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Sample records for single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy

  1. Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reaction of Single Molecules Directly Probed by Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Han-Kyu; Park, Won-Hwa; Park, Chan-Gyu; Shin, Hyun-Hang; Lee, Kang Sup; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2016-04-01

    The study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions remains a major challenge because it involves a complex network of reaction steps with various intermediates. If the vibrational spectra of individual molecules could be monitored in real time, one could characterize the structures of the intermediates and the time scales of reaction steps without ensemble averaging. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy does provide vibrational spectra with single-molecule sensitivity, but typical single-molecule SERS signals exhibit spatial heterogeneities and temporal fluctuations, making them difficult to be used in single-molecule kinetics studies. Here we show that SERS can monitor the single-molecule catalytic reactions in real time. The surface-immobilized reactants placed at the junctions of well-defined nanoparticle-thin film structures produce time-resolved SERS spectra with discrete, step-transitions of photoproducts. We interpret that such SERS-steps correspond to the reaction events of individual molecules occurring at the SERS hotspot. The analyses of the yield, dynamics, and the magnitude of such SERS steps, along with the associated spectral characteristics, fully support our claim. In addition, a model that is based on plasmonic field enhancement and surface photochemistry reproduces the key features of experimental observation. Overall, the result demonstrates that it is possible, under well-controlled conditions, to differentiate the chemical and physical processes contributing to the single-molecule SERS signals, and thus shows the use of single-molecule SERS as a tool for studying the metal-catalyzed organic reactions. PMID:26964567

  2. Single-Molecule Vibrational Spectroscopy Adds Structural Resolution to the Optical Trap

    PubMed Central

    Ganim, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    The ability to apply forces on single molecules with an optical trap is combined with the endogenous structural resolution of Raman spectroscopy in an article in this issue, and applied to measure the Raman spectrum of ds-DNA during force-extension. PMID:23332052

  3. Nature of Asymmetry in the Vibrational Line Shape of Single-Molecule Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy with the STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Chiang, Chi-lun; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W.

    2016-04-01

    Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy and microscopy was demonstrated in 1998 by inelastic electron tunneling with the scanning tunneling microscope. To date, the discussion of its application has mainly focused on the spatial resolution and the spectral energy and intensity. Here we report on the vibrational line shape for a single carbon monoxide molecule that qualitatively exhibits inversion symmetry when it is transferred from the surface to the tip. The dependence of the line shape on the molecule's asymmetric couplings in the tunnel junction can be understood from theoretical simulation and further validates the mechanisms of inelastic electron tunneling.

  4. Nature of Asymmetry in the Vibrational Line Shape of Single-Molecule Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy with the STM.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Chiang, Chi-Lun; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W

    2016-04-22

    Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy and microscopy was demonstrated in 1998 by inelastic electron tunneling with the scanning tunneling microscope. To date, the discussion of its application has mainly focused on the spatial resolution and the spectral energy and intensity. Here we report on the vibrational line shape for a single carbon monoxide molecule that qualitatively exhibits inversion symmetry when it is transferred from the surface to the tip. The dependence of the line shape on the molecule's asymmetric couplings in the tunnel junction can be understood from theoretical simulation and further validates the mechanisms of inelastic electron tunneling. PMID:27152811

  5. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoji G.; Rang, Matthias; Craig, Ian M.; Rashcke, Markus B.

    2012-06-18

    While scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has demonstrated its potential to extend infrared (IR) spectroscopy into the nanometer scale, it has not yet reached its full potential in terms of spectroscopic sensitivity. We combine broadband femtosecond mid-IR excitation with an optimized spectral irradiance of 2 W/cm2/ cm–1 (power/area/bandwidth) and a combination of tip- and substrate enhancement to demonstrate single-monolayer sensitivity with exceptional signal-to-noise ratio. Using interferometric time domain detection, the near-field IR s-SNOM spectral phase directly reflects the molecular vibrational resonances and their intrinsic line shapes. We probe the stretching resonance of 1000 carbonyl groups at 1700 cm–1 in a self-assembled monolayer of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) on an evaporated gold substrate with spectroscopic contrast and sensitivity of 100 vibrational oscillators. From these results we provide a roadmap for achieving true single-molecule IR vibrational spectroscopy in s-SNOM by implementing optical antenna resonant enhancement, increased spectral pump power, and improved detection schemes.

  6. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  7. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  8. Variation of Exciton-Vibrational Coupling in Photosystem II Core Complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus As Revealed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spectral properties and dynamics of the fluorescence emission of photosystem II core complexes are investigated by single-molecule spectroscopy at 1.6 K. The emission spectra are dominated by sharp zero-phonon lines (ZPLs). The sharp ZPLs are the result of weak to intermediate exciton-vibrational coupling and slow spectral diffusion. For several data sets, it is possible to surpass the effect of spectral diffusion by applying a shifting algorithm. The increased signal-to-noise ratio enables us to determine the exciton-vibrational coupling strength (Huang–Rhys factor) with high precision. The Huang–Rhys factors vary between 0.03 and 0.8. The values of the Huang–Rhys factors show no obvious correlation between coupling strength and wavelength position. From this result, we conclude that electrostatic rather than exchange or dispersive interactions are the main contributors to the exciton-vibrational coupling in this system. PMID:25708355

  9. FCS and Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigler, Rudolf

    The idea to develop Fluorescence Fluctuation spectroscopy started when working in Manfred Eigens' Laboratory in G¨ottingen in the Max Planck Institute for Physical Chemistry as a postdoctoral fellow. I had just finished the construction and testing of a fluorescence T-jump machine [1] when Jean Pierre Changeux from Institut Pasteur arrived in G¨ottingen with a bag of freshly isolated nicotinic acetyl choline receptor to use the new fluorescence T-jump apparatus for relaxation kinetic studies of the receptor. Due to the high concentration of detergents present in the preparation and limited conductivity of the solvent leading to strong cavitation in the T-jump cell we could not perform the temperature relaxation experiments. However, this experience raised the question whether the analysis of equilibrium fluctuations by observing changes in the quantum yield of fluorescence would not be an alternative way to follow kinetic processes. In this way all problems related to the instantaneous temperature change could be avoided.

  10. Local vibrations in disordered solids studied via single-molecule spectroscopy: Comparison with neutron, nuclear, Raman scattering, and photon echo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Yu. G.; Naumov, A. V.; Kador, L.

    2008-06-01

    The energy spectrum of low-frequency vibrational modes (LFMs) in three disordered organic solids—amorphous polyisobutylene (PIB), toluene and deuterated toluene glasses, weakly doped with fluorescent chromophore molecules of tetra-tert-butylterrylene (TBT) has been measured via single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy. Analysis of the individual temperature dependences of linewidths of single TBT molecules allowed us to determine the values of the vibrational mode frequencies and the SM-LFM coupling constants for vibrations in the local environment of the molecules. The measured LFM spectra were compared with the “Boson peak” as measured in pure PIB by inelastic neutron scattering, in pure toluene glass by low-frequency Raman scattering, in doped toluene glass by nuclear inelastic scattering, and with photon echo data. The comparative analysis revealed close agreement between the spectra of the local vibrations as measured in the present study and the literature data of the Boson peak in PIB and toluene. The analysis has also the important result that weak doping of the disordered matrices with nonpolar probe molecules whose chemical composition is similar to that of the matrix molecules does not influence the observed vibrational dynamics markedly. The experimental data displaying temporal stability on the time scale of a few hours of vibrational excitation parameters in local surroundings was obtained for the first time both for polymer and molecular glass.

  11. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  12. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  13. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives. PMID:26606461

  14. Single-molecule spectroscopy using microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Zare, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidics serves as a convenient platform for single-molecule experiments by providing manipulation of small amounts of liquids and micron-sized particles. An adapted version of capillary electrophoresis (CE) on a microchip can be utilized to separate chemical species with high resolution based on their ionic mobilities (i.e., charges and sizes), but identification of separated species is not trivial, especially for complex mixtures of sticky biomolecules. We describe here how to use a surfactant mixture system for CE on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip, capture separated peaks within a 50-pl chamber using microvalves, analyze the fluorescence signals with correlation spectroscopy to extract molecular diffusion characteristics, and to identify the biomolecular clusters in a model immunocomplex system. PMID:20580962

  15. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes. PMID:26679007

  16. Bringing single-molecule spectroscopy to macromolecular protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chirlmin; Fareh, Mohamed; Kim, V. Narry

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers real-time, nanometer-resolution information. Over the past two decades, this emerging single-molecule technique has been rapidly adopted to investigate the structural dynamics and biological functions of proteins. Despite this remarkable achievement, single-molecule fluorescence techniques must be extended to macromolecular protein complexes that are physiologically more relevant for functional studies. In this review, we present recent major breakthroughs for investigating protein complexes within cell extracts using single-molecule fluorescence. We outline the challenges, future prospects and potential applications of these new single-molecule fluorescence techniques in biological and clinical research. PMID:23200186

  17. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in (bio)catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; De Cremer, Gert; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Muls, Benîot; Sels, Bert F.; Jacobs, Pierre A.; De Schryver, Frans C.; De Vos, Dirk E.; Hofkens, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The ever-improving time and space resolution and molecular detection sensitivity of fluorescence microscopy offer unique opportunities to deepen our insights into the function of chemical and biological catalysts. Because single-molecule microscopy allows for counting the turnover events one by one, one can map the distribution of the catalytic activities of different sites in solid heterogeneous catalysts, or one can study time-dependent activity fluctuations of individual sites in enzymes or chemical catalysts. By experimentally monitoring individuals rather than populations, the origin of complex behavior, e.g., in kinetics or in deactivation processes, can be successfully elucidated. Recent progress of temporal and spatial resolution in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is discussed in light of its impact on catalytic assays. Key concepts are illustrated regarding the use of fluorescent reporters in catalytic reactions. Future challenges comprising the integration of other techniques, such as diffraction, scanning probe, or vibrational methods in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are suggested. PMID:17664433

  18. Action spectroscopy for single-molecule reactions - Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Motobayashi, K.; Frederiksen, T.; Ueba, H.; Kawai, M.

    2015-05-01

    We review several representative experimental results of action spectroscopy (AS) of single molecules on metal surfaces using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by M. Kawai's group over last decade. The experimental procedures to observe STM-AS are described. A brief description of a low-temperature STM and experimental setup are followed by key experimental techniques of how to determine an onset bias voltage of a reaction and how to measure a current change associated with reactions and finally how to observe AS for single molecule reactions. The experimental results are presented for vibrationally mediated chemical transformation of trans-2-butene to 1.3-butadiene molecule and rotational motion of a single cis-2-butene molecule among four equivalent orientations on Pd(1 1 0). The AS obtained from the motion clearly detects more vibrational modes than inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with an STM. AS is demonstrated as a useful and novel single molecule vibrational spectroscopy. The AS for a lateral hopping of water dimer on Pt(1 1 1) is presented as an example of novelty. Several distinct vibrational modes are detected as the thresholds in the AS. The assignment of the vibrational modes determined from the analysis of the AS is made from a view of the adsorption geometry of hydrogen-bond donor or acceptor molecules in water dimer. A generic theory of STM-AS, i.e., a reaction rate or yield as a function of bias voltage, is presented using a single adsorbate resonance model for single molecule reactions induced by the inelastic tunneling current. Formulas for the reaction rate R (V) and Y (V) , i.e., reaction yield per electron Y (V) = eR (V) / I are derived. It provides a versatile framework to analyze any vibrationally mediated reactions of single adsorbates on metal surfaces. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate generic features of the vibrational generation rate and Y (V) at different levels of approximations and to show how the effective

  19. Single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.S.

    1996-12-01

    The spirit of studying single-molecule behaviors dates back to the turn of the century. In addition to Einstein`s well-known work on Brownian motion, there has been a tradition for studying single {open_quotes}macromolecules{close_quotes} or a small number of molecules either by light scattering or by fluorescence using an optical microscope. Modern computers have allowed detailed studies of single-molecule behaviors in condensed media through molecular dynamics simulations. Optical spectroscopy offers a wealth of information on the structure, interaction, and dynamics of molecular species. With the motivation of removing {open_quotes}inhomogeneous broadening{close_quotes}, spectroscopic techniques have evolved from spectral hole burning, fluorescence line narrowing, and photo-echo to the recent pioneering work on single-molecule spectroscopy in solids at cryogenic temperatures. High-resolution spectroscopic work on single molecules relies on zero phonon lines which appear at cryogenic temperatures, and have narrow line widths and large absorption cross sections. Recent advances in near-field and confocal fluorescence have allowed not only fluorescence imaging of single molecules with high spatial resolutions but also single-molecule spectroscopy at room temperature. In this Account, the author provides a physical chemist`s perspective on experimental and theoretical developments on room-temperature single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics, with the emphasis on the information obtainable from single-molecule experiments. 61 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-01

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive "detection" based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  1. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-07

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive “detection” based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  2. Single-molecule spectroscopy and imaging over the decades.

    PubMed

    Moerner, W E; Shechtman, Yoav; Wang, Quan

    2015-01-01

    As of 2015, it has been 26 years since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter. This area of science has expanded far beyond the early low temperature studies in crystals to include single molecules in cells, polymers, and in solution. The early steps relied upon high-resolution spectroscopy of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral fine structure arising directly from the position-dependent fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, a variety of fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, including imaging of the light from single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency. In the room temperature regime, researchers showed that bursts of light from single molecules could be detected in solution, leading to imaging and microscopy by a variety of methods. Studies of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. All of these early steps provided important fundamentals underpinning the development of super-resolution microscopy based on single-molecule localization and active control of emitting concentration. Current thrust areas include extensions to three-dimensional imaging with high precision, orientational analysis of single molecules, and direct measurements of photodynamics and transport properties for single molecules trapped in solution by suppression of Brownian motion. Without question, a huge variety of studies of single molecules performed by many

  3. Tunneling spectroscopy of organic monolayers and single molecules.

    PubMed

    Hipps, K W

    2012-01-01

    Basic concepts in tunneling spectroscopy applied to molecular systems are presented. Junctions of the form M-A-M, M-I-A-M, and M-I-A-I'-M, where A is an active molecular layer, are considered. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is found to be readily applied to all the above device types. It can provide both vibrational and electron spectroscopic data about the molecules comprising the A layer. In IETS there are no strong selection rules (although there are preferences) so that transitions that are normally IR, Raman, or even photon-forbidden can be observed. In the electronic transition domain, spin and Laporte forbidden transitions may be observed. Both vibrational and electronic IETS can be acquired from single molecules. The negative aspect of this seemingly ideal spectroscopic method is the thermal line width of about 5 k(B)T. This limits the useful measurement of vibrational IETS to temperatures below about 10 K. In the case of most electronic transitions where the intrinsic linewidth is much broader, useful experiments above 100 K are possible. One further limitation of electronic IETS is that it is generally limited to transitions with energy less than about 20,000 cm(-1). IETS can be identified by peaks in d(2) I/dV (2) vs bias voltage plots that occur at the same position (but not necessarily same intensity) in either bias polarity.Elastic tunneling spectroscopy is discussed in the context of processes involving molecular ionization and electron affinity states, a technique we call orbital mediated tunneling spectroscopy, or OMTS. OMTS can be applied readily to M-I-A-M and M-I-A-I'-M systems, but application to M-A-M junctions is problematic. Spectra can be obtained from single molecules. Ionization state results correlate well with UPS spectra obtained from the same systems in the same environment. Both ionization and affinity levels measured by OMTS can usually be correlated with one electron oxidation and reduction potentials for the

  4. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions. PMID:27004879

  5. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  6. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  7. Observation of vibrational overtones by single molecule resonant photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Gang; Khanyile, Ncamiso; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Molecular ions sympathetically cooled by a chain of laser-cooled atomic ions are ideal for performing high-precision molecular spectroscopy with applications in astrochemistry and fundamental physics. The same system can be coupled with a broadband laser to perform survey spectroscopy and discover new molecular transitions. Here we present our results using three-ion chains of Ca+ and CaH+ to observe vibrational transitions via resonance enhanced multiphoton dissociation detected by Ca+ fluorescence. Based on theoretical calculations, the observed peaks are assigned to two vibrational overtones corresponding to transitions from the ground vibrational state, ν = 0, to the excited vibrational states, ν = 9 and ν = 10. Our method allows us to track single molecular events, and it can be extended to handle any molecule by monitoring normal mode frequency shifts to detect the dissociation.

  8. High-throughput multispot single-molecule spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Kim, Taiho; Rech, Ivan; Resnati, Daniele; Marangoni, Stefano; Ghioni, Massimo; Cova, Sergio; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule spectroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful techniques to access a variety of molecular properties such as size, brightness, conformation, and binding constants. However, this is limited to low concentrations, which results in long acquisition times in order to achieve good statistical accuracy. Data can be acquired more quickly by using parallelization. We present a new approach using a multispot excitation and detection geometry made possible by the combination of three powerful new technologies: (i) a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to produce multiple diffraction-limited excitation spots; (ii) a multipixel detector array matching the excitation pattern and (iii) a low-cost reconfigurable multichannel counting board. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique by reporting FCS measurements of various calibrated samples as well as single-molecule burst measurements. PMID:21643532

  9. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  10. Observation of vibrational overtones by single-molecule resonant photodissociation

    PubMed Central

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Shu, Gang; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular ions can be held in a chain of laser-cooled atomic ions by sympathetic cooling. This system is ideal for performing high-precision molecular spectroscopy with applications in astrochemistry and fundamental physics. Here we show that this same system can be coupled with a broadband laser to discover new molecular transitions. We use three-ion chains of Ca+ and CaH+ to observe vibrational transitions via resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation detected by Ca+ fluorescence. On the basis of theoretical calculations, we assign the observed peaks to the transition from the ground vibrational state, ν=0 to ν=9 and 10. Our method allows us to track single-molecular events, and it can be extended to work with any molecule by using normal mode frequency shifts to detect the dissociation. This survey spectroscopy serves as a bridge to the precision spectroscopy required for molecular ion control. PMID:26197787

  11. Observation of vibrational overtones by single-molecule resonant photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Shu, Gang; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular ions can be held in a chain of laser-cooled atomic ions by sympathetic cooling. This system is ideal for performing high-precision molecular spectroscopy with applications in astrochemistry and fundamental physics. Here we show that this same system can be coupled with a broadband laser to discover new molecular transitions. We use three-ion chains of Ca+ and CaH+ to observe vibrational transitions via resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation detected by Ca+ fluorescence. On the basis of theoretical calculations, we assign the observed peaks to the transition from the ground vibrational state, ν=0 to ν=9 and 10. Our method allows us to track single-molecular events, and it can be extended to work with any molecule by using normal mode frequency shifts to detect the dissociation. This survey spectroscopy serves as a bridge to the precision spectroscopy required for molecular ion control.

  12. Nonlinear coherent spectroscopy in the single molecule limit (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals from signal molecules is a longstanding experimental challenge. Driving the vibrational CARS response with surface plasmon fields has proven notoriously difficult due to strong background contributions, unfavorable heat dissipation and the phase dispersion of the plasmon modes in the ensemble. In this work we overcome previous experimental limitations and demonstrate time-resolved, vibrational CARS from molecules in the low copy number limit, down to the single molecule level. Our measurements, which are performed under ambient and non-electronic resonance conditions, establish that the coherent response from vibrational modes of individual molecules can be studied experimentally, opening up a new realm of molecular spectroscopic investigations.

  13. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory.

    PubMed

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J Michael; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence-detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlorophylls, Lut 1 can act as an efficient fluorescence quencher in LHCII. PMID:27189196

  14. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence-detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlorophylls, Lut 1 can act as an efficient fluorescence quencher in LHCII. PMID:27189196

  15. Reconstructing Folding Energy Landscapes by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Woodside, Michael T.; Block, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Folding may be described conceptually in terms of trajectories over a landscape of free energies corresponding to different molecular configurations. In practice, energy landscapes can be difficult to measure. Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), whereby structural changes are monitored in molecules subjected to controlled forces, has emerged as a powerful tool for probing energy landscapes. We summarize methods for reconstructing landscapes from force spectroscopy measurements under both equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. Other complementary, but technically less demanding, methods provide a model-dependent characterization of key features of the landscape. Once reconstructed, energy landscapes can be used to study critical folding parameters, such as the characteristic transition times required for structural changes and the effective diffusion coefficient setting the timescale for motions over the landscape. We also discuss issues that complicate measurement and interpretation, including the possibility of multiple states or pathways and the effects of projecting multiple dimensions onto a single coordinate. PMID:24895850

  16. Subnanometre enzyme mechanics probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelz, Benjamin; Žoldák, Gabriel; Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin; Rief, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Enzymes are molecular machines that bind substrates specifically, provide an adequate chemical environment for catalysis and exchange products rapidly, to ensure fast turnover rates. Direct information about the energetics that drive conformational changes is difficult to obtain. We used subnanometre single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the energetic drive of substrate-dependent lid closing in the enzyme adenylate kinase. Here we show that in the presence of the bisubstrate inhibitor diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), closing and opening of both lids is cooperative and tightly coupled to inhibitor binding. Surprisingly, binding of the substrates ADP and ATP exhibits a much smaller energetic drive towards the fully closed state. Instead, we observe a new dominant energetic minimum with both lids half closed. Our results, combining experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, give detailed mechanical insights into how an enzyme can cope with the seemingly contradictory requirements of rapid substrate exchange and tight closing, to ensure efficient catalysis.

  17. Subnanometre enzyme mechanics probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Benjamin; Žoldák, Gabriel; Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin; Rief, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are molecular machines that bind substrates specifically, provide an adequate chemical environment for catalysis and exchange products rapidly, to ensure fast turnover rates. Direct information about the energetics that drive conformational changes is difficult to obtain. We used subnanometre single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the energetic drive of substrate-dependent lid closing in the enzyme adenylate kinase. Here we show that in the presence of the bisubstrate inhibitor diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), closing and opening of both lids is cooperative and tightly coupled to inhibitor binding. Surprisingly, binding of the substrates ADP and ATP exhibits a much smaller energetic drive towards the fully closed state. Instead, we observe a new dominant energetic minimum with both lids half closed. Our results, combining experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, give detailed mechanical insights into how an enzyme can cope with the seemingly contradictory requirements of rapid substrate exchange and tight closing, to ensure efficient catalysis. PMID:26906294

  18. Subnanometre enzyme mechanics probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pelz, Benjamin; Žoldák, Gabriel; Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin; Rief, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are molecular machines that bind substrates specifically, provide an adequate chemical environment for catalysis and exchange products rapidly, to ensure fast turnover rates. Direct information about the energetics that drive conformational changes is difficult to obtain. We used subnanometre single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the energetic drive of substrate-dependent lid closing in the enzyme adenylate kinase. Here we show that in the presence of the bisubstrate inhibitor diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), closing and opening of both lids is cooperative and tightly coupled to inhibitor binding. Surprisingly, binding of the substrates ADP and ATP exhibits a much smaller energetic drive towards the fully closed state. Instead, we observe a new dominant energetic minimum with both lids half closed. Our results, combining experiment and molecular dynamics simulations, give detailed mechanical insights into how an enzyme can cope with the seemingly contradictory requirements of rapid substrate exchange and tight closing, to ensure efficient catalysis. PMID:26906294

  19. Polarization-dependent single-molecule spectroscopy on photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skandary, S.; Konrad, A.; Hussels, M.; Meixner, A. J.; Brecht, M.

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) at low temperature was used to study the spectral properties, heterogeneities and spectral dynamics of the chlorophyll a (Chl a) molecules responsible for the fluorescence emission of photosystem I (PS I). The fluorescence spectra of single PS I complexes are dominated by several red-shifted Chl a molecules categorized into red pools called C708 and C719. By polarization dependent measurements we demonstrate spectrally separate emissions corresponding to C708 and C719 in single PS I monomers and trimers. Moreover, we compared the results of SMS polarization dependent between monomeric and trimeric PS I complexes and give an estimation for the orientation between these red pools. As a consequence, we get new insight into the energy transfer towards and between the red Chl a molecules in PS I complexes.

  20. Voltage tuning of vibrational mode energies in single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajing; Doak, Peter; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational modes of molecules are fundamental properties determined by intramolecular bonding, atomic masses, and molecular geometry, and often serve as important channels for dissipation in nanoscale processes. Although single-molecule junctions have been used to manipulate electronic structure and related functional properties of molecules, electrical control of vibrational mode energies has remained elusive. Here we use simultaneous transport and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements to demonstrate large, reversible, voltage-driven shifts of vibrational mode energies of C60 molecules in gold junctions. C60 mode energies are found to vary approximately quadratically with bias, but in a manner inconsistent with a simple vibrational Stark effect. Our theoretical model instead suggests that the mode shifts are a signature of bias-driven addition of electronic charge to the molecule. These results imply that voltage-controlled tuning of vibrational modes is a general phenomenon at metal–molecule interfaces and is a means of achieving significant shifts in vibrational energies relative to a pure Stark effect. PMID:24474749

  1. Effects of electron-vibration coupling in transport through single molecules.

    PubMed

    Franke, Katharina J; Pascual, Jose Ignacio

    2012-10-01

    Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we study the transport of electrons through C(60) molecules on different metal surfaces. When electrons tunnel through a molecule, they may excite molecular vibrations. A fingerprint of these processes is a characteristic sub-structure in the differential conductance spectra of the molecular junction reflecting the onset of vibrational excitation. Although the intensity of these processes is generally weak, they become more important as the resonant character of the transport mechanism increases. The detection of single vibrational levels crucially depends on the energy level alignment and lifetimes of excited states. In the limit of large current densities, resonant electron-vibration coupling leads to an energy accumulation in the molecule, which eventually leads to its decomposition. With our experiments on C(60) we are able to depict a molecular scale picture of how electrons interact with the vibrational degrees of freedom of single molecules in different transport regimes. This understanding helps in the development of stable molecular devices, which may also carry a switchable functionality. PMID:22964796

  2. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  3. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Phospholipid Bilayer Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Abhinav; Trexler, Adam J.; Koo, Peter; Miranker, Andrew D.; Atkins, William M.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Nanodiscs are a new class of model membranes that are being used to solubilize and study a range of integral membrane proteins and membrane-associated proteins. Unlike other model membranes, the Nanodisc bilayer is bounded by a scaffold protein coat that confers enhanced stability and a narrow particle size distribution. The bilayer diameter can be precisely controlled by changing the diameter of the protein coat. All these properties make Nanodiscs excellent model membranes for single molecule fluorescence applications. In this chapter, we describe our work using Nanodiscs to apply total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the integral membrane protein cytochrome P450 3A4 and the membrane-binding proteins islet amyloid popypeptide (IAPP) and α-synuclein, respectively. The monodisperse size distribution of Nanodiscs enhances control over the oligomeric state of the membrane protein of interest, and also facilitates accurate solution-based measurements. Nanodiscs also comprise an excellent system to stably immobilize integral membrane proteins in a bilayer without covalent modification, enabling a range of surface-based experiments where accurate localization of the protein of interest is required. PMID:20580961

  4. Improved single molecule force spectroscopy using micromachined cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew S; Sullan, Ruby May A; Li, Hongbin; Perkins, Thomas T

    2014-05-27

    Enhancing the short-term force precision of atomic force microscopy (AFM) while maintaining excellent long-term force stability would result in improved performance across multiple AFM modalities, including single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). SMFS is a powerful method to probe the nanometer-scale dynamics and energetics of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins). The folding and unfolding rates of such macromolecules are sensitive to sub-pN changes in force. Recently, we demonstrated sub-pN stability over a broad bandwidth (Δf = 0.01-16 Hz) by removing the gold coating from a 100 μm long cantilever. However, this stability came at the cost of increased short-term force noise, decreased temporal response, and poor sensitivity. Here, we avoided these compromises while retaining excellent force stability by modifying a short (L = 40 μm) cantilever with a focused ion beam. Our process led to a ∼10-fold reduction in both a cantilever's stiffness and its hydrodynamic drag near a surface. We also preserved the benefits of a highly reflective cantilever while mitigating gold-coating induced long-term drift. As a result, we extended AFM's sub-pN bandwidth by a factor of ∼50 to span five decades of bandwidth (Δf ≈ 0.01-1000 Hz). Measurements of mechanically stretching individual proteins showed improved force precision coupled with state-of-the-art force stability and no significant loss in temporal resolution compared to the stiffer, unmodified cantilever. Finally, these cantilevers were robust and were reused for SFMS over multiple days. Hence, we expect these responsive, yet stable, cantilevers to broadly benefit diverse AFM-based studies. PMID:24670198

  5. Signatures of molecular magnetism in single-molecule transport spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Moon-Ho; Grose, Jacob E; Baheti, Kanhayalal; Deshmukh, Mandar M; Sokol, Jennifer J; Rumberger, Evan M; Hendrickson, David N; Long, Jeffrey R; Park, Hongkun; Ralph, D C

    2006-09-01

    We report single-molecule-transistor measurements on devices incorporating magnetic molecules. By studying the electron-tunneling spectrum as a function of magnetic field, we are able to identify signatures of magnetic states and their associated magnetic anisotropy. A comparison of the data to simulations also suggests that sequential electron tunneling may enhance the magnetic relaxation of the magnetic molecule. PMID:16968018

  6. Theoretical analysis of single molecule spectroscopy lineshapes of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Murali

    Conjugated Polymers(CPs) exhibit a wide range of highly tunable optical properties. Quantitative and detailed understanding of the nature of excitons responsible for such a rich optical behavior has significant implications for better utilization of CPs for more efficient plastic solar cells and other novel optoelectronic devices. In general, samples of CPs are plagued with substantial inhomogeneous broadening due to various sources of disorder. Single molecule emission spectroscopy (SMES) offers a unique opportunity to investigate the energetics and dynamics of excitons and their interactions with phonon modes. The major subject of the present thesis is to analyze and understand room temperature SMES lineshapes for a particular CP, called poly(2,5-di-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (DEH-PPV). A minimal quantum mechanical model of a two-level system coupled to a Brownian oscillator bath is utilized. The main objective is to identify the set of model parameters best fitting a SMES lineshape for each of about 200 samples of DEH-PPV, from which new insight into the nature of exciton-bath coupling can be gained. This project also entails developing a reliable computational methodology for quantum mechanical modeling of spectral lineshapes in general. Well-known optimization techniques such as gradient descent, genetic algorithms, and heuristic searches have been tested, employing an L2 measure between theoretical and experimental lineshapes for guiding the optimization. However, all of these tend to result in theoretical lineshapes qualitatively different from experimental ones. This is attributed to the ruggedness of the parameter space and inadequateness of the L2 measure. On the other hand, when the dynamic reduction of the original parameter space to a 2-parameter space through feature searching and visualization of the search space paths using directed acyclic graphs(DAGs), the qualitative nature of the fitting improved significantly. For a more

  7. Vibrationally dependent electron-electron interactions in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, A.; Härtle, R.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of electronic-vibrational coupling in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions, taking into account that the corresponding coupling strengths may depend on the charge and excitation state of the molecular bridge. Within an effective-model Hamiltonian approach for a molecule with multiple electronic states, this requires to extend the commonly used model and include vibrationally dependent electron-electron interaction. We use Born-Markov master equation methods and consider selected models to exemplify the effect of the additional interaction on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule junction. In particular, we show that it has a significant influence on local cooling and heating mechanisms, it may result in negative differential resistance, and it may cause pronounced asymmetries in the conductance map of a single-molecule junction.

  8. Hybrid photodetector for single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Cheng, Adrian; Antelman, Joshua; Suyama, Motohiro; Arisaka, Katsushi; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    We report benchmark tests of a new single-photon counting detector based on a GaAsP photocathode and an electron-bombarded avalanche photodiode developed by Hamamatsu Photonics. We compare its performance with those of standard Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. We show its advantages for FCS due to the absence of after-pulsing and for fluorescence lifetime measurements due to its excellent time resolution. Its large sensitive area also greatly simplifies setup alignment. Its spectral sensitivity being similar to that of recently introduced CMOS SPADs, this new detector could become a valuable tool for single-molecule fluorescence measurements, as well as for many other applications. PMID:21822361

  9. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  10. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise.

  11. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  12. Theoretical investigation on single-molecule chiroptical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, M.; Yokojima, S.; Fukaminato, T.; Ogata, K.; Nakamura, S.

    2013-12-10

    Some experimental results of chiroptical response of single molecule have already reported. In those experiments, dissymmetry parameter, g was used as an indicator of the relative circular dichroism intensity. The parameter for individual molecules was measured. For the purpose of giving an interpretation or explanation to the experimental result, the dissymmetry parameter is formulated on the basis of Fermi’s golden rule. Subsequently, the value of individual molecules is evaluated as a function of the direction of light propagation to the orientationary fixed molecules. The ground and excited wavefunction of electrons in the molecule and transition moments needed are culculated using the density functional theory.

  13. Directly measuring single-molecule heterogeneity using force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hinczewski, Michael; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-01

    One of the most intriguing results of single-molecule experiments on proteins and nucleic acids is the discovery of functional heterogeneity: the observation that complex cellular machines exhibit multiple, biologically active conformations. The structural differences between these conformations may be subtle, but each distinct state can be remarkably long-lived, with interconversions between states occurring only at macroscopic timescales, fractions of a second or longer. Although we now have proof of functional heterogeneity in a handful of systems-enzymes, motors, adhesion complexes-identifying and measuring it remains a formidable challenge. Here, we show that evidence of this phenomenon is more widespread than previously known, encoded in data collected from some of the most well-established single-molecule techniques: atomic force microscopy or optical tweezer pulling experiments. We present a theoretical procedure for analyzing distributions of rupture/unfolding forces recorded at different pulling speeds. This results in a single parameter, quantifying the degree of heterogeneity, and also leads to bounds on the equilibration and conformational interconversion timescales. Surveying 10 published datasets, we find heterogeneity in 5 of them, all with interconversion rates slower than 10 s(-1) Moreover, we identify two systems where additional data at realizable pulling velocities is likely to find a theoretically predicted, but so far unobserved crossover regime between heterogeneous and nonheterogeneous behavior. The significance of this regime is that it will allow far more precise estimates of the slow conformational switching times, one of the least understood aspects of functional heterogeneity. PMID:27317744

  14. Ultra high-throughput single molecule spectroscopy with a 1024 pixel SPAD

    PubMed Central

    Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Villa, Federica A.; Guerrieri, Fabrizio; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco; Cova, Sergio; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopy is a powerful approach to measuring molecular properties such as size, brightness, conformation, and binding constants. Due to the low concentrations in the single-molecule regime, measurements with good statistical accuracy require long acquisition times. Previously we showed a factor of 8 improvement in acquisition speed using a custom-CMOS 8x1 SPAD array. Here we present preliminary results with a 64X improvement in throughput obtained using a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator (LCOS-SLM) and a novel standard CMOS 1024 pixel SPAD array, opening the way to truly high-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:24386535

  15. On artifacts in single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2015-01-01

    In typical force spectroscopy experiments, a small biomolecule is attached to a soft polymer linker that is pulled with a relatively large bead or cantilever. At constant force, the total extension stochastically changes between two (or more) values, indicating that the biomolecule undergoes transitions between two (or several) conformational states. In this paper, we consider the influence of the dynamics of the linker and mesoscopic pulling device on the force-dependent rate of the conformational transition extracted from the time dependence of the total extension, and the distribution of rupture forces in force-clamp and force-ramp experiments, respectively. For these different experiments, we derive analytic expressions for the observables that account for the mechanical response and dynamics of the pulling device and linker. Possible artifacts arise when the characteristic times of the pulling device and linker become comparable to, or slower than, the lifetimes of the metastable conformational states, and when the highly anharmonic regime of stretched linkers is probed at high forces. We also revisit the problem of relating force-clamp and force-ramp experiments, and identify a linker and loading rate-dependent correction to the rates extracted from the latter. The theory provides a framework for both the design and the quantitative analysis of force spectroscopy experiments by highlighting, and correcting for, factors that complicate their interpretation. PMID:26540730

  16. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  17. Theory of femtosecond coherent double-pump single-molecule spectroscopy: Application to light harvesting complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lipeng; Zhao, Yang; Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-04-28

    We develop a first principles theoretical description of femtosecond double-pump single-molecule signals of molecular aggregates. We incorporate all singly excited electronic states and vibrational modes with significant exciton-phonon coupling into a system Hamiltonian and treat the ensuing system dynamics within the Davydov D{sub 1} Ansatz. The remaining intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath and their effect is accounted for through lineshape functions. We apply our theory to simulate single-molecule signals of the light harvesting complex II. The calculated signals exhibit pronounced oscillations of mixed electron-vibrational (vibronic) origin. Their periods decrease with decreasing exciton-phonon coupling.

  18. High-throughput single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy using parallel detection

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Kim, T.; Levi, Moran; Aharoni, Daniel; Cheng, Adrian; Guerrieri, F.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Millaud, Jacques; Rech, I.; Resnati, D.; Marangoni, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Cova, S.; Weiss, S.

    2011-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful new experimental approach with applications in all fields of natural sciences. The basic concept of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume (typically femtoliter) and work in a concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single-molecule. Those events are accumulated over time to achieve proper statistical accuracy. Therefore the advantage of extreme sensitivity is somewhat counterbalanced by a very long acquisition time. One way to speed up data acquisition is parallelization. Here we will discuss a general approach to address this issue, using a multispot excitation and detection geometry that can accommodate different types of novel highly-parallel detector arrays. We will illustrate the potential of this approach with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule fluorescence measurements obtained with different novel multipixel single-photon counting detectors. PMID:21625288

  19. From single-molecule spectroscopy to super-resolution imaging of the neuron: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Romain F.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; van de Linde, Sebastian; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2016-06-01

    For more than 20 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has been providing invaluable insights into nature at the molecular level. The field has received a powerful boost with the development of the technique into super-resolution imaging methods, ca. 10 years ago, which overcome the limitations imposed by optical diffraction. Today, single molecule super-resolution imaging is routinely used in the study of macromolecular function and structure in the cell. Concomitantly, computational methods have been developed that provide information on numbers and positions of molecules at the nanometer-scale. In this overview, we outline the technical developments that have led to the emergence of localization microscopy techniques from single-molecule spectroscopy. We then provide a comprehensive review on the application of the technique in the field of neuroscience research.

  20. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  1. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  2. Nobel Lecture: Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E. William E.

    2015-10-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room-temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts as a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and selected current developments are summarized.

  3. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging, and Photocontrol: Foundations for Super-Resolution Microscopy (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Moerner, W E William E

    2015-07-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 90s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and current developments are summarized. PMID:26088273

  4. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  5. Supramolecular Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of Macromolecules: Recent Advances by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was invented in the 1990s. Since then, SMFS has been developed into a powerful tool to study the inter- and intra-molecular interactions of macromolecules. Using SMFS, a number of problems in the field of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry have been studied at the single-molecule level, which are not accessible by traditional ensemble characterization methods. In this review, the principles of SMFS are introduced, followed by the discussion of several problems of contemporary interest at the interface of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry of macromolecules, including single-chain elasticity of macromolecules, interactions between water and macromolecules, interactions between macromolecules and solid surface, and the interactions in supramolecular polymers. PMID:25860255

  6. Single molecule spin resonance spectroscopy and imaging by diamond-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiangfeng

    Single-molecule magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging is one of the ultimate goals in magnetic resonance and will has great applications in a broad range of scientific areas, from life science to physics and chemistry. The spin of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a highly sensitive magnetic-field sensor, which has been proposed for detection of single molecules or nanoscale targets. We and co-workers have successfully obtained the first single-protein spin resonance spectroscopy under ambient conditions, high-resolution vector microwave imaging, and realized atomic-scale structure analysis of single nuclear-spin clusters in diamond. Moreover, we have tried to improve the quantum control technique and succeed to achieve fault-tolerant universal quantum gates. As the last part, I will briefly introduce our most recently work on single protein imaging in situ in cell.

  7. Dynamics of Protein Folding and Cofactor Binding Monitored by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins in living cells require cofactors to carry out their biological functions. To reach their functional states, these proteins need to fold into their unique three-dimensional structures in the presence of their cofactors. Two processes, folding of the protein and binding of cofactors, intermingle with each other, making the direct elucidation of the folding mechanism of proteins in the presence of cofactors challenging. Here we use single-molecule atomic force microscopy to directly monitor the folding and cofactor binding dynamics of an engineered metal-binding protein G6-53 at the single-molecule level. Using the mechanical stability of different conformers of G6-53 as sensitive probes, we directly identified different G6-53 conformers (unfolded, apo- and Ni2+-bound) populated along the folding pathway of G6-53 in the presence of its cofactor Ni2+. By carrying out single-molecule atomic force microscopy refolding experiments, we monitored kinetic evolution processes of these different conformers. Our results suggested that the majority of G6-53 folds through a binding-after-folding mechanism, whereas a small fraction follows a binding-before-folding pathway. Our study opens an avenue to utilizing force spectroscopy techniques to probe the folding dynamics of proteins in the presence of cofactors at the single-molecule level, and we anticipated that this method can be used to study a wide variety of proteins requiring cofactors for their function. PMID:22004755

  8. Ultrafast folding kinetics and cooperativity of villin headpiece in single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Žoldák, Gabriel; Stigler, Johannes; Pelz, Benjamin; Li, Hongbin; Rief, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    In this study we expand the accessible dynamic range of single-molecule force spectroscopy by optical tweezers to the microsecond range by fast sampling. We are able to investigate a single molecule for up to 15 min and with 300-kHz bandwidth as the protein undergoes tens of millions of folding/unfolding transitions. Using equilibrium analysis and autocorrelation analysis of the time traces, the full energetics as well as real-time kinetics of the ultrafast folding of villin headpiece 35 and a stable asparagine 68 alanine/lysine 70 methionine variant can be measured directly. We also performed Brownian dynamics simulations of the response of the bead-DNA system to protein-folding fluctuations. All key features of the force-dependent deflection fluctuations could be reproduced: SD, skewness, and autocorrelation function. Our measurements reveal a difference in folding pathway and cooperativity between wild-type and stable variant of headpiece 35. Autocorrelation force spectroscopy pushes the time resolution of single-molecule force spectroscopy to ∼10 µs thus approaching the timescales accessible for all atom molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24145407

  9. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D.; Camden, Jon P.; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures (“metasurfaces”) can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent. PMID:24091825

  10. Force-Manipulation Single-Molecule Spectroscopy Studies of Enzymatic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter; He, Yufan; Lu, Maolin; Cao, Jin; Guo, Qing

    2014-03-01

    Subtle conformational changes play a crucial role in protein functions, especially in enzymatic reactions involving complex substrate-enzyme interactions and chemical reactions. We applied AFM-enhanced and magnetic tweezers-correlated single-molecule spectroscopy to study the mechanisms and dynamics of enzymatic reactions involved with kinase and lysozyme proteins. Enzymatic reaction turnovers and the associated structure changes of individual protein molecules were observed simultaneously in real-time by single-molecule FRET detections. Our single-molecule spectroscopy measurements of enzymatic conformational dynamics have revealed time bunching effect and intermittent coherence in conformational state change dynamics involving in enzymatic reaction cycles. The coherent conformational state dynamics suggests that the enzymatic catalysis involves a multi-step conformational motion along the coordinates of substrate-enzyme complex formation and product releasing. Our results support a multiple-conformational state model, being consistent with a complementary conformation selection and induced-fit enzymatic loop-gated conformational change mechanism in substrate-enzyme active complex formation.

