Science.gov

Sample records for single-pass radar interferometer

  1. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, G.; Wu, X.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Michel, T.; Lou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Processing challenges were encountered in achieving the accuracy requirements on several fronts including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. However, through a combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. We will present results from the IPY data collections including system performance evaluations and imagery. This includes a large area digital elevation model (DEM) collected over Jakobshavn glacier as an illustrative science data product. Further, by intercomparison with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and calibration targets we quantify the interferometric penetration bias of the Ka-band returns into the snow cover. Following the success of the IPY campaign, we are funded under the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program to transition GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. In addition

  2. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Michel, T.; Muellerschoen, R.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Miller, T.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Sanchez-Barbetty, M.; Lou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicated swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Following the success of the IPY campaign, the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program funded the upgrade of GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. The AITT made three fundamental upgrades to improve system performance: 1. State-of-the-art solid-state power amplifiers (80W peak) were integrated directly on the antenna panel reducing front-end losses; 2. A ping-pong capability was incorporated to effectively double the baseline thereby improving height measurement precision by a factor of two; and 3. A high-fidelity calibration loop was implemented which is critical for routine processing. Upon completion of our engineering flights in February 2013, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska (4/24-4/27/13). The purpose was to fully demonstrate GLISTIN-A's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Furthermore, the question of the utility of GLISTIN-A for sea-ice mapping, tracking and inventory has received a great deal of interest. To address this GLISTIN-A collected data over sea-ice in the Beaufort sea including an underflight of CryoSAT II. Note that there are

  3. EcoSAR: NASA's P-band fully polarimetric single pass interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Rincon, R. F.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.; Sun, G.; Daniyan, O.; Harcum, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    EcoSAR is a new airborne synthetic aperture radar imaging system, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is a P-band sensor that employs a non-conventional and innovative design. The EcoSAR system was designed as a multi-disciplinary instrument to image the 3-dimensional surface of the earth from a single pass platform with two antennas. EcoSAR's principal mission is to penetrate the forest canopy to return vital information about the canopy structure and estimate biomass. With a maximum bandwidth of 200 MHz in H and 120 MHz in V polarizations it can provide sub-meter resolution imagery of the study area. EcoSAR's dual antenna, 32 transmit and receive channel architecture provides a test-bed for developing new algorithms in InSAR data processing such as single pass interferometry, full polarimetry, post-processing synthesis of multiple beams, simultaneous measurement over both sides of the flight track, selectable resolution and variable incidence angle. The flexible architecture of EcoSAR will create new opportunities in radar remote sensing of forest biomass, permafrost active layer thickness, and topography mapping. EcoSAR's first test flight occurred between March 27th and April 1st, 2014 over the Andros Island in Bahamas and Corcovado and La Selva National Parks in Costa Rica. The 32 channel radar system collected about 6 TB of radar data in about 12 hours of data collection. Due to the existence of radio and TV communications in the operational frequency band, acquired data contains strong radar frequency interference, which had to be removed prior to beamforming and focusing. Precise locations of the antennas are tracked using high-rate GPS and inertial navigation units, which provide necessary information for accurate processing of the imagery. In this presentation we will present preliminary imagery collected during the test campaign, show examples of simultaneous dual track imaging, as well as a single pass interferogram. The

  4. Orbit Determination of LEO Satellites for a Single Pass through a Radar: Comparison of Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khutorovsky, Z.; Kamensky, S.; Sbytov, N.; Alfriend, K. T.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of determining the orbit of a space object from measurements based on one pass through the field of view of a radar is not a new one. Extensive research in this area has been carried out in the USA and Russia since the late 50s when these countries started the development of ballistic missile defense (BMD) and Early Warning systems. In Russia these investigations got additional stimulation in the early 60s after the decision to create a Space Surveillance System, whose primary task would be the maintenance of the satellite catalog. These problems were the focus of research interest until the middle 70s when the appropriate techniques and software were implemented for all radars. Then for more than 20 years no new research papers appeared on this subject. This produced an impression that all the problems of track determination based on one pass had been solved and there was no need for further research. In the late 90s interest in this problem arose again in relation to the following. It was estimated that there would be greater than 100,000 objects with size greater than 1-2 cm and collision of an operational spacecraft with any of these objects could have catastrophic results. Thus, for prevention of hazardous approaches and collisions with valuable spacecraft the existing satellite catalog should be extended by at least an order of magnitude This is a very difficult scientific and engineering task. One of the issues is the development of data fusion procedures and the software capable of maintaining such a huge catalog in near real time. The number of daily processed measurements (of all types, radar and optical) for such a system may constitute millions, thus increasing the number of measurements by at least an order of magnitude. Since we will have ten times more satellites and measurements the computer effort required for the correlation of measurements will be two orders of magnitude greater. This could create significant problems for processing

