital. Rectification is caused by asymmetric coupling of the orbital to the electrodes, which results in asymmetric movement of the two Fermi levels with respect to the orbital under external bias. Results from numerical studies of the family of suggested molecular rectifiers, HS-(CH(2))(n)-C(6)H(4)(CH(2))(m)SH, are presented. Current rectification ratios in excess of 100 are achievable for n = 2 and m > 6. A class of bistable stator-rotor molecules is proposed. The stationary part connects the two electrodes and facilitates electron transport between them. The rotary part, which has a large dipole moment, is attached to an atom of the stator via a single sigma bond. Electrostatic bonds formed between the oxygen atom of the rotor and hydrogen atoms of the stator make the symmetric orientation of the dipole unstable. The rotor has two potential minima with equal energy for rotation about the sigma bond. The dipole can be flipped between the two states by an external electric field. Both rotor-orientation states have asymmetric current-voltage characteristics that are the reverse of each other, so they are distinguishable electrically. Theoretical results on conformation, energy barriers, retention times, switching voltages, and current-voltage characteristics are presented for a particular stator-rotor molecule. Such molecules could be the base for single-molecule switches, reversible diodes, and other molecular electronic devices. PMID:14976019

  2. Towards physiological complexity with in vitro single-molecule biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Duzdevich, Daniel; Greene, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule biology has matured in recent years, driven to greater sophistication by the development of increasingly advanced experimental techniques. A progressive appreciation for its unique strengths is attracting research that spans an exceptionally broad swath of physiological phenomena—from the function of nucleosomes to protein diffusion in the cell membrane. Newfound enthusiasm notwithstanding, the single-molecule approach is limited to an intrinsically defined set of biological questions; such limitation applies to all experimental approaches, and an explicit statement of the boundaries delineating each set offers a guide to most fruitfully orienting in vitro single-molecule research in the future. Here, we briefly describe a simple conceptual framework to categorize how submolecular, molecular and intracellular processes are studied. We highlight the domain of single-molecule biology in this scheme, with an emphasis on its ability to probe various forms of heterogeneity inherent to populations of discrete biological macromolecules. We then give a general overview of our high-throughput DNA curtain methodology for studying protein–nucleic acid interactions, and by contextualizing it within this framework, we explore what might be the most enticing avenues of future research. We anticipate that a focus on single-molecule biology's unique strengths will suggest a new generation of experiments with greater complexity and more immediately translatable physiological relevance. PMID:23267187

  3. Massively Parallel Single-Molecule Manipulation Using Centrifugal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, two issues that have impeded the widespread adoption of these techniques are equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. To meet these challenges, we have developed an approach that enables massively parallel single- molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in the centrifuge force microscope, an instrument in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force- field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high- throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Currently, we are taking steps to integrate high-resolution detection, fluorescence, temperature control and a greater dynamic range in force. With significant benefits in efficiency, cost, simplicity, and versatility, single-molecule centrifugation has the potential to expand single-molecule experimentation to a wider range of researchers and experimental systems.

  4. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, S. R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  5. Observing single-molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emory, Steven R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scatters (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of bread SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm-1 and 1340 cm-1 observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurement of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  6. Inelastic transport and low-bias rectification in a single-molecule diode.

    PubMed

    Hihath, Joshua; Bruot, Christopher; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Lee, Youngu; Yu, Luping; Tao, Nongjian

    2011-10-25

    Designing, controlling, and understanding rectification behavior in molecular-scale devices has been a goal of the molecular electronics community for many years. Here we study the transport behavior of a single molecule diode, and its nonrectifying, symmetric counterpart at low temperatures, and at both low and high biases to help elucidate the electron-phonon interactions and transport mechanisms in the rectifying system. We find that the onset of current rectification occurs at low biases, indicating a significant change in the elastic transport pathway. However, the peaks in the inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectrum are antisymmetric about zero bias and show no significant changes in energy or intensity in the forward or reverse bias directions, indicating that despite the change in the elastic transmission probability there is little impact on the inelastic pathway. These results agree with first principles calculations performed to evaluate the IETS, which also allow us to identify which modes are active in the single molecule junction. PMID:21932824

  7. CHARGE TRANSFER. Efficient hot-electron transfer by a plasmon-induced interfacial charge-transfer transition.

    PubMed

    Wu, K; Chen, J; McBride, J R; Lian, T

    2015-08-01

    Plasmon-induced hot-electron transfer from metal nanostructures is a potential new paradigm for solar energy conversion; however, the reported efficiencies of devices based on this concept are often low because of the loss of hot electrons via ultrafast electron-electron scattering. We propose a pathway, called the plasmon-induced interfacial charge-transfer transition (PICTT), that enables the decay of a plasmon by directly exciting an electron from the metal to a strongly coupled acceptor. We demonstrated this concept in cadmium selenide nanorods with gold tips, in which the gold plasmon was strongly damped by cadmium selenide through interfacial electron transfer. The quantum efficiency of the PICTT process was high (>24%), independent of excitation photon energy over a ~1-electron volt range, and dependent on the excitation polarization. PMID:26250682

  8. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  9. The importance of surfaces in single-molecule bioscience

    PubMed Central

    Visnapuu, Mari-Liis; Duzdevich, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed an explosion of new techniques that can be used to probe the dynamic behavior of individual biological molecules, leading to discoveries that would not have been possible with more traditional biochemical methods. A common feature among these single-molecule approaches is the need for the biological molecules to be anchored to a solid support surface. This must be done under conditions that minimize nonspecific adsorption without compromising the biological integrity of the sample. In this review we highlight why surface attachments are a critical aspect of many single-molecule studies and we discuss current methods for anchoring biomolecules. Finally, we provide a detailed description of a new method developed by our laboratory for anchoring and organizing hundreds of individual DNA molecules on a surface, allowing “high-throughput” studies of protein–DNA interactions at the single-molecule level. PMID:18414737

  10. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  11. Single-molecule junctions with epitaxial graphene nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Konrad; Coto, Pedro B; Leitherer, Susanne; Molina-Ontoria, Agustín; Martín, Nazario; Thoss, Michael; Weber, Heiko B

    2015-05-13

    On the way to ultraflat single-molecule junctions with transparent electrodes, we present a fabrication scheme based on epitaxial graphene nanoelectrodes. As a suitable molecule, we identified a molecular wire with fullerene anchor groups. With these two components, stable electrical characteristics could be recorded. Electrical measurements show that single-molecule junctions with graphene and with gold electrodes display a striking agreement. This motivated a hypothesis that the differential conductance spectra are rather insensitive to the electrode material. It is further corroborated by the assignment of asymmetries and spectral features to internal molecular degrees of freedom. The demonstrated open-access graphene electrodes and the electrode-insensitive molecules provide a model system that will allow for a thorough investigation of an individual single-molecule contact with additional probes. PMID:25923590

  12. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Henrry M; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar; Gluyas, Josef B G; Hartl, František; Higgins, Simon J; Leary, Edmund; Low, Paul J; Martín, Santiago; Nichols, Richard J; Tory, Joanne; Ulstrup, Jens; Vezzoli, Andrea; Milan, David C; Zeng, Qiang

    2015-11-18

    Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids. These data are rationalized in terms of a two-step electrochemical model for charge transport across the redox bridge. In this model the gate coupling in the ionic liquid is found to be fully effective with a modeled gate coupling parameter, ?, of unity. This compares to a much lower gate coupling parameter of 0.2 for the equivalent aqueous gating system. This study shows that ionic liquids are far more effective media for gating the conductance of single molecules than either solid-state three-terminal platforms created using nanolithography, or aqueous media. PMID:26488257

  13. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Michalet, X; Siegmund, O H W; Vallerga, J V; Jelinsky, P; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S

    2007-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  14. Open-frame system for single-molecule microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Adriel; Leith, Jason S; Henkin, Gil; McFaul, Christopher M J; Tarling, Matthew; Talbot, Richard; Berard, Daniel; Michaud, Francois; Scott, Shane; Leslie, Sabrina R

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and construction of a versatile, open frame inverted microscope system for wide-field fluorescence and single molecule imaging. The microscope chassis and modular design allow for customization, expansion, and experimental flexibility. We present two components which are included with the microscope which extend its basic capabilities and together create a powerful microscopy system: A Convex Lens-induced Confinement device provides the system with single-molecule imaging capabilities, and a two-color imaging system provides the option of imaging multiple molecular species simultaneously. The flexibility of the open-framed chassis combined with accessible single-molecule, multi-species imaging technology supports a wide range of new measurements in the health, nanotechnology, and materials science research sectors. PMID:25832232

  15. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Making connections--strategies for single molecule fluorescence biophysics.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Dina; Werner, Finn; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy carried out on the single molecule level are elegant methods to decipher complex biological systems; it can provide a wealth of information that frequently is obscured in the averaging of ensemble measurements. Fluorescence can be used to localise a molecule, study its binding with interaction partners and ligands, or to follow conformational changes in large multicomponent systems. Efficient labelling of proteins and nucleic acids is very important for any fluorescence method, and equally the development of novel fluorophores has been crucial in making biomolecules amenable to single molecule fluorescence methods. In this paper we review novel coupling strategies that permit site-specific and efficient labelling of proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss progressive single molecule approaches that allow the detection of individual molecules and biomolecular complexes even directly isolated from cellular extracts at much higher and much lower concentrations than has been possible so far. PMID:23769868

  17. Single-Molecule Dynamics and Mechanisms of Metalloregulators and Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Keller, Aaron M.; Joshi, Chandra P.; Martell, Danya J.; Andoy, Nesha May; Benítez, Jaime J.; Chen, Tai-Yen; Santiago, Ace George; Yang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how cells regulate and transport metal ions is an important goal in the field of bioinorganic chemistry, a frontier research area that resides at the interfaces of chemistry and biology. This Current Topics article reviews recent advances from the authors' group in using single-molecule fluorescence imaging techniques to identify the mechanisms of metal homeostatic proteins, including metalloregulators and metallochaperones. It emphasizes the novel mechanistic insights into how dynamic protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions offer efficient pathways for MerR-family metalloregulators and copper chaperones to fulfill their functions. The article also summarizes other related single-molecule studies of bioinorganic systems, and gives an outlook toward single-molecule imaging of metalloprotein functions in living cells. PMID:24053279

  18. Application of Degenerately Doped Metal Oxides in the Study of Photoinduced Interfacial Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Farnum, Byron H; Morseth, Zachary A; Brennaman, M Kyle; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-06-18

    Degenerately doped In2O3:Sn semiconductor nanoparticles (nanoITO) have been used to study the photoinduced interfacial electron-transfer reactivity of surface-bound [Ru(II)(bpy)2(4,4'-(PO3H2)2-bpy)](2+) (RuP(2+)) molecules as a function of driving force over a range of 1.8 eV. The metallic properties of the ITO nanoparticles, present within an interconnected mesoporous film, allowed for the driving force to be tuned by controlling their Fermi level with an external bias while their optical transparency allowed for transient absorption spectroscopy to be used to monitor electron-transfer kinetics. Photoinduced electron transfer from excited-state -RuP(2+*) molecules to nanoITO was found to be dependent on applied bias and competitive with nonradiative energy transfer to nanoITO. Back electron transfer from nanoITO to oxidized -RuP(3+) was also dependent on the applied bias but without complication from inter- or intraparticle electron diffusion in the oxide nanoparticles. Analysis of the electron injection kinetics as a function of driving force using Marcus-Gerischer theory resulted in an experimental estimate of the reorganization energy for the excited-state -RuP(3+/2+*) redox couple of ?* = 0.83 eV and an electronic coupling matrix element, arising from electronic wave function overlap between the donor orbital in the molecule and the acceptor orbital(s) in the nanoITO electrode, of Hab = 20-45 cm(-1). Similar analysis of the back electron-transfer kinetics yielded ? = 0.56 eV for the ground-state -RuP(3+/2+) redox couple and Hab = 2-4 cm(-1). The use of these wide band gap, degenerately doped materials provides a unique experimental approach for investigating single-site electron transfer at the surface of oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25668488

  19. Methods of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.; Fromm, David P.

    2003-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy at the ultimate limit of a single molecule has grown over the past dozen years into a powerful technique for exploring the individual nanoscale behavior of molecules in complex local environments. Observing a single molecule removes the usual ensemble average, allowing the exploration of hidden heterogeneity in complex condensed phases as well as direct observation of dynamical state changes arising from photophysics and photochemistry, without synchronization. This article reviews the experimental techniques of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with emphasis on studies at room temperature where the same single molecule is studied for an extended period. Key to successful single-molecule detection is the need to optimize signal-to-noise ratio, and the physical parameters affecting both signal and noise are described in detail. Four successful microscopic methods including the wide-field techniques of epifluorescence and total internal reflection, as well as confocal and near-field optical scanning microscopies are described. In order to extract the maximum amount of information from an experiment, a wide array of properties of the emission can be recorded, such as polarization, spectrum, degree of energy transfer, and spatial position. Whatever variable is measured, the time dependence of the parameter can yield information about excited state lifetimes, photochemistry, local environmental fluctuations, enzymatic activity, quantum optics, and many other dynamical effects. Due to the breadth of applications now appearing, single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy may be viewed as useful new tools for the study of dynamics in complex systems, especially where ensemble averaging or lack of synchronization may obscure the details of the process under study.

  20. Single-Molecule Stochastic Analysis of Channeling Enzyme Tryptophan Synthase.

    PubMed

    Loutchko, Dimitri; Gonze, Didier; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-03-10

    The channeling enzyme tryptophan synthase provides a paradigmatic example of a chemical nanomachine. It possesses two active centers and, as a single molecule, catalyzes 13 different reaction steps with a complex pattern of allosteric regulation and with an intermediate product channeled from one active center to another. Here, the first single-molecule stochastic model of the enzyme is proposed and analyzed. All its transition rate constants were deduced from the experimental data available, and no fitting parameters were thus employed. Numerical simulations reveal strong correlations in the states of the active centers and the emergent synchronization of intramolecular processes in tryptophan synthase. PMID:26863529

  1. Extracting conformational information from single molecule photon statistics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yonggang; Yang, Chuanlu; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-02-14

    In this paper, we describe the approach of resonant trajectories of photon emission (Traj〈N〉 and TrajQ) in the conformational coordinate X and external field frequency ωL space to extract the conformational information of single molecule. The Smoluchowski equation is employed to describe the conformational dynamics of the single molecule in complex environments. This approach is applied to single Thioflavin T (ThT) molecule, and our results are in excellent agreement with the results of ab initio simulations. PMID:26874487

  2. Single Molecule Switches and Molecular Self-Assembly: Low Temperature STM Investigations and Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Violeta

    2006-08-01

    This dissertation is devoted to single molecule investigations and manipulations of two porphyrin-based molecules, chlorophyll-a and Co-popphyrin. The molecules are absorbed on metallic substrates and studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the molecules are investigated in detail with atomic level precision. Chlorophyll-a is the key ingredient in photosynthesis processes while Co-porphyrin is a magnetic molecule that represents the recent emerging field of molecular spintronics. Using the scanning tunneling microscope tip and the substrate as electrodes, and the molecules as active ingredients, single molecule switches made of these two molecules are demonstrated. The first switch, a multiple and reversible mechanical switch, is realized by using chlorophyll-a where the energy transfer of a single tunneling electron is used to rotate a C-C bond of the molecule's tail on a Au(111) surface. Here, the det

  3. Theory of femtosecond coherent double-pump single-molecule spectroscopy: Application to light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lipeng; Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang; Zhao, Yang

    2015-04-28

    We develop a first principles theoretical description of femtosecond double-pump single-molecule signals of molecular aggregates. We incorporate all singly excited electronic states and vibrational modes with significant exciton-phonon coupling into a system Hamiltonian and treat the ensuing system dynamics within the Davydov D1 Ansatz. The remaining intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath and their effect is accounted for through lineshape functions. We apply our theory to simulate single-molecule signals of the light harvesting complex II. The calculated signals exhibit pronounced oscillations of mixed electron-vibrational (vibronic) origin. Their periods decrease with decreasing exciton-phonon coupling. PMID:25933751

  4. Theory of femtosecond coherent double-pump single-molecule spectroscopy: Application to light harvesting complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lipeng; Zhao, Yang; Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-04-28

    We develop a first principles theoretical description of femtosecond double-pump single-molecule signals of molecular aggregates. We incorporate all singly excited electronic states and vibrational modes with significant exciton-phonon coupling into a system Hamiltonian and treat the ensuing system dynamics within the Davydov D{sub 1} Ansatz. The remaining intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath and their effect is accounted for through lineshape functions. We apply our theory to simulate single-molecule signals of the light harvesting complex II. The calculated signals exhibit pronounced oscillations of mixed electron-vibrational (vibronic) origin. Their periods decrease with decreasing exciton-phonon coupling.

  5. Magnetic behaviour of TbPc2 single-molecule magnets chemically grafted on silicon surface

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Matteo; Bertani, Federico; Tudisco, Cristina; Malavolti, Luigi; Poggini, Lorenzo; Misztal, Kasjan; Menozzi, Daniela; Motta, Alessandro; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe; Sainctavit, Philippe; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Dalcanale, Enrico; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are among the most promising molecular systems for the development of novel molecular electronics based on the spin transport. Going beyond the investigations focused on physisorbed SMMs, in this work the robust grafting of Terbium(III) bis(phthalocyaninato) complexes to silicon surface from a diluted solution is achieved by rational chemical design yielding the formation of a partially oriented monolayer on the conducting substrate. Here, by exploiting the surface sensitivity of X-ray circular magnetic dichroism we evidence an enhancement of the magnetic bistability of this single-molecule magnet, in contrast to the dramatic reduction of the magnetic hysteresis that characterises monolayer deposits evaporated on noble and ferromagnetic metals. Photoelectron spectroscopy investigations and density functional theory analysis suggest a non-innocent role played by the silicon substrate, evidencing the potentiality of this approach for robust integration of bistable magnetic molecules in electronic devices. PMID:25109254

  6. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  7. Conductance and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Single Molecules Utilizing Dimers of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadosh, Tali

    In the past few years, the field of molecular electronics and in particular, the development of new techniques for contacting and measuring single molecules, has emerged, providing new insights into this field. The relatively small size of a molecule, typically of the order of 1 nm, requires innovative approaches in order to develop functioning single-molecule devices. The experimental methods currently used for single-molecule measurements provide little control over the number of molecules bridging the gap or the local electronic properties of the metal-molecule contact. In this thesis, a new approach for contacting a single molecule is presented that provides better control of these parameters. Our method is based on synthesizing a dimer structure consisting of two gold colloids connected by a thiol group to either side of the molecule. This structure is then positioned between two electrodes by electrostatic trapping and, thus, the conductance of the molecule can be measured. The fundamental questions addressed by the field of molecular electronics are as follows: "what is the conductivity of a junction containing an individual molecule and how is it affected by the molecule's specific structure?" We were able to shed some light on these questions by studying the electrical conduction through three short organic molecules that differ by their degree of conjugation. We will consider here a fully conjugated molecule, 4,4'-biphenyldithiol (BPD), Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether (BPE), in which the conjugation is broken at the center by an oxygen atom, and 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT), where the conjugation is broken near the contacts by a methylene group. We found that the presence of localizing groups such as the oxygen in the BPE and the methylene groups in the BDMT suppresses the electrical conduction dramatically, relative to the conjugated molecule, BPD. A unique feature of the BPD molecule is the appearance of reproducible, pronounced peaks in its conductance at certain voltage values. The position of peaks in the spectrum was affected by the electrostatic environment, resulting in random gating. In view of the above developments, my thesis focuses on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement of single molecules. Single-molecule spectroscopy is an emerging field that provides detailed information on molecular response, which is unavailable in measurements performed on an assembly of molecules. The obvious problem, however, in implementing most spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, is the very weak signal obtained from a single molecule. Interestingly, the Raman signal from a molecule has been shown to increase dramatically when the molecule is adsorbed to metal particles of certain types having sub-wavelength dimensions [1, 2]. This enhancement technique, known as surface-enhanced Raman scattering, can increase the Raman signal by as much as 14--15 orders of magnitude, which has been shown to be sufficient for performing single-molecule spectroscopy successfully. Dimer structures are not only attractive for conductance measurements on single-molecule devices; they could also serve as an efficient antenna system that greatly enhances the electromagnetic field at the center of the dimer, where the molecule resides. Dimers provide a basic experimental model for studying the fundamentals of the SERS enhancement, which are not well understood. Dimers have the advantage of possessing a small gap (on the order of a nanometer) that is beyond the limit of today's sophisticated lithography techniques. By utilizing the dimer structures that contain a Rhodamine 123 molecule, we were able to resolve some fundamental questions regarding the SERS enhancement mechanism. The issue of how the nanoparticles' surface plasmon properties affects the SERS enhancement was addressed both experimentally and by calculations. Moreover, it was predicted by our calculations that when the dimers consist of large nanoparticles, a non-uniform enhancement of the different molecular modes of Rhodamine 123 should o

  8. Single-molecule photophysics, from cryogenic to ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Kozankiewicz, Boles?aw; Orrit, Michel

    2014-02-21

    We review recent progress in characterizing and understanding the photophysics of single molecules in condensed matter, mostly at cryogenic temperatures. We discuss the central role of the triplet state in limiting the number of useful host-guest systems, notably a new channel, intermolecular intersystem crossing. Another important limitation to the use of single molecules is their photo-reactivity, leading to blinking of the fluorescence signal, and eventually to its loss by photo-bleaching. These processes are at the heart of modern super-resolution schemes. We then examine some of the new host-guest systems recently discovered following these general principles, and the mechanisms of spectral diffusion and dephasing that they have revealed. When charges are injected into organic conductors, they get trapped and influence single molecules via the local fields they create in the material, and via their coupling to localized vibrations. Understanding these processes is necessary for better control of spectral diffusion and dephasing of single molecules. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this fascinating field. PMID:24190080

  9. Single Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy on Planar Supported Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Axmann, Markus; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Huppa, Johannes B.

    2015-01-01

    In the course of a single decade single molecule microscopy has changed from being a secluded domain shared merely by physicists with a strong background in optics and laser physics to a discipline that is now enjoying vivid attention by life-scientists of all venues 1. This is because single molecule imaging has the unique potential to reveal protein behavior in situ in living cells and uncover cellular organization with unprecedented resolution below the diffraction limit of visible light 2. Glass-supported planar lipid bilayers (SLBs) are a powerful tool to bring cells otherwise growing in suspension in close enough proximity to the glass slide so that they can be readily imaged in noise-reduced Total Internal Reflection illumination mode 3,4. They are very useful to study the protein dynamics in plasma membrane-associated events as diverse as cell-cell contact formation, endocytosis, exocytosis and immune recognition. Simple procedures are presented how to generate highly mobile protein-functionalized SLBs in a reproducible manner, how to determine protein mobility within and how to measure protein densities with the use of single molecule detection. It is shown how to construct a cost-efficient single molecule microscopy system with TIRF illumination capabilities and how to operate it in the experiment. PMID:26555335

  10. Statistics and Related Topics in Single-Molecule Biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hong; Kou, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Since the universal acceptance of atoms and molecules as the fundamental constituents of matter in the early twentieth century, molecular physics, chemistry and molecular biology have all experienced major theoretical breakthroughs. To be able to actually “see” biological macromolecules, one at a time in action, one has to wait until the 1970s. Since then the field of single-molecule biophysics has witnessed extensive growth both in experiments and theory. A distinct feature of single-molecule biophysics is that the motions and interactions of molecules and the transformation of molecular species are necessarily described in the language of stochastic processes, whether one investigates equilibrium or nonequilibrium living behavior. For laboratory measurements following a biological process, if it is sampled over time on individual participating molecules, then the analysis of experimental data naturally calls for the inference of stochastic processes. The theoretical and experimental developments of single-molecule biophysics thus present interesting questions and unique opportunity for applied statisticians and probabilists. In this article, we review some important statistical developments in connection to single-molecule biophysics, emphasizing the application of stochastic-process theory and the statistical questions arising from modeling and analyzing experimental data. PMID:25009825

  11. Single molecule imaging of NGF axonal transport in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Osakada, Yasuko; Vrljic, Marija; Chen, Liang; Mudrakola, Harsha V.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling begins at the nerve terminal, where it binds and activates membrane receptors and subsequently carries the cell-survival signal to the cell body through the axon. A recent study revealed that the majority of endosomes contain a single NGF molecule, which makes single molecule imaging an essential tool for NGF studies. Despite being an increasingly popular technique, single molecule imaging in live cells is often limited by background fluorescence. Here, we employed a microfluidic culture platform to achieve background reduction for single molecule imaging in live neurons. Microfluidic devices guide the growth of neurons and allow separately-controlled microenvironment for cell bodies or axon termini. Designs of microfluidic devices were optimized and a three-compartment device successfully achieved direct observation of axonal transport of single NGF when quantum dot labeled NGF (Qdot-NGF) was applied only to the distal-axon compartment while imaging was carried out exclusively in the cell-body compartment. Qdot-NGF was shown to move exclusively toward the cell body with a characteristic stop-and-go pattern of movements. Measurements at various temperatures show that the rate of NGF retrograde transport decreased exponentially over the range of 36–14°C. A 10°C decrease in temperature resulted in a threefold decrease in the rate of NGF retrograde transport. Our successful measurements of NGF transport suggest that the microfluidic device can serve as a unique platform for single molecule imaging of molecular processes in neurons. PMID:20623041

  12. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  13. The properties and applications of single-molecule DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John F; Milos, Patrice M

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule sequencing enables DNA or RNA to be sequenced directly from biological samples, making it well-suited for diagnostic and clinical applications. Here we review the properties and applications of this rapidly evolving and promising technology. PMID:21349208

  14. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Igor D.; Kamping, Wiecher; van den Hout, Michiel; Candelli, Andrea; Hage, Susanne; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNA-enzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Such a construct is typically subject to several criteria. First, single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques often require an RNA construct that is longer than the RNA molecules used for bulk biochemical studies. Next, the incorporation of modified nucleotides into the RNA construct is required for its surface immobilization. In addition, RNA constructs for single-molecule studies are commonly assembled from different single-stranded RNA molecules, demanding good control of hybridization or ligation. Finally, precautions to prevent RNase- and divalent cation-dependent RNA digestion must be taken. The rather limited selection of molecular biology tools adapted to the manipulation of RNA molecules, as well as the sensitivity of RNA to degradation, make RNA construct preparation a challenging task. We briefly illustrate the types of single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments that can be performed on RNA, and then present an overview of the toolkit of molecular biology techniques at one's disposal for the assembly of such RNA constructs. Within this context, we evaluate the molecular biology protocols in terms of their effectiveness in producing long and stable RNA constructs. PMID:17905817

  15. Effects of fixed pattern noise on single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Long, F; Zeng, S Q; Huang, Z L

    2014-10-21

    The newly developed scientific complementary metal oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) cameras are capable of realizing fast single molecule localization microscopy without sacrificing field-of-view, benefiting from their readout speed which is significantly higher than that of conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras. However, the poor image uniformity (suffered from fixed pattern noise, FPN) is a major obstruction for widespread use of sCMOS cameras in single molecule localization microscopy. Here we present a quantitative investigation on the effects of FPN on single molecule localization microscopy via localization precision and localization bias. We found that FPN leads to almost no effect on localization precision, but introduces a certain amount of localization bias. However, for a commercial Hamamatsu Flash 4.0 sCMOS camera, such localization bias is usually <2 nm and thus can be neglected for most localization microscopy experiments. This study addresses the FPN concern which worries researchers, and thus will promote the application of sCMOS cameras in single molecule localization microscopy. PMID:25189193

  16. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  17. Single molecule techniques in DNA repair: a primer.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig D; Simons, Michelle; Mackenzie, Cassidy E; Van Houten, Bennett; Kad, Neil M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful new approach has become much more widespread and offers insights into aspects of DNA repair unattainable with billions of molecules. Single molecule techniques can be used to image, manipulate or characterize the action of a single repair protein on a single strand of DNA. This allows search mechanisms to be probed, and the effects of force to be understood. These physical aspects can dominate a biochemical reaction, where at the ensemble level their nuances are obscured. In this paper we discuss some of the many technical advances that permit study at the single molecule level. We focus on DNA repair to which these techniques are actively being applied. DNA repair is also a process that encompasses so much of what single molecule studies benefit--searching for targets, complex formation, sequential biochemical reactions and substrate hand-off to name just a few. We discuss how single molecule biophysics is poised to transform our understanding of biological systems, in particular DNA repair. PMID:24819596

  18. Interfacial ultramorphology evaluation of resin luting cements to dentin: a correlative scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; André, Carolina Bosso; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the dentin-resin cements interfacial ultramorphologies using two different methods: scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four commercial products were evaluated: two conventional cementing system (RelyX ARC/Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE and Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond, Kuraray) and two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray). Prepolymerized resin disks (Sinfony, 3M ESPE) were cemented on oclusal dentin surfaces of 24 third human molars, simulating the indirect restorations. After 24 h, teeth were sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs and processed for microscopy analyses (SEM or TEM/ n = 3). Qualitative characterization of dentin-resin cement interface was performed. Hybrid layer formation with long and dense resin tags was observed only for RelyX ARC cementing system. Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond system revealed few and short resin tags formation, whereas no hybridization and resin tags were detected for self-adhesive resin cements. Some interfacial regions exhibited that the self-adhesive resin cements were not bonded to dentin, presenting bubbles or voids at the interfaces. In conclusion, TEM and SEM bonding interface analyses showed ultramorphological variations among resin cements, which are directly related to dental bonding strategies used for each resin cement tested. PMID:24030836

  19. The optics inside an automated single molecule array analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuigan, William; Fournier, David R.; Watson, Gary W.; Walling, Les; Gigante, Bill; Duffy, David C.; Rissin, David M.; Kan, Cheuk W.; Meyer, Raymond E.; Piech, Tomasz; Fishburn, Matthew W.

    2014-02-01

    Quanterix and Stratec Biomedical have developed an instrument that enables the automated measurement of multiple proteins at concentration ~1000 times lower than existing immunoassays. The instrument is based on Quanterix's proprietary Single Molecule Array technology (Simoa™ ) that facilitates the detection and quantification of biomarkers previously difficult to measure, thus opening up new applications in life science research and in-vitro diagnostics. Simoa is based on trapping individual beads in arrays of femtoliter-sized wells that, when imaged with sufficient resolution, allows for counting of single molecules associated with each bead. When used to capture and detect proteins, this approach is known as digital ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The platform developed is a merger of many science and engineering disciplines. This paper concentrates on the optical technologies that have enabled the development of a fully-automated single molecule analyzer. At the core of the system is a custom, wide field-of-view, fluorescence microscope that images arrays of microwells containing single molecules bound to magnetic beads. A consumable disc containing 24 microstructure arrays was developed previously in collaboration with Sony DADC. The system cadence requirements, array dimensions, and requirement to detect single molecules presented significant optical challenges. Specifically, the wide field-of-view needed to image the entire array resulted in the need for a custom objective lens. Additionally, cost considerations for the system required a custom solution that leveraged the image processing capabilities. This paper will discuss the design considerations and resultant optical architecture that has enabled the development of an automated digital ELISA platform.

  20. A multi-state single-molecule switch actuated by rotation of an encapsulated cluster within a fullerene cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tian; Zhao, Jin; Feng, Min; Popov, Alexey A.; Yang, Shangfeng; Dunsch, Lothar; Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate a single-molecule switch based on tunneling electron-driven rotation of a triangular Sc3N cluster within an icosahedral C80 fullerene cage among three pairs of enantiomorphic configurations. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of switching within single molecules and electronic structure theory identify the conformational isomers and their isomerization pathways. Bias-dependent action spectra and modeling identify the antisymmetric stretch vibration of Sc3N cluster to be the gateway for energy transfer from the tunneling electrons to the cluster rotation. Hierarchical switching of conductivity through the internal cluster motion among multiple stationary states while maintaining a constant shape, is advantageous for the integration of endohedral fullerene-based single-molecule memory and logic devices into parallel molecular computing architectures.