  11. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein conformational dynamics in live eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    König, Iwo; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Soranno, Andrea; Wunderlich, Bengt; Dingfelder, Fabian; Stüber, Jakob C; Plückthun, Andreas; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule methods have become widely used for quantifying the conformational heterogeneity and structural dynamics of biomolecules in vitro. Their application in vivo, however, has remained challenging owing to shortcomings in the design and reproducible delivery of labeled molecules, the range of applicable analysis methods, and suboptimal cell culture conditions. By addressing these limitations in an integrated approach, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing protein dynamics from milliseconds down to the nanosecond regime in live eukaryotic cells with confocal single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. We illustrate the versatility of the approach by determining the dimensions and submicrosecond chain dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein; by detecting even subtle changes in the temperature dependence of protein stability, including in-cell cold denaturation; and by quantifying the folding dynamics of a small protein. The methodology opens possibilities for assessing the effect of the cellular environment on biomolecular conformation, dynamics and function. PMID:26147918

  14. Single-molecule spectroscopy of the temperature-induced collapse of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Nettels, Daniel; Müller-Späth, Sonja; Küster, Frank; Hofmann, Hagen; Haenni, Dominik; Rüegger, Stefan; Reymond, Luc; Hoffmann, Armin; Kubelka, Jan; Heinz, Benjamin; Gast, Klaus; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    We used single-molecule FRET in combination with other biophysical methods and molecular simulations to investigate the effect of temperature on the dimensions of unfolded proteins. With single-molecule FRET, this question can be addressed even under near-native conditions, where most molecules are folded, allowing us to probe a wide range of denaturant concentrations and temperatures. We find a compaction of the unfolded state of a small cold shock protein with increasing temperature in both the presence and the absence of denaturant, with good agreement between the results from single-molecule FRET and dynamic light scattering. Although dissociation of denaturant from the polypeptide chain with increasing temperature accounts for part of the compaction, the results indicate an important role for additional temperature-dependent interactions within the unfolded chain. The observation of a collapse of a similar extent in the extremely hydrophilic, intrinsically disordered protein prothymosin alpha suggests that the hydrophobic effect is not the sole source of the underlying interactions. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water show changes in secondary structure content with increasing temperature and suggest a contribution of intramolecular hydrogen bonding to unfolded state collapse. PMID:19933333

  15. Identifying the Mechanism for Amyloid Formation Using Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Troy

    2005-03-01

    We are investigating the mechanism for the initial stages of protein self-assembly leading to amyloid growth using single molecule spectroscopy (SMS). β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) has been shown to form amyloid under denaturing conditions and has been chosen as a model protein for this study. Initial bulk experiments have been performed utilizing dynamic light scattering along with steady state and time-resolved fluorescence of conformationally sensitive fluorophores, and a preliminary mechanism of amyloid growth has been formulated. However, SMS directly identifies critical intermediates that may only be hypothesized by bulk experiments. A single molecule imaging experiment utilizing incubated samples of mono-labeled TMR-(β-LG) has been designed to count number of precursor monomers per aggregate species by counting the number of photobleaching steps required to extinguish a single particle's fluorescence. The time evolution of the particle number distribution is fit to a kinetic model representing a mechanism of amyloid growth. Results of bulk and single-molecule experiments will be discussed.

  16. Resolving dual binding conformations of cellulosome cohesin-dockerin complexes using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Schoeler, Constantin; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B; Bayer, Edward A; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Receptor-ligand pairs are ordinarily thought to interact through a lock and key mechanism, where a unique molecular conformation is formed upon binding. Contrary to this paradigm, cellulosomal cohesin-dockerin (Coh-Doc) pairs are believed to interact through redundant dual binding modes consisting of two distinct conformations. Here, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to study the unbinding of Coh:Doc complexes under force. We designed Doc mutations to knock out each binding mode, and compared their single-molecule unfolding patterns as they were dissociated from Coh using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. Although average bulk measurements were unable to resolve the differences in Doc binding modes due to the similarity of the interactions, with a single-molecule method we were able to discriminate the two modes based on distinct differences in their mechanical properties. We conclude that under native conditions wild-type Doc from Clostridium thermocellum exocellulase Cel48S populates both binding modes with similar probabilities. Given the vast number of Doc domains with predicteddual binding modes across multiple bacterial species, our approach opens up newpossibilities for understanding assembly and catalytic properties of a broadrange of multi-enzyme complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10319.001 PMID:26519733

  17. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence. PMID:27145878

  18. Stochastic-trajectories and nonPoisson kinetics in single-molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Vladimir; Schulz, Michael; Mukamel, Shaul

    1999-10-01

    Microscopic correlation-function expressions for the stochastic evolution observed in single molecule spectroscopy are derived using Liouville-space projection operators. The kinetics of a multilevel quantum system coupled to a single collective overdamped Brownian-oscillator coordinate is exactly mapped onto a continuous-time-random-walk (CTRW) involving the transition states(curve-crossing points). Closed expressions are derived for the stochastic trajectories and the nonPoissonian distribution of number of flips. When the oscillator relaxation is fast compared with the reaction rates, the waiting time distribution becomes exponential and the standard Poisson kinetics is recovered.

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taekjip

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  20. Cylindrical Illumination Confocal Spectroscopy: Rectifying the Limitations of Confocal Single Molecule Spectroscopy through One-Dimensional Beam Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kelvin J.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2008-01-01

    Cylindrical illumination confocal spectroscopy (CICS) is a new implementation of single molecule detection that can be generically incorporated into any microfluidic system and allows highly quantitative and accurate analysis of single fluorescent molecules. Through theoretical modeling of confocal optics and Monte Carlo simulations, one-dimensional beam shaping is used to create a highly uniform sheet-like observation volume that enables the detection of digital fluorescence bursts while retaining single fluorophore sensitivity. First, we theoretically show that when used to detect single molecules in a microchannel, CICS can be optimized to obtain near 100% mass detection efficiency, <10% relative SD in burst heights, and a high signal/noise ratio. As a result, CICS is far less sensitive to thresholding artifacts than traditional single molecule detection and significantly more accurate at determining both burst rate and burst parameters. CICS is then experimentally implemented, optically characterized, and integrated into separate two microfluidic devices for the analysis of fluorescently stained plasmid DNA and single Cy5 labeled oligonucleotides. CICS rectifies the limitations of traditional confocal spectroscopy-based single molecule detection without the significant operational complications of competing technologies. PMID:18515376

  1. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy Study on the Mechanism of RNA Disassembly in Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Chen, Ying; Peng, Bo; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Qian; Su, Zhaohui; Zhang, Wenke; Li, Hongbin; Shen, Jiacong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the disassembly mechanism of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model system for virus study, during infection, we have used single-molecule force spectroscopy to mimic and follow the process of RNA disassembly from the protein coat of TMV by the replisome (molecular motor) in vivo, under different pH and Ca2+ concentrations. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed the unbinding free-energy landscapes as that at pH 4.7 the disassembly process is dominated by one free-energy barrier, whereas at pH 7.0 the process is dominated by one barrier and that there exists a second barrier. The additional free-energy barrier at longer distance has been attributed to the hindrance of disordered loops within the inner channel of TMV, and the biological function of those protein loops was discussed. The combination of pH increase and Ca2+ concentration drop could weaken RNA-protein interactions so much that the molecular motor replisome would be able to pull and disassemble the rest of the genetic RNA from the protein coat in vivo. All these facts provide supporting evidence at the single-molecule level, to our knowledge for the first time, for the cotranslational disassembly mechanism during TMV infection under physiological conditions. PMID:24359751

  3. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences. PMID:23267180

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences. PMID:23267180

  6. Microfluidic mixing for non-equilibrium single-molecule optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeil, Shawn H.

    We describe a series of experiments made possible by the combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microfluidic mixing. To perform these measurements, a microfluidic sample handling system was developed and characterized. This system allows observation at times as early as 2.4 ms after a reaction is triggered, which is an more than an order of magnitude earlier than previous microfabricated devices. Dilutions as high as 1:19 (v/v) are achieved, allowing measurements of molecular refolding in native conditions. The interconversion of subpopulations, masked by averaging in ensemble measurements, is observed. This technology also facilitates ultra-sensitive chemiluminescence measurements, using only microliters of sample. Microfluidics are designed and fabricated to extend single-molecule measurements to samples out of equilibrium. The system is optimized for sensitive optical detection and experimental convenience. Channels are replica-molded in poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) elastomer and sealed to coverglass. The resulting devices are compatible with a broad range of chemicals, and exhibit low background fluorescence. The combination of continuous flow, which decouples reaction progress from measurement duration, with low background enables single molecules to be probed at well defined times after a reaction is triggered. Fluid delivery and pressure connections are made using an interface optimized for rapid assembly, rapid sample exchange, and modular device replacement, while providing access for high numerical aperture optics. The kinetics of Csp, the cold shock protein from Thermotoga maritima, are studied with the mixer. An order of magnitude decrease in deadtime puts a new upper limit of 4.6 ms on the time required for collapse after mixing. This result is in agreement with indirect measurements of chain reconfiguration time, which suggest collapse happens on the timescale of 10--100 ns. Measurements of the kinetics of a DNA sequence that

  7. Mechanisms of small molecule–DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA–ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  8. Mechanisms of small molecule-DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almaqwashi, Ali A; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2016-05-19

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA-ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  9. Intramolecular Interactions of Highly π-Conjugated Perylenediimide Oligomers Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Won; Yoo, Hyejin; Lee, Ji-Eun; Yan, Qifan; Zhao, Dahui; Kim, Dongho

    2014-11-01

    Highly π-conjugated perylenediimide (PDI) oligomers are promising low band gap organic materials for various applications in optoelectronics. In this work, individual fluorescence dynamics of ethynylene- and butadiynylene-bridged dimeric and trimeric PDIs (PEP, PBP, and PEPEP) were monitored and analyzed by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to gain information on the degree of extension of π-conjugation through the acetylene bridge in PDI multichromophores. The simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and spectrum indicate a sequential decrease in π-conjugation upon photobleaching of PDI monomer units. Furthermore, Huang-Rhys (HR) factors, S, are obtained to evaluate the degree of electronic coupling in view of π-conjugation and overall rigidity between the PDI units in PDI oligomers at the single-molecule level. In addition, butadiynylene-bridged dimeric PDI (PBP) reveals conformational heterogeneity due to the long butadiynylene linker. These results suggest a new way to control the photophysical properties of the PDI multichromophoric system by expansion of π-conjugation and modification with different linker groups. PMID:26278766

  10. Single molecule spectroscopy of conjugated polymer chains in an electric field-aligned liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan; Yethiraj, Arun; Barbara, Paul F

    2008-01-17

    Using single molecule polarization spectroscopy, we investigated the alignment of a polymer solute with respect to the liquid crystal (LC) director in an LC device while applying an external electric field. The polymer solute is poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (or MEH-PPV), and the LC solvent is 5CB. The electric field induces a change in the LC director orientation from a planar alignment (no electric field) to a perpendicular (homeotropic) alignment with an applied field of 5.5 x 103 V/cm. We find that the polymer chains align with the LC director in both planar and homeotropic alignment when measured in the bulk of the LC solution away from the device interface. Single molecule polarization distributions measured as a function of distance from the LC device interface reveal a continuous change of the MEH-PPV alignment from planar to homeotropic. The observed polarization distributions are modeled using a conventional elastic model that predicts the depth profile of the LC director orientation for the applied electric field. The excellent agreement between experiment and simulations shows that the alignment of MEH-PPV follows the LC director throughout the LC sample. Furthermore, our results suggest that conjugated polymers such as MEH-PPV can be used as sensitive local probes to explore complex (and unknown) structures in anisotropic media. PMID:17975912

  11. Mechanical Unfolding of Acylphosphatase Studied by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Arad-Haase, Gali; Chuartzman, Silvia G.; Dagan, Shlomi; Nevo, Reinat; Kouza, Maksim; Mai, Binh Khanh; Nguyen, Hung Tien; Li, Mai Suan; Reich, Ziv

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Single-molecule manipulation methods provide a powerful means to study protein transitions. Here we combined single-molecule force spectroscopy and steered molecular-dynamics simulations to study the mechanical properties and unfolding behavior of the small enzyme acylphosphatase (AcP). We find that mechanical unfolding of AcP occurs at relatively low forces in an all-or-none fashion and is decelerated in the presence of a ligand, as observed in solution measurements. The prominent energy barrier for the transition is separated from the native state by a distance that is unusually long for α/β proteins. Unfolding is initiated at the C-terminal strand (βT) that lies at one edge of the β-sheet of AcP, followed by unraveling of the strand located at the other. The central strand of the sheet and the two helices in the protein unfold last. Ligand binding counteracts unfolding by stabilizing contacts between an arginine residue (Arg-23) and the catalytic loop, as well as with βT of AcP, which renders the force-bearing units of the protein resistant to force. This stabilizing effect may also account for the decelerated unfolding of ligand-bound AcP in the absence of force. PMID:20655852

  12. Single-molecule Spectroscopy: Exploring Heterogeneity in Chemical and Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-04-01

    Many chemical and biological systems are heterogeneous in the molecular length scale (∼ 1 nm). Heterogeneity in many chemical systems and organized assemblies may be monitored using single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS). In SMS, the size of the focal spot (i.e., the smallest region to be probed) is nearly half of the excitation wavelength (λ/2, i.e., 200-375 nm) for visible light (400-750 nm). We discuss how one can get spatial resolutions better than 200 nm using molecules as nanometric probes. We show that polymer hydrogels, lipid vesicles, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), and binary liquid mixtures exhibit such heterogeneity. Another important observation is solute-dependent friction in RTILs. In an RTIL, diffusion of an ionic solute is slower than that of a neutral solute. PMID:26814020

  13. Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of isolated Mn12-Ph Single Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaves, K.; Han, P.; Iwaya, K.; Hitosugi, T.; Packwood, D.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Zhao, H.; Dunbar, K. R.; Kim, K.; Teizer, W.

    2015-03-01

    We study Mn12O12(C6H5COO)16(H2O)4 (Mn12-Ph) single-molecule magnets on a Cu(111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures (T < 6K). We report the observation of Mn12-Ph in isolation and in thin films, deposited through in situ vacuum spray deposition onto clean Cu(111). The tunneling current of isolated Mn12-Ph, normalized with respect to the Cu background, shows a strong bias voltage dependence within the molecular interior. The qualitative features of these I vs.V curves differ by spatial location in several intriguing ways (e.g. fixed junction impedance with increasing bias voltages). We explore these normalized I vs. V curves and present a phenomenological explanation for the observed behaviors, corresponding to the physical and electronic structure within the molecule. Funding from WPI-AIMR.

  14. Superhydrophobicity, plasmonics and Raman spectroscopy for few/single molecule detection down to attomolar concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G.; Gentile, F.; De Angelis, F.; Coluccio, M. L.; Liberale, C.; Proietti Zaccaria, R.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2012-10-01

    Few/single molecule detection is of great importance in fields including biomedicine, safety and eco-pollution in relation to rare and dangerous chemicals. Superhydrophobic surfaces incorporated with the nanoplasmonic structure enable this device to overcome the diffusion limit of molecules dissolved in water with the concentration down to 10 attomolar. In this paper demonstrated the fabrication of hydrophobic surfaces using optical lithography/reactive ion etching and its application to overcome the diffusion limit. Various experiments such as contact angle measurements, SEM, fluorescence, Raman and FTIR absorption spectroscopy were performed which indicate that utilizing this device it could be possible to perform the measurements for the sample with extremely low dilution. The major application of this novel family of devices would be the early detection of tumors or other important pathologies, with incredible advances in medicine.

  15. Copper nanoparticle heterogeneous catalytic ‘click’ cycloaddition confirmed by single-molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decan, Matthew R.; Impellizzeri, Stefania; Marin, M. Luisa; Scaiano, Juan C.

    2014-08-01

    Colloidal or heterogeneous nanocatalysts can improve the range and diversity of Cu(I)-catalysed click reactions and facilitate catalyst separation and reuse. Catalysis by metal nanoparticles raises the question as to whether heterogeneous catalysts may cause homogeneous catalysis through metal ion leaching, since the catalytic process could be mediated by the particle, or by metal ions released from it. The question is critical as unwanted homogeneous processes could offset the benefits of heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we combine standard bench scale techniques with single-molecule spectroscopy to monitor single catalytic events in real time and demonstrate that click catalysis occurs directly at the surface of copper nanoparticles; this general approach could be implemented in other systems. We use ‘from the mole to the molecule’ to describe this emerging idea in which mole scale reactions can be optimized through an intimate understanding of the catalytic process at the single-molecule—single catalytic nanoparticle level.

  16. Force dependency of biochemical reactions measured by single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for using force-clamp spectroscopy to precisely quantify the effect of force on biochemical reactions. A calibrated force is used to control the exposure of reactive sites in a single polyprotein substrate composed of repeated domains. The use of polyproteins allows the identification of successful single-molecule recordings from unambiguous mechanical unfolding fingerprints. Biochemical reactions are then measured directly by detecting the length changes of the substrate held at a constant force. We present the layout of a force-clamp spectrometer along with protocols to design and conduct experiments. These experiments measure reaction kinetics as a function of applied force. We show sample data of the force dependency of two different reactions, protein unfolding and disulfide reduction. These data, which can be acquired in just a few days, reveal mechanistic details of the reactions that currently cannot be resolved by any other technique. PMID:23744288

  17. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. PMID:27558726

  18. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single Molecules and Single Nano-Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Samuel Louis

    Although plasmonic nanoparticles are widely utilized in spectroscopy and sensing applications, a quantitative structure-function relationship is lacking. In this dissertation, we discuss measurements of single noble metal nanoparticles using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate structure-function relationships. Correlated studies involving two or all three of these techniques relate optical properties of the same nanoparticle to its structure. Through these correlated techniques we have been able to elucidate some of the structural motifs which give rise to the largest SERS enhancements. A variety of SERS substrates are used and the strengths and weaknesses of each type are compared. This information can be applied to sensing and detection methodologies. The utility of SERS is further explored through the use of SER spectroelectrochemistry. This confluence of techniques provided unique insight into the intermolecular interactions present in self-assembled monolayers of tetrathiafulvalene-modified thiolates on gold. Both ensemble-averaged and single-molecule SERS are thoroughly explored and with their benefits and limitations used synergistically to access the most fundamental physics of the light-matter interaction.

  19. Probing Protein Multidimensional Conformational Fluctuations by Single-Molecule Multiparameter Photon Stamping Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are highly dynamic and intrinsically complex. To capture the temporal and spatial complexity of conformational motions and further to understand their roles in protein functions, an attempt is made to probe multidimensional conformational dynamics of proteins besides the typical one-dimensional FRET coordinate or the projected conformational motions on the one-dimensional FRET coordinate. T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motions between two domains along α-helix have been probed by single-molecule FRET. Nevertheless, the domain motions of T4 lysozyme are rather complex involving multiple coupled nuclear coordinates and most likely contain motions besides hinge-bending. It is highly likely that the multiple dimensional protein conformational motions beyond the typical enzymatic hinged-bending motions have profound impact on overall enzymatic functions. In this report, we have developed a single-molecule multiparameter photon stamping spectroscopy integrating fluorescence anisotropy, FRET, and fluorescence lifetime. This spectroscopic approach enables simultaneous observations of both FRET-related site-to-site conformational dynamics and molecular rotational (or orientational) motions of individual Cy3-Cy5 labeled T4 lysozyme molecules. We have further observed wide-distributed rotational flexibility along orientation coordinates by recording fluorescence anisotropy and simultaneously identified multiple intermediate conformational states along FRET coordinate by monitoring time-dependent donor lifetime, presenting a whole picture of multidimensional conformational dynamics in the process of T4 lysozyme open-close hinge-bending enzymatic turnover motions under enzymatic reaction conditions. By analyzing the autocorrelation functions of both lifetime and anisotropy trajectories, we have also observed the dynamic and static inhomogeneity of T4 lysozyme multidimensional conformational fluctuation dynamics, providing a fundamental

  20. Polymer scaling laws of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins quantified with single-molecule spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Soranno, Andrea; Borgia, Alessandro; Gast, Klaus; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The dimensions of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins are highly dependent on their amino acid composition and solution conditions, especially salt and denaturant concentration. However, the quantitative implications of this behavior have remained unclear, largely because the effective theta-state, the central reference point for the underlying polymer collapse transition, has eluded experimental determination. Here, we used single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and two-focus correlation spectroscopy to determine the theta points for six different proteins. While the scaling exponents of all proteins converge to 0.62 ± 0.03 at high denaturant concentrations, as expected for a polymer in good solvent, the scaling regime in water strongly depends on sequence composition. The resulting average scaling exponent of 0.46 ± 0.05 for the four foldable protein sequences in our study suggests that the aqueous cellular milieu is close to effective theta conditions for unfolded proteins. In contrast, two intrinsically disordered proteins do not reach the Θ-point under any of our solvent conditions, which may reflect the optimization of their expanded state for the interactions with cellular partners. Sequence analyses based on our results imply that foldable sequences with more compact unfolded states are a more recent result of protein evolution. PMID:22984159

  1. Effect of Viscoelasticity on the Analysis of Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, V.K.; Neeves, K.B.; Eggleton, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is used to probe the kinetics of receptor-ligand bonds by applying mechanical forces to an intermediate media on which the molecules reside. When this intermediate media is a live cell, the viscoelastic properties can affect the calculation of rate constants. We theoretically investigate the effect of media viscoelasticity on the common assumption that the bond force is equal to the instantaneous applied force. Dynamic force spectroscopy is simulated between two cells of varying micromechanical properties adhered by a single bond with a constant kinetic off-rate. We show that cell and microvilli deformation, and hydrodynamic drag contribute to bond forces that can be 28–90% lower than the applied force for loading rates of 103–107 pN/s, resulting in longer bond lifetimes. These longer bond lifetimes are not caused by changes in bond kinetics; rather, they are due to the mechanical response of the intermediate media on which the bonds reside. Under the assumption that the instantaneous bond force is equal to the applied force—thereby ignoring viscoelasticity—leads to 14–39% error in the determination of off-rates. We present an approach that incorporates viscoelastic properties in calculating the instantaneous bond force and kinetic dissociation parameter of the intermolecular bond. PMID:22828340

  2. A single-molecule force spectroscopy study of the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates on cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weidong; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2013-03-01

    The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells.The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00553d

  3. Force spectroscopy 101: how to design, perform, and analyze an AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy experiment.

    PubMed

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2011-10-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy presents a deceptively simple approach to probing interaction between molecules and molecular assemblies on the nanoscale by measuring forces that it takes to pull the molecules apart. Yet, a more detailed analysis reveals a wealth of different behaviors and interesting physics. This article aims to explore basic physical concepts behind these experiments from a strictly practical point of using these data to extract meaningful information about the interactions. It also focuses on different loading regimes in these experiments, different kinetics that they cause, and different data interpretation that is required for measurements in those regimes. PMID:21862386

  4. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy of DNA-Based Reversible Polymer Bridges: Surface Robustness and Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, Michael J.; Whitehead, Jason R.; Rivera, Monica; Clark, Robert L.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy, as implemented in an atomic force microscope, provides a rarely-used method by which to monitor dynamic processes that occur near surfaces. Here, a methodology is presented and characterized that facilitates the study of polymer bridging across nanometer-sized gaps. The model system employed is that of DNA-based reversible polymers, and an automated procedure is introduced that allows the AFM tip-surface contact point to be automatically determined, and the distance d between opposing surfaces to be actively controlled. Using this methodology, the importance of several experimental parameters was systematically studied, e.g. the frequency of repeated tip/surface contacts, the area of the substrate surface sampled by the AFM, and the use of multiple AFM tips and substrates. Experiments revealed the surfaces to be robust throughout pulling experiments, so that multiple touches and pulls could be carried out on a single spot with no measurable affect on the results. Differences in observed bridging probabilities were observed, both on different spots on the same surface and, more dramatically, from one day to another. Data normalization via a reference measurement allows data from multiple days to be directly compared. PMID:21966095

  5. Extracting Kinetics from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy: Nanopore Unzipping of DNA Hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Dudko, Olga K.; Mathé, Jérôme; Szabo, Attila; Meller, Amit; Hummer, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Single-molecule force experiments provide powerful new tools to explore biomolecular interactions. Here, we describe a systematic procedure for extracting kinetic information from force-spectroscopy experiments, and apply it to nanopore unzipping of individual DNA hairpins. Two types of measurements are considered: unzipping at constant voltage, and unzipping at constant voltage-ramp speeds. We perform a global maximum-likelihood analysis of the experimental data at low-to-intermediate ramp speeds. To validate the theoretical models, we compare their predictions with two independent sets of data, collected at high ramp speeds and at constant voltage, by using a quantitative relation between the two types of measurements. Microscopic approaches based on Kramers theory of diffusive barrier crossing allow us to estimate not only intrinsic rates and transition state locations, as in the widely used phenomenological approach based on Bell's formula, but also free energies of activation. The problem of extracting unique and accurate kinetic parameters of a molecular transition is discussed in light of the apparent success of the microscopic theories in reproducing the experimental data. PMID:17384066

  6. Single-Molecule Study of G-Quadruplex Disruption Using Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Messieres, Michel; Chang, Jen-Chien; Brawn-Cinani, Barbara; La Porta, Arthur

    2012-08-01

    Guanine-rich sequences in nucleic acids can fold into G quadruplexes, in which four guanines on a single strand combine to form G-tetrad planes stabilized by metallic ions. Sequence motifs which are predicted to form a G quadruplex are found throughout the genome and are believed to regulate a variety of biological processes. Detailed knowledge of the kinetics of G-quadruplex folding and unfolding would provide critical insight into these processes. To probe its structural stability, we used optical tweezers to disrupt single molecules of a single-stranded DNA G4 quadruplex. Dynamic force spectroscopy was employed, in which the distribution of rupture forces was measured for different loading rates and used to infer the nature of the transition state barrier for unfolding of the structure. The distance and height of the energy barriers were extracted for two observed conformations. The energy barrier was found to be close to the folded conformation, resulting in a high disruption force despite the relatively low energy barrier height.

  7. High-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy for membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosshart, Patrick D.; Casagrande, Fabio; Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Ratera, Merce; Bippes, Christian A.; Müller, Daniel J.; Palacin, Manuel; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2008-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful tool for studying the mechanical properties, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, unfolding pathways, and energy landscapes of membrane proteins. One limiting factor for the large-scale applicability of SMFS on membrane proteins is its low efficiency in data acquisition. We have developed a semi-automated high-throughput SMFS (HT-SMFS) procedure for efficient data acquisition. In addition, we present a coarse filter to efficiently extract protein unfolding events from large data sets. The HT-SMFS procedure and the coarse filter were validated using the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum and the L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC from the bacterium Escherichia coli. To screen for molecular interactions between AdiC and its substrates, we recorded data sets in the absence and in the presence of L-arginine, D-arginine, and agmatine. Altogether ~400 000 force-distance curves were recorded. Application of coarse filtering to this wealth of data yielded six data sets with ~200 (AdiC) and ~400 (BR) force-distance spectra in each. Importantly, the raw data for most of these data sets were acquired in one to two days, opening new perspectives for HT-SMFS applications.

  8. Motion of a DNA Sliding Clamp Observed by Single Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Ted A.; Kwon, Youngeun; Johnson, Aaron; Hollars, Christopher W.; O'Donnell, Mike; Camarero, Julio A.; Barsky, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and slide along DNA to allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. These clamps contain many positively charged residues that could curtail the sliding due to attractive interactions with the negatively charged DNA. By single-molecule spectroscopy we have observed a fluorescently labeled sliding clamp (polymerase III β subunit or β clamp) loaded onto freely diffusing, single-stranded M13 circular DNA annealed with fluorescently labeled DNA oligomers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for the β clamp diffusing along DNA is on the order of 10–14 m2/s, at least 3 orders of magnitude less than that for diffusion through water alone. We also find evidence that the β clamp remains at the 3′ end in the presence of Escherichia coli single-stranded-binding protein. These results may imply that the clamp not only acts to hold the polymerase on the DNA but also prevents excessive drifting along the DNA. PMID:18556658

  9. Design principles of natural light-harvesting as revealed by single molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2016-01-01

    Biology offers a boundless source of adaptation, innovation, and inspiration. A wide range of photosynthetic organisms exist that are capable of harvesting solar light in an exceptionally efficient way, using abundant and low-cost materials. These natural light-harvesting complexes consist of proteins that strongly bind a high density of chromophores to capture solar photons and rapidly transfer the excitation energy to the photochemical reaction centre. The amount of harvested light is also delicately tuned to the level of solar radiation to maintain a constant energy throughput at the reaction centre and avoid the accumulation of the products of charge separation. In this Review, recent developments in the understanding of light-harvesting by plants will be discussed, based on results obtained from single molecule spectroscopy studies. Three design principles of the main light-harvesting antenna of plants will be highlighted: (a) fine, photoactive control over the intrinsic protein disorder to efficiently use intrinsically available thermal energy dissipation mechanisms; (b) the design of the protein microenvironment of a low-energy chromophore dimer to control the amount of shade absorption; (c) the design of the exciton manifold to ensure efficient funneling of the harvested light to the terminal emitter cluster.

  10. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy Studies of APOBEC3A-Single-Stranded DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Dutta, Samrat; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-06-01

    APOBEC3A (A3A) inhibits the replication of a range of viruses and transposons and might also play a role in carcinogenesis. It is a single-domain deaminase enzyme that interacts with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and converts cytidines to uridines within specific trinucleotide contexts. Although there is abundant information that describes the potential biological activities of A3A, the interplay between binding ssDNA and sequence-specific deaminase activity remains controversial. Using a single-molecule atomic force microscopy spectroscopy approach developed by Shlyakhtenko et al. [(2015) Sci. Rep. 5, 15648], we determine the stability of A3A in complex with different ssDNA sequences. We found that the strength of the complex is sequence-dependent, with more stable complexes formed with deaminase-specific sequences. A correlation between the deaminase activity of A3A and the complex strength was identified. The ssDNA binding properties of A3A and those for A3G are also compared and discussed. PMID:27182892

  11. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Ted Alfred

    2002-07-30

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  12. Multiscale sensing of antibody-antigen interactions by organic transistors and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Casalini, Stefano; Dumitru, Andra C; Leonardi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Herruzo, Elena T; Campana, Alessandra; de Oliveira, Rafael F; Cramer, Tobias; Garcia, Ricardo; Biscarini, Fabio

    2015-05-26

    Antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) recognition is the primary event at the basis of many biosensing platforms. In label-free biosensors, these events occurring at solid-liquid interfaces are complex and often difficult to control technologically across the smallest length scales down to the molecular scale. Here a molecular-scale technique, such as single-molecule force spectroscopy, is performed across areas of a real electrode functionalized for the immunodetection of an inflammatory cytokine, viz. interleukin-4 (IL4). The statistical analysis of force-distance curves allows us to quantify the probability, the characteristic length scales, the adhesion energy, and the time scales of specific recognition. These results enable us to rationalize the response of an electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor (EGOFET) operated as an IL4 immunosensor. Two different strategies for the immobilization of IL4 antibodies on the Au gate electrode have been compared: antibodies are bound to (i) a smooth film of His-tagged protein G (PG)/Au; (ii) a 6-aminohexanethiol (HSC6NH2) self-assembled monolayer on Au through glutaraldehyde. The most sensitive EGOFET (concentration minimum detection level down to 5 nM of IL4) is obtained with the first functionalization strategy. This result is correlated to the highest probability (30%) of specific binding events detected by force spectroscopy on Ab/PG/Au electrodes, compared to 10% probability on electrodes with the second functionalization. Specifically, this demonstrates that Ab/PG/Au yields the largest areal density of oriented antibodies available for recognition. More in general, this work shows that specific recognition events in multiscale biosensors can be assessed, quantified, and optimized by means of a nanoscale technique. PMID:25868724

  13. Conformational Switching in a Light-Harvesting Protein as Followed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Andrew; Ilioaia, Cristian; Krüger, Tjaart P.J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Among the ultimate goals of protein physics, the complete, experimental description of the energy paths leading to protein conformational changes remains a challenge. Single protein fluorescence spectroscopy constitutes an approach of choice for addressing protein dynamics, and, among naturally fluorescing proteins, light-harvesting (LH) proteins from purple bacteria constitute an ideal object for such a study. LHs bind bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, which confer on them a high intrinsic fluorescence yield. Moreover, the electronic properties of these pigment-proteins result from the strong excitonic coupling between their bound bacteriochlorophyll a molecules in combination with the large energetic disorder due to slow fluctuations in their structure. As a result, the position and probability of their fluorescence transition delicately depends on the precise realization of the disorder of the set of bound pigments, which is governed by the LH protein dynamics. Analysis of these parameters using time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy thus yields direct access to the protein dynamics. Applying this technique to the LH2 protein from Rhodovulum (Rdv.) sulfidophilum, the structure—and consequently the fluorescence properties—of which depends on pH, allowed us to follow a single protein, pH-induced, reversible, conformational transition. Hence, for the first time, to our knowledge, a protein transition can be visualized through changes in the electronic structure of the intrinsic cofactors, at a level of a single LH protein, which opens a new, to our knowledge, route for understanding the changes in energy landscape that underlie protein function and adaptation to the needs of living organisms. PMID:26039172

  14. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  15. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  16. High-speed low-cost correlator for single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsu-Yang; Lin, Hsin-Yu; White, Jonathon D.; Fann, Wunshain

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been extensively applied to study the kinetics and photophysics of molecules as well as interactions between molecules by extracting information from the fluctuation of signals. In particular, single molecule applications of FCS promise the greatest amounts of information. Ideally, one would like to carry out FCS in real-time; however, due to the time-consuming nature of the correlation process, performing the correlation in real-time is totally nontrivial. Generally an expensive hardware correlator or a TCSPC board is required for this purpose. Recently highly-efficient algorithms based on multi-tau method have been proposed to build up a software correlator. In this work, we set forth an innovative algorithm capable of realizing the real-time correlation, without turning to the multi-tau method. This algorithm takes advantage of the low count rate generally existing in the FCS experiments, directly using the time interval between each photon its adjacent photon to efficiently update the correlation function. Based on this efficiency, it is possible to build a low-cost software correlator with just an ordinary counter board. We practically demonstrate the feasibility by setting up this correlator to measure the diffusion motion of rhodamine 6G in water using FCS. The algorithm was validated by duplicating the signal from the photon detector and sending it to both the ordinary counter board with our software correlator and a commercial correlator simultaneously. The perfect coincidence of the correlation curves from these two correlators and the real-time display of the correlation function indicate the validity and practicability of our approach.

  17. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M.P.; Pardo, Julian; Graeber, P.; Galvez, E.M.

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  18. Theory of Linear and Nonlinear Surface-Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Hu, Zhongwei; Moore, Justin E; Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-05-27

    The vibrational spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude so that the detection and identification of single molecules are possible. The enhancement of most linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies has been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss theoretical approaches to understanding linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. A unified description of enhancement mechanisms classified as either electromagnetic or chemical in nature is presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the spectral changes necessary for interpretation of linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. PMID:27090843

  19. Theory of Linear and Nonlinear Surface-Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V.; Hu, Zhongwei; Moore, Justin E.; Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-05-01

    The vibrational spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude so that the detection and identification of single molecules are possible. The enhancement of most linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies has been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss theoretical approaches to understanding linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. A unified description of enhancement mechanisms classified as either electromagnetic or chemical in nature is presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the spectral changes necessary for interpretation of linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies.

  20. Testing Landscape Theory for Biomolecular Processes with Single Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truex, Katherine; Chung, Hoi Sung; Louis, John M.; Eaton, William A.

    2015-07-01

    Although Kramers' theory for diffusive barrier crossing on a 1D free energy profile plays a central role in landscape theory for complex biomolecular processes, it has not yet been rigorously tested by experiment. Here we test this 1D diffusion scenario with single molecule fluorescence measurements of DNA hairpin folding. We find an upper bound of 2.5 μ s for the average transition path time, consistent with the predictions by theory with parameters determined from optical tweezer measurements.

  1. The Study of Biomolecule-Substrate Interactions by Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy and Brownian Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Sara Iliafar

    Hybrids of biomolecules and nanomaterials have been identified as promising candidates in the development of novel therapeutics and electronic devices. Single stranded DNA (ssDNA)-bound Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are of particular interest as they may be the key to solving the challenges that face the carbon nanotube separation technology and because of their potential application in bio-nanomedicine. The ability of ssDNA to form a stable hybrid with CNTs has been attributed to the structure and amphiphilic nature of this macromolecule, enabling the dispersion, sorting and patterned placement of nanotubes. Considering the significant role of ssDNA-CNTs in future technologies and the potential toxicity of such nanomaterials in biological systems, it is essential to gain a quantitative and fundamental understanding on the interactions that allow, weaken or prevent the formation of these hybrids. In this dissertation, we use both experimental and theoretical methods to systematically investigate the major characteristics of these interactions. The free energy of binding of ssDNA homopolymers to solvated carbon nanotubes is one of the key characteristics that determine the stability of such dispersions. We used single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), first on graphite and next on single walled carbon nanotubes, to probe and directly quantify the binding strength of ssDNA homopolymer oligomers to these substrates. The force resisting removal of DNA molecules from these surfaces shows characteristic steady-state force plateaus which were distinguishable for each DNA sequence. The free energy of binding per nucleotide for these oligomers on graphite were ranked as T >= A > G >= C (11.3 +/- 0.8 kT, 9.9 +/- 0.4 kT, 8.3 +/- 0.2 kT, and 7.5 +/- 0.8 kT, respectively). On SWCNTs, these interactions decreased in the following order: A > G > T > C, and their magnitude was much larger than on graphite (38.1 +/- 0.2; 33.9 +/- 0.1; 23.3 +/- 0.1; 17.1 +/- 0.1 k

  2. Single-molecule conductance measurement of self-assembled organic monolayers using scanning tunneling spectroscopy in combination with statistics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumei; Dou, Chengfu; Wang, Yin

    2011-05-01

    Based on ambient atmosphere scanning tunneling microscope (STM) technique, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) combined with statistics analysis was developed to investigate the single-molecule conductance of various kinds of molecules which were self-assembled on the Au (1 1 1). Conductance histograms obtained from current-voltage curves revealed well-defined peaks at integer multiples of a fundamental conductance and were used to identify the conductance of a single molecule. The conductances of saturated molecules like 1,8-octanedithol and hexanethiocyanate were found to be 0.072 × 10 -4G 0 and 0.06 × 10 -4G 0 respectively and 0.23 × 10 -4G 0 and 0.13 × 10 -4G 0 for unsaturated molecules like 5,5'-dithiol- 2,2',5',2″-terthiophene and 4,4'-dithio-tert(phenylene ethylene).

  3. The structure and function of cell membranes examined by atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda

    2015-06-01

    The cell membrane is one of the most complicated biological complexes, and long-term fierce debates regarding the cell membrane persist because of technical hurdles. With the rapid development of nanotechnology and single-molecule techniques, our understanding of cell membranes has substantially increased. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided several unprecedented advances (e.g., high resolution, three-dimensional and in situ measurements) in the study of cell membranes and has been used to systematically dissect the membrane structure in situ from both sides of membranes; as a result, novel models of cell membranes have recently been proposed. This review summarizes the new progress regarding membrane structure using in situ AFM and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), which may shed light on the study of the structure and functions of cell membranes. PMID:25893228

  4. Probing redox proteins on a gold surface by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmalk, Abdalmohsen T.; Salverda, Jante M.; Tabares, Leandro C.; Canters, Gerard W.; Aartsma, Thijs J.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between the fluorescently labeled redox protein, azurin, and a thin gold film is characterized using single-molecule fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements. Fluorescence quenching starts at distances below 2.3 nm from the gold surface. At shorter distances the quantum yield may decrease down to fourfold for direct attachment of the protein to bare gold. Outside of the quenching range, up to fivefold enhancement of the fluorescence is observed on average with increasing roughness of the gold layer. Fluorescence-detected redox activity of individual azurin molecules, with a lifetime switching ratio of 0.4, is demonstrated for the first time close to a gold surface.

  5. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path. PMID:26280329

  6. Extracting intrinsic dynamic parameters of biomolecular folding from single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gi-Moon; Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule studies in which a mechanical force is transmitted to the molecule of interest and the molecular extension or position is monitored as a function of time are versatile tools for probing the dynamics of protein folding, stepping of molecular motors, and other biomolecular processes involving activated barrier crossing. One complication in interpreting such studies, however, is the fact that the typical size of a force probe (e.g., a dielectric bead in optical tweezers or the atomic force microscope tip/cantilever assembly) is much larger than the molecule itself, and so the observed molecular motion is affected by the hydrodynamic drag on the probe. This presents the experimenter with a nontrivial task of deconvolving the intrinsic molecular parameters, such as the intrinsic free energy barrier and the effective diffusion coefficient exhibited while crossing the barrier from the experimental signal. Here we focus on the dynamical aspect of this task and show how the intrinsic diffusion coefficient along the molecular reaction coordinate can be inferred from single-molecule measurements of the rates of biomolecular folding and unfolding. We show that the feasibility of accomplishing this task is strongly dependent on the relationship between the intrinsic molecular elasticity and that of the linker connecting the molecule to the force probe and identify the optimal range of instrumental parameters allowing determination of instrument-free molecular dynamics. PMID:26088347

  7. Directly measuring single molecule heterogeneity in proteins and RNA using force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, Devarajan

    One of the most intriguing results of single molecule experiments on proteins and nucleic acids is the discovery of functional heterogeneity: the observation that complex cellular machines exhibit multiple, biologically active conformations. The structural differences between these conformations may be subtle, but each distinct state can be remarkably long-lived, with stochastic interconversions occurring only at macroscopic timescales, fractions of a second or longer. Though we now have proof of functional heterogeneity in a handful of systems--enzymes, motors, adhesion complexes--identifying and measuring it remains a formidable challenge. We show that evidence of this phenomenon is more widespread than previously known, encoded in data collected from some of the most well-established single molecule techniques: AFM or optical tweezer pulling experiments. We present a theoretical procedure for analyzing distributions of rupture/unfolding forces recorded at different pulling speeds. This results in a single parameter, quantifying the degree of heterogeneity, and also leads to bounds on the equilibration and conformational interconversion timescales. Our work suggests experimental approaches for estimating the timescales of these fluctuations with unprecedented accuracy.