  5. Information content of a single pass of phase-delay data from a short baseline connected element interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    An analytic development of the information array obtained with a single tracking pass of phase-delay measurements made from a short baseline interferometer is presented. Phase-delay observations can be made with great precision from two antennas using a single, common distributed frequency standard, hence the name connected element. With the information array, closed-form expressions are developed for the error covariance in declination and right ascension. These equations serve as useful tools for analyzing the relative merits of candidate station locations for connected element interferometry (CEI). The navigation performance of a short baseline interferometer located at the Deep Space Network's (DSN's) Goldstone intracomplex is compared with that which is presently achievable using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) over intercontinental baselines. The performance of an intracomplex pair of short baselines formed by three stations is also investigated, along with the use of a single baseline in conjunction with conventional two-way Doppler data. The phase-delay measurement accuracy and data rate used in the analysis are based on the expected performance of an experimental connected element system presently under construction at Goldstone. The results indicate that the VLBI system that will be used during the Galileo mission can determine the declination and right ascension of a distant spacecraft to an accuracy of 20 to 25 nrad, while the CEI triad system and the combination of CEI-Doppler system are both capable of 30 to 70 nrad performance.

  6. Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn K.; Sadowy, Gregory A.; Rignot, Eric J.; Madsen, Soren N.

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses Ka-band (35-GHz) radar for mapping the surface topography of glaciers and ice sheets at high spatial resolution and high vertical accuracy, independent of cloud cover, with a swath-width of 70 km. The system is a single- pass, single-platform interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) with an 8-mm wavelength, which minimizes snow penetration while remaining relatively impervious to atmospheric attenuation. As exhibited by the lower frequency SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) AirSAR and GeoSAR systems, an InSAR measures topography using two antennas separated by a baseline in the cross-track direction, to view the same region on the ground. The interferometric combination of data received allows the system to resolve the pathlength difference from the illuminated area to the antennas to a fraction of a wavelength. From the interferometric phase, the height of the target area can be estimated. This means an InSAR system is capable of providing not only the position of each image point in along-track and slant range as with a traditional SAR but also the height of that point through interferometry. Although the evolution of InSAR to a millimeter-wave center frequency maximizes the interferometric accuracy from a given baseline length, the high frequency also creates a fundamental problem of swath coverage versus signal-to-noise ratio. While the length of SAR antennas is typically fixed by mass and stowage or deployment constraints, the width is constrained by the desired illuminated swath width. As the across-track beam width which sets the swath size is proportional to the wavelength, a fixed swath size equates to a smaller antenna as the frequency is increased. This loss of antenna size reduces the two-way antenna gain to the second power, drastically reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of the SAR system. This fundamental constraint of high-frequency SAR systems is addressed by applying digital beam-forming (DBF) techniques to

  7. A single pass electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Marlin N.; Vroom, David A.

    1995-02-01

    Higher volumes, increasing competition and the need to improve quality have led us to re-examine the process for irradiation of tubing and wire. Traditionallyin Raychem, product irradiation has involved the use of large multi-purpose facilities that were designed to handle relatively small volumes of a large variety of products as a separate process. Today, with larger volumes of certain products, there is an interest in combining processes to improve quality and reduce cost. We have recently designed and constructed a small, low voltage accelerator system that can be placed in-line with another manufacturing process and can uniformly irradiate a tube or wire product in a single pass. The system is comprised of two conventional accelerator systems having elongated filaments and placed on opposite sides of a linear product path. The ribbon shaped electron beams from these two accelerators are scanned, after acceleration toward the product path, in a conventional manner and 180 degrees out of phase from each other. The two accelerated electron beams then enter a third magnetic field that is synchronous with the scanning magnets and whose oscillating polarity is such that the ribbon beams are converged onto a tubular shaped window close to and around a segment of the product path. Trials with a prototype system have produced tubing having a dose concentricity of better than ± 10 percent on a single pass through the system.

  8. Gadanki Ionospheric Radar Interferometer (GIRI): System Description, Capabilities and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga rao, Meka; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Patra, Amit; Kamaraj, Pandian; Jayaraj, Katta; Raghavendra, J.; Yasodha, Polisetti

    2016-07-01

    A 30-MHz radar has been developed at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory for dedicated probing of ionosphere and to study the low latitude ionospheric plasma irregularities. The radar has the beam steering capability to scan a larger part of the sky up to ±45o in East-West direction, which will overcome the limitation of slit camera picture obtained by the fixed beam of the Gadanki MST radar on the ionospheric plasma irregularity/structures. The system is also configured for pulse-to-pulse beam steering, employs multi-channel receiving system to carryout Interferometry/Imaging experiments. The radar system employs 20x8 phased antenna array, Direct Digital Synthesizers to generate pulse coded excitation signals, high power solid-state Transmit-Receive modules to generate a peak power of 150 kW, low loss coaxial beam forming and feeder network and multi-channel direct IF digital receiver. Round-the-clock observations are being made with uninterrupted operations and high quality E-and F-Region Range-Time-Intensity and conical maps are obtained with the system. In this paper we present, the system design philosophy, realization, initial observations and also the capability of the system to augment for Meteor observations.