  1. A Multi-State Single-Molecule Switch Actuated by Rotation of an Encapsulated Cluster within a Fullerene Cage

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tian; Zhao, Jin; Feng, Min; Popov, Alexey A.; Yang, Shangfeng; Dunsch, Lothar; Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-11-12

    We demonstrate a single-molecule switch based on tunneling electron-driven rotation of a triangular Sc?N cluster within an icosahedral C 80 fullerene cage among three pairs of enantiomorphic configura-tions. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of switching within single molecules and electronic structure theory identify the conformational isomers and their isomerization pathways. Bias-dependent actionspectra and modeling identify the antisymmetric stretch vibration of Sc 3N cluster to be the gateway for energy transfer from the tunneling electrons to the cluster rotation. Hierarchical switching of conductivity through the internal cluster motion among multiple stationary states while maintaining a constant shape, is advantageous for the integration of endohedral fullerene-based single-molecule memory and logic devices into parallel molecular computing arc.

  2. Dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial photoinduced electron transfer processes of third generation photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christophe; Teuscher, Joël; Brauer, Jan C; Punzi, Angela; Marchioro, Arianna; Ghadiri, Elham; De Jonghe, Jelissa; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Banerji, Natalie; Moser, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) across molecular/bulk interfaces has gained attention only recently and is still poorly understood. These interfaces offer an excellent case study, pertinent to a variety of photovoltaic systems, photo- and electrochemistry, molecular electronics, analytical detection, photography, and quantum confinement devices. They play in particular a key role in the emerging fields of third-generation photovoltaic energy converters and artificial photosynthetic systems aimed at the production of solar fuels, creating a need for a better understanding and theoretical treatment of the dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial PET processes. We aim to achieve a fundamental understanding of these phenomena by designing experiments that can be used to test and alter modern theory and computational modeling. One example illustrating recent investigations into the details of the ultrafast processes that form the basis for photoinduced charge separation at a molecular/bulk interface relevant to dye-sensitized solar cells is briefly presented here: Kinetics of interfacial PET and charge recombination processes were measured by fs and ns transient spectroscopy in a heterogeneous donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system, where D is a Ru(II)(terpyridyl-PO3)(NCS)3 complex, B an oligo-p-phenylene bridge, and A nanocrystalline TiO2. The forward ET reaction was found to be faster than vibrational relaxation of the vibronic excited state of the donor. Instead, the back ET occurred on the micros time scale and involved fully thermalized species. The D-A distance dependence of the electron transfer rate was studied by varying the number of p-phenylene units contained in the bridge moiety. The remarkably low damping factor beta = 0.16 angstroms(-1) observed for the ultrafast charge injection from the dye excited state into the conduction band of TiO2 is attributed to the coupling of electron tunneling with nonequilibrium vibrations redistributed on the bridge, giving rise to polaronic transport of charges from the donor ligand to the acceptor solid oxide surface. PMID:22026184

  3. The enzyme mechanism of nitrite reductase studied at single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Sofya; Zauner, Gerhild; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Engelkamp, Hans; Hatzakis, Nikos; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Canters, Gerard W.

    2008-01-01

    A generic method is described for the fluorescence “readout” of the activity of single redox enzyme molecules based on Förster resonance energy transfer from a fluorescent label to the enzyme cofactor. The method is applied to the study of copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 immobilized on a glass surface. The parameters extracted from the single-molecule fluorescence time traces can be connected to and agree with the macroscopic ensemble averaged kinetic constants. The rates of the electron transfer from the type 1 to the type 2 center and back during turnover exhibit a distribution related to disorder in the catalytic site. The described approach opens the door to single-molecule mechanistic studies of a wide range of redox enzymes and the precise investigation of their internal workings. PMID:18303118

  4. Pushing single molecule techniques to microsecond resolution proves that T4 Lysozyme is a Brownian ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhterov, Maxim V.; Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Sims, Patrick C.; Iftikhar, Mariam; Gul, O. Tolga; Corso, Brad L.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2015-03-01

    Single-molecule techniques can monitor conformational dynamics of proteins, but such methods usually lack the resolution to directly observe conformational pathways or intermediate conformational states. We have recently described a single-molecule electronic technique that breaks this barrier. Using a 1 MHz-bandwidth carbon nanotube transistor, the transition pathways between open and closed conformations of T4 lysozyme have been recorded with a microsecond resolution. We directly resolve a smooth, continuous transition with an average duration of 37 microseconds. Unexpectedly, the mechanical closing and re-opening of the enzyme have identical distributions of transition durations, and the motion is independent of the enzyme catalyzing the substrate. These results illustrate the principle of microscopic reversibility applied to a Brownian ratchet, with lysozyme tracing a single pathway for closing and the reverse pathway for enzyme opening, regardless of its instantaneous catalytic productivity.

  5. Terahertz Field Enhancement and Photon-Assisted Tunneling in Single-Molecule Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Shibata, Kenji; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the electron transport in single-C60 -molecule transistors under the illumination of intense monochromatic terahertz (THz) radiation. By employing an antenna structure with a sub-nm-wide gap, we concentrate THz radiation beyond the diffraction limit and focus it onto a single molecule. Photon-assisted tunneling (PAT) in the single molecule transistors is observed in both the weak-coupling and Kondo regimes. The THz power dependence of the PAT conductance indicates that when the incident THz intensity is a few tens of mW, the THz field induced at the molecule exceeds 100 kV /cm , which is enhanced by a factor of ˜105 from the field in the free space.

  6. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  7. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  8. Monitoring patterned enzymatic polymerization on DNA origami at single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okholm, A. H.; Aslan, H.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.; Kjems, J.

    2015-06-01

    DNA origami has been used to orchestrate reactions with nano-precision using a variety of biomolecules. Here, the dynamics of albumin-assisted, localized single-molecule DNA polymerization by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase on a 2D DNA origami are monitored using AFM in liquid. Direct visualization of the surface activity revealed the mechanics of growth.DNA origami has been used to orchestrate reactions with nano-precision using a variety of biomolecules. Here, the dynamics of albumin-assisted, localized single-molecule DNA polymerization by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase on a 2D DNA origami are monitored using AFM in liquid. Direct visualization of the surface activity revealed the mechanics of growth. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01945a

  9. Diversity of Chemical Mechanisms in Thioredoxin Catalysis Revealed by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Li, Jingyuan; Kosuri, Pallav; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Wiita, Arun P.; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Chueca, Ana; Holmgren, Arne; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Becker, Katja; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Beckwith, Jon; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean P.; Gaucher, Eric; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins are oxido-reductase enzymes present in all organisms, catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins. By applying a calibrated force to a substrate disulfide, the chemical mechanisms of Trx catalysis can be examined in detail at the single molecule level. Here we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to explore the chemical evolution of Trx catalysis by probing the chemistry of eight different thioredoxin enzymes. While all Trxs show a characteristic Michaelis-Menten mechanism detected when the disulfide bond is stretched at low forces, two different chemical behaviors distinguish bacterial from eukaryotic-origin Trxs at high forces. Eukaryotic-origin Trxs reduce disulfide bonds through a single-electron transfer reaction (SET) whereas bacterial-origin Trxs exhibit both nucleophilic substitution (SN2) and SET reactions. A computational analysis of Trx structures identifies the evolution of the binding groove as an important factor controlling the chemistry of Trx catalysis. PMID:19597482

  10. Rectifications in organic single-molecule diodes alkanethiolate-terminated heterocyclics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wang, Tianxing; Wang, Guangtao; Fu, Zhaoming

    2016-02-01

    Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with the ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the rectifying behaviors of the organic single-molecule S(CH2)11-terminated with a variety of heterocyclics (i.e., BIPY, PHE, PHEPY, and PYR) coupled with two semi-infinite Au electrodes. Our quantum transport calculation results show that the BIPY and PHE nanojunctions show the high-efficiency rectifying effects. While, differently, the current-voltage (I-V) curves of PHEPY and PYR nanojunctions display the insulating and linear characters, respectively. The corresponding electronic transport mechanisms are analyzed in detail. Our calculation results demonstrate that these investigated organic single-molecule nanojunctions have the potential applications in rectifiers and molecular wires.

  11. Terahertz Field Enhancement and Photon-Assisted Tunneling in Single-Molecule Transistors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Shibata, Kenji; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-09-25

    We have investigated the electron transport in single-C_{60}-molecule transistors under the illumination of intense monochromatic terahertz (THz) radiation. By employing an antenna structure with a sub-nm-wide gap, we concentrate THz radiation beyond the diffraction limit and focus it onto a single molecule. Photon-assisted tunneling (PAT) in the single molecule transistors is observed in both the weak-coupling and Kondo regimes. The THz power dependence of the PAT conductance indicates that when the incident THz intensity is a few tens of mW, the THz field induced at the molecule exceeds 100? kV/cm, which is enhanced by a factor of ~10^{5} from the field in the free space. PMID:26451585

  12. Energy-Level Alignment for Single-Molecule Conductance of Extended Metal-Atom Chains.

    PubMed

    Ting, Ta-Cheng; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Huang, Min-Jie; Horng, Er-Chien; Lu, Hao-Cheng; Hsu, Chan-Hsiang; Jiang, Ching-Hong; Jin, Bih-Yaw; Peng, Shie-Ming; Chen, Chun-Hsien

    2015-12-21

    The use of single-molecule junctions for various functions constitutes a central goal of molecular electronics. The functional features and the efficiency of electron transport are dictated by the degree of energy-level alignment (ELA), that is, the offset potential between the electrode Fermi level and the frontier molecular orbitals. Examples manifesting ELA are rare owing to experimental challenges and the large energy barriers of typical model compounds. In this work, single-molecule junctions of organometallic compounds with five metal centers joined in a collinear fashion were analyzed. The single-molecule i-V scans could be conducted in a reliable manner, and the EFMO levels were electrochemically accessible. When the electrode Fermi level (EF ) is close to the frontier orbitals (EFMO ) of the bridging molecule, larger conductance was observed. The smaller |EF -EFMO | gap was also derived quantitatively, unambiguously confirming the ELA. The mechanism is described in terms of a two-level model involving co-tunneling and sequential tunneling processes. PMID:26546238

  13. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  14. Biophysical Variables Which Are Available from Single-Molecule Optical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2013-03-01

    Since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a condensed phase host in 1989, a wealth of new information has been obtained from time-dependent measurements and single-molecule probability distributions. When single-molecule imaging is combined with active control of the emitter concentration, enhanced spatial resolution well beyond the optical diffraction limit can be obtained for a wide array of biophysical structures in cells. Single-molecule emitters also provide precise and accurate 3D position as well as dipole moment orientation when combined with Fourier plane processing. Examples here include the implementation of a double-helix point spread function for 3D position information (Backlund, Lew et al. PNAS (2012)), and the creation of a quadrated pupil response to sense emission dipole orientations (Backer et al. submitted 2012). If high-resolution spatial information is not needed, a machine called the Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trap provides real-time suppression of Brownian motion for single molecules in solution for extended analysis of dynamical state changes (Wang et al. Acc. Chem. Res. (2012)). With proper design of reporter fluorophore, individual electron transfer events to a single Cu atom in a redox enzyme may be sensed under turnover conditions (Goldsmith et al. PNAS (2011)). Optical counting of fluorescent ATP nucleotides on a multisubunit enzyme provides measurement of ATP number distributions, which can be used to generate a new window into enzyme cooperativity devoid of ensemble averaging (Jiang et al PNAS (2011)). With advanced control system design of feedback to enable optimal trapping performance, the ABEL trap also allows direct, simultaneous measurement of three variables: brightness, excited state lifetime, and emission spectrum, for objects as small as individual ~1-2 nm sized fluorophores in solution (Wang et al. JPCB (in press 2013)). These examples illustrate some of the wide variety of physical variables which may now be measured for single molecules in a various condensed phase environments ranging from aqueous solutions to living cells. Work supported by NIGMS and DOE-BES

  15. Molecule-electrode bonding design for high single-molecule conductance.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kazumichi; Taniguchi, Masateru; Tsutsui, Makusu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-12-15

    We report the application of an intermolecular interaction design for organic conductor crystals with a high conductance to a molecule-electrode design for a high single-molecule conductance by using dithiol and diselenol terthiophenes. We found that dithiol and diselenol single-molecule junctions show the highest single-molecule conductance among single-molecule junctions with Au-S and Au-Se bonds, and that diselenol single-molecule junctions have a higher single-molecule conductance than dithiol ones. We demonstrate that replacing S atoms with Se atoms is a promising molecule-electrode bonding design for a high single-molecule conductance. PMID:21086990

  16. Interfacial electronic effects in functional biolayers integrated into organic field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Angione, Maria Daniela; Cotrone, Serafina; Magliulo, Maria; Mallardi, Antonia; Altamura, Davide; Giannini, Cinzia; Cioffi, Nicola; Sabbatini, Luigia; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Biosystems integration into an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) structure is achieved by spin coating phospholipid or protein layers between the gate dielectric and the organic semiconductor. An architecture directly interfacing supported biological layers to the OFET channel is proposed and, strikingly, both the electronic properties and the biointerlayer functionality are fully retained. The platform bench tests involved OFETs integrating phospholipids and bacteriorhodopsin exposed to 1–5% anesthetic doses that reveal drug-induced changes in the lipid membrane. This result challenges the current anesthetic action model relying on the so far provided evidence that doses much higher than clinically relevant ones (2.4%) do not alter lipid bilayers’ structure significantly. Furthermore, a streptavidin embedding OFET shows label-free biotin electronic detection at 10 parts-per-trillion concentration level, reaching state-of-the-art fluorescent assay performances. These examples show how the proposed bioelectronic platform, besides resulting in extremely performing biosensors, can open insights into biologically relevant phenomena involving membrane weak interfacial modifications. PMID:22493224

  17. Mechanically activated switching of Si-based single-molecule junction as imaged with three-dimensional dynamic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Miki; Yoshida, Shoji; Katayama, Tomoki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Mera, Yutaka; Okada, Susumu; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and extracting the full functions of single-molecule characteristics are key factors in the development of future device technologies, as well as in basic research on molecular electronics. Here we report a new methodology for realizing a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic probe of single-molecule conductance, which enables the elaborate 3D analysis of the conformational effect on molecular electronics, by the formation of a Si/single molecule/Si structure using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The formation of robust covalent bonds between a molecule and Si electrodes, together with STM-related techniques, enables the stable and repeated control of the conformational modulation of the molecule. By 3D imaging of the conformational effect on a 1,4-diethynylbenzene molecule, a binary change in conductance with hysteresis is observed for the first time, which is considered to originate from a mechanically activated conformational change.

  18. Single-molecule reader for proteomics and genomics.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Jan; Wechselberger, Christian; Sonnleitner, Max; Schindler, Hansgeorg; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2002-12-25

    Recent developments in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy enabled the detection and detailed characterization of individual biomolecules in their native environment. New types of information can be obtained from studying individual molecules, which is not accessible from ensemble measurements. Moreover, this methodological advance matches the need of bioscience to downscale the sample amount required for screening devices. It is envisioned that concentrations as low as approximately 1000 molecules contained in a sample of 1 nl can be detected in a chip-based assay. In this review, we overview state-of-the-art single molecule microscopy with respect to its applicability to ultrasensitive screening. Quantitative estimations will be given, based on a novel apparatus designed for large area screening at single molecule sensitivity. PMID:12458002

  19. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  20. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-06-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15??V/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions.

  1. Three-dimensional Molecular Modeling with Single Molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Axel T.; Strop, Pavel; Vrljic, Marija; Chu, Steven; Weninger, Keith R.

    2011-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence energy transfer experiments enable investigations of macromolecular conformation and folding by the introduction of fluorescent dyes at specific sites in the macromolecule. Multiple such experiments can be performed with different labeling site combinations in order to map complex conformational changes or interactions between multiple molecules. Distances that are derived from such experiments can be used for determination of the fluorophore positions by triangulation. When combined with a known structure of the macromolecule(s) to which the fluorophores are attached, a three-dimensional model of the system can be determined. However, care has to be taken to properly derive distance from fluorescence energy transfer efficiency and to recognize the systematic or random errors for this relationship. Here we review the experimental and computational methods used for three-dimensional modeling based on single molecule fluorescence resonance transfer, and describe recent progress in pushing the limits of this approach to macromolecular complexes. PMID:20837146

  2. Dynamic Chromatin Regulation from a Single Molecule Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fierz, Beat

    2016-03-18

    Chromatin regulatory processes, like all biological reactions, are dynamic and stochastic in nature but can give rise to stable and inheritable changes in gene expression patterns. A molecular understanding of those processes is key for fundamental biological insight into gene regulation, epigenetic inheritance, lineage determination, and therapeutic intervention in the case of disease. In recent years, great progress has been made in identifying important molecular players involved in key chromatin regulatory pathways. Conversely, we are only beginning to understand the dynamic interplay between protein effectors, transcription factors, and the chromatin substrate itself. Single-molecule approaches employing both highly defined chromatin substrates in vitro, as well as direct observation of complex regulatory processes in vivo, open new avenues for a molecular view of chromatin regulation. This review highlights recent applications of single-molecule methods and related techniques to investigate fundamental chromatin regulatory processes. PMID:26565113

  3. High-Resolution, Single-Molecule Measurements of Biomolecular Motion

    PubMed Central

    Greenleaf, William J.; Woodside, Michael T.; Block, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Many biologically important macromolecules undergo motions that are essential to their function. Biophysical techniques can now resolve the motions of single molecules down to the nanometer scale or even below, providing new insights into the mechanisms that drive molecular movements. This review outlines the principal approaches that have been used for high-resolution measurements of single-molecule motion, including centroid tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and optical traps. For each technique, the principles of operation are outlined, the capabilities and typical applications are examined, and various practical issues for implementation are considered. Extensions to these methods are also discussed, with an eye toward future application to outstanding biological problems. PMID:17328679

  4. Novel sensor for ultrasensitive and single-molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga, K.; Godik, E.; Krutov, J.; Zaitsev, V. B.; Shubin, V. E.; Shushakov, D. A.; Vinogradov, S. L.

    2006-02-01

    The detection and identification of single molecules represent one of the ultimate goals of analytical chemistry. We have designed, developed and tested a new family of photodetectors with Internal Discrete Amplification (IDA) mechanism. These photodetectors can operate in linear (analog) detection mode with gain-bandwidth product up to 5.10 14 and one- or few-photon sensitivity, as well as in the photon counting mode with count rates up to 10 8 cps. Their key performance characteristics exceed those of photomultiplier tube (PMT) and avalanche photodiode (APD) devices. The measured parameters of the detectors are: gain > 10 5, excess noise factor as low as 1.02, maximum count rate > 10 8 counts/s, and rise/fall time < 300 ps. The new family of the photo detectors may become an ideal solution for the problems of ultrasensitive and single-molecule detection by fluorescence spectroscopy and other optical methods.

  5. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    SciTech Connect

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  6. Single-molecule imaging in live bacteria cells

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Ken; Lill, Yoriko; Sood, Chetan; Lee, Hochan; Zhang, Shunyuan

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus, are the most studied and perhaps best-understood organisms in biology. The advances in understanding of living systems gained from these organisms are immense. Application of single-molecule techniques in bacteria have presented unique difficulties owing to their small size and highly curved form. The aim of this review is to show advances made in single-molecule imaging in bacteria over the past 10 years, and to look to the future where the combination of implementing such high-precision techniques in well-characterized and controllable model systems such as E. coli could lead to a greater understanding of fundamental biological questions inaccessible through classic ensemble methods. PMID:23267188

  7. Visualizing Cellular Machines with Colocalization Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Joshua D.; Rodgers, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the cell's macromolecular machines contain multiple components that transiently associate with one another. This compositional and dynamic complexity presents a challenge for understanding how these machines are constructed and function. Colocalization single molecule spectroscopy enables simultaneous observation of individual components of these machines in real-time and grants a unique window into processes that are typically obscured in ensemble assays. Colocalization experiments can yield valuable information about assembly pathways, compositional heterogeneity, and kinetics that together contribute to the development of richly detailed reaction mechanisms. This review focuses on recent advances in colocalization single molecule spectroscopy and how this technique has been applied to enhance our understanding of transcription, RNA splicing, and translation. PMID:23970346

  8. A Single-Molecule Study of RNA Catalysis and Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaowei; Bartley, Laura E.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Russell, Rick; Ha, Taekjip; Herschlag, Daniel; Chu, Steven

    2000-06-01

    Using fluorescence microscopy, we studied the catalysis by and folding of individual Tetrahymena thermophila ribozyme molecules . The dye-labeled and surface-immobilized ribozymes used were shown to be functionally indistinguishable from the unmodified free ribozyme in solution. A reversible local folding step in which a duplex docks and undocks from the ribozyme core was observed directly in single-molecule time trajectories, allowing the determination of the rate constants and characterization of the transition state. A rarely populated docked state, not measurable by ensemble methods, was observed. In the overall folding process, intermediate folding states and multiple folding pathways were observed. In addition to observing previously established folding pathways, a pathway with an observed folding rate constant of 1 per second was discovered. These results establish single-molecule fluorescence as a powerful tool for examining RNA folding.

  9. Light Sheet Microscopy for Single Molecule Tracking in Living Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Jörg Gerhard; Veith, Roman; Veenendaal, Andreas; Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule observation in cells and tissue allows the analysis of physiological processes with molecular detail, but it still represents a major methodological challenge. Here we introduce a microscopic technique that combines light sheet optical sectioning microscopy and ultra sensitive high-speed imaging. By this approach it is possible to observe single fluorescent biomolecules in solution, living cells and even tissue with an unprecedented speed and signal-to-noise ratio deep within the sample. Thereby we could directly observe and track small and large tracer molecules in aqueous solution. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility to visualize the dynamics of single tracer molecules and native messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in salivary gland cell nuclei of Chironomus tentans larvae up to 200 µm within the specimen with an excellent signal quality. Thus single molecule light sheet based fluorescence microscopy allows analyzing molecular diffusion and interactions in complex biological systems. PMID:20668517

  10. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  11. Tetraanionic biphenyl lanthanide complexes as single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenliang; Le Roy, Jennifer J; Khan, Saeed I; Ungur, Liviu; Murugesu, Muralee; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-03-01

    Inverse sandwich biphenyl complexes [(NN(TBS))Ln]2(?-biphenyl)[K(solvent)]2 [NN(TBS) = 1,1'-fc(NSi(t)BuMe2)2; Ln = Gd, Dy, Er; solvent = Et2O, toluene; 18-crown-6], containing a quadruply reduced biphenyl ligand, were synthesized and their magnetic properties measured. One of the dysprosium biphenyl complexes was found to exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling and single-molecule-magnet behavior with Ueff of 34 K under zero applied field. The solvent coordinated to potassium affected drastically the nature of the magnetic interaction, with the other dysprosium complex showing ferromagnetic coupling. Ab initio calculations were performed to understand the nature of magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions bridged by the anionic arene ligand and the origin of single-molecule-magnet behavior. PMID:25695369

  12. Single-Molecule Studies of DNA Replisome Function

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Senthil K.; Yue, Hongjun; Hu, Zhenxin; Spiering, Michelle M.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Fast and accurate replication of DNA is accomplished by the interactions of multiple proteins in the dynamic DNA replisome. The DNA replisome effectively coordinates the leading and lagging strand synthesis of DNA. These complex, yet elegantly organized, molecular machines have been studied extensively by kinetic and structural methods to provide an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of DNA replication. Owing to averaging of observables, unique dynamic information of the biochemical pathways and reactions are concealed in conventional ensemble methods. However, recent advances in the rapidly expanding field of single-molecule analyses to study single biomolecules offer opportunities to probe and understand the dynamic processes involved in large biomolecular complexes such as replisomes. This review will focus on the recent developments in the biochemistry and biophysics of DNA replication employing single-molecule techniques and the insights provided by these methods towards a better understanding of the intricate mechanisms of DNA replication. PMID:19665592

  13. Single-Molecule Observation of Prokaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Nathan A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in optical imaging and molecular manipulation techniques have made it possible to observe the activity of individual enzymes and study the dynamic properties of processes that are challenging to elucidate using ensemble-averaging techniques. The use of single-molecule approaches has proven to be particularly successful in the study of the dynamic interactions between the components at the replication fork. In this section, we describe the methods necessary for in vitro single-molecule studies of prokaryotic replication systems. Through these experiments, accurate information can be obtained on the rates and processivities of DNA unwinding and polymerization. The ability to monitor in real time the progress of a single replication fork allows for the detection of short-lived, intermediate states that would be difficult to visualize in bulk-phase assays. PMID:19563119

  14. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  15. Interfacial Charge Transport in Organic Electronic Materials: the Key to a New Electronics Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Campbell, I.H.; Davids, P.S.; Heller, C.M.; Laurich, B.K.; Crone, B.K.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.; Ferraris, J.P.; Yu, Z.G.

    1999-06-04

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The primary aim of this project is to obtain a basic scientific understanding of electrical transport processes at interfaces that contain an organic electronic material. Because of their processing advantages and the tunability of their electronic properties, organic electronic materials are revolutionizing major technological areas such as information display. We completed an investigation of the fundamental electronic excitation energies in the prototype conjugated polymer MEH-PPV. We completed a combined theoretical/experimental study of the energy relation between charged excitations in a conjugated polymer and the metal at a polymer/metal interface. We developed a theoretical model that explains injection currents at polymer/metal interfaces. We have made electrical measurements on devices fabricated using the conjugated polymer MEH-PPV a nd a series of metals.

  16. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  17. "Sticky electrons" transport and interfacial transfer of electrons in the dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Peter, Laurence

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs, also known as Gratzel cells) mimic the photosynthetic process by using a sensitizer dye to harvest light energy to generate electrical power. Several functional features of these photochemical devices are unusual, and DSC research offers a rewarding arena in which to test new ideas, new materials, and new methodologies. Indeed, one of the most attractive chemical features of the DSC is that the basic concept can be used to construct a range of devices, replacing individual components with alternative materials. Despite two decades of increasing research activity, however, many aspects of the behavior of electrons in the DSC remain puzzling. In this Account, we highlight current understanding of the processes involved in the functioning of the DSC, with particular emphasis on what happens to the electrons in the mesoporous film following the injection step. The collection of photoinjected electrons appears to involve a random walk process in which electrons move through the network of interconnected titanium dioxide nanoparticles while undergoing frequent trapping and detrapping. During their passage to the cell contact, electrons may be lost by transfer to tri-iodide species in the redox electrolyte that permeates the mesoporous film. Competition between electron collection and back electron transfer determines the performance of a DSC: ideally, all injected electrons should be collected without loss. This Account then goes on to survey recent experimental and theoretical progress in the field, placing particular emphasis on issues that need to be resolved before we can gain a clear picture of how the DSC works. Several important questions about the behavior of "sticky" electrons, those that undergo multiple trapping and detrapping, in the DSC remain unanswered. The most fundamental of these concerns is the nature of the electron traps that appear to dominate the time-dependent photocurrent and photovoltage response of DSCs. The origin of the nonideality factor in the relationship between the intensity and the DSC photovoltage is also unclear, as is the discrepancy in electron diffusion length values determined by steady-state and non-steady-state methods. With these unanswered questions, DSC research is likely to remain an active and fruitful area for some years to come. PMID:19637905

  18. Nanoparticle-Free Single Molecule Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyser-Capadona, Lynn; Zheng, Jie; González, Jose I.; Lee, Tae-Hee; Patel, Sandeep A.; Dickson, Robert M.

    2005-02-01

    In the absence of large, plasmon-supporting nanoparticles, biocompatible dendrimer- and peptide-encapsulated few-atom Ag nanoclusters produce scaffold-specific single molecule (SM) Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The strong SM vibrational signatures are enhanced by the Agn transitions in nanoparticle-free samples and cannot arise from plasmon enhancement. Characteristic SM-Raman intermittency is observed, with antibunching of the underlying Agn emission directly confirming the SM nature of the emissive species.

  19. Mechanical Single Molecule Investigations of SNARE Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Montana, Vedrana; Parpura, Vladimir; Mohideen, Umar

    2007-03-01

    We used an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) to perform single molecule investigations of the SNARE (soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors) proteins, syntaxin, synaptobrevin and SNAP 25. These proteins are involved in the docking and release of neurotransmitters. The rupture force and extension of the interactions were measured. Chemical reaction rate theory was applied to obtain the energy barrier width and lifetime. Their temperature dependence was also explored.

  20. Heterometallic 3d-4f single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Rosado Piquer, Lidia; Sañudo, E Carolina

    2015-05-21

    The promising potential applications, such as information processing and storage or molecular spintronics, of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have spurred on the research of new, better SMMs. In this context, lanthanide ions have been seen as ideal candidates for new heterometallic transition metal-lanthanide SMMs. This perspective reviews 3d-4f SMMs up to 2014 and highlights the most significant advances and challenges of the field. PMID:25847327

  1. Ultrasensitive laser spectroscopy in solids: Single-molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.; Ambrose, W. P.; Kador, L.

    1989-10-01

    In spite of detection intensity constraints necessary to avoid power broadening, the optical absorption spectrum of single molecules of pentacene in p-terphenyl crystals can be measured by using laser FM spectroscopy combined with Stark and/or ultrasonic double modulation (to remove residual amplitude modulation) and recording spectra far out in the wings of the inhomogeneous line to reduce the number of molecules in resonance to one.