  8. Scanning Single-Molecule Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Enables Kinetics Study of DNA Hairpin Folding with a Time Window from Microseconds to Seconds.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huimin; Yin, Yandong; Pan, Bailong; Li, Geng; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-05-19

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been widely used to explore kinetics and dynamics of biological systems. Among them, single-molecule imaging (SMI) is good at tracking processes slower than tens of milliseconds, whereas fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is good at probing processes faster than submilliseconds. However, there is still shortage of simple yet effective single-molecule fluorescence method to cover the time-scale between submilliseconds and tens of milliseconds. To effectively bridge this millisecond gap, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (smFCS) method that works on surface-immobilized single molecules through surface scanning. We validated it by monitoring the classical DNA hairpin folding process. With a wide time window from microseconds to seconds, the experimental data are well fitted to the two-state folding model. All relevant molecular parameters, including the relative fluorescence brightness, equilibrium constant, and reaction rate constants, were uniquely determined. PMID:27140004

  9. Single-molecule spectroscopy exposes hidden states in an enzymatic electron relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Iris; Yuval Aviram, Haim; Armony, Gad; Horovitz, Amnon; Hofmann, Hagen; Haran, Gilad; Fass, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    The ability to query enzyme molecules individually is transforming our view of catalytic mechanisms. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a multidomain catalyst of disulfide-bond formation that relays electrons from substrate cysteines through two redox-active sites to molecular oxygen. The chemical steps in electron transfer have been delineated, but the conformational changes accompanying these steps are poorly characterized. Here we use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe QSOX conformation in resting and cycling enzyme populations. We report the discovery of unanticipated roles for conformational changes in QSOX beyond mediating electron transfer between redox-active sites. In particular, a state of the enzyme not previously postulated or experimentally detected is shown to gate, via a conformational transition, the entrance into a sub-cycle within an expanded QSOX kinetic scheme. By tightly constraining mechanistic models, smFRET data can reveal the coupling between conformational and chemical transitions in complex enzymatic cycles.

  10. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein folding in a chaperonin cage

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Hoffmann, Armin; Streich, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are known to be essential for avoiding protein aggregation in vivo, but it is still unclear how they affect protein folding mechanisms. We use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to follow the folding of a protein inside the GroEL/GroES chaperonin cavity over a time range from milliseconds to hours. Our results show that confinement in the chaperonin decelerates the folding of the C-terminal domain in the substrate protein rhodanese, but leaves the folding rate of the N-terminal domain unaffected. Microfluidic mixing experiments indicate that strong interactions of the substrate with the cavity walls impede the folding process, but the folding hierarchy is preserved. Our results imply that no universal chaperonin mechanism exists. Rather, a competition between intra- and intermolecular interactions determines the folding rates and mechanisms of a substrate inside the GroEL/GroES cage. PMID:20547872

  11. A Simple Bioconjugate Attachment Protocol for Use in Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy Experiments Based on Mixed Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Simon J.; Simpson, Anna M. C.; Stone, Rachael; Hamaia, SamirW.; Roy, Debdulal; Farndale, RichardW.; Ouberai, Myriam; Welland, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to probe the interaction force between individual biomolecular species. We focus our attention on the tip and sample coupling chemistry, which is crucial to these experiments. We utilised a novel approach of mixed self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols in conjunction with a heterobifunctional crosslinker. The effectiveness of the protocol is demonstrated by probing the biotin-avidin interaction. We measured unbinding forces comparable to previously reported values measured at similar loading rates. Specificity tests also demonstrated a significant decrease in recognition after blocking with free avidin. PMID:23202965

  12. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  13. A novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Michaelis, Monika; Wei, Gang; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) capable of detecting mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with sub-nM sensitivity. The single-strand (ss) DNA aptamer used in this work is rich in thymine (T) and readily forms T-Hg(2+)-T complexes in the presence of Hg(2+). The aptamer was conjugated to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe, and the adhesion force between the probe and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). The presence of Hg(2+) ions above a concentration threshold corresponding to the affinity constant of the ions for the aptamer (about 5 × 10(9) M(-1)) could be easily detected by a change of the measured adhesion force. With our chosen aptamer, we could reach an Hg(2+) detection limit of 100 pM, which is well below the maximum allowable level of Hg(2+) in drinking water. In addition, this aptasensor presents a very high selectivity for Hg(2+) over other metal cations, such as K(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Cd(2+). Furthermore, the effects of the ionic strength and loading rate on the Hg(2+) detection were evaluated. Its simplicity, reproducibility, high selectivity and sensitivity make our SMFS-based aptasensor advantageous with respect to other current Hg(2+) sensing methods. It is expected that our strategy can be exploited for monitoring the pollution of water environments and the safety of potentially contaminated food. PMID:26075518

  14. Single-molecule spectroscopy exposes hidden states in an enzymatic electron relay

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Iris; Yuval Aviram, Haim; Armony, Gad; Horovitz, Amnon; Hofmann, Hagen; Haran, Gilad; Fass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The ability to query enzyme molecules individually is transforming our view of catalytic mechanisms. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a multidomain catalyst of disulfide-bond formation that relays electrons from substrate cysteines through two redox-active sites to molecular oxygen. The chemical steps in electron transfer have been delineated, but the conformational changes accompanying these steps are poorly characterized. Here we use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe QSOX conformation in resting and cycling enzyme populations. We report the discovery of unanticipated roles for conformational changes in QSOX beyond mediating electron transfer between redox-active sites. In particular, a state of the enzyme not previously postulated or experimentally detected is shown to gate, via a conformational transition, the entrance into a sub-cycle within an expanded QSOX kinetic scheme. By tightly constraining mechanistic models, smFRET data can reveal the coupling between conformational and chemical transitions in complex enzymatic cycles. PMID:26468675

  15. Structural Architecture of Prothrombin in Solution Revealed by Single Molecule Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Nicola; Bystranowska, Dominika; Zuo, Xiaobing; Di Cera, Enrico

    2016-08-26

    The coagulation factor prothrombin has a complex spatial organization of its modular assembly that comprises the N-terminal Gla domain, kringle-1, kringle-2, and the C-terminal protease domain connected by three intervening linkers. Here we use single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to access the conformational landscape of prothrombin in solution and uncover structural features of functional significance that extend recent x-ray crystallographic analysis. Prothrombin exists in equilibrium between two alternative conformations, open and closed. The closed conformation predominates (70%) and features an unanticipated intramolecular collapse of Tyr(93) in kringle-1 onto Trp(547) in the protease domain that obliterates access to the active site and protects the zymogen from autoproteolytic conversion to thrombin. The open conformation (30%) is more susceptible to chymotrypsin digestion and autoactivation, and features a shape consistent with recent x-ray crystal structures. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements of prothrombin wild type stabilized 70% in the closed conformation and of the mutant Y93A stabilized 80% in the open conformation directly document two envelopes that differ 50 Å in length. These findings reveal important new details on the conformational plasticity of prothrombin in solution and the drastic structural difference between its alternative conformations. Prothrombin uses the intramolecular collapse of kringle-1 onto the active site in the closed form to prevent autoactivation. The open-closed equilibrium also defines a new structural framework for the mechanism of activation of prothrombin by prothrombinase. PMID:27435675

  16. Mechanism of amyloid β-protein dimerization determined using single-molecule AFM force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhengjian; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Condron, Margaret M.; Teplow, David B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-10-01

    Aβ42 and Aβ40 are the two primary alloforms of human amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The two additional C-terminal residues of Aβ42 result in elevated neurotoxicity compared with Aβ40, but the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule force microscopy to characterize interpeptide interactions for Aβ42 and Aβ40 and corresponding mutants. We discovered a dramatic difference in the interaction patterns of Aβ42 and Aβ40 monomers within dimers. Although the sequence difference between the two peptides is at the C-termini, the N-terminal segment plays a key role in the peptide interaction in the dimers. This is an unexpected finding as N-terminal was considered as disordered segment with no effect on the Aβ peptide aggregation. These novel properties of Aβ proteins suggests that the stabilization of N-terminal interactions is a switch in redirecting of amyloids form the neurotoxic aggregation pathway, opening a novel avenue for the disease preventions and treatments.

  17. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Amino Acids and Peptides by Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules and measuring the electron tunneling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic ‘fingerprints’ associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunneling technique, we are able to identify D, L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers, and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  18. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic 'fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  19. Super- and sub-Poissonian photon statistics for single molecule spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Barkai, Eli

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the distribution of the number of photons emitted by a single molecule undergoing a spectral diffusion process and interacting with a continuous wave laser field. The spectral diffusion is modeled based on a stochastic approach, in the spirit of the Anderson-Kubo line shape theory. Using a generating function formalism we solve the generalized optical Bloch equations and obtain an exact analytical formula for the line shape and Mandel's Q parameter. The line shape exhibits well-known behaviors, including motional narrowing when the stochastic modulation is fast and power broadening. The Mandel parameter, describing the line shape fluctuations, exhibits a transition from a quantum sub-Poissonian behavior in the fast modulation limit to a classical super-Poissonian behavior found in the slow modulation limit. Our result is applicable for weak and strong laser fields, namely, for arbitrary Rabi frequency. We show how to choose the Rabi frequency in such a way so that the quantum sub-Poissonian nature of the emission process becomes strongest. A lower bound on Q is found and simple limiting behaviors are investigated. A nontrivial behavior is obtained in the intermediate modulation limit, when the time scales for spectral diffusion and the lifetime of the excited state become similar. A comparison is made between our results and previous ones derived, based on the semiclassical generalized Wiener-Khintchine formula. PMID:15918743

  20. Detection of metal binding sites on functional S-layer nanoarrays using single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jilin; Ebner, Andreas; Kraxberger, Bernhard; Leitner, Michael; Hykollari, Alba; Kepplinger, Christian; Grunwald, Christian; Gruber, Hermann J; Tampé, Robert; Sleytr, Uwe B; Ilk, Nicola; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) show the ability to recrystallize into highly regular pattern on solid supports. In this study, the genetically modified S-layer protein SbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177, carrying a hexa-histidine tag (His(6)-tag) at the C-terminus, was used to generate functionalized two-dimensional nanoarrays on a silicon surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to explore the topography and the functionality of the fused His(6)-tags. The accessibility of the His(6)-tags was demonstrated by in-situ anti-His-tag antibody binding to the functional S-layer array. The metal binding properties of the His(6)-tag was investigated by single molecule force microscopy. For this purpose, newly developed tris-NTA was tethered to the AFM tips via a flexible polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. The functionalized tips showed specific interactions with S-layer containing His(6)-tags in the presence of nickel ions. Thus the His(6)-tag is located at the outer surface of the S-layer and can be used for stable but reversible attachment of functional tris-NTA derivatives. PMID:19232541

  1. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers.

    PubMed

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-04-20

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  2. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers

    PubMed Central

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  3. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  4. Calibration of a dual-trap optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqing; Hu, Chunguang; Gao, Xiaoqing; Su, Chenguang; Wang, Sirong; Lei, Hai; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-10-01

    Optical tweezers has shown its significant advantages in applying pico-Newton force on micro beads and handling them with nanometer-level precision, and becomes a powerful tool for single-molecule biology. Many excellent researching results in use of the optical tweezers have been reported. Most of them focus on the single-trap optical tweezers experiments. However, when a single-trap optical tweezers is applied to biological molecule, there is often an obvious noise from the sample chamber holder to which one end of the sample molecule is tethered. In contrast, a dual-trap optical tweezers can intrinsically avoid this problem because both ends of the sample tethered to microspheres are manipulated with two separate optical traps. In order to force the molecule precisely, it is of importance to do calibrations for both traps. Many approaches have been studied to obtain the stiffness and sensitivity of the trap, but those are not quite suitable for making calibration during experiment. Here, we use a modified method of power spectrum density (PSD) for the calibrations of the stiffness and sensitivity of the traps, which combines a sinusoidal motion of the sample stage. The main strength of the method is that the beads used for the calibration also can be used in experiment later. In addition, the calibration can be performed during experiment. Finally, an experiment using a dsDNA molecule to test the system is presented. The results show that the calibration approach for the dual-trap optical tweezers is efficient and accurate.

  5. Fundamental High-Speed Limits in Single-Molecule, Single-Cell, and Nanoscale Force Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Amo, Carlos A; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-26

    Force spectroscopy is enhancing our understanding of single-biomolecule, single-cell, and nanoscale mechanics. Force spectroscopy postulates the proportionality between the interaction force and the instantaneous probe deflection. By studying the probe dynamics, we demonstrate that the total force acting on the probe has three different components: the interaction, the hydrodynamic, and the inertial. The amplitudes of those components depend on the ratio between the resonant frequency and the frequency at which the data are measured. A force-distance curve provides a faithful measurement of the interaction force between two molecules when the inertial and hydrodynamic components are negligible. Otherwise, force spectroscopy measurements will underestimate the value of unbinding forces. Neglecting the above force components requires the use of frequency ratios in the 50-500 range. These ratios will limit the use of high-speed methods in force spectroscopy. The theory is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:27359243

  6. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Banerjee, S; Sett, S; Ghosh, S; Rakshit, T; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time. PMID:27183010

  7. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sett, S.; Ghosh, S.; Rakshit, T.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA—the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA—the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time. PMID:27183010

  8. Following aptamer-ricin specific binding by single molecule recognition and force spectroscopy measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) recognition and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) experiments provide both morphology and interaction information of the aptamer and protein, which can be used for the future study on the thermodynamics and kinetics properties of ricin-aptamer/antibody interactions. ...

  9. Single molecule force spectroscopy data and BD- and MD simulations on the blood protein von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Posch, Sandra; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Schwarzl, Richard; Karner, Andreas; Radtke, Matthias; Gräter, Frauke; Obser, Tobias; König, Gesa; Brehm, Maria A; Gruber, Hermann J; Netz, Roland R; Baldauf, Carsten; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We here give information for a deeper understanding of single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) data through the example of the blood protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). It is also shown, how fitting of rupture forces versus loading rate profiles in the molecular dynamics (MD) loading-rate range can be used to demonstrate the qualitative agreement between SMFS and MD simulations. The recently developed model by Bullerjahn, Sturm, and Kroy (BSK) was used for this demonstration. Further, Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, which can be utilized to estimate the lifetimes of intramolecular VWF interactions under physiological shear, are described. For interpretation and discussion of the methods and data presented here, we would like to directly point the reader to the related research paper, "Mutual A domain interactions in the force sensing protein von Willebrand Factor" (Posch et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27508268

  10. How does the molecular linker in dynamic force spectroscopy affect probing molecular interactions at the single-molecule level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Aizawa, Kota; Hanyu, Tatsuya; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) based on atomic force microscopy, which enables us to obtain information on the interaction potential between molecules such as antigen–antibody complexes at the single-molecule level, is a key technique for advancing molecular science and technology. However, to ensure the reliability of DFS measurement, its basic mechanism must be well understood. We examined the effect of the molecular linker used to fix the target molecule to the atomic force microscope cantilever, i.e., the force direction during measurement, for the first time, which has not been discussed until now despite its importance. The effect on the lifetime and barrier position, which can be obtained by DFS, was found to be ∼10 and ∼50%, respectively, confirming the high potential of DFS.

  11. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  12. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  13. How does the molecular linker in dynamic force spectroscopy affect probing molecular interactions at the single-molecule level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Aizawa, Kota; Hanyu, Tatsuya; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) based on atomic force microscopy, which enables us to obtain information on the interaction potential between molecules such as antigen-antibody complexes at the single-molecule level, is a key technique for advancing molecular science and technology. However, to ensure the reliability of DFS measurement, its basic mechanism must be well understood. We examined the effect of the molecular linker used to fix the target molecule to the atomic force microscope cantilever, i.e., the force direction during measurement, for the first time, which has not been discussed until now despite its importance. The effect on the lifetime and barrier position, which can be obtained by DFS, was found to be ˜10 and ˜50%, respectively, confirming the high potential of DFS.

  14. Spectroscopy and microscopy of single molecules in nanoscopic channels: spectral behavior vs. confinement depth.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, Benjamin; Maser, Andreas; Utikal, Tobias; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2016-07-20

    We perform high-resolution spectroscopy and localization microscopy to study single dye molecules confined to nanoscopic dimensions in one direction. We provide the fabrication details of our nanoscopic glass channels and the procedure for filling them with organic matrices. Optical data on hundreds of molecules in different channel depths show a clear trend from narrow stable lines in deep channels to broader linewidths in ultrathin matrices. In addition, we observe a steady blue shift of the center of the inhomogeneous band as the channels become thinner. Furthermore, we use super-resolution localization microscopy to correlate the positions and orientations of the individual dye molecules with the lateral landscape of the organic matrix, including cracks and strain-induced dislocations. Our results and methodology are useful for a number of studies in various fields such as physical chemistry, solid-state spectroscopy, and quantum nano-optics. PMID:27327379

  15. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy investigation of reversibly switched dipolar vanadyl phthalocyanine on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jialin; Wang, Zhunzhun; Li, Zhenyu E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg; Niu, Tianchao; Chen, Wei E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg

    2014-03-17

    We report a spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) investigation of reversibly switchable dipolar vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) on graphite by using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. VOPc molecule can be switched between O-up and O-down configurations by changing the polarity of the pulse voltage applied to the tip, actuated by the inelastic tunneling electrons. The spatially resolved STS measurements allow the identification of the electronic structures of VOPc with different dipole orientation. The present approach provides geometry images and electronic characterization of a molecular switch on surface spontaneously.

  16. Single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy of the fibronectin-heparin interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Gabriel; Lamontagne, Charles-Antoine; Lebel, Rejean; Grandbois, Michel Malouin, Francois

    2007-12-21

    The integrity of cohesive tissues strongly depends on the presence of the extracellular matrix, which provides support and anchorage for cells. The fibronectin protein and the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans are key components of this dynamic structural network. In this report, atomic force spectroscopy was used to gain insight into the compliance and the resistance of the fibronectin-heparin interaction. We found that this interaction can be described by an energetic barrier width of 3.1 {+-} 0.2 A and an off-rate of 0.2 {+-} 0.1 s{sup -1}. These dissociation parameters are similar to those of other carbohydrate-protein interactions and to off-rate values reported for more complex interactions between cells and extracellular matrix components. Our results indicate that the function of the fibronectin-heparin interaction is supported by its capacity to sustain significant deformations and considerable external mechanical forces.

  17. Quantifying Instrumental Artifacts in Folding Kinetics Measured by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Krishna; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-07-26

    Force spectroscopy is commonly used to measure the kinetics of processes occurring in single biological molecules. These measurements involve attaching the molecule of interest to micron-sized or larger force probes via compliant linkers. Recent theoretical work has described how the properties of the probes and linkers can alter the observed kinetics from the intrinsic behavior of the molecule in isolation. We applied this theory to estimate the errors in measurements of folding made using optical tweezers. Errors in the folding rates arising from instrument artifacts were only ∼20% for constant-force measurements of DNA hairpins with typical choices of linker length and probe size. Measurements of transition paths using a constant trap position at high trap stiffness were also found to be in the low-artifact limit. These results indicate that typical optical trap measurements of kinetics reflect the dynamics of the molecule fairly well, and suggest practical limitations on experimental design to ensure reliable kinetic measurements. PMID:27369870

  18. Membrane-based actuation for high-speed single molecule force spectroscopy studies using AFM.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Krishna; Torun, Hamdi; Finkler, Ofer; Zhu, Cheng; Degertekin, Levent

    2010-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based dynamic force spectroscopy of single molecular interactions involves characterizing unbinding/unfolding force distributions over a range of pulling speeds. Owing to their size and stiffness, AFM cantilevers are adversely affected by hydrodynamic forces, especially at pulling speeds >10 microm/s, when the viscous drag becomes comparable to the unbinding/unfolding forces. To circumvent these adverse effects, we have fabricated polymer-based membranes capable of actuating commercial AFM cantilevers at speeds >or=100 microm/s with minimal viscous drag effects. We have used FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to simulate high-speed pulling and fast actuation of AFM cantilevers and membranes in different experimental configurations. The simulation results support the experimental findings on a variety of commercial AFM cantilevers and predict significant reduction in drag forces when membrane actuators are used. Unbinding force experiments involving human antibodies using these membranes demonstrate that it is possible to achieve bond loading rates >or=10(6) pN/s, an order of magnitude greater than that reported with commercial AFM cantilevers and systems. PMID:20054686

  19. Single-molecule Force Spectroscopy Predicts a Misfolded, Domain-swapped Conformation in human γD-Crystallin Protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Giganti, David; Badilla, Carmen L; Lezamiz, Ainhoa; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Beedle, Amy E M; Fernández, Julio M

    2016-02-19

    Cataract is a protein misfolding disease where the size of the aggregate is directly related to the severity of the disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the onset of aggregation remain unknown. Here we use a combination of protein engineering techniques and single-molecule force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy to study the individual unfolding pathways of the human γD-crystallin, a multidomain protein that must remain correctly folded during the entire lifetime to guarantee lens transparency. When stretching individual polyproteins containing two neighboring HγD-crystallin monomers, we captured an anomalous misfolded conformation in which the β1 and β2 strands of the N terminus domain of two adjacent monomers swap. This experimentally elusive domain-swapped conformation is likely to be responsible for the increase in molecular aggregation that we measure in vitro. Our results demonstrate the power of force spectroscopy at capturing rare misfolded conformations with potential implications for the understanding of the molecular onset of protein aggregation. PMID:26703476

  20. Single-molecule Force Spectroscopy Predicts a Misfolded, Domain-swapped Conformation in human γD-Crystallin Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Giganti, David; Badilla, Carmen L.; Lezamiz, Ainhoa; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Beedle, Amy E. M.; Fernández, Julio M.

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is a protein misfolding disease where the size of the aggregate is directly related to the severity of the disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the onset of aggregation remain unknown. Here we use a combination of protein engineering techniques and single-molecule force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy to study the individual unfolding pathways of the human γD-crystallin, a multidomain protein that must remain correctly folded during the entire lifetime to guarantee lens transparency. When stretching individual polyproteins containing two neighboring HγD-crystallin monomers, we captured an anomalous misfolded conformation in which the β1 and β2 strands of the N terminus domain of two adjacent monomers swap. This experimentally elusive domain-swapped conformation is likely to be responsible for the increase in molecular aggregation that we measure in vitro. Our results demonstrate the power of force spectroscopy at capturing rare misfolded conformations with potential implications for the understanding of the molecular onset of protein aggregation. PMID:26703476

  1. Distinguishing individual vibrational fingerprints: single-molecule surface-enhanced resonance raman scattering from one-to-one binary mixtures in Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Paul J G; Aroca, Ricardo F

    2007-04-01

    Here, it is demonstrated that similar chemical species within a multicomponent sample can be distinguished, down to the single-molecule level, by means of their surface-enhanced vibrational fingerprints. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectra and 2D spatial intensity maps are recorded from thin Ag nanoparticle films coated with fatty acid Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers containing one-to-one binary mixtures, at varying concentrations, of two dye molecules of similar absorption and scattering cross section (n-pentyl-5-salicylimidoperylene and octadecylrhodamine B). The results reveal the change in the distribution of the two dyes within the monolayer, and the breakdown of ensemble spectral averaging, which occur as the single-molecule regime is approached. It is found that the unimolecular level is reached when 1-10 molecules of each dye occupy the 1-microm2 scattering areas probed by the laser. These signals are attributed to the rare spatial coincidence of isolated target analyte molecules and localized electromagnetic hot spots in the nanostructured metal film. The bianalyte nature of the samples provides strong corroborative support for the attribution of spectra to single molecules at high dilution, while the effect of domain formation/aggregation is found to be important at higher concentrations. PMID:17311464

  2. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies. PMID:26421945

  3. Site-dependent electronic structures of a single molecule on a metal surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katano, Satoshi; Hori, Masafumi; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2014-10-01

    Single-molecule observation of the electronic structures of para-cyanobenzoate (pCB) adsorbed on Cu(1 1 0) has been performed using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). We found that pCB has two types of the adsorption site on Cu(1 1 0); i.e., two oxygen atoms of pCB are bridged between adjacent Cu atoms at the short- or long-bridge sites. STS and STS mapping revealed that the pCB adsorbed at the short-bridge site has a resonant peak at 2.0 V above the Fermi level, which is assigned to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of pCB. However, the LUMO state is shifted toward lower voltage (1.2 V) when the pCB molecule is adsorbed at the long-bridge site. The energy levels of the LUMO state, depending on the adsorption site of pCB, can thus be ascribed to the degree of the electronic interaction between pCB and the Cu substrate. The site transformation of pCB induced by the injection of tunneling electrons from the STM tip has also been presented.

  4. Experimental validation of free-energy-landscape reconstruction from non-equilibrium single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Vincent, Abhilash; Neupane, Krishna; Yu, Hao; Wang, Feng; Woodside, Michael T.

    2011-08-01

    Free-energy-landscape formalisms provide the fundamental conceptual framework for physical descriptions of how proteins and nucleic acids fold into specific three-dimensional structures. Although folding landscapes are difficult to measure experimentally, recent theoretical work by Hummer and Szabo has shown that landscape profiles can be reconstructed from non-equilibrium single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements using an extension of the Jarzynski equality. This method has been applied to simulations and experiments but never validated experimentally. We tested it using force-extension measurements on DNA hairpins with distinct, sequence-dependent folding landscapes. Quantitative agreement was found between the landscape profiles obtained from the non-equilibrium reconstruction and those from equilibrium probability distributions. We also tested the method on a riboswitch aptamer with three partially folded intermediate states, successfully reconstructing the landscape but finding some states difficult to resolve owing to low occupancy or overlap of the potential wells. These measurements validate the landscape-reconstruction method and provide a new test of non-equilibrium work relations.

  5. Dissecting the behavior and function of MBD3 in DNA methylation homeostasis by single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The detailed mechanism for DNA methylation homeostasis relies on an intricate regulatory network with a possible contribution from methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3 (MBD3). In this study we examine the single-molecule behavior of MBD3 and its functional implication in balancing the activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Besides a localization tendency to DNA demethylating sites, MBD3 experiences a concurrent transcription with DNMTs in cell cycle. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) and photon counting histogram (PCH) were applied to characterize the chromatin binding kinetics and stoichiometry of MBD3 in different cell phases. In the G1-phase, MBD3, in the context of the Mi-2/NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) complex, could adopt a salt-dependent homodimeric association with its target epigenomic loci. Along with cell cycle progression, utilizing fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-based Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) we revealed that a proportion of MBD3 and MBD2 would co-localize with DNMT1 during DNA maintenance methylation, providing a proofreading and protective mechanism against a possible excessive methylation by DNMT1. In accordance with our hypothesis, insufficient MBD3 induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was found to result in a global DNA hypermethylation as well as increased methylation in the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of a number of cell cycle related genes. PMID:25753672

  6. Investigation of the binding modes between AIE-active molecules and dsDNA by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ma, Ke; Hu, Ting; Jiang, Bo; Xu, Bin; Tian, Wenjing; Sun, Jing Zhi; Zhang, Wenke

    2015-05-01

    AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that DSAI can strongly intercalate into DNA base pairs, while DSABr-C6 is unable to intercalate into DNA due to the steric hindrance of the alkyl side chains. Cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy can also intercalate into DNA base pairs, but the binding shows strong ionic strength dependence. Multiple binding modes of TPEDPy with dsDNA have been discussed. In addition, the electrostatic interaction enhanced intercalation of cis-TPEDPy with dsDNA has also been revealed.AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The

  7. The Effect of Electrode Coupling on Single Molecule Device Characteristics: An X-Ray Spectroscopy and Scanning Probe Microscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Arunabh

    This thesis studies electronic properties of molecular devices in the limiting cases of strong and weak electrode-molecule coupling. In these two limits, we use the complementary techniques of X-Ray spectroscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) to understand the mechanisms for electrode-molecule bond formation, the energy level realignment due to metal-molecule bonds, the effect of coupling strength on single-molecule conductance in low-bias measurements, and the effect of coupling on transport under high-bias. We also introduce molecular designs with inherent asymmetries, and develop an analytical method to determine the effect of these features on high-bias conductance. This understanding of the role of electrode-molecule coupling in high-bias regimes enables us to develop a series of functional electronic devices whose properties can be predictably tuned through chemical design. First, we explore the weak electrode-molecule coupling regime by studing the interaction of two types of paracyclophane derivates that are coupled 'through-space' to underlying gold substrates. The two paracyclophane derivatives differ in the strength of their intramolecular through-space coupling. X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorbance Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy allows us to determine the orientation of both molecules; Resonant Photoemission Spectroscopy (RPES) then allows us to measure charge transfer time from molecule to metal for both molecules. This study provides a quantititative measure of charge transfer time as a function of through-space coupling strength. Next we use this understanding in STM based single-molecule current-voltage measurements of a series of molecules that couple through-space to one electrode, and through-bond to the other. We find that in the high-bias regime, these molecules respond differently depending on the direction of the applied field. This asymmetric response to electric field direction results in

  8. Electrochemical setup--a unique chance to simultaneously control orbital energies and vibrational properties of single-molecule junctions with unprecedented efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2014-12-21

    Impressive advances in nanoscience permit nowadays the manipulation of single molecules and broad control of many of their properties. Still, tuning the molecular charge and vibrational properties of single molecules embedded in nanojunctions in broad ranges escaped so far to an efficient control. By combining theoretical results with recent experimental data, we show that, under electrochemical control, it is possible to continuously drive a redox molecule (viologen) between almost perfect oxidized and reduced states. This yields an unprecedentedly efficient control of both vibrational frequencies and the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensities. The broad tuning achieved under electrochemical control by varying the overpotential ("gate potential") within experimentally accessible ranges contrasts to the case of two-terminal setups that require high biases, which real nanojunctions cannot withstand. The present study aims to stimulate concurrent transport and SERS measurements in an electrochemical setup. This may open a new avenue of research that is not accessible via two-terminal approaches for better understanding the transport at the nanoscale. PMID:25357175

  9. Note: A method to isolate and detect a large number of single molecules by microdroplet fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ng, K C; Heredia, K H; Kliewer, D

    2012-03-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system, in combination with a glass-frit nebulizer and a photo-voltaic cell detector, is described for single molecule detection. The glass-frit nebulizer continuously generates a large number of droplets with an average droplet size of three micrometers in diameter. Rhodamine 6G molecules were detected at the 10(-12) M level. Concentrations 10(-12)-10(-10) M would provide mostly single molecules (0, 1, 2, 3, ...) in the individual droplets, as determined by Poisson distribution. PMID:22462973

  10. Note: A method to isolate and detect a large number of single molecules by microdroplet fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, K. C.; Heredia, K. H.; Kliewer, D.

    2012-03-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system, in combination with a glass-frit nebulizer and a photo-voltaic cell detector, is described for single molecule detection. The glass-frit nebulizer continuously generates a large number of droplets with an average droplet size of three micrometers in diameter. Rhodamine 6G molecules were detected at the 10-12 M level. Concentrations 10-12-10-10 M would provide mostly single molecules (0, 1, 2, 3, …) in the individual droplets, as determined by Poisson distribution.

  11. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  12. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  13. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  15. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  16. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya

    2010-04-02

    The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can change dramatically even under constant laser excitation. The phenomenon is frequently called "blinking" and involves molecules switching between high and low intensity states.[1-3] In additional to spontaneous blinking, the fluorescence of some special fluorophores, such as cyanine dyes and photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, can be switched on and off by choice using a second laser. Recent single-molecule spectroscopy investigations have shed light on mechanisms of single molecule blinking and photoswitching. This ability to controllably switch single molecules led to the invention of a novel fluorescence microscopy with nanometer spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit.

  17. Triplet states as non-radiative traps in multichromophoric entities: single molecule spectroscopy of an artificial and natural antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofkens, Johan; Schroeyers, Wouter; Loos, Davey; Cotlet, Mircea; Köhn, Fabian; Vosch, Tom; Maus, Michael; Herrmann, A.; Müllen, K.; Gensch, Thomas; De Schryver, F. C.

    2001-09-01

    Energy transfer in antenna systems, ordered arrays of chromophores, is one of the key steps in the photosynthetic process. The photophysical processes taking place in such multichromophoric systems, even at the single molecule level, are complicated and not yet fully understood. Instead of directly studying individual antenna systems, we have chosen to focus first on systems for which the amount of chromophores and the interactions among the chromophores can be varied in a systematic way. Dendrimers with a controlled number of chromophores at the rim fulfill those requirements perfectly. A detailed photophysical study of a second-generation dendrimer, containing eight peryleneimide chromophores at the rim, was performed 'J. Am. Chem. Soc., 122 (2000) 9278'. One of the most intriguing findings was the presence of collective on/off jumps in the fluorescence intensity traces of the dendrimers. This phenomenon can be explained by assuming a simultaneous presence of both a radiative trap (energetically lowest chromophoric site) and a non-radiative trap (triplet state of one chromophore) within one individual dendrimer. It was shown that an analogue scheme could explain the collective on/off jumps in the fluorescence intensity traces of the photosynthetic pigment B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) ( Porphyridium cruentum). The different values of the triplet lifetime that could be recovered for a fluorescence intensity trace of B-PE were correlated with different intensity levels in the trace, suggesting different chromophores acting as a trap as function of time.

  18. Cotunneling spectroscopy and the properties of excited-state spin manifolds of Mn12 single molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamzadeh Renani, Fatemeh; Kirczenow, George

    2014-10-01

    We study charge transport through single molecule magnet (SMM) junctions in the cotunneling regime as a tool for investigating the properties of the excited-state manifolds of neutral Mn12 SMs. This study is motivated by a recent transport experiment [S. Kahle et al., Nano Lett. 12, 518 (2012), 10.1021/nl204141z] that probed the details of the magnetic and electronic structure of Mn12 SMMs beyond the ground-state spin manifold. A giant spin Hamiltonian and master equation approach is used to explore theoretically the cotunneling transport through Mn12-Ac SMM junctions. We identify SMM transitions that can account for both the strong and weak features of the experimental differential conductance spectra. We find the experimental results to imply that the excited spin-state manifolds of the neutral SMM have either different anisotropy constants or different g factors in comparison with its ground-state manifold. However, the latter scenario accounts best for the experimental data.

  19. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, S. R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  20. Electronic transport, transition-voltage spectroscopy, and the Fano effect in single molecule junctions composed of a biphenyl molecule attached to metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Brito da Silva Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Leal, José Fernando Pereira; Aleixo, Vicente Ferrer Pureza; Pinheiro, Felipe A; Del Nero, Jordan

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated electronic transport in a single-molecule junction composed of a biphenyl molecule attached to a p-doped semiconductor and metallic carbon nanotube leads. We find that the current-voltage characteristics are asymmetric as a result of the different electronic natures of the right and left leads, which are metallic and semiconducting, respectively. We provide an analysis of transition voltage spectroscopy in such a system by means of both Fowler-Nordheim and Lauritsen-Millikan plots; this analysis allows one to identify the positions of resonances and the regions where the negative differential conductance occurs. We show that transmittance curves are well described by the Fano lineshape, for both direct and reverse bias, demonstrating that the frontier molecular orbitals are effectively involved in the transport process. This result gives support to the interpretation of transition voltage spectroscopy based on the coherent transport model. PMID:25109887

  1. Significant Heterogeneity and Slow Dynamics of the Unfolded Ubiquitin Detected by the Line Confocal Method of Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Kamonprasertsuk, Supawich; Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Oikawa, Hiroyuki; Kushiro, Keiichiro; Takai, Madoka; Chen, Po-Ting; Chen, Eric H-L; Chen, Rita P-Y; Takahashi, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    The conformation and dynamics of the unfolded state of ubiquitin doubly labeled regiospecifically with Alexa488 and Alexa647 were investigated using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. The line confocal fluorescence detection system combined with the rapid sample flow enabled the characterization of unfolded proteins at the improved structural and temporal resolutions compared to the conventional single-molecule methods. In the initial stage of the current investigation, however, the single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) data of the labeled ubiquitin were flawed by artifacts caused by the adsorption of samples to the surfaces of the fused-silica flow chip and the sample delivery system. The covalent coating of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer to the flow chip surface was found to suppress the artifacts. The sm-FRET measurements based on the coated flow chip demonstrated that the histogram of the sm-FRET efficiencies of ubiquitin at the native condition were narrowly distributed, which is comparable to the probability density function (PDF) expected from the shot noise, demonstrating the structural homogeneity of the native state. In contrast, the histogram of the sm-FRET efficiencies of the unfolded ubiquitin obtained at a time resolution of 100 μs was distributed significantly more broadly than the PDF expected from the shot noise, demonstrating the heterogeneity of the unfolded state conformation. The variety of the sm-FRET efficiencies of the unfolded state remained even after evaluating the moving average of traces with a window size of 1 ms, suggesting that conformational averaging of the heterogeneous conformations mostly occurs in the time domain slower than 1 ms. Local structural heterogeneity around the labeled fluorophores was inferred as the cause of the structural heterogeneity. The heterogeneity and slow dynamics revealed by the line confocal tracking of sm-FRET might be common properties of the unfolded

  2. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  3. Forces and Dynamics of Glucose and Inhibitor Binding to Sodium Glucose Co-transporter SGLT1 Studied by Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Neundlinger, Isabel; Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Wildling, Linda; Rankl, Christian; Wang, Lai-Xi; Gruber, Hermann J.; Kinne, Rolf K. H.; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy was employed to investigate the dynamics of the sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT1) upon substrate and inhibitor binding on the single molecule level. CHO cells stably expressing rbSGLT1 were probed by using atomic force microscopy tips carrying either thioglucose, 2′-aminoethyl β-d-glucopyranoside, or aminophlorizin. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains of different length and varying end groups were used as tether. Experiments were performed at 10, 25 and 37 °C to address different conformational states of SGLT1. Unbinding forces between ligands and SGLT1 were recorded at different loading rates by changing the retraction velocity, yielding binding probability, width of energy barrier of the binding pocket, and the kinetic off rate constant of the binding reaction. With increasing temperature, width of energy barrier and average life time increased for the interaction of SGLT1 with thioglucose (coupled via acrylamide to a long PEG) but decreased for aminophlorizin binding. The former indicates that in the membrane-bound SGLT1 the pathway to sugar translocation involves several steps with different temperature sensitivity. The latter suggests that also the aglucon binding sites for transport inhibitors have specific, temperature-sensitive conformations. PMID:24962566

  4. Highly specific identification of single nucleic polymorphism in M. tuberculosis using smart probes and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with blocking oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Müller, Matthias; Nolte, Oliver; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Sauer, Markus; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter; Marme, Nicole

    2008-02-01

    In this article we present a method for the highly specific identification of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) responsible for rifampicin resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This approach applies fluorescently labeled hairpin-structured oligonucleotides (smart probes) and confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Smart probes are fluorescently labeled at the 5'-end. The dye's fluorescence is quenched in the closed hairpin conformation due to close proximity of the guanosine residues located at the 3'-end. As a result of the hybridization to the complementary target sequence the hairpin structure and thus fluorescence quenching gets lost and a strong fluorescence increase appears. To enhance the specificity of the SNP detection unlabeled "blocking oligonucleotides" were added to the sample. These oligonucleotides hybridizes to the DNA sequence containing the mismatch thus masking this sequence and hereby preventing the smart probe from hybridizing to the mismatched sequence.

  5. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  6. Soil chemical insights provided through vibrational spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrational spectroscopy techniques provide a powerful approach to study environmental materials and processes. These multifunctional analysis tools can be used to probe molecular vibrations of solid, liquid, and gaseous samples for characterizing materials, elucidating reaction mechanisms, and exam...

  7. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  8. Single-Molecule Bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Lemay, Serge G.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques which interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. Here we review several technologies which can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  9. Single-molecule bioelectronics.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Jacob K; Lemay, Serge G; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques that interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. In this study, we review several technologies that can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  10. Demonstration of specific binding of heparin to Plasmodium falciparum-infected vs. non-infected red blood cells by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force ranging between 28 and 46 pN depending on the loading rate. No significant binding of heparin to non-infected RBCs has been observed in control experiments. This work represents the first approach to quantitatively evaluate GAG-pRBC molecular interactions at the individual molecule level.Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force

  11. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  12. Single Molecule Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Galburt, Eric A.; Grill, Stephan W.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule optical trapping assays have now been applied to a great number of macromolecular systems including DNA, RNA, cargo motors, restriction enzymes, DNA helicases, chromosome remodelers, DNA polymerases and both viral and bacterial RNA polymerases. The advantages of the technique are the ability to observe dynamic, unsynchronized molecular processes, to determine the distributions of experimental quantities and to apply force to the system while monitoring the response over time. Here, we describe the application of these powerful techniques to study the dynamics of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19426807

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy of photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Gary

    2015-01-01

    to that used in time-resolved step-scan FTIR measurements. In this article the latest work that has been undertaken using both visible and infrared time resolved spectroscopies on the same sample will be described. Finally, vibrational spectroscopic data that has been obtained for phylloquinone in the A1 binding site in photosystem I is compared to corresponding data for ubiquinone in the QA binding site in purple bacterial reaction centers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25086273

  14. Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy and modeling of polymer/dopant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moule, Adam; Harrelson, Thomas; Cheng, Yongqiang; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal; Faller, Roland; Huang, David

    Neutron vibrational spectroscopy (VISION and ORNL) is a powerful technique to determine the configurations of organic species in amorphous samples. We apply this technique to samples of the semiconducting polymer regio-regular P3HT to determine the molecular configurations outside of the crystalline domains, which have never been investigated. Application of density functional theory modeling using crystal field theory and for the single molecule approach yield a variety of configurations of the polymer backbone and side chains. These results demonstrate that only 1% of the volume corresponds to the assumed crystal structure solved using x-ray diffraction. In addition we investigate the configurations of P3HT doped with the molecular dopant F4TCNQ and determine that the charging of the polymer backbone leads to increased side chain stiffness. These results have significant implications for design of organic electronic devices based on thiophenes.

  15. Single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1995-09-15

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required for individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed before-hand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  16. {beta}-connectin studies by small-angle x-ray scattering and single-molecule force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, S.; Carla, M.; Gambi, C. M. C.; Sbrana, F.; Vassalli, M.; Toscano, A.; Pacini, A.; Fratini, E.; Tiribilli, B.