  9. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Szoke, Abraham; Prosnitz, Donald

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  10. Development of an external interferometer for meteor wind observation attached to the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Tsutsumi, Masaki

    1997-05-01

    An external meteor detection system for the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar, Shigaraki, Japan, has been developed in order to monitor the wind velocities at 80-100 km. The characteristics of the MU radar system and the observations are closely inspected, and we design a three-channel interferometer system using three independent single antennas. The data-taking system was carefully designed, considering fast data rate, short interpulse period, wide data bits (19 bit), and fast sampling rate (1 million samples/s), and all the logics are assembled by programmable logic devices. This external interferometer was operated since March 1995 during the Doppler beam swinging observation by the MU radar, and the first results are presented. Meteor echo rate was around 2000/day, 1000 of which were usable for postprocessing, i.e., wind measurement. This echo rate is greater than that of the meteor radar system in Jakarta. Wind velocities were determined with time-height resolutions of 1 hour × 2 km, which showed reasonable agreement with the wind velocities determined from the turbulent echoes in the mesosphere. We present the capability of an external interferometry system attached to the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere/stratosphere-troposphere radar as a meteor wind observation system.

  11. Plasma irregularities associated with a morning discrete auroral arc - Radar interferometer observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Providakes, J.; Farley, D. T.; Swartz, W. E.; Riggin, D.

    1985-01-01

    A description is given of E region auroral plasma irregularities associated with an intense auroral morning arc observed over Fort Churchill by radar. The observations are compared with data from an all-sky camera (ASC) operated at Fort Churchill by the National Research Council of Canada. The particular event described was chosen because of the rapid variation in structure and motion of the arc as it traveled through the radar beam. The horizontal vector electron drift velocity and electric field along the poleward boundary of the morning discrete auroral arc was successfully measured with a radar interferometer. This instrument provided information concerning the temporal and spatial structure of the electrostatic plasma turbulence in the arc. The observations are described.

  12. Single-pass ion cyclotron resonance absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, Boris N.; Arefiev, Alexey V.

    2001-03-01

    The ion response to the rf-field during single-pass ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be essentially nonlinear. This paper presents a self-consistent theory of the rf-wave propagation and ion motion through the resonance. An important ingredient of the problem is the ion flow along the magnetic field. The flow velocity limits the time the ions spend at the resonance, which in turn limits the ion energy gain. A feature that makes the problem nonlinear is that the flow accelerates under the effect of the {nabla}B force and rf-pressure. This acceleration can produce a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance, resulting in partial reflection of the incident wave.

  13. Onboard Interferometric SAR Processor for the Ka-Band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Peral, Eva; Clark, Duane I.; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard processor concept and algorithm has been developed for the Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIn) instrument on the Surface and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. This is a mission- critical subsystem that will perform interferometric SAR processing and multi-look averaging over the oceans to decrease the data rate by three orders of magnitude, and therefore enable the downlink of the radar data to the ground. The onboard processor performs demodulation, range compression, coregistration, and re-sampling, and forms nine azimuth squinted beams. For each of them, an interferogram is generated, including common-band spectral filtering to improve correlation, followed by averaging to the final 1 1-km ground resolution pixel. The onboard processor has been prototyped on a custom FPGA-based cPCI board, which will be part of the radar s digital subsystem. The level of complexity of this technology, dictated by the implementation of interferometric SAR processing at high resolution, the extremely tight level of accuracy required, and its implementation on FPGAs are unprecedented at the time of this reporting for an onboard processor for flight applications.

  14. Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; J. Richard Hess

    2004-08-01

    Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  15. The Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; John R. Hess

    2004-08-01

    collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  16. Efficient Single-Pass Index Construction for Text Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Steffen; Zobel, Justin

    2003-01-01

    Discusses index construction for text collections, reviews principal approaches to inverted indexes, analyzes their theoretical cost, and presents experimental results of the use of a single-pass inversion method on Web document collections. Shows that the single-pass approach is faster and does not require the complete vocabulary of the indexed…

  17. High-resolution Precipitation and Lightning Monitoring by the Ku-band Broadband Radar and the VHF Broadband Digital Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Yoshikawa, Eiichi; Akita, Manabu; Morimoto, Takeshi; Ushio, Tomoo; Kawasaki, Zen-Ichiro; Saito, Toshiya; Nishida, Takashi; Sakazume, Norio

    We propose a high-resolution precipitation and lightning monitoring for meteorological application. This monitoring is mainly utilized the Ku-band broadband radar (BBR) and the VHF broadband digital interferometer (DITF). The BBR can accurately measure the radar reflectivity factor and the mean Doppler velocity with 5 m resolution over a range from 40 m to several kilometers for 10 W power using a pulse compression technique. The two or more DITFs make us visualize lightning channel propagations in three dimensions. Moreover, we add new functions that integrate these observation data and disclose integration analyses results with the quasi real-time information disclosure system. Initial observations for severe storms with lightning during summer and winter thunderstorm season by these monitoring instruments indicate that we obtain detailed precipitation distribution and detect active convective cells with lightning discharges.