  2. Single molecule conformational memory extraction: p5ab RNA hairpin.

    PubMed

    Pressé, Steve; Peterson, Jack; Lee, Julian; Elms, Phillip; MacCallum, Justin L; Marqusee, Susan; Bustamante, Carlos; Dill, Ken

    2014-06-19

    Extracting kinetic models from single molecule data is an important route to mechanistic insight in biophysics, chemistry, and biology. Data collected from force spectroscopy can probe discrete hops of a single molecule between different conformational states. Model extraction from such data is a challenging inverse problem because single molecule data are noisy and rich in structure. Standard modeling methods normally assume (i) a prespecified number of discrete states and (ii) that transitions between states are Markovian. The data set is then fit to this predetermined model to find a handful of rates describing the transitions between states. We show that it is unnecessary to assume either (i) or (ii) and focus our analysis on the zipping/unzipping transitions of an RNA hairpin. The key is in starting with a very broad class of non-Markov models in order to let the data guide us toward the best model from this very broad class. Our method suggests that there exists a folding intermediate for the P5ab RNA hairpin whose zipping/unzipping is monitored by force spectroscopy experiments. This intermediate would not have been resolved if a Markov model had been assumed from the onset. We compare the merits of our method with those of others. PMID:24898871

  3. Single Molecule Electrochemical Detection in Aqueous Solutions and Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Byers, Joshua C; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Perry, David; McKelvey, Kim; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-10-20

    Single molecule electrochemical detection (SMED) is an extremely challenging aspect of electroanalytical chemistry, requiring unconventional electrochemical cells and measurements. Here, SMED is reported using a "quad-probe" (four-channel probe) pipet cell, fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barreled pipet and filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, and quasi-reference counter electrodes. A meniscus forms at the end of the probe covering the two working electrodes and is brought into contact with a substrate working electrode surface. In this way, a nanogap cell is produced whereby the two carbon electrodes in the pipet can be used to promote redox cycling of an individual molecule with the substrate. Anticorrelated currents generated at the substrate and tip electrodes, at particular distances (typically tens of nanometers), are consistent with the detection of single molecules. The low background noise realized in this droplet format opens up new opportunities in single molecule electrochemistry, including the use of ionic liquids, as well as aqueous solution, and the quantitative assessment and analysis of factors influencing redox cycling currents, due to a precisely known gap size. PMID:26398675

  4. Towards Single-Molecule Optical Mapping of the Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Kim, Soohong; Gassman, Natalie R.; Gottfried, Anna; Antelman, Josh; Kim, Younggyu; Ho, Sam; Samuel, Robin; Michalet, Xavier; Lin, Ron R.; Dertinger, Thomas; Kim, Andrew S.; Chung, Sangyoon; Colyer, Ryan A.; Weinhold, Elmar; Weiss, Shimon; Ebenstein, Yuval

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen an explosive growth in the utilization of single-molecule techniques for the study of complex systems. The ability to resolve phenomena otherwise masked by ensemble averaging has made these approaches especially attractive for the study of biological systems, where stochastic events lead to inherent inhomogeneity on the population level. The complex composition of the genome has made it an ideal system to study on the single-molecule level and methods aimed at resolving genetic information from long, individual, genomic DNA molecules have been in use for the last 30 years. These methods, and particularly optical based mapping of DNA, have been instrumental in highlighting genomic variation and contributed significantly to the assembly of many genomes including the human genome. Nanotechnology and nanoscopy have been a strong driving force for advancing genomic mapping approaches, allowing both better manipulation of DNA on the nano-scale and enhanced optical resolving power for analysis of genomic information. In the very last years, these developments have been adopted also for epigenetic studies. The common principle for these studies is the use of advanced optical microscopy for the detection of fluorescently labeled epigenetic marks on long, extended DNA molecules. Here we will discuss recent single-molecule studies for the mapping of chromatin composition and epigenetic DNA modifications, such as DNA methylation. PMID:24328256

  5. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in (bio)catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; De Cremer, Gert; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Muls, Benîot; Sels, Bert F.; Jacobs, Pierre A.; De Schryver, Frans C.; De Vos, Dirk E.; Hofkens, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The ever-improving time and space resolution and molecular detection sensitivity of fluorescence microscopy offer unique opportunities to deepen our insights into the function of chemical and biological catalysts. Because single-molecule microscopy allows for counting the turnover events one by one, one can map the distribution of the catalytic activities of different sites in solid heterogeneous catalysts, or one can study time-dependent activity fluctuations of individual sites in enzymes or chemical catalysts. By experimentally monitoring individuals rather than populations, the origin of complex behavior, e.g., in kinetics or in deactivation processes, can be successfully elucidated. Recent progress of temporal and spatial resolution in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is discussed in light of its impact on catalytic assays. Key concepts are illustrated regarding the use of fluorescent reporters in catalytic reactions. Future challenges comprising the integration of other techniques, such as diffraction, scanning probe, or vibrational methods in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are suggested. PMID:17664433

  6. Single Molecule Conformational Memory Extraction: P5ab RNA Hairpin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extracting kinetic models from single molecule data is an important route to mechanistic insight in biophysics, chemistry, and biology. Data collected from force spectroscopy can probe discrete hops of a single molecule between different conformational states. Model extraction from such data is a challenging inverse problem because single molecule data are noisy and rich in structure. Standard modeling methods normally assume (i) a prespecified number of discrete states and (ii) that transitions between states are Markovian. The data set is then fit to this predetermined model to find a handful of rates describing the transitions between states. We show that it is unnecessary to assume either (i) or (ii) and focus our analysis on the zipping/unzipping transitions of an RNA hairpin. The key is in starting with a very broad class of non-Markov models in order to let the data guide us toward the best model from this very broad class. Our method suggests that there exists a folding intermediate for the P5ab RNA hairpin whose zipping/unzipping is monitored by force spectroscopy experiments. This intermediate would not have been resolved if a Markov model had been assumed from the onset. We compare the merits of our method with those of others. PMID:24898871

  7. Viruses and Tetraspanins: Lessons from Single Molecule Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dahmane, Selma; Rubinstein, Eric; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanins are four-span membrane proteins that are widely distributed in multi-cellular organisms and involved in several infectious diseases. They have the unique property to form a network of protein-protein interaction within the plasma membrane, due to the lateral associations with one another and with other membrane proteins. Tracking tetraspanins at the single molecule level using fluorescence microscopy has revealed the membrane behavior of the tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cell lines, providing a first dynamic view of this network. Single molecule tracking highlighted that these 2 proteins can freely diffuse within the plasma membrane but can also be trapped, permanently or transiently, in tetraspanin-enriched areas. More recently, a similar strategy has been used to investigate tetraspanin membrane behavior in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this review we summarize the main results emphasizing the relationship in terms of membrane partitioning between tetraspanins, some of their partners such as Claudin-1 and EWI-2, and viral proteins during infection. These results will be analyzed in the context of other membrane microdomains, stressing the difference between raft and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, but also in comparison with virus diffusion at the cell surface. New advanced single molecule techniques that could help to further explore tetraspanin assemblies will be also discussed. PMID:24800676

  8. Field Regulation of Single Molecule Conductivity by a Charged Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkow, Robert

    2006-03-01

    A new concept for a single molecule transistor is demonstrated [1]. A single chargeable atom adjacent to a molecule shifts molecular energy levels into alignment with electrode levels, thereby gating current through the molecule. Seemingly paradoxically, the silicon substrate to which the molecule is covalently attached provides 2, not 1, effective contacts to the molecule. This is achieved because the single charged silicon atom is at a substantially different potential than the remainder of the substrate. Charge localization at one dangling bond is ensured by covalently capping all other surface atoms. Dopant level control and local Fermi level control can change the charge state of that atom. The same configuration is shown to be an effective transducer to an electrical signal of a single molecule detection event. Because the charged atom induced shifting results in conductivity changes of substantial magnitude, these effects are easily observed at room temperature. [1] Paul G. Piva1,Gino A. DiLabio, Jason L. Pitters, Janik Zikovsky, Moh'd Rezeq, Stanislav Dogel, Werner A. Hofer & Robert A. Wolkow, Field regulation of single-molecule conductivity by a charged surface atom, NATURE 435, 658-661 (2005)

  9. Improved Dye Stability in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EcheverrÍa Aitken, Colin; Marshall, R. Andrew; Pugi, Joseph D.

    Complex biological systems challenge existing single-molecule methods. In particular, dye stability limits observation time in singlemolecule fluorescence applications. Current approaches to improving dye performance involve the addition of enzymatic oxygen scavenging systems and small molecule additives. We present an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system that improves dye stability in single-molecule experiments. Compared to the currently-employed glucose-oxidase/catalase system, the protocatechuate-3,4-dioxygenase system achieves lower dissolved oxygen concentration and stabilizes single Cy3, Cy5, and Alexa488 fluorophores. Moreover, this system possesses none of the limitations associated with the glucose oxidase/catalase system. We also tested the effects of small molecule additives in this system. Biological reducing agents significantly destabilize the Cy5 fluorophore as a function of reducing potential. In contrast, anti-oxidants stabilize the Cy3 and Alexa488 fluorophores. We recommend use of the protocatechuate-3,4,-dioxygenase system with antioxidant additives, and in the absence of biological reducing agents. This system should have wide application to single-molecule fluorescence experiments.

  10. Single-Molecule Ion Channel Conformational Dynamics in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes regulate the function and dynamics of ion channels that are crucial for cell functions, neuronal signaling, and brain functions. Such complexity makes it difficult, if not impossible, to characterize ion channel dynamics using conventional electrical recording alone since that the measurement does not specifically interrogate the associated conformational changes but rather the consequences of the conformational changes. Recently, new technology developments on single-molecule spectroscopy, and especially, the combined approaches of using single ion channel patch-clamp electrical recording and single-molecule fluorescence imaging have provided us the capability of probing ion channel conformational changes simultaneously with the electrical single channel recording. By combining real-time single-molecule fluorescence imaging measurements with real-time single-channel electric current measurements in artificial lipid bilayers and in living cell membranes, we were able to probe single ion-channel-protein conformational changes simultaneously, and thus providing an understanding the dynamics and mechanism of ion-channel proteins at the molecular level. The function-regulating and site-specific conformational changes of ion channels are now measurable under physiological conditions in real-time, one molecule at a time. We will focus our discussion on the new development and results of real-time imaging of the dynamics of gramicidin, colicin, and NMDA receptor ion channels in lipid bilayers and living cells. Our results shed light on new perspectives of the intrinsic interplay of lipid membrane dynamics, solvation dynamics, and the ion channel functions.

  11. Single-molecule imaging of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, Joachim; Kaminski, Tim P.; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Jerosch, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Human synovial fluid contains a high concentration of hyaluronan, a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that provides viscoelasticity and contributes to joint lubrication. In osteoarthritis synovial fluid, the concentration and molecular weight of hyaluronan decrease, thus impairing shock absorption and lubrication. Consistently, substitution of hyaluronan (viscosupplementation) is a widely used treatment for osteoarthritis. So far, the organization and dynamics of hyaluronan in native human synovial fluid and its action mechanism in viscosupplementation are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we introduce highly sensitive single molecule microscopy to analyze the conformation and interactions of fluorescently labeled hyaluronan molecules in native human synovial fluid. Our findings are consistent with a random coil conformation of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid, and point to specific interactions of hyaluronan molecules with the synovial fluid matrix. Furthermore, single molecule microscopy is capable of detecting the breakdown of the synovial fluid matrix in osteoarthritis. Thus, single molecule microscopy is a useful new method to probe the structure of human synovial fluid and its changes in disease states like osteoarthritis.

  12. Single-Molecule Studies of Actin Assembly and Disassembly Factors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin A.; Gelles, Jeff; Goode, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is very dynamic and highly regulated by multiple associated proteins in vivo. Understanding how this system of proteins functions in the processes of actin network assembly and disassembly requires methods to dissect the mechanisms of activity of individual factors and of multiple factors acting in concert. The advent of single-filament and single-molecule fluorescence imaging methods has provided a powerful new approach to discovering actin-regulatory activities and obtaining direct, quantitative insights into the pathways of molecular interactions that regulate actin network architecture and dynamics. Here we describe techniques for acquisition and analysis of single-molecule data, applied to the novel challenges of studying the filament assembly and disassembly activities of actin-associated proteins in vitro. We discuss the advantages of single-molecule analysis in directly visualizing the order of molecular events, measuring the kinetic rates of filament binding and dissociation, and studying the coordination among multiple factors. The methods described here complement traditional biochemical approaches in elucidating actin-regulatory mechanisms in reconstituted filamentous networks. PMID:24630103

  13. Single-molecule Raman mapping with sub-nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhenchao

    2014-03-01

    Visualizing individual molecules with chemical recognition is a longstanding target in catalysis, bio-imaging, molecular nanotechnology, and material science. Molecular vibrations provide a valuable ``fingerprint'' for this identification. The spectroscopy based on tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has opened a path to obtain enhanced vibrational signals thanks to the strong localized plasmonic field originated at the tip apex. However, the best spatial resolution of the TERS imaging reported to date is still limited to a few nm, obviously not adequate for resolving a single molecule chemically. Here we demonstrate unprecedented sub-molecular Raman spectroscopic mapping with spatial resolution below 1 nm, resolving even the inner structure of a single molecule and its configuration on the surface. This is achieved by creating a double-resonance nonlinear process via spectral matching, particularly by matching the resonance of the nanocavity plasmon to the downward molecular vibronic transitions. Such exquisite tuning capability is provided by a combination of low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrasensitive optical detection. Our nonlinear TERS technique features the use of only a continuous wave laser rather than two pulse lasers. Our finding of Raman spectromicroscopy going intra-molecular and sub-nanometer may open up a new avenue to probe surface chemical identification, optical processes and photochemistry at the single-molecule scale. This work was supported by the MOST of China, CAS, and NSFC.

  14. Probing Single-Molecule Dissociations from a Bimolecular Complex NO-Co-Porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Howon; Chang, Yun Hee; Jang, Won-Jun; Lee, Eui-Sup; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2015-07-28

    Axial coordinations of diatomic NO molecules to metalloporphyrins play key roles in dynamic processes of biological functions such as blood pressure control and immune response. Probing such reactions at the single molecule level is essential to understand their physical mechanisms but has been rarely performed. Here we report on our single molecule dissociation experiments of diatomic NO from NO-Co-porphyrin complexes describing its dissociation mechanisms. Under tunneling junctions of scanning tunneling microscope, both positive and negative energy pulses gave rise to dissociations of NO with threshold voltages, +0.68 and -0.74 V at 0.1 nA tunneling current on Au(111). From the observed power law relations between dissociation rate and tunneling current, we argue that the dissociations were inelastically induced with molecular orbital resonances by stochastically tunneling electrons, which is supported with our density functional theory calculations. Our study shows that single molecule dissociation experiments can be used to probe reaction mechanisms in a variety of axial coordinations between small molecules and metalloporphyrins. PMID:26172541

  15. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  16. Single-Molecule Diodes with High On/Off Ratios Through Environmental Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Dell, Emma; Adak, Olgun; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey; Campos, Luis; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-03-01

    Single-Molecule diodes were first proposed with an asymmetric molecule comprising a donor-bridge-acceptor architecture to mimic a semiconductor p-n junction. Progress in molecular electronics has led to the realization of several single-molecule diodes; these have relied on asymmetric molecular backbones, asymmetric molecule-electrode linkers, or asymmetric electrode materials. Despite these advances, molecular diodes have had limited potential for functional applications due to several pitfalls, including low rectification ratios (``on''/``off'' current ratios <10). Here, we introduce a powerful approach for inducing rectification in conventionally symmetric single-molecule junctions, taking advantage of environmental factors about the junction. By utilizing an asymmetric environment instead of an asymmetric molecule, we reproducibly achieve high rectification ratios at low operating voltages for molecular junctions based on a family of symmetric small-gap molecules. This technique serves as an unconventional approach for developing functional molecular-scale devices and probing their charge transport characteristics. Furthermore, this technique should be applicable to other nanoscale devices, providing a general route for tuning device properties.

  17. A mononuclear transition metal single-molecule magnet in a nuclear spin-free ligand environment.

    PubMed

    Fataftah, Majed S; Zadrozny, Joseph M; Rogers, Dylan M; Freedman, Danna E

    2014-10-01

    The high-spin pseudotetrahedral complex [Co(C3S5)2](2-) exhibits slow magnetic relaxation in the absence of an applied dc magnetic field, one of a small number of mononuclear complexes to display this property. Fits to low-temperature magnetization data indicate that this single-molecule magnet possesses a very large and negative axial zero-field splitting and small rhombicity. The presence of single-molecule magnet behavior in a zero-nuclear spin ligand field offers the opportunity to investigate the potential for this molecule to be a qubit, the smallest unit of a quantum information processing (QIP) system. However, simulations of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra and the absence of EPR spectra demonstrate that this molecule is unsuitable as a qubit due to the same factors that promote single molecule magnet behavior. We discuss the influence of rhombic and axial zero-field splitting on QIP applications and the implications for future molecular qubit syntheses. PMID:25198379

  18. Protein mechanics: from single molecules to functional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Cao, Yi

    2010-10-19

    Elastomeric proteins act as the essential functional units in a wide variety of biomechanical machinery and serve as the basic building blocks for biological materials that exhibit superb mechanical properties. These proteins provide the desired elasticity, mechanical strength, resilience, and toughness within these materials. Understanding the mechanical properties of elastomeric protein-based biomaterials is a multiscale problem spanning from the atomistic/molecular level to the macroscopic level. Uncovering the design principles of individual elastomeric building blocks is critical both for the scientific understanding of multiscale mechanics of biomaterials and for the rational engineering of novel biomaterials with desirable mechanical properties. The development of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques has provided methods for characterizing mechanical properties of elastomeric proteins one molecule at a time. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) is uniquely suited to this purpose. Molecular dynamic simulations, protein engineering techniques, and single-molecule AFM study have collectively revealed tremendous insights into the molecular design of single elastomeric proteins, which can guide the design and engineering of elastomeric proteins with tailored mechanical properties. Researchers are focusing experimental efforts toward engineering artificial elastomeric proteins with mechanical properties that mimic or even surpass those of natural elastomeric proteins. In this Account, we summarize our recent experimental efforts to engineer novel artificial elastomeric proteins and develop general and rational methodologies to tune the nanomechanical properties of elastomeric proteins at the single-molecule level. We focus on general design principles used for enhancing the mechanical stability of proteins. These principles include the development of metal-chelation-based general methodology, strategies to control the unfolding hierarchy of multidomain elastomeric proteins, and the design of novel elastomeric proteins that exhibit stimuli-responsive mechanical properties. Moving forward, we are now exploring the use of these artificial elastomeric proteins as building blocks of protein-based biomaterials. Ultimately, we would like to rationally tailor mechanical properties of elastomeric protein-based materials by programming the molecular sequence, and thus nanomechanical properties, of elastomeric proteins at the single-molecule level. This step would help bridge the gap between single protein mechanics and material biomechanics, revealing how the mechanical properties of individual elastomeric proteins are translated into the properties of macroscopic materials. PMID:20669937

  19. Intracellular bottom-up generation of targeted nanosensors for single-molecule imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yanyan; Arai, Satoshi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-02-01

    Organic dyes are useful tools for sensing cellular activities but unfavorable in single-molecule imaging, whereas quantum dots (QDs) are widely applied in single-molecule imaging but with few sensing applications. Here, to visualize cellular activities by monitoring the response of a single probe in living cells, we propose a bottom-up approach to generate nanoprobes where four organic dyes are conjugated to tetravalent single-chain avidin (scAVD) proteins via an intracellular click reaction. We demonstrate that the nanoprobes, exhibiting increased brightness and enhanced photostability, were detectable as single dots in living cells. The ease of intracellular targeting allowed the tracking of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling with nanometer spatial resolution. Conjugating thermosensitive dyes generated temperature-sensitive nanoprobes on ER membranes that successfully monitored local temperature changes in response to external heat pulses. Our approach is potentially a suitable tool for visualizing localized cellular activities with single probe sensitivity in living cells.Organic dyes are useful tools for sensing cellular activities but unfavorable in single-molecule imaging, whereas quantum dots (QDs) are widely applied in single-molecule imaging but with few sensing applications. Here, to visualize cellular activities by monitoring the response of a single probe in living cells, we propose a bottom-up approach to generate nanoprobes where four organic dyes are conjugated to tetravalent single-chain avidin (scAVD) proteins via an intracellular click reaction. We demonstrate that the nanoprobes, exhibiting increased brightness and enhanced photostability, were detectable as single dots in living cells. The ease of intracellular targeting allowed the tracking of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling with nanometer spatial resolution. Conjugating thermosensitive dyes generated temperature-sensitive nanoprobes on ER membranes that successfully monitored local temperature changes in response to external heat pulses. Our approach is potentially a suitable tool for visualizing localized cellular activities with single probe sensitivity in living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08012f

  20. Amorphous oxide alloys as interfacial layers with broadly tunable electronic structures for organic photovoltaic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nanjia; Kim, Myung-Gil; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Guo, Xugang; Song, Charles; Jin, Hosub; Chen, Zhihua; Yoon, Seok Min; Freeman, Arthur J.; Chang, Robert P. H.; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J.

    2015-01-01

    In diverse classes of organic optoelectronic devices, controlling charge injection, extraction, and blocking across organic semiconductor–inorganic electrode interfaces is crucial for enhancing quantum efficiency and output voltage. To this end, the strategy of inserting engineered interfacial layers (IFLs) between electrical contacts and organic semiconductors has significantly advanced organic light-emitting diode and organic thin film transistor performance. For organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, an electronically flexible IFL design strategy to incrementally tune energy level matching between the inorganic electrode system and the organic photoactive components without varying the surface chemistry would permit OPV cells to adapt to ever-changing generations of photoactive materials. Here we report the implementation of chemically/environmentally robust, low-temperature solution-processed amorphous transparent semiconducting oxide alloys, In-Ga-O and Ga-Zn-Sn-O, as IFLs for inverted OPVs. Continuous variation of the IFL compositions tunes the conduction band minima over a broad range, affording optimized OPV power conversion efficiencies for multiple classes of organic active layer materials and establishing clear correlations between IFL/photoactive layer energetics and device performance. PMID:26080437

  1. Single-molecule Raman spectroscopy: a probe of surface dynamics and plasmonic fields.

    PubMed

    Haran, Gilad

    2010-08-17

    Single-molecule spectroscopy has opened exciting new realms of research, allowing the exploration of molecular dynamics within heterogeneous media, from live cells to chemical catalysts. Raman spectroscopy of individual molecules is particularly useful because it may provide more detailed information than is available in the typically broad fluorescent spectrum. To overcome the problem of small Raman cross sections, however, enhancement by surface plasmon excitation is necessary. This enhancement is particularly strong in the gaps between noble metal nanoparticles; indeed, it is strong enough for the observation of Raman signals from single molecules. The electromagnetic fields generated by surface plasmons depend quite intricately on the shape of the nanoparticles, their spatial arrangement, and their environment. Single molecules can serve as the ultimate local probes for the plasmonic fields. Such a "mapping expedition" requires accurate molecular positioning abilities on one hand, and nanoparticle cluster engineering methods on the other hand. This Account describes our first steps toward achieving these goals. It is shown that a molecule can indeed be judiciously positioned within the gap of a nanoparticle dimer and that it can report on the effect of particle size on the plasmon resonance spectrum. When a third particle is added, breaking the dimer symmetry, the electromagnetic field at the gap changes significantly, as manifested by dramatic polarization effects. A combination of electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations is used to fully understand symmetry breaking in nanoparticle trimers. As is well-known, the strong interaction of molecules with metallic surfaces may lead to modulation of their excited state energies and even to charge transfer to or from the surface. The impact of charge transfer on surface-enhanced Raman scattering has been debated for many years. Single-molecule spectroscopy offers new opportunities for probing this phenomenology. Charge-transfer excitations may enhance Raman scattering, sometimes also modulating the Raman spectrum in a manner reminiscent of the molecular resonance effect. Two approaches for looking into this effect are described in the Account. First, the observation of spectral dynamics driven by molecular motion provides indirect evidence for the importance of molecule-surface electronic coupling. More direct evidence is offered by single-molecule Raman spectroscopy studies within an electrochemical cell. The surface potential is systematically modulated, and the effect on Raman spectra is studied. It is found that the charge transfer interaction increases the signals by at least 3 orders of magnitude, but it also changes dramatically Raman spectral shapes. A mechanism for this complex behavior is proposed based on the theory of charge-transfer resonance-Raman scattering. PMID:20521801

  2. Stark effects after excited-state interfacial electron transfer at sensitized TiO(2) nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Shane; Sun, Yali; Staniszewski, Aaron; Castellano, Felix N; Meyer, Gerald J

    2010-05-19

    Photophysical studies were performed with [Ru(dtb)(2)(dcb)](PF(6))(2) and cis-Ru(dcb)(dnb)(NCS)(2,) where dtb is 4,4'-(C(CH(3))(3))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, dcb is 4,4'-(COOH)(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, and dnb is 4,4'-(CH(3)(CH(2))(8))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine), anchored to anatase TiO(2) particles ( approximately 15 nm in diameter) interconnected in a mesoporous, 10 mum thick film immersed in Li(+)-containing CH(3)CN electrolytes with iodide or phenothiazine donors. Pulsed-laser excitation resulted in rapid excited-state injection and donor oxidation to yield TiO(2)(e(-))s and oxidized donors, while the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption spectrum of the Ru(II) coordination compounds differed from that which was initially excited. The spectral data were consistent with an underlying Stark effect and indicated that the surface electric field was not completely screened from the molecular sensitizer. The magnitude of the electric field was estimated to be approximately 270 MV/m from Li(+) titration experiments, corresponding to a approximately 40 mV potential drop. With iodide donors, the amplitude of the Stark effect decreased over time periods where charge recombination was absent, behavior attributed to "screening" of the electric field by interfacial ionic reorganization. The screening kinetics were nonexponential but were well described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model, from which a characteristic rate constant, tau(o)(-1), of approximately 1.5 x 10(5) s(-1) was abstracted. At least seven other sensitizers and five different cations, as well as on SnO(2) nanoparticle films, exhibited similar transient absorption behavior with iodide donor molecules indicating that the effect was quite general. In the presence of phenothiazine donors (or in the absence of an external donor), there was no clear evidence for screening, and the Stark effect disappeared concurrent with interfacial charge recombination. Complementary spectroelectrochemical studies of these same sensitized films displayed similar absorption spectra when the TiO(2) thin film was partially reduced with a forward bias. Spectral modeling in the absence of donor molecules as well as studies of TiO(2) thin films sensitized with two different Ru(II) compounds demonstrated that the electric field created by excited-state injection from one sensitizer influenced the absorption spectra of other sensitizers that had not undergone photoinduced electron injection. PMID:20423089

  3. Molecular length dictates the nature of charge carriers in single-molecule junctions of oxidized oligothiophenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.; Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Venkataraman, Latha; Campos, Luis M.

    2015-03-01

    To develop advanced materials for electronic devices, it is of utmost importance to design organic building blocks with tunable functionality and to study their properties at the molecular level. For organic electronic and photovoltaic applications, the ability to vary the nature of charge carriers and so create either electron donors or acceptors is critical. Here we demonstrate that charge carriers in single-molecule junctions can be tuned within a family of molecules that contain electron-deficient thiophene-1,1-dioxide (TDO) building blocks. Oligomers of TDO were designed to increase electron affinity and maintain delocalized frontier orbitals while significantly decreasing the transport gap. Through thermopower measurements we show that the dominant charge carriers change from holes to electrons as the number of TDO units is increased. This results in a unique system in which the charge carrier depends on the backbone length, and provides a new means to tune p- and n-type transport in organic materials.

  4. Ultrafast Photoinduced Interfacial Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from CdSe Quantum Dots to 4,4'-Bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Wu, Kaifeng; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Jia, Yanyan; Ding, Wendu; Xie, Zhao-Xiong; Batista, Victor S; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-01-27

    Pyridine and derivatives have been reported as efficient and selective catalysts for the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2 to methanol. Although the catalytic mechanism remains a subject of considerable recent debate, most proposed models involve interfacial proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) to electrode-bound catalysts. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photoreduction of 4,4'-bipyridium (bPYD) using CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a model system for interfacial PCET. We observed ultrafast photoinduced PCET from CdSe QDs to form doubly protonated [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations at low pH (4-6). Through studies of the dependence of PCET rate on isotopic substitution, pH and bPYD concentration, the radical formation mechanism was identified to be a sequential interfacial electron and proton transfer (ET/PT) process with a rate-limiting pH independent electron transfer rate constant, kint, of 1.05 ± 0.13 × 10(10) s(-1) between a QD and an adsorbed singly protonated [bPYDH](+). Theoretical studies of the adsorption of [bPYDH](+) and methylviologen on QD surfaces revealed important effects of hydrogen bonding with the capping ligand (3-mercaptopropionic acid) on binding geometry and interfacial PCET. In the presence of sacrificial electron donors, this system was shown to be capable of generating [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations under continuous illumination at 405 nm with a steady-state photoreduction quantum yield of 1.1 ± 0.1% at pH 4. The mechanism of bPYD photoreduction reported in this work may provide useful insights into the catalytic roles of pyridine and pyridine derivatives in the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2. PMID:26713752

  5. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in single-molecule magnet junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haiqing; Wang, Qiang; Jiao, Hujun; Liang, J.-Q.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum transport through single-molecule magnet (SMM) junctions with ferromagnetic and normal-metal leads in the sequential regime. The current obtained by means of the rate-equation gives rise to the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR), which varies with the angle between the magnetization direction of ferromagnetic lead and the easy axis of SMM. The angular dependence of TAMR can serve as a probe to determine experimentally the easy axis of SMM. Moreover, it is demonstrated that both the magnitude and the sign of TAMR are tunable by the bias voltage, suggesting a new spin-valve device with only one magnetic electrode in molecular spintronics.

  6. Single molecule labeling of an atomic force microscope cantilever tip

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianwei; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method to functionalize the very apex of an atomic force microscope cantilever with a single or a few molecules. In force spectroscopy or interaction mapping, the cantilever must be functionalized with only a few molecules to avoid noise or spurious measurements. Here, we covalently attached single molecules to the cantilever by touching it to a paper wetted with a solution of quantum dots. The paper competes with wicking up the hydrophilic surface of the tip. This method has broad applications in scanning probe microscopy where small numbers of molecules are needed on the tip. PMID:23152642

  7. Single molecule as a local acoustic detector for mechanical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuxi; Navarro, Pedro; Orrit, Michel

    2014-09-26

    A single molecule can serve as a nanometer-sized detector of acoustic strain. Such a nanomicrophone has the great advantage that it can be placed very close to acoustic signal sources and high sensitivities can be achieved. We demonstrate this scheme by monitoring the fluorescence intensity of a single dibenzoterrylene molecule in an anthracene crystal attached to an oscillating tuning fork. The characterization of the vibration amplitude and of the detection sensitivity is a first step towards detection and control of nanomechanical oscillators through optical detection and feedback. PMID:25302904

  8. Single Molecule as a Local Acoustic Detector for Mechanical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuxi; Navarro, Pedro; Orrit, Michel

    2014-09-01

    A single molecule can serve as a nanometer-sized detector of acoustic strain. Such a nanomicrophone has the great advantage that it can be placed very close to acoustic signal sources and high sensitivities can be achieved. We demonstrate this scheme by monitoring the fluorescence intensity of a single dibenzoterrylene molecule in an anthracene crystal attached to an oscillating tuning fork. The characterization of the vibration amplitude and of the detection sensitivity is a first step towards detection and control of nanomechanical oscillators through optical detection and feedback.

  9. Advances in magnetic tweezers for single molecule and cell biophysics.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Lee, Gil U

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MTW) enable highly accurate forces to be transduced to molecules to study mechanotransduction at the molecular or cellular level. We review recent MTW studies in single molecule and cell biophysics that demonstrate the flexibility of this technique. We also discuss technical advances in the method on several fronts, i.e., from novel approaches for the measurement of torque to multiplexed biophysical assays. Finally, we describe multi-component nanorods with enhanced optical and magnetic properties and discuss their potential as future MTW probes. PMID:24263142

  10. Multiphoton cascade absorption in single molecule fluorescence saturation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Winckler, Pascale; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2013-05-01

    Saturation spectroscopy is a relevant method to investigate photophysical parameters of single fluorescent molecules. Nevertheless, the impact of a gradual increase, over a broad range, of the laser excitation on the intramolecular dynamics is not completely understood, particularly concerning their fluorescence emission (the so-called brightness). Thus, we propose a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study to interpret the unexpected evolution of the brightness with the laser power taking into account the cascade absorption of two and three photons. Furthermore, we highlight the key role played by the confocal observation volume in fluorescence saturation spectroscopy of single molecules in solution. PMID:23521543

  11. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Täuber, Daniela; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule (SM) methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC). Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC. PMID:24077123

  12. Detection of pathogenic DNA at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiatène, Idir; Klamp, Tobias; Schüttpelz, Mark; Sauer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection of pathogenic DNA in a homogeneous assay at the single-molecule level applying two-color coincidence analysis. The target molecule we quantify is a 100 nucleotide long synthetic single-stranded oligonucleotide adapted from Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Using spontaneous hybridization of two differently fluorescing Molecular Beacons we demonstrate a detection sensitivity of 100 fM (10-13M) in 30 seconds applying a simple microfluidic device with a 100 μm channel and confocal two-color fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  14. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  15. Reversible Positioning of Single Molecules inside Zero-Mode Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hybrid nanopore/zero-mode waveguide device for single-molecule fluorescence and DNA sequencing applications. The device is a freestanding solid-state membrane with sub-5 nm nanopores that reversibly delivers individual biomolecules to the base of 70 nm diameter waveguides for interrogation. Rapid and reversible molecular loading is achieved by controlling the voltage across the device. Using this device we demonstrate protein and DNA loading with efficiency that is orders of magnitude higher than diffusion-based molecular loading. PMID:25209321

  16. The statistics of single molecule detection: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlein, J.; Robbins, D.L.; Ambrose, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    An overview of our recent results in modeling single molecule detection in fluid flow is presented. Our mathematical approach is based on a path integral representation. The model accounts for all experimental details, such as light collection, laser excitation, hydrodynamics and diffusion, and molecular photophysics. Special attention is paid to multiple molecule crossings through the detection volume. Numerical realization of the theory is discussed. Measurements of burst size distributions in single B-phycoerythrin molecule detection experiments are presented and compared with theoretical predictions.