    2011-05-15

    The three-dimensional structure and the mechanical properties of a {beta}-connectin fragment from human cardiac muscle, belonging to the I band, from I{sub 27} to I{sub 34}, were investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). This molecule presents an entropic elasticity behavior, associated to globular domain unfolding, that has been widely studied in the last 10 years. In addition, atomic force microscopy based SMFS experiments suggest that this molecule has an additional elastic regime, for low forces, probably associated to tertiary structure remodeling. From a structural point of view, this behavior is a mark of the fact that the eight domains in the I{sub 27}-I{sub 34} fragment are not independent and they organize in solution, assuming a well-defined three-dimensional structure. This hypothesis has been confirmed by SAXS scattering, both on a diluted and a concentrated sample. Two different models were used to fit the SAXS curves: one assuming a globular shape and one corresponding to an elongated conformation, both coupled with a Coulomb repulsion potential to take into account the protein-protein interaction. Due to the predominance of the structure factor, the effective shape of the protein in solution could not be clearly disclosed. By performing SMFS by atomic force microscopy, mechanical unfolding properties were investigated. Typical sawtooth profiles were obtained and the rupture force of each unfolding domain was estimated. By fitting a wormlike chain model to each peak of the sawtooth profile, the entropic elasticity of octamer was described.

  17. β-connectin studies by small-angle x-ray scattering and single-molecule force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, S.; Sbrana, F.; Toscano, A.; Fratini, E.; Carlà, M.; Vassalli, M.; Tiribilli, B.; Pacini, A.; Gambi, C. M. C.

    2011-05-01

    The three-dimensional structure and the mechanical properties of a β-connectin fragment from human cardiac muscle, belonging to the I band, from I27 to I34, were investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). This molecule presents an entropic elasticity behavior, associated to globular domain unfolding, that has been widely studied in the last 10 years. In addition, atomic force microscopy based SMFS experiments suggest that this molecule has an additional elastic regime, for low forces, probably associated to tertiary structure remodeling. From a structural point of view, this behavior is a mark of the fact that the eight domains in the I27-I34 fragment are not independent and they organize in solution, assuming a well-defined three-dimensional structure. This hypothesis has been confirmed by SAXS scattering, both on a diluted and a concentrated sample. Two different models were used to fit the SAXS curves: one assuming a globular shape and one corresponding to an elongated conformation, both coupled with a Coulomb repulsion potential to take into account the protein-protein interaction. Due to the predominance of the structure factor, the effective shape of the protein in solution could not be clearly disclosed. By performing SMFS by atomic force microscopy, mechanical unfolding properties were investigated. Typical sawtooth profiles were obtained and the rupture force of each unfolding domain was estimated. By fitting a wormlike chain model to each peak of the sawtooth profile, the entropic elasticity of octamer was described.

  18. Single-molecule Force Spectroscopy Reveals the Calcium Dependence of the Alternative Conformations in the Native State of a βγ-Crystallin Protein.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Li, Qing; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2016-08-26

    Although multidomain proteins predominate the proteome of all organisms and are expected to display complex folding behaviors and significantly greater structural dynamics as compared with single-domain proteins, their conformational heterogeneity and its impact on their interaction with ligands are poorly understood due to a lack of experimental techniques. The multidomain calcium-binding βγ-crystallin proteins are particularly important because their deterioration and misfolding/aggregation are associated with melanoma tumors and cataracts. Here we investigate the mechanical stability and conformational dynamics of a model calcium-binding βγ-crystallin protein, Protein S, and elaborate on its interactions with calcium. We ask whether domain interactions and calcium binding affect Protein S folding and potential structural heterogeneity. Our results from single-molecule force spectroscopy show that the N-terminal (but not the C-terminal) domain is in equilibrium with an alternative conformation in the absence of Ca(2+), which is mechanically stable in contrast to other proteins that were observed to sample a molten globule under similar conditions. Mutagenesis experiments and computer simulations reveal that the alternative conformation of the N-terminal domain is caused by structural instability produced by the high charge density of a calcium binding site. We find that this alternative conformation in the N-terminal domain is diminished in the presence of calcium and can also be partially eliminated with a hitherto unrecognized compensatory mechanism that uses the interaction of the C-terminal domain to neutralize the electronegative site. We find that up to 1% of all identified multidomain calcium-binding proteins contain a similarly highly charged site and therefore may exploit a similar compensatory mechanism to prevent structural instability in the absence of ligand. PMID:27378818

  19. Electronic transport in benzodifuran single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, An; Li, Hui; Chen, Songjie; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Liao, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices.Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The fabrication procedure for BDF single-molecule

  20. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  2. Localized surface plasmon resonances in nanostructures to enhance nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies: towards an astonishing molecular sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vibrational transitions contain some of the richest fingerprints of molecules and materials, providing considerable physicochemical information. Vibrational transitions can be characterized by different spectroscopies, and alternatively by several imaging techniques enabling to reach sub-microscopic spatial resolution. In a quest to always push forward the detection limit and to lower the number of needed vibrational oscillators to get a reliable signal or imaging contrast, surface plasmon resonances (SPR) are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators. Another approach is based on maximizing the collective response of the excited vibrational oscillators through molecular coherence. Both features are often naturally combined in vibrational nonlinear optical techniques. In this frame, this paper reviews the main achievements of the two most common vibrational nonlinear optical spectroscopies, namely surface-enhanced sum-frequency generation (SE-SFG) and surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SE-CARS). They can be considered as the nonlinear counterpart and/or combination of the linear surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques, respectively, which are themselves a branching of the conventional IR and spontaneous Raman spectroscopies. Compared to their linear equivalent, those nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies have proved to reach higher sensitivity down to the single molecule level, opening the way to astonishing perspectives for molecular analysis. PMID:25551056

  3. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R.

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy of high optical-depth samples. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to speed-up of decay processes. We compare our calculation to recent work and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be taken into account in a wide variety of ultracold molecule experiments, including vibrational and rotational states.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy in high temperature dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun has been used to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and their mixtures, as well as liquid N{sub 2}O. The experimental spectra are compared to spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities to obtain vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and linewidths. The derived spectroscopic parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational populations is established in less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations. The variation of the vibrational frequency shift at pressure with species concentration in mixtures is investigated.

  6. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3- dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]- dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems.

  7. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  8. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  10. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Trapped Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-06-01

    We perform vibrational spectroscopy on the V0←10 overtone of a trapped and sympathetically cooled CaH+ molecular ion using a resonance enhanced two photon dissociation scheme. Our experiments are motivated by theoretical work that proposes comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms to detect possible time variation of in the mass ratio of the proton to electron. Due to the nonexistence of experimental data of the transition, we start the search with a broadband femtosecond Ti:Saph laser guided by theoretical calculations. Once the vibrational transition has been identified, we will move to CW lasers to perform rotationally resolved spectroscopy. M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Opt.Phys., 42,154022(2009) Private communication

  11. Anharmonic Theoretical Vibrational Spectroscopy of Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Panek, Paweł T; Jacob, Christoph R

    2016-08-18

    Because of the size of polypeptides and proteins, the quantum-chemical prediction of their vibrational spectra presents an exceptionally challenging task. Here, we address one of these challenges, namely, the inclusion of anharmonicities. By performing the expansion of the potential energy surface in localized-mode coordinates instead of the normal-mode coordinates, it becomes possible to calculate anharmonic vibrational spectra of polypeptides efficiently and reliably. We apply this approach to calculate the infrared, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of helical alanine polypeptides consisting of up to 20 amino acids. We find that while anharmonicities do not alter the band shapes, simple scaling procedures cannot account for the different shifts found for the individual bands. This closes an important gap in theoretical vibrational spectroscopy by making it possible to quantify the anharmonic contributions and opens the door to a first-principles calculation of multidimensional vibrational spectra. PMID:27472016

  12. Combining single-molecule manipulation and single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Juan Carlos; Das, Dibyendu Kumar; Manning, Harris W; Lang, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    Single molecule force manipulation combined with fluorescence techniques offers much promise in revealing mechanistic details of biomolecular machinery. Here, we review force-fluorescence microscopy, which combines the best features of manipulation and detection techniques. Three of the mainstay manipulation methods (optical traps, magnetic traps and atomic force microscopy) are discussed with respect to milestones in combination developments, in addition to highlight recent contributions to the field. An overview of additional strategies is discussed, including fluorescence based force sensors for force measurement in vivo. Armed with recent exciting demonstrations of this technology, the field of combined single-molecule manipulation and single-molecule detection is poised to provide unprecedented views of molecular machinery. PMID:25255052

  13. Nanochannel Based Single Molecule Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Lesoine, John F.; Venkataraman, Prahnesh A.; Maloney, Peter C.; Dumont, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the fluorescence from a single molecule hundreds of times without surface immobilization. The approach is based on the use of electroosmosis to repeatedly drive a single target molecule in a fused silica nanochannel through a stationary laser focus. Single molecule fluorescence detected during the transit time through the laser focus is used to repeatedly reverse the electrical potential controlling the flow direction. Our method does not rely on continuous observation and therefore is less susceptible to fluorescence blinking than existing fluorescence-based trapping schemes. The variation in the turnaround times can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient on a single molecule level. We demonstrate the ability to recycle both proteins and DNA in nanochannels and show that the procedure can be combined with single-pair Förster energy transfer. Nanochannel-based single molecule recycling holds promise for studying conformational dynamics on the same single molecule in solution and without surface tethering. PMID:22662745

  14. Single-molecule spectroscopy and femtosecond transient absorption studies on the excitation energy transfer process in ApcE(1-240) dimers.

    PubMed

    Long, Saran; Zhou, Meng; Tang, Kun; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Niu, Yingli; Guo, Qianjin; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Xia, Andong

    2015-05-28

    ApcE(1-240) dimers with one intrinsic phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore in each monomer that is truncated from the core-membrane linker (ApcE) of phycobilisomes (PBS) in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 show a sharp and significantly red-shifted absorption. Two explanations either conformation-dependent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or the strong exciton coupling limit have been proposed for red-shifted absorption. This is a classic example of the special pair in the photosynthetic light harvesting proteins, but the mechanism of this interaction is still a matter of intense debate. We report the studies using single-molecule and transient absorption spectra on the interaction in the special pair of ApcE dimers. Our results demonstrate the presence of conformation-dependent FRET between the two PCB chromophores in ApcE dimers. The broad distributions of fluorescence intensities, lifetimes and polarization difference from single-molecule measurements reveal the heterogeneity of local protein-pigment environments in ApcE dimers, where the same molecular structures but different protein environments are the main reason for the two PCB chromophores with different spectral properties. The excitation energy transfer rate between the donor and the acceptor about (110 ps)(-1) is determined from transient absorption measurements. The red-shifted absorption in ApcE dimers could result from more extending conformation, which shows another type of absorption redshift that does not depend on strong exciton coupling. The results here stress the importance of conformation-controlled spectral properties of the chemically identical chromophores, which could be a general feature to control energy/electron transfer, widely existing in the light harvesting complexes. PMID:25925197

  15. Single-Molecule DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efcavitch, J. William; Thompson, John F.

    2010-07-01

    The ability to detect single molecules of DNA or RNA has led to an extremely rich area of exploration of the single most important biomolecule in nature. In cases in which the nucleic acid molecules are tethered to a solid support, confined to a channel, or simply allowed to diffuse into a detection volume, novel techniques have been developed to manipulate the DNA and to examine properties such as structural dynamics and protein-DNA interactions. Beyond the analysis of the properties of nucleic acids themselves, single-molecule detection has enabled dramatic improvements in the throughput of DNA sequencing and holds promise for continuing progress. Both optical and nonoptical detection methods that use surfaces, nanopores, and zero-mode waveguides have been attempted, and one optically based instrument is already commercially available. The breadth of literature related to single-molecule DNA analysis is vast; this review focuses on a survey of efforts in molecular dynamics and nucleic acid sequencing.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy in shock-compressed liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in simple molecular liquids at the high pressures and temperatures characteristic of explosive detonation. Dense fluids to several thousand degrees temperature and several hundred kilobars pressure are obtained using the shock-compression technique. Vibrational frequencies, third-order susceptibility ratios, and linewidths have been measured for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, mixtures of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO, and N{sub 2}O. Frequencies are found to increase with pressure. The transition intensity and line-width data suggest that thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is attained in less than a few nanoseconds at these high pressures and temperatures. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy in shock-compressed liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1992-03-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in simple molecular liquids at the high pressures and temperatures characteristic of explosive detonation. Dense fluids to several thousand degrees temperature and several hundred kilobars pressure are obtained using the shock-compression technique. Vibrational frequencies, third-order susceptibility ratios, and linewidths have been measured for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, mixtures of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO, and N{sub 2}O. Frequencies are found to increase with pressure. The transition intensity and line-width data suggest that thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is attained in less than a few nanoseconds at these high pressures and temperatures. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations.

  18. Modeling, calculating, and analyzing multidimensional vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Yoshitaka; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2009-09-15

    Spectral line shapes in a condensed phase contain information from various dynamic processes that modulate the transition energy, such as microscopic dynamics, inter- and intramolecular couplings, and solvent dynamics. Because nonlinear response functions are sensitive to the complex dynamics of chemical processes, multidimensional vibrational spectroscopies can separate these processes. In multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy, the nonlinear response functions of a molecular dipole or polarizability are measured using ultrashort pulses to monitor inter- and intramolecular vibrational motions. Because a complex profile of such signals depends on the many dynamic and structural aspects of a molecular system, researchers would like to have a theoretical understanding of these phenomena. In this Account, we explore and describe the roles of different physical phenomena that arise from the peculiarities of the system-bath coupling in multidimensional spectra. We also present simple analytical expressions for a weakly coupled multimode Brownian system, which we use to analyze the results obtained by the experiments and simulations. To calculate the nonlinear optical response, researchers commonly use a particular form of a system Hamiltonian fit to the experimental results. The optical responses of molecular vibrational motions have been studied in either an oscillator model or a vibration energy state model. In principle, both models should give the same results as long as the energy states are chosen to be the eigenstates of the oscillator model. The energy state model can provide a simple description of nonlinear optical processes because the diagrammatic Liouville space theory that developed in the electronically resonant spectroscopies can easily handle three or four energy states involved in high-frequency vibrations. However, the energy state model breaks down if we include the thermal excitation and relaxation processes in the dynamics to put the system in a

  19. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy on Metal Transition Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latouche, Camille; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Advances in hardware performance and the availability of efficient and reliable computational models have made possible the application of computational spectroscopy to ever larger molecular systems. The systematic interpretation of experimental data and the full characterization of complex molecules can then be facilitated. Focusing on vibrational spectroscopy, several approaches have been proposed to simulate spectra beyond the double harmonic approximation, so that more details become available. However, a routine use of such tools requires the preliminary definition of a valid protocol with the most appropriate combination of electronic structure and nuclear calculation models. Several benchmark of anharmonic calculations frequency have been realized on organic molecules. Nevertheless, benchmarks of organometallics or inorganic metal complexes at this level are strongly lacking despite the interest of these systems due to their strong emission and vibrational properties. Herein we report the benchmark study realized with anharmonic calculations on simple metal complexes, along with some pilot applications on systems of direct technological or biological interest.

  20. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches. PMID:27096701

  1. Nanodevices for Single Molecule Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, H. G.; Stavis, S. M.; Samiee, K. T.

    During the last two decades, biotechnology research has resulted in progress in fields as diverse as the life sciences, agriculture and healthcare. While existing technology enables the analysis of a variety of biological systems, new tools are needed for increasing the efficiency of current methods, and for developing new ones altogether. Interest has grown in single molecule analysis for these reasons.

  2. Biomedical applications of single molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    The search for increased sensitivity of bio-analytical techniques has recently shifted from signal generation to detection. While enzyme amplifiers and chemiluminescent reporters developed by chemists over the last two decades gradually moved detection limits to the attomol level, it has taken engineers only a few years to reach single- molecule sensitivity with the development of new instrumentation. A number of different approaches have successfully achieved single-molecule fluorescence detection including confocal and near-field scanning optical microscopy, photon-counting cameras, fluorescence- correlation and time-gated spectroscopy. They detect labels immobilized on substrates, diffusing in solution and flowing in electro-osmotic and hydrodynamically focused streams. Biotechnology has created numerous application s for single- molecule detection. In research labs, it can dramatically increase the rate of DNA sequencing, screen libraries for products of directed evolution, and characterize compounds in drug discovery programs. In medical diagnostics, ultra- sensitive detection technologies can be used for genetic screening, detection of infectious diseases, or multi- analyte profiles. It can be applied to immunoassays as well as DNA or RNA hybridization assays.

  3. Laser-Assisted Single Molecule Refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Marshall, Myles; Aleman, Elvin; Lamichhane, Rajan; Rueda, David

    2010-03-01

    In vivo, many RNA molecules can adopt multiple conformations depending on their biological context such as the HIV Dimerization Initiation Sequence (DIS) or the DsrA RNA in bacteria. It is quite common that the initial interaction between the two RNAs takes place via complementary unpaired regions, thus forming a so-called kissing complex. However, the exact kinetic mechanism by which the two RNA molecules reach the dimerized state is still not well understood. To investigate the refolding energy surface of RNA molecules, we have developed new technology based on the combination of single molecule spectroscopy with laser induced temperature jump kinetics, called Laser Assisted Single-molecule Refolding (LASR). LASR enables us to induce folding reactions of otherwise kinetically trapped RNAs at the single molecule level, and to characterize their folding landscape. LASR provides an exciting new approach to study molecular memory effects and kinetically trapped RNAs in general. LASR should be readily applicable to study DNA and protein folding as well.

  4. Heterodyne-Detected Dispersed Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-11-01

    We develop heterodyned dispersed vibrational echo spectroscopy (HDVE) and demonstrate the new capabilities in biophysical applications. HDVE is a robust ultrafast technique that provides a characterization of the real and imaginary components of third-order nonlinear signals with high sensitivity and single-laser-shot capability and can be used to extract dispersed pump-probe and dispersed vibrational echo spectra. Four methods for acquiring HDVE phase and amplitude spectra were compared: Fourier transform spectral interferometry, a new phase modulation spectral interferometry technique, and combination schemes. These extraction techniques were demonstrated in the context of protein amide I spectroscopy. Experimental HDVE and heterodyned free induction decay amide I spectra were explicitly compared to conventional dispersed pump-probe, dispersed vibrational echo, and absorption spectra. The new capabilities of HDVE were demonstrated by acquiring single-shot spectra and melting curves of ubiquitin and concentration-dependent spectra of insulin suitable for extracting the binding constant for dimerization. The introduced techniques will prove particularly useful in transient experiments, studying irreversible reactions, and micromolar concentration studies of small proteins.

  5. Multiparameter single-molecule fluorescence measurements of DNA intercalating fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Benjamin P.; Enderlein, Jorg; Woodbury, Neal W. T.

    2003-06-01

    Experiments using single-molecules of TOTO-1 intercalated into dsDNA were performed to investigate the DNA sequence dependence on the fluorescence detectable with single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Previous work has shown that there is a difference in the fluorescence lifetime when TOTO-1 is intercalated in poly-AT DNA or in poly-GC DNA. The fluorescence detected from single-molecules in this work for poly-GC and poly-AT DNA showed fluorescence lifetimes of 2.1 and 1.8 nsec, respectively. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity detected from single-molecules of TOTO-1 was performed by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. TOTO-1 is shown to spend large amounts of time in dark states. These dark states reduce the detectable fluorescence intensity to approximately 10 photons per millisecond on average.

  6. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of vibrationally excited nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Eypper, Marie; Stranges, Stefano; West, John B.; King, George C.; Dyke, John M.

    2013-02-01

    Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) has been used to study flowing nitrogen subjected to a microwave discharge. The first three photoelectron (PE) bands of nitrogen corresponding to the ionizations N2+ (X2Σ+g) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″, N2+ (A2Πu) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″ and N2 + (B2Σ+u) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″ were investigated. An analysis of the vibrationally resolved threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra shows evidence of population of the vibrational levels v″ = 0-5 in the N2 X1Σ+g neutral state. By a comparison with the PE spectrum recorded under the same conditions, use of computed Franck-Condon factors for each ionization and evidence from vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, the relative intensities of vibrational components in a TPE band can be qualitatively explained using the Franck-Condon factors for each ionization as well as the gain in intensity from autoionization from Rydberg states that are degenerate with an ionization threshold or lie just above a threshold. The enhancement in intensity obtained in the TPE spectra, relative to the intensity in a PE spectrum recorded under the same conditions, was estimated as at least one order of magnitude. The first band of atomic nitrogen was also observed in the discharge-on TPE spectra. The experimental resolution was sufficiently good to allow the three ionizations N+(3P0,1,2) ← N(4S3/2) to be resolved and their relative component intensities were measured as 1: 0.95 ± 0.10: 0.70 ± 0.10. The complementary nature of the TPES and PES techniques has been outlined and the extra information obtained from studying a vibrationally excited small molecule such as N2 with these methods has been demonstrated.

  7. Electric Field Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy in a Single Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyazin, Alexander S.; van den Berg, Johan W. G.; Osorio, Edgar A.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P.; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R.; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe$_4$ single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties, and moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition / subtraction controlled with the gate voltage. Single-molecule magnetism can thus be electrically controlled.

  8. Electric field controlled magnetic anisotropy in a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Zyazin, Alexander S; van den Berg, Johan W G; Osorio, Edgar A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe(4) single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties and, moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition/subtraction controlled with the gate voltage. Single-molecule magnetism can thus be electrically controlled. PMID:20687519

  9. Single molecule surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C.; Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2004-06-01

    One of the most intriguing findings in single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) is the observation of Raman spectra of individual molecules, despite the small cross section of the transitions involved. The observation of the spectra can be explained by the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERRS) effect. At the single-molecule level, the SERRS-spectra recorded as a function of time reveal inhomogeneous behaviour such as on/off blinking, spectral diffusion, intensity fluctuations of vibrational line, and even splitting of some lines within the spectrum of one molecule. Single-molecule SERRS (SM-SERRS) spectroscopy opens up exciting opportunities in the field of biophysics and biomedical spectroscopy. The first example of single protein SERRS was performed on hemoglobin. However, the possibility of extracting the heme group by silver sols can not be excluded. Here we report on SM-SERRS spectra of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in which the chromophore is kept in the protein. The time series of SM-SERRS spectra suggest the conversion of the EGFP chromophore between the deprotonated and the protonated form. Autocorrelation analysis of SM-SERRS trajectory reveals the presence of fast dynamics taking place in the protein. Our findings show the potential of the technique to study structural dynamics of protein molecules.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of water at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Skinner, J L; Pieniazek, P A; Gruenbaum, S M

    2012-01-17

    Understanding liquid water's behavior at the molecular level is essential to progress in fields as disparate as biology and atmospheric sciences. Moreover, the properties of water in bulk and water at interfaces can be very different, making the study of the hydrogen-bonding networks therein very important. With recent experimental advances in vibrational spectroscopy, such as ultrafast pulses and heterodyne detection, it is now possible to probe the structure and dynamics of bulk and interfacial water in unprecedented detail. We consider here three aqueous interfaces: the water liquid-vapor interface, the interface between water and the surfactant headgroups of reverse micelles, and the interface between water and the lipid headgroups of aligned multi-bilayers. In the first case, sum-frequency spectroscopy is used to probe the interface. In the second and third cases, the confined water pools are sufficiently small that techniques of bulk spectroscopy (such as FTIR, pump-probe, two-dimensional IR, and the like) can be used to probe the interfacial water. In this Account, we discuss our attempts to model these three systems and interpret the existing experiments. For the water liquid-vapor interface, we find that three-body interactions are essential for reproducing the experimental sum-frequency spectrum, and presumably for the structure of the interface as well. The observed spectrum is interpreted as arising from overlapping and canceling positive and negative contributions from molecules in different hydrogen-bonding environments. For the reverse micelles, our theoretical models confirm that the experimentally observed blue shift of the water OD stretch (for dilute HOD in H(2)O) arises from weaker hydrogen bonding to sulfonate oxygens. We interpret the observed slow-down in water rotational dynamics as arising from curvature-induced frustration. For the water confined between lipid bilayers, our theoretical models confirm that the experimentally observed red

  11. Mechanical studies on single molecules: general considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Elements of molecular biology * Advantages and drawbacks of single molecule studies * Order of magnitude of the relevant parameters at the single molecule level * Single molecule manipulation techniques * Comparison of the different techniques * DNA mechanical properties * Conclusion * Bibliography

  12. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  13. Surface-Bulk Vibrational Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sandra; Covert, Paul A; Jarisz, Tasha A; Chan, Chantelle; Hore, Dennis K

    2016-05-01

    Homo- and heterospectral correlation analysis are powerful methods for investigating the effects of external influences on the spectra acquired using distinct and complementary techniques. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy is a selective and sensitive probe of surface structure changes, as bulk molecules are excluded on the basis of symmetry. However, as a result of this exquisite specificity, it is blind to changes that may be occurring in the solution. We demonstrate that correlation analysis between surface-specific techniques and bulk probes such as infrared absorption or Raman scattering may be used to reveal additional details of the adsorption process. Using the adsorption of water and ethanol binary mixtures as an example, we illustrate that this provides support for a competitive binding model and adds new insight into a dimer-to-bilayer transition proposed from previous experiments and simulations. PMID:27058265

  14. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  15. Room temperature single molecule microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Enderlein, G.; Semin, D.J.; Keller, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    We have developed three capabilities to image the locations of and interrogate immobilized single fluorescent molecules: near-field scanning optical, confocal scanning optical, and wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy. Each microscopy has its own advantages. Near-field illumination can beat the diffraction limit. Confocal microscopy has high brightness and temporal resolution. Wide-field has the quickest (parallel) imaging capability. With confocal microscopy, we have verified that single fluorescent spots in our images are due to single molecules by observing photon antibunching. Using all three microscopies, we have observed that xanthene molecules dispersed on dry silica curiously exhibit intensity fluctuations on millisecond to minute time scales. We are exploring the connection between the intensity fluctuations and fluctuations in individual photophysical parameters. The fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G on silica fluctuate. The complex nature of the intensity and lifetime fluctuations is consistent with a mechanism that perturbs more than one photophysical parameter.

  16. Electrochemical detection of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Fan, F R; Bard, A J

    1995-02-10

    The electrochemical behavior of a single molecule can be observed by trapping a small volume of a dilute solution of the electroactive species between an ultramicroelectrode tip with a diameter of approximately 15 nanometers and a conductive substrate. A scanning electrochemical microscope was used to adjust the tip-substrate distance ( approximately 10 nanometers), and the oxidation of [(trimethylammonio)methyl] ferrocene (Cp(2)FeTMA(+)) to Cp(2)FeTMA(2+) was carried out. The response was stochastic, and anodic current peaks were observed as the molecule moved into and out of the electrode-substrate gap. Similar experiments were performed with a solution containing two redox species, ferrocene carboxylate (Cp(2)FeCOO(-)) and Os(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl). PMID:17813918

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy in stem cell characterisation: is there a niche?

    PubMed

    Sulé-Suso, J; Forsyth, N R; Untereiner, V; Sockalingum, G D

    2014-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy using both infrared and Raman spectroscopies has been used in recent years with the aim to aid clinicians in disease diagnosis. More recently, these techniques have been applied to study stem cell differentiation and to determine stem cell presence in tissues. These studies have demonstrated the potential of these techniques in better characterising stem cell differentiation phenotypes with potential applications in tissue engineering strategies. However, before the translation of vibrational spectroscopy into clinical practice becomes a reality, several issues still need to be addressed. We describe here an overview of the work carried out so far and the problems that might be encountered when using vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:24703620

  18. Multireflection sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-18

    We developed a multireflection data collection method in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, which we refer to as multireflection SFG, or MRSFG for short. To achieve MRSFG, a collinear laser beam propagation geometry was adopted and trapezoidal Dove prisms were used as sample substrates. An in-depth discussion on the signal and SNR in MRSFG was performed. We showed experimentally, with "m" total internal reflections in a Dove prism, MRSFG signal is ∼m times that of conventional SFG; SNR of the SFG signal-to-background is improved by a factor of >m(1/2) and vibrational signals. Surface molecular structures of adsorbed ethanol molecules, polymer films, and a lipid monolayer were characterized using both MRSFG and conventional SFG. Molecular orientation information on lipid molecules with a 9% composition in a mixed monolayer was measured using MRSFG, which showed a good agreement with that derived from 100% lipid surface coverage using conventional SFG. MRSFG can both improve the spectral quality and detection limit of SFG spectroscopy and is expected to have important applications in surface science for studying structures of molecules with a low surface coverage or less ordered molecular moieties. PMID:26176565

  19. Single molecule detection for in vitro diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Thomas; Ackermann, Jörg; Mathis, Harald P.; Greiner, Benjamin; Tonn, Thomas; Tschachojan, David; Kukoc-Zivojnov, Natasa; Giehring, Sebastian

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel highly sensitive detection system for diagnostic applications. The system is designed to meet the needs of medical diagnostics for reliable measurements of pathogens and biomarkers in the low concentration regime. It consists of a confocal detection unit, micro-structured sampling cells, and a "Virtual lab" analysis software. The detection unit works with laser induced fluorescence and is designed to provide accurate and highly sensitive measurement at the single molecule level. Various sampling cells are micro-structured in glass, silicon or polymers to enable measurements under flow and nonflow conditions. Sampling volume is below one microliter. The "Virtual lab" software analyzes the light intensity online according to the patent pending "Accurate Stochastic Fluorescence Spectroscopy" (ASFS) developed by FluIT Biosystems GmbH. Tools for simulation and experiment optimization are included as well. Experimental results for various applications with relevance for in vitro diagnostics will be presented.

  20. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.

    to sample similar conformers. This work demonstrates that the conductance of bithiophene displays a strong dependence on the conformational fluctuations accessible within a given junction configuration, and that the symmetry of such small molecules can significantly influence their conductance behavior. Next, the single-molecule conductance of a family of oligothiophenes comprising one to six thiophene units was measured. An anomalous behavior was found: the peak of the conductance histogram distribution did not follow a clear exponential decay with increasing number of thiophene units in the chain. The electronic properties of the materials were characterized by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry to gain an understanding of the factors affecting the conductance of these molecules. Different conformers in the junction were postulated to be a contributing factor to the anomalous trend in the observed conductance as a function of molecule length. Then, the electronic properties of the thiophene-1,1-dioxide unit were investigated. These motifs have become synthetically accessible in the last decade, due to Rozen's unprecedentedly potent oxidizing reagent - HOF˙CH 3CN - which has been shown to be powerful yet selective enough to oxidize thiophenes in various environments. The resulting thiophene-1,1-dioxides show great promise for electronic devices. The oxidation chemistry of thiophenes was expanded and tuning of the frontier energy levels was demonstrated through combining electron poor and electron rich units. Finally, charge carriers in single-molecule junctions were shown to be tunable within a family of molecules containing these thiophene-1,1-dioxide (TDO) building blocks. Oligomers of TDO were designed in order to increase electron affinity, maintain delocalized frontier orbitals, while significantly decreasing the transport gap. Through thermopower measurements, the dominant charge carriers were shown to change from holes to electrons as the number of

  1. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  2. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, E.; Schwille, P.

    Craig Venter published the sequence of the human genome a few years ago [1]. However, the 2.91 billion base pair DNA examined seems to code for only about 30 000 proteins. A vast majority of them are barely known to exist, let alone fully understood. Therefore, major goals of current biological research are not only the identification, but also the precise physico-chemical characterization of elementary processes on the level of individual proteins and nucleic acids. These molecules are believed to be the smallest functional units in biological systems.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy in biomedical science: bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamsjäger, Sonja; Zoehrer, R.; Roschger, P.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Mendelsohn, R.; Paschalis, E. P.

    2009-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIR) and Raman Microspectroscopy are powerful tools for characterizing the distribution of different chemical moieties in heterogeneous materials. FTIR and Raman measurements have been adapted to assess the maturity of the mineral and the quality of the organic component (collagen and non-collagenous proteins) of the mineralized tissue in bone. Unique to the FTIRI analysis is the capability to provide the spatial distribution of two of the major collagen cross-links (pyridinoline, and dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine) and through the study of normal and diseased bone, relate them to bone strength. These FTIR parameters have been validated based on analysis of model compounds. It is widely accepted that bone strength is determined by bone mass and bone quality. The latter is a multifactorial term encompassing the material and structural properties of bone, and one important aspect of the bone material properties is the organic matrix. The bone material properties can be defined by parameters of mineral and collagen, as determined by FTIR and Raman analysis. Considerably less attention has been directed at collagen, although there are several publications in the literature reporting altered collagen properties associated with fragile bone, in both animals and humans. Since bone is a heterogeneous tissue due to the remodeling process, microscopic areas may be carefully selected based on quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging or histological staining, thus ensuring comparison of areas with similar metabolic activity and mineral content. In conclusion, FTIRI and Raman vibrational spectroscopy are proving to be powerful tools in bone-related medical research.

  4. Electromechanical Properties of Single Molecule Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Christopher

    Understanding the interplay between the electrical and mechanical properties of single molecules is of fundamental importance for molecular electronics. The sensitivity of charge transport to mechanical fluctuations is a key problem in developing long lasting molecular devices. Furthermore, harnessing this response to mechanical perturbation, molecular devices which can be mechanically gated can be developed. This thesis demonstrates three examples of the unique electromechanical properties of single molecules. First, the electromechanical properties of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecular junctions are investigate. Counterintuitively, the conductance of this molecule is found to increase by more than an order of magnitude when stretched. This conductance increase is found to be reversible when the molecular junction is compressed. The current-voltage, conductance-voltage and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy characteristics are used to attribute the conductance increase to a strain-induced shift in the frontier molecular orbital relative to the electrode Fermi level, leading to resonant enhancement in the conductance. Next, the effect of stretching-induced structural changes on charge transport in DNA molecules is studied. The conductance of single DNA molecules with lengths varying from 6 to 26 base pairs is measured and found to follow a hopping transport mechanism. The conductance of DNA molecules is highly sensitive to mechanical stretching, showing an abrupt decrease in conductance at surprisingly short stretching distances, with weak dependence on DNA length. This abrupt conductance decrease is attributed to force-induced breaking of hydrogen bonds in the base pairs at the end of the DNA sequence. Finally, the effect of small mechanical modulation of the base separation on DNA conductance is investigated. The sensitivity of conductance to mechanical modulation is studied for molecules of different sequence and length. Sequences with purine-purine stacking

  5. Sorting single molecules: application to diagnostics and evolutionary biotechnology.

    PubMed Central

    Eigen, M; Rigler, R

    1994-01-01

    A method is described that provides for detection and identification of single molecules in solution. The method is based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, which records spatio-temporal correlations among fluctuating light signals, coupled with devices for trapping single molecules in an electric field. This technique is applied to studies of molecular evolution, where it allows fast screening of large mutant spectra in which targets are labeled by specific fluorescent ligands. The method expands the horizon in molecular diagnostics by making it possible to monitor concentrations down to (less than) 10(-15) M without any need for amplification. Images PMID:7517036

  6. Single molecule techniques for the study of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    García-Sáez, Ana J; Schwille, Petra

    2007-08-01

    Single molecule techniques promise novel information about the properties and behavior of individual particles, thus enabling access to molecular heterogeneities in biological systems. Their recent developments to accommodate membrane studies have significantly deepened the understanding of membrane proteins. In this short review, we will describe the basics of the three most common single-molecule techniques used on membrane proteins: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single particle tracking, and atomic force microscopy. We will discuss the most relevant findings made during the recent years and their contribution to the membrane protein field. PMID:17497147

  7. 2010 GRC VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 6, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks Pate

    2010-08-06

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, and medicine. The theory of molecular vibrational motion and its connection to spectroscopic signatures and chemical reaction dynamics is the third major theme of the meeting. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules and nanomaterials.

  8. Simultaneous time and frequency resolved fluorescence microscopy of single molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Carl C.; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Chandler, David W.; Luong, A. Khai

    2005-01-01

    Single molecule fluorophores were studied for the first time with a new confocal fluorescence microscope that allows the wavelength and emission time to be simultaneously measured with single molecule sensitivity. In this apparatus, the photons collected from the sample are imaged through a dispersive optical system onto a time and position sensitive detector. This detector records the wavelength and emission time of each detected photon relative to an excitation laser pulse. A histogram of many events for any selected spatial region or time interval can generate a full fluorescence spectrum and correlated decay plot for the given selection. At the single molecule level, this approach makes entirely new types of temporal and spectral correlation spectroscopy of possible. This report presents the results of simultaneous time- and frequency-resolved fluorescence measurements of single rhodamine 6G (R6G), tetramethylrhodamine (TMR), and Cy3 embedded in thin films of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA).

  9. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  10. Sizing up single-molecule enzymatic conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lu, H Peter

    2014-02-21

    Enzymatic reactions and related protein conformational dynamics are complex and inhomogeneous, playing crucial roles in biological functions. The relationship between protein conformational dynamics and enzymatic reactions has been a fundamental focus in modern enzymology. It is extremely difficult to characterize and analyze such complex dynamics in an ensemble-averaged measurement, especially when the enzymes are associated with multiple-step, multiple-conformation complex chemical interactions and transformations. Beyond the conventional ensemble-averaged studies, real-time single-molecule approaches have been demonstrated to be powerful in dissecting the complex enzymatic reaction dynamics and related conformational dynamics. Single-molecule enzymology has come a long way since the early demonstrations of the single-molecule spectroscopy studies of enzymatic dynamics about two decades ago. The rapid development of this fundamental protein dynamics field is hand-in-hand with the new development of single-molecule imaging and spectroscopic technology and methodology, theoretical model analyses, and correlations with biological preparation and characterization of the enzyme protein systems. The complex enzymatic reactions can now be studied one molecule at a time under physiological conditions. Most exciting developments include active manipulation of enzymatic conformational changes and energy landscape to regulate and manipulate the enzymatic reactivity and associated conformational dynamics, and the new advancements have established a new stage for studying complex protein dynamics beyond by simply observing but by actively manipulating and observing the enzymatic dynamics at the single-molecule sensitivity temporally and spatially. PMID:24306450

  11. Figuration and detection of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevels, R.; Welch, G. R.; Cremer, P. S.; Hemmer, P.; Phillips, T.; Scully, S.; Sokolov, A. V.; Svidzinsky, A. A.; Xia, H.; Zheltikov, A.; Scully, M. O.

    2012-08-01

    Recent advances in the description of atoms and molecules based on Dimensional scaling analysis, developed by Dudley Herschbach and co-workers, provided new insights into visualization of molecular structure and chemical bonding. Prof. Herschbach is also a giant in the field of single molecule scattering. We here report on the engineering of molecular detectors. Such systems have a wide range of application from medical diagnostics to the monitoring of chemical, biological and environmental hazards. We discuss ways to identify preselected molecules, in particular, mycotoxin contaminants using coherent laser spectroscopy. Mycotoxin contaminants, e.g. aflatoxin B1 which is present in corn and peanuts, are usually analysed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. We present a new approach that derives from recent experiments in which molecules are prepared by one (or more) femtosecond laser(s) and probed by another set. We call this technique FAST CARS (femto second adaptive spectroscopic technique for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). We propose and analyse ways in which FAST CARS can be used to identify preselected molecules, e.g. aflatoxin, rapidly and economically.

  12. Interplay between magnetic anisotropy and vibron-assisted tunneling in a single-molecule magnet transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzuri, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre

    2015-03-01

    Molecules trapped in single-molecule devices vibrate with discrete frequencies characteristic to the molecules, and the molecular vibrations can couple to electronic charge and/or spin degrees of freedom. For a significant electron-vibron coupling, electrons may tunnel via the vibrational excitations unique to the molecules. Recently, electron transport via individual anisotropic magnetic molecules (referred to as single-molecule magnets) has been observed in single-molecule transistors. A single-molecule magnet has a large spin moment and a large magnetic anisotropy barrier. So far, studies of electron-vibron coupling effects in single-molecule devices, are mainly for isotropic molecules. Here we investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via a single-molecule magnet Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (arXiv:1411.2677). We show that the magnetic anisotropy of the Fe4 induces new features in vibrational conductance peaks and creates vibrational satellite peaks. The main and satellite peak heights have a strong, unusual dependence on the direction and magnitude of applied magnetic field, because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is comparable to vibrational energies. Funding from NSF DMR-1206354, EU FP7 program project 618082 ACMOL, advanced ERC grant (Mols@Mols). Computer resources from SDSC Trestles under DMR060009N and VT ARC.

  13. Chemical principles of single-molecule electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Neupane, Madhav; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-03-01

    The field of single-molecule electronics harnesses expertise from engineering, physics and chemistry to realize circuit elements at the limit of miniaturization; it is a subfield of nanoelectronics in which the electronic components are single molecules. In this Review, we survey the field from a chemical perspective and discuss the structure-property relationships of the three components that form a single-molecule junction: the anchor, the electrode and the molecular bridge. The spatial orientation and electronic coupling between each component profoundly affect the conductance properties and functions of the single-molecule device. We describe the design principles of the anchor group, the influence of the electronic configuration of the electrode and the effect of manipulating the structure of the molecular backbone and of its substituent groups. We discuss single-molecule conductance switches as well as the phenomenon of quantum interference and then trace their fundamental roots back to chemical principles.

  14. Transient Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy in a Vibrational Ladder.

    PubMed

    Kemlin, Vincent; Bonvalet, Adeline; Daniault, Louis; Joffre, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    We report on transient 2D Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) after vibrational ladder climbing induced in the CO-moiety longitudinal stretch of carboxyhemoglobin. The population distribution, spreading up to seven vibrational levels, results in a nonequilibrium 2DIR spectrum evidencing a large number of peaks that can be easily attributed to individual transitions thanks to the anharmonicity of the vibrational potential. We discuss the physical origin of the observed peaks as well as the qualitative behavior of the subsequent dynamics governed by population relaxation in the vibrational ladder. PMID:27508408

  15. Single-molecule photophysics, from cryogenic to ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Kozankiewicz, Bolesław; Orrit, Michel

    2014-02-21

    We review recent progress in characterizing and understanding the photophysics of single molecules in condensed matter, mostly at cryogenic temperatures. We discuss the central role of the triplet state in limiting the number of useful host-guest systems, notably a new channel, intermolecular intersystem crossing. Another important limitation to the use of single molecules is their photo-reactivity, leading to blinking of the fluorescence signal, and eventually to its loss by photo-bleaching. These processes are at the heart of modern super-resolution schemes. We then examine some of the new host-guest systems recently discovered following these general principles, and the mechanisms of spectral diffusion and dephasing that they have revealed. When charges are injected into organic conductors, they get trapped and influence single molecules via the local fields they create in the material, and via their coupling to localized vibrations. Understanding these processes is necessary for better control of spectral diffusion and dephasing of single molecules. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this fascinating field. PMID:24190080

  16. Vibrationally mediated photodissociation of t-butyl hydroperoxide: Vibrational overtone spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Likar, M.D.; Baggott, J.E.; Crim, F.F.