  18. Single pass lead VDD pacing in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, S; Elami, A; Amikam, S; Erdman, S; Ovsyshcher, I E

    1997-08-01

    Implantation of permanent pacemakers in children and adolescents is possible but usually is limited to single chamber generators. The natural growth of these patients may require physiological pacing, but until recently two leads were required for this type of pacing. The single pass lead VDD pacing mode makes possible physiological pacing by using only one lead, for both atrial sensing and ventricular sensing and pacing. The feasibility of VDD pacing using endocardial lead was evaluated in 16 children and adolescents with congenital or postsurgical atrioventricular block. Their mean age was 7.9 +/- 4.9 years (range 1-16 years) and the smallest patient's weight was 8.2 kg. In all the patients, a single pass pacing lead with atrial sensing rings and bipolar ventricular pacing and sensing capability was implanted through the left or right subclavian vein. The pacemaker generator was implanted in a rectopectoral position. The mean atrial electrogram during the implantation was 4.2 +/- 2.1 mV and 2.6 +/- 1.9 mV after a mean of 1 week. The ventricular pacing threshold was 0.5 +/- 0.2 V; the ventricular pacing impedance was 560 +/- 95 omega; and the ventricular electrogram amplitude was 9.9 +/- 2.1 mV. This is a first report to demonstrate the feasibility of atrial synchronous ventricular endocardial pacing using a single pass lead in a relatively large group of children and adolescents. PMID:9272534

  19. Comparison of medium frequency pulsed radar interferometer and correlation analysis winds, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.; Reid, I. M.; Manson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    In principle, the interferometer analysis determines the radial velocity and direction of single scatterers provided that each has a sufficiently different Doppler frequency to permit separation by spectral analysis. In fact, scatterers will not have constant radial velocity, and their Doppler frequencies as well as their directions will be modulated by their horizontal motion. Thus, there is a tradeoff between the poorer resolution but less smeared scatterers on shorter records and the higher resolution (longer) records. Three or more non-collinear scatterers are sufficient to determine the wind. It appears that the velocity found from the combined interferometer peaks agrees well with the apparent velocity from correlation methods, but the true velocity is a factor of 2 smaller. This difference might be resolved by searching for scatters showing regular movement between adjacent records.

  20. Observations of storm time midlatitude ion-neutral coupling using SuperDARN radars and NATION Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. P.; H. Baker, J. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Makela, J. J.; Fisher, D. J.; Harding, B. J.; Frissell, N. A.; Thomas, E. G.

    2015-10-01

    Ion drag is known to play an important role in driving neutral thermosphere circulation at auroral latitudes, especially during the main phase of geomagnetic storms. During the recovery phase, the neutrals are known to drive the ions and generate ionospheric electric fields and currents via the disturbance dynamo mechanism. At midlatitudes, the precise interplay between ions and neutrals is less understood largely because of the paucity of measurements that have been available. In this work, we investigate ion-neutral coupling at middle latitudes using colocated ion drift velocity measurements obtained from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars and neutral wind velocity and temperature measurements obtained from the North American Thermosphere Ionosphere Observing Network (NATION) Fabry-Perot interferometers. We examine one recent storm period on 2-3 October 2013 during both the main phase and late recovery phase. By using ion-neutral momentum exchange theory and a time-lagged correlation analysis, we analyze the coupling time scales and dominant driving mechanisms. We observe that during the main phase the neutrals respond to the ion convection on a time scale of ˜84 min which is significantly faster than what would be expected from local ion drag momentum forcing alone. This suggests that other storm time influences are important for driving the neutrals during the main phase, such as Joule heating. During the late recovery phase, the neutrals are observed to drive the ion convection without any significant time delay, consistent with the so-called "neutral fly wheel effect" or disturbance dynamo persisting well into the late recovery phase.