  17. Isostructural single-chain and single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Patrick L; Stephenson, Casey J; Hendrickson, David N

    2010-07-19

    Isostructural single-chain magnet (SCM) and single-molecule magnets (SMM) with formulas [Mn(6)X(2)(salox)(6)O(2)(N(3))(8)] (X = Mn(II) (1), Cd(II) (2); H(2)salox = salicylaldoxime) have been synthesized and magnetically characterized. Complexes 1 and 2 possess significantly different magnetization reversal barriers of U(eff) = 100.3 and 57.0 K, in spite of comparable uniaxial anisotropies (D) and ground state spin values (S). These observations are indicative of the intrinsic spin dynamics in these structurally related yet magnetically distinct SCM/SMM systems. PMID:20565068

  18. Analysis of photobleaching in single-molecule multicolor excitation and Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Widengren, Jerker; Brand, Leif; Schaffer, Jörg; Felekyan, Suren; Seidel, Claus A M

    2006-03-01

    Dye photobleaching is a major constraint of fluorescence readout within a range of applications. In this study, we investigated the influence of photobleaching in fluorescence experiments applying multicolor laser as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mediated excitation using several red-emitting dyes frequently used in multicolor experiments or as FRET acceptors. The chosen dyes (cyanine 5 (Cy5), MR121, Alexa660, Alexa680, Atto647N, Atto655) have chemically distinct chromophore systems and can be excited at 650 nm. Several fluorescence analysis techniques have been applied to detect photobleaching and to disclose the underlying photophysics, all of which are based on single-molecule detection: (1) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of bulk solutions, (2) fluorescence cross-correlation of single-molecule trajectories, and (3) multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) of single-molecule events. The maximum achievable fluorescence signals as well as the survival times of the red dyes were markedly reduced under additional laser irradiation in the range of 500 nm. Particularly at excitation levels at or close to saturation, the 500 nm irradiation effectively induced transitions to higher excited electronic states on already excited dye molecules, leading to a pronounced bleaching reactivity. A theoretical model for the observed laser irradiance dependence of the fluorescence brightness of a Cy5 FRET acceptor dye has been developed introducing the full description of the underlying photophysics. The model takes into account acceptor as well as donor photobleaching from higher excited electronic states, population of triplet states, and energy transfer to both the ground and excited states of the acceptor dye. Also, photoinduced reverse intersystem crossing via higher excited triplet states is included, which was found to be very efficient for Cy5 attached to DNA. Comparing continuous wave (cw) and pulsed donor excitation, a strong enhancement of acceptor photobleaching by a factor of 5 was observed for the latter. Thus, in the case of fluorescence experiments utilizing multicolor pulsed laser excitation, the application of the appropriate timing of synchronized green and red laser pulses in an alternating excitation mode can circumvent excessive photobleaching. Moreover, important new single-molecule analysis diagnosis tools are presented: (1) For the case of excessive acceptor photobleaching, cross-correlation analysis of single-molecule trajectories of the fluorescence signal detected in the donor and acceptor detection channels and vice versa shows an anticorrelated exponential decay and growth, respectively. (2) The time difference, Tg - Tr, of the mean observation times of all photons detected for the donor and acceptor detection channels within a single-molecule fluorescence burst allows one to identify and exclude molecules with an event of acceptor photobleaching. The presented single-molecule analysis methods can be constrained to, for example, FRET-active subpopulations, reducing bias from FRET-inactive molecules. The observations made are of strong relevance for and demand a careful choice of laser action in multicolor and FRET experiments, in particular when performed at or close to saturation. PMID:16509620

  19. Rational design of DNA-actuated enzyme nanoreactors guided by single molecule analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Soma; Adendorff, Matthew R.; Liu, Minghui; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational heterogeneity. Upon rational redesign of the Holliday junctions located at their hinge and arms, we found that the DNA tweezers could be more completely and uniformly closed. A novel single molecule enzyme assay was developed to demonstrate that our design improvements yield significant, independent enhancements in the fraction of active enzyme nanoreactors and their individual substrate turnover frequencies. The sequence-level design strategies explored here may aid more broadly in improving the performance of DNA-based nanodevices including biological and chemical sensors.The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational heterogeneity. Upon rational redesign of the Holliday junctions located at their hinge and arms, we found that the DNA tweezers could be more completely and uniformly closed. A novel single molecule enzyme assay was developed to demonstrate that our design improvements yield significant, independent enhancements in the fraction of active enzyme nanoreactors and their individual substrate turnover frequencies. The sequence-level design strategies explored here may aid more broadly in improving the performance of DNA-based nanodevices including biological and chemical sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the DNA sequences, assembly, and bulk characterization of all DNA tweezers; details of the smFRET characterization of the tweezers; additional AFM images; detailed results of MD simulation; bulk measurement of tweezer-scaffolded G6pDH activity; and single molecule measurements of tweezer-scaffolded G6pDH activity. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07263h

  20. Interaction of spin and vibrations in transport through single-molecule magnets

    PubMed Central

    May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Summary We study electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) and the interplay of its anisotropic spin with quantized vibrational distortions of the molecule. Based on numerical renormalization group calculations we show that, despite the longitudinal anisotropy barrier and small transverse anisotropy, vibrational fluctuations can induce quantum spin-tunneling (QST) and a QST-Kondo effect. The interplay of spin scattering, QST and molecular vibrations can strongly enhance the Kondo effect and induce an anomalous magnetic field dependence of vibrational Kondo side-bands. PMID:22043459

  1. Cationic Mn4 single-molecule magnet with a sterically isolated core.

    PubMed

    Heroux, Katie J; Quddusi, Hajrah M; Liu, Junjie; O'Brien, James R; Nakano, Motohiro; del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen; Hendrickson, David N

    2011-08-15

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of a ligand-modified Mn(4) dicubane single-molecule magnet (SMM), [Mn(4)(Bet)(4)(mdea)(2)(mdeaH)(2)](BPh(4))(4), are presented, where the cationic SMM units are significantly separated from neighboring molecules in the crystal lattice. There are no cocrystallized solvate molecules, making it an ideal candidate for single-crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance studies. Increased control over intermolecular interactions in such materials is a crucial factor in the future application of SMMs. PMID:21751785

  2. Real-Space Imaging of Molecular Structure by Single-Molecule Inelastic Tunneling Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhumin; Chiang, Chi-Lun; Xu, Chen; Ho, Wilson

    2014-03-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope is one of the most powerful tools to perform real space imaging of the electronic, magnetic, optical, and vibrational signatures of a single molecule. However, the spatial distributions of these signatures do not always relate directly to the geometric structures of the molecules. In this study, a CO molecule is transferred from the surface to a STM tip. The energy and intensity of the hindered translational mode of the CO vary when the tip is scanned across an adsorbed molecule (such as cobalt phthalocyanine). By monitoring these variations in space, we are able to resolve the geometric structure of the molecule and even subtle intramolecular and intermolecular interactions.

  3. Single-Molecule High-Resolution Colocalization of Single Probes

    PubMed Central

    Churchman, L. Stirling; Spudich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Colocalization of fluorescent probes is commonly used in cell biology to discern the proximity of two proteins in the cell. Considering that the resolution limit of optical microscopy is on the order of 250 nm, there has not been a need for high-resolution colocalization techniques. However, with the advent of higher resolution techniques for cell biology and single-molecule biophysics, colocalization must also improve. For diffraction-limited applications, a geometric transformation (i.e., translation, scaling, and rotation) is typically applied to one color channel to align it with the other; however, to achieve high-resolution colocalization, this is not sufficient. Single-molecule high-resolution colocalization (SHREC) of single probes uses the local weighted mean transformation to achieve a colocalization resolution of at least 10 nm. This protocol describes the acquisition of registration data and the analysis required to obtain a high-resolution mapping between imaging channels. The total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM) system described is designed to excite and image the fluorescent probes Cy3 and Cy5. Modifications may be required depending on the requirements of the individual study. PMID:22301661

  4. Ultra-Stable Organic Fluorophores for Single-Molecule Research

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qinsi; Juette, Manuel F.; Jockusch, Steffen; Wasserman, Michael R.; Zhou, Zhou; Altman, Roger B.; Blanchard, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence provides a mechanism for achieving contrast in biological imaging that enables investigations of molecular structure, dynamics, and function at high spatial and temporal resolution. Small-molecule organic fluorophores have proven essential for such efforts and are widely used in advanced applications such as single-molecule and super-resolution microscopy. Yet, organic fluorophores, like all fluorescent species, exhibit instabilities in their emission characteristics, including blinking and photobleaching that limit their utility and performance. Here, we review the photophysics and photochemistry of organic fluorophores as they pertain to mitigating such instabilities, with a specific focus on the development of stabilized fluorophores through derivatization. Self-healing organic fluorophores, wherein the triplet state is intramolecularly quenched by a covalently attached protective agent, exhibit markedly improved photostabilities. We discuss the potential for further enhancements towards the goal of developing “ultra-stable” fluorophores spanning the visible spectrum and how such fluorophores are likely to impact the future of single-molecule research. PMID:24177677

  5. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  6. Single-Molecule Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas; Janovjak, Harald; Fotiadis, Dimtrios; Kedrov, Alexej; Cisneros, David; Müller, Daniel J.

    Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides novel ways to characterize the structure-function relationship of native membrane proteins. High-resolution AFM topographs allow observing the structure of single proteins at sub-nanometer resolution as well as their conformational changes, oligomeric state, molecular dynamics and assembly. We will review these feasibilities illustrating examples of membrane proteins in native and reconstituted membranes. Classification of individual topographs of single proteins allows understanding the principles of motions of their extrinsic domains, to learn about their local structural flexibilities and to find the entropy minima of certain conformations. Combined with the visualization of functionally related conformational changes these insights allow understanding why certain flexibilities are required for the protein to function and how structurally flexible regions allow certain conformational changes. Complementary to AFM imaging, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments detect molecular interactions established within and between membrane proteins. The sensitivity of this method makes it possible to measure interactions that stabilize secondary structures such as transmembrane ?-helices, polypeptide loops and segments within. Changes in temperature or protein-protein assembly do not change the locations of stable structural segments, but influence their stability established by collective molecular interactions. Such changes alter the probability of proteins to choose a certain unfolding pathway. Recent examples have elucidated unfolding and refolding pathways of membrane proteins as well as their energy landscapes.

  7. Second harmonic generation correlation spectroscopy for single molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate a single molecule detection approach to further extend the detection limit of correlation spectroscopic techniques through the Second Harmonic Generation Correlation Spectroscopy (SHGCS). SHG signals with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were obtained from Barium titanium oxide, BaTiO(3) (BTO) nanocrystals (NCs) upon excitation by a femto-second laser fitted to the scanning confocal bench. The fluctuation of SHG signals from BTO NCs in transparent and turbid media was examined and their diffusion time and particle concentration were evaluated by autocorrelation. Proof-of-concept measurements indicate that water-dispersed BTO NCs at different concentrations yield an average diffusion time of 6.43 ± 0.68 ms and the detection limit of SHGCS was found to be at 814 ± 41 fM, approximately 100 folds below the detection limit of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The dynamics of BTO NCs was demonstrated in serum with high SNR and selectivity to show its potential applicability in biomedicine. High SNR and the sub-picomolar detection limit positions SHGCS as an excellent technique for ultralow single particle or single molecule experimentation in a complex medium. PMID:24216930

  8. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  9. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  10. High contrast single molecule tracking in the pericellular coat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; McLane, Louis T.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2014-03-01

    The pericellular coat is a robust, hydrated, polymer brush-like structure that can extend several micrometers into the extracellular space around living cells. By controlling access to the cell surface, acting as a filter and storage reservoir for proteins, and actively controlling tissue-immune system interactions, the cell coat performs many important functions at scales ranging from the single cell to whole tissues. The cell coat consists of a malleable backbone - the large polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) - with its structure, material properties, and ultimately its bio-functionality tuned by a diverse set of HA binding proteins. These proteins add charge, cross-links and growth factor-like ligands to the coat To probe the dynamic behavior of this soft biomaterial we have used high contrast single molecule imaging, based on highly inclined laser illumination, to observe individual fluorescently labeled HA binding proteins within the cell coat. Our work focuses on the cell coat of living chondrocyte (cartilage) cells, and in particular the effect of the large, highly charged, protein aggrecan on the properties of the coat. Through single molecule imaging we observe that aggrecan is tightly tethered to HA, and plays an important role in cell coat extension and stiffening.

  11. Probing the kinetics of single molecule protein folding.

    PubMed

    Leite, Vitor B P; Onuchic, José N; Stell, George; Wang, Jin

    2004-12-01

    We propose an approach to integrate the theory, simulations, and experiments in protein-folding kinetics. This is realized by measuring the mean and high-order moments of the first-passage time and its associated distribution. The full kinetics is revealed in the current theoretical framework through these measurements. In the experiments, information about the statistical properties of first-passage times can be obtained from the kinetic folding trajectories of single molecule experiments (for example, fluorescence). Theoretical/simulation and experimental approaches can be directly related. We study in particular the temperature-varying kinetics to probe the underlying structure of the folding energy landscape. At high temperatures, exponential kinetics is observed; there are multiple parallel kinetic paths leading to the native state. At intermediate temperatures, nonexponential kinetics appears, revealing the nature of the distribution of local traps on the landscape and, as a result, discrete kinetic paths emerge. At very low temperatures, exponential kinetics is again observed; the dynamics on the underlying landscape is dominated by a single barrier. The ratio between first-passage-time moments is proposed to be a good variable to quantitatively probe these kinetic changes. The temperature-dependent kinetics is consistent with the strange kinetics found in folding dynamics experiments. The potential applications of the current results to single-molecule protein folding are discussed. PMID:15465871

  12. Dual-Colored DNA Comb Polymers for Single Molecule Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Marciel, Amanda; Schroeder, Charles

    2014-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of branched biopolymers for single molecule rheology. In our work, we utilize a hybrid enzymatic-synthetic approach to graft ``short'' DNA branches to ``long'' DNA backbones, thereby producing macromolecular DNA comb polymers. The branches and backbones are synthesized via polymerase chain reaction with chemically modified deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs): ``short'' branches consist of Cy5-labeled dNTPs and a terminal azide group, and ``long'' backbones contain dibenzylcyclooctyne-modified (DBCO) dNTPs. In this way, we utilize strain-promoted, copper-free cycloaddition ``click'' reactions for facile grafting of azide-terminated branches at DBCO sites along backbones. Copper-free click reactions are bio-orthogonal and nearly quantitative when carried out under mild conditions. Moreover, comb polymers can be labeled with an intercalating dye (e.g., YOYO) for dual-color fluorescence imaging. We characterized these materials using gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and optical microscopy, with atomic force microscopy in progress. Overall, DNA combs are suitable for single molecule dynamics, and in this way, our work holds the potential to improve our understanding of topologically complex polymer melts and solutions.

  13. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  14. Single-molecule microscopy using tunable nanoscale confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Leith, Jason; Jia, Bojing; Michaud, François; Arsenault, Adriel; Martin, Andrew; Berard, Daniel; Leslie, Sabrina

    2013-09-01

    We present the design, construction and implementation of a modular microscopy device that transforms a basic inverted fluorescence microscope into a versatile single-molecule imaging system. The device uses Convex Lens- Induced Confinement (CLIC) to improve background rejection and extend diffusion-limited observation time. To facilitate its integration into a wide range of laboratories, this implementation of the CLIC device can use a standard flow-cell, into which the sample is loaded. By mechanically deforming the flow-cell, the device creates a tunable, wedge-shaped imaging chamber which we have modeled using finite element analysis simulations and characterized experimentally using interferometry. A powerful feature of CLIC imaging technology is the ability to examine single molecules under a continuum of applied confinement, from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. We demonstrate, using freely diffusing ?-phage DNA, that when the imposed confinement is on the scale of individual molecules their molecular conformations and diffusivity are altered significantly. To improve the flow-cell stiffness, seal, and re-usability, we have innovated the fabrication of thin PDMS-bonded flow-cells. The presented flow-cell CLIC technology can be combined with surface-lithography to provide an accessible and powerful approach to tune, trap, and image individual molecules under an extended range of imaging conditions. It is well-suited to tackling open problems in biophysics, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and chemistry.

  15. Single Molecule Observation of the Cyclization of Short DNA Duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyi, Teckla; Lee, I.-Ren; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-03-01

    In the presented work, a single molecule DNA cyclization assay was used to follow the looping kinetics of single DNA 83 bp molecules, utilizing single molecule fluorescence energy transfer (smFRET) technique. The assay was first prepared in a Na+ free condition and the majority of the DNA was in its unlooped form. A sudden Na+ jump was introduced at different concentrations (0.05-1.75M) and finally yielded DNA in its looping state by annealing the complementary single-strand overhangs of the assay. Looping and unlooping rates were obtained from the kinetic measurements. The result shows a positive and negative linear dependence of the Na+ concentration to the looping and unlooping rate, respectively, until they reach a plateau at 500 mM. The plateau persists until about 1M. For concentrations beyond 1M, an immoderate increase in looping rate is noticed while the unlooping rate does so gradually. Above 1M Na+ there is a preference of looping events that is attributed to the increase of the annealing rate of the overhangs rather than increased flexibility, consistent with earlier studies by Ibrahim Cisse et al.(2012). A protein mediated cyclization assay was also used in experiments with HU protein in which a dramatic increase in the looping rate is noticeable. However in high HU concentration, looping is prohibited implying filament formation.

  16. Tunable magnetoresistance in an asymmetrically coupled single-molecule junction.

    PubMed

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prüser, Henning; Sharp, John; Persson, Mats; Fisher, Andrew J; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F

    2015-03-01

    Phenomena that are highly sensitive to magnetic fields can be exploited in sensors and non-volatile memories. The scaling of such phenomena down to the single-molecule level may enable novel spintronic devices. Here, we report magnetoresistance in a single-molecule junction arising from negative differential resistance that shifts in a magnetic field at a rate two orders of magnitude larger than Zeeman shifts. This sensitivity to the magnetic field produces two voltage-tunable forms of magnetoresistance, which can be selected via the applied bias. The negative differential resistance is caused by transient charging of an iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule on a single layer of copper nitride (Cu2N) on a Cu(001) surface, and occurs at voltages corresponding to the alignment of sharp resonances in the filled and empty molecular states with the Cu(001) Fermi energy. An asymmetric voltage-divider effect enhances the apparent voltage shift of the negative differential resistance with magnetic field, which inherently is on the scale of the Zeeman energy. These results illustrate the impact that asymmetric coupling to metallic electrodes can have on transport through molecules, and highlight how this coupling can be used to develop molecular spintronic applications. PMID:25622229

  17. Single molecule studies of the neuronal SNARE fusion machinery

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Axel T.; Weninger, Keith; Bowen, Mark; Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    SNAREs are essential components of the machinery for Ca2+-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, resulting in neurotransmitter release into the synaptic cleft. While much is known about their biophysical and structural properties and their interactions with accessory proteins such as the Ca2+ sensor synaptotagmin, their precise role in membrane fusion remains an enigma. Ensemble studies of liposomes with reconstituted SNAREs have demonstrated that SNAREs and accessory proteins can trigger lipid mixing/fusion, but the inability to study individual fusion events has precluded molecular insights into the fusion process. Thus, this field is ripe for studies with single molecule methodology. In this review we discuss first applications of single-molecule approaches to observe reconstituted SNAREs, their complexes, associated proteins, and their effect on biological membranes. Some of the findings are provocative, such the possibility of parallel and anti-parallel SNARE complexes, or vesicle docking with only syntaxin and synaptobrevin, but have been confirmed by other experiments. PMID:19489736

  18. New antifouling platform characterized by single-molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji Young; Song, In Taek; Lau, K H Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoon, Tae-Young; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-03-12

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm(2) which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ?5 pg/cm(2) adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (?0.5 pg/cm(2)). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  19. Single-Molecule Electrical Random Resequencing of DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshiro, Takahito; Matsubara, Kazuki; Tsutsui, Makusu; Furuhashi, Masayuki; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2012-07-01

    Two paradigm shifts in DNA sequencing technologies--from bulk to single molecules and from optical to electrical detection--are expected to realize label-free, low-cost DNA sequencing that does not require PCR amplification. It will lead to development of high-throughput third-generation sequencing technologies for personalized medicine. Although nanopore devices have been proposed as third-generation DNA-sequencing devices, a significant milestone in these technologies has been attained by demonstrating a novel technique for resequencing DNA using electrical signals. Here we report single-molecule electrical resequencing of DNA and RNA using a hybrid method of identifying single-base molecules via tunneling currents and random sequencing. Our method reads sequences of nine types of DNA oligomers. The complete sequence of 5'-UGAGGUA-3' from the let-7 microRNA family was also identified by creating a composite of overlapping fragment sequences, which was randomly determined using tunneling current conducted by single-base molecules as they passed between a pair of nanoelectrodes.

  20. Single-molecule optical spectroscopy of autofluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2002-12-01

    Several genetically encoded autofluorescent proteins are now available, in which the emission arises from the formation of a fluorophore directly from the amino acids of the protein sequence. These proteins are heavily used in cellular biology to assess gene expression and protein localization. The optical behavior of such proteins has recently been described in vitro at the single-molecule level. These investigations have explored several yellow-emitting mutants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), the red-emitting DsRed protein, and the dual-GFP cameleon construct designed for fluorescence resonant energy transfer sensing of calcium ion binding. A variety of blinking, switching, and fluctuation effects have been observed, showing that several dark states are accessible after optical excitation, arising from variations in charge state, isomerization state, and photobleaching. The single-molecule spectroscopy of these systems will be surveyed by describing several illustrative examples. Although the autofluorescent proteins available at present need improvement in order to reach the performance of laser dye fluorophores, the novelty of these systems and their ease of use in biological contexts requires a continuing effort to understand the photophysical behavior.

  1. Linker dependence of interfacial electron transfer rates in Fe(II)-polypyridine sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, David N.; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Barnes, Lyndsay J.; Jakubikova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) convert solar energy to electricity employing dye molecules attached to a semiconductor surface. Some of the most efficient DSSCs use Ru-based chromophores. Fe-based dyes represent a cheaper and more environmentally friendly alternative to these expensive and toxic dyes. The photoactive state of Fe-based chromophores responsible for charge-separation at the dye-semiconductor interface is, however, deactivated on a sub-picosecond time scale via the intersystem crossing (ISC) into a manifold of low-lying photo-inactive quintet states. Therefore, development of Fe-based dyes capable of fast interfacial electron transfer (IET) leading to efficient charge separation on a time scale competitive with the ISC events is important. This work investigates how linker groups anchoring a prototypical Fe-based dye [Fe(bpy-L)2(CN)2] (bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, L = linker group) onto the TiO2 semiconductor surface influence the IET rates in the dye-semiconductor assemblies. Linker groups investigated include carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid, hydroxamate, catechol, and acetylacetonate. We employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to obtain absorption spectra of [Fe(bpy-L)2(CN)2] with each linker, and quantum dynamics simulations to investigate the IET rates between the dye and the (101) TiO2 anatase surface. For all attachments, TD-DFT calculations show similar absorption spectra with two main bands corresponding to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions. The quantum dynamics simulations predict that the utilization of the hydroxamate linker instead of the commonly used carboxylic acid linker will lead to a more efficient IET and better photon-to-current conversion efficiencies in Fe(II)-polypyridine sensitized solar cells.

  2. New single-molecule magnet based on Mn12 oxocarboxylate clusters with mixed carboxylate ligands, [Mn12O12(CN-o-C6H4CO2)12(CH3CO2)4(H2O)4]·8CH2Cl2: Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kushch, L A; Sasnovskaya, V D; Dmitriev, A I; Yagubskii, E B; Koplak, O V; Zorina, L V; Boukhvalov, D W

    2012-11-28

    A new high symmetry Mn(12) oxocarboxylate cluster [Mn(12)O(12)(CN-o-C(6)H(4)CO(2))(12)(CH(3)CO(2))(4)(H(2)O)(4)]·8CH(2)Cl(2) (1) with mixed carboxylate ligands is reported. It was synthesized by the standard carboxylate substitution method. 1 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4(1)/a. Complex 1 contains a [Mn(12)O(12)] core with eight CN-o-C(6)H(4)CO(2) ligands in the axial positions, four CH(3)CO(2) and four CN-o-C(6)H(4)CO(2) in equatorial positions. Four H(2)O molecules are bonded to four Mn atoms in an alternating up, down, up, down arrangement indicating a 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 isomer. The Mn(12) molecules in 1 are self-assembled by complementary hydrogen C-H···N bonds formed with participation of the axial o-cyanobenzoate ligands of the adjacent Mn(12) clusters. The lattice solvent molecules (CH(2)Cl(2)) are weakly interacted with Mn(12) units that results in solvent loss immediately after removal of the crystals from the mother liquor. The electronic structure and the intramolecular exchange parameters have been calculated. Mn 3d bands of 1 are rather broad, and the center of gravity of the bands shifts down from the Fermi level. The overlap between Mn 3d bands and 2p ones of the oxygen atoms from the carboxylate bridges is higher than in the parent Mn(12)-acetate cluster. These changes in the electronic structure provide a significant difference in the exchange interactions in comparison to Mn(12)-acetate. The magnetic properties have been studied on a dried (solvent-free) polycrystalline sample of 1. The dc magnetic susceptibility measurements in the 2-300 K temperature range support a high-spin ground state (S = 10). A bifurcation of temperature dependencies of magnetization taken under zero field cooled and field cooled conditions observed below 4.5 K is due to slow magnetization relaxation. Magnetization versus applied dc field exhibited a stepwise hysteresis loop at 2 K. The ac magnetic susceptibility data revealed the frequency dependent out-of-phase (?(M)'') signals characteristic of single-molecule magnets. PMID:23059752

  3. Understanding the electroluminescence emitted by single molecules in scanning tunneling microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buker, John; Kirczenow, George

    2008-09-01

    We explore theoretically the electroluminescence of single molecules. We adopt a local-electrode framework that is appropriate for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments where electroluminescence originates from individual molecules of moderate size on complex substrates: Couplings between the STM tip and molecule and between the molecule and multiple substrate sites are treated on the same footing as local electrodes contacting the molecule. Electron flow is modeled with the Lippmann-Schwinger Green’s function scattering technique. The evolution of the electronic energy levels of the molecule under bias is modeled assuming the total charge of the molecule to be invariant, consistent with Coulomb blockade considerations, but the electronic occupations of the molecular highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels vary with changing bias. The photon-emission rate is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule. We apply this theoretical approach to the STM/Zn-etioporphyrin/ Al2O3/NiAl(110) system and simulate various configurations of coupling strength between the molecule and substrate. We compare our results to the experimental observations of Qiu [Science 299, 542 (2003)] for this system and find that our model provides a comprehensive explanation of a multitude of previously unexplained observations. These include the different types of current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) that are observed experimentally, the observed association of electroluminescence with some CVCs and not others, and key properties of the observed photon spectra. Theoretical predictions are presented for further single-molecule electroluminescence experiments.

  4. X-ray induced demagnetization of single-molecule magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiser, Jan; Westerström, Rasmus; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald; Yang, Shangfeng; Popov, Alexey; Dunsch, Lothar; Greber, Thomas

    2014-07-21

    Low-temperature x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on the endohedral single-molecule magnet DySc{sub 2}N@C{sub 80} at the Dy M{sub 4,5} edges reveal a shrinking of the opening of the observed hysteresis with increasing x-ray flux. Time-dependent measurements show that the exposure of the molecules to x-rays resonant with the Dy M{sub 5} edge accelerates the relaxation of magnetization more than off-resonant x-rays. The results cannot be explained by a homogeneous temperature rise due to x-ray absorption. Moreover, the observed large demagnetization cross sections indicate that the resonant absorption of one x-ray photon induces the demagnetization of many molecules.

  5. Mechanisms of cellular proteostasis: insights from single-molecule approaches.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos J; Kaiser, Christian M; Maillard, Rodrigo A; Goldman, Daniel H; Wilson, Christian A M

    2014-01-01

    Cells employ a variety of strategies to maintain proteome homeostasis. Beginning during protein biogenesis, the translation machinery and a number of molecular chaperones promote correct de novo folding of nascent proteins even before synthesis is complete. Another set of molecular chaperones helps to maintain proteins in their functional, native state. Polypeptides that are no longer needed or pose a threat to the cell, such as misfolded proteins and aggregates, are removed in an efficient and timely fashion by ATP-dependent proteases. In this review, we describe how applications of single-molecule manipulation methods, in particular optical tweezers, are shedding new light on the molecular mechanisms of quality control during the life cycles of proteins. PMID:24895851

  6. Bayesian cluster identification in single-molecule localization microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Rubin-Delanchy, Patrick; Burn, Garth L; Griffié, Juliette; Williamson, David J; Heard, Nicholas A; Cope, Andrew P; Owen, Dylan M

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy techniques such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) produce pointillist data sets of molecular coordinates. Although many algorithms exist for the identification and localization of molecules from raw image data, methods for analyzing the resulting point patterns for properties such as clustering have remained relatively under-studied. Here we present a model-based Bayesian approach to evaluate molecular cluster assignment proposals, generated in this study by analysis based on Ripley's K function. The method takes full account of the individual localization precisions calculated for each emitter. We validate the approach using simulated data, as well as experimental data on the clustering behavior of CD3?, a subunit of the CD3 T cell receptor complex, in resting and activated primary human T cells. PMID:26436479

  7. Single-molecule paleoenzymology probes the chemistry of resurrected enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Inglés-Prieto, Alvaro; Zhao, Zi-Ming; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Kosuri, Pallav; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Kappock, T. Joseph; Tanokura, Masaru; Holmgren, Arne; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2011-01-01

    A journey back in time is possible at the molecular level by reconstructing proteins from extinct organisms. Here we report the reconstruction, based on sequence predicted by phylogenetic analysis, of seven Precambrian thioredoxin enzymes (Trx), dating back between ~1.4 and ~4 billion years (Gyr). The reconstructed enzymes are up to 32° C more stable than modern enzymes and the oldest show significantly higher activity than extant ones at pH 5. We probed their mechanisms of reduction using single-molecule force spectroscopy. From the force-dependency of the rate of reduction of an engineered substrate, we conclude that ancient Trxs utilize chemical mechanisms of reduction similar to those of modern enzymes. While Trx enzymes have maintained their reductase chemistry unchanged, they have adapted over a 4 Gyr time span to the changes in temperature and ocean acidity that characterize the evolution of the global environment from ancient to modern Earth. PMID:21460845

  8. Nonlinear irreversible thermodynamics of single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaría-Holek, I.; López-Alamilla, N. J.; Hidalgo-Soria, M.; Pérez-Madrid, A.

    2015-06-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics of single-molecule experiments subject to external constraining forces of a mechanical nature is presented. Extending Onsager's formalism to the nonlinear case of systems under nonequilibrium external constraints, we are able to calculate the entropy production and the general nonlinear kinetic equations for the variables involved. In particular, we analyze the case of RNA stretching protocols obtaining critical oscillations between different configurational states when forced by external means to remain in the unstable region of its free-energy landscape, as observed in experiments. We also calculate the entropy produced during these hopping events and show how resonant phenomena in stretching experiments of single RNA macromolecules may arise. We also calculate the hopping rates using Kramer's approach obtaining a good comparison with experiments.

  9. Exploiting single-molecule transcript sequencing for eukaryotic gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Schneider, Jessica; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Viehöver, Prisca; Montfort, Magda; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Weisshaar, Bernd; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method to predict and validate gene models using PacBio single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) cDNA reads. Ninety-eight percent of full-insert SMRT reads span complete open reading frames. Gene model validation using SMRT reads is developed as automated process. Optimized training and prediction settings and mRNA-seq noise reduction of assisting Illumina reads results in increased gene prediction sensitivity and precision. Additionally, we present an improved gene set for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and the first genome-wide gene set for spinach (Spinacia oleracea). The workflow and guidelines are a valuable resource to obtain comprehensive gene sets for newly sequenced genomes of non-model eukaryotes. PMID:26328666

  10. Single-molecule orientation measurements with a quadrated pupil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Adam S.; Backlund, Mikael P.; Lew, Matthew D.; Diezmann, Alexander R.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Moerner, W. E.