    1989-06-01

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation is a two-photon technique for studying the spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In these experiments, a highly vibrationally excited t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) molecule, prepared by excitation in the region of the third overtone of the O--H stretching vibration (4..nu../sub OH/), absorbs a second photon to dissociate to OH and t-butoxy fragments, and laser induced fluorescence determines the quantum state populations of the OH fragment. Vibrational overtone excitation spectra, obtained by varying the vibrational overtone excitation wavelength while monitoring a single OH rotational state, are nearly identical to photoacoustic spectra. We fit the coarse structure in the vibrational overtone excitation spectrum in the region of the 4..nu../sub OH/ transition and the photoacoustic spectra in the regions of the 5..nu../sub OH/ and 6..nu../sub OH/ transitions using a spectroscopic model of the interaction of the O--H bond stretching vibration with the torsional vibration about the O--O bond. This analysis determines the barrier to internal rotation of the O--H and t-butoxy groups through the trans configuration and its variation with vibrational excitation. The trans barrier in the ground vibrational state is 275 cm/sup -1/ and increases with vibrational excitation to 425, 575, and 680 cm/sup -1/ for t-BuOOH molecules with four, five, and six quanta of O--H stretching excitation, respectively.

  17. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  18. Irving Langmuir Prize Talk: Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging: Nanoscale Emitters with Photoinduced Switching Enable Superresolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2009-03-01

    In the two decades since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a solid (Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2535 (1989)), much has been learned about the ability of single molecules to probe local nanoenvironments and individual behavior in biological and nonbiological materials in the absence of ensemble averaging that can obscure heterogeneity. The early years concentrated on high-resolution spectroscopy in solids, which provided observations of lifetime-limited spectra, optical saturation, spectral diffusion, optical switching, vibrational spectra, and magnetic resonance of a single molecular spin. In the mid-1990's, much of the field moved to room temperature, where a wide variety of biophysical effects were subsequently explored, but it is worth noting that several features from the low-temperature studies have analogs at high temperature. For example, in our first studies of yellow-emitting variants of green fluorescent protein (EYFP) in the water-filled pores of a gel (Nature 388, 355 (1997)), optically induced switching of the emission was observed, a room-temperature analog of the earlier low-temperature behavior. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic imaging of individual fluorophores leads naturally to superlocalization, or determination of the position of the molecule with precision beyond the optical diffraction limit, simply by digitization of the point-spread function from the single emitter. Recent work has allowed measurement of the shape of single filaments in a living cell simply by allowing a single molecule to move through the filament (PNAS 103, 10929 (2006)). The additional use of photoinduced control of single-molecule emission allows imaging beyond the diffraction limit (superresolution) by several novel approaches proposed by different researchers. For example, using photoswitchable EYFP, a novel protein superstructure can now be directly imaged in a living bacterial cell at

  19. Translating vibrational spectroscopy into clinical applications - vision or reality?

    PubMed

    Petrich, Wolfgang

    2016-06-23

    The Faraday Discussion meeting "Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy for Biomedical Applications" provided an excellent opportunity to share and discuss recent research and applications on a highly interdisciplinary level. Spectral pathology, single cell analysis, data handling, clinical spectroscopy, and the spectral analysis of biofluids were among the topics covered during the meeting. The focus on discussion rather than "merely" presentation was highly appreciated and fruitful discussions evolved around the interpretation of the amide-bands, optical resolution, the role of diffraction and data analysis procedure, to name a few. The meeting made clear that the spectroscopy of molecular vibrations in biomolecules has evolved from a purely academic research tool to a technology used in clinical practice in some cases. In this sense, biomedical vibrational spectroscopy has reached a pivotal point at which questions like diagnostic value, therapeutic consequence and financial viability are gaining more and more importance. PMID:27250100

  20. Placing Single-Molecule T4 Lysozyme Enzymes on a Bacterial Cell Surface: Toward Probing Single-Molecule Enzymatic Reaction in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-07-01

    TheT4 lysozyme enzymatic hydrolyzation reaction of bacterial cell walls is an important biological process, and single-molecule enzymatic reaction dynamics had been studied under physiological condition using purified E. Coli cell walls as substrates. Here, we report progress toward characterizing the T4 lysozyme enzymatic reaction on a living bacterial cell wall using a combined single-molecule placement and spectroscopy. Placing a dye-labeled single T4 lysozyme molecule on a targeted cell wall by using a hydrodynamic micro-injection approach, we monitored single-molecule rotational motions during binding, attachment to, and dissociation from the cell wall by tracing single-molecule fluorescence intensity time trajectories and polarization. The single-molecule attachment duration of the T4 lysozyme to the cell wall during enzymatic reactions was typically shorter than photobleaching time under physiological conditions.

  1. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  2. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Halogen Substituted Benzene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Y.; Rai, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    The absorption spectra of halogen substituted benzenes have been studied in its pure form in the 400-20000 cm-1 region. Large number of bands involving fundamental, C-H overtones and combination bands has been observed. Vibrational frequencies, anharmonicity constants and dissociation energies, for the C-H stretch vibrations have been determined using local mode model. The frequencies obtained are compared with the frequencies obtained theoretically using B3LYP/6-311G* method. Effect of hydrogen atom substitution by chlorine and bromine atoms has been studied by measuring changes in the vibrational frequency and bond length of the C-H bond. Frequency changes have been well correlated with the change in charge density on the carbon as well as chlorine atoms.

  3. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  4. Visualizing Cellular Machines with Colocalization Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Joshua D.; Rodgers, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the cell's macromolecular machines contain multiple components that transiently associate with one another. This compositional and dynamic complexity presents a challenge for understanding how these machines are constructed and function. Colocalization single molecule spectroscopy enables simultaneous observation of individual components of these machines in real-time and grants a unique window into processes that are typically obscured in ensemble assays. Colocalization experiments can yield valuable information about assembly pathways, compositional heterogeneity, and kinetics that together contribute to the development of richly detailed reaction mechanisms. This review focuses on recent advances in colocalization single molecule spectroscopy and how this technique has been applied to enhance our understanding of transcription, RNA splicing, and translation. PMID:23970346

  5. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  6. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of shock-compressed liquid CO

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.; Shaw, M.S.; Johnson, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Single-pulse, multiplex, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) was used to observe the vibrational spectra of liquid CO shock compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 9.9 GPa and 2010 K. The experimental spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and estimated vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities and Raman line widths. A comparison of these data with result in the isoelectronic and materially very similar N{sub 2} show a significant difference in vibrational frequency shift with pressure. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy used in milk products analysis: A review.

    PubMed

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Hoang, Vu Dang

    2016-04-01

    Milk is a fluid containing several substances, and its composition depends on several factors. Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine the constituent concentrations and qualitative characteristics of dairy products. Vibrational spectrometry covers a series of well-established analytical methodologies suitable to be employed for both qualitative and quantitative purposes. In the first part of this review, theoretical aspects on vibrational techniques are presented; in the second part, the most important papers, published during the period 2009-2015, related to milk analysis are discussed. PMID:26593568

  9. Identification of vibrational signatures from short chains of interlinked molecule-nanoparticle junctions obtained by inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafri, S. H. M.; Löfås, H.; Fransson, J.; Blom, T.; Grigoriev, A.; Wallner, A.; Ahuja, R.; Ottosson, H.; Leifer, K.

    2013-05-01

    Short chains containing a series of metal-molecule-nanoparticle nanojunctions are a nano-material system with the potential to give electrical signatures close to those from single molecule experiments while enabling us to build portable devices on a chip. Inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS) measurements provide one of the most characteristic electrical signals of single and few molecules. In interlinked molecule-nanoparticle (NP) chains containing typically 5-7 molecules in a chain, the spectrum is expected to be a superposition of the vibrational signatures of individual molecules. We have established a stable and reproducible molecule-AuNP multi-junction by placing a few 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT) molecules onto a versatile and portable nanoparticle-nanoelectrode platform and measured for the first time vibrational molecular signatures at complex and coupled few-molecule-NP junctions. From quantum transport calculations, we model the IETS spectra and identify vibrational modes as well as the number of molecules contributing to the electron transport in the measured spectra.Short chains containing a series of metal-molecule-nanoparticle nanojunctions are a nano-material system with the potential to give electrical signatures close to those from single molecule experiments while enabling us to build portable devices on a chip. Inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS) measurements provide one of the most characteristic electrical signals of single and few molecules. In interlinked molecule-nanoparticle (NP) chains containing typically 5-7 molecules in a chain, the spectrum is expected to be a superposition of the vibrational signatures of individual molecules. We have established a stable and reproducible molecule-AuNP multi-junction by placing a few 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT) molecules onto a versatile and portable nanoparticle-nanoelectrode platform and measured for the first time vibrational molecular signatures at complex and coupled few

  10. Surface vibrational spectroscopy of pure liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Du, Q.; Shen, Y.R.

    1991-03-01

    We report the use of infrared visible sum frequency generation (SFG) to obtain the surface vibrational spectra of pure liquid methanol and water. These are the first surface vibrational spectra ever obtained for pure liquids. We have also deduced from the SFG results the absolute orientations of molecules at the pure liquid/vapor interface. The surface methanol molecules appear to have their CH{sub 3} groups projecting out of the liquid in agreement with the theoretical prediction. For the orientation of surface water molecules, however, different calculations have yielded very different predictions. Our SFG measurement provides clear evidence that the molecules are oriented with an unbonded hydrogen projecting out of the liquid. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  12. Examining surface and bulk structures using combined nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Jie; Khmaladze, Alexander; Liu, Yuwei; Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2011-06-15

    We combined sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy in one system to examine both surface and bulk structures of materials with the same geometry and without the need to move the sample. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) thin films were tested before and after plasma treatment. The sensitivities of SFG and CARS were tested by varying polymer film thickness and using a lipid monolayer. PMID:21685990

  13. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  14. Sample preparation for single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allen, John R; Ross, Stephen T; Davidson, Michael W

    2013-11-21

    Single molecule localization-based optical nanoscopy was introduced in 2006, surpassing traditional diffraction-limited resolutions by an order of magnitude. Seven years later, this superresolution technique is continuing to follow a trend of increasing popularity and pervasiveness, with the proof-of-concept work long finished and commercial implementations now available. However one important aspect that tends to become lost in translation is the importance of proper sample preparation, with very few resources addressing the considerations that must be made when preparing samples for imaging with single molecule level sensitivity. Presented here is a an in-depth analysis of all aspects of sample preparation for single molecule superresolution, including both live and fixed cell preparation, choice of fluorophore, fixation and staining techniques, and imaging buffer considerations. PMID:24084850

  15. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-27

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies. PMID:27070321

  16. Protein folding at single-molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M.; Deniz, Ashok A.

    2011-01-01

    The protein folding reaction carries great significance for cellular function and hence continues to be the research focus of a large interdisciplinary protein science community. Single-molecule methods are providing new and powerful tools for dissecting the mechanisms of this complex process by virtue of their ability to provide views of protein structure and dynamics without associated ensemble averaging. This review briefly introduces common FRET and force methods, and then explores several areas of protein folding where single-molecule experiments have yielded insights. These include exciting new information about folding landscapes, dynamics, intermediates, unfolded ensembles, intrinsically disordered proteins, assisted folding and biomechanical unfolding. Emerging and future work is expected to include advances in single-molecule techniques aimed at such investigations, and increasing work on more complex systems from both the physics and biology standpoints, including folding and dynamics of systems of interacting proteins and of proteins in cells and organisms. PMID:21303706

  17. Single molecule nanometry for biological physics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurement is a hallmark of physics but the small length scale (~ nanometer) of elementary biological components and thermal fluctuations surrounding them challenge our ability to visualize their action. Here, we highlight the recent developments in single molecule nanometry where the position of a single fluorescent molecule can be determined with nanometer precision, reaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, and the relative motion between two molecules can be determined with ~ 0.3 nm precision at ~ 1 millisecond time resolution, and how these new tools are providing fundamental insights on how motor proteins move on cellular highways. We will also discuss how interactions between three and four fluorescent molecules can be used to measure three and six coordinates, respectively, allowing us to correlate movements of multiple components. Finally, we will discuss recent progress in combining angstrom precision optical tweezers with single molecule fluorescent detection, opening new windows for multi-dimensional single molecule nanometry for biological physics. PMID:23249673

  18. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  19. Spin Manipulation by Creation of Single-Molecule Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Sujoy; Li, Na; Zhang, Yajie; He, Yang; Hong, I.-Po; Song, Huanjun; Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Yongfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Wu, Kai; Michelitsch, Georg S.; Maurer, Reinhard J.; Diller, Katharina; Reuter, Karsten; Weismann, Alexander; Berndt, Richard

    2016-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ReA), a closed-shell organic molecule comprising only C, H, and O atoms, is investigated on a Au(111) substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. In dense arrays single ReA molecules are switched to a number of states, three of which carry a localized spin as evidenced by conductance spectroscopy in high magnetic fields. The spin of a single molecule may be reversibly switched on and off without affecting its neighbors. We suggest that ReA on Au is readily converted to a radical by the abstraction of an electron.

  20. Single Molecule Electron Transfer Process of Ruthenium Complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-03-01

    Transition metal complexes such as ruthenium complexes, having metal-to-ligand charge transfer states, are extensively used in solar energy conversion and electron transfer in biological systems and at interfaces. The dynamics of metal-to-ligand charge transfer and subsequent intermolecular, intramolecular, and interfacial electron transfer processes can be highly complex and inhomogeneous, especially when molecules are involved in interactions and perturbations from heterogeneous local environments and gated by conformation fluctuations. We have employed the single-molecule spectroscopy, a powerful approach for inhomogeneous systems to study the electron transfer dynamics of ruthenium complexes. We have applied a range of statistical analysis methods to reveal nonclassical photon emission behavior of the single ruthenium complex, i.e., photon antibunching, and photophysical ground-state recovering dynamics on a microsecond time scale. The use of photon antibunching to measure phosphorescence lifetimes and single-molecule electron transfer dynamics at room temperature is demonstrated.

  1. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation in highly vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Highly vibrationally excited molecules often control the course of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, combustion, plasmas, and many other environments. The research described in this Progress Report uses laser excitation and interrogation techniques to study and control the dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In particular, they show that it is possible to unravel the details and influence the course of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction. The experiments use laser excitation of overtone vibrations to prepare highly vibrationally excited molecules, frequently with single quantum state resolution, and laser spectroscopy to monitor the subsequent behavior of the excited molecule. We have studied the vibrationally mediated photodissociation and the bond- and state-selected bimolecular reaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In the first process, one photon creates a highly excited molecule, a second photon from another laser dissociates it, and light from a third laser detects the population of individual product quantum states. This approach allows us to explore otherwise inaccessible regions of the ground and excited state potential energy surface and, by exciting to the proper regions of the surface, to control the breaking of a selected chemical bond. In the second process, the highly vibrationally excited molecule reacts with an atom formed either in a microwave discharge or by photolysis and another laser interrogates the products. We have used this approach to demonstrate mode- and bond-selected bimolecular reactions in which the initial excitation controls the subsequent chemistry. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  2. COCIS: Markov processes in single molecule fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, David S.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the current status of Markov processes in single molecule fluorescence. For molecular dynamics to be described by a Markov process, the Markov process must include all states involved in the dynamics and the FPT distributions out of those states must be describable by a simple exponential law. The observation of non-exponential first-passage time distributions or other evidence of non-Markovian dynamics is common in single molecule studies and offers an opportunity to expand the Markov model to include new dynamics or states that improve understanding of the system. PMID:19543444

  3. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  4. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  5. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate themore » slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions« less

  6. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  7. Reversible gating of smart plasmonic molecular traps using thermoresponsive polymers for single-molecule detection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhui; Soeriyadi, Alexander H.; Rosa, Lorenzo; Ng, Soon Hock; Bach, Udo; Justin Gooding, J.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted increasing interest for chemical and biochemical sensing. Many conventional substrates have a broad distribution of SERS enhancements, which compromise reproducibility and result in slow response times for single-molecule detection. Here we report a smart plasmonic sensor that can reversibly trap a single molecule at hotspots for rapid single-molecule detection. The sensor was fabricated through electrostatic self-assembly of gold nanoparticles onto a gold/silica-coated silicon substrate, producing a high yield of uniformly distributed hotspots on the surface. The hotspots were isolated with a monolayer of a thermoresponsive polymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)), which act as gates for molecular trapping at the hotspots. The sensor shows not only a good SERS reproducibility but also a capability to repetitively trap and release molecules for single-molecular sensing. The single-molecule sensitivity is experimentally verified using SERS spectral blinking and bianalyte methods. PMID:26549539

  8. Reversible gating of smart plasmonic molecular traps using thermoresponsive polymers for single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanhui; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Rosa, Lorenzo; Ng, Soon Hock; Bach, Udo; Justin Gooding, J

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted increasing interest for chemical and biochemical sensing. Many conventional substrates have a broad distribution of SERS enhancements, which compromise reproducibility and result in slow response times for single-molecule detection. Here we report a smart plasmonic sensor that can reversibly trap a single molecule at hotspots for rapid single-molecule detection. The sensor was fabricated through electrostatic self-assembly of gold nanoparticles onto a gold/silica-coated silicon substrate, producing a high yield of uniformly distributed hotspots on the surface. The hotspots were isolated with a monolayer of a thermoresponsive polymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)), which act as gates for molecular trapping at the hotspots. The sensor shows not only a good SERS reproducibility but also a capability to repetitively trap and release molecules for single-molecular sensing. The single-molecule sensitivity is experimentally verified using SERS spectral blinking and bianalyte methods. PMID:26549539

  9. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  10. Single-Molecule Ion Channel Conformational Dynamics in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes regulate the function and dynamics of ion channels that are crucial for cell functions, neuronal signaling, and brain functions. Such complexity makes it difficult, if not impossible, to characterize ion channel dynamics using conventional electrical recording alone since that the measurement does not specifically interrogate the associated conformational changes but rather the consequences of the conformational changes. Recently, new technology developments on single-molecule spectroscopy, and especially, the combined approaches of using single ion channel patch-clamp electrical recording and single-molecule fluorescence imaging have provided us the capability of probing ion channel conformational changes simultaneously with the electrical single channel recording. By combining real-time single-molecule fluorescence imaging measurements with real-time single-channel electric current measurements in artificial lipid bilayers and in living cell membranes, we were able to probe single ion-channel-protein conformational changes simultaneously, and thus providing an understanding the dynamics and mechanism of ion-channel proteins at the molecular level. The function-regulating and site-specific conformational changes of ion channels are now measurable under physiological conditions in real-time, one molecule at a time. We will focus our discussion on the new development and results of real-time imaging of the dynamics of gramicidin, colicin, and NMDA receptor ion channels in lipid bilayers and living cells. Our results shed light on new perspectives of the intrinsic interplay of lipid membrane dynamics, solvation dynamics, and the ion channel functions.

  11. Vibration-rotation spectroscopy of molecules trapped inside C60.

    PubMed

    Cross, R James

    2008-08-01

    A simple model is developed to treat the energy levels and spectroscopy of diatomic molecules inside C 60. The C 60 cage is treated as spherically symmetric, and the coupling to the C 60 vibrations is ignored. The remaining six degrees of freedom correspond to the vibrations and rotations of the diatomic molecule and the rattling vibration of the molecule inside the cage. By using conservation of angular momentum, we can remove two of these motions and simplify the calculations. The resulting energy levels are simple and can be labeled by a set of quantum numbers. The IR and Raman spectra look like those of gas-phase diatomic molecules at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, hot bands due to the low-frequency rattling mode appear, and the spectrum becomes congested, looking like a solution spectrum. PMID:18598014

  12. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  13. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm(-1) wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm(-1), which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk. PMID:23563634

  14. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm-1 wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm-1, which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk.

  15. Do-it-yourself guide: How to use the modern single molecule toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nils G.; Huang, Cheng-Yen; Manzo, Anthony J.; Sobhy, Mohamed A.

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy has evolved into the ultimate-sensitivity toolkit to study systems from small molecules to living cells, with the prospect of revolutionizing the modern biosciences. Here we survey the current state-of-the-art in single molecule tools including fluorescence spectroscopy, tethered particle microscopy, optical and magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy. Our review seeks to guide the biological scientist in choosing the right approach from the available single molecule toolkit for applications ranging as far as structural biology, enzymology, nanotechnology, and systems biology. PMID:18511916

  16. Identification of vibrational signatures from short chains of interlinked molecule-nanoparticle junctions obtained by inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jafri, S H M; Löfås, H; Fransson, J; Blom, T; Grigoriev, A; Wallner, A; Ahuja, R; Ottosson, H; Leifer, K

    2013-06-01

    Short chains containing a series of metal-molecule-nanoparticle nanojunctions are a nano-material system with the potential to give electrical signatures close to those from single molecule experiments while enabling us to build portable devices on a chip. Inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS) measurements provide one of the most characteristic electrical signals of single and few molecules. In interlinked molecule-nanoparticle (NP) chains containing typically 5-7 molecules in a chain, the spectrum is expected to be a superposition of the vibrational signatures of individual molecules. We have established a stable and reproducible molecule-AuNP multi-junction by placing a few 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT) molecules onto a versatile and portable nanoparticle-nanoelectrode platform and measured for the first time vibrational molecular signatures at complex and coupled few-molecule-NP junctions. From quantum transport calculations, we model the IETS spectra and identify vibrational modes as well as the number of molecules contributing to the electron transport in the measured spectra. PMID:23619506

  17. Spin coherence in a Mn3 single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywardana, Chathuranga; Mowson, Andrew M.; Christou, George; Takahashi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Spin coherence in single crystals of the spin S = 6 single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Mn3O(O2CEt)3(mpko)3]+ (abbreviated Mn3) has been investigated using 230 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Coherence in Mn3 was uncovered by significantly suppressing dipolar contribution to the decoherence with complete spin polarization of Mn3 SMMs. The temperature dependence of spin decoherence time (T2) revealed that the dipolar decoherence is the dominant source of decoherence in Mn3 and T2 can be extended up to 267 ns by quenching the dipolar decoherence.

  18. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong σ conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene σ bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  19. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  20. Artifacts in single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burgert, Anne; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy provides subdiffraction resolution images with virtually molecular resolution. Through the availability of commercial instruments and open-source reconstruction software, achieving super resolution is now public domain. However, despite its conceptual simplicity, localization microscopy remains prone to user errors. Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we investigate the impact of irradiation intensity, label density and photoswitching behavior on the distribution of membrane proteins in reconstructed super-resolution images. We demonstrate that high emitter densities in combination with inappropriate photoswitching rates give rise to the appearance of artificial membrane clusters. Especially, two-dimensional imaging of intrinsically three-dimensional membrane structures like microvilli, filopodia, overlapping membranes and vesicles with high local emitter densities is prone to generate artifacts. To judge the quality and reliability of super-resolution images, the single-molecule movies recorded to reconstruct the images have to be carefully investigated especially when investigating membrane organization and cluster analysis. PMID:26138928

  1. Single-Molecule Analysis of Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    Biomembranes are more than just a cell's envelope - as the interface to the surrounding of a cell they carry key signalling functions. Consequentially, membranes are highly complex organelles: they host about thousand different types of lipids and about half of the proteome, whose interaction has to be orchestrated appropriately for the various signalling purposes. In particular, knowledge on the nanoscopic organization of the plasma membrane appears critical for understanding the regulation of interactions between membrane proteins. The high localization precision of ˜20 nm combined with a high time resolution of ˜1 ms made single molecule tracking an excellent technology to obtain insights into membrane nanostructures, even in a live cell context. In this chapter, we will highlight concepts to achieve superresolution by single molecule imaging, summarize tools for data analysis, and review applications on artificial and live cell membranes.

  2. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research. PMID:17115774

  3. Single-molecule Studies of Riboswitch Folding

    PubMed Central

    Savinov, Andrew; Perez, Christian F.; Block, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The folding dynamics of riboswitches are central to their ability to modulate gene expression in response to environmental cues. In most cases, a structural competition between the formation of a ligand-binding aptamer and an expression platform (or some other competing off-state) determines the regulatory outcome. Here, we review single-molecule studies of riboswitch folding and function, predominantly carried out using single-molecule FRET or optical trapping approaches. Recent results have supplied new insights into riboswitch folding energy landscapes, the mechanisms of ligand binding, the roles played by divalent ions, the applicability of hierarchical folding models, and kinetic vs. thermodynamic control schemes. We anticipate that future work, based on improved data sets and potentially combining multiple experimental techniques, will enable the development of more complete models for complex RNA folding processes. PMID:24727093

  4. Superresolution Imaging using Single-Molecule Localization

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, George; Davidson, Michael; Manley, Suliana; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Superresolution imaging is a rapidly emerging new field of microscopy that dramatically improves the spatial resolution of light microscopy by over an order of magnitude (∼10–20-nm resolution), allowing biological processes to be described at the molecular scale. Here, we discuss a form of superresolution microscopy based on the controlled activation and sampling of sparse subsets of photoconvertible fluorescent molecules. In this single-molecule based imaging approach, a wide variety of probes have proved valuable, ranging from genetically encodable photoactivatable fluorescent proteins to photoswitchable cyanine dyes. These have been used in diverse applications of superresolution imaging: from three-dimensional, multicolor molecule localization to tracking of nanometric structures and molecules in living cells. Single-molecule-based superresolution imaging thus offers exciting possibilities for obtaining molecular-scale information on biological events occurring at variable timescales. PMID:20055680

  5. An atomic spectrum recorded with a single-molecule light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Wilhelm; Rezai, Mohammad; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2016-02-01

    A single molecule under cryogenic conditions allows one to realize an extremely bright and simultaneously narrow-band single-photon source. We present a review on the different excitation schemes of a single molecule and present the corresponding single-photon nature of the emitted light. Single-molecule spectroscopy has been recently interlinked with atomic spectroscopy. This optical interconnect among the different quantum systems might be enhanced by a so-called Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter—an ideal tool for many experiments in quantum optics. We introduce our theoretical and experimental approach on these filters which are based on hot atomic sodium vapor. The electrical tunability together with the brightness of a single molecule allows us to record a full atomic spectrum of this filter with the single photons originating from a single-molecular emitter.

  6. Single Molecule Dynamics of Branched DNA Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Sing, Charles; Schroeder, Charles

    This work focuses on extending the field of single polymer dynamics to topologically complex polymers. Here, we report the direct observation of DNA-based branched polymers. Recently, we recently demonstrated a two-step synthesis method to generate star, H-shaped, and comb polymers for single molecule visualization. Following synthesis, we use single-color or dual-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize branched polymer dynamics in flow, in particular tracking side branches and backbones independently. In this way, our imaging method allows for characterization of molecular properties, including quantification of polymer contour length and branch distributions. Moving beyond characterization, we use molecular rheology and single molecule techniques to study the dynamics of single branched polymers in flow. Here, we utilize precision microfluidics to directly observe branched DNA polymer conformations during transient stretching, steady-state extension, and relaxation from high stretch. We specifically measure backbone end-to-end distance as a function of time. Experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations show that branched polymer relaxation is a strong function of the number of branches and position of branch points along the main chain backbone.

  7. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  8. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  9. Protein mechanics: from single molecules to functional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Cao, Yi

    2010-10-19

    Elastomeric proteins act as the essential functional units in a wide variety of biomechanical machinery and serve as the basic building blocks for biological materials that exhibit superb mechanical properties. These proteins provide the desired elasticity, mechanical strength, resilience, and toughness within these materials. Understanding the mechanical properties of elastomeric protein-based biomaterials is a multiscale problem spanning from the atomistic/molecular level to the macroscopic level. Uncovering the design principles of individual elastomeric building blocks is critical both for the scientific understanding of multiscale mechanics of biomaterials and for the rational engineering of novel biomaterials with desirable mechanical properties. The development of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques has provided methods for characterizing mechanical properties of elastomeric proteins one molecule at a time. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) is uniquely suited to this purpose. Molecular dynamic simulations, protein engineering techniques, and single-molecule AFM study have collectively revealed tremendous insights into the molecular design of single elastomeric proteins, which can guide the design and engineering of elastomeric proteins with tailored mechanical properties. Researchers are focusing experimental efforts toward engineering artificial elastomeric proteins with mechanical properties that mimic or even surpass those of natural elastomeric proteins. In this Account, we summarize our recent experimental efforts to engineer novel artificial elastomeric proteins and develop general and rational methodologies to tune the nanomechanical properties of elastomeric proteins at the single-molecule level. We focus on general design principles used for enhancing the mechanical stability of proteins. These principles include the development of metal-chelation-based general methodology, strategies to control the unfolding hierarchy of

  10. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Boujday, Souhir; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Srajer, Johannes; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small) molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR), (phase-modulated) InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS), and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS). Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes. PMID:26343666

  11. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Boujday, Souhir; de la Chapelle, Marc Lamy; Srajer, Johannes; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small) molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR), (phase-modulated) InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS), and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS). Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes. PMID:26343666

  12. Simulated single molecule microscopy with SMeagol

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Ćurić, Vladimir; Boucharin, Alexis; Fange, David; Elf, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Summary: SMeagol is a software tool to simulate highly realistic microscopy data based on spatial systems biology models, in order to facilitate development, validation and optimization of advanced analysis methods for live cell single molecule microscopy data. Availability and implementation: SMeagol runs on Matlab R2014 and later, and uses compiled binaries in C for reaction–diffusion simulations. Documentation, source code and binaries for Mac OS, Windows and Ubuntu Linux can be downloaded from http://smeagol.sourceforge.net. Contact: johan.elf@icm.uu.se Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153711

  13. Single-molecule electrophoresis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1996-05-22

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer-simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required by individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed beforehand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method, and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented.

  14. Charge Transport in Azobenzene-Based Single-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Kim, Youngsang; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Frederiksen, Thomas; Groth, Ulrich; Scheer, Elke

    2013-03-01

    The azobenzene class of molecules has become an archetype of molecular photoswitch research, due to their simple structure and the significant difference of the electronic system between their cis and trans isomers. However, a detailed understanding of the charge transport for the two isomers, when embedded in a junction with electrodes is still lacking. In order to clarify this issue, we investigate charge transport properties through single Azobenzene-ThioMethyl (AzoTM) molecules in a mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) system at 4.2 K. Single-molecule conductance, I-V characteristics, and IETS spectra of molecular junctions are measured and compared with first-principles transport calculations. Our studies elucidate the origin of a slightly higher conductance of junctions with cis isomer and demonstrate that IETS spectra of cis and trans forms show distinct vibrational fingerprints that can be used for identifying the isomer.

  15. Computational Vibrational Spectroscopy of HDO in Osmolyte-Water Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hochan; Choi, Jun-Ho; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-07-28

    The IR absorption and time-resolved IR spectroscopy of the OD stretch mode of HDO in water was successfully used to study osmolyte effects on water H-bonding network. Protecting osmolytes such as sorbitol and trimethylglycine (TMG) make the vibrational OD stretch band red-shifted, whereas urea affects the OD band marginally. Furthermore, we recently showed that, even though sorbitol and TMG cause a slow-down of HDO rotation in their aqueous solutions, urea does not induce any change in the rotational relaxation of HDO in aqueous urea solutions even at high concentrations. To clarify the underlying osmolyte effects on water H-bonding structure and dynamics, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a variety of aqueous osmolyte solutions. Using the vibrational solvatochromism model for the OD stretch mode and taking into account the vibrational non-Condon and polarization effects on the OD transition dipole moment, we then calculated the IR absorption spectra and rotational anisotropy decay of the OD stretch mode of HDO for the sake of direct comparisons with our experimental results. The simulation results on the OD stretch IR absorption spectra and the rotational relaxation rate of HDO in osmolyte solutions are found to be in quantitative agreement with experimental data, which confirms the validity of the MD simulation and vibrational solvatochromism approaches. As a result, it becomes clear that the protecting osmolytes like sorbitol and TMG significantly modulate water H-bonding network structure, while urea perturbs water structure little. We anticipate that the computational approach discussed here will serve as an interpretive method with atomic-level chemical accuracy of current linear and nonlinear time-resolved IR spectroscopy of structure and dynamics of water near the surfaces of membranes and proteins under crowded environments. PMID:27341918

  16. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  17. Single-molecule studies of collagen mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Kirkness, Michael

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Its triple helical structure at the molecular level is believed to be strongly related to its mechanical role in connective tissues. However, the mechanics of collagen at the single-molecule level remain contentious. Estimates of its persistence length span an order of magnitude, from 15-180 nm for this biopolymer of 300 nm contour length. How collagen responds to applied force is also controversial, with different single-molecule studies suggesting one of three different responses: extending entropically, overwinding, or unwinding, all at forces below 10 pN. Using atomic force microscopy to image collagens deposited from solution, we find that their flexibility depends strongly on ionic strength and pH. To study force-dependent structural changes, we are performing highly parallelized enzymatic cleavage assays of triple helical collagen in our new compact centrifuge force microscope. Because proteolytic cleavage requires a locally unwound triple helix, these experiments are revealing how local collagen structure changes in response to applied force. Our results can help to resolve long-standing debates about collagen mechanics and structure at the molecular level.

  18. Single molecule dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaug, Michael James

    Lipid membranes are self-assembled molecular materials that form the membranes of cells. Because of their biological function, lipid membranes are important from a biomedical and biotechnological standpoint. Because of their complex fluid properties, they also provide a rich testbed for studying the structure and dynamics in self-assembled materials and for developing other bio-mimetic structures. In this work, we studied the dynamics of single lipid molecules using experimental and computational techniques. Using single molecule fluorescence microscopy, we tracked the diffusive motion of lipids in phase separated lipid membranes. With the additional techniques of atomic force microscopy and Monte Carlo simulation, we were able to, for the first time experimentally, directly correlate the observed obstructed diffusion with lipid membrane organization. The single molecule tracking tracking experiments required the addition of impurity fluorescent molecules and the assumption that the impurities do not alter the dynamics of the system. To test this assumption, we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of a fluorescently labeled lipid in a lipid membrane. We showed that the fluorescent impurity could have a significant impact on some membrane properties, such as phase behavior, but that relative changes in diffusive behavior are unaffected.

  19. Single Molecule and Single Cell Epigenomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; McElwee, John L.; Soloway, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamically regulated changes in chromatin states are vital for normal development and can produce disease when they go awry. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted to characterizing these states under normal and pathological conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method to characterize where in the genome transcription factors, modified histones, modified nucleotides and chromatin binding proteins are found; bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) and its variants are commonly used to characterize the locations of DNA modifications. Though very powerful, these methods are not without limitations. Notably, they are best at characterizing one chromatin feature at a time, yet chromatin features arise and function in combination. Investigators commonly superimpose separate ChIP-seq or BS-seq datasets, and then infer where chromatin features are found together. While these inferences might be correct, they can be misleading when the chromatin source has distinct cell types, or when a given cell type exhibits any cell to cell variation in chromatin state. These ambiguities can be eliminated by robust methods that directly characterize the existence and genomic locations of combinations of chromatin features in very small inputs of cells or ideally, single cells. Here we review single molecule epigenomic methods under development to overcome these limitations, the technical challenges associated with single molecule methods and their potential application to single cells. PMID:25204781

  20. PREFACE: Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM) is dedicated to Professor Stuart M Lindsay on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in recognition of his outstanding contributions to multiple research areas, including light scattering spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, biophysics, solid-liquid interfaces and molecular and nanoelectronics. It contains a collection of 14 papers in some of these areas, including a feature article by Lindsay. Each paper was subject to the normal rigorous review process of JPCM. In Lindsay's paper, he discusses the next generations of hybrid chemical-CMOS devices for low cost and personalized medical diagnosis. The discussion leads to several papers on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. Kawaguchi et al report on the detection of single pollen allergen particles using electrode embedded microchannels. Stern et al describe a structural study of three-dimensional DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. Hihath et al measure the conductance of methylated DNA, and discuss the possibility of electrical detection DNA methylation. Portillo et al study the electrostatic effects on the aggregation of prion proteins and peptides with atomic force microscopy. In an effort to understand the interactions between nanostructures and cells, Lamprecht et al report on the mapping of the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes with a confocal Raman imaging technique, and Wang et al focus on the intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles using fluorescence microscopy. Park and Kristic provide theoretical analysis of micro- and nano-traps and their biological applications. This section also features several papers on the fundamentals of electron transport in single atomic wires and molecular junctions. The papers by Xu et al and by Wandlowksi et al describe new methods to measure conductance and forces in single molecule junctions and metallic atomic wires. Scullion et al report on the conductance of molecules with similar

  1. Accurate single-molecule FRET studies using multiparameter fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sisamakis, Evangelos; Valeri, Alessandro; Kalinin, Stanislav; Rothwell, Paul J; Seidel, Claus A M

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decade, single-molecule (sm) spectroscopy has come of age and is providing important insight into how biological molecules function. So far our view of protein function is formed, to a significant extent, by traditional structure determination showing many beautiful static protein structures. Recent experiments by single-molecule and other techniques have questioned the idea that proteins and other biomolecules are static structures. In particular, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies of single molecules have shown that biomolecules may adopt many conformations as they perform their function. Despite the success of sm-studies, interpretation of smFRET data are challenging since they can be complicated due to many artifacts arising from the complex photophysical behavior of fluorophores, dynamics, and motion of fluorophores, as well as from small amounts of contaminants. We demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of a maximum of fluorescence parameters by multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) allows for a robust assessment of all possible artifacts arising from smFRET and offers unsurpassed capabilities regarding the identification and analysis of individual species present in a population of molecules. After a short introduction, the data analysis procedure is described in detail together with some experimental considerations. The merits of MFD are highlighted further with the presentation of some applications to proteins and nucleic acids, including accurate structure determination based on FRET. A toolbox is introduced in order to demonstrate how complications originating from orientation, mobility, and position of fluorophores have to be taken into account when determining FRET-related distances with high accuracy. Furthermore, the broad time resolution (picoseconds to hours) of MFD allows for kinetic studies that resolve interconversion events between various subpopulations as a biomolecule of interest explores its

  2. Magnetostructural correlations in Tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Gregoli, Luisa; Danieli, Chiara; Barra, Anne-Laure; Neugebauer, Petr; Pellegrino, Giovanna; Poneti, Giordano; Sessoli, Roberta; Cornia, Andrea

    2009-06-22

    Tunable single-molecule magnets: The spin-level landscape in a series of Fe(III) (4) single-molecule magnets with propeller-like structure was analyzed by means of high-frequency EPR spectroscopy. The zero-field splitting parameter D of the ground S=5 spin state correlates strongly with the pitch of the propeller gamma (see picture), and thus provides a simple link between molecular structure and magnetic behavior.We report three novel tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnets with formula [Fe(4)(L)(2)(dpm)(6)] (Hdpm=2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dione), prepared by using pentaerythritol monoether ligands H(3)L=R'OCH(2)C(CH(2)OH)(3) with R'=allyl (1), (R,S)-2-methyl-1-butyl (2), and (S)-2-methyl-1-butyl (3), along with a new crystal phase of the complex containing H(3)L=11-(acetylthio)-2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)- undecan-1-ol (4). High-frequency EPR (HF-EPR) spectra at low temperature were collected on powder samples in order to determine the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters in the ground S=5 spin state. In 1-4 and in other eight isostructural compounds previously reported, a remarkable correlation is found between the axial zfs parameter D and the pitch gamma of the propeller-like structure. The relationship is directly demonstrated by 1, which features both structurally and magnetically inequivalent molecules in the crystal. The dynamics of magnetization has been investigated by ac susceptometry, and the results analyzed by master-matrix calculations. The large rhombicities of 2 and 3 were found to be responsible for the fast magnetic relaxation observed in the two compounds. However, complex 3 shows an additional faster relaxation mechanism which is unaccounted for by the set of spin Hamiltonian parameters determined by HF-EPR. PMID:19462389

  3. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy of HD{sup +} with 2-ppb Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Roth, B.; Wicht, A.; Ernsting, I.; Schiller, S.

    2007-04-27

    By measurement of the frequency of a vibrational overtone transition in the molecular hydrogen ion HD{sup +}, we demonstrate the first optical spectroscopy of trapped molecular ions with submegahertz accuracy. We use a diode laser, locked to a stable frequency comb, to perform resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy on sympathetically cooled HD{sup +} ions at 50 mK. The achieved 2-ppb relative accuracy is a factor of 150 higher than previous results for HD{sup +}, and the measured transition frequency agrees well with recent high-accuracy ab initio calculations, which include high-order quantum electrodynamic effects. We also show that our method bears potential for achieving considerably higher accuracy and may, if combined with slightly improved theoretical calculations, lead to a new and improved determination of the electron-proton mass ratio.

  5. PREFACE: Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM) is dedicated to Professor Stuart M Lindsay on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in recognition of his outstanding contributions to multiple research areas, including light scattering spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, biophysics, solid-liquid interfaces and molecular and nanoelectronics. It contains a collection of 14 papers in some of these areas, including a feature article by Lindsay. Each paper was subject to the normal rigorous review process of JPCM. In Lindsay's paper, he discusses the next generations of hybrid chemical-CMOS devices for low cost and personalized medical diagnosis. The discussion leads to several papers on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. Kawaguchi et al report on the detection of single pollen allergen particles using electrode embedded microchannels. Stern et al describe a structural study of three-dimensional DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. Hihath et al measure the conductance of methylated DNA, and discuss the possibility of electrical detection DNA methylation. Portillo et al study the electrostatic effects on the aggregation of prion proteins and peptides with atomic force microscopy. In an effort to understand the interactions between nanostructures and cells, Lamprecht et al report on the mapping of the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes with a confocal Raman imaging technique, and Wang et al focus on the intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles using fluorescence microscopy. Park and Kristic provide theoretical analysis of micro- and nano-traps and their biological applications. This section also features several papers on the fundamentals of electron transport in single atomic wires and molecular junctions. The papers by Xu et al and by Wandlowksi et al describe new methods to measure conductance and forces in single molecule junctions and metallic atomic wires. Scullion et al report on the conductance of molecules with similar

  6. Single Molecule Mechanical Probing of the SNARE Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W.; Montana, Vedrana; Bai, Jihong; Chapman, Edwin R.; Mohideen, U.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Exocytotic release of neurotransmitters is mediated by the ternary soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) complex, comprised of syntaxin (Sx), synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25), and synaptobrevin 2 (Sb2). Since exocytosis involves the nonequilibrium process of association and dissociation of bonds between molecules of the SNARE complex, dynamic measurements at the single molecule level are necessary for a detailed understanding of these interactions. To address this issue, we used the atomic force microscope in force spectroscopy mode to show from single molecule investigations of the SNARE complex, that Sx1A and Sb2 are zippered throughout their entire SNARE domains without the involvement of SNAP25. When SNAP25B is present in the complex, it creates a local interaction at the 0 (ionic) layer by cuffing Sx1A and Sb2. Force loading rate studies indicate that the ternary complex interaction is more stable than the Sx1A-Sb2 interaction. PMID:16648158

  7. Surface Passivation for Single-molecule Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chandradoss, Stanley D.; Haagsma, Anna C.; Lee, Young Kwang; Hwang, Jae-Ho; Nam, Jwa-Min; Joo, Chirlmin

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be instrumental in understanding a wide range of biological phenomena at the nanoscale. Important examples of what this technique can yield to biological sciences are the mechanistic insights on protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. When interactions of proteins are probed at the single-molecule level, the proteins or their substrates are often immobilized on a glass surface, which allows for a long-term observation. This immobilization scheme may introduce unwanted surface artifacts. Therefore, it is essential to passivate the glass surface to make it inert. Surface coating using polyethylene glycol (PEG) stands out for its high performance in preventing proteins from non-specifically interacting with a glass surface. However, the polymer coating procedure is difficult, due to the complication arising from a series of surface treatments and the stringent requirement that a surface needs to be free of any fluorescent molecules at the end of the procedure. Here, we provide a robust protocol with step-by-step instructions. It covers surface cleaning including piranha etching, surface functionalization with amine groups, and finally PEG coating. To obtain a high density of a PEG layer, we introduce a new strategy of treating the surface with PEG molecules over two rounds, which remarkably improves the quality of passivation. We provide representative results as well as practical advice for each critical step so that anyone can achieve the high quality surface passivation. PMID:24797261

  8. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  9. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  10. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  11. Single-Molecule Observations of Ribosome Function

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Single-molecule investigations promise to greatly advance our understanding of basic and regulated ribosome functions during the process of translation. Here, recent progress towards directly imaging the elemental translation elongation steps using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based imaging methods is discussed, which provide striking evidence of the highly dynamic nature of the ribosome. In this view, global rates and fidelities of protein synthesis reactions may be regulated by interactions of the ribosome with mRNA, tRNA, translation factors, and potentially many other cellular ligands, that modify intrinsic conformational equilibria in the translating particle. Future investigations probing this model must aim to visualize translation processes from multiple structural and kinetic perspectives simultaneously, to provide direct correlations between factor binding and conformational events. PMID:19223173

  12. Single-Molecule Solvation-Shell Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, E.; Höbenreich, H.; Higgins, S. J.; van Zalinge, H.; Haiss, W.; Nichols, R. J.; Finch, C. M.; Grace, I.; Lambert, C. J.; McGrath, R.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new route to single-molecule sensing via solvation shells surrounding a current-carrying backbone molecule. As an example, we show that the presence of a water solvation shell “gates” the conductance of a family of oligothiophene-containing molecular wires, and that the longer the oligothiophene, the larger is the effect. For the longest example studied, the molecular conductance is over 2 orders of magnitude larger in the presence of a shell comprising just 10 water molecules. A first principles theoretical investigation of electron transport through the molecules, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, shows that water molecules interact directly with the thiophene rings, significantly shifting transport resonances and greatly increasing the conductance. This reversible effect is confirmed experimentally through conductance measurements performed in the presence of moist air and dry argon.