  1. Error Analysis for High Resolution Topography with Bi-Static Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chen, Curtis W.; Hensley, Scott; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We present a flow down error analysis from the radar system to topographic height errors for bi-static single pass SAR interferometry for a satellite tandem pair. Because of orbital dynamics the baseline length and baseline orientation evolve spatially and temporally, the height accuracy of the system is modeled as a function of the spacecraft position and ground location. Vector sensitivity equations of height and the planar error components due to metrology, media effects, and radar system errors are derived and evaluated globally for a baseline mission. Included in the model are terrain effects that contribute to layover and shadow and slope effects on height errors. The analysis also accounts for nonoverlapping spectra and the non-overlapping bandwidth due to differences between the two platforms' viewing geometries. The model is applied to a 514 km altitude 97.4 degree inclination tandem satellite mission with a 300 m baseline separation and X-band SAR. Results from our model indicate that global DTED level 3 can be achieved.

  2. Preliminary results of short term continuous monitoring of an unstable permafrost affected rock slope using a portable, real aperture radar interferometer (GPRI).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Andrew; Amann, Florian; Strozzi, Tazio; Button, Edward; Rothard, Gerd

    2010-05-01

    A portable real aperture radar interferometer was used to continuously monitor a large unstable rock slope located in the Glarner Alps of Switzerland over a 26 hour period. With an elevation ranging between 2500 and 2800 m.a.s.l., and a north facing aspect, the slope is influenced by permafrost processes. Radar images revealed a larger than previously known area of instability, characterized by several discrete zones of movement. Maximum average displacements were on the order of approx. 0.5mm per hour. The unstable area was delineated by structural features, one of which included open (ice-filled) fractures. A strong radar signature for toppling was observed after 6 hours corresponding to a large rock column leaning approximately 10 degrees towards the radar's line of sight at the top of slope, however, further interpretation of failure mechanisms from the observed displacement field is complicated without additional data due to the heterogeneous nature of the rock mass characteristics and distribution of discrete talus deposits.

  3. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  4. Fine Resolution Topographic Mapping of the Jovian Moons: A Ka-Band High Resolution Topographic Mapping Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, S. N.; Carsey, F. D.; Turtle, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through use of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  5. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Kobrick, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and 56 degrees south latitude. The DEM will have 30 m horizontal resolution and about 15 m vertical errors. Two ortho-rectified C-band image mosaics are also planned. SRTM used a modification of the radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory that flew twice on the Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the interferometric data, a 60 m mast, additional C-band antenna, and improved tracking and navigation devices were added. A second X-band antenna was also added by the German Space Agency, and produced higher resolution topographic measurements in strips nested within the full, C-band coverage. First results indicate that the radars and ancillary instruments worked very well. Data played back to the ground during the flight were processed to DEMs and products released hours after acquisition. An extensive program for calibration and verification of the SRTM data is now underway. When complete later this year, systematic processing of the data will begin, with final products emerging a continent at a time. Data processing will be completed by the end of 2002. Products will be transferred to the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Center for civilian archive and distribution. NIMA will handle Department of Defense distribution. * Work performed under contract to NASA.

  6. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Kobrick, M.

    2001-12-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies. The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and 56 degrees south latitude. The DEM will have 30 m horizontal resolution and better than 15 m vertical errors. Two ortho-rectified C-band image mosaics are also planned. Data processing will be completed by the end of 2002. SRTM used a modification of the radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory that flew twice on the Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the interferometric data, a 60 m mast, additional C-band antenna, and improved tracking and navigation devices were added. A second X-band antenna was also added by the German Space Agency, and produced higher resolution topographic measurements in strips nested within the full, C-band coverage. First results indicate that the radars and ancillary instruments worked very well. Data played back to the ground during the flight were processed to DEMs and products released hours after acquisition. An extensive program for calibration and verification of the SRTM data is now underway. When complete later this year, systematic processing of the data will begin, with final products emerging a continent at a time. Products will be transferred to the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Center for civilian archive and distribution. NIMA will handle Department of Defense distribution. * Work performed under contract to NASA.

  7. Practical aspects of single-pass scan Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyong; Mao, Bin; Lan, Fei; Liu, Liming

    2012-11-01

    The single-pass scan Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in ambient condition has a few advantages over the dual-pass lift-up scan KPFM. For example, its spatial resolution is expected to be higher; and its topographical errors caused by electrostatic forces are minimized because electrostatic forces are actively suppressed during the simultaneous topographical and KPFM measurement. Because single-pass scan KPFM in ambient condition is relatively new, it received little attention in the literature so far. In this article, we discuss several major practical aspects of single-pass scan KPFM especially in ambient condition. First, we define the resolution using a point spread function. With this definition, we analyze the relation between the resolution and the scanning parameters such as tip apex radius and tip-surface distance. We further study the accuracy of KPFM based on the point spread function. Then, we analyze the sensitivity of KPFM under different operation modes. Finally, we investigate the crosstalk between the topographical image and the surface potential image and demonstrate the practical ways to minimize the crosstalk. These discussions not only help us to understand the single-pass scan KPFM but also provide practical guidance in using single-pass scan KPFM. PMID:23206065