    2014-03-01

    We present a means of measuring the dipole orientation of a fluorescent, rotationally fixed single molecule (SM), using a specially designed phase mask, termed a "quadrated pupil," conjugate to the back focal plane of a conventional widefield microscope. In comparison to image-fitting techniques that infer orientation by matching simulations to defocused or excessively magnified images, the quadrated pupil approach is more robust to minor modeling discrepancies, defocus, and optical aberrations. Precision on the order of 1°-5° is achieved in proofof- concept experiments for both azimuthal (?) and polar (?) angles. Since the phase mask is implemented on a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) that may be deactivated without any mechanical perturbation of the sample or imaging system, the technique may be readily integrated into conventional imaging studies.

  11. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  12. Single-molecule protein sequencing through fingerprinting: computational assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Docter, Margreet; van Ginkel, Jetty; de Ridder, Dick; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-10-01

    Proteins are vital in all biological systems as they constitute the main structural and functional components of cells. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have brought the promise of complete proteomics by helping draft the human proteome. Yet, this commonly used protein sequencing technique has fundamental limitations in sensitivity. Here we propose a method for single-molecule (SM) protein sequencing. A major challenge lies in the fact that proteins are composed of 20 different amino acids, which demands 20 molecular reporters. We computationally demonstrate that it suffices to measure only two types of amino acids to identify proteins and suggest an experimental scheme using SM fluorescence. When achieved, this highly sensitive approach will result in a paradigm shift in proteomics, with major impact in the biological and medical sciences.

  13. Single-Molecule Detection in Micron-Sized Capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, David A.; Shen, Guoqing; Davis, Lloyd M.

    2004-11-01

    The detection of individual molecules in solution by laser-induced fluorescence is becoming an increasingly important tool for biophysics research and biotechnology applications. In a typical single-molecule detection (SMD) experiment, diffusion is the dominant mode of transport of fluorophores through the focused laser beam. In order to more rapidly process a large number of slowly diffusing bio-molecules for applications in pharmaceutical drug discovery, a flow can be introduced within a capillary. If the flow speed is sufficient, bio-molecules will be carried through the probe volume significantly faster than by diffusion alone. Here we discuss SMD near the tip of, and in, such micron-sized capillaries, with a high numerical-aperture microscope objective used for confocal-epi-illumination along the axis of the capillary. Problems such as molecular adsorption to the glass are also addressed.

  14. Single-molecule imaging of transcriptionally coupled and uncoupled splicing.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Diana Y; Shah, Khyati; Batish, Mona; Levandoski, Michael; Sinha, Sourav; Marras, Salvatore A E; Schedl, Paul; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2011-11-23

    Introns are removed from pre-mRNAs during transcription while the pre-mRNA is still tethered to the gene locus via RNA polymerase. However, during alternative splicing, it is important that splicing be deferred until all of the exons and introns involved in the choice have been synthesized. We have developed an in situ RNA imaging method with single-molecule sensitivity to define the intracellular sites of splicing. Using this approach, we found that the normally tight coupling between transcription and splicing is broken in situations where the intron's polypyrimidine tract is sequestered within strong secondary structures. We also found that in two cases of alternative splicing, in which certain exons are skipped due to the activity of the RNA-binding proteins Sxl and PTB, splicing is uncoupled from transcription. This uncoupling occurs only on the perturbed introns, whereas the preceding and succeeding introns are removed cotranscriptionally. PAPERCLIP: PMID:22118462

  15. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vukojevi?, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed. PMID:19011092

  16. Alternating-laser excitation: single-molecule FRET and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hohlbein, Johannes; Craggs, Timothy D; Cordes, Thorben

    2014-02-21

    The alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) scheme continues to expand the possibilities of fluorescence-based assays to study biological entities and interactions. Especially the combination of ALEX and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) has been very successful as ALEX enables the sorting of fluorescently labelled species based on the number and type of fluorophores present. ALEX also provides a convenient way of accessing the correction factors necessary for determining accurate molecular distances. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the concept and current applications of ALEX and we explicitly discuss how to obtain fully corrected distance information across the entire FRET range. We also present new ideas for applications of ALEX which will push the limits of smFRET-based experiments in terms of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of complex biological systems. PMID:24037326

  17. Mechanisms of Cellular Proteostasis: Insights from Single-Molecule Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Carlos J.; Kaiser, Christian M.; Maillard, Rodrigo A.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Wilson, Christian A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells employ a variety of strategies to maintain proteome homeostasis. Beginning during protein biogenesis, the translation machinery and a number of molecular chaperones promote correct de novo folding of nascent proteins even before synthesis is complete. Another set of molecular chaperones helps to maintain proteins in their functional, native state. Polypeptides that are no longer needed or pose a threat to the cell, such as misfolded proteins and aggregates, are removed in an efficient and timely fashion by ATP-dependent proteases. In this review, we describe how applications of single-molecule manipulation methods, in particular optical tweezers, are shedding new light on the molecular mechanisms of quality control during the life cycles of proteins. PMID:24895851

  18. Single Molecule Probing of Exocytotic Protein Interactions Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Vedrana; Liu, Wei; Mohideen, Umar; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Relatively recently, the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) emerged as a powerful tool for single molecule nanomechanical investigations. Parameters that can be measured by force spectroscopy using AFM, such as the force and total mechanical extension required to break bonds between various proteins can yield valuable insights into the nature of the bond (zippering vs. highly localized binding site), the sequence of its interactions and the energy landscape along the length of the interaction. In this review we discuss the use of AFM in force spectroscopy mode to study intermolecular interactions between the exocytotic proteins of the core SNARE complex. Information gathered by force spectroscopy of protein-protein interactions of this complex supplement previous results acquired with other techniques, and allows a deeper understanding of SNARE protein interactions and their role in exocytosis. PMID:20151046

  19. Eukaryotic transcriptional dynamics: from single molecules to cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Antoine; Chow, Carson C.; Singer, Robert H.; Larson, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is achieved through combinatorial interactions between regulatory elements in the human genome and a vast range of factors that modulate the recruitment and activity of RNA polymerase. Experimental approaches for studying transcription in vivo now extend from single-molecule techniques to genome-wide measurements. Parallel to these developments is the need for testable quantitative and predictive models for understanding gene regulation. These conceptual models must also provide insight into the dynamics of transcription and the variability that is observed at the single-cell level. In this Review, we discuss recent results on transcriptional regulation and also the models those results engender. We show how a non-equilibrium description informs our view of transcription by explicitly considering time-and energy-dependence at the molecular level. PMID:23835438

  20. Tristability in a light-actuated single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaowen; Mathonière, Corine; Jeon, Ie-Rang; Rouzières, Mathieu; Ozarowski, Andrew; Aubrey, Michael L; Gonzalez, Miguel I; Clérac, Rodolphe; Long, Jeffrey R

    2013-10-23

    Molecules exhibiting bistability have been proposed as elementary binary units (bits) for information storage, potentially enabling fast and efficient computing. In particular, transition metal complexes can display magnetic bistability via either spin-crossover or single-molecule magnet behavior. We now show that the octahedral iron(II) complexes in the molecular salt [Fe(1-propyltetrazole)6](BF4)2, when placed in its high-symmetry form, can combine both types of behavior. Light irradiation under an applied magnetic field enables fully reversible switching between an S = 0 state and an S = 2 state with either up (M(S) = +2) or down (M(S) = -2) polarities. The resulting tristability suggests the possibility of using molecules for ternary information storage in direct analogy to current binary systems that employ magnetic switching and the magneto-optical Kerr effect as write and read mechanisms. PMID:24066720

  1. Studies of a nickel-based single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Andres, Hanspeter; Basler, Reto; Blake, Alexander J; Cadiou, Cyril; Chaboussant, Gregory; Grant, Craig M; Güdel, Hans-Ulrich; Murrie, Mark; Parsons, Simon; Paulsen, Carley; Semadini, Fabrizzio; Villar, Vincent; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2002-11-01

    A cyclic complex [Ni(12)(chp)(12)(O(2)CMe)(12)(thf)(6)(H(2)O)(6)] (1) has been synthesised and studied (chp=6-chloro-2-pyridonate). Complex 1 exhibits ferromagnetic exchange between the S=1 centres, giving an S=12 spin ground state. Detailed studies demonstrate that it is a single-molecule magnet with an energy barrier of approximately 10 K for reorientation of magnetisation. Resonant quantum tunnelling is also observed. The field between resonances allows accurate measurement of D, which is 0.067 K. Inelastic neutron scattering studies have allowed exchange parameters to be derived accurately, which was impossible from susceptibility data alone. Three exchange interactions are required: two ferromagnetic nearest neighbour interactions of approximately 11 and 2 cm(-1) and an anti-ferromagnetic next nearest neighbour interaction of -0.9 cm(-1). PMID:12397588

  2. Processive cytoskeletal motors studied with single-molecule fluorescence techniques

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Vladislav; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Processive cytoskeletal motors from the myosin, kinesin, and dynein families walk on actin filaments and microtubules to drive cellular transport and organization in eukaryotic cells. These remarkable molecular machines are able to take hundreds of successive steps at speeds of up to several microns per second, allowing them to effectively move vesicles and organelles throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we focus on single-molecule fluorescence techniques and discuss their wide-ranging applications to the field of cytoskeletal motor research. We cover both traditional fluorescence and sub-diffraction imaging of motors, providing examples of how fluorescence data can be used to measure biophysical parameters of motors such as coordination, stepping mechanism, gating, and processivity. We also outline some remaining challenges in the field and suggest future directions. PMID:24882363

  3. Subnanometre enzyme mechanics probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pelz, Benjamin; Žoldák, Gabriel; Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin; Rief, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are molecular machines that bind substrates specifically, provide an adequate chemical environment for catalysis and exchange products rapidly, to ensure fast turnover rates. Direct information about the energetics that drive conformational changes is difficult to obtain. We used subnanometre single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the energetic drive of substrate-dependent lid closing in the enzyme adenylate kinase. Here we show that in the presence of the bisubstrate inhibitor diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), closing and opening of both lids is cooperative and tightly coupled to inhibitor binding. Surprisingly, binding of the substrates ADP and ATP exhibits a much smaller energetic drive towards the fully closed state. Instead, we observe a new dominant energetic minimum with both lids half closed. Our results, combining experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, give detailed mechanical insights into how an enzyme can cope with the seemingly contradictory requirements of rapid substrate exchange and tight closing, to ensure efficient catalysis. PMID:26906294

  4. Subnanometre enzyme mechanics probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Benjamin; Žoldák, Gabriel; Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin; Rief, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are molecular machines that bind substrates specifically, provide an adequate chemical environment for catalysis and exchange products rapidly, to ensure fast turnover rates. Direct information about the energetics that drive conformational changes is difficult to obtain. We used subnanometre single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the energetic drive of substrate-dependent lid closing in the enzyme adenylate kinase. Here we show that in the presence of the bisubstrate inhibitor diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), closing and opening of both lids is cooperative and tightly coupled to inhibitor binding. Surprisingly, binding of the substrates ADP and ATP exhibits a much smaller energetic drive towards the fully closed state. Instead, we observe a new dominant energetic minimum with both lids half closed. Our results, combining experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, give detailed mechanical insights into how an enzyme can cope with the seemingly contradictory requirements of rapid substrate exchange and tight closing, to ensure efficient catalysis. PMID:26906294

  5. Low-temperature phonoemissive tunneling rates in single molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Garg, Anupam

    2016-03-01

    Tunneling between the two lowest energy levels of single molecule magnets with Ising type anisotropy, accompanied by the emission or absorption of phonons, is considered. Quantitatively accurate calculations of the rates for such tunneling are performed for a model Hamiltonian especially relevant to the best studied example, Fe8. Two different methods are used: high-order perturbation theory in the spin-phonon interaction and the non-Ising-symmetric parts of the spin Hamiltonian, and a novel semiclassical approach based on spin-coherent-state-path-integral instantons. The methods are found to be in good quantitative agreement with other, and consistent with previous approaches to the problem. The implications of these results for magnetization of molecular solids of these molecules are discussed briefly.

  6. Subnanometre enzyme mechanics probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelz, Benjamin; Žoldák, Gabriel; Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin; Rief, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Enzymes are molecular machines that bind substrates specifically, provide an adequate chemical environment for catalysis and exchange products rapidly, to ensure fast turnover rates. Direct information about the energetics that drive conformational changes is difficult to obtain. We used subnanometre single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the energetic drive of substrate-dependent lid closing in the enzyme adenylate kinase. Here we show that in the presence of the bisubstrate inhibitor diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), closing and opening of both lids is cooperative and tightly coupled to inhibitor binding. Surprisingly, binding of the substrates ADP and ATP exhibits a much smaller energetic drive towards the fully closed state. Instead, we observe a new dominant energetic minimum with both lids half closed. Our results, combining experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, give detailed mechanical insights into how an enzyme can cope with the seemingly contradictory requirements of rapid substrate exchange and tight closing, to ensure efficient catalysis.

  7. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central ? -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the ? -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  8. Progress towards DNA sequencing at the single molecule level

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.

    1995-12-01

    We describe progress towards sequencing DNA at the single molecule level. Our technique involves incorporation of fluorescently tagged nucleotides into a targeted sequence, anchoring the labeled DNA strand in a flowing stream, sequential exonuclease digestion of the DNA strand, and efficient detection and identification of single tagged nucleotides. Experiments demonstrating strand specific exonuclease digestion of fluorescently labeled DNA anchored in flow as well as the detection of single cleaved fluorescently tagged nucleotides from a small number of anchored DNA fragments axe described. We find that the turnover rate of Esherichia coli exonuclease III on fluorescently labeled DNA in flow at 36{degree}C is {approximately}7 nucleotides per DNA strand per second, which is approximately the same as that measured for this enzyme on native DNA under static, saturated (excess enzyme) conditions. Experiments demonstrating the efficient detection of single fluorescent molecules delivered electrokinetically to a {approximately}3 pL probe volume are also described.

  9. Linear trinuclear cobalt(II) single molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhu; Brown, Andrew J; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Gao, Song

    2015-02-14

    The introduction of NaBPh(4) into a methanolic solution of CoCl(2)·(6)H(2)O and 2-[(pyridine-2-ylimine)-methyl]phenol (Hpymp) afforded {[Co(II)(3)(pymp)(4)(MeOH)(2)][BPh(4)](2)}·(2)MeOH (1) with a centro-symmetrically linear trinuclear structure. Magnetic analysis of 1 exhibited significant intracluster ferromagnetic exchange (2.4 cm(-1)) and slow relaxation of magnetization in both zero and non-zero static fields below 5 K, giving the first [Co(II)(3)] single molecule magnet with an effective energy barrier of 17.2(3) cm(-1) under a 500 Oe dc field. PMID:25562308

  10. Probing local currents in semiconductors with single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruge, Jean-Michel; Orrit, Michel

    2001-11-01

    The narrow zero-phonon lines of single molecules at low temperatures can be used as sensitive probes for slow dynamical processes in solids at nanometer scales. Here we propose to probe electric conduction in semiconductors. In poorly conducting samples of ZnO, we found that only a small fraction of the molecules react to electric currents, but these reactions can be very strong, leading to line broadening or to changes in the fluorescence autocorrelation function. Even for moderate applied voltages, we found a few ``hot spots'' pointing to a strong spatial concentration of joule heating in areas less than 100 nm in size. A single molecule can therefore act as a nanothermometer. In more conducting samples of indium-tin oxide, we found even more surprising effects. For most molecules, we observed large shifts of the molecular lines under static voltages. The shift does not arise from a conventional Stark effect and cannot be attributed to lattice heating because the lines do not broaden, even for the highest voltages we used. We propose that the shift is caused by a change of polarizability of the semiconductor on application of a current, possibly related to hot carriers. When we applied ac currents to the sample, we observed clear resonant structures at very low frequencies, between 100 Hz and a few MHz. The resonance spectra were completely different for different molecules in the same laser spot of less than 1 micrometer in radius. We also observed autooscillations of the molecular transition frequency when a dc voltage was applied to the semiconductor film, with a clear threshold and oscillation frequencies lower than 100 kHz. The interpretation of these effects is still open, but we think that the molecules are very close to the semiconductor surface, making image effects quite strong. The surprising resonating systems we discovered could be related to recharging waves, whose existence was predicted theoretically some 30 years ago in compensated semiconductors.

  11. Determining Serpin Conformational Distributions with Single Molecule Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Mushero, Nicole; Gershenson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Conformational plasticity is key to inhibitory serpin function, and this plasticity gives serpins relatively easy access to alternative, dysfunctional conformations. Thus, a given serpin population may contain both functional and dysfunctional proteins. Single molecule fluorescence (SMF), with its ability to interrogate one fluorescently labeled protein at a time, is a powerful method for elucidating conformational distributions and monitoring how these distributions change over time. SMF and related methods have been particularly valuable for characterizing serpin polymerization. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments have revealed a second lag phase during in vitro α1-antitrypsin polymerization associated with the formation of smaller oligomers that then condense to form longer polymers [Purkayastha, P., Klemke, J. W., Lavender, S., Oyola, R., Cooperman, B. S., and Gai, F. (2005). Alpha 1-antitrypsin polymerization: A fluorescence correlation spectroscopic study. Biochemistry 44, 2642–2649.]. SMF studies of in vitro neuroserpin polymerization have confirmed that a monomeric intermediate is required for polymer formation while providing a test of proposed polymerization mechanisms [Chiou, A., Hägglöf, P., Orte, A., Chen, A. Y., Dunne, P. D., Belorgey, D., Karlsson-Li, S., Lomas, D., and Klenerman, D. (2009)]. Probing neuroserpin polymerization and interaction with amyloid-beta peptides using single molecule fluorescence. Biophys. J. 97, 2306–2315.]. SMF has also been used to monitor protease–serpin interactions. Single pair Förster resonance energy transfer studies of covalent protease–serpin complexes suggest that the extent of protease structural disruption in the complex is protease dependent [Liu, L., Mushero, N., Hedstrom, L., and Gershenson, A. (2006). Conformational distributions of protease-serpin complexes: A partially translocated complex. Biochemistry 45, 10865–10872.]. SMF techniques are still evolving and the combination of SMF with encapsulation methods has the potential to provide more detailed information on the conformational changes associated with serpin polymerization, protease–serpin complex formation, and serpin folding. PMID:22078542

  12. Single-cell and single-molecule laser biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl O.; Bauer, Eckhard; Fiedler, Ursula; Hoyer, Carsten; Koenig, Karsten; Monajembashi, Shamci

    1996-01-01

    While lasers have found a wide field of application in the analysis of cells and biomolecules, their use in manipulation is less common. Now, new applications of lasers are emerging, which aim at cells and even molecules as biotechnological individuals: For example, in single cell gel electrophoresis individual cells are irradiated by UV laser pulses which cause radiation damage to DNA. When the whole cell is positioned in an electric field and the UV induced damages are converted into DNA strand breaks, the resulting DNA fragments are eluted out of the cell nucleus. Small fragments are running further than large ones. After staining of the DNA fragments, the cell has the appearance like a comet (therefore comet assay). The tail moment, a parameter quantifying the shape of the tail, gives information on the degree of DNA damage. The kinetics of DNA damage induction can be described by a type of exponential law with parameters which are related to radiation sensitivity of the DNA. A further emerging technique aims at DNA as a molecular individuum. One pivotal step for single molecule DNA analysis is single molecule handling. For that purpose, a DNA molecule is coupled to a micrometer sized polystyrene bead, either via an avidin-biotin bridge or, more specifically, by strand recognition, and labeled with fluorescence dyes such as DAPI. In order to visualize the dynamics of individual DNA molecules, highly sensitive video processing and single photon counting is required. Moving the polystyrene bead using optical tweezers, the molecule can be deformed, i.e., bent, turned or stretched. Using a laser microbeam, the same individual molecule can be cut into smaller portions.

  13. Single-molecule imaging on living bacterial cell surface by high-speed AFM.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hayato; Taoka, Azuma; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Asano, Tomoya; Ando, Toshio; Fukumori, Yoshihiro

    2012-09-14

    Advances in microscopy have contributed to many biologic discoveries. Electron microscopic techniques such as cryo-electron tomography are remarkable tools for imaging the interiors of bacterial cells in the near-native state, whereas optical microscopic techniques such as fluorescence imaging are useful for following the dynamics of specific single molecules in living cells. Neither technique, however, can be used to visualize the structural dynamics of a single molecule at high resolution in living cells. In the present study, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) to image the molecular dynamics of living bacterial cell surfaces. HS-AFM visualizes the dynamic molecular processes of isolated proteins at sub-molecular resolution without the need for complicated sample preparation. In the present study, magnetotactic bacterial cells were anchored in liquid medium on substrate modified by poly-L-lysine and glutaraldehyde. High-resolution HS-AFM images of live cell surfaces showed that the bacterial outer membrane was covered with a net-like structure comprising holes and the hole rims framing them. Furthermore, HS-AFM captured the dynamic movement of the surface ultrastructure, showing that the holes in the net-like structure slowly diffused in the cell surface. Nano-dissection revealed that porin trimers constitute the net-like structure. Here, we report for the first time the direct observation of dynamic molecular architectures on a live cell surface using HS-AFM. PMID:22613761

  14. Switching of a coupled spin pair in a single-molecule junction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Kisslinger, Ferdinand; Ballmann, Stefan; Schramm, Frank; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai; Bodenstein, Tilmann; Fuhr, Olaf; Secker, Daniel; Fink, Karin; Ruben, Mario; Weber, Heiko B

    2013-08-01

    Single-molecule spintronics investigates electron transport through magnetic molecules that have an internal spin degree of freedom. To understand and control these individual molecules it is important to read their spin state. For unpaired spins, the Kondo effect has been observed as a low-temperature anomaly at small voltages. Here, we show that a coupled spin pair in a single magnetic molecule can be detected and that a bias voltage can be used to switch between two states of the molecule. In particular, we use the mechanically controlled break-junction technique to measure electronic transport through a single-molecule junction containing two coupled spin centres that are confined on two Co(2+) ions. Spin-orbit configuration interaction methods are used to calculate the combined spin system, where the ground state is found to be a pseudo-singlet and the first excitations behave as a pseudo-triplet. Experimentally, these states can be assigned to the absence and occurrence of a Kondo-like zero-bias anomaly in the low-temperature conductance data, respectively. By applying finite bias, we can repeatedly switch between the pseudo-singlet state and the pseudo-triplet state. PMID:23851359

  15. An approach for an advanced anode interfacial layer with electron-blocking ability to achieve high-efficiency organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jun-Seok; Yun, Jin-Mun; Kang, Minji; Khim, Dongyoon; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Soon; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial properties of PEDOT:PSS, pristine r-GO, and r-GO with sulfonic acid (SR-GO) in organic photovoltaic are investigated to elucidate electron-blocking property of PEDOT:PSS anode interfacial layer (AIL), and to explore the possibility of r-GO as electron-blocking layers. The SR-GO results in an optimized power conversion efficiency of 7.54% for PTB7-th:PC71BM and 5.64% for P3HT:IC61BA systems. By combining analyses of capacitance-voltage and photovoltaic-parameters dependence on light intensity, it is found that recombination process at SR-GO/active film is minimized. In contrast, the devices using r-GO without sulfonic acid show trap-assisted recombination. The enhanced electron-blocking properties in PEDOT:PSS and SR-GO AILs can be attributed to surface dipoles at AIL/acceptor. Thus, for electron-blocking, the AIL/acceptor interface should be importantly considered in OPVs. Also, by simply introducing sulfonic acid unit on r-GO, excellent contact selectivity can be realized in OPVs. PMID:25343490

  16. Placing Single-Molecule T4 Lysozyme Enzymes on a Bacterial Cell Surface: Toward Probing Single-Molecule Enzymatic Reaction in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-07-01

    TheT4 lysozyme enzymatic hydrolyzation reaction of bacterial cell walls is an important biological process, and single-molecule enzymatic reaction dynamics had been studied under physiological condition using purified E. Coli cell walls as substrates. Here, we report progress toward characterizing the T4 lysozyme enzymatic reaction on a living bacterial cell wall using a combined single-molecule placement and spectroscopy. Placing a dye-labeled single T4 lysozyme molecule on a targeted cell wall by using a hydrodynamic micro-injection approach, we monitored single-molecule rotational motions during binding, attachment to, and dissociation from the cell wall by tracing single-molecule fluorescence intensity time trajectories and polarization. The single-molecule attachment duration of the T4 lysozyme to the cell wall during enzymatic reactions was typically shorter than photobleaching time under physiological conditions.

  17. The study of single anticancer peptides interacting with HeLa cell membranes by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yuping; Huang, Jinfeng; Tan, Juanjuan; Gao, Gui; Liu, Shuheng; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of biophysical parameters (e.g. charge, hydrophobicity, helicity) of peptides on the mechanism of anticancer activity, we applied a single molecule technique--force spectroscopy based on atomic force microscope (AFM)--to study the interaction force at the single molecule level. The activity of the peptide and analogs against HeLa cells exhibited a strong correlation with the hydrophobicity of peptides. Our results indicated that the action mode between ?-helical peptides and cancer cells was largely hydrophobicity-dependent.To determine the effects of biophysical parameters (e.g. charge, hydrophobicity, helicity) of peptides on the mechanism of anticancer activity, we applied a single molecule technique--force spectroscopy based on atomic force microscope (AFM)--to study the interaction force at the single molecule level. The activity of the peptide and analogs against HeLa cells exhibited a strong correlation with the hydrophobicity of peptides. Our results indicated that the action mode between ?-helical peptides and cancer cells was largely hydrophobicity-dependent. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Peptide design, biophysical properties, biological activities and experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11541g

  18. Effects of bonding type and interface geometry on coherent transport through the single-molecule magnet Mn12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Garcia-Suarez, Victor; Ferrer, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    We investigate coherent electron transport through the single-molecule magnet Mn12, connected to Au electrodes, using the nonequilibrium Green's function method and density-functional theory. We analyze the impact on the electronic properties, and charge and spin transport across the junction of (i) using different bonding mechanisms and linker molecules; (ii) letting the geometry of the junction relax; (iii) using different molecular orientations. We consider nine interface geometries leading to five different bonding mechanisms and two molecular orientations. The two molecular orientations of Mn12 considered correspond to the magnetic easy axis of Mn12 parallel or normal to the direction of the electron transport. The general trend among the different bonding types and molecular orientations obtained from this study may be applied to transport through other single-molecule magnets.

  19. Single Molecule Detection in Living Biological Cells using Carbon Nanotube Optical Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nanoscale sensing elements offer promise for single molecule analyte detection in physically or biologically constrained environments. Molecular adsorption can be amplified via modulation of sharp singularities in the electronic density of states that arise from 1D quantum confinement [1]. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), as single molecule optical sensors [2-3], offer unique advantages such as photostable near-infrared (n-IR) emission for prolonged detection through biological media, single-molecule sensitivity and, nearly orthogonal optical modes for signal transduction that can be used to identify distinct classes of analytes. Selective binding to the SWNT surface is difficult to engineer [4]. In this lecture, we will briefly review the immerging field of fluorescent diagnostics using band gap emission from SWNT. In recent work, we demonstrate that even a single pair of SWNT provides at least four optical modes that can be modulated to uniquely fingerprint chemical agents by the degree to which they alter either the emission band intensity or wavelength. We validate this identification method in vitro by demonstrating detection and identification of six genotoxic analytes, including chemotherapeutic drugs and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are spectroscopically differentiated into four distinct classes. We also demonstrate single-molecule sensitivity in detecting hydrogen peroxide, one of the most common genotoxins and an important cellular signal. Finally, we employ our sensing and fingerprinting method of these analytes in real time within live 3T3 cells, demonstrating the first multiplexed optical detection from a nanoscale biosensor and the first label-free tool to optically discriminate between genotoxins. We will also discuss our recent efforts to fabricate biomedical sensors for real time detection of glucose and other important physiologically relevant analytes in-vivo. The response of embedded SWNT in a swellable hydrogel construct to osmotic pressure gradients will be discussed, as well as its potential as a unique transduction mechanism for a new class of implantable sensors. [4pt] [1] Saito, R., Dresselhaus, G. & Dresselhaus, M. S. Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes (Imperial College Press, London, 1998). [0pt] [2] Barone, P. W., Baik, S., Heller, D. A. & Strano, M. S. Near-Infrared Optical Sensors Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes. Nature Materials 4, 86-92 (2005). [0pt] [3] Jeng, E. S., Moll, A. E., Roy, A. C., Gastala, J. B. & Strano, M. S. Detection of DNA hybridization using the near infrared band-gap fluorescence of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Nano Letters 6, 371-375 (2006). [0pt] [4] Heller, D. A. et al. Optical detection of DNA conformational polymorphism on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Science 311, 508-511 (2006).

  20. Investigations of electron-injection mechanisms and interfacial chemical reactions of Bphen doped with rubidium carbonate in OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Hsin; Leem, Dong-Seok; Lin, C. T.; Lee, G. R.; Pi, Tun-Wen; Kim, Jang-Joo; Wu, Chih-I.

    2008-08-01

    The effectiveness of carrier injection in electron transport layers has been investigated for high efficiency organic light emitting devices. Via ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), the carrier band structures, interfacial interactions and electron-injection mechanisms are discussed. Acting as a good hole blocking layer with higher mobility for electrons, 4,7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (Bphen) was chosen to be the electron transport layer. The performance of device used Rb2CO3 doped into Bphen is obviously better than the device even used LiF with aluminum as cathode. According to the UPS spectra, the Fermi level of Bphen after doped with the ratio of 2% and 8% rubidium carbonate (Rb2CO3) shifts toward the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital as a result of charge transfer from rubidium atom to Bphen, showing that electron-injection ability would be improved based on strong n-type doping effect. Moreover, when aluminum is deposited as a thin layer on the surface of Bphen doped with Rb2CO3, the peak around 5 eV, which is attributed to the delocalized Pi-electrons decreases as gap states appear around 2.8 eV at the top of the highest occupied molecular orbital. There are changes in the binding energy of core levels of rubidium, nitrogen and aluminum, which indicates a negative charge transfer to Bphen at the interface that could have the reduction of electroninjection barrier height. Thus, the interfacial chemical reaction leads to the excellent electron injection ability could be demonstrated.

  1. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Ji-Young Lee

    2006-12-12

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA was probed with fluorescently-labeled probe molecules and imaged. When only the probes were stained and hybridized in a vial, it had 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range with a detection limit of {approx}0.7 copy/cell. A second dye was added to lower the false positive levels. Although there was a sacrifice of two orders of magnitude in detection limit, the number of false positives was reduced to zero. HPV-16 DNA was also hybridized and detected on surface-tethered probes. When the entire human genomic DNA and HPV was labeled and hybridized, the detection limit was similar to that of one-color assay detected in capillary. However, non-specific adsorption was high, and the dynamic range was narrow because of saturation of the surface and electrostatic repulsion between hybridized targets on the surface. The second probe was introduced to lower non-specific adsorption, and the strategy succeeded in 4 orders of magnitude linear dynamic range in a log-log plot, along with 2.4 copies/cell detection limit. DNA extracts of cell lines that contained a known copy number of HPV-16 DNA were tested with the four strategies described above. The calculated numbers from observed molecule counts matched the known values. Results from the Pap test sample with added HPV DNA were similar to those of purified DNA, suggesting our method is compatible with the conventional Pap test sample collection method. Further optimization will be needed before this single molecule level detection and identification can actually be used in a real clinical lab, but it has good potential and applicability. Improvement such as automated imaging and scanning, more accurate data processing software as well as sensitive camera, should help increase the efficiency and throughput.

  2. Interfacial electronic transport phenomena in single crystalline Fe-MgO-Fe thin barrier junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Gangineni, R. B.; Negulescu, B.; Baraduc, C.; Gaudin, G.

    2014-05-05

    Spin filtering effects in nano-pillars of Fe-MgO-Fe single crystalline magnetic tunnel junctions are explored with two different sample architectures and thin MgO barriers (thickness: 3–8 monolayers). The two architectures, with different growth and annealing conditions of the bottom electrode, allow tuning the quality of the bottom Fe/MgO interface. As a result, an interfacial resonance states (IRS) is observed or not depending on this interface quality. The IRS contribution, observed by spin polarized tunnel spectroscopy, is analyzed as a function of the MgO barrier thickness. Our experimental findings agree with theoretical predictions concerning the symmetry of the low energy (0.2?eV) interfacial resonance states: a mixture of ?{sub 1}-like and ?{sub 5}-like symmetries.