  13. A 3-terminal single molecule nanoscale amperometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hliwa, M.; Ami, S.; Joachim, C.

    2006-07-01

    A 3-terminal single molecule transducer is presented which is able to measure tunnel current intensities. The conformation of a pyrene-phenyl molecule is changed under an intramolecular inelastic current effect. This conformation change is detected by a third lateral electrode interacting also with the molecule. The full multi-channel electronic scattering matrix of the device is calculated taking into account the chemisorption of the molecule at one end and the details mechanics of the conformation change of this molecule. A semi-classical model is used to describe the intramolecular transduction effect between the electrons transferred through the molecule and its conformation change. It results a linear transduction curve between the input and the detection currents of the device for a range of tunnel current of interest for mono-molecular electronics.

  14. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy of N‧-(Adamantan-2-ylidene)thiophene-2-carbohydrazide, a potential antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, Lev L.; Gaponenko, Sergey V.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, Elena V.; Shimko, Anna N.; Al-Abdullah, Ebtehal S.; El-Emam, Ali A.

    2014-07-01

    Vibrational states of the newly synthesized molecule N‧-(Adamantan-2-ylidene)thiophene-2-carbohydrazide, a potential antibacterial agent, are examined experimentally for the crystalline phase and analyzed based on quantum chemical modelling of the solitary molecule and of the dimer, and assignment of the observed vibrational frequencies is proposed. Modelling of the title molecule dimer is found to describe better the experimentally observed vibration frequencies for the crystalline phase than calculations performed for a solitary molecule. Contributions from adamantane and thiophene parts within the molecule are identified. Additionally, multiple hydrogen bonds have been revealed both experimentally and computationally, inherent in the crystalline phase contrary to a solitary molecule. The spectroscopic findings correlate with the calculated interatomic distances which were found to change in the dimer versus a single molecule and to correspond better to the X-ray analysis data of the title compound in the crystalline phase.

  16. Vibrational Assignments of Six-Coordinate Ferrous Heme Nitrosyls: New Insight From Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paulat, F.; Berto, T.C.; George, S.DeBeer; Goodrich, L.; Praneeth, V.K.K.; Sulok, C.D.; Lehnert, N.

    2009-05-21

    This Communication addresses a long-standing problem: the exact vibrational assignments of the low-energy modes of the Fe-N-O subunit in six-coordinate ferrous heme nitrosyl model complexes. This problem is addressed using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) coupled to {sup 15}N{sup 18}O isotope labeling and detailed simulations of the obtained data. Two isotope-sensitive features are identified at 437 and 563 cm{sup -1}. Normal coordinate analysis shows that the 437 cm{sup -1} mode corresponds to the Fe-NO stretch, whereas the 563 cm{sup -1} band is identified with the Fe-N-O bend. The relative NRVS intensities of these features determine the degree of vibrational mixing between the stretch and the bend. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the trans effect of imidazole on the bound NO. In addition, a comparison to myoglobin-NO (Mb-NO) is made to determine the effect of the Mb active site pocket on the bound NO.

  17. n and p type character of single molecule diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoldan, Vinícius Claudio; Faccio, Ricardo; Pasa, André Avelino

    2015-02-01

    Looking for single molecule electronic devices, we have investigated the charge transport properties of individual tetra-phenylporphyrin molecules on different substrates by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and by first-principles calculations. The tetra-phenylporphyrins with a Co atom (Co-TPP) or 2 hydrogens (H2-TPP) in the central macrocycle when deposited on Cu3Au(100) substrates showed a diode-like behavior with p and n type character, respectively. After removing the central hydrogens of H2-TPP molecule with the STM tip an ohmic behavior was measured. The rectifying effect was understood from the theoretical point of view by assuming for Co-TPP HOMO conduction and for H2-TPP LUMO conduction, both selectively elected by the hybridization of states between molecule and substrate surface.

  18. n and p type character of single molecule diodes.

    PubMed

    Zoldan, Vinícius Claudio; Faccio, Ricardo; Pasa, André Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Looking for single molecule electronic devices, we have investigated the charge transport properties of individual tetra-phenylporphyrin molecules on different substrates by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and by first-principles calculations. The tetra-phenylporphyrins with a Co atom (Co-TPP) or 2 hydrogens (H2-TPP) in the central macrocycle when deposited on Cu3Au(100) substrates showed a diode-like behavior with p and n type character, respectively. After removing the central hydrogens of H2-TPP molecule with the STM tip an ohmic behavior was measured. The rectifying effect was understood from the theoretical point of view by assuming for Co-TPP HOMO conduction and for H2-TPP LUMO conduction, both selectively elected by the hybridization of states between molecule and substrate surface. PMID:25666850

  19. n and p type character of single molecule diodes

    PubMed Central

    Zoldan, Vinícius Claudio; Faccio, Ricardo; Pasa, André Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Looking for single molecule electronic devices, we have investigated the charge transport properties of individual tetra-phenylporphyrin molecules on different substrates by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and by first-principles calculations. The tetra-phenylporphyrins with a Co atom (Co-TPP) or 2 hydrogens (H2-TPP) in the central macrocycle when deposited on Cu3Au(100) substrates showed a diode-like behavior with p and n type character, respectively. After removing the central hydrogens of H2-TPP molecule with the STM tip an ohmic behavior was measured. The rectifying effect was understood from the theoretical point of view by assuming for Co-TPP HOMO conduction and for H2-TPP LUMO conduction, both selectively elected by the hybridization of states between molecule and substrate surface. PMID:25666850

  20. Single-molecule paleoenzymology probes the chemistry of resurrected enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Inglés-Prieto, Alvaro; Zhao, Zi-Ming; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Kosuri, Pallav; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Kappock, T. Joseph; Tanokura, Masaru; Holmgren, Arne; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2011-01-01

    A journey back in time is possible at the molecular level by reconstructing proteins from extinct organisms. Here we report the reconstruction, based on sequence predicted by phylogenetic analysis, of seven Precambrian thioredoxin enzymes (Trx), dating back between ~1.4 and ~4 billion years (Gyr). The reconstructed enzymes are up to 32° C more stable than modern enzymes and the oldest show significantly higher activity than extant ones at pH 5. We probed their mechanisms of reduction using single-molecule force spectroscopy. From the force-dependency of the rate of reduction of an engineered substrate, we conclude that ancient Trxs utilize chemical mechanisms of reduction similar to those of modern enzymes. While Trx enzymes have maintained their reductase chemistry unchanged, they have adapted over a 4 Gyr time span to the changes in temperature and ocean acidity that characterize the evolution of the global environment from ancient to modern Earth. PMID:21460845

  1. Single-molecule redox blinking of perylene diimide derivatives in water.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Thorben; Vogelsang, Jan; Anaya, Milena; Spagnuolo, Carla; Gietl, Andreas; Summerer, Wolfram; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-02-24

    Dynamic developments in ultrasensitive and superresolution fluorescence microscopy call for improved fluorescence markers with increased photostability and new functionalities. We used single-molecule spectroscopy to study water-soluble perylene dicarboximide fluorophores (PDI), which were immobilized in aqueous buffer by attaching the fluorophore to DNA. Under these conditions bright fluorescence, comparable to that of single-molecule compatible organic fluorophores, is observed with homogeneous spectral and fluorescence decay time distributions. We additionally show how the fluorescence of the PDI can be controlled through photoinduced electron-transfer reactions by using different concentrations of reductants and oxidants, yielding either blinking or stable emission. We explain these properties by the redox potentials of PDI and the recently introduced ROXS (reducing and oxidizing system) concept. Finally, we evaluate how this fluorescence control of PDIs can be used for superresolution "Blink-Microscopy" in aqueous or organic media and more generally for single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:20121094

  2. Single molecule dissociation by tunneling electrons in NO-Co-Porphyrin complex on Au(111): A novel mechanics revealed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and first-principles thermodynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yunhee; Kim, Howon; Lee, Eui-Sup; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2015-03-01

    To microscopically understand the mechanisms of electron-induced NO dissociations, we performed first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for NO-CoTPP on Au(111). We explain the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) results that the dissociations of NO were induced by both positive and negative voltage pulses with threshold voltages, +0.68 V and 0.74 V, respectively, at 0.1 nA tunneling current, showing power law relations between tunneling current and dissociation yield. To evaluate first-principles thermodynamics of the NO dissociation, we considered not only adsorption-desorption energetics, zero-point energy, and vibrational free energy at experiment temperature from first-principles, but also the chemical potential of NO gas at the cryogenic ultra-high vacuum condition. Using first-principles thermodynamics for the NO dissociation, we argue that the dissociations are induced with inelastic electron tunneling through molecular orbital resonances.

  3. Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of - CH Activation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    Despite the rather simple composition of alkanes the strength of their C-C and C-H bonds has made controlled, selective reaction of these compounds an unrealized goal of synthetic chemistry. The field was pioneered by Shilov and coworkers in 1969 when they observed the exchange of H and D in methane that was bubbled into an acidic solution of K_2PtCl_4. The Shilov reaction has since been extended to induce oxidation of methane selectively to methanol and has become the standard bearer of CH activation despite its limitations. The mechanism for the reaction, while inferred from kinetics studies, is still largely uncharacterized. Here, we present our work towards applying cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) to capture the intermediate species of this reaction with a focus on the σ-CH adduct formed between methane and Pt(II) complexes that is believed to be crucial to the selectivity and rate of this reaction.

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Sympathetically Cooled CaH^+ Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Goeders, James E.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2013-06-01

    The search for time variation in the fundamental constants of nature such as the fine structure constant(α) and the proton/electron mass ratio(μ), is an area of active research. Comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms has been proposed as a means to detect possible time variation of μ Before these precision measurements can be realized, the survey spectroscopy needs to be performed. We describe our experiments using a Coulomb crystal of sympathetically cooled CaH^+ and laser-cooled Ca^+ ions to measure the vibrational overtones by resonance-enhanced multiphoton photo-dissociation (REMPD) in a linear Paul trap. The dissociation of CaH^+ is detected by observing the change in the crystal composition by monitoring the Ca^+ fluorescence. Future single ion experiments for the precision measurement are also discussed. J. Uzan, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 403 (2003). M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42, 154022(2009).

  5. Liquid Space Lubricants Examined by Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop liquid lubricants for satellites and space exploration vehicles. These lubricants must often perform under a range of harsh conditions such as vacuum, radiation, and temperature extremes while in orbit or in transit and in extremely dusty environments at destinations such as the Moon and Mars. Historically, oil development was guided by terrestrial application, which did not provide adequate space lubricants. Novel fluids such as the perfluorinated polyethers provided some relief but are far from ideal. With each new fluid proposed to solve one problem, other problems have arisen. Much of the work performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in elucidating the mechanisms by which chemical degradation of space oils occur has been done by vibrational micro-spectroscopic techniques such as infrared and Raman, which this review details. Presented are fundamental lubrication studies as well as actual case studies in which vibrational spectroscopy has led to millions of dollars in savings and potentially prevented loss of mission.

  6. Single-molecule magnets ``without'' intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Vergnani, L.; Rodriguez-Douton, M. J.; Cornia, A.; Neugebauer, P.; Barra, A. L.; Sorace, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2012-02-01

    Intermolecular magnetic interactions (dipole-dipole and exchange) affect strongly the magnetic relaxation of crystals of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), especially at low temperature, where quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) dominates. This leads to complex many-body problems [l]. Measurements on magnetically diluted samples are desirable to clearly sort out the behaviour of magnetically-isolated SMMs and to reveal, by comparison, the effect of intermolecular interactions. Here, we diluted a Fe4 SMM into a diamagnetic crystal lattice, affording arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. We found that the resonant tunnel transitions are much sharper, the tunneling efficiency changes significantly, and two-body QTM transitions disappear. These changes have been rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and of transverse dipolar fields, whose effect has been analyzed using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on the SMM behaviour and disclose the magnetic response of truly-isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.[4pt] [1] W. Wernsdorfer, at al, PRL 82, 3903 (1999); PRL 89, 197201 (2002); Nature 416, 406 (2002); IS Tupitsyn, PCE Stamp, NV Prokof'ev, PRB 69, 132406 (2004).

  7. Single-molecule strong coupling at room temperature in plasmonic nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Barrow, Steven J; Scherman, Oren A; Rosta, Edina; Demetriadou, Angela; Fox, Peter; Hess, Ortwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2016-07-01

    Photon emitters placed in an optical cavity experience an environment that changes how they are coupled to the surrounding light field. In the weak-coupling regime, the extraction of light from the emitter is enhanced. But more profound effects emerge when single-emitter strong coupling occurs: mixed states are produced that are part light, part matter1, 2, forming building blocks for quantum information systems and for ultralow-power switches and lasers. Such cavity quantum electrodynamics has until now been the preserve of low temperatures and complicated fabrication methods, compromising its use. Here, by scaling the cavity volume to less than 40 cubic nanometres and using host–guest chemistry to align one to ten protectively isolated methylene-blue molecules, we reach the strong-coupling regime at room temperature and in ambient conditions. Dispersion curves from more than 50 such plasmonic nanocavities display characteristic light–matter mixing, with Rabi frequencies of 300 millielectronvolts for ten methylene-blue molecules, decreasing to 90 millielectronvolts for single molecules—matching quantitative models. Statistical analysis of vibrational spectroscopy time series and dark-field scattering spectra provides evidence of single-molecule strong coupling. This dressing of molecules with light can modify photochemistry, opening up the exploration of complex natural processes such as photosynthesis and the possibility of manipulating chemical bonds. PMID:27296227

  8. Single-molecule strong coupling at room temperature in plasmonic nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Barrow, Steven J.; Scherman, Oren A.; Rosta, Edina; Demetriadou, Angela; Fox, Peter; Hess, Ortwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2016-07-01

    Photon emitters placed in an optical cavity experience an environment that changes how they are coupled to the surrounding light field. In the weak-coupling regime, the extraction of light from the emitter is enhanced. But more profound effects emerge when single-emitter strong coupling occurs: mixed states are produced that are part light, part matter, forming building blocks for quantum information systems and for ultralow-power switches and lasers. Such cavity quantum electrodynamics has until now been the preserve of low temperatures and complicated fabrication methods, compromising its use. Here, by scaling the cavity volume to less than 40 cubic nanometres and using host–guest chemistry to align one to ten protectively isolated methylene-blue molecules, we reach the strong-coupling regime at room temperature and in ambient conditions. Dispersion curves from more than 50 such plasmonic nanocavities display characteristic light–matter mixing, with Rabi frequencies of 300 millielectronvolts for ten methylene-blue molecules, decreasing to 90 millielectronvolts for single molecules—matching quantitative models. Statistical analysis of vibrational spectroscopy time series and dark-field scattering spectra provides evidence of single-molecule strong coupling. This dressing of molecules with light can modify photochemistry, opening up the exploration of complex natural processes such as photosynthesis and the possibility of manipulating chemical bonds.

  9. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  10. Determining the elastic properties of aptamer-ricin single molecule multiple pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricin and an anti-ricin aptamer showed three stable binding conformations with their special chemomechanical properties. The elastic properties of the ricin-aptamer single-molecule interactions were investigated by the dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS). The worm-like-chain model and Hook’s law were ...

  11. Single-Molecule Sensors: Challenges and Opportunities for Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gooding, J Justin; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-09-12

    Measurement science has been converging to smaller and smaller samples, such that it is now possible to detect single molecules. This Review focuses on the next generation of analytical tools that combine single-molecule detection with the ability to measure many single molecules simultaneously and/or process larger and more complex samples. Such single-molecule sensors constitute a new type of quantitative analytical tool, as they perform analysis by molecular counting and thus potentially capture the heterogeneity of the sample. This Review outlines the advantages and potential of these new, quantitative single-molecule sensors, the measurement challenges in making single-molecule devices suitable for analysis, the inspiration biology provides for overcoming these challenges, and some of the solutions currently being explored. PMID:27444661

  12. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mureşan, Leila; Jacak, Jarosław; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  13. 'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    At scales below micrometers, Brownian motion dictates most of the behaviors. The simple observation of a colloid is striking: a permanent and random motion is seen, whereas inertial forces play a negligible role. This Physics, where velocity is proportional to force, has opened new horizons in biology. The random feature is challenged in living systems where some proteins - molecular motors - have a directed motion whereas their passive behaviors of colloid should lead to a Brownian motion. Individual proteins, polymers of living matter such as DNA, RNA, actin or microtubules, molecular motors, all these objects can be viewed as chains of colloids. They are submitted to shocks from molecules of the solvent. Shapes taken by these biopolymers or dynamics imposed by motors can be measured and modeled from single molecules to their collective effects. Thanks to the development of experimental methods such as optical tweezers, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micropipettes, and quantitative fluorescence (such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, FRET), it is possible to manipulate these individual biomolecules in an unprecedented manner: experiments allow to probe the validity of models; and a new Physics has thereby emerged with original biological insights. Theories based on statistical mechanics are needed to explain behaviors of these systems. When force-extension curves of these molecules are extracted, the curves need to be fitted with models that predict the deformation of free objects or submitted to a force. When velocity of motors is altered, a quantitative analysis is required to explain the motions of individual molecules under external forces. This lecture will give some elements of introduction to the lectures of the session 'Nanophysics for Molecular Biology'. PMID:24565227

  14. From single molecule to single tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chin-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems often make decisions upon conformational changes and assembly of single molecules. In vivo, epithelial cells (such as the mammary gland cells) can respond to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, type I collagen (COL), and switch their morphology from a lobular lumen (100-200 micron) to a tubular lumen (1mm-1cm). However, how cells make such a morphogenetic decision through interactions with each other and with COL is unclear. Using a temporal control of cell-ECM interaction, we find that epithelial cells, in response to a fine-tuned percentage of type I collagen (COL) in ECM, develop various linear patterns. Remarkably, these patterns allow cells to self-assemble into a tubule of length ˜ 1cm and diameter ˜ 400 micron in the liquid phase (i.e., scaffold-free conditions). In contrast with conventional thought, the linear patterns arise through bi-directional transmission of traction force, but not through diffusible biochemical factors secreted by cells. In turn, the transmission of force evokes a long-range (˜ 600 micron) intercellular mechanical interaction. A feedback effect is encountered when the mechanical interaction modifies cell positioning and COL alignment. Micro-patterning experiments further reveal that such a feedback is a novel cell-number-dependent, rich-get-richer process, which allows cells to integrate mechanical interactions into long-range (> 1mm) linear coordination. Our results suggest a mechanism cells can use to form and coordinate long-range tubular patterns, independent of those controlled by diffusible biochemical factors, and provide a new strategy to engineer/regenerate epithelial organs using scaffold-free self-assembly methods.

  15. Structure and mechanics of proteins from single molecules to cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre E.

    2009-07-01

    Physical factors drive evolution and play important roles in motility and attachment as well as in differentiation. As animal cells adhere to survive, they generate force and "feel" various mechanical features of their surroundings and respond to externally applied forces. This mechanosensitivity requires a substrate for cells to adhere to and a mechanism for cells to apply force, followed by a cellular response to the mechanical properties of the substrate. We have taken an outside-in approach to characterize several aspects of cellular mechanosensitivity. First, we used single molecule force spectroscopy to measure how fibrinogen, an extracellular matrix protein that forms the scaffold of blood clots, responds to applied force and found that it rapidly unfolds in 23 nm steps at forces around 100 pN. Second, we used tensile testing to measure the force-extension behavior of fibrin gels and found that they behave almost linearly to strains of over 100%, have extensibilities of 170 +/- 15%, and undergo a large volume decrease that corresponds to a large and negative peak in compressibility at low strain, which indicates a structural transition. Using electron microscopy and X-ray scattering we concluded that these properties are likely due to coiled-coil unfolding, as observed at the single molecule level in fibrinogen. Moving inside cells, we used total internal reflection fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to image self-assembled myosin filaments. These filaments of motor proteins that are responsible for cell and muscle contractility were found to be asymmetric, with an average of 32% more force generating heads on one half than the other. This could imply a force imbalance, so that rather than being simply contractile, myosin filaments may also be motile in cells.

  16. Collective effects in Single Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Pradeep

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs), such as Mn12-acetate, are composed of transition metal ions and consists of identical molecules with large ground-state spin (S = 10) and a strong uniaxial anisotropy (65 K). Below about 3 K, Mn12-acetate exhibits magnetic hysteresis with steps at specific values of longitudinal magnetic field due to resonant quantum tunneling between spin up and down projections along the easy axis. The intermolecular exchange interactions between spins on molecules are quite small and spins are considered to be independent and non-interacting. However, the molecules do interact with each other both through magnetic dipolar interactions and through the lattice (e.g. phonons). I have investigated collective effects in SMMs due to these intermolecular interactions. In the thesis I will present experiments that explored magnetic ordering due to magnetic dipole interactions in Mn12-acetate and Mn12-acetate-MeOH. I will also present exper- iments on the onset of magnetic de agration in Mn12-acetate due to a thermal instability. The magnetic ordering studies involved investigating the effect of transverse fields on the susceptibility of single crystals of Mn12-acetate and Mn12-acetate- MeOH. Transverse fields increase quantum spin uctuations that suppress long- range order. However, the suppression of the Curie temperature by transverse fields in Mn12-acetate is far more rapid than predicted by the Transverse-Field Ising Ferromagnetic Model (TFIFM) and instead agrees with the predictions of the Random-Field Ising Ferromagnet Model. It appears that solvent disorder in Mn12-acetate gives rise to a distribution of random-fields that further suppress long-range order. Subsequent studies on Mn12-acetate-MeOH, with the same spin and similar lattice constants but without solvent disorder as Mn12-acetate, agrees with the TFIFM. The magnetic de agration studies involved studying the instability that leads to the ignition of magnetic deflagration in a thermally

  17. Observation of terahertz vibrations in Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via impulsive coherent vibrational spectroscopy and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy--interpretation by molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Xiao, Yuming; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Ichiye, Toshiko; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Adams, Michael W W; Jenney, Francis E; Cramer, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    We have used impulsive coherent vibrational spectroscopy (ICVS) to study the Fe(S-Cys)(4) site in oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). In this experiment, a 15 fs visible laser pulse is used to coherently pump the sample to an excited electronic state, and a second <10 fs pulse is used to probe the change in transmission as a function of the time delay. PfRd was observed to relax to the ground state by a single exponential decay with time constants of approximately 255-275 fs. Superimposed on this relaxation are oscillations caused by coherent excitation of vibrational modes in both excited and ground electronic states. Fourier transformation reveals the frequencies of these modes. The strongest ICV mode with 570 nm excitation is the symmetric Fe-S stretching mode near 310 cm(-1), compared to 313 cm(-1) in the low temperature resonance Raman. If the rubredoxin is pumped at 520 nm, a set of strong bands occurs between 20 and 110 cm(-1). Finally, there is a mode at approximately 500 cm(-1) which is similar to features near 508 cm(-1) in blue Cu proteins that have been attributed to excited state vibrations. Normal mode analysis using 488 protein atoms and 558 waters gave calculated spectra that are in good agreement with previous nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) results. The lowest frequency normal modes are identified as collective motions of the entire protein or large segments of polypeptide. Motion in these modes may affect the polar environment of the redox site and thus tune the electron transfer functions in rubredoxins. PMID:17204331

  18. Molecular vibrational dynamics in polyvinyl alcohol studied by femtosecond coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, T.; Yamashita, S.; Hirochi, K.; Miyagawa, H.; Tsurumachi, N.; Koshiba, S.; Nakanishi, S.; Itoh, H.

    2012-11-01

    We have performed femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study the vibrational dynamics in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film. We observed femtosecond coherent vibrational relaxation and CARS signal beats in PVA at room temperature. We found that the coherent vibrational relaxation of anti-symmetric CH2 stretching modes in PVA is faster than that of symmetric modes, probably due to faster vibrational energy transfer. The coherent vibrational relaxation of OH stretching modes was observed to be slower than that of CH2 modes, because OH stretching modes have less resonant energy transfer rate compared to CH2 modes.

  19. Single molecule image formation, reconstruction and processing: introduction.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Amit; Piestun, Rafael; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    The ability to image at the single molecule scale has revolutionized research in molecular biology. This feature issue presents a collection of articles that provides new insights into the fundamental limits of single molecule imaging and reports novel techniques for image formation and analysis. PMID:27409708

  20. Multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy for tunneling processes in a dissipative environment.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Akihito; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2005-07-01

    Simulating tunneling processes as well as their observation are challenging problems for many areas. In this study, we consider a double-well potential system coupled to a heat bath with a linear-linear (LL) and square-linear (SL) system-bath interactions. The LL interaction leads to longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) homogeneous relaxations, whereas the SL interaction leads to the inhomogeneous dephasing (T2*) relaxation in the white noise limit with a rotating wave approximation. We discuss the dynamics of the double-well system under infrared (IR) laser excitations from a Gaussian-Markovian quantum Fokker-Planck equation approach, which was developed by generalizing Kubo's stochastic Liouville equation. Analytical expression of the Green function is obtained for a case of two-state-jump modulation by performing the Fourier-Laplace transformation. We then calculate a two-dimensional infrared signal, which is defined by the four-body correlation function of optical dipole, for various noise correlation time, system-bath coupling parameters, and temperatures. It is shown that the bath-induced vibrational excitation and relaxation dynamics between the tunneling splitting levels can be detected as the isolated off-diagonal peaks in the third-order two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy for a specific phase matching condition. Furthermore, this spectroscopy also allows us to directly evaluate the rate constants for tunneling reactions, which relates to the coherence between the splitting levels; it can be regarded as a novel technique for measuring chemical reaction rates. We depict the change of reaction rates as a function of system-bath coupling strength and a temperature through the 2D-IR signal. PMID:16035851

  1. Electrical, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Nongjian

    2014-08-20

    The specific aims of the prior DOE grant are to determine the stability of a single molecule bound to two electrodes, study local heating in single molecule junctions due to electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, measure electron-phonon interactions in single molecule wires; and explore piezoelectric properties of single molecules. We have completed all the major tasks, and also expanded naturally the scope of the project to address several other critical issues in single molecule properties, developed new experimental capabilities, and observed a number of unexpected phenomena. We summarized here some of the findings that are most relevant to the present renewal proposal. More details can be found in the publications resulted from this grant and annual progress reports.

  2. Analyzing Single-Molecule Time Series via Nonparametric Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Keegan E.; Bankston, John R.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to measure the properties of proteins at the single-molecule level offers an unparalleled glimpse into biological systems at the molecular scale. The interpretation of single-molecule time series has often been rooted in statistical mechanics and the theory of Markov processes. While existing analysis methods have been useful, they are not without significant limitations including problems of model selection and parameter nonidentifiability. To address these challenges, we introduce the use of nonparametric Bayesian inference for the analysis of single-molecule time series. These methods provide a flexible way to extract structure from data instead of assuming models beforehand. We demonstrate these methods with applications to several diverse settings in single-molecule biophysics. This approach provides a well-constrained and rigorously grounded method for determining the number of biophysical states underlying single-molecule data. PMID:25650922

  3. Investigating buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the studies of buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Both buried solid/liquid and solid/solid interfaces involving polymeric materials are discussed. SFG studies of polymer/water interfaces show that different polymers exhibit varied surface restructuring behavior in water, indicating the importance of probing polymer/water interfaces in situ. SFG has also been applied to the investigation of interfaces between polymers and other liquids. It has been found that molecular interactions at such polymer/liquid interfaces dictate interfacial polymer structures. The molecular structures of silane molecules, which are widely used as adhesion promoters, have been investigated using SFG at buried polymer/silane and polymer/polymer interfaces, providing molecular-level understanding of polymer adhesion promotion. The molecular structures of polymer/solid interfaces have been examined using SFG with several different experimental geometries. These results have provided molecular-level information about polymer friction, adhesion, interfacial chemical reactions, interfacial electronic properties, and the structure of layer-by-layer deposited polymers. Such research has demonstrated that SFG is a powerful tool to probe buried interfaces involving polymeric materials, which are difficult to study by conventional surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:21113334

  4. Nonlinear thermoelectric transport in single-molecule junctions: the effect of electron-phonon interactions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze steady-state thermoelectric transport through a single-molecule junction with a vibrating bridge. The thermally induced charge current in the system is explored using a nonequilibrium Green function formalism. We study the combined effects of Coulomb interactions between charge carriers on the bridge and electron-phonon interactions on the thermocurrent beyond the linear response regime. It is shown that electron-vibron interactions may significantly affect both the magnitude and the direction of the thermocurrent, and vibrational signatures may appear. PMID:27248442

  5. Nonlinear thermoelectric transport in single-molecule junctions: the effect of electron–phonon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze steady-state thermoelectric transport through a single-molecule junction with a vibrating bridge. The thermally induced charge current in the system is explored using a nonequilibrium Green function formalism. We study the combined effects of Coulomb interactions between charge carriers on the bridge and electron–phonon interactions on the thermocurrent beyond the linear response regime. It is shown that electron–vibron interactions may significantly affect both the magnitude and the direction of the thermocurrent, and vibrational signatures may appear.

  6. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Alexander James

    The last decade has seen incredible growth in the quality of experiments being done on single molecule junctions. Contemporary experimental measurements have expanded far beyond simple electron transport. Measurement of vibronic eects, quantum interference and decoherence eects, molecular optical response (Raman spectroscopy), and molecular spintronics are just some of the continuing areas of research in single molecule junctions. Experimental advancements demand advanced theoretical treatments, which can be used accurately within appropriate physical regimes, in order to understand measured phenomena and predict interesting directions for future study. In this dissertation we will study systems with strong intra-system interactions using a many-body states based approach. We will be focused on three related processes in molecular junctions: electron transport, electronic energy transfer, and molecular excitation. Inelastic electron transport in the regime of strong and nonlinear electron-vibration coupling within and outside of the Born-Oppenheimer regime will be investigated. To understand their appropriateness, we will compare simple semi-classical approximations in molecular redox junctions and electron-counting devices to fully quantum calculations based on many-body system states. The role of coherence and quantum interference in energy and electron transfer in molecular junctions is explored. Experiments that simultaneously measure surface enhanced Raman scattering and electron conduction have revealed a strong interaction between conducting electrons and molecular excitation. We investigate the role of the molecular response to a classical surface plasmon enhanced electric eld considering the back action of the oscillating molecular dipole. Raman scattering is quantum mechanical by nature and involves strong interaction between surface plasmons in the contacts and the molecular excitation. We develop a scheme for treating strong plasmon-molecular excitation

  7. Graphene-porphyrin single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, Jan A.; Lau, Chit Siong; Lewis, Wilfred J. M.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Roche, Cecile; Cnossen, Arjen; Warner, Jamie H.; Lambert, Colin J.; Anderson, Harry L.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a robust graphene-molecule-graphene transistor architecture. We observe remarkably reproducible single electron charging, which we attribute to insensitivity of the molecular junction to the atomic configuration of the graphene electrodes. The stability of the graphene electrodes allow for high-bias transport spectroscopy and the observation of multiple redox states at room-temperature.We demonstrate a robust graphene-molecule-graphene transistor architecture. We observe remarkably reproducible single electron charging, which we attribute to insensitivity of the molecular junction to the atomic configuration of the graphene electrodes. The stability of the graphene electrodes allow for high-bias transport spectroscopy and the observation of multiple redox states at room-temperature. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR03294F

  8. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    This research is designed to determine the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, probe unimolecular reactions at the level of individual quantum states, and study the dynamics of electronic photodissociation from highly vibrationally excited states. In our experiments, pulsed laser excitation of a vibrational overtone transition prepares a highly vibrationally excited molecule and time-resolved spectroscopic detection of products monitors their subsequent decomposition. We have used this scheme to follow unimolecular reactions of large and small molecules in both room temperature gases and supersonic expansions and to investigate the role that vibrational excitation plays in electronic photodissociation dynamics. Most recently we have used the localized nature of the highly vibrationally excited states we create to selectively break bonds in photodissociation and biomolecular reactions.

  9. Characterizing Anharmonic Vibrational Modes of Quinones with Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cyran, Jenée D; Nite, Jacob M; Krummel, Amber T

    2015-07-23

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy was used to study the vibrational modes of three quinones--benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, and anthraquinone. The vibrations of interest were in the spectral range of 1560-1710 cm(-1), corresponding to the in-plane carbonyl and ring stretching vibrations. Coupling between the vibrational modes is indicated by the cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra. The diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities range from 4.6 to 17.4 cm(-1) for the quinone series. In addition, there is significant vibrational coupling between the in-plane carbonyl and ring stretching vibrations. The diagonal anharmonicity, off-diagonal anharmonicity, and vibrational coupling constants are reported for benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, and anthraquinone. PMID:25697689

  10. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  11. Coherent multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy of representative N-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Nathan A; Rickard, Mark A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Block, Stephen B; Yurs, Lena A; Wright, John C

    2009-09-10

    Mixed frequency/time domain, two color triply vibrationally enhanced (TRIVE) four wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopy is used to study the methyl and methylene modes in octane and dotriacontane. The experiments involve scanning different combinations of the two excitation frequencies, the monochromator frequency, and the two time delays between the three excitation pulses while the remaining variables are fixed. Two dimensional spectra of the methyl and methylene stretching region have weak, asymmetrical diagonal- and cross-peaks when the excitation pulses are temporally overlapped. As the time delays change, the spectra change as new peaks appear and their peak intensity and position change. Combined two-dimensional scans of the excitation frequency and time delay show the changes are caused by relaxation of the initially excited populations to other states that are coupled to the methyl and methylene stretching modes. Two dimensional time delay scans show that the coherence dephasing rates are very fast so fully coherent TRIVE FWM pathways involving multiple quantum coherences are not possible without shorter excitation pulses. Similar experiments involving the methyl and methylene bend and stretching modes identify cross-peaks between these modes and population transfer processes that create cross-peaks. The asymmetric methylene stretch/Fermi resonance band is observed to contain unresolved states that couple differently with the symmetric methylene stretching and scissor modes as well as with lower lying quantum states that are fed by population transfer. The TRIVE FWM data show that the multidimensional spectra are dominated by rapid population transfer within the methyl and methylene stretching modes and to lower quantum states that are coupled to the stretching modes. PMID:19725584

  12. Single Molecule Detection and Imaging in Single Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2002-03-01

    Direct observation of single molecules and single molecular events inside living cells could dramatically improve our understanding of basic cellular processes (e.g., signal transduction and gene transcription) as well as improving our knowledge on the intracellular transport and fate of therapeutic agents (e.g., antisense RNA and gene therapy vectors). This talk will focus on using single-molecule fluorescence and luminescent quantum dots to examine the dynamics and spatial distribution of RNA and proteins inside living cells and on the surface membrane surface. These single-molecule studies yield a detailed description of molecular events and cellular structures under physiological conditions.

  13. Microscopy beyond the diffraction limit using actively controlled single molecules

    PubMed Central

    MOERNER, W.E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this short review, the general principles are described for obtaining microscopic images with resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit with single molecules. Although it has been known for several decades that single-molecule emitters can blink or turn on and off, in recent work the addition of on/off control of molecular emission to maintain concentrations at very low levels in each imaging frame combined with sequential imaging of sparse subsets has enabled the reconstruction of images with resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Single-molecule active control microscopy provides a powerful window into information about nanoscale structures that was previously unavailable. PMID:22582796

  14. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M.; Ferry, Vivian E.; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-06-03

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Lastly, such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  15. Single-molecule detection: applications to ultrasensitive biochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alonso; Shera, E. Brooks

    1995-06-01

    Recent developments in laser-based detection of fluorescent molecules have made possible the implementation of very sensitive techniques for biochemical analysis. We present and discuss our experiments on the applications of our recently developed technique of single-molecule detection to the analysis of molecules of biological interest. These newly developed methods are capable of detecting and identifying biomolecules at the single-molecule level of sensitivity. In one case, identification is based on measuring fluorescence brightness from single molecules. In another, molecules are classified by determining their electrophoretic velocities.

  16. Single-molecule imaging at high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, Hugh; Lucas Black, S.; Flors, Cristina; Lloyd, Diarmuid; Bruce Ward, F.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2013-04-01

    Direct microscopic fluorescence imaging of single molecules can provide a wealth of mechanistic information, but up to now, it has not been possible under high pressure conditions, due to limitations in microscope pressure cell design. We describe a pressure cell window design that makes it possible to image directly single molecules at high hydrostatic pressure. We demonstrate our design by imaging single molecules of Alexa Fluor 647 dye bound to DNA, at 120 and 210 bar, and following their fluorescence photodynamics. We further show that the failure pressure of this type of pressure cell window can be in excess of 1 kbar.

  17. Manipulating transport through a single-molecule junction

    SciTech Connect

    Sotthewes, Kai; Heimbuch, René; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.

    2013-12-07

    Molecular Electronics deals with the realization of elementary electronic devices that rely on a single molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a single molecule is its conductance. Here we show how the conductance of a single octanethiol molecule can be measured and manipulated by varying the contact's interspace. This mechanical gating of the single molecule junction leads to a variation of the conductance that can be understood in terms of a tunable image charge effect. The image charge effect increases with a decrease of the contact's interspace due to a reduction of the effective potential barrier height of 1.5 meV/pm.

  18. Probing Single Molecules with a Tunable Femtosecond Laser Coupled RF-STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Weicai

    Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) has become a powerful tool in nanoscience for imaging, manipulation and electronic spectroscopy. STM inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) first achieved chemical identification of molecular species by characterizing vibrational energies. Recently, with the STM itProbe and H2 rotational spectromicroscopy, molecular structure and chemical bonds are observed with the STM. Despite these successes in spatial resolution, various efforts have been made to combine fs laser with STM to overcome the temporal resolution limitation of STM, there is so far no clear evidence of simultaneous fs and A resolution. Electronic properties of organic molecules are of central importance to applications such as molecular electronics, organic LEDs, and solar cells. Properties of these molecules can be probed by the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at the single molecule level and with sub-A spatial resolution. The molecular orbital of 4, 7-Di ([2, 20-bithiophen]-5-yl) benzo[c] [1, 2, 5] thiadiazole (4T-BTD) with intramolecular donor-acceptor-donor sites is probed with the electronic state dI/dV imaging and H2 rotational and vibrational spectromicroscopy. 1, 4-Phenylene Diisocyanide (PDI) is probed by imaging with a CO-terminated tip and H2. PDI can self-assemble on noble metal surfaces to form nanostructures, which could have potential applications in molecular electronics and catalysis. Further combination of a RF-STM with a tunable femtosecond laser enables the investigation of light-molecule interactions. In this dissertation, efforts are spent to setup a new tunable fs laser (220 nm˜1040 nm) to couple with the RF-STM. The effects of the femtosecond laser are followed by detecting photo induced electron emission and photochemistry. A new double lock-in technique is applied to detect the weak laser-induced signal in the tunneling regime. To sharpen the energy width and increase the lifetime of the excited states of molecules, thin

  19. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved. PMID:26192667

  20. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  1. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  2. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  3. An Improved Surface Passivation Method for Single-Molecule Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Boyang; Young Han, Kyu; Zhou, Ruobo; Kim, Hajin; Shi, Xinghua; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Jain, Ankur; Singh, Digvijay; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Woodson, Sarah A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a surface passivation method for in vitro single-molecule studies, which more efficiently prevents non-specific binding of biomolecules as compared to the polyethylene glycol surface. The new surface does not perturb the behavior and activities of tethered biomolecules. It can also be used for single-molecule imaging in the presence of high concentrations of labeled species in solution. Reduction in preparation time and cost is another major advantage. PMID:25306544

  4. Magnetic anisotropy and high-spin effects in single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyazin, Alexander; van den Berg, Johan; Osorio, Edgar; Konstantinidis, Nikos; Leijnse, Martin; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea; Wegewijs, Maarten; van der Zant, Herre

    2011-03-01

    Fabrication of single-molecule transistors where electron transport occurs through an individual molecule has become possible due to the recent progress in molecular electronics. Three-terminal configuration allows charging molecules and performing transport spectroscopy in multiple redox states. Single-molecule magnets combining large spin with uniaxial anisotropy are of special interest as appealing candidates for high density memory applications and quantum information processing. We study single-molecule magnets Fe 4 . Three-terminal junctions are fabricated using electromigration of gold nanowires followed by a self-breaking. High-spin Kondo effect and inelastic cotunneling excitations show up in transport measurements. Several excitations feature the energy close to the energy of zero-field splitting (ZFS) of a ground spin multiplet in bulk. This splitting is caused by the anisotropy and is a hallmark of single-molecule magnets. We observe nonlinear Zeeman effect due to a misalignment of an anisotropy axis and a magnetic field direction. The ZFS energy is increased in oxidized and reduced states of the molecule indicating enhancement of the anisotropy in these states.