  8. Practical aspects of single-pass scan Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangyong; Mao, Bin; Lan, Fei; Liu, Liming

    2012-11-01

    The single-pass scan Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in ambient condition has a few advantages over the dual-pass lift-up scan KPFM. For example, its spatial resolution is expected to be higher; and its topographical errors caused by electrostatic forces are minimized because electrostatic forces are actively suppressed during the simultaneous topographical and KPFM measurement. Because single-pass scan KPFM in ambient condition is relatively new, it received little attention in the literature so far. In this article, we discuss several major practical aspects of single-pass scan KPFM especially in ambient condition. First, we define the resolution using a point spread function. With this definition, we analyze the relation between the resolution and the scanning parameters such as tip apex radius and tip-surface distance. We further study the accuracy of KPFM based on the point spread function. Then, we analyze the sensitivity of KPFM under different operation modes. Finally, we investigate the crosstalk between the topographical image and the surface potential image and demonstrate the practical ways to minimize the crosstalk. These discussions not only help us to understand the single-pass scan KPFM but also provide practical guidance in using single-pass scan KPFM.

  9. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  10. Evaluating single-pass catch as a tool for identifying spatial pattern in fish distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, D.S.; Gresswell, R.E.; Torgersen, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the efficacy of single-pass electrofishing without blocknets as a tool for collecting spatially continuous fish distribution data in headwater streams. We compare spatial patterns in abundance, sampling effort, and length-frequency distributions from single-pass sampling of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) to data obtained from a more precise multiple-pass removal electrofishing method in two mid-sized (500–1000 ha) forested watersheds in western Oregon. Abundance estimates from single- and multiple-pass removal electrofishing were positively correlated in both watersheds, r = 0.99 and 0.86. There were no significant trends in capture probabilities at the watershed scale (P > 0.05). Moreover, among-sample variation in fish abundance was higher than within-sample error in both streams indicating that increased precision of unit-scale abundance estimates would provide less information on patterns of abundance than increasing the fraction of habitat units sampled. In the two watersheds, respectively, single-pass electrofishing captured 78 and 74% of the estimated population of cutthroat trout with 7 and 10% of the effort. At the scale of intermediate-sized watersheds, single-pass electrofishing exhibited a sufficient level of precision to be effective in detecting spatial patterns of cutthroat trout abundance and may be a useful tool for providing the context for investigating fish-habitat relationships at multiple scales.

  11. KARIN: The Ka-Band Radar Interferometer for the Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Peral, Eva; McWatters, Dalia; Pollard, Brian; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Hughes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several nadir profiling radar altimeters have provided our first global look at the ocean basin-scale circulation and the ocean mesoscale at wavelengths longer than 100 km. Due to sampling limitations, nadir altimetry is unable to resolve the small wavelength ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale that are responsible for the vertical mixing of ocean heat and gases and the dissipation of kinetic energy from large to small scales. The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would be a partnership between NASA, CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spaciales) and the Canadian Space Agency, and would have as one of its main goals the measurement of ocean topography with kilometer-scale spatial resolution and centimeter scale accuracy. In this paper, we provide an overview of all ocean error sources that would contribute to the SWOT mission.

  12. Comparing the linewidths from single-pass SPDC and singly resonant cavity SPDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, Oliver; Ma, Lijun; Kuo, Paulina; Tang, Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) is a common method to generate entangled photon pairs for use in quantum communications. The generated single photon linewidth is a critical issue for photon-atom interactions in quantum memory applications. We compare the linewidths of greatly non-degenerate single photon pairs from SPDC generated in the single-pass case and the singly-resonant cavity case. For a 6 mm periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal, the linewidth of the generated signal photons is reduced from 1 THz in the single pass case to tens of MHz in the singly-resonant cavity case, while the brightness within the modal lineiwdth is increased by a factor of the cavity finesse, though the overall SPDC generation rate remains unchanged.

  13. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  14. Assessing the efficacy of single-pass backpack electrofishing to characterize fish community structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; McIntyre, J.P.; Pollock, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-pass backpack electrofishing data collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to assess the efficacy of single-pass backpack electrofishing. A two-capture removal model was used to estimate, within 10 river basins across the United States, proportional fish species richness from one-pass electrofishing and probabilities of detection for individual fish species. Mean estimated species richness from first-pass sampling (p??s1) ranged from 80.7% to 100% of estimated total species richness for each river basin, based on at least seven samples per basin. However, p??s1 values for individual sites ranged from 40% to 100% of estimated total species richness. Additional species unique to the second pass were collected in 50.3% of the samples. Of these, cyprinids and centrarchids were collected most frequently. Proportional fish species richness estimated for the first pass increased significantly with decreasing stream width for 1 of the 10 river basins. When used to calculate probabilities of detection of individual fish species, the removal model failed 48% of the time because the number of individuals of a species was greater in the second pass than in the first pass. Single-pass backpack electrofishing data alone may make it difficult to determine whether characterized fish community structure data are real or spurious. The two-pass removal model can be used to assess the effectiveness of sampling species richness with a single electrofishing pass. However, the two-pass removal model may have limited utility to determine probabilities of detection of individual species and, thus, limit the ability to assess the effectiveness of single-pass sampling to characterize species relative abundances. Multiple-pass (at least three passes) backpack electrofishing at a large number of sites may not be cost-effective as part of a standardized sampling protocol for large-geographic-scale studies. However, multiple