  3. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  4. Compact Quantum Dots for Single-molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew M.; Nie, Shuming

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms of biomolecular function and for visualizing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of molecular behaviors that underlie cellular biology 1-4. To image an individual molecule of interest, it is typically conjugated to a fluorescent tag (dye, protein, bead, or quantum dot) and observed with epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While dyes and fluorescent proteins have been the mainstay of fluorescence imaging for decades, their fluorescence is unstable under high photon fluxes necessary to observe individual molecules, yielding only a few seconds of observation before complete loss of signal. Latex beads and dye-labeled beads provide improved signal stability but at the expense of drastically larger hydrodynamic size, which can deleteriously alter the diffusion and behavior of the molecule under study. Quantum dots (QDs) offer a balance between these two problematic regimes. These nanoparticles are composed of semiconductor materials and can be engineered with a hydrodynamically compact size with exceptional resistance to photodegradation 5. Thus in recent years QDs have been instrumental in enabling long-term observation of complex macromolecular behavior on the single molecule level. However these particles have still been found to exhibit impaired diffusion in crowded molecular environments such as the cellular cytoplasm and the neuronal synaptic cleft, where their sizes are still too large 4,6,7. Recently we have engineered the cores and surface coatings of QDs for minimized hydrodynamic size, while balancing offsets to colloidal stability, photostability, brightness, and nonspecific binding that have hindered the utility of compact QDs in the past 8,9. The goal of this article is to demonstrate the synthesis, modification, and characterization of these optimized nanocrystals, composed of an alloyed HgxCd1-xSe core coated with an insulating CdyZn1-yS shell, further coated with a multidentate polymer ligand modified with short polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains (Figure 1). Compared with conventional CdSe nanocrystals, HgxCd1-xSe alloys offer greater quantum yields of fluorescence, fluorescence at red and near-infrared wavelengths for enhanced signal-to-noise in cells, and excitation at non-cytotoxic visible wavelengths. Multidentate polymer coatings bind to the nanocrystal surface in a closed and flat conformation to minimize hydrodynamic size, and PEG neutralizes the surface charge to minimize nonspecific binding to cells and biomolecules. The end result is a brightly fluorescent nanocrystal with emission between 550-800 nm and a total hydrodynamic size near 12 nm. This is in the same size range as many soluble globular proteins in cells, and substantially smaller than conventional PEGylated QDs (25-35 nm). PMID:23093375

  5. Compact quantum dots for single-molecule imaging.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Smith AM; Nie S

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms of biomolecular function and for visualizing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of molecular behaviors that underlie cellular biology (1-4). To image an individual molecule of interest, it is typically conjugated to a fluorescent tag (dye, protein, bead, or quantum dot) and observed with epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While dyes and fluorescent proteins have been the mainstay of fluorescence imaging for decades, their fluorescence is unstable under high photon fluxes necessary to observe individual molecules, yielding only a few seconds of observation before complete loss of signal. Latex beads and dye-labeled beads provide improved signal stability but at the expense of drastically larger hydrodynamic size, which can deleteriously alter the diffusion and behavior of the molecule under study. Quantum dots (QDs) offer a balance between these two problematic regimes. These nanoparticles are composed of semiconductor materials and can be engineered with a hydrodynamically compact size with exceptional resistance to photodegradation (5). Thus in recent years QDs have been instrumental in enabling long-term observation of complex macromolecular behavior on the single molecule level. However these particles have still been found to exhibit impaired diffusion in crowded molecular environments such as the cellular cytoplasm and the neuronal synaptic cleft, where their sizes are still too large (4,6,7). Recently we have engineered the cores and surface coatings of QDs for minimized hydrodynamic size, while balancing offsets to colloidal stability, photostability, brightness, and nonspecific binding that have hindered the utility of compact QDs in the past (8,9). The goal of this article is to demonstrate the synthesis, modification, and characterization of these optimized nanocrystals, composed of an alloyed HgxCd1-xSe core coated with an insulating CdyZn1-yS shell, further coated with a multidentate polymer ligand modified with short polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains (Figure 1). Compared with conventional CdSe nanocrystals, HgxCd1-xSe alloys offer greater quantum yields of fluorescence, fluorescence at red and near-infrared wavelengths for enhanced signal-to-noise in cells, and excitation at non-cytotoxic visible wavelengths. Multidentate polymer coatings bind to the nanocrystal surface in a closed and flat conformation to minimize hydrodynamic size, and PEG neutralizes the surface charge to minimize nonspecific binding to cells and biomolecules. The end result is a brightly fluorescent nanocrystal with emission between 550-800 nm and a total hydrodynamic size near 12 nm. This is in the same size range as many soluble globular proteins in cells, and substantially smaller than conventional PEGylated QDs (25-35 nm).

  6. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Schmidt, Torsten; Jemt, Anders; Sahlén, Pelin; Sychugov, Ilya; Lundeberg, Joakim; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to ?7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection. PMID:26180050

  7. An azophenine radical-bridged Fe2 single-molecule magnet with record magnetic exchange coupling.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ie-Rang; Park, Jesse G; Xiao, Dianne J; Harris, T David

    2013-11-13

    One-electron reduction of the complex [(TPyA)2Fe(II)2((NPh)L(2-))](2+) (TPyA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, (NPh)LH2 = azophenine = N,N',N",N'''-tetraphenyl-2,5-diamino-1,4-diiminobenzoquinone) affords the complex [(TPyA)2Fe(II)2((NPh)L(3-•))](+). X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirm that the reduction occurs on (NPh)L(2-) to give an S = 1/2 radical bridging ligand. Dc magnetic susceptibility measurements demonstrate the presence of extremely strong direct antiferromagnetic exchange between S = 2 Fe(II) centers and (NPh)L(3-•) in the reduced complex, giving an S = 7/2 ground state with an estimated coupling constant magnitude of |J| ? 900 cm(-1). Mössbauer spectroscopy and ac magnetic susceptibility reveal that this complex behaves as a single-molecule magnet with a spin relaxation barrier of U(eff) = 50(1) cm(-1). To our knowledge, this complex exhibits by far the strongest magnetic exchange coupling ever to be observed in a single-molecule magnet. PMID:24164631

  8. Single molecule localization deep within thick cells; a novel super-resolution microscope.

    PubMed

    Tafteh, Reza; Scriven, David R L; Moore, Edwin D W; Chou, Keng C

    2016-01-01

    A novel 3D imaging system based on single-molecule localization microscopy is presented to allow high-accuracy drift-free (<0.7 nm lateral; 2.5 nm axial) imaging many microns deep into a cell. When imaging deep within the cell, distortions of the point-spread function result in an inaccurate and very compressed Z distribution. For the system to accurately represent the position of each blink, a series of depth-dependent calibrations are required. The system and its allied methodology are applied to image the ryanodine receptor in the cardiac myocyte. Using the depth-dependent calibration, the receptors deep within the cell are spread over a Z range that is many hundreds of nanometers greater than implied by conventional analysis. We implemented a time domain filter to detect overlapping blinks that were not filtered by a stringent goodness of fit criterion. This filter enabled us to resolve the structure of the individual (30 nm square) receptors giving a result similar to that obtained with electron tomography. High-accuracy deep imaging of the ryanodine receptor in the cardiac myocyte, using single-molecule localization microscopy. Depth-dependent calibrations are performed for accurate depth localization. The optical design featuring two independent and variable focal planes allows real-time feedback for drift-free deep imaging. PMID:26249021

  9. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  10. Visualisation of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale with single molecule localisation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuwe, Christian; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szekeres, G.; Csete, M.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Mahajan, Sumeet; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonic coupling of light to free electrons on metallic surfaces allows the confinement of electric fields far below the optical diffraction limit. Scattering processes of molecules placed into these plasmonic `hotspots' are dramatically enhanced[1] which is commonly used to increase the sensitivity of spectroscopic techniques for biological and chemical sensor applications [2, 3]. Strikingly, hardly any measurement technique exists for the direct visualisation and characterisation of the underlying nanoscopic electromagnetic field distributions that either do not perturb the field [3, 4] or require complex electron beam imaging [5]. In this paper we introduce surface enhanced localisation microscopy (SELM), demonstrating the direct visualisation of fields on patterned plasmonic substrates using optical super resolution microscopy [6]. The observed strong photo-blinking behaviour of single molecules in plasmonic fields is exploited in SELM to map electromagnetic field distributions at nanometer resolutions.

  11. Analysis and Interpretation of Single Molecule Protein Unfolding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of protein unfolding under a stretching force has been extensively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) over the past decade [1]. Experimental artifacts at the single molecule level introduce uncertainties in the data analysis that have led to several competing physical models for the unfolding process. For example, the unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin under constant force has been described by probability distributions as diverse as exponential [2,3], a sum of exponentials, log-normal [4], and more recently a function describing static disorder in the Arrhenius model [5]. A new method for data analysis is presented that utilizes maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) combined with other traditional statistical tests to unambiguously rank the consistency of these and other models with the experimental data. These techniques applied to the ubiquitin unfolding data shows that the probability of unfolding is best fit with a stretched exponential distribution, with important implications on the complexity of the mechanism of protein unfolding. [4pt] [1] Carrion-Vazquez, et. al. Springer Series in Biophys. 2006 [0pt] [2] Fernandez et. al. Science 2004 [0pt] [3] Brujic et. al. Nat. Phys 2006 [0pt] [4] Garcia-Manyes et. al. Biophys. J. 2007 [0pt] [5] Kuo et. al. PNAS 2010

  12. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jerry; Tomlinson, Ian; Warnement, Michael; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana; Piston, David; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, we implement a novel, single molecule approach to define the localization and mobility of the brain's major target of widely prescribed antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT labeled with single quantum dot (Qdot) revealed unsuspected features of transporter mobility with cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (often referred to as ``lipid rafts'') and cytoskeleton network linked to transporter activation. We document two pools of surface SERT proteins defined by their lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion in the plasma membrane and a second that displays significantly restricted mobility and localizes to cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Diffusion model prediction and instantaneous velocity analysis indicated that stimuli that act through p38 MAPK-dependent signaling pathways to activate SERT trigger rapid SERT movements within membrane microdomains. Cytoskeleton disruption showed that SERT lateral mobility behaves a membrane raft-constrained, cytoskeleton-associated manner. Our results identify an unsuspected aspect of neurotransmitter transporter regulation that we propose reflects the dissociation of inhibitory, SERT-associated cytoskeletal anchors.

  13. Thermopower distribution of single molecule junctions with different interaction types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-11-01

    The thermopower (S) distribution in single-molecule junctions with different interaction types were investigated by using a scanning tunneling microscope break-junction (STM-BJ) technique. We used 4,4'-bipyridine (BPy) and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPyE) molecules, each having the Van der Waals (vdW) interaction between a pyridine ring and a Au atom and a donor-acceptor (DA) interaction between a nitrogen(N) atom and a Au atom, depending on the different binding geometries formed with the Au electrodes. From the full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the distribution of S, we found that S had a smaller variation for the vdW interaction compared to the DA interaction, due to the high binding stability of vdW interaction. Furthermore, we measured the molecular bonding forces which are in the range of 1.5 nN - 1.8 nN for the vdW interaction and 0.8 nN for the DA interaction. This confirms that the bonding is stronger for the vdW interaction than for the DA interaction, which is consistent with the experimental results for the S distributions as well as those for the molecular bonding stabilities.

  14. Anti-Brownian traps for studies on single molecules.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander P; Cohen, Adam E

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, Brownian motion was seen as an immutable feature of small particles in room-temperature liquids. Molecules, viruses, organelles, and small cells jiggle incessantly due to countless collisions with thermally agitated molecules of solvent. Einstein showed in 1905 that this motion is intimately linked to the tendency of every system to relax toward thermal equilibrium. In recent years, we and others have realized that Brownian motion is not as inescapable as one might think. By tracking the motion of a small particle and applying correction forces to the particle or to the measurement apparatus, one can largely suppress the Brownian motion of particles as small as a few nanometers in diameter, in aqueous solution at room temperature. This new ability to stabilize single molecules has led to a host of studies on topics ranging from the conformational dynamics of DNA to the optical properties of metal nanoparticles. In this review, we outline the physical principles behind suppression of Brownian motion. We discuss the relative merits of several systems that have been implemented. We give examples of studies performed with our anti-Brownian Electrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) as well as other anti-Brownian traps, and we discuss prospects for future research. PMID:20627157

  15. Multiplexed single-molecule measurements with magnetic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeck, Noah; Saleh, Omar A.

    2008-09-15

    We present a method for performing multiple single-molecule manipulation experiments in parallel with magnetic tweezers. We use a microscope with a low magnification, and thus a wide field of view, to visualize multiple DNA-tethered paramagnetic beads and apply an optimized image analysis routine to track the three-dimensional position of each bead simultaneously in real time. Force is applied to each bead using an externally applied magnetic field. Since variations in the field parameters are negligible across the field of view, nearly identical manipulation of all visible beads is possible. However, we find that the error in the position measurement is inversely proportional to the microscope's magnification. To mitigate the increased error caused by demagnification, we have developed a strategy based on tracking multiple fixed beads. Our system is capable of simultaneously manipulating and tracking up to 34 DNA-tethered beads at 60 Hz with {approx}1.5 nm resolution and with {approx}10% variation in applied force.

  16. Quantitative structural information from single-molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Beckers, M; Drechsler, F; Eilert, T; Nagy, J; Michaelis, J

    2015-12-12

    Single-molecule studies can be used to study biological processes directly and in real-time. In particular, the fluorescence energy transfer between reporter dye molecules attached to specific sites on macromolecular complexes can be used to infer distance information. When several measurements are combined, the information can be used to determine the position and conformation of certain domains with respect to the complex. However, data analysis schemes that include all experimental uncertainties are highly complex, and the outcome depends on assumptions about the state of the dye molecules. Here, we present a new analysis algorithm using Bayesian parameter estimation based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and parallel tempering termed Fast-NPS that can analyse large smFRET networks in a relatively short time and yields the position of the dye molecules together with their respective uncertainties. Moreover, we show what effects different assumptions about the dye molecules have on the outcome. We discuss the possibilities and pitfalls in structure determination based on smFRET using experimental data for an archaeal transcription pre-initiation complex, whose architecture has recently been unravelled by smFRET measurements. PMID:26407323

  17. A theoretical justification for single molecule peptide sequencing.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Jagannath; Boulgakov, Alexander A; Marcotte, Edward M

    2015-02-01

    The proteomes of cells, tissues, and organisms reflect active cellular processes and change continuously in response to intracellular and extracellular cues. Deep, quantitative profiling of the proteome, especially if combined with mRNA and metabolite measurements, should provide an unprecedented view of cell state, better revealing functions and interactions of cell components. Molecular diagnostics and biomarker discovery should benefit particularly from the accurate quantification of proteomes, since complex diseases like cancer change protein abundances and modifications. Currently, shotgun mass spectrometry is the primary technology for high-throughput protein identification and quantification; while powerful, it lacks high sensitivity and coverage. We draw parallels with next-generation DNA sequencing and propose a strategy, termed fluorosequencing, for sequencing peptides in a complex protein sample at the level of single molecules. In the proposed approach, millions of individual fluorescently labeled peptides are visualized in parallel, monitoring changing patterns of fluorescence intensity as N-terminal amino acids are sequentially removed, and using the resulting fluorescence signatures (fluorosequences) to uniquely identify individual peptides. We introduce a theoretical foundation for fluorosequencing and, by using Monte Carlo computer simulations, we explore its feasibility, anticipate the most likely experimental errors, quantify their potential impact, and discuss the broad potential utility offered by a high-throughput peptide sequencing technology. PMID:25714988

  18. Whole-mount single molecule FISH method for zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yuma; Sato, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Noise in gene expression renders cells more adaptable to changing environment by imposing phenotypic and functional heterogeneity on genetically identical individual cells. Hence, quantitative measurement of noise in gene expression is essential for the study of biological processes in cells. Currently, there are two complementary methods for quantitatively measuring noise in gene expression at the single cell level: single molecule FISH (smFISH) and single cell qRT-PCR (or single cell RNA-seq). While smFISH has been developed for culture cells, tissue sections and whole-mount invertebrate organisms, the method has not been reported for whole-mount vertebrate organisms. Here, we report an smFISH method that is suitable for whole-mount zebrafish embryo, a popular vertebrate model organism for the studies of development, physiology and disease. We show the detection of individual transcripts for several cell-type specific and ubiquitously expressed genes at the single cell level in whole-mount zebrafish embryo. We also demonstrate that the method can be adapted to detect two different genes in individual cells simultaneously. The whole-mount smFISH method described in this report is expected to facilitate the study of noise in gene expression and its role in zebrafish, a vertebrate animal model relevant to human biology. PMID:25711926

  19. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  20. Profiling of Short RNAs Using Helicos Single-Molecule Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kapranov, Philipp; Ozsolak, Fatih; Milos, Patrice M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of short (<200 nt) RNAs in cell biogenesis has been well documented. These short RNAs include crucial classes of molecules such as transfer RNAs, small nuclear RNA, microRNAs, and many others (reviewed in Storz et al., Annu Rev Biochem 74:199–217, 2005; Ghildiyal and Zamore, Nat Rev Genet 10:94–108, 2009). Furthermore, the realm of functional RNAs that fall within this size range is growing to include less well-characterized RNAs such as short RNAs found at the promoters and 3? termini of genes (Affymetrix ENCODE Transcriptome Project et al., Nature 457:1028–1032, 2009; Davis and Ares, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103:3262–3267, 2006; Kapranov et al., Science 316:1484–1488, 2007; Taft et al., Nat Genet 41:572–578, 2009; Kapranov et al., Nature 466:642–646, 2010), short RNAs involved in paramutation (Rassoulzadegan et al., Nature 441:469–474, 2006), and others (reviewed in Kawaji and Hayashizaki, PLoS Genet 4:e22, 2008). Discovery and accurate quantification of these RNA molecules, less than 200 bases in size, is thus an important and also challenging aspect of understanding the full repertoire of cellular and extracellular RNAs. Here, we describe the strategies and procedures we developed to profile short RNA species using single-molecule sequencing (SMS) and the advantages SMS offers. PMID:22144202

  1. Single-Molecule Manipulation Studies of a Mechanically Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-10-01

    Plasma von Willebrand factor (pVWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood and must be adhesively activated by exposure to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to initiate blood clotting. Sheared pVWF (sVWF) will undergo a conformational change from a loose tangled coil to elongated strings forming adhesive fibers by binding with other sVWF. VWF's adhesion activity is also related to its length, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-actively adhesive without exposure to shear stress; it has also been shown to spontaneously form fibers. We used single molecule manipulation techniques with the AFM to stretch pVWF, sVWF and ULVWF and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. This mechanical resistance to forced unfolding is reduced when other molecules known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results show that sVWF and ULVWF domains unfold at higher forces than pVWF, which is consistent with the hypothesis that shear stress induces lateral association that alters adhesion activity of pVWF.

  2. Extracting Conformational Memory from Single-Molecule Kinetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Julian; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule data often comes in the form of stochastic time trajectories. A key question is how to extract an underlying kinetic model from the data. A traditional approach is to assume some discrete state model, i.e. a model topology, and to assume that transitions between states are Markovian. The transition rates are then selected according to which best fit the data. However in experiments, each apparent state can be a broad ensemble of states or can be hiding multiple inter-converting states. Here we describe a more general approach called the non-Markov Memory Kernel (NMMK) method. The idea is to begin with a very broad class of non-Markov models and to let the data directly select for the best possible model. To do so, we adapt an image reconstruction approach that is grounded in Maximum Entropy. The NMMK method is not limited to discrete state models for the data; it yields a unique model given the data; it gives error bars for the model; it does not assume Markov dynamics. Furthermore, NMMK is less wasteful of data by letting the entire data set determine the model. When the data warrants, the NMMK gives a memory kernel that is Markovian. We highlight, by numerical example, how conformational memory extracted using this method can be translated into useful mechanistic insight. PMID:23259771

  3. Chapter 15: Live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Panorchan, Porntula; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method to measure the kinetics and micromechanical properties of individual receptor-ligand bonds formed between two living cells. Using living cells rather than recombinant proteins ensures that the orientation, surface density, and posttranslational modifications of the probed receptors are physiological and that their regulated attachment to the cytoskeleton can occur. A cell is tethered to a flexible cantilever and brought into contact with cells adherent to a substratum before being pulled at a controlled retraction velocity. Measurements of bond rupture forces and associated bond loading rates over an extended range of retraction velocities allow us to compute precisely the tensile strength, reactive compliance, lifetime, and dissociation rate of individual intercellular receptor-ligand bonds. We also describe tests of specificity and Monte Carlo simulations, which ensure that measurements obtained by this method correspond to a single type of intercellular adhesion bond. We illustrate this live-cell single molecule force spectroscopy assay by characterizing homotypic bonds composed of vascular endothelial -cadherin pairs formed between living endothelial cells. This versatile assay could be used to establish the molecular principles that drive a wide range of important physiological processes involving receptor-mediated intercellular adhesion, such as the immunological synapse between a lymphocyte and an antigen-presenting cell and synaptic interactions between neuron cells, and pathological processes resulting in altered intercellular adhesion. PMID:19118684

  4. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling. PMID:22319393

  5. Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Investigations of RNA Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Julie L.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2007-03-01

    To function properly, catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) fold into specific three-dimensional shapes stabilized by multiple tertiary interactions. However, only limited information is available on the contributions of individual tertiary contacts to RNA conformational dynamics. The Tetrahymena ribozymes's P4--P6 domain forms a hinged, ``candy-cane'' structure with parallel helices clamped by two motifs, the GAAA tetraloop-tetraloop receptor and adenosine (A)-rich bulge--P4 helix interactions. Previously, we characterized RNA folding due to a tetraloop-receptor interaction. In this study, we employ time-resolved single-molecule FRET methods to probe A-rich bulge induced structural dynamics. Specifically, fluorescently labeled RNA constructs excited by a pulsed 532 nm laser are detected in the confocal region of an inverted microscope, with each photon sorted by arrival time, color and polarization. We resolve the kinetic dependence of A-rich bulge-P4 helix docking/undocking on cationic environment (e.g. Na^+ and Mg^2+ concentration.) At saturating [Mg^2+], the docked structure appears only weakly stabilized, while only 50% of the molecules exhibit efficient folding.

  6. Coupling single-molecule magnets to quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Mark; Hümmer, Thomas; José Martínez-Pérez, María; García-Ripoll, Juanjo; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    In this work we study theoretically the coupling of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) to a variety of quantum circuits, including microwave resonators with and without constrictions and flux qubits. The main result of this study is that it is possible to achieve strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes between SMM crystals and the superconducting circuit, with strong hints that such a coupling could also be reached for individual molecules close to constrictions. Building on the resulting coupling strengths and the typical coherence times of these molecules (? ?s), we conclude that SMMs can be used for coherent storage and manipulation of quantum information, either in the context of quantum computing or in quantum simulations. Throughout the work we also discuss in detail the family of molecules that are most suitable for such operations, based not only on the coupling strength, but also on the typical energy gaps and the simplicity with which they can be tuned and oriented. Finally, we also discuss practical advantages of SMMs, such as the possibility to fabricate the SMMs ensembles on the chip through the deposition of small droplets.

  7. Single-molecule localization microscopy using mCherry.

    PubMed

    Winterflood, Christian M; Ewers, Helge

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate the potential of the commonly used red fluorescent protein mCherry for single-molecule super-resolution imaging. mCherry can be driven into a light-induced dark state in the presence of a thiol from which it can recover spontaneously or by irradiation with near UV light. We show imaging of subcellular protein structures such as microtubules and the nuclear pore complex with a resolution below 40 nm. We were able to image the C-terminus of the nuclear pore protein POM121, which is on the inside of the pore and not readily accessible for external labeling. The photon yield for mCherry is comparable to that of the latest optical highlighter fluorescent proteins. Our findings show that the widely used mCherry red fluorescent protein and the vast number of existing mCherry fusion proteins are readily amenable to super-resolution imaging. This obviates the need for generating novel protein fusions that may compromise function or the need for external fluorescent labeling. PMID:25111075

  8. A single-molecule view of gene regulation in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. Steroid receptors coordinate a diverse range of responses in higher eukaryotes and are involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. Steroid receptor response elements are present throughout the human genome and modulate chromatin remodeling and transcription in both a local and long-range fashion. As such, steroid receptor-mediated transcription is a paradigm of genetic control in the metazoan nucleus. Moreover, the ligand-dependent nature of these transcription factors makes them appealing targets for therapeutic intervention, necessitating a quantitative understanding of how receptors control output from target genes. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. The response delay is a measure of time required for chromatin remodeling at a single gene.

  9. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  10. Single-molecule orientation measurements with a quadrated pupil

    PubMed Central

    Backer, Adam S.; Backlund, Mikael P.; Lew, Matthew D.; Moerner, W. E.

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents a means of measuring the dipole orientation of a fluorescent, orientationally fixed single molecule, which uses a specially designed phase mask, termed a “quadrated pupil,” conjugate to the back focal plane of a conventional wide-field microscope. The method leverages the spatial anisotropy of the far-field emission pattern of a dipole emitter and makes this anisotropy amenable to quantitative analysis at the image plane. In comparison to older image-fitting techniques that infer orientation by matching simulations to defocused or excessively magnified images, the quadrated pupil approach is more robust to minor modeling discrepancies and optical aberrations. Precision of 1°–5° is achieved in proof-of-concept experiments for both azimuthal (?) and polar (?) angles without defocusing. Since the phase mask is implemented on a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator that may be deactivated without any mechanical perturbation of the sample or imaging system, the technique may be readily integrated into clear aperture imaging studies. PMID:23632538

  11. Magnetic Quantum Tunneling and Symmetry in Single Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Andrew D.

    2003-03-01

    We have studied the symmetry of magnetic quantum tunneling (MQT) in single molecule magnets (SMMs) using a micro-Hall effect magnetometer and high field vector superconducting magnet system. In the most widely studied SMM, Mn12-acetate, an average crystal 4-fold symmetry in the magnetic response is shown to be due to local molecular environments of 2-fold symmetry that are rotated by 90 degrees with respect to one another. We attribute this to ligand disorder that leads to local rhombic distortions, a model first proposed by Cornia et al. based on x-ray diffraction data [1]. We have magnetically distilled a Mn12-acetate crystal to study a subset of these lower (2-fold) site symmetry molecules and present evidence for a spin-parity effect consistent with a local 2-fold symmetry [2]. These results highlight the importance of subtle changes in molecule environment in modulating magnetic anisotropy and MQT. [1] Cornia et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 257201 (2002) [2] E. del Barco, A. D. Kent, E. Rumberger, D. H. Hendrickson, G. Christou, submitted for publication (2002) and Europhys. Lett. 60, 768 (2002)

  12. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging SM advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display6 or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide (PAA) thin film to construct a random SM array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies)7 and analyzed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimeter. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured based on the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and antibody binding profiling, were demonstrated. SMI-Seq enables “library vs. library” screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity. PMID:25252978

  13. DNA Y Structure: A Versatile, Multidimensional Single Molecule Assay

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful single molecule technique used to study dynamic biomolecular events, especially those involving DNA and DNA-binding proteins. Current implementations usually involve only one of stretching, unzipping, or twisting DNA along one dimension. To expand the capabilities of optical trapping for more complex measurements would require a multidimensional technique that combines all of these manipulations in a single experiment. Here, we report the development and utilization of such a novel optical trapping assay based on a three-branch DNA construct, termed a “Y structure”. This multidimensional assay allows precise, real-time tracking of multiple configurational changes. When the Y structure template is unzipped under both force and torque, the force and extension of all three branches can be determined simultaneously. Moreover, the assay is readily compatible with fluorescence, as demonstrated by unzipping through a fluorescently labeled, paused transcription complex. This novel assay thus allows for the visualization and precision mapping of complex interactions of biomechanical events. PMID:25291441

  14. Single molecule studies reveal new mechanisms for microtubule severing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Diaz-Valencia, Juan Daniel; Morelli, Margaret; Zhang, Dong; Sharp, David

    2011-03-01

    Microtubule-severing enzymes are hexameric complexes made from monomeric enzyme subunits that remove tubulin dimers from the microtubule lattice. Severing proteins are known to remodel the cytoskeleton during interphase and mitosis, and are required in proper axon morphology and mammalian bone and cartilage development. We have performed the first single molecule imaging to determine where and how severing enzymes act to cut microtubules. We have focused on the original member of the group, katanin, and the newest member, fidgetin to compare their biophysical activities in vitro. We find that, as expected, severing proteins localize to areas of activity. Interestingly, the association is very brief: they do not stay bound nor do they bind cooperatively at active sites. The association duration changes with the nucleotide content, implying that the state in the catalytic cycle dictates binding affinity with the microtubule. We also discovered that, at lower concentrations, both katanin and fidgetin can depolymerize taxol-stabilized microtubules by removing terminal dimers. These studies reveal the physical regulation schemes to control severing activity in cells, and ultimately regulate cytoskeletal architecture. This work is supported by the March of Dimes Grant #5-FY09-46.

  15. Quantum Dot Spin Valves Controlled by Single Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamzadeh Renani, Fatemeh; Kirczenow, George

    2013-03-01

    We explore theoretically for the first time the properties of a new class of spintronic nano-devices in which the electrical resistance of a non-magnetic quantum dot contacted by non-magnetic electrodes is controlled by transition metal-based single molecule nanomagnets (SMMs) bound to the dot. Although the SMMs do not lie directly in the current path in these devices, we show that the relative orientation of their magnetic moments can strongly influence on the electric current passing through the device. If the magnetic moment of one of the SMMs is reversed by the application of a magnetic field, we predict a large change in the resistance of the dot, i.e., a strong spin valve effect. The mechanism is resonant conduction via molecular orbitals extending over the entire system. The spin valve is activated by a gate that tunes the transport resonances through the Fermi energy. Detailed results will be presented for the case of Mn12 SMMs bound to a gold quantum dot. This work was supported by CIFAR and NSERC.

  16. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C.; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A.; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L.; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5′ extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated. PMID:25690894

  17. A layer-by-layer ZnO nanoparticle-PbS quantum dot self-assembly platform for ultrafast interfacial electron injection.

    PubMed

    Eita, Mohamed; Usman, Anwar; El-Ballouli, Ala'a O; Alarousu, Erkki; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2015-01-01

    Absorbent layers of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now used as material platforms for low-cost, high-performance solar cells. The semiconductor metal oxide nanoparticles as an acceptor layer have become an integral part of the next generation solar cell. To achieve sufficient electron transfer and subsequently high conversion efficiency in these solar cells, however, energy-level alignment and interfacial contact between the donor and the acceptor units are needed. Here, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique is used to assemble ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), providing adequate PbS QD uptake to achieve greater interfacial contact compared with traditional sputtering methods. Electron injection at the PbS QD and ZnO NP interface is investigated using broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 120 femtosecond temporal resolution. The results indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to ZnO NPs occurs on a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This observation is supported by the interfacial electronic-energy alignment between the donor and acceptor moieties. Finally, due to the combination of large interfacial contact and ultrafast electron injection, this proposed platform of assembled thin films holds promise for a variety of solar cell architectures and other settings that principally rely on interfacial contact, such as photocatalysis. PMID:25163799

  18. Single molecule vibrationally mediated chemistry. Towards state-specific strategies for molecular handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, J. I.