  5. Photophysics of Fluorescence Probes for Single Molecule Biophysics and Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Taekjip; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy are important elements of the ongoing technical revolution to reveal biochemical and cellular processes in unprecedented clarity and precision. Demands placed on the photophysical properties of the fluorophores are stringent and drive the choice of appropriate probes. Such fluorophores are not simple light bulbs of certain color and brightness but instead have their own ‘personalities’ regarding spectroscopic parameters, redox properties, size and water solubility, photostability and several more. Here, we review the photophysics of fluorescent probes, both organic fluorophores and fluorescent proteins, used in applications such as particle tracking, single molecule FRET, stoichiometry determination, and super-resolution imaging. Of particular interest is the thiol-induced blinking of Cy5, a curse for single molecule biophysical studies which was later overcome using Trolox through reducing/oxidizing system, but a boon for super-resolution imaging due to the controllable photoswitching. Understanding photophysics is critical in design and interpreting single molecule experiments. PMID:22404588

  6. Recent Progress in the Study of Single Molecule Chemistry at the Nanometer Length Scale and Picosecond Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duyne, Richard

    2015-03-01

    During the last few years, there has been an explosion of interest and activity in the field of plasmonics. The goal of plasmonics is to control and manipulate light on the nanometer length scale using the properties of the collective electronic excitations in noble metal films or nanoparticles, known as surface plasmons. An improved understanding of the interactions between adsorbed molecules and plasmonic nanostructures (i.e., molecular plasmonics) is having a significant impact in a number of research areas including electrochemistry, surface science, catalysis for energy conversion and storage, the materials science of nanoparticles, biomedical diagnostics, art conservation science, and nanolithography. In the first part of this lecture, I will provide some background material on the basic physical concepts underlying molecular plasmonics with an emphasis on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy, and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). In the second part of this lecture, I will focus in on three recent advances in TERS which illustrate the power of this nanoscale vibrational spectroscopy. First, new insights into the nature of the relative intensity fluctuations in single molecule tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMTERS) will be discussed. Second, our current understanding of the adsorbate surface interactions involved in the low temperature (LT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) TERS of the Ag tip/Rhodamine 6G (R6G) /Ag(111) system will be described. Finally, an update on our new results in coupling ultrafast lasers with TERS. This last topic illuminates a path forward toward the goal of understanding chemistry at the space-time limit.

  7. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-11-21

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm{sup −1}. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions.

  8. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-11-21

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O-H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm(-1). We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150-250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1-2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O-H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions. PMID:26590536

  9. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O-H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm-1. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150-250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1-2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O-H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ˜200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions.

  10. Isotope-Resolved and Charge-Sensitive Force Imaging Using Scanned Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Rastawicki, Dominik; Liu, Yang; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari; Miglio, Anna; Melinte, Sorin; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; He, Lianhua; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Aihui

    Originally conceived as surface imaging instruments, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) were recently used to probe molecular chemical bonds with exquisite sensitivity. Remarkably, molecule-functionalized scanning tips can also provide direct access to the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum (IETS) of the terminal molecule. Here we report atomic manipulation experiments addressing carbon monoxide (CO) isotopes at low temperatures. The unique and quantifiable dependence of the CO vibrational modes offers insight into tip-controlled force and charge sensing of surface adsorbates, subsurface defects, and quantum nanostructures. The specific behavior of the monitored vibrational modes originates from the interplay of interaction forces between the top electrode--a scanned tip functionalized with a single molecule--and the atomic scale force field surrounding the target atomically-assembled nanostructure. We also present density functional theory (DFT) computations that have been performed in order to scrutinize and visualize the vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints and local force fields.

  11. Knotting and unknotting of a protein in single molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Fabian; Lim, Nicole C H; Mandal, Soumit Sankar; Pelz, Benjamin; Ng, Wei-Ping; Schlierf, Michael; Jackson, Sophie E; Rief, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous folding of a polypeptide chain into a knotted structure remains one of the most puzzling and fascinating features of protein folding. The folding of knotted proteins is on the timescale of minutes and thus hard to reproduce with atomistic simulations that have been able to reproduce features of ultrafast folding in great detail. Furthermore, it is generally not possible to control the topology of the unfolded state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy is an ideal tool for overcoming this problem: by variation of pulling directions, we controlled the knotting topology of the unfolded state of the 52-knotted protein ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isoenzyme L1 (UCH-L1) and have therefore been able to quantify the influence of knotting on its folding rate. Here, we provide direct evidence that a threading event associated with formation of either a 31 or 52 knot, or a step closely associated with it, significantly slows down the folding of UCH-L1. The results of the optical tweezers experiments highlight the complex nature of the folding pathway, many additional intermediate structures being detected that cannot be resolved by intrinsic fluorescence. Mechanical stretching of knotted proteins is also of importance for understanding the possible implications of knots in proteins for cellular degradation. Compared with a simple 31 knot, we measure a significantly larger size for the 52 knot in the unfolded state that can be further tightened with higher forces. Our results highlight the potential difficulties in degrading a 52 knot compared with a 31 knot. PMID:27339135

  12. 2012 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  13. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ˜1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ˜1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state.

  14. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ∼1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ∼1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state.

  15. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicholas H C; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ∼1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ∼1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state. PMID:25956093

  16. Spin blockade effect in single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Guangpu; Park, Kyungwha

    Recently single-molecule transistors consisting of individual single-molecule magnets trapped between electrodes have been experimentally realized and electron transport properties through individual single-molecule magnets have been measured. For a single-molecule magnet the (2S+1)-fold degeneracy of magnetic levels in a given spin multiplet is lifted even in the absence of external magnetic field, due to the magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling. This anisotropic nature of single-molecule magnets allowed one to discover interesting, unexpected transport properties. A recent theoretical study showed that an Eu-based anisotropic magnetic molecule can switch its magnetic anisotropy between magnetic easy plane and easy axis upon varying the charge state of the molecule. Motivated by this report, we investigate how this switch of magnetic anisotropy influences the electron transport through the molecule, by considering sequential electron tunneling. We calculate current-voltage characteristics by solving the master equation based on the model Hamiltonians. We explore this interesting effect in the absence and presence of external magnetic field. Funding from NSF DMR-1206354.

  17. ULTRAFAST CHEMISTRY: Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy for Interrogation of Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Fidder, Henk; Pines, Ehud

    2005-05-01

    Time-resolved infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy elucidates molecular structure evolution during ultrafast chemical reactions. Following vibrational marker modes in real time provides direct insight into the structural dynamics, as is evidenced in studies on intramolecular hydrogen transfer, bimolecular proton transfer, electron transfer, hydrogen bonding during solvation dynamics, bond fission in organometallic compounds and heme proteins, cis-trans isomerization in retinal proteins, and transformations in photochromic switch pairs. Femtosecond IR spectroscopy monitors the site-specific interactions in hydrogen bonds. Conversion between excited electronic states can be followed for intramolecular electron transfer by inspection of the fingerprint IR- or Raman-active vibrations in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Excess internal vibrational energy, generated either by optical excitation or by internal conversion from the electronic excited state to the ground state, is observable through transient frequency shifts of IR-active vibrations and through nonequilibrium populations as deduced by Raman resonances.

  18. A Multi-State Single-Molecule Switch Actuated by Rotation of an Encapsulated Cluster within a Fullerene Cage

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tian; Zhao, Jin; Feng, Min; Popov, Alexey A.; Yang, Shangfeng; Dunsch, Lothar; Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-11-12

    We demonstrate a single-molecule switch based on tunneling electron-driven rotation of a triangular Sc₃N cluster within an icosahedral C 80 fullerene cage among three pairs of enantiomorphic configura-tions. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of switching within single molecules and electronic structure theory identify the conformational isomers and their isomerization pathways. Bias-dependent actionspectra and modeling identify the antisymmetric stretch vibration of Sc 3N cluster to be the gateway for energy transfer from the tunneling electrons to the cluster rotation. Hierarchical switching of conductivity through the internal cluster motion among multiple stationary states while maintaining a constant shape, is advantageous for the integration of endohedral fullerene-based single-molecule memory and logic devices into parallel molecular computing arc.

  19. A Practical Guide for Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) of Biochemical Samples and Model Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Alp, Ercan; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) has been used by physicists for many years. However, it is still a relatively new technique for bioinorganic users. This technique yields a vibrational spectrum for a specific element, which can be easily interpreted. Furthermore, isotopic labeling allows for site-specific experiments. In this chapter we discuss how to access specific beamlines, what kind of equipment is used in NRVS and how the sample should be prepared and the data collected and analyzed. PMID:24639257

  20. Ensemble and Single-Molecule Studies on Fluorescence Quenching in Transition Metal Bipyridine-Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brox, Dominik; Kiel, Alexander; Wörner, Svenja Johanna; Pernpointner, Markus; Comba, Peter; Martin, Bodo; Herten, Dirk-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Beyond their use in analytical chemistry fluorescent probes continuously gain importance because of recent applications of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to monitor elementary reaction steps. In this context, we characterized quenching of a fluorescent probe by different metal ions with fluorescence spectroscopy in the bulk and at the single-molecule level. We apply a quantitative model to explain deviations from existing standard models for fluorescence quenching. The model is based on a reversible transition from a bright to a dim state upon binding of the metal ion. We use the model to estimate the stability constants of complexes with different metal ions and the change of the relative quantum yield of different reporter dye labels. We found ensemble data to agree widely with results from single-molecule experiments. Our data indicates a mechanism involving close molecular contact of dye and quenching moiety which we also found in molecular dynamics simulations. We close the manuscript with a discussion of possible mechanisms based on Förster distances and electrochemical potentials which renders photo-induced electron transfer to be more likely than Förster resonance energy transfer. PMID:23483966

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy and theoretical studies on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiş, V.; Filip, S.; Miclăuş, V.; Pîrnău, A.; Tănăselia, C.; Almăşan, V.; Vasilescu, M.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we will report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular and vibrational structure of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. FT-IR, FT-IR/ATR and Raman spectra of normal and deuterated DNPH have been recorded and analyzed in order to get new insights into molecular structure and properties of this molecule, with particular emphasize on its intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds (HB's). For computational purposes we used density functional theory (DFT) methods, with B3LYP and BLYP exchange-correlation functionals, in conjunction with 6-31G(d) basis set. All experimental vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal modes on the basis of DFT calculations and isotopic shifts and by comparison to other dinitro- substituted compounds [V. Chiş, Chem. Phys., 300 (2004) 1]. To aid in mode assignments, we based on the direct comparison between experimental and calculated spectra by considering both the frequency sequence and the intensity pattern of the experimental and computed vibrational bands. It is also shown that semiempirical AM1 method predicts geometrical parameters and vibrational frequencies related to the HB in a pleasant agreement with experiment, being surprisingly accurate from this perspective.

  2. Single-molecule decoding of combinatorially modified nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Shema, Efrat; Jones, Daniel; Shoresh, Noam; Donohue, Laura; Ram, Oren; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-05-01

    Different combinations of histone modifications have been proposed to signal distinct gene regulatory functions, but this area is poorly addressed by existing technologies. We applied high-throughput single-molecule imaging to decode combinatorial modifications on millions of individual nucleosomes from pluripotent stem cells and lineage-committed cells. We identified definitively bivalent nucleosomes with concomitant repressive and activating marks, as well as other combinatorial modification states whose prevalence varies with developmental potency. We showed that genetic and chemical perturbations of chromatin enzymes preferentially affect nucleosomes harboring specific modification states. Last, we combined this proteomic platform with single-molecule DNA sequencing technology to simultaneously determine the modification states and genomic positions of individual nucleosomes. This single-molecule technology has the potential to address fundamental questions in chromatin biology and epigenetic regulation. PMID:27151869

  3. Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kudalkar, Emily M; Davis, Trisha N; Asbury, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    The advent of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has permitted visualization of biological events on an unprecedented scale: the single-molecule level. Using TIRF, it is now possible to view complex biological interactions such as cargo transport by a single molecular motor or DNA replication in real time. TIRF allows for visualization of single molecules by eliminating out-of-focus fluorescence and enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. TIRF has been instrumental for studying in vitro interactions and has also been successfully implemented in live-cell imaging. Visualization of cytoskeletal structures and dynamics at the plasma membrane, such as endocytosis, exocytosis, and adhesion, has become much clearer using TIRF microscopy. Thanks to recent advances in optics and commercial availability, TIRF microscopy is becoming an increasingly popular and user-friendly technique. In this introduction, we describe the fundamental properties of TIRF microscopy and the advantages of using TIRF for single-molecule investigation. PMID:27140922

  4. Open-frame system for single-molecule microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Adriel; Leith, Jason S; Henkin, Gil; McFaul, Christopher M J; Tarling, Matthew; Talbot, Richard; Berard, Daniel; Michaud, Francois; Scott, Shane; Leslie, Sabrina R

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and construction of a versatile, open frame inverted microscope system for wide-field fluorescence and single molecule imaging. The microscope chassis and modular design allow for customization, expansion, and experimental flexibility. We present two components which are included with the microscope which extend its basic capabilities and together create a powerful microscopy system: A Convex Lens-induced Confinement device provides the system with single-molecule imaging capabilities, and a two-color imaging system provides the option of imaging multiple molecular species simultaneously. The flexibility of the open-framed chassis combined with accessible single-molecule, multi-species imaging technology supports a wide range of new measurements in the health, nanotechnology, and materials science research sectors. PMID:25832232

  5. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  7. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Henrry M; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar; Gluyas, Josef B G; Hartl, František; Higgins, Simon J; Leary, Edmund; Low, Paul J; Martín, Santiago; Nichols, Richard J; Tory, Joanne; Ulstrup, Jens; Vezzoli, Andrea; Milan, David C; Zeng, Qiang

    2015-11-18

    Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids. These data are rationalized in terms of a two-step electrochemical model for charge transport across the redox bridge. In this model the gate coupling in the ionic liquid is found to be fully effective with a modeled gate coupling parameter, ξ, of unity. This compares to a much lower gate coupling parameter of 0.2 for the equivalent aqueous gating system. This study shows that ionic liquids are far more effective media for gating the conductance of single molecules than either solid-state three-terminal platforms created using nanolithography, or aqueous media. PMID:26488257

  8. Single-Molecule Experiments in Vitro and in Silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-05-01

    Single-molecule force experiments in vitro enable the characterization of the mechanical response of biological matter at the nanometer scale. However, they do not reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying mechanical function. These can only be readily studied through molecular dynamics simulations of atomic structural models: “in silico” (by computer analysis) single-molecule experiments. Steered molecular dynamics simulations, in which external forces are used to explore the response and function of macromolecules, have become a powerful tool complementing and guiding in vitro single-molecule experiments. The insights provided by in silico experiments are illustrated here through a review of recent research in three areas of protein mechanics: elasticity of the muscle protein titin and the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin; linker-mediated elasticity of the cytoskeleton protein spectrin; and elasticity of ankyrin repeats, a protein module found ubiquitously in cells but with an as-yet unclear function.

  9. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance. PMID:26048551

  10. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-07-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  11. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  12. Inversion vibration of PH3+(X~ 2A2'') studied by zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Juan; Hao, Yusong; Zhou, Chang; Mo, Yuxiang

    2006-08-01

    We report the first rotationally resolved spectroscopic studies on PH3+(X˜A2″2) using zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and coherent VUV radiation. The spectra about 8000cm-1 above the ground vibrational state of PH3+(X˜A2″2) have been recorded. We observed the vibrational energy level splittings of PH3+(X˜A2″2) due to the tunneling effect in the inversion (symmetric bending) vibration (ν2+). The energy splitting for the first inversion vibrational state (0+/0-) is 5.8cm-1. The inversion vibrational energy levels, rotational constants, and adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) for ν2+=0-16 have been determined. The bond angles between the neighboring P-H bonds and the P-H bond lengths are also obtained using the experimentally determined rotational constants. With the increasing of the inversion vibrational excitations (ν2+), the bond lengths (P-H) increase a little and the bond angles (H-P-H) decrease a lot. The inversion vibrational energy levels have also been calculated by using one dimensional potential model and the results are in good agreement with the experimental data for the first several vibrational levels. In addition to inversion vibration, we also observed firstly the other two vibrational modes: the symmetric P-H stretching vibration (ν1+) and the degenerate bending vibration (ν4+). The fundamental frequencies for ν1+ and ν4+ are 2461.6 (±2) and 1043.9 (±2)cm-1, respectively. The first IE for PH3 was determined as 79670.9 (±1)cm-1.

  13. Single-molecule chemistry and physics explored by low-temperature scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Swart, Ingmar; Gross, Leo; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-08-28

    It is well known that scanning probe techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely offer atomic scale information on the geometric and the electronic structure of solids. Recent developments in STM and especially in non-contact AFM have allowed imaging and spectroscopy of individual molecules on surfaces with unprecedented spatial resolution, which makes it possible to study chemistry and physics at the single molecule level. In this feature article, we first review the physical concepts underlying image contrast in STM and AFM. We then focus on the key experimental considerations and use selected examples to demonstrate the capabilities of modern day low-temperature scanning probe microscopy in providing chemical insight at the single molecule level. PMID:21584325

  14. Chemical structure imaging of a single molecule by atomic force microscopy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kota; Yamazaki, Shiro; Mutombo, Pingo; Hapala, Prokop; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is capable of resolving the chemical structure of a single molecule on a surface. In previous research, such high resolution has only been obtained at low temperatures. Here we demonstrate that the chemical structure of a single molecule can be clearly revealed even at room temperature. 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride, which is strongly adsorbed onto a corner-hole site of a Si(111)–(7 × 7) surface in a bridge-like configuration is used for demonstration. Force spectroscopy combined with first-principle calculations clarifies that chemical structures can be resolved independent of tip reactivity. We show that the submolecular contrast over a central part of the molecule is achieved in the repulsive regime due to differences in the attractive van der Waals interaction and the Pauli repulsive interaction between different sites of the molecule. PMID:26178193

  15. Magnetic behaviour of TbPc2 single-molecule magnets chemically grafted on silicon surface

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Matteo; Bertani, Federico; Tudisco, Cristina; Malavolti, Luigi; Poggini, Lorenzo; Misztal, Kasjan; Menozzi, Daniela; Motta, Alessandro; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe; Sainctavit, Philippe; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Dalcanale, Enrico; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are among the most promising molecular systems for the development of novel molecular electronics based on the spin transport. Going beyond the investigations focused on physisorbed SMMs, in this work the robust grafting of Terbium(III) bis(phthalocyaninato) complexes to silicon surface from a diluted solution is achieved by rational chemical design yielding the formation of a partially oriented monolayer on the conducting substrate. Here, by exploiting the surface sensitivity of X-ray circular magnetic dichroism we evidence an enhancement of the magnetic bistability of this single-molecule magnet, in contrast to the dramatic reduction of the magnetic hysteresis that characterises monolayer deposits evaporated on noble and ferromagnetic metals. Photoelectron spectroscopy investigations and density functional theory analysis suggest a non-innocent role played by the silicon substrate, evidencing the potentiality of this approach for robust integration of bistable magnetic molecules in electronic devices. PMID:25109254

  16. Separation of overlapping vibrational peaks in terahertz spectra using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ishii, Shinya; Otani, Chiko

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were measured during isothermal crystallization at 90-120 °C. The temporal changes in the absorption spectra were analyzed using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS). In the asynchronous plot, cross peaks were observed around 2.4 THz, suggesting that two vibrational modes overlap in the raw spectrum. By comparing this to the peak at 2.9 THz corresponding to the stretching mode of the helical structure of PHB and the assignment obtained using polarization spectroscopy, we concluded that the high-frequency band could be attributed to the vibration of the helical structure and the low-frequency band to the vibration between the helical structures. The exact frequencies of the overlapping vibrational bands and their assignments provide a new means to inspect the thermal behavior of the intermolecular vibrational modes. The large red-shift of the interhelix vibrational mode suggests a large anharmonicity in the vibrational potential.

  17. Stochasticity in single-molecule nanoelectrochemistry: origins, consequences, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradyumna S; Kätelhön, Enno; Mathwig, Klaus; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Lemay, Serge G

    2012-11-27

    Electrochemical detection of single molecules is being actively pursued as an enabler of new fundamental experiments and sensitive analytical capabilities. Most attempts to date have relied on redox cycling in a nanogap, which consists of two parallel electrodes separated by a nanoscale distance. While these initial experiments have demonstrated single-molecule detection at the proof-of-concept level, several fundamental obstacles need to be overcome to transform the technique into a realistic detection tool suitable for use in more complex settings (e.g., studying enzyme dynamics at single catalytic event level, probing neuronal exocytosis, etc.). In particular, it has become clearer that stochasticity--the hallmark of most single-molecule measurements--can become the key limiting factor on the quality of the information that can be obtained from single-molecule electrochemical assays. Here we employ random-walk simulations to show that this stochasticity is a universal feature of all single-molecule experiments in the diffusively coupled regime and emerges due to the inherent properties of brownian motion. We further investigate the intrinsic coupling between stochasticity and detection capability, paying particular attention to the role of the geometry of the detection device and the finite time resolution of measurement systems. We suggest concrete, realizable experimental modifications and approaches to mitigate these limitations. Overall, our theoretical analyses offer a roadmap for optimizing single-molecule electrochemical experiments, which is not only desirable but also indispensable for their wider employment as experimental tools for electrochemical research and as realistic sensing or detection systems. PMID:23106647

  18. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    PubMed

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong. PMID:19734925

  19. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  20. Multidimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the vibrational and solvation dynamics of isoniazid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Daniel J.; Adamczyk, Katrin; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Simpson, Niall; Robb, Kirsty; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.; Hoskisson, Paul A.; Hunt, Neil T.

    2015-06-01

    The results of infrared spectroscopic investigations into the band assignments, vibrational relaxation, and solvation dynamics of the common anti-tuberculosis treatment Isoniazid (INH) are reported. INH is known to inhibit InhA, a 2-trans-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase enzyme responsible for the maintenance of cell walls in Mycobacterium tuberculosis but as new drug-resistant strains of the bacterium appear, next-generation therapeutics will be essential to combat the rise of the disease. Small molecules such as INH offer the potential for use as a biomolecular marker through which ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopies can probe drug binding and so inform design strategies but a complete characterization of the spectroscopy and dynamics of INH in solution is required to inform such activity. Infrared absorption spectroscopy, in combination with density functional theory calculations, is used to assign the vibrational modes of INH in the 1400-1700 cm-1 region of the infrared spectrum while ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopy measurements determine the vibrational relaxation dynamics and the effects of solvation via spectral diffusion of the carbonyl stretching vibrational mode. These results are discussed in the context of previous linear spectroscopy studies on solid-phase INH and its usefulness as a biomolecular probe.

  1. Multidimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the vibrational and solvation dynamics of isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Daniel J; Adamczyk, Katrin; Frederix, Pim W J M; Simpson, Niall; Robb, Kirsty; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Hoskisson, Paul A; Hunt, Neil T

    2015-06-01

    The results of infrared spectroscopic investigations into the band assignments, vibrational relaxation, and solvation dynamics of the common anti-tuberculosis treatment Isoniazid (INH) are reported. INH is known to inhibit InhA, a 2-trans-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase enzyme responsible for the maintenance of cell walls in Mycobacterium tuberculosis but as new drug-resistant strains of the bacterium appear, next-generation therapeutics will be essential to combat the rise of the disease. Small molecules such as INH offer the potential for use as a biomolecular marker through which ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopies can probe drug binding and so inform design strategies but a complete characterization of the spectroscopy and dynamics of INH in solution is required to inform such activity. Infrared absorption spectroscopy, in combination with density functional theory calculations, is used to assign the vibrational modes of INH in the 1400-1700 cm(-1) region of the infrared spectrum while ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopy measurements determine the vibrational relaxation dynamics and the effects of solvation via spectral diffusion of the carbonyl stretching vibrational mode. These results are discussed in the context of previous linear spectroscopy studies on solid-phase INH and its usefulness as a biomolecular probe. PMID:26049421

  2. Microwave spectroscopy of furfural in vibrationally excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2007-07-01

    The results of microwave spectrum investigation of the excited vibrational states of furfural in the frequency range between 49 and 149 GHz are reported. In total 15 excited vibrational states (9 for trans-furfural and 6 for cis-furfural) were assigned and analyzed. Six of the 15 investigated states were assigned for the first time. Accurate values of rigid rotor and quartic centrifugal distortion constants of asymmetric top Hamiltonian have been determined for 13 excited states. Also for some states several sextic and octic level constants were needed in order to fit the data within experimental accuracy. The vt = 3 and vs = 1, va = 1 states of trans-furfural were found to be strongly perturbed and only rotational transitions with low Ka values can be reliably identified in this study.

  3. Vibrational energy flow in photoactive yellow protein revealed by infrared pump-visible probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Hamada, Norio

    2015-05-14

    Vibrational energy flow in the electronic ground state of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is studied by ultrafast infrared (IR) pump-visible probe spectroscopy. Vibrational modes of the chromophore and the surrounding protein are excited with a femtosecond IR pump pulse, and the subsequent vibrational dynamics in the chromophore are selectively probed with a visible probe pulse through changes in the absorption spectrum of the chromophore. We thus obtain the vibrational energy flow with four characteristic time constants. The vibrational excitation with an IR pulse at 1340, 1420, 1500, or 1670 cm(-1) results in ultrafast intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The vibrational modes excited through the IVR process relax to the initial ground state with a time constant of 6-8 ps in parallel with vibrational cooling with a time constant of 14 ps. In addition, upon excitation with an IR pulse at 1670 cm(-1), we observe the energy flow from the protein backbone to the chromophore that occurs with a time constant of 4.2 ps. PMID:25896223

  4. A vibrational spectroscopy study on anserine and its aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Y; Balci, K; Goren, Y; Akyuz, S; Stricker, M C; Stover, D D; Ritzhaupt, G; Collier, W B

    2015-10-01

    In this study based on vibrational spectroscopic measurements and Density Functional Theory (DFT), we aimed for a reliable interpretation of the IR and Raman spectra recorded for anserine in the solid phase and water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O) solutions. Initial DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) searched possible conformers of the anserine zwitterion using a systematic conformational search. The corresponding equilibrium geometrical parameters and vibrational spectral data were determined for each of the stable conformers (in water) by the geometry optimization and hessian calculations performed at the same level of theory using the polarized continuum model (PCM). The same calculations were repeated to determine the most energetically preferred dimer structure for the molecule and the associated geometry, force field and vibrational spectral data. The harmonic force constants obtained from these calculations were scaled by the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field (SQM) method and then used in the calculation of the refined wavenumbers, potential energy distributions, IR and Raman intensities. These refined theoretical data, which confirm the zwitterion structure for anserine in the solid phase or aqueous solvents, revealed the remarkable effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the structural properties and observed IR and Raman spectra of this molecule. PMID:25997178

  5. Statistics and Related Topics in Single-Molecule Biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hong; Kou, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Since the universal acceptance of atoms and molecules as the fundamental constituents of matter in the early twentieth century, molecular physics, chemistry and molecular biology have all experienced major theoretical breakthroughs. To be able to actually “see” biological macromolecules, one at a time in action, one has to wait until the 1970s. Since then the field of single-molecule biophysics has witnessed extensive growth both in experiments and theory. A distinct feature of single-molecule biophysics is that the motions and interactions of molecules and the transformation of molecular species are necessarily described in the language of stochastic processes, whether one investigates equilibrium or nonequilibrium living behavior. For laboratory measurements following a biological process, if it is sampled over time on individual participating molecules, then the analysis of experimental data naturally calls for the inference of stochastic processes. The theoretical and experimental developments of single-molecule biophysics thus present interesting questions and unique opportunity for applied statisticians and probabilists. In this article, we review some important statistical developments in connection to single-molecule biophysics, emphasizing the application of stochastic-process theory and the statistical questions arising from modeling and analyzing experimental data. PMID:25009825

  6. Single Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy on Planar Supported Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Axmann, Markus; Schütz, Gerhard J; Huppa, Johannes B

    2015-01-01

    In the course of a single decade single molecule microscopy has changed from being a secluded domain shared merely by physicists with a strong background in optics and laser physics to a discipline that is now enjoying vivid attention by life-scientists of all venues (1). This is because single molecule imaging has the unique potential to reveal protein behavior in situ in living cells and uncover cellular organization with unprecedented resolution below the diffraction limit of visible light (2). Glass-supported planar lipid bilayers (SLBs) are a powerful tool to bring cells otherwise growing in suspension in close enough proximity to the glass slide so that they can be readily imaged in noise-reduced Total Internal Reflection illumination mode (3,4). They are very useful to study the protein dynamics in plasma membrane-associated events as diverse as cell-cell contact formation, endocytosis, exocytosis and immune recognition. Simple procedures are presented how to generate highly mobile protein-functionalized SLBs in a reproducible manner, how to determine protein mobility within and how to measure protein densities with the use of single molecule detection. It is shown how to construct a cost-efficient single molecule microscopy system with TIRF illumination capabilities and how to operate it in the experiment. PMID:26555335

  7. Binding configurations and intramolecular strain in single-molecule devices.

    PubMed

    Rascón-Ramos, Habid; Artés, Juan Manuel; Li, Yuanhui; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    The development of molecular-scale electronic devices has made considerable progress over the past decade, and single-molecule transistors, diodes and wires have all been demonstrated. Despite this remarkable progress, the agreement between theoretically predicted conductance values and those measured experimentally remains limited. One of the primary reasons for these discrepancies lies in the difficulty to experimentally determine the contact geometry and binding configuration of a single-molecule junction. In this Article, we apply a small-amplitude, high-frequency, sinusoidal mechanical signal to a series of single-molecule devices during junction formation and breakdown. By measuring the current response at this frequency, it is possible to determine the most probable binding and contact configurations for the molecular junction at room temperature in solution, and to obtain information about how an applied strain is distributed within the molecular junction. These results provide insight into the complex configuration of single-molecule devices, and are in excellent agreement with previous predictions from theoretical models. PMID:25686263

  8. Single Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy on Planar Supported Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Axmann, Markus; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Huppa, Johannes B.

    2015-01-01

    In the course of a single decade single molecule microscopy has changed from being a secluded domain shared merely by physicists with a strong background in optics and laser physics to a discipline that is now enjoying vivid attention by life-scientists of all venues 1. This is because single molecule imaging has the unique potential to reveal protein behavior in situ in living cells and uncover cellular organization with unprecedented resolution below the diffraction limit of visible light 2. Glass-supported planar lipid bilayers (SLBs) are a powerful tool to bring cells otherwise growing in suspension in close enough proximity to the glass slide so that they can be readily imaged in noise-reduced Total Internal Reflection illumination mode 3,4. They are very useful to study the protein dynamics in plasma membrane-associated events as diverse as cell-cell contact formation, endocytosis, exocytosis and immune recognition. Simple procedures are presented how to generate highly mobile protein-functionalized SLBs in a reproducible manner, how to determine protein mobility within and how to measure protein densities with the use of single molecule detection. It is shown how to construct a cost-efficient single molecule microscopy system with TIRF illumination capabilities and how to operate it in the experiment. PMID:26555335

  9. Single-Molecule Electronic Measurements with Metal Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    A review of concepts like tunneling through a metal-molecule-metal-junction, contrast with electrochemical and optical-charge injection, strong-coupling limit, calculations of tunnel transport, electron transfer through Redox-active molecules is presented. This is followed by a discussion of experimental approaches for single-molecule measurements.

  10. Single-Molecule Biochemical Analysis Using Channel Current Cheminformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    A single nanometer-scale protein channel, residing in a bilayer, is used as a single-molecule measurement device. Single molecule kinetic information can be directly obtained with this approach via observation of single-molecule channel current blockades. A nanopore-based detector can also measure molecular characteristics indirectly, by changes in the blockades resulting from a changing bound-molecule complex. In essence, the heart of chemistry — the nature of the chemical bond — is now accessible via a new, computationally intensive, single-molecule observation method. In this work: (i) analysis of blockade signals is done using a variety of bioinformatics and machine learning tools; (ii) antibody blockade signals are examined and preliminary data on the characterization of antibody-antigen binding is briefly explored; and (iii) aptamer-based drug-discovery screening prospects are explored. The initial feature identification and extraction of blockade signals involves HMMs for level identification, HMM-EM for level projection, and time-domain FSAs for processing of the level-projected waveform. HMMs are then used for feature extraction and an SVM decision tree for multiclass discrimination. A new family of SVM variants is used, based on regularized-divergence kernels, and restriction is also made to feature vectors that can be interpreted as probability vectors. A web interface to the Channel Current Cheminformatics tools (unoCCC) and the Support Vector Machine classifier (unoSVM) will also be described.

  11. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  12. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  13. Single-molecule Studies of RNA Polymerase: Motoring Along

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Greenleaf, William J.; Block, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques have advanced our understanding of transcription by RNA polymerase. A new arsenal of approaches, including single-molecule fluorescence, atomic-force microscopy, magnetic tweezers, and optical traps have been employed to probe the many facets of the transcription cycle. These approaches supply fresh insights into the means by which RNA polymerase identifies a promoter; initiates transcription, translocates and pauses along the DNA template, proofreads errors, and ultimately terminates transcription. Results from single-molecule experiments complement knowledge gained from biochemical and genetic assays by facilitating the observation of states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging, such as those resulting from heterogeneity in molecular structure, elongation rate, or pause propensity. Most studies to date have been performed with bacterial RNA polymerase, but work is also being carried out with eukaryotic polymerase (Pol II) and single-subunit polymerases from bacteriophages. We discuss recent progress achieved by single-molecule studies, highlighting some of the unresolved questions and ongoing debates. PMID:18410247

  14. Combining single-molecule imaging and single-channel electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Weatherill, Eve E; Wallace, Mark I

    2015-01-16

    Combining simultaneous single-molecule fluorescence measurements of ion channel conformational change with single-channel electrophysiology would enable a direct link between structure and function. Such methods would help us to create a truly molecular "movie" of how these important biomolecules work. Here we review past and recent progress toward this goal. PMID:25026065

  15. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  16. Single Molecule Study of DNA Organization and Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Botao

    We have studied five projects related to DNA organization and recombination using mainly single molecule force-spectroscopy and statistical tools. First, HU is one of the most abundant DNA-organizing proteins in bacterial chromosomes and participates in gene regulation. We report experiments that study the dependence of DNA condensation by HU on force, salt and HU concentration. A first important result is that at physiological salt levels, HU only bends DNA, resolving a previous paradox of why a chromosome-compacting protein should have a DNA-stiffening function. A second major result is quantitative demonstration of strong dependencies of HU-DNA dissociation on both salt concentration and force. Second, we have used a thermodynamic Maxwell relation to count proteins driven off large DNAs by tension, an effect important to understanding DNA organization. Our results compare well with estimates of numbers of proteins HU and Fis in previous studies. We have also shown that a semi-flexible polymer model describes our HU experimental data well. The force-dependent binding suggests mechano-chemical mechanisms for gene regulation. Third, the elusive role of protein H1 in chromatin has been clarified with purified H1 and Xenopus extracts. We find that H1 compacts DNA by both bending and looping. Addition of H1 enhances chromatin formation and maintains the plasticity of the chromatin. Fourth, the topology and mechanics of DNA twisting are critical to DNA organization and recombination. We have systematically measured DNA extension as a function of linking number density from 0.08 to -2 with holding forces from 0.2 to 2.4 pN. Unlike previous proposals, the DNA extension decreases with negative linking number. Finally, DNA recombination is a dynamic process starting from enzyme-DNA binding. We report that the Int-DBD domain of lambda integrase binds to DNA without compaction at low Int-DBD concentration. High concentration of Int-DBD loops DNA below a threshold force

  17. The optics inside an automated single molecule array analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuigan, William; Fournier, David R.; Watson, Gary W.; Walling, Les; Gigante, Bill; Duffy, David C.; Rissin, David M.; Kan, Cheuk W.; Meyer, Raymond E.; Piech, Tomasz; Fishburn, Matthew W.

    2014-02-01

    Quanterix and Stratec Biomedical have developed an instrument that enables the automated measurement of multiple proteins at concentration ~1000 times lower than existing immunoassays. The instrument is based on Quanterix's proprietary Single Molecule Array technology (Simoa™ ) that facilitates the detection and quantification of biomarkers previously difficult to measure, thus opening up new applications in life science research and in-vitro diagnostics. Simoa is based on trapping individual beads in arrays of femtoliter-sized wells that, when imaged with sufficient resolution, allows for counting of single molecules associated with each bead. When used to capture and detect proteins, this approach is known as digital ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The platform developed is a merger of many science and engineering disciplines. This paper concentrates on the optical technologies that have enabled the development of a fully-automated single molecule analyzer. At the core of the system is a custom, wide field-of-view, fluorescence microscope that images arrays of microwells containing single molecules bound to magnetic beads. A consumable disc containing 24 microstructure arrays was developed previously in collaboration with Sony DADC. The system cadence requirements, array dimensions, and requirement to detect single molecules presented significant optical challenges. Specifically, the wide field-of-view needed to image the entire array resulted in the need for a custom objective lens. Additionally, cost considerations for the system required a custom solution that leveraged the image processing capabilities. This paper will discuss the design considerations and resultant optical architecture that has enabled the development of an automated digital ELISA platform.

  18. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  19. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an `aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be `safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  20. Expanded Choices for Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy in the Physical Chemistry Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Joel R.; Dolson, David A.

    2015-06-01

    Many third-year physical chemistry laboratory students in the US analyze the vibration-rotation spectrum of HCl in support of lecture concepts in quantum theory and molecular spectroscopy. Contemporary students in physical chemistry teaching laboratories increasingly have access to FTIR spectrometers with 1/8th wn resolution, which allows for expanded choices of molecules for vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Here we present the case for choosing HBr/DBr for such a study, where the 1/8th wn resolution enables the bromine isotopic lines to be resolved. Vibration-rotation lines from the fundamental and first-overtone bands of four hydrogen bromide isotopomers are combined in a global analysis to determine molecular spectroscopic constants. Sample production, spectral appearance, analysis and results will be presented for various resolutions commonly available in teaching laboratories.

  1. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  2. Monitoring Nanoscale Deformations in a Drawn Polymer Melt with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Polarization Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Stefan; Neumann, Martin; Fröbe, Melanie; Magerle, Robert; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2016-02-23

    Elongating a polymer melt causes polymer segments to align and polymer coils to deform along the drawing direction. Despite the importance of this molecular response for understanding the viscoelastic properties and relaxation behavior of polymeric materials, studies on the single-molecule level are rare and were not performed in real time. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence polarization microscopy for monitoring the position and orientation of single fluorescent perylene diimide molecules embedded in a free-standing thin film of a polymethyl acrylate (PMA) melt with a time resolution of 500 ms during the film drawing and the subsequent stress relaxation period. The orientation distribution of the perylene diimide molecules is quantitatively described with a model of rod-like objects embedded in a uniaxially elongated matrix. The orientation of the fluorescent probe molecules is directly coupled to the local deformation of the PMA melt, which we derive from the distances between individual dye molecules. In turn, the fluorescence polarization monitors the shape deformation of the polymer coils on a length scale of 5 nm. During stress relaxation, the coil shape relaxes four times more slowly than the mechanical stress. This shows that stress relaxation involves processes on length scales smaller than a polymer coil. Our work demonstrates how optical spectroscopy and microscopy can be used to study the coupling of individual fluorescent probe molecules to their embedding polymeric matrix and to an external mechanical stimulus on the single-molecule level. PMID:26831762

  3. Label-free field-effect-based single-molecule detection of DNA hybridization kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Chiu, Chien-yang; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing biomolecules at the single-molecule level can provide useful information about molecular interactions, kinetics and motions that is usually hidden in ensemble measurements. Techniques with improved sensitivity and time resolution are required to explore fast biomolecular dynamics. Here, we report the first observation of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level using a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. By covalently attaching a single-stranded probe DNA sequence to a point defect in a carbon nanotube, we are able to measure two-level fluctuations in the nanotube conductance due to reversible hybridizing and melting of a complementary DNA target. The kinetics are studied as a function of temperature, allowing the measurement of rate constants, melting curves and activation energies for different sequences and target concentrations. The kinetics show non-Arrhenius behavior, in agreement with DNA hybridization experiments using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This technique is label-free and has the potential for studying single-molecule dynamics at sub-microsecond time-scales. PMID:21258331

  4. Single-molecule dissection of the high-affinity cohesin–dockerin complex

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Stefan W.; Nash, Michael A.; Fried, Daniel B.; Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Bayer, Edward A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose-degrading enzyme systems are of significant interest from both a scientific and technological perspective due to the diversity of cellulase families, their unique assembly and substrate binding mechanisms, and their potential applications in several key industrial sectors, notably cellulose hydrolysis for second-generation biofuel production. Particularly fascinating are cellulosomes, the multimodular extracellular complexes produced by numerous anaerobic bacteria. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we analyzed the mechanical stability of the intermolecular interfaces between the cohesin and the dockerin modules responsible for self-assembly of the cellulosomal components into the multienzyme complex. The observed cohesin–dockerin rupture forces (>120 pN) are among the highest reported for a receptor–ligand system to date. Using an atomic force microscope protocol that quantified single-molecule binding activity, we observed force-induced dissociation of calcium ions from the duplicated loop–helix F-hand motif located within the dockerin module, which in the presence of EDTA resulted in loss of affinity to the cohesin partner. A cohesin amino acid mutation (D39A) that eliminated hydrogen bonding with the dockerin’s critically conserved serine residues reduced the observed rupture forces. Consequently, no calcium loss occurred and dockerin activity was maintained throughout multiple forced dissociation events. These results offer insights at the single-molecule level into the stability and folding of an exquisite class of high-affinity protein–protein interactions that dictate fabrication and architecture of cellulose-degrading molecular machines. PMID:23188794

  5. Binding and Translocation of Termination Factor Rho Studied at the Single-Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Koslover, Daniel J.; Fazal, Furqan M.; Mooney, Rachel A.; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Rho termination factor is an essential hexameric helicase responsible for terminating 20–50% of all mRNA synthesis in E. coli. We used single- molecule force spectroscopy to investigate Rho-RNA binding interactions at the Rho- utilization (rut) site of the ? tR1 terminator. Our results are consistent with Rho complexes adopting two states, one that binds 57 ±2 nucleotides of RNA across all six of the Rho primary binding sites, and another that binds 85 ±2 nucleotides at the six primary sites plus a single secondary site situated at the center of the hexamer. The single-molecule data serve to establish that Rho translocates 5′-to-3′ towards RNA polymerase (RNAP) by a tethered-tracking mechanism, looping out the intervening RNA between the rut site and RNAP. These findings lead to a general model for Rho binding and translocation, and establish a novel experimental approach that should facilitate additional single- molecule studies of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:22885804

  6. Binding and translocation of termination factor rho studied at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Koslover, Daniel J; Fazal, Furqan M; Mooney, Rachel A; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M

    2012-11-01

    Rho termination factor is an essential hexameric helicase responsible for terminating 20-50% of all mRNA synthesis in Escherichia coli. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate Rho-RNA binding interactions at the Rho utilization site of the λtR1 terminator. Our results are consistent with Rho complexes adopting two states: one that binds 57 ± 2nt of RNA across all six of the Rho primary binding sites, and another that binds 85 ± 2nt at the six primary sites plus a single secondary site situated at the center of the hexamer. The single-molecule data serve to establish that Rho translocates 5'→3' toward RNA polymerase (RNAP) by a tethered-tracking mechanism, looping out the intervening RNA between the Rho utilization site and RNAP. These findings lead to a general model for Rho binding and translocation and establish a novel experimental approach that should facilitate additional single-molecule studies of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:22885804

  7. Single-stranded DNA scanning and deamination with Single molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, David

    2012-04-01

    Over the past decade, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (smFRET) has become an increasingly popular tool to study the structural dynamics of biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA and proteins. The most attractive aspect of single-molecule experiments is that, unlike ensemble-averaged techniques, they directly reveal the structural dynamics of individual molecules, which would otherwise be hidden in ensemble-averaged experiments. Here, we will present a novel single molecule assay to study, for the first time, scanning of an enzyme (APOBEC3G, involved in the defense against HIV) on single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We have investigated the ssDNA scanning and activity of Apo3G with smFRET. Our data show that Apo3G scans ssDNA randomly and bidirectionally with average excursion lengths of ˜ 10 å and ˜1 s-1 scanning rates. Apo3G quasi-localization is observed on highly reactive motifs located near the one end of the ssDNA. Motif-dependent ssDNA bending is also observed, where the bending is maximal for highly reactive targets located near the DNA end. Interestingly, both the Apo3G scanning and Apo3G-induced ssDNA bending is reduced with lowered ionic strength, indicating that Apo3G motion on ssDNA is facilitated by salt by reducing `electrostatic friction'. Although scanning is random, asymmetric catalytic orientation may be the reason for Apo3G directional activity.