  15. Efficient single-pass resonantly-pumped Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian; Kendall, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    A simple scheme for efficient generation of two micron laser radiation is reported. Using a thulium fibre laser to pump a Q-switched Ho:YAG laser 31.7 W of average output power is achieved with an M2 of 1.5 (an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 67% in terms of absorbed pump power) at a wavelength of 2.1 μm. A single-pass pump geometry is used, eliminating the risk of feedback of unabsorbed light into the fibre laser.

  16. Relationship between in vitro transendothelial permeability and in vivo single-pass brain extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, J.P.; Di Rocco, R.J.; Narra, R.K.

    1994-09-01

    In vitro transendothelial permeability was compared to in vivo rat single-pass cerebral extractions to evaluate which method would best estimate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of several SPECT imaging agents. Six {sup 99m}Tc complexes and seven non-Tc complexes were tested in vitro using monolayers of primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells and in vivo using the rat single-pass cerebral extraction model. In vitro transendothelial permeability indices (PI) were determined by measuring the average percent of radioactivity traversing the monolayers as a function of time. In vivo single-pass cerebral extractions were determined using an indicator fractionation method. A positive correlation between extraction and PI was found for the non-TC complexes (r{sup 2} = 0.96). The CBF imaging agents {sup 99m}Tc-ECD and {sup 99m}Tc-PnAO have high values for E and PI, demonstrating that these agents penetrate the BBB and have a high membrane permeability, while the heart imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi had low values for both E and PI. The low PI and E values for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi are consistent with a low brain uptake for this agent, except in cases of disruption of the BBB. In contrast to {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, {sup 99m}Tc-PnAO and {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, which had concordant values for E and PI, two highly lipophilic boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime (BATOs), {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, {sup 99m}Tc-Cl(DMG){sub 3}2MP, had low negative values for PI, but high values for E. In addition, after 3 hr of incubation, the monolayer-to-medium concentration ratio of the BATOs was 642:1 and 744:1, respectively. This compares with values of 89:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-PnAO), 25:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) and 34:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi). These data suggest that the high in vivo single-pass extraction of the BATOs may be explained by a hydrophobic interaction with the luminal surface of the capillary endothelial cell plasma membrane.

  17. Observations of single-pass ion cyclotron heating in a trans-sonic flowing plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E. A.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Glover, T. W.; Carter, M. D.; McCaskill, G. E.; Longmier, B. W.; Brukardt, M. S.; Chancery, W. J.; Jacobson, V. T.

    2010-04-01

    The VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR®) is a high power electric spacecraft propulsion system, capable of Isp/thrust modulation at constant power [F. R. Chang Díaz et al., Proceedings of the 39th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, NV, 8-11 Jan. 2001]. The VASIMR® uses a helicon discharge to generate plasma. This plasma is energized by an rf booster stage that uses left hand polarized slow mode waves launched from the high field side of the ion cyclotron resonance. In the experiments reported in this paper, the booster uses 2-4 MHz waves with up to 50 kW of power. This process is similar to the ion cyclotron heating (ICH) in tokamaks, but in the VASIMR® the ions only pass through the resonance region once. The rapid absorption of ion cyclotron waves has been predicted in recent theoretical studies. These theoretical predictions have been supported with several independent measurements in this paper. The single-pass ICH produced a substantial increase in ion velocity. Pitch angle distribution studies showed that this increase took place in the resonance region where the ion cyclotron frequency was roughly equal to the frequency on the injected rf waves. Downstream of the resonance region the perpendicular velocity boost should be converted to axial flow velocity through the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant as the magnetic field decreases in the exhaust region of the VASIMR®. This paper will review all of the single-pass ICH ion acceleration data obtained using deuterium in the first VASIMR® physics demonstrator machine, the VX-50. During these experiments, the available power to the helicon ionization stage increased from 3 to 20+ kW. The increased plasma density produced increased plasma loading of the ICH coupler. Starting with an initial demonstration of single-pass ion cyclotron acceleration, the experiments demonstrate significant improvements in coupler efficiency and in ion heating efficiency. In