    2005-08-01

    Tunnelling electrons may scatter inelastically with an adsorbate, releasing part of their energy through the excitation of molecular vibrations. The resolution of inelastic processes with a low temperature scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) provides a valuable tool to chemically characterize single adsorbates and their adsorption mechanisms. Here, we present a molecular scale picture of single molecule vibrational chemistry, as resolved by STM. To understand the way a reaction proceed it is needed knowledge about both the excitation and damping of a molecular vibration. The excitation is mediated by the specific coupling between electronic molecular resonances present at the Fermi level and vibrational states of the adsorbate. Thus, the two-dimensional mapping of the inelastic signal with an STM provides the spatial distribution of the adsorbate electronic states (near the Fermi level) which are predominantly coupled to the particular vibrational mode observed. The damping of the vibration follows a competition between different mechanisms, mediated via the creation of electron-hole pairs or via anharmonic coupling between vibrational states. This latter case give rise to effective energy transfer mechanisms which eventually may focus vibrational energy in a specific reaction coordinate. In this single-molecule work-bench, STM provides alternative tools to understand reactivity in the limit of low excitation rate, which demonstrate the existence of state-specific excitation strategies which may lead to selectivity in the product of a reaction. The author acknowledges his co-workers in the work presented here, H. Conrad, N. Lorente, H.-P. Rust, and Z. Song, as well as collaborations with J. Gómez Herrero, J.J. Jackiw, D. Sánchez-Portal and P.S. Weiss.

  19. Many-body theory of electric and thermal transport in single-molecule heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Electron transport in single-molecule junctions (SMJ) is a key example of a strongly-correlated system far from equilibrium, with myriad potential applications in nanotechnology. When macroscopic leads are attached to a single molecule, a SMJ is formed, transforming the ``few-body'' molecular problem into a true ``many-body'' problem. Until recently, a theory of transport that properly accounts for both the particle and wave character of the electron has been lacking, so that the Coulomb blockade and coherent transport regimes were considered ``complementary.'' We have developed a nonequilibrium many-body theoryfootnotetextJ. P. Bergfield and C. A. Stafford, Phys. Rev. B 79, 245125 (2009). that reproduces the key features of both the Coulomb blockade and coherent transport regimes simultaneously. Our approach is based on nonequilibrium Green's functions, enabling physically motivated approximations that sum terms to all orders. The junction Green's functions are calculated exactly in the sequential-tunneling limit, and the corrections to the electron self-energy due to finite tunneling width are included via Dyson-Keldysh equations. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of our many-body theory of SMJ and discuss the simulated linear and nonlinear response of a benzenedithiol-gold junction. I will also outline our derivation of an exact expression for the heat current in an interacting nanostructure, highlighting our predictionfootnotetextJ. P. Bergfield and C. A. Stafford, Nano Letters 9, 3072 (2009). of a dramatic quantum-induced enhancement of thermoelectric effects in the vicinity of a transmission node. Finally, I will provide several striking examples where the predictions of our many-body theory differ drastically from those of mean-field (density functional) theory.

  20. Bayesian orientation estimate and structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray diffraction images.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Michał; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    We developed a Bayesian method to extract macromolecular structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray free-electron laser diffraction images. The method addresses two possible scenarios. First, using a "seed" structural model, the molecular orientation is determined for each of the provided diffraction images, which are then averaged in three-dimensional reciprocal space. Subsequently, the real space electron density is determined using a relaxed averaged alternating reflections algorithm. In the second approach, the probability that the "seed" model fits to the given set of diffraction images as a whole is determined and used to distinguish between proposed structures. We show that for a given x-ray intensity, unexpectedly, the achievable resolution increases with molecular mass such that structure determination should be more challenging for small molecules than for larger ones. For a sufficiently large number of recorded photons (>200) per diffraction image an M^{1/6} scaling is seen. Using synthetic diffraction data for a small glutathione molecule as a challenging test case, successful determination of electron density was demonstrated for 20000 diffraction patterns with random orientations and an average of 82 elastically scattered and recorded photons per image, also in the presence of up to 50% background noise. The second scenario is exemplified and assessed for three biomolecules of different sizes. In all cases, determining the probability of a structure given set of diffraction patterns allowed successful discrimination between different conformations of the test molecules. A structure model of the glutathione tripeptide was refined in a Monte Carlo simulation from a random starting conformation. Further, effective distinguishing between three differently arranged immunoglobulin domains of a titin molecule and also different states of a ribosome in a tRNA translocation process was demonstrated. These results show that the proposed method is robust and enables structure determination from sparse and noisy x-ray diffraction images of single molecules spanning a wide range of molecular masses. PMID:25215765

  1. Interfacial Electronic Structure of the Dipolar Vanadyl Naphthalocyanine on Au (111): “Push-back” vs Dipolar Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Terentjevs, Aleksandrs; Steele, Mary P.; Blumenfeld, Michael L.; Ilyas, Nahid; Kelly, Leah L.; Fabiano, Eduardo; Monti, Oliver L.A.; Della Sala, Fabio

    2011-11-03

    We investigate the interfacial electronic structure of the dipolar organic semiconductor vanadyl naphthalocyanine on Au(111) in a combined computational and experimental approach to understand the role of the permanent molecular dipole moment on energy-level alignment at this interface. First-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on such large systems are challenging, due to the large computational cost and the need to accurately consider dispersion interactions. Our DFT results with dispersion correction show a molecular deformation upon adsorption but no strong chemical bond formation. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show a considerable workfunction change of ?0.73(2) eV upon growth of the first monolayer, which is well reproduced by the DFT calculations. This shift originates from a large electron density “push-back” effect at the gold surface, whereas the large out-of-plane vanadyl dipole moment plays only a minor role.

  2. Imaging interfacial electrical transport in graphene-MoS2 heterostructures with electron-beam-induced-currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, E. R.; Kerelsky, Alexander; Hubbard, William A.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Regan, B. C.

    2015-11-01

    Heterostructure devices with specific and extraordinary properties can be fabricated by stacking two-dimensional crystals. Cleanliness at the inter-crystal interfaces within a heterostructure is crucial for maximizing device performance. However, because these interfaces are buried, characterizing their impact on device function is challenging. Here, we show that electron-beam induced current (EBIC) mapping can be used to image interfacial contamination and to characterize the quality of buried heterostructure interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We applied EBIC and photocurrent imaging to map photo-sensitive graphene-MoS2 heterostructures. The EBIC maps, together with concurrently acquired scanning transmission electron microscopy images, reveal how a device's photocurrent collection efficiency is adversely affected by nanoscale debris invisible to optical-resolution photocurrent mapping.

  3. High-Throughput Single-Molecule Studies of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Aaron D.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence and force-based single-molecule studies of protein-nucleic acid interactions continue to shed critical insights into many aspects of DNA and RNA processing. As single-molecule assays are inherently low-throughput, obtaining statistically relevant datasets remains a major challenge. Additionally, most fluorescence-based single-molecule particle-tracking assays are limited to observing fluorescent proteins that are in the low-nanomolar range, as spurious background signals predominate at higher fluorophore concentrations. These technical limitations have traditionally limited the types of questions that could be addressed via single-molecule methods. In this review, we describe new approaches for high-throughput and high-concentration single-molecule biochemical studies. We conclude with a discussion of outstanding challenges for the single-molecule biologist and how these challenges can be tackled to further approach the biochemical complexity of the cell. PMID:24859086

  4. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for single-molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Chen, Danqi; Yue, Hongjun; French, Jarrod B.; Rufo, Joey; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments on various lab-on-a-chip techniques allow miniaturized and integrated devices to perform on-chip single-molecule studies. Fluidic-based platforms that utilize the unique microscale fluidic behavior are capable of conducting single-molecule experiments with high sensitivities and throughputs, while biomolecular systems can be studied on-chip using techniques such as DNA curtains, magnetic tweezers, and solid-state nanopores. The advances of these on-chip single-molecule techniques lead to next-generation lab-on-a-chip devices such as DNA transistors, and single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology for rapid and low-cost whole genome DNA sequencing. In this Focus article, we will discuss some recent successes on developing lab-on-a-chip techniques for single-molecule studies and expound our thoughts on the near future of on-chip single-molecule studies. PMID:23670195

  5. Improved single molecule force spectroscopy using micromachined cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew S; Sullan, Ruby May A; Li, Hongbin; Perkins, Thomas T

    2014-05-27

    Enhancing the short-term force precision of atomic force microscopy (AFM) while maintaining excellent long-term force stability would result in improved performance across multiple AFM modalities, including single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). SMFS is a powerful method to probe the nanometer-scale dynamics and energetics of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins). The folding and unfolding rates of such macromolecules are sensitive to sub-pN changes in force. Recently, we demonstrated sub-pN stability over a broad bandwidth (?f = 0.01-16 Hz) by removing the gold coating from a 100 ?m long cantilever. However, this stability came at the cost of increased short-term force noise, decreased temporal response, and poor sensitivity. Here, we avoided these compromises while retaining excellent force stability by modifying a short (L = 40 ?m) cantilever with a focused ion beam. Our process led to a ?10-fold reduction in both a cantilever's stiffness and its hydrodynamic drag near a surface. We also preserved the benefits of a highly reflective cantilever while mitigating gold-coating induced long-term drift. As a result, we extended AFM's sub-pN bandwidth by a factor of ?50 to span five decades of bandwidth (?f ? 0.01-1000 Hz). Measurements of mechanically stretching individual proteins showed improved force precision coupled with state-of-the-art force stability and no significant loss in temporal resolution compared to the stiffer, unmodified cantilever. Finally, these cantilevers were robust and were reused for SFMS over multiple days. Hence, we expect these responsive, yet stable, cantilevers to broadly benefit diverse AFM-based studies. PMID:24670198

  6. Single-molecule manipulation measurements of polymer/solution interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmore, Andrew N.

    Because the properties of soft materials emerge from the physics of the constituent polymers, we are motivated to characterize chain molecules at a fundamental level. We build upon the magnetic tweezers single-molecule manipulation technique, which involves measuring the distance between the ends of a polymer in real time and with nanometer precision while applying stable magnetic stretching forces in the piconewton range. Here we demonstrate new applications of this technique, specifically by measuring the interactions between a polymer and the surrounding solvent. First, through low-force elastic measurements, we determine a range of fundamental parameters that quantify solvent quality and chain structure. We present a force-solvent phase diagram to summarize these parameters and our experimental data, and discuss where PEG, DNA, RNA, and proteins fit into the diagram. The unstructured and structured states of a biomolecule reside at opposite ends of the diagram, indicating that folding is accompanied by a change in the character of the solvent. We therefore chose to investigate the local solvent change that occurs when a charged biomolecule folds. We present a thermodynamic framework for measuring the uptake of counterions that accompanies nucleic acid folding. Our measurements of a simple DNA hairpin identify potential shortcomings in thermodynamic parameters of MFOLD, the most widely used predictive software for nucleic acids. Finally, we present a variety of polymer immobilization schemes, achieve low-noise measurements with a strong magnet design, identify new assays, and provide technical guidance that may be useful to those interested in pursuing future magnetic tweezers experiments.

  7. Interfacial Coupling and Electronic Structure of Two-Dimensional Silicon Grown on the Ag(111) Surface at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiagui; Wagner, Sean R; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2015-01-01

    Freestanding silicene, a monolayer of Si arranged in a honeycomb structure, has been predicted to give rise to massless Dirac fermions, akin to graphene. However, Si structures grown on a supporting substrate can show properties that strongly deviate from the freestanding case. Here, combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and differential conductance mapping, we show that the electrical properties of the (?3 x ?3) phase of few-layer Si grown on Ag(111) strongly depend on film thickness, where the electron phase coherence length decreases and the free-electron-like surface state gradually diminishes when approaching the interface. These features are presumably attributable to the inelastic inter-band electron-electron scattering originating from the overlap between the surface state, interface state and the bulk state of the substrate. We further demonstrate that the intrinsic electronic structure of the as grown (?3 x ?3) phase is identical to that of the (?3 x ?3)R30° reconstructed Ag on Si(111), both of which exhibit the parabolic energy-momentum dispersion relation with comparable electron effective masses. These findings highlight the essential role of interfacial coupling on the properties of two-dimensional Si structures grown on supporting substrates, which should be thoroughly scrutinized in pursuit of silicene. PMID:26084916

  8. Orientation detection of a single molecule using pupil filter with electrically controllable polarization pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the orientation of single molecules using a conventional wide-field fluorescence microscope with a polarization filter consisting of a polarizer and a compact polarization mode converter. The polarization filter electrically controls the pattern of polarization filtering. Since the polarization of the fluorescence from a single molecule highly depends on the angle between the observation direction and the molecular direction, polarization pattern filtering at the pupil plane of the objective lens allows the orientation of a single molecule to be visualized. Using this system, we demonstrated the orientation detection of single molecules.

  9. Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of isolated Mn12-Ph Single Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaves, K.; Han, P.; Iwaya, K.; Hitosugi, T.; Packwood, D.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Zhao, H.; Dunbar, K. R.; Kim, K.; Teizer, W.

    2015-03-01

    We study Mn12O12(C6H5COO)16(H2O)4 (Mn12-Ph) single-molecule magnets on a Cu(111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures (T < 6K). We report the observation of Mn12-Ph in isolation and in thin films, deposited through in situ vacuum spray deposition onto clean Cu(111). The tunneling current of isolated Mn12-Ph, normalized with respect to the Cu background, shows a strong bias voltage dependence within the molecular interior. The qualitative features of these I vs.V curves differ by spatial location in several intriguing ways (e.g. fixed junction impedance with increasing bias voltages). We explore these normalized I vs. V curves and present a phenomenological explanation for the observed behaviors, corresponding to the physical and electronic structure within the molecule. Funding from WPI-AIMR.

  10. STM Study of the Adsorption of Single-Molecule Magnet Fe4 on Bi(111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Luo, Lan; Sun, Kai; Tao, Min-Long; Wang, Jun-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have unique magnetic properties such as quantum tunneling of magnetization and quantum coherent oscillation, which have potential applications in quantum computation and information storage. In this paper, using the tip-deposition method, we have grafted individual Fe4 molecules onto the semi-metallic Bi(111) surface. Low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LT-STM) was used to characterize the molecular morphology and electronic structures. It was found that individual Fe4 molecules reveal a triangle shape, which is consistent with the molecular structure of Fe4. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) analysis indicated that the HOMO-LUMO gap is 0.49 eV. These studies provide direct information about the adsorption of individual SMMs on semi-metal surfaces.

  11. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kochise; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins. PMID:24880284

  12. A semi-classical XOR logic gate integrated in a single molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jlidat, N.; Hliwa, M.; Joachim, C.

    2008-01-01

    To improve the design of molecular rectifiers, a molecule is presented for performing the digital XOR function where the output circuit is independent of the inputs. An intermolecular inelastic effect was optimised to get the non-linear effect for an XOR to work. This demonstrates how an intramolecular circuit can be designed where energy is provided along the molecule independently of the inputs. The electronic characteristics of this molecule-XOR were calculated using the N-ESQC technique for N=4 interconnects at a semi-empirical level of description. Inside a single molecule, pilling up each classical function implemented by a specific chemical group (two rectifiers and a rotor for the XOR) is limited in the final molecule by the spectral mixing of the molecular orbitals of each function.

  13. A Trigonal-Pyramidal Erbium(III) Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew J; Pinkowicz, Dawid; Saber, Mohamed R; Dunbar, Kim R

    2015-05-11

    Given the recent advent of mononuclear single-molecule magnets (SMMs), a rational approach based on lanthanides with axially elongated f-electron charge cloud (prolate) has only recently received attention. We report herein a new SMM, [Li(THF)4[Er{N(SiMe3)2}3Cl]?2?THF, which exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization under zero dc field with an effective barrier to the reversal of magnetization (?Eeff/kB =63.3?K) and magnetic hysteresis up to 3?K at a magnetic field sweep rate of 34.6?Oe?s(-1). This work questions the theory that oblate or prolate lanthanides must be stabilized with the appropriate ligand framework in order for SMM behavior to be favored. PMID:25809280

  14. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kochise Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-05-28

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins.

  15. Thermoelectric ZT enhanced by asymmetric configuration in single-molecule-magnet junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Pengbin; Shi, Yunlong; Sun, Zhu; Nie, Yi-Hang; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2016-02-01

    In mesoscopic devices, many factors like the Coulomb and spin interactions can enhance the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. Here we use a system consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) connected to two ferromagnetic electrodes to consider the possible enhancement effects of thermoelectric efficiency. By introducing an asymmetric configuration to the transport junction, we find that this configuration can significantly enhance the thermoelectric ZT. The optimized asymmetric thermoelectric ZT is five times that of the ZT with a symmetric configuration or non-magnetic case. Due to this asymmetry, a non-zero charge thermopower at the electron-hole symmetry point is also found. These results demonstrate that the asymmetry of the transport junction helps to enhance thermoelectric efficiency and is useful for fabricating SMM-based thermoelectric devices.

  16. Magnetization tunneling in high-symmetry single-molecule magnets: Limitations of the giant spin approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Lawrence, J.; Yang, E.-C.; Nakano, M.; Hendrickson, D. N.; Hill, S.

    2006-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of a Ni4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) yield the zero-field-splitting (ZFS) parameters D , B40 , and B44 , based on the giant spin approximation (GSA) with S=4 ; B44 is responsible for the magnetization tunneling in this SMM. Experiments on an isostructural Ni-doped Zn4 crystal establish the NiII ion ZFS parameters. The fourth-order ZFS parameters in the GSA arise from the interplay between the Heisenberg interaction J?1•?2 and the second-order single-ion anisotropy, giving rise to mixing of higher-lying S?4 states into the S=4 state. Consequently, J directly influences the ZFS in the ground state, enabling its determination by EPR.

  17. Frequency domain Fourier transform THz-EPR on single molecule magnets using coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Alexander; Behrends, Jan; Lips, Klaus; Bittl, Robert; Holldack, Karsten

    2009-08-21

    Frequency domain Fourier transform THz electron paramagnetic resonance (FD-FT THz-EPR) based on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is presented as a novel tool to ascertain very large zero field splittings in transition metal ion complexes. A description of the FD-FT THz-EPR at the BESSY II storage ring providing CSR in a frequency range from 5 cm(-1) up to 40 cm(-1) at external magnetic fields from -10 T to +10 T is given together with first measurements on the single molecule magnet Mn(12)Ac where we studied DeltaM(S) = +/-1 spin transition energies as a function of the external magnetic field and temperature. PMID:19639156

  18. Tuning the thermoelectric properties of a single-molecule junction by mechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alberto; Pontes, Renato B; da Silva, Antônio J R; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-02-21

    We theoretically investigate, as a function of the stretching, the behaviour of the thermoelectric properties - the Seebeck coefficient (S), the electronic heat conductance (?el) and the figure of merit (ZT) - of a molecule-based junction composed of a benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule (BDT) coupled to Au(111) surfaces at room temperature. We show that the thermoelectric properties of a single molecule junction can be tuned by mechanic stretching. The Seebeck coefficient is positive, indicating that it is dominated by the HOMO. Furthermore, it increases as the HOMO level, which is associated to the sulphur atom, tends towards energies close to the Fermi energy. By modelling the transmission coefficient of the system as a single Lorentzian peak, we propose a scheme to obtain the maximum ZT of any molecular junction. PMID:25612893

  19. Tuning the Thermoelectric Properties of a Single-Molecule Junction by Mechanical Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, Renato; Torres, Alberto; da Silva, Antonio J. R.; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    We theoretically investigate, as a function of the stretching, the behaviour of the thermoelectric properties - Seebeck coefficient (S), the electronic heat conductance (?el) and the figure of merit (ZT) - of a molecule-based junction composed by benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule (BDT) coupled to Au(111) surfaces at room temperature. We show that the thermoelectric properties of a single molecule junction can be tuned by mechanic stretching. The Seebeck coefficient is positive, indicating that it is dominated by the HOMO. Furthermore, it increases as the HOMO level, which is associated to the sulphur atom, goes to energies close to the Fermi energy. By modelling the transmission coefficient of the system as a single lorentzian peak, we propose a scheme to obtain the maximum ZT of any molecular junction. The authors thank the Brazilian funding agencies CNPq, CAPES and FAPESP. We also thank CENAPAD-SP for the computational facilities.

  20. A Mononuclear Uranium(IV) Single-Molecule Magnet with an Azobenzene Radical Ligand.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Maria A; Coutinho, Joana T; Santos, Isabel C; Marçalo, Joaquim; Almeida, Manuel; Baldoví, José J; Pereira, Laura C J; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    A tetravalent uranium compound with a radical azobenzene ligand, namely, [{(SiMe2 NPh)3 -tacn}U(IV) (?(2) -N2 Ph2 (.) )] (2), was obtained by one-electron reduction of azobenzene by the trivalent uranium compound [U(III) {(SiMe2 NPh)3 -tacn}] (1). Compound 2 was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and (1) H?NMR, IR, and UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy. The magnetic properties of 2 and precursor 1 were studied by static magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements, which for the former revealed single-molecule magnet behaviour for the first time in a mononuclear U(IV) compound, whereas trivalent uranium compound 1 does not exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperatures. A first approximation to the magnetic behaviour of these compounds was attempted by combining an effective electrostatic model with a phenomenological approach using the full single-ion Hamiltonian. PMID:26536849

  1. A theoretical model for single-molecule incoherent scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, H.

    2008-11-01

    Single-molecule scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), with dephasing due to elastic and inelastic scattering, is of some current interest. Motivated by this, we report an extended Hückel theory (EHT)-based mean-field non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) transport model with electron-phonon scattering treated within the self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA). Furthermore, a procedure based on EHT basis set modification is described. We use this model to study the effect of the temperature-dependent dephasing due to low lying modes in the far-infrared range for which \\hbar \\omega \\ll k_{\\mathrm {B}}T , on the resonant conduction through the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of a phenyl dithiol molecule bonded to fcc-Au(111) contact. We finally propose to include dephasing in room temperature molecular resonant conduction calculations.

  2. Partial nitrogen atom transfer: a new synthetic tool to design single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mei; Rouzières, Mathieu; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Pink, Maren; Clérac, Rodolphe; Smith, Jeremy M

    2015-09-21

    Incomplete nitrogen atom transfer from the iron(IV) nitride complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe?N to the vanadium(III) complex V(Mes)3(THF) quantitatively provides the bimetallic complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe-N?V(Mes)3. Structural and spectroscopic characterizations reveal that the nitride ligand forms a linear bridge between V(V) and high-spin Fe(II) metal ions, confirming that atom transfer is accompanied by electron transfer. In the presence of an applied dc field, the complex displays slow relaxation of the magnetization, revealing its single-molecule magnet properties with an estimation of the energy barrier at about 10 K. This complex establishes a synthetic principle for the assembly of paramagnetic complexes bridged by nitride ligands. PMID:26322964

  3. Ab Initio Modeling of Fe(II) Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer at Goethite (?-FeOOH) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Goethite (?-FeOOH) surfaces represent one of the most ubiquitous redox-active interfaces in the environment, playing an important role in biogeochemical metal cycling and contaminant residence in the subsurface. Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite is a fundamental process in this context, but the proposed Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite electron and iron atom exchange mechanism of recrystallization remains poorly understood at the atomic level. We examine the adsorption of aqueous Fe(II) and subsequent interfacial electron transfer (ET) between adsorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) at the (110) and (021) goethite surfaces using density functional theory calculations including Hubbard U corrections (DFT+U) aided by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate various surface sites for the adsorption of Fe2+(H2O)6 in different coordination environments. Calculated energies for adsorbed complexes at both surfaces favor monodentate complexes with reduced 4- and 5-fold coordination over higher-dentate structures and 6- fold coordination. The hydrolysis of H2O ligands is observed for some pre-ET adsorbed Fe(II) configurations. ET from the adsorbed Fe(II) into the goethite lattice is calculated to be energetically uphill always, but simultaneous proton transfer from H2O ligands of the adsorbed complexes to the surface oxygen species stabilizes post-ET states. We find that surface defects such as oxygen vacancies near the adsorption site also can stabilize post-ET states, enabling the Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite interfacial electron transfer reaction implied from experiments to proceed.

  4. Ab initio modeling of Fe(II) adsorption and interfacial electron transfer at goethite (?-FeOOH) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Rosso, Kevin M

    2015-06-14

    Goethite (?-FeOOH) surfaces represent one of the most ubiquitous redox-active interfaces in the environment, playing an important role in biogeochemical metal cycling and contaminant residence in the subsurface. Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite is a fundamental process in this context, but the proposed Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite electron and iron atom exchange mechanism of recrystallization remains poorly understood at the atomic level. We examine the adsorption of aqueous Fe(II) and subsequent interfacial electron transfer (ET) between adsorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) at the (110) and (021) goethite surfaces using density functional theory calculations including Hubbard U corrections (DFT + U) aided by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate various surface sites for the adsorption of Fe(2+)(H2O)6 in different coordination environments. Calculated energies for adsorbed complexes at both surfaces favor monodentate complexes with reduced 4- and 5-fold coordination over higher-dentate structures and 6-fold coordination. The hydrolysis of H2O ligands is observed for some pre-ET adsorbed Fe(II) configurations. ET from the adsorbed Fe(II) into the goethite lattice is calculated to be energetically uphill always, but simultaneous proton transfer from H2O ligands of the adsorbed complexes to the surface oxygen species stabilizes post-ET states. We find that surface defects such as oxygen vacancies near the adsorption site also can stabilize post-ET states, enabling the Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite interfacial electron transfer reaction implied from experiments to proceed. PMID:25968615

  5. Comparison of hydrolytic and non-hydrolytic atomic layer deposition chemistries: Interfacial electronic properties at alumina-silicon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marstell, Roderick J.; Strandwitz, Nicholas C.

    2015-11-01

    We report the differences in the passivation and electronic properties of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) deposited on silicon via traditional hydrolytic atomic layer deposition (ALD) and non-hydrolytic (NH) ALD chemistries. Traditional films were grown using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water and NHALD films grown using TMA and isopropanol at 300 °C. Hydrolytically grown ALD films contain a smaller amount of fixed charge than NHALD films (oxide fixed charge Qf Traditional = -8.1 × 1011 cm-2 and Qf NHALD = -3.6 × 1012 cm-2), and a larger degree of chemical passivation than NHALD films (density of interface trap states, Dit Traditional = 5.4 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 and Dit NHALD = 2.9 × 1012 eV-1 cm-2). Oxides grown with both chemistries were found to have a band gap of 7.1 eV. The conduction band offset was 3.21 eV for traditionally grown films and 3.38 eV for NHALD. The increased Dit for NHALD films may stem from carbon impurities in the oxide layer that are at and near the silicon surface, as evidenced by both the larger trap state time constant (τTraditional = 2.2 × 10-9 s and τNHALD = 1.7 × 10-7 s) and the larger carbon concentration. We have shown that the use of alcohol-based oxygen sources in NHALD chemistry can significantly affect the resulting interfacial electronic behavior presenting an additional parameter for understanding and controlling interfacial electronic properties at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces.

  6. Separation and counting of single molecules through nanofluidics, programmable electrophoresis, and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2006-04-25

    An apparatus for carrying out the separation, detection, and/or counting of single molecules at nanometer scale. Molecular separation is achieved by driving single molecules through a microfluidic or nanofluidic medium using programmable and coordinated electric fields. In various embodiments, the fluidic medium is a strip of hydrophilic material on nonconductive hydrophobic surface, a trough produced by parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material on a hydrophilic base, or a covered passageway produced by parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material on a hydrophilic base together with a nonconductive cover on the parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material. The molecules are detected and counted using nanoelectrode-gated electron tunneling methods, dielectric monitoring, and other methods.

  7. Single molecule activity measurements of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase reveal the existence of two discrete functional states.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Tomas; Singha, Aparajita; Rantzau, Nicolai; Tutkus, Marijonas; Borch, Jonas; Hedegård, Per; Stamou, Dimitrios; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Hatzakis, Nikos S

    2014-03-21

    Electron transfer between membrane spanning oxidoreductase enzymes controls vital metabolic processes. Here we studied for the first time with single molecule resolution the function of P450 oxidoreductase (POR), the canonical membrane spanning activator of all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes. Measurements and statistical analysis of individual catalytic turnover cycles shows POR to sample at least two major functional states. This phenotype may underlie regulatory interactions with different cytochromes P450 but to date has remained masked in bulk kinetics. To ensure that we measured the inherent behavior of POR, we reconstituted the full length POR in "native like" membrane patches, nanodiscs. Nanodisc reconstitution increased stability by ?2-fold as compared to detergent solubilized POR and showed significantly increased activity at biologically relevant ionic strength conditions, highlighting the importance of studying POR function in a membrane environment. This assay paves the way for studying the function of additional membrane spanning oxidoreductases with single molecule resolution. PMID:24359083

  8. Influence of the electron-phonon interfacial conductance on the thermal transport at metal/dielectric interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lombard, J; Detcheverry, F; Merabia, S

    2015-01-14

    Thermal boundary conductance at a metal-dielectric interface is a quantity of prime importance for heat management at the nanoscale. While the boundary conductance is usually ascribed to the coupling between metal phonons and dielectric phonons, in this work we examine the influence of a direct coupling between the metal electrons and the dielectric phonons. The effect of electron-phonon processes is generally believed to be resistive and tends to decrease the overall thermal boundary conductance as compared to the phonon-phonon conductance ?(p). Here, we find that the effect of a direct electron-phonon interfacial coupling ?(e) is to enhance the effective thermal conductance between the metal and the dielectric. Resistive effects turn out to be important only for thin films of metals that have a low electron-phonon coupling strength. Two approaches are explored to reach these conclusions. First, we present an analytical solution of the two-temperature model to compute the effective conductance which accounts for all the relevant energy channels, as a function of ?(e), ?(p) and the electron-phonon coupling factor G. Second, we use numerical resolution to examine the influence of ?(e) on two realistic cases: a gold film on silicon or silica substrates. We point out the implications for the interpretation of time-resolved thermoreflectance experiments. PMID:25425559

  9. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600 bp/s and 700 bp/s, respectively, as compared to 140 bp/s for φ29.

  10. Calix[4]arene Based Single-Molecule Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Karotsis, Georgios; Teat, Simon J.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Piligkos, Stergios; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Brechin, Euan K.

    2009-06-04

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have been the subject of much interest in recent years because their molecular nature and inherent physical properties allow the crossover between classical and quantum physics to be observed. The macroscopic observation of quantum phenomena - tunneling between different spin states, quantum interference between tunnel paths - not only allows scientists to study quantum mechanical laws in great detail, but also provides model systems with which to investigate the possible implementation of spin-based solid state qubits and molecular spintronics. The isolation of small, simple SMMs is therefore an exciting prospect. To date almost all SMMs have been made via the self-assembly of 3d metal ions in the presence of bridging/chelating organic ligands. However, very recently an exciting new class of SMMs, based on 3d metal clusters (or single lanthanide ions) housed within polyoxometalates, has appeared. These types of molecule, in which the SMM is completely encapsulated within (or shrouded by) a 'protective' organic or inorganic sheath have much potential for design and manipulation: for example, for the removal of unwanted dipolar interactions, the introduction of redox activity, or to simply aid functionalization for surface grafting. Calix[4]arenes are cyclic (typically bowl-shaped) polyphenols that have been used extensively in the formation of versatile self-assembled supramolecular structures. Although many have been reported, p-{sup t}But-calix[4]arene and calix[4]arene (TBC4 and C4 respectively, Figure 1A) are frequently encountered due to (a) synthetic accessibility, and (b) vast potential for alteration at either the upper or lower rim of the macrocyclic framework. Within the field of supramolecular chemistry, TBC4 is well known for interesting polymorphic behavior and phase transformations within anti-parallel bi-layer arrays, while C4 often forms self-included trimers. The polyphenolic nature of calix[n]arenes (where n = 4-8) also suggests they should be excellent candidates as ligands for the isolation of molecular magnets, but to date their use in the isolation of paramagnetic cluster compounds is rather limited. Herein we present the first Mn cluster and the first SMM to be isolated using any methylene bridged calix[n]arene - a ferromagnetically coupled mixed-valence [Mn{sub 2}{sup III}Mn{sub 2}{sup II}] complex housed between either two TBC4s or two C4s.