  8. Molecular vibrational dynamics in water studied by femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Sheng; Zhou, Boyang; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yuanqin

    2014-10-01

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics in distilled water at room temperature. The CARS signals from the broad OH-stretching modes between 3100 cm-1 and 3700 cm-1 were obtained and analyzed. The dephasing times of four Raman modes in water were detected and compared.

  9. Chiral Vibrational Structures of Proteins at Interfaces Probed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent development of chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and its applications to study chiral vibrational structures at interfaces. This review summarizes observations of chiral SFG signals from various molecular systems and describes the molecular origins of chiral SFG response. It focuses on the chiral vibrational structures of proteins and presents the chiral SFG spectra of proteins at interfaces in the C-H stretch, amide I, and N-H stretch regions. In particular, a combination of chiral amide I and N-H stretches of the peptide backbone provides highly characteristic vibrational signatures, unique to various secondary structures, which demonstrate the capacity of chiral SFG spectroscopy to distinguish protein secondary structures at interfaces. On the basis of these recent developments, we further discuss the advantages of chiral SFG spectroscopy and its potential application in various fields of science and technology. We conclude that chiral SFG spectroscopy can be a new approach to probe chiral vibrational structures of protein at interfaces, providing structural and dynamic information to study in situ and in real time protein structures and dynamics at interfaces. PMID:22272140

  10. Coherent Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biomolecules; Concepts, Simulations and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Wei; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Mukamel, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    The response of complex molecules to sequences of femtosecond infrared pulses provides a unique window into their structure, dynamics and fluctuating environments, as projected into the vibrational degrees of freedom. In this review we survey the basic principles of these novel two dimensional infrared (2DIR) analogues of multidimensional NMR. The perturbative approach for computing the nonlinear optical response of coupled localized chromophores is introduced and applied to the amide backbone transitions of protein, liquid water, membrane lipids, and amyloid fibrils. The signals are analyzed using classical MD simulations combined with an effective fluctuating Hamiltonian for coupled localized anharmonic vibrations whose dependence on the local electrostatic environment is parameterized by an ab initio map. Several simulation protocols. Including the Cumulant expansion of Gaussian Fluctuation (CGF), a quasiparticle scattering approach (NEE), the Stochastic Liouville Equations (SLE), and Direct Numerical Propagation are surveyed. These are implemented in a code SPECTRON that interfaces with standard electronic structure and molecular mechanisms MD codes. Chirality-induced techniques which dramatically enhance the resolution are demonstrated. Signatures of conformational and hydrogen bonding fluctuations, protein folding, and chemical exchange processes are discussed. PMID:19415637

  11. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation in highly vibrationally excited molecules. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Highly vibrationally excited molecules often control the course of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, combustion, plasmas, and many other environments. The research described in this Progress Report uses laser excitation and interrogation techniques to study and control the dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In particular, they show that it is possible to unravel the details and influence the course of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction. The experiments use laser excitation of overtone vibrations to prepare highly vibrationally excited molecules, frequently with single quantum state resolution, and laser spectroscopy to monitor the subsequent behavior of the excited molecule. We have studied the vibrationally mediated photodissociation and the bond- and state-selected bimolecular reaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In the first process, one photon creates a highly excited molecule, a second photon from another laser dissociates it, and light from a third laser detects the population of individual product quantum states. This approach allows us to explore otherwise inaccessible regions of the ground and excited state potential energy surface and, by exciting to the proper regions of the surface, to control the breaking of a selected chemical bond. In the second process, the highly vibrationally excited molecule reacts with an atom formed either in a microwave discharge or by photolysis and another laser interrogates the products. We have used this approach to demonstrate mode- and bond-selected bimolecular reactions in which the initial excitation controls the subsequent chemistry. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Colloidal lenses allow high-temperature single-molecule imaging and improve fluorophore photostability

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jerrod J.; Stavrakis, Stavros; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Although single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was first demonstrated at near-absolute zero temperatures (1.8 K)1, the field has since advanced to include room-temperature observations2, largely owing to the use of objective lenses with high numerical aperture, brighter fluorophores and more sensitive detectors. This has opened the door for many chemical and biological systems to be studied at native temperatures at the single-molecule level both in vitro3–4 and in vivo5–6. However, it is difficult to study systems and phenomena at temperatures above 37 °C, because the index-matching fluids used with high-numerical-aperture objective lenses can conduct heat from the sample to the lens, and sustained exposure to high temperatures can cause the lens to fail. Here, we report that TiO2 colloids with diameters of 2 μm and a high refractive index can act as lenses that are capable of single-molecule imaging at 70 °C when placed in immediate proximity to an emitting molecule. The optical system is completed by a low-numerical-aperture optic that can have a long working distance and an air interface, which allows the sample to be independently heated. Colloidal lenses were used for parallel imaging of surface-immobilized single fluorophores and for real-time single-molecule measurements of mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes at 70 °C. Fluorophores in close proximity to TiO2 also showed a 40% increase in photostability due to a reduction of the excited-state lifetime. PMID:20023643

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy and intramolecular energy transfer in isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, M.J.; Berghout, H.L.; Woods, E. III; Crim, F.F.

    1999-06-01

    Room temperature photoacoustic spectra in the region of the first through the fourth overtones (2{nu}{sub 1} to 5{nu}{sub 1}) and free-jet action spectra of the second through the fourth overtones (3{nu}{sub 1} to 5{nu}{sub 1}) of the N{endash}H stretching vibration permit analysis of the vibrational and rotational structure of HNCO. The analysis identifies the strong intramolecular couplings that control the early stages of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and gives the interaction matrix elements between the zero-order N{endash}H stretching states and the other zero-order states with which they interact. The experimentally determined couplings and zero-order state separations are consistent with {ital ab initio} calculations of East, Johnson, and Allen [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 98}, 1299 (1993)], and comparison with the calculation identifies the coupled states and likely interactions. The states most strongly coupled to the pure N{endash}H stretching zero-order states are ones with a quantum of N{endash}H stretching excitation ({nu}{sub 1}) replaced by different combinations of N{endash}C{endash}O asymmetric or symmetric stretching excitation ({nu}{sub 2} or {nu}{sub 3}) and {ital trans}-bending excitation ({nu}{sub 4}). The two strongest couplings of the n{nu}{sub 1} state are to the states (n{minus}1){nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 2}+{nu}{sub 4} and (n{minus}1){nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3}+2{nu}{sub 4}, and sequential couplings through a series of low order resonances potentially play a role. The analysis shows that if the pure N{endash}H stretch zero-order state were excited, energy would initially flow out of that mode into the strongly coupled mode in 100 fs to 700 fs, depending on the level of initial excitation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. A gate-tunable single-molecule diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Mickael L.; Galán, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Grozema, Ferdinand; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    2016-04-01

    In the pursuit of down-sizing electronic components, the ultimate limit is the use of single molecules as functional devices. The first theoretical proposal of such a device, predicted more than four decades ago, is the seminal Aviram-Ratner rectifier that exploits the orbital structure of the molecule. The experimental realization of single-molecule rectifiers, however, has proven to be challenging. In this work, we report on the experimental realization of a gate-tunable single-molecule rectifier with rectification ratios as high as 600. The rectification mechanism arises from the molecular structure and relies on the presence of two conjugated sites that are weakly coupled through a saturated linker. The observed gate dependence not only demonstrates tunability of the rectification ratio, it also shows that the proposed rectification mechanism based on the orbital structure is operative in the molecule.In the pursuit of down-sizing electronic components, the ultimate limit is the use of single molecules as functional devices. The first theoretical proposal of such a device, predicted more than four decades ago, is the seminal Aviram-Ratner rectifier that exploits the orbital structure of the molecule. The experimental realization of single-molecule rectifiers, however, has proven to be challenging. In this work, we report on the experimental realization of a gate-tunable single-molecule rectifier with rectification ratios as high as 600. The rectification mechanism arises from the molecular structure and relies on the presence of two conjugated sites that are weakly coupled through a saturated linker. The observed gate dependence not only demonstrates tunability of the rectification ratio, it also shows that the proposed rectification mechanism based on the orbital structure is operative in the molecule. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: DFT calculations on the DPE molecule, three-terminal measurements on the DPE molecule, additional analysis

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy of the sulphate mineral sturmanite from Kuruman manganese deposits, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-12-10

    The mineral sturmanite is a hydrated calcium iron aluminium manganese sulphate tetrahydroxoborate hydroxide of formula Ca6(Fe, Al, Mn)2(SO4)2(B(OH)4)(OH)12·26H2O. We have studied the mineral sturmanite using a number of techniques, including SEM with EPMA and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by Ca, Fe, Mn, S, Al and Si. B is not determined in this EPMA technique. An intense Raman band at 990cm(-1) is assigned to the SO4(2-) symmetric stretching mode. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a band at 1069cm(-1) which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. Infrared spectra display two bands at 1080 and 1107cm(-1) assigned to the SO4(2-) antisymmetric stretching modes. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3622cm(-1) is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3479cm(-1) to water stretching bands. Infrared spectroscopy shows a set of broad overlapping bands in the OH stretching region. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of sturmanite to be made. PMID:24929311

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy of the sulphate mineral sturmanite from Kuruman manganese deposits, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    The mineral sturmanite is a hydrated calcium iron aluminium manganese sulphate tetrahydroxoborate hydroxide of formula Ca6(Fe, Al, Mn)2(SO4)2(B(OH)4)(OH)12·26H2O. We have studied the mineral sturmanite using a number of techniques, including SEM with EPMA and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by Ca, Fe, Mn, S, Al and Si. B is not determined in this EPMA technique. An intense Raman band at 990 cm-1 is assigned to the SO42- symmetric stretching mode. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a band at 1069 cm-1 which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. Infrared spectra display two bands at 1080 and 1107 cm-1 assigned to the SO42- antisymmetric stretching modes. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3622 cm-1 is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3479 cm-1 to water stretching bands. Infrared spectroscopy shows a set of broad overlapping bands in the OH stretching region. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of sturmanite to be made.

  17. Cation Far Infrared Vibrational Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, W.; Zhang, J.; Han, F.

    2009-06-01

    The far infrared (FIR) region is crucial for spectroscopic investigations because of the existence of skeletal modes of moderately sized molecules. However, our knowledge of FIR modes is significantly lacking, largely due to the limited availability of light sources and detectors in this spectral region. The technique "pulsed field ionization zero kinetic energy electron spectroscopy" (PFI-ZEKE) is ideal for studies of FIR spectroscopy. This is because the low internal energy of the cation associated with the skeletal modes is particularly beneficial for the stability of the corresponding Rydberg states. In this work, we report our effort in studies of FIR spectroscopy of cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Using laser desorption, we can vaporize the non-volatile PAH for gas phase spectroscopy. To ensure the particle density and therefore the critical ion density in prolonging the lifetime of Rydberg electrons, we have used a "chamber-in-a-chamber" design and significantly shortened the distance between the desorption region and the detection region. From our studies of catacondensed PAHs, we have observed the emergence of the flexible waving modes with the increasing length of the molecular ribbon. Pericondensed PAHs, on the other hand, have shown significant out of plane IR active transitions. The planarity of the molecular frame is therefore a question of debate. The FIR modes are also interesting for another reason: they are also telltales of the precision of modern computational packages. The combination of experimental and theoretical studies will help with the identification of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. This effort therefore directly serves the missions of the Spitzer Space Observatory and more importantly, the missions of the Herschel Space Observatory.

  18. Probing Single-Molecule T4 Lysozyme Conformational Dynamics by Intramolecular Fluorescence Energy Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Hu, Dehong; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Lu, H PETER.

    2003-07-16

    We demonstrate the use of single-molecule spectroscopy to study enzyme conformational motions of T4 lysozyme under hydrolysis reaction of the polysaccharide walls of E. Coli B cells.By attaching a donoracceptor pair of dye molecules site-specifically to noninterfering sites on the enzyme, the hinge-bending motions of the enzyme are measured by monitoring the donor-acceptor emission intensity as a function of time. The overall enzymatic reaction rate constants are found to vary widely from molecule to molecule. The dominant contribution to this static inhomogeneity is attributed to enzyme searching for reactive sites on the substrate.

  19. Insights into chromatin fibre structure by in vitro and in silico single-molecule stretching experiments

    PubMed Central

    Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    The detailed structure and dynamics of the chromatin fibre and their relation to gene regulation represent important open biological questions. Recent advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments have addressed these questions by directly measuring the forces that stabilize and alter the folded states of chromatin, and by investigating the mechanisms of fibre unfolding. We present examples that demonstrate how complementary modelling approaches have helped not only to interpret the experimental findings, but also to advance our knowledge of force-induced events such as unfolding of chromatin with dynamically bound linker histones and nucleosome unwrapping. PMID:23514142

  20. Applying Semiconductor Technologies and Metrology Tools to Biomedical Research: Manipulation and Detection of Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Andrew A.; Sundararajan, Narayan; Koo, Tae-Woong

    2005-09-01

    Intel's Precision Biology research effort is working to combine Intel's expertise in nanotechnology with aspects of biology and medicine to create highly sensitive instrumentation for biomolecular analysis. The ability to manipulate, detect, and identify biological molecules at ultra-low concentrations is important for applications ranging from whole-genome DNA sequencing to protein-based early disease detection. In this paper we describe our work to develop a molecular labeling system based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS), to enable highly sensitive protein detection. We also present a set of microfluidic and spectroscopic techniques that our team has developed for transporting and identifying single molecules in solution.

  1. Applications of optical trapping to single molecule DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sonek, G.J.; Berns, M.W.; Keller, R.A.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project focused on the methodologies required to integrate optical trapping with single molecule detection (SMD) so as to demonstrate high speed sequencing through optical micromanipulation of host substrates, nucleotide cleavage, and single molecule detection. As part of this effort, the new technology of optical tweezers was applied to the confinement and manipulation of microsphere handles containing attached DNA fragments. The authors demonstrated substrate optical trapping in rapid flow streams, the fluorescence excitation and detection of fluorescently labeled nucleotides in an optical trapping system, and the epifluorescent imaging of DNA fragments in flow streams. They successfully demonstrated optical trapping in laminar flow streams and completely characterized the trapping process as functions of fluid flow velocity, chamber dimension, trapping depth, incident laser power, and fluorescence measurement geometry.

  2. High-Resolution, Single-Molecule Measurements of Biomolecular Motion

    PubMed Central

    Greenleaf, William J.; Woodside, Michael T.; Block, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Many biologically important macromolecules undergo motions that are essential to their function. Biophysical techniques can now resolve the motions of single molecules down to the nanometer scale or even below, providing new insights into the mechanisms that drive molecular movements. This review outlines the principal approaches that have been used for high-resolution measurements of single-molecule motion, including centroid tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and optical traps. For each technique, the principles of operation are outlined, the capabilities and typical applications are examined, and various practical issues for implementation are considered. Extensions to these methods are also discussed, with an eye toward future application to outstanding biological problems. PMID:17328679

  3. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  4. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  5. Single-Molecule Observation of Prokaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Nathan A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in optical imaging and molecular manipulation techniques have made it possible to observe the activity of individual enzymes and study the dynamic properties of processes that are challenging to elucidate using ensemble-averaging techniques. The use of single-molecule approaches has proven to be particularly successful in the study of the dynamic interactions between the components at the replication fork. In this section, we describe the methods necessary for in vitro single-molecule studies of prokaryotic replication systems. Through these experiments, accurate information can be obtained on the rates and processivities of DNA unwinding and polymerization. The ability to monitor in real time the progress of a single replication fork allows for the detection of short-lived, intermediate states that would be difficult to visualize in bulk-phase assays. PMID:19563119

  6. Single-Molecule Studies of DNA Replisome Function

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Senthil K.; Yue, Hongjun; Hu, Zhenxin; Spiering, Michelle M.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Fast and accurate replication of DNA is accomplished by the interactions of multiple proteins in the dynamic DNA replisome. The DNA replisome effectively coordinates the leading and lagging strand synthesis of DNA. These complex, yet elegantly organized, molecular machines have been studied extensively by kinetic and structural methods to provide an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of DNA replication. Owing to averaging of observables, unique dynamic information of the biochemical pathways and reactions are concealed in conventional ensemble methods. However, recent advances in the rapidly expanding field of single-molecule analyses to study single biomolecules offer opportunities to probe and understand the dynamic processes involved in large biomolecular complexes such as replisomes. This review will focus on the recent developments in the biochemistry and biophysics of DNA replication employing single-molecule techniques and the insights provided by these methods towards a better understanding of the intricate mechanisms of DNA replication. PMID:19665592

  7. Single molecule fluorescence experiments determine protein folding transition path times

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoi Sung; McHale, Kevin; Louis, John M.; Eaton, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free-energy barrier between two states. It is a single-molecule property that contains all the mechanistic information on how a process occurs. As a step toward observing transition paths in protein folding we determined the average transition-path time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule Förster-resonance-energy-transfer experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by a factor of 10,000, the transition-path times differ by less than a factor of 5, showing that a fast-and a slow-folding protein take almost the same time to fold when folding actually happens. A very simple model based on energy landscape theory can explain this result. PMID:22363011

  8. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Y; Habuka, S; Okuyama, H; Hatta, S; Aruga, T; Frederiksen, T; Paulsson, M; Ueba, H

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  9. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  10. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    SciTech Connect

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  11. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hatzakis, Nikos S

    2014-02-01

    Biomolecular interactions regulate a plethora of vital cellular processes, including signal transduction, metabolism, catalysis and gene regulation. Regulation is encoded in the molecular properties of the constituent proteins; distinct conformations correspond to different functional outcomes. To describe the molecular basis of this behavior, two main mechanisms have been advanced: 'induced fit' and 'conformational selection'. Our understanding of these models relies primarily on NMR, computational studies and kinetic measurements. These techniques report the average behavior of a large ensemble of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape, that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Here we survey new insights from single molecule studies that advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biomolecular recognition. PMID:24342874

  12. Single Molecule Approaches in RNA-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Serebrov, Victor; Moore, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions govern every aspect of RNA metabolism, and aberrant RNA-binding proteins are the cause of hundreds of genetic diseases. Quantitative measurements of these interactions are necessary in order to understand mechanisms leading to diseases and to develop efficient therapies. Existing methods of RNA-protein interactome capture can afford a comprehensive snapshot of RNA-protein interaction networks but lack the ability to characterize the dynamics of these interactions. As all ensemble methods, their resolution is also limited by statistical averaging. Here we discuss recent advances in single molecule techniques that have the potential to tackle these challenges. We also provide a thorough overview of single molecule colocalization microscopy and the essential protein and RNA tagging and detection techniques. PMID:27256383

  13. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  14. Hydration effects on membrane structure probed by single molecule orientations.

    PubMed

    Huckabay, Heath A; Dunn, Robert C

    2011-03-15

    Single molecule fluorescence measurements are used to probe the structural changes in glass-supported DPPC bilayers as a function of relative humidity (RH). Defocused polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is employed to determine the three-dimensional orientation of the fluorescent lipid analogue BODIPY-PC, doped into DPPC membranes in trace amounts. Supported DPPC bilayers formed using vesicle fusion and Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Schäfer (LB/LS) transfer are compared and show similar trends as a function of relative humidity. Population histograms of the emission dipole tilt angle reveal bimodal distributions as observed previously for BODIPY-PC in DPPC. These distributions are dominated by large populations of BODIPY-PC molecules with emission dipoles oriented parallel (≥81°) and normal (≤10°) to the membrane plane, with less than 25% oriented at intermediate tilts. As the relative humidity is increased from 13% to 95%, the population of molecules oriented normal to the surface decreases with a concomitant increase in those oriented parallel to the surface. The close agreement in trends observed for bilayers formed from vesicle fusion and LB/LS transfer supports the assignment of an equivalent surface pressure of 23 mN/m for bilayers formed from vesicle fusion. At each RH condition, a small population of BODIPY-PC dye molecules are laterally mobile in both bilayer preparations. This population exponentially increases with RH but never exceeds 6% of the total population. Interestingly, even under conditions where there is little lateral diffusion, fluctuations in the single molecule orientations can be observed which suggests there is appreciable freedom in the acyl chain region. Dynamic measurements of single molecule orientation changes, therefore, provide a new view into membrane properties at the single molecule level. PMID:21319764

  15. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kröger, J.; Berndt, R.; Vázquez, H.; Brandbyge, M.; Paulsson, M.

    2010-04-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure of the surface electrode. Nonequilibrium Green’s function calculations reproduce the trend of the conductance and visualize the current flow through the junction, which is guided through molecule-electrode chemical bonds.

  16. Integrated magnetic tweezers and single-molecule FRET for investigating the mechanical properties of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi; Parks, Joseph W; Stone, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Many enzymes promote structural changes in their nucleic acid substrates via application of piconewton forces over nanometer length scales. Magnetic tweezers (MT) is a single molecule force spectroscopy method widely used for studying the energetics of such mechanical processes. MT permits stable application of a wide range of forces and torques over long time scales with nanometer spatial resolution. However, in any force spectroscopy experiment, the ability to monitor structural changes in nucleic acids with nanometer sensitivity requires the system of interest to be held under high degrees of tension to improve signal to noise. This limitation prohibits measurement of structural changes within nucleic acids under physiologically relevant conditions of low stretching forces. To overcome this challenge, researchers have integrated a spatially sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy method, single molecule-FRET, with MT to allow simultaneous observation and manipulation of nanoscale structural transitions over a wide range of forces. Here, we describe a method for using this hybrid instrument to analyze the mechanical properties of nucleic acids. We expect that this method for analysis of nucleic acid structure will be easily adapted for experiments aiming to interrogate the mechanical responses of other biological macromolecules. PMID:27320203

  17. Single Molecule Electrochemical Detection in Aqueous Solutions and Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Byers, Joshua C; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Perry, David; McKelvey, Kim; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-10-20

    Single molecule electrochemical detection (SMED) is an extremely challenging aspect of electroanalytical chemistry, requiring unconventional electrochemical cells and measurements. Here, SMED is reported using a "quad-probe" (four-channel probe) pipet cell, fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barreled pipet and filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, and quasi-reference counter electrodes. A meniscus forms at the end of the probe covering the two working electrodes and is brought into contact with a substrate working electrode surface. In this way, a nanogap cell is produced whereby the two carbon electrodes in the pipet can be used to promote redox cycling of an individual molecule with the substrate. Anticorrelated currents generated at the substrate and tip electrodes, at particular distances (typically tens of nanometers), are consistent with the detection of single molecules. The low background noise realized in this droplet format opens up new opportunities in single molecule electrochemistry, including the use of ionic liquids, as well as aqueous solution, and the quantitative assessment and analysis of factors influencing redox cycling currents, due to a precisely known gap size. PMID:26398675

  18. Application of Recognition Tunneling in Single Molecule Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan

    Single molecule identification is one essential application area of nanotechnology. The application areas including DNA sequencing, peptide sequencing, early disease detection and other industrial applications such as quantitative and quantitative analysis of impurities, etc. The recognition tunneling technique we have developed shows that after functionalization of the probe and substrate of a conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope with recognition molecules ("tethered molecule-pair" configuration), analyte molecules trapped in the gap that is formed by probe and substrate will bond with the reagent molecules. The stochastic bond formation/breakage fluctuations give insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level. The distinct time domain and frequency domain features of tunneling signals were extracted from raw signals of analytes such as amino acids and their enantiomers. The Support Vector Machine (a machine-learning method) was used to do classification and predication based on the signal features generated by analytes, giving over 90% accuracy of separation of up to seven analytes. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid Peptide/DNA sequencing and molecule identification at single molecule level.

  19. Single-molecule observation of prokaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Hylkje J; Duderstadt, Karl E; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2015-01-01

    Replication of DNA requires the coordinated activity of a number of proteins within a multiprotein complex, the replisome. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have enabled the observation of dynamic behavior of individual replisome components and of the replisome as a whole, aspects that previously often have been obscured by ensemble averaging in more classical solution-phase biochemical experiments. To improve robustness and reproducibility of single-molecule assays of replication and allow objective analysis and comparison of results obtained from such assays, common practices should be established. Here, we describe the technical details of two assays to study replisome activity. In one, the kinetics of replication are observed as length changes in DNA molecules mechanically stretched by a laminar flow applied to attached beads. In the other, fluorescence imaging is used to determine both the kinetics and stoichiometry of individual replisome components. These in vitro single-molecule methods allow for elucidation of the dynamic behavior of individual replication proteins of prokaryotic replication systems. PMID:25916715

  20. Single-Molecule Electronic Monitoring of DNA Polymerase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchak, Denys O.; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Turvey, Mackenzie W.; Choi, Yongki; Gul, O. Tolga; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    Single-molecule techniques can reveal new spatial and kinetic details of the conformational changes occurring during enzymatic catalysis. Here, we investigate the activity of DNA polymerases using an electronic single-molecule technique based on carbon nanotube transistors. Single molecules of the Klenow fragment (KF) of polymerase I were conjugated to the transistors and then monitored via fluctuations in electrical conductance. Continuous, long-term monitoring recorded single KF molecules incorporating up to 10,000 new bases into single-stranded DNA templates. The duration of individual incorporation events was invariant across all analog and native nucleotides, indicating that the precise structure of different base pairs has no impact on the timing of incorporation. Despite similar timings, however, the signal magnitudes generated by certain analogs reveal alternate conformational states that do not occur with native nucleotides. The differences induced by these analogs suggest that the electronic technique is sensing KF's O-helix as it tests the stability of nascent base pairs.

  1. Single-molecule imaging studies of protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareh, Shannon Kian G.

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for studying biological events. The work of this thesis primarily focuses on single molecule studies of the dynamics of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and other fluorescent-labeled proteins by utilizing Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and imaging. The single molecule experiments of this thesis covered three broad topics. First, the adsorption mechanisms of proteins onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic fused silica surfaces were imaged and reversible and irreversible adsorption mechanisms were observed. The second topic covered a new technique for measuring the diffusion coefficient of Brownian diffusing proteins, in particular GFP, in solution via a single image. The corresponding experiments showed a relationship between the intensity profile width and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing molecules. The third topic covered an in vivo experiment involving imaging and quantifying prokaryotic cell metabolism protein dynamics inside the Bacillus subtilis bacteria, in which a helical diffusion pattern for the protein was observed. These topics are presented in the chronological order of the experiments conducted.

  2. Single-molecule imaging of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, Joachim; Kaminski, Tim P.; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Jerosch, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Human synovial fluid contains a high concentration of hyaluronan, a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that provides viscoelasticity and contributes to joint lubrication. In osteoarthritis synovial fluid, the concentration and molecular weight of hyaluronan decrease, thus impairing shock absorption and lubrication. Consistently, substitution of hyaluronan (viscosupplementation) is a widely used treatment for osteoarthritis. So far, the organization and dynamics of hyaluronan in native human synovial fluid and its action mechanism in viscosupplementation are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we introduce highly sensitive single molecule microscopy to analyze the conformation and interactions of fluorescently labeled hyaluronan molecules in native human synovial fluid. Our findings are consistent with a random coil conformation of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid, and point to specific interactions of hyaluronan molecules with the synovial fluid matrix. Furthermore, single molecule microscopy is capable of detecting the breakdown of the synovial fluid matrix in osteoarthritis. Thus, single molecule microscopy is a useful new method to probe the structure of human synovial fluid and its changes in disease states like osteoarthritis.

  3. Semisynthetic protein nanoreactor for single-molecule chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joongoo; Bayley, Hagan

    2015-01-01

    The covalent chemistry of individual reactants bound within a protein pore can be monitored by observing the ionic current flow through the pore, which acts as a nanoreactor responding to bond-making and bond-breaking events. In the present work, we incorporated an unnatural amino acid into the α-hemolysin (αHL) pore by using solid-phase peptide synthesis to make the central segment of the polypeptide chain, which forms the transmembrane β-barrel of the assembled heptamer. The full-length αHL monomer was obtained by native chemical ligation of the central synthetic peptide to flanking recombinant polypeptides. αHL pores with one semisynthetic subunit were then used as nanoreactors for single-molecule chemistry. By introducing an amino acid with a terminal alkyne group, we were able to visualize click chemistry at the single-molecule level, which revealed a long-lived (4.5-s) reaction intermediate. Additional side chains might be introduced in a similar fashion, thereby greatly expanding the range of single-molecule covalent chemistry that can be investigated by the nanoreactor approach. PMID:26504203

  4. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. PMID:25453259

  5. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic–vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic–vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  6. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-07-15

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  7. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  8. Edge chlorination of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene investigated by density functional theory and vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maghsoumi, Ali; Narita, Akimitsu; Dong, Renhao; Feng, Xinliang; Castiglioni, Chiara; Müllen, Klaus; Tommasini, Matteo

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the molecular structure and vibrational properties of perchlorinated hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC-Cl) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and IR and Raman spectroscopy, in comparison to the parent HBC. The theoretical and experimental IR and Raman spectra demonstrated very good agreement, elucidating a number of vibrational modes corresponding to the observed peaks. Compared with the parent HBC, the edge chlorination significantly alters the planarity of the molecule. Nevertheless, the results indicated that such structural distortion does not significantly impair the π-conjugation of such polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:26912311

  9. Vibrational neutron spectroscopy of collagen and model polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Middendorf, H D; Hayward, R L; Parker, S F; Bradshaw, J; Miller, A

    1995-01-01

    A pulsed source neutron spectrometer has been used to measure vibrational spectra (20-4000 cm-1) of dry and hydrated type I collagen fibers, and of two model polypeptides, polyproline II and (prolyl-prolyl-glycine)10, at temperatures of 30 and 120 K. the collagen spectra provide the first high resolution neutron views of the proton-dominated modes of a protein over a wide energy range from the low frequency phonon region to the rich spectrum of localized high frequency modes. Several bands show a level of fine structure approaching that of optical data. The principal features of the spectra are assigned. A difference spectrum is obtained for protein associated water, which displays an acoustic peak similar to pure ice and a librational band shifted to lower frequency by the influence of the protein. Hydrogen-weighted densities of states are extracted for collagen and the model polypeptides, and compared with published calculations. Proton mean-square displacements are calculated from Debye-Waller factors measured in parallel quasi-elastic neutron-scattering experiments. Combined with the collagen density of states function, these yield an effective mass of 14.5 a.m.u. for the low frequency harmonic oscillators, indicating that the extended atom approximation, which simplifies analyses of low frequency protein dynamics, is appropriate. PMID:8527680

  10. Thermochromism in polyalkylthiophenes: Molecular aspects from vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbi, G.; Chierichetti, B.; Ingänas, O.

    1991-03-01

    It is known that polyalkylthiophenes show reversible thermochromism within a well-defined temperature range. The vibrational infrared and Raman spectra are used as structural probes for understanding the structures of polyhexyl and polyoctyl thiophenes at room temperature and their evolution with temperature during the thermochromic process. The seemingly sample IR and Raman spectra of these materials are explained in terms of the theory of the effective conjugation coordinate which also accounts for the observed ``dispersion'' of the Raman spectrum with exciting wavelength or from solid to solution states in terms of changes of effective conjugation length. A detailed description of the structure of the system is reached. At room T the sample consists mainly of two phases: (i) an ordered phase with the alkyl side chains in the transplanar structure and the main chain in a quasicoplanar or coplanar conformation and (ii) a disordered phase with the alkyl residue fully conformationally coiled and the main chain conformationally twisted with the torsional angle of ˜ 30°. Upon heating, the relative concentration of the disordered phase increases. The temperature dependence of the side chain and the main chain conformations are similar, thus showing that the coiling of the side chain drives the twisting of the main chain. The thermochromism is thus accounted for.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy for online monitoring of extraction solvent degradation products

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.; Robinson, T.; Bryan, S.A.; Levitskaia, T.G.

    2013-07-01

    In our research, we are exploring the potential of online monitoring of the organic solvents for the flowsheets relevant to the used nuclear fuel reprocessing and tributyl phosphate (TBP)- based extraction processes in particular. Utilization of vibrational spectroscopic techniques permits the discrimination of the degradation products from the primary constituents of the loaded extraction solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitates development of the regression models for their quantification in real time and potentially enables online implementation of a monitoring system. Raman and FTIR spectral databases were created and used to develop the regression partial least squares (PLS) chemometric models for the quantitative prediction of HDBP (dibutyl phosphoric acid) degradation product, TBP, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} extraction organic product phase. It was demonstrated that both these spectroscopic techniques are suitable for the quantification of the Purex solvent components in the presence of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Developed PLS models successfully predicted HDBP and TBP organic concentrations in simulated Purex solutions.

  12. Clathrate hydrates studied by diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Timothy; Hemley, Russell; Mao, Wendy; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Militzer, Burkhard; Struzhkin, Viktor

    2007-03-01

    Clathrate hydrate structures are a potentially viable method for hydrogen storage (Mao and Mao 2004). For simple hydrogen-water clathrates, low temperatures (<150 K) or high pressures (>2 kbar) are needed for stability. We investigated, using inelastic neutron spectroscopy, the hydrogen storage character of a clathrate of hydrogen with the addition of tetrahydrofuran as a promoter molecule. The addition of tetrahydrofuran allows the formation of the clathrate structure at elevated temperature and decreased pressure as compared to the hydrogen clathrate (Lee, et al. 2005). In addition we have examined the higher pressure clathrate forms at lower temperatures. High pressure diamond anvil work has allowed Raman and x-ray spectroscopy on novel clathrate environments. Analysis these model compounds will assist in future investigations to additional clathrate compounds. Lee, Huen, et al. ``Tuning Clathrate Hydrates for Hydrogen Storage.'' Nature 434 (April 2005): 743-746. Mao, Wendy, and Ho-kwang Mao. ``Hydrogen Storage in Molecular Compounds.'' Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101, no. 3 (2004): 708-710.

  13. Two-photon vibrational spectroscopy for biosciences based on surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    Two-photon excitation is gaining rapidly in interest and significance in spectroscopy and microscopy. Here we introduce a new approach that suggests versatile optical labels suitable for both one- and two-photon excitation and also two-photon-excited ultrasensitive, nondestructive chemical probing. The underlying spectroscopic effect is the incoherent inelastic scattering of two photons on the vibrational quantum states called hyper-Raman scattering (HRS). The rather weak effect can be strengthened greatly if HRS takes place in the local optical fields of gold and silver nanostructures. This so-called surface-enhanced HRS (SEHRS) is the two-photon analogue to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SEHRS provides structurally sensitive vibrational information complementary to those obtained by SERS. SEHRS combines the advantages of two-photon spectroscopy with the structural information of vibrational spectroscopy and the high-sensitivity and nanometer-scale local confinement of plasmonics-based spectroscopy. We infer effective two-photon cross-sections for SEHRS on the order of 10−46 to 10−45 cm4·s, similar to or higher than the best “action” cross-sections (product of the two-photon absorption cross-section and fluorescence quantum yield) for two-photon fluorescence, and we demonstrate HRS on biological structures such as single cells after incubation with gold nanoparticles. PMID:17088534

  14. Excitonic and vibrational coherence in artificial photosynthetic systems studied by negative-time ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongjia; Xue, Bing; Du, Juan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Xing, Xin; Yuan, Wei; Li, Yanyan; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-09-21

    Quantum coherences between excitonic states are believed to have a substantial impact on excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. Here, the excitonic and vibrational coherence relaxation dynamics of artificially synthetic chlorosomes are studied by a sub 7 fs negative-time-delay laser spectroscopy at room temperature. The results provide direct evidence for the quantum coherence of the excitonic dephasing time of 23 ± 1 fs at physiologically relevant temperatures, which is significant in the initial step of energy transfer in chlorosome or chlorosome-like photosynthetic systems. Meanwhile, coherent molecular vibrations in the excited state are also detected without the effect of wave-packet motion in the ground state, which shows that the excited state wave-packet motion contributes greatly to the vibrational modes of ∼150 and ∼1340 cm(-1) in artificial chlorosome systems. PMID:27531576

  15. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  16. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  17. Microwave Spectroscopy of the Excited Vibrational States of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John; Daly, Adam M.; Bermúdez, Celina

    2015-06-01

    Methanol is the simplest molecule with a three-fold internal rotation and the observation of its νb{8} band served the primary catalyst for the development of internal rotation theory(a,b). The 75 subsequent years of investigation into the νb{8} band region have yielded a large number assignments, numerous high precision energy levels and a great deal of insight into the coupling of νb{t}=3 & 4 with νb{8}, νb{7}, νb{11} and other nearby states(c). In spite of this progress numerous assignment mysteries persist, the origin of almost half the far infrared laser lines remain unknown and all attempts to model the region quantum mechanically have had very limited success. The C3V internal rotation Hamiltonian has successfully modeled the νb{t}=0,1 & 2 states of methanol and other internal rotors(d). However, successful modeling of the coupling between torsional bath states and excited small amplitude motion remains problematic and coupling of multiple interacting excited small amplitude vibrations featuring large amplitude motions remains almost completely unexplored. Before such modeling can be attempted, identifying the remaining low lying levels of νb{7} and νb{11} is necessary. We present an investigation into the microwave spectrum of νb{7}, νb{8} and νb{11} along with the underlying torsional bath states in νb{t}=3 and νb{t}= 4. (a) A. Borden, E.F. Barker J. Chem. Phys., 6, 553 (1938). (b) J. S. Koehler and D. M. Dennison, Phys. Rev. 57, 1006 (1940). (c) R. M. Lees, Li-Hong Xu, J. W. C. Johns, B. P. Winnewisser, and M. Lock, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 243, 168 (2007). (d) L.-H. Xu, J. Fisher, R.M. Lees, H.Y. Shi, J.T. Hougen, J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, G.A. Blake, R. Braakman J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 305 (2008).

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Dipolar Radicals via Autodetachment of Dipole-Bound States of Cold Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Liu, Hong-Tao; Dau, Phuong Diem; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of transient species is important for determining their molecular structures and understanding their chemical reactivity. However, the low abundance and high reactivity of molecular radicals pose major challenges to conventional absorption spectroscopic methods. The observation of dipole-bound states (DBS) in anions extend autodetachment spectroscopy to molecular anions whose corresponding neutral radicals possess a large enough dipole moment (>2.5 D).1,2 However, due to the difficulty of assigning the congested spectra at room temperature, there have been only a limited number of autodetachment spectra via DBS reported. Recently, we have built an improved version of a cold trap3 coupled with high-resolution photoelectron imaging.4 The first observation of mode-specific auotodetachment of DBS of cold phenoxide have shown that not only vibrational hot bands were completely suppressed, but also rotational profile was observed.5 The vibrational frequencies of the DBS were found to be the same as those of the neutral radical, suggesting that vibrational structures of dipolar radicals can be probed via DBS.5 More significantly, the DBS resonances allowed a number of vibrational modes with very weak Frank-Condon factors to be "lightened" up via vibrational autodetachment.5 Recently, our first high-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of the dehydrogenated uracil radical, with partial rotational resolution, via autodetachment from DBS of cold deprotonated uracil anions have been reported.6 Rich vibrational information is obtained for this important radical species. The resolved rotational profiles also allow us to characterize the rotational temperature of the trapped anions for the first time.6 1 K. R. Lykke, D. M. Neumark, T. Andersen, V. J. Trapa, and W. C. Lineberger, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6842 (1987). 2 D. M. Wetzel, and J. I. Brauman, J. Chem. Phys. 90, 68 (1989). 3 P. D. Dau, H. T. Liu, D. L. Huang, and L. S. Wang, J. Chem. Phys

  19. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of peptides and proteins in one and two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jonggu; Yang, Seongeun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-09-15

    Vibrational spectroscopy provides direct information on molecular environment and motions but, its interpretation is often hampered by band broadening. Over the past decade, two-dimensional (2D) vibrational spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique to overcome a number of difficulties associated with linear spectroscopy and provided significantly detailed information on the structure and dynamics of complex molecules in condensed phases. This Account reviews recently developed computational methods used to simulate 1D and 2D vibrational spectra. The central quantity to calculate in computational spectroscopy is the spectroscopic response function, which is the product of many contributing factors such as vibrational transition energies, transition moments, and their modulations by fluctuating local environment around a solute. Accurate calculations of such linear and nonlinear responses thus require a concerted effort employing a wide range of methods including electronic structure calculation (ESC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The electronic structure calculation can provide fundamental quantities such as normal-mode frequencies and transition multipole strengths. However, since the treatable system size is limited with this method, classical MD simulation has also been used to account for the dynamics of the solvent environment. To achieve chemical accuracy, these two results are combined to generate time series of fluctuating transition frequencies and transition moments with the distributed multipole analysis, and this particular approach has been known as the hybrid ESC/MD method. For coupled multichromophore systems, vibrational properties of each chromophore such as a peptide are individually calculated by electronic structure methods and the Hessian matrix reconstruction scheme was used to obtain local mode frequencies and couplings of constituting anharmonic oscillators. The spectra thus obtained, especially for biomolecules including

  20. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Jenney, Francis; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Fe-S protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. PMID:26052177