  11. Localization microscopy: mapping cellular dynamics with single molecules.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A J; Hess, S T

    2014-04-01

    Resolution describes the smallest details within a sample that can be recovered by a microscope lens system. For optical microscopes detecting visible light, diffraction limits the resolution to ∼200-250 nm. In contrast, localization measures the position of an isolated object using its image. Single fluorescent molecules can be localized with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometres, and in some cases less than one nanometre. Superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy (SRFLM) images and localizes fluorescent molecules in a sample. By controlling the visibility of the fluorescent molecules with light, it is possible to cause a sparse subset of the tags to fluoresce and be spatially separated from each other. A movie is acquired with a camera, capturing images of many sets of visible fluorescent tags over a period of time. The movie is then analysed by a computer whereby all of the single molecules are independently measured, and their positions are recorded. When the coordinates of a sufficient number of molecules are collected, an image can be rendered by plotting the coordinates of the localized molecules. The spatial resolution of these rendered images can be better than 20 nm, roughly an order of magnitude better than the diffraction limited resolution. The invention of SRFLM has led to an explosion of related techniques. Through the use of specialized optics, the fluorescent signal can be split into multiple detection channels. These channels can capture additional information such as colour (emission wavelength), orientation and three-dimensional position of the detected molecules. Measurement of the colour of the detected fluorescence can allow researchers to distinguish multiple types of fluorescent tags and to study the interaction between multiple molecules of interest. Three-dimensional imaging and determination of molecular orientations offer insight into structural organization of the sample. SRFLM is compatible with living samples and has helped to illuminate many dynamic biological processes, such as the trajectories of molecules within living cells. This review discusses the concept and process of SRFLM imaging and investigates recent advances in SRFLM functionality. Since its announcement in 2006, SRFLM has been quickly adopted and modified by many researchers to help investigate questions whose answers lie below the diffraction limit. The versatility of the SRFLM technique has great promise for improving our understanding of cell biology at the molecular level. PMID:24611627

  12. Single Molecule Study of DNA Organization and Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Botao

    We have studied five projects related to DNA organization and recombination using mainly single molecule force-spectroscopy and statistical tools. First, HU is one of the most abundant DNA-organizing proteins in bacterial chromosomes and participates in gene regulation. We report experiments that study the dependence of DNA condensation by HU on force, salt and HU concentration. A first important result is that at physiological salt levels, HU only bends DNA, resolving a previous paradox of why a chromosome-compacting protein should have a DNA-stiffening function. A second major result is quantitative demonstration of strong dependencies of HU-DNA dissociation on both salt concentration and force. Second, we have used a thermodynamic Maxwell relation to count proteins driven off large DNAs by tension, an effect important to understanding DNA organization. Our results compare well with estimates of numbers of proteins HU and Fis in previous studies. We have also shown that a semi-flexible polymer model describes our HU experimental data well. The force-dependent binding suggests mechano-chemical mechanisms for gene regulation. Third, the elusive role of protein H1 in chromatin has been clarified with purified H1 and Xenopus extracts. We find that H1 compacts DNA by both bending and looping. Addition of H1 enhances chromatin formation and maintains the plasticity of the chromatin. Fourth, the topology and mechanics of DNA twisting are critical to DNA organization and recombination. We have systematically measured DNA extension as a function of linking number density from 0.08 to -2 with holding forces from 0.2 to 2.4 pN. Unlike previous proposals, the DNA extension decreases with negative linking number. Finally, DNA recombination is a dynamic process starting from enzyme-DNA binding. We report that the Int-DBD domain of lambda integrase binds to DNA without compaction at low Int-DBD concentration. High concentration of Int-DBD loops DNA below a threshold force, which depends on salt concentration. We also report experiments with the recombinase Hin mutant H107Y. The synapse formation is demonstrated with single DNA containing two hix sites. We further show preliminary data for cleavage and subunit rotation from a braiding assay. These direct observations elucidate the recombination mechanism.

  13. Electronic Transport properties of SET and REST states of interfacial phase-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hisao; Tominaga, Junji; Asai, Yoshihiro; Rungger, Ivan; Narayan, Awadhesh; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    The phase change memory (PCM) is one of most promising nonvolatile information storage technologies. Recently, the superlattice structure of GeTe/Sb2Te3 is proposed as PCM to reduce the restive switching energy. This PCM is called interfacial PCM (iPCM) and it is considered that SET and RESET states are realized only by the flip-flop transition of Ge atoms in crystal phase because of small loss of entropy. Furthermore, the GeTe is sandwiched by Sb2Te3 topological insulator. In this study, we performed the first principles electric transport calculations including spin-orbit interactions. We presents the mechanism of resistive switch by the transition of Ge atoms as well as the volume change effect and the role of spin-orbit interaction to resistance ration of SET and RESE states.

  14. Single-molecule detection and radiation control in solutions at high concentrations via a heterogeneous optical slot antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenglong; Liu, Yongmin; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jiasen

    2014-07-01

    We designed a heterogeneous optical slot antenna (OSA) that is capable of detecting single molecules in solutions at high concentrations, where most biological processes occur. A heterogeneous OSA consists of a rectangular nanoslot fabricated on heterogeneous metallic films formed by sequential deposition of gold and aluminum on a glass substrate. The rectangular nanoslot gives rise to large field and fluorescence enhancement for single molecules. The near-field intensity inside a heterogeneous OSA is 170 times larger than that inside an aluminum zero-mode waveguide (ZMW), and the fluorescence emission rate of a molecule inside the heterogeneous OSA is about 70 times higher than that of the molecule in free space. Our proposed heterogeneous optical antenna enables excellent balance between performance and cost. The design takes into account the practical experimental conditions so that the parameters chosen in the simulation are well within the reach of current nano-fabrication technologies. Our results can be used as a direct guidance for designing high-performance, low-cost plasmonic nanodevices for the study of bio-molecule and enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level.We designed a heterogeneous optical slot antenna (OSA) that is capable of detecting single molecules in solutions at high concentrations, where most biological processes occur. A heterogeneous OSA consists of a rectangular nanoslot fabricated on heterogeneous metallic films formed by sequential deposition of gold and aluminum on a glass substrate. The rectangular nanoslot gives rise to large field and fluorescence enhancement for single molecules. The near-field intensity inside a heterogeneous OSA is 170 times larger than that inside an aluminum zero-mode waveguide (ZMW), and the fluorescence emission rate of a molecule inside the heterogeneous OSA is about 70 times higher than that of the molecule in free space. Our proposed heterogeneous optical antenna enables excellent balance between performance and cost. The design takes into account the practical experimental conditions so that the parameters chosen in the simulation are well within the reach of current nano-fabrication technologies. Our results can be used as a direct guidance for designing high-performance, low-cost plasmonic nanodevices for the study of bio-molecule and enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01407c

  15. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    DOEpatents

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria (Los Alamos, NM); Redondo, Antonio (Los Alamos, NM); Olazabal, Virginia (Los Alamos, NM); Hoffbauer, Mark A. (Los Alamos, NM); Akhadov, Elshan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-12-29

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  16. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J.; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-11-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference.The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of 1c; experimental details of conductance measurements, formation of charge transfer complexes of 1c and 2 in solution; further details of theoretical methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04420k

  17. Coherent Manipulation and Decoherence of S=10 Single-Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2009-03-01

    A single crystal of high-spin single-molecule magnets (SMMs) is an attractive testbed for quantum science and technologies. High-spin SMMs are suitable for applications to dense quantum memory and computing devices. Because SMM clusters are identical and interact weakly, the ensemble properties of single crystals of SMMs reflect the properties of a single cluster. However coherent manipulation of high-spin SMM crystals has never been demonstrated due to strong spin decoherence. For spins in the solid state, an interaction with fluctuations of surrounding spin bath is a major source of spin decoherence. One approach to reduce spin bath fluctuations is to bring the spin bath into a well-known quantum state that exhibits little or no fluctuations. A prime example is the case of a fully polarized spin bath. In diamond, spin decoherence has been quenched using high-frequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) [1]. We present coherent manipulation and decoherence of a single-crystal of S=10 Fe8 SMMs. Through polarizing a spin bath in Fe8 single-molecule magnets at 4.6 T and 1.3 K, we demonstrate that spin decoherence is significantly suppressed to extend the spin decoherence time (T2) up to 700 ns [2]. Investigation of temperature dependence of spin relaxation times reveals the nature of spin decoherence. This work is collaboration with J. van Tol, C. C. Beedle, D. N. Hendrickson, L.-C. Brunel, and M. S. Sherwin.[4pt] [1] S. Takahashi, R. Hanson, J. van Tol, M. S. Sherwin, and D. D. Awschalom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 047601 (2008).[0pt] [2] S. Takahashi, J. van Tol, C. C. Beedle, D. N. Hendrickson, L.-C. Brunel, and M. S. Sherwin, arXiv: 0810.1254.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Surfing on a new wave of single-molecule fluorescence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohlbein, Johannes; Gryte, Kristofer; Heilemann, Mike; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2010-09-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is currently one of the most popular methods in the single-molecule toolbox. In this review, we discuss recent advances in fluorescence instrumentation and assays: these methods are characterized by a substantial increase in complexity of the instrumentation or biological samples involved. Specifically, we describe new multi-laser and multi-colour fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging techniques, super-resolution microscopy imaging and the development of instruments that combine fluorescence detection with other single-molecule methods such as force spectroscopy. We also highlight two pivotal developments in basic and applied biosciences: the new information available from detection of single molecules in single biological cells and exciting developments in fluorescence-based single-molecule DNA sequencing.

  19. Reversible gating of smart plasmonic molecular traps using thermoresponsive polymers for single-molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanhui; Soeriyadi, Alexander H.; Rosa, Lorenzo; Ng, Soon Hock; Bach, Udo; Justin Gooding, J.

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted increasing interest for chemical and biochemical sensing. Many conventional substrates have a broad distribution of SERS enhancements, which compromise reproducibility and result in slow response times for single-molecule detection. Here we report a smart plasmonic sensor that can reversibly trap a single molecule at hotspots for rapid single-molecule detection. The sensor was fabricated through electrostatic self-assembly of gold nanoparticles onto a gold/silica-coated silicon substrate, producing a high yield of uniformly distributed hotspots on the surface. The hotspots were isolated with a monolayer of a thermoresponsive polymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)), which act as gates for molecular trapping at the hotspots. The sensor shows not only a good SERS reproducibility but also a capability to repetitively trap and release molecules for single-molecular sensing. The single-molecule sensitivity is experimentally verified using SERS spectral blinking and bianalyte methods.

  20. Reversible gating of smart plasmonic molecular traps using thermoresponsive polymers for single-molecule detection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhui; Soeriyadi, Alexander H.; Rosa, Lorenzo; Ng, Soon Hock; Bach, Udo; Justin Gooding, J.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted increasing interest for chemical and biochemical sensing. Many conventional substrates have a broad distribution of SERS enhancements, which compromise reproducibility and result in slow response times for single-molecule detection. Here we report a smart plasmonic sensor that can reversibly trap a single molecule at hotspots for rapid single-molecule detection. The sensor was fabricated through electrostatic self-assembly of gold nanoparticles onto a gold/silica-coated silicon substrate, producing a high yield of uniformly distributed hotspots on the surface. The hotspots were isolated with a monolayer of a thermoresponsive polymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)), which act as gates for molecular trapping at the hotspots. The sensor shows not only a good SERS reproducibility but also a capability to repetitively trap and release molecules for single-molecular sensing. The single-molecule sensitivity is experimentally verified using SERS spectral blinking and bianalyte methods. PMID:26549539

  1. Reversible gating of smart plasmonic molecular traps using thermoresponsive polymers for single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanhui; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Rosa, Lorenzo; Ng, Soon Hock; Bach, Udo; Justin Gooding, J

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted increasing interest for chemical and biochemical sensing. Many conventional substrates have a broad distribution of SERS enhancements, which compromise reproducibility and result in slow response times for single-molecule detection. Here we report a smart plasmonic sensor that can reversibly trap a single molecule at hotspots for rapid single-molecule detection. The sensor was fabricated through electrostatic self-assembly of gold nanoparticles onto a gold/silica-coated silicon substrate, producing a high yield of uniformly distributed hotspots on the surface. The hotspots were isolated with a monolayer of a thermoresponsive polymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)), which act as gates for molecular trapping at the hotspots. The sensor shows not only a good SERS reproducibility but also a capability to repetitively trap and release molecules for single-molecular sensing. The single-molecule sensitivity is experimentally verified using SERS spectral blinking and bianalyte methods. PMID:26549539

  2. Controlling orbital-selective Kondo effects in a single molecule through coordination chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Minamitani, Emi; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2014-08-01

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule causes novel Kondo effects derived from the unique electronic structure of multi-spins and multi-orbitals when attached to Au(111). Two unpaired electrons in the dz2 and the degenerate d? orbitals are screened stepwise, resulting in spin and spin+orbital Kondo effects, respectively. We investigated the impact on the Kondo effects of the coordination of CO and NO molecules to the Fe2+ ion as chemical stimuli by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. The impacts of the two diatomic molecules are different from each other as a result of the different electronic configurations. The coordination of CO converts the spin state from triplet to singlet, and then the Kondo effects completely disappear. In contrast, an unpaired electron survives in the molecular orbital composed of Fe dz2 and NO 5? and 2?* orbitals for the coordination of NO, causing a sharp Kondo resonance. The isotropic magnetic response of the peak indicates the origin is the spin Kondo effect. The diatomic molecules attached to the Fe2+ ion were easily detached by applying a pulsed voltage at the STM junction. These results demonstrate that the single molecule chemistry enables us to switch and control the spin and the many-body quantum states reversibly.

  3. Controlling orbital-selective Kondo effects in a single molecule through coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Minamitani, Emi; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2014-08-01

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule causes novel Kondo effects derived from the unique electronic structure of multi-spins and multi-orbitals when attached to Au(111). Two unpaired electrons in the d(z)(2) and the degenerate d? orbitals are screened stepwise, resulting in spin and spin+orbital Kondo effects, respectively. We investigated the impact on the Kondo effects of the coordination of CO and NO molecules to the Fe(2+) ion as chemical stimuli by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. The impacts of the two diatomic molecules are different from each other as a result of the different electronic configurations. The coordination of CO converts the spin state from triplet to singlet, and then the Kondo effects completely disappear. In contrast, an unpaired electron survives in the molecular orbital composed of Fe d(z)(2) and NO 5? and 2?* orbitals for the coordination of NO, causing a sharp Kondo resonance. The isotropic magnetic response of the peak indicates the origin is the spin Kondo effect. The diatomic molecules attached to the Fe(2+) ion were easily detached by applying a pulsed voltage at the STM junction. These results demonstrate that the single molecule chemistry enables us to switch and control the spin and the many-body quantum states reversibly. PMID:25106595

  4. Controlling orbital-selective Kondo effects in a single molecule through coordination chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki; Minamitani, Emi; Kim, Yousoo

    2014-08-07

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule causes novel Kondo effects derived from the unique electronic structure of multi-spins and multi-orbitals when attached to Au(111). Two unpaired electrons in the d{sub z}{sup 2} and the degenerate d? orbitals are screened stepwise, resulting in spin and spin+orbital Kondo effects, respectively. We investigated the impact on the Kondo effects of the coordination of CO and NO molecules to the Fe{sup 2+} ion as chemical stimuli by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. The impacts of the two diatomic molecules are different from each other as a result of the different electronic configurations. The coordination of CO converts the spin state from triplet to singlet, and then the Kondo effects completely disappear. In contrast, an unpaired electron survives in the molecular orbital composed of Fe d{sub z}{sup 2} and NO 5? and 2?* orbitals for the coordination of NO, causing a sharp Kondo resonance. The isotropic magnetic response of the peak indicates the origin is the spin Kondo effect. The diatomic molecules attached to the Fe{sup 2+} ion were easily detached by applying a pulsed voltage at the STM junction. These results demonstrate that the single molecule chemistry enables us to switch and control the spin and the many-body quantum states reversibly.

  5. Integration of biological ion channels onto optically addressable micro-fluidic electrode arrays for single molecule characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Frink, Laura J. Douglas; Bachand, George David; Keller, David J.; Patrick, Elizabeth L.; Marshall, Jason A.; Ortiz, Theodore P.; Meyer, Lauren A.; Davis, Ryan W.; Brozik, James A.; Flemming, Jeb Hunter

    2004-12-01

    The challenge of modeling the organization and function of biological membranes on a solid support has received considerable attention in recent years, primarily driven by potential applications in biosensor design. Affinity-based biosensors show great promise for extremely sensitive detection of BW agents and toxins. Receptor molecules have been successfully incorporated into phospholipid bilayers supported on sensing platforms. However, a collective body of data detailing a mechanistic understanding of membrane processes involved in receptor-substrate interactions and the competition between localized perturbations and delocalized responses resulting in reorganization of transmembrane protein structure, has yet to be produced. This report describes a systematic procedure to develop detailed correlation between (recognition-induced) protein restructuring and function of a ligand gated ion channel by combining single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and single channel current recordings. This document is divided into three sections: (1) reported are the thermodynamics and diffusion properties of gramicidin using single molecule fluorescence imaging and (2) preliminary work on the 5HT{sub 3} serotonin receptor. Thirdly, we describe the design and fabrication of a miniaturized platform using the concepts of these two technologies (spectroscopic and single channel electrochemical techniques) for single molecule analysis, with a longer term goal of using the physical and electronic changes caused by a specific molecular recognition event as a transduction pathway in affinity based biosensors for biotoxin detection.

  6. Solid phase single-molecule counting of antibody binding to supported protein layers surface with low nonspecific adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dafeng; Zhang, Qianqian; Shen, Xibo; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2010-08-15

    On the basis of the supported protein layers (SPLs) substrate, the study presented an ultrasensitive and highly specific platform for single-molecule fluorescence detection of antibody using quantum dots (QDs) as probes. To construct the SPLs surface platform for antibody immobilization, bovine serum albumin (BSA), anti-BSA, and protein G were firstly attached to carboxyl-terminated substrate surfaces by turns. Then nonspecific adsorption of single antibody molecules on SPLs surfaces was investigated. Through the irreversible interaction between streptavidin and biotin, streptavidin-QD conjugates were employed to conjugate with biotinylated antibody, producing QD-antibody conjugates for generating fluorescent signals in fluorescent imaging. Epi-fluorescence microscopy equipped with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was chosen as the tool for single-molecule fluorescence detection here. The concentration of antibody is quantified based on the direct counting of individual fluorescent spots, one by one. The generated fluorescent signals increased with the increasing concentration of immobilized antibody and were found to be proportional to antibody concentrations. The better brightness and photostability of QDs, and slower increase in the number of counted molecules make a large linear dynamic range of 1.0x10(-14) to 3.0x10(-12)mol L(-1) between the number of single molecules and antibody concentrations, which is comparable to the previously reported surface-based SMD analysis. PMID:20678659

  7. "Butterfly effect" in CuO/graphene composite nanosheets: a small interfacial adjustment triggers big changes in electronic structure and Li-ion storage performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Jisheng; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Fedoseeva, Yu V; Okotrub, A V; Bulusheva, L G

    2014-10-01

    Generally speaking, excellent electrochemical performance of metal oxide/graphene nanosheets (GNSs) composite is attributed to the interfacial interaction (or "synergistic effect") between constituents. However, there are no any direct observations on how the electronic structure is changed and how the properties of Li-ion storage are affected by adjusting the interfacial interaction, despite of limited investigations on the possible nature of binding between GNSs and metal oxide. In this paper, CuO nanosheets/GNSs composites with a little Cu2O (ca. 4 wt %) were utilized as an interesting model to illustrate directly the changes of interfacial nature as well as its deep influence on the electronic structure and Li-ion storage performance of composite. The interfacial adjustment was successfully fulfilled by removal of Cu2O in the composite by NH3·H2O. Formation of Cu-O-C bonds on interfaces both between CuO and GNSs, and Cu2O and GNSs in the original CuO/GNSs composites was detected. The small interfacial alteration by removal of the little Cu2O results in the obvious changes in electronic structure, such as weakening of covalent Cu-O-C interfacial interaction and recovery of π bonds in graphene, and simultaneously leads to variations in electrochemical performance of composites, including a 21% increase of reversible capacity, degradation of cyclic stability and rate-performance, and obvious increase of charge-transfer resistance, which can be called a "butterfly effect" in graphene-based metal oxide composites. These interesting phenomena could be helpful to design not only the high-performance graphene/metal oxide anode materials but also various advanced graphene-based composites used in the other fields such as sensors, catalysis, fuel cells, solar cells, etc. PMID:25226227

  8. Self-Doping, O2-Stable, n-Type Interfacial Layer for Organic Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, T. H. III; Hains, A. W.; Chen, H. Y.; Gregg, B. A.

    2012-04-01

    Solid films of a water-soluble dicationic perylene diimide salt, perylene bis(2-ethyltrimethylammonium hydroxide imide), Petma{sup +}OH{sup -}, are strongly doped n-type by dehydration and reversibly de-doped by hydration. The hydrated films consist almost entirely of the neutral perylene diimide, PDI, while the dehydrated films contain {approx}50% PDI anions. The conductivity increases by five orders of magnitude upon dehydration, probably limited by film roughness, while the work function decreases by 0.74 V, consistent with an n-type doping density increase of {approx}12 orders of magnitude. Remarkably, the PDI anions are stable in dry air up to 120 C. The work function of the doped film, {phi} (3.96 V vs. vacuum), is unusually negative for an O{sub 2}-stable contact. Petma{sup +} OH{sup -} is also characterized as an interfacial layer, IFL, in two different types of organic photovoltaic cells. Results are comparable to state of the art cesium carbonate IFLs, but may improve if film morphology can be better controlled. The films are stable and reversible over many months in air and light. The mechanism of this unusual self-doping process may involve the change in relative potentials of the ions in the film caused by their deshielding and compaction as water is removed, leading to charge transfer when dry.

  9. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Absorbance and fluorescence spectra of quantum dot nanoprobes, electrophoresis analysis, and experimental setup for fluorescence imaging with dual channels. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03291d

  10. Comparative study on the interfacial electron transfer of zinc porphyrins with meso-?-extension at a 2(n) pattern.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanru; Huang, Yu; Jiang, Yuan; Ning, Xingming; Wang, Xuemei; Shan, Duoliang; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2016-01-15

    Three zinc-tetraarylporphyrins were prepared in order to investigate the effects of systematic meso-?-extension on the redox behaviors and interfacial electron transfer kinetics. The meso-?-extension increased at a 2(n) pattern, where 2(n) was the benzene ring number in an aryl group and the aryl group represented phenyl, naphthyl and pyrenyl group, respectively. The structures of zinc-tetraarylporphyrins and hydroquinone were optimized by using density functional theory. The bimolecular reactions between zinc-tetraarylporphyrins and hydroquinone at the liquid-liquid interface were studied by using scanning electrochemical microscopy. There was an inverse electron transfer rate-overall driving force dependence by comparison of three bimolecular reactions. It was suggested that the formation of a precursor between zinc-tetraarylporphyrin cation and hydroquinone was deeply influenced by the increasing steric hindrance from phenyl group to pyrenyl group. The electron transfer rate constant depended strongly on the overall driving force for each bimolecular reaction, with transfer coefficients of 0.41, 0.37 and 0.39. PMID:26439289

  11. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Amino Acids and Peptides by Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules and measuring the electron tunneling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic ‘fingerprints’ associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunneling technique, we are able to identify D, L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers, and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  13. Versatile electron-collecting interfacial layer by in situ growth of silver nanoparticles in nonconjugated polyelectrolyte aqueous solution for polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2014-10-01

    Novel PEIE-Ag composites by in situ growth of silver nanoparticles in poly(ethylenimine)-ethoxylated (PEIE) aqueous solution are explored as an efficient interfacial layer for improving inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) performance. The hybrid PEIE-Ag interfacial material is simple to fabricate only via ultraviolet irradiation with good water-solubility and unique film formation. The generated Ag nanoparticles can anchor in the PEIE polymer chains to form a conductive continuous interpenetrating network structure. Combining of the advantages of PEIE and Ag nanoparticles, the PEIE-Ag shows enhanced charge transport, electron selective and collection, and improved light-harvesting, mainly due to the surface plasmon resonance effect, better energy alignment induced by the formation of ideal dipole layer, as well as the improved conductivity. These distinguished interfacial properties result in the power conversion efficiency of inverted PSCs based on poly[4,8-bis(2-ethyl-hexyl-thiophene-5-yl)-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b]dithiophene-2,6-diyl]-alt-[2-(2-ethyl-hexanoyl)-thieno[3,4-b]thiophen-4,6-diyl] (PBDTTT-C-T) and [6,6]-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) photoactive layer substantially improved up to 7.66% from 6.11%. Moreover, the device performance is insensitively dependent on the thickness of the PEIE-Ag interfacial layer, broadening the thicknesses selection window for interfacial materials. These results demonstrate that PEIE-Ag is a potential interfacial material compatible with roll-to-roll techniques and suitable for printed electronic devices. PMID:25207753

  14. Metal/dielectric thermal interfacial transport considering cross-interface electron-phonon coupling: Theory, two-temperature molecular dynamics, and thermal circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zexi; Wang, Yan; Ruan, Xiulin

    2016-02-01

    The standard two-temperature equations for electron-phonon coupled thermal transport across metal/nonmetal interfaces are modified to include the possible coupling between metal electrons with substrate phonons. The previous two-temperature molecular dynamics (TT-MD) approach is then extended to solve these equations numerically at the atomic scale, and the method is demonstrated using Cu/Si interface as an example. A key parameter in TT-MD is the nonlocal coupling distance of metal electrons and nonmetal phonons, and here we use two different approximations. The first is based on Overhauser's "joint-modes" concept, while we use an interfacial reconstruction region as the length scale of joint region rather than the phonon mean-free path as in Overhauser's original model. In this region, the metal electrons can couple to the joint phonon modes. The second approximation is the "phonon wavelength" concept where electrons couple to phonons nonlocally within the range of one phonon wavelength. Compared with the original TT-MD, including the cross-interface electron-phonon coupling can slightly reduce the total thermal boundary resistance. Whether the electron-phonon coupling within the metal block is nonlocal or not does not make an obvious difference in the heat transfer process. Based on the temperature profiles from TT-MD, we construct a new mixed series-parallel thermal circuit. We show that such a thermal circuit is essential for understanding metal/nonmetal interfacial transport, while calculating a single resistance without solving temperature profiles as done in most previous studies is generally incomplete. As a comparison, the simple series circuit that neglects the cross-interface electron-phonon coupling could overestimate the interfacial resistance, while the simple parallel circuit in the original Overhauser's model underestimates the total interfacial resistance.

  15. Single-molecule surface studies of fibrinogen and DNA on semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xianhua

    Understanding of protein adsorption onto non-biological substrates is of fundamental interest in science, but also has great potential technological applications in medical devices and biosensors. This study explores the non-specific interaction, at the single molecule level, of a blood protein and DNA with semiconductor surfaces through the use of a custom built, non rastering electron emission microscope and a scanning probe microscope. The specifics and history of electron emission are described as well as the equipment used in this study. The protein examined in this study is human plasma fibrinogen, which plays an important role in haemostatis and thrombosis, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is also studied. A novel technique for determining the photothreshold of biomolecules on single molecule level is developed and applied to fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on oxidized silicon surfaces, using photo-electron emission microscopy (PEEM). Three theoretical models are employed and compared to analyze the experimental photothreshold data. The non-specific adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen on oxidized p- and n- type silicon (100) surfaces is investigated to characterize both hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces. The experimental results indicate that hydrophobic interactions are one of the driving forces for protein adsorption and the electrostatic interactions also play a role in the height of the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on the surface. PEEM images establish a photo threshold of 5.0 +/- 0.2 eV for fibrinogen on both n-type and p-type Si (100) surfaces. We suggest that the photothreshold results from surface state associated Fermi level (EF) pinning and there exists negative charge transfer from the adsorbed fibrinogen onto the p-type silicon substrates, while on n-type silicon substrates negative charge is transferred in the opposite direction. The adsorption of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on mica and silicon is studied in liquid and ambient environments with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Its interactions with fibrinogen proteins co-adsorbed on surfaces exhibit an interesting desorption effect. The photoelectric imaging of DNA adsorbed on silicon is studied in ultra-high vacuum. A contrast reversal is observed on Si (111) depending on different surface pretreatments, which we suggest is due to the surface states induced photoemission. Several semiconductor materials, including Si(100), Si (111), diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, single crystal diamond (SCD) (100), nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films, silicon carbide (SiC) (0001), and graphene, are examined for biocompatibility in applications such as medical implants and biosensors. In conjunction with other studies in the literature, we suggest that DLC, NCD, and SiC are suitable for biosensor applications.

  16. Surface Chemically Switchable Ultraviolet Luminescence from Interfacial Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad A; Saldana-Greco, Diomedes; Gu, Zongquan; Wang, Fenggong; Breckenfeld, Eric; Lei, Qingyu; Xu, Ruijuan; Hawley, Christopher J; Xi, X X; Martin, Lane W; Rappe, Andrew M; Spanier, Jonathan E

    2016-01-13

    We report intense, narrow line-width, surface chemisorption-activated and reversible ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence from radiative recombination of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with photoexcited holes at LaAlO3/SrTiO3. The switchable luminescence arises from an electron transfer-driven modification of the electronic structure via H-chemisorption onto the AlO2-terminated surface of LaAlO3, at least 2 nm away from the interface. The control of the onset of emission and its intensity are functionalities that go beyond the luminescence of compound semiconductor quantum wells. Connections between reversible chemisorption, fast electron transfer, and quantum-well luminescence suggest a new model for surface chemically reconfigurable solid-state UV optoelectronics and molecular sensing. PMID:26675987

  17. Single-base resolution and long-coverage sequencing based on single-molecule nanomanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongjie; Huang, Jiehuan; Lü, Ming; Li, Xueling; Lü, Junhong; Li, Haikuo; Zhang, Yi; Li, Minqian; Hu, Jun

    2007-06-01

    We show new approaches towards a novel single-molecule sequencing strategy which consists of high-resolution positioning isolation of overlapping DNA fragments with atomic force microscopy (AFM), subsequent single-molecule PCR amplification and conventional Sanger sequencing. In this study, a DNA labelling technique was used to guarantee the accuracy in positioning the target DNA. Single-molecule multiplex PCR was carried out to test the contamination. The results showed that the two overlapping DNA fragments isolated by AFM could be successfully sequenced with high quality and perfect contiguity, indicating that single-base resolution and long-coverage sequencing have been achieved simultaneously.

  18. Do-it-yourself guide: How to use the modern single molecule toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nils G.; Huang, Cheng-Yen; Manzo, Anthony J.; Sobhy, Mohamed A.

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy has evolved into the ultimate-sensitivity toolkit to study systems from small molecules to living cells, with the prospect of revolutionizing the modern biosciences. Here we survey the current state-of-the-art in single molecule tools including fluorescence spectroscopy, tethered particle microscopy, optical and magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy. Our review seeks to guide the biological scientist in choosing the right approach from the available single molecule toolkit for applications ranging as far as structural biology, enzymology, nanotechnology, and systems biology. PMID:18511916

  19. Experimental approaches for addressing fundamental biological questions in living, functioning cells with single molecule precision

    PubMed Central

    Lenn, Tchern; Leake, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, single molecule experimentation has allowed researchers to observe biological processes at the sensitivity level of single molecules in actual functioning, living cells, thereby allowing us to observe the molecular basis of the key mechanistic processes in question in a very direct way, rather than inferring these from ensemble average data gained from traditional molecular and biochemical techniques. In this short review, we demonstrate the impact that the application of single molecule bioscience experimentation has had on our understanding of various cellular systems and processes, and the potential that this approach has for the future to really address very challenging and fundamental questions in the life sciences. PMID:22773951

  20. Non-fluorescent schemes for single-molecule detection, imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Jaime Ortega; Kukura, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    For decades, optical studies of single molecules have relied on fluorescence detection. The availability of alternative approaches for single-molecule interrogation would greatly expand the range of addressable molecules beyond species that are highly emissive and photostable, thus offering new applications in fields other than molecular biophysics and imaging. Here, we discuss the range of recent developments in optical label-free detection and imaging schemes that offer single-molecule sensitivity, with an emphasis on plasmonically enhanced and scattering-based approaches. We highlight the advantages and challenges facing these emerging methodologies and briefly outline their potential future applications.