  18. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  19. Single-pass high-harmonic generation at 20.8 MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Vernaleken, Andreas; Weitenberg, Johannes; Sartorius, Thomas; Russbueldt, Peter; Schneider, Waldemar; Stebbings, Sarah L; Kling, Matthias F; Hommelhoff, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Poprawe, Reinhart; Krausz, Ferenc; Hänsch, Theodor W; Udem, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    We report on single-pass high-harmonic generation (HHG) with amplified driving laser pulses at a repetition rate of 20.8 MHz. An Yb:YAG Innoslab amplifier system provides 35 fs pulses with 20 W average power at 1030 nm after external pulse compression. Following tight focusing into a xenon gas jet, we observe the generation of high-harmonic radiation of up to the seventeenth order. Our results show that state-of-the-art amplifier systems have become a promising alternative to cavity-assisted HHG for applications that require high repetition rates, such as frequency comb spectroscopy in the extreme UV. PMID:21886233

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF SUPERRADIANCE IN A SINGLE PASS SEEDED FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    Superradiance and nonlinear evolution of a FEL pulse in a single-pass FEL were experimentally demonstrated at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Source Development Laboratory (SDL). The experiment was performed using a 1.5 ps high-brightness electron beam and a 100fs Ti:Sapphire seed laser. The seed laser and electron beam interact in the 10 meter long NISUS undulator with a period of 3.89 cm. The FEL spectrum, energy and pulse length along the undulator were measured. FEL saturation was observed, and gain of more the 200 (relative to seed laser) was measured. Both FEL spectrum widening and pulse length shortening were observed; FEL pulses as short as 65 fs FWHM were measured. The superradiance and nonlinear evolution were also simulated using the numerical code GENESIS1.3 yielding good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Beam-Beam Simulations for a Single Pass SuperB-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Seeman, J.; Schulte, D.; /CERN

    2007-05-18

    A study of beam-beam collisions for an asymmetric single pass SuperB-Factory is presented [1]. In this scheme an e{sup -} and an e{sup +} beam are first stored and damped in two Damping Rings (DR), then extracted, compressed and focused to the IP. After collision the two beams are re-injected in the DR to be damped and extracted for collision again. The explored beam parameters are similar to those used in the design of the International Linear Collider, except for the beam energies. Flat beams and round beams were compared in the simulations in order to optimize both luminosity performances and beam blowup after collision. With such approach a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved.

  2. European clinical experience with a dual chamber single pass sensing and pacing defibrillation lead.

    PubMed

    Gradaus, Rainer; Gonska, Bernd D; Stellbrink, Christoph; Cron, Thomas; Tebbenjohanns, Jürgen; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina; Himmrich, Ewald; Salerno, Jorge A; Osswald, Stefan; Gommer, Erik D; Van Veen, Benno K; Böcker, Dirk

    2002-07-01

    Dual chamber ICDs are increasingly implanted nowadays, mainly to improve discrimination between supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias but also to maintain AV synchrony in patients with bradycardia. The aim of this study was to investigate a new single pass right ventricular defibrillation lead capable of true bipolar sensing and pacing in the right atrium and integrated bipolar sensing and pacing in the right ventricle. The performance of the lead was evaluated in 57 patients (age 61 +/- 12 years; New York Heart Association 1.9 +/- 0.6, left ventricular ejection fraction 0.38 +/- 0.15) at implant, at prehospital discharge, and during a 1-year follow-up. Sensing and pacing behavior of the lead was evaluated in six different body positions. In four patients, no stable position of the atrial electrode could intraoperatively be found. The intraoperative atrial sensing was 2.3 +/- 1.6 mV and the atrial pacing threshold 0.8 +/- 0.5 V at 0.5 ms. At follow-up, the atrial sensing ranged from 1.5 mV to 2.2 mV and the atrial pacing threshold product from 0.8 to 1.7 V/ms. In 11 patients, an intermittent atrial sensing problem and in 24 patients an atrial pacing dysfunction were observed in at least one body position. In 565 episodes, a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 96.5% were found for ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, this single pass defibrillation lead performed well as a VDD lead and for dual chamber arrhythmia discrimination. However, loss of atrial capture in 45% of patients preclude its use in patients depending on atrial pacing. PMID:12164450

  3. Implantation of a dual chamber pacing and sensing single pass defibrillation lead.

    PubMed

    Gradaus, R; Block, M; Dorszewski, A; Schriever, C; Hammel, D; Scheld, H H; Borggrefe, M; Breithardt, G; Böcker, D

    2001-04-01

    Dual-chamber ICDs are increasingly used to avoid inappropriate shocks due to supraventricular tachycardias. Additionally, many ICD patients will probably benefit from dual chamber pacing. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the intraoperative performance and short-term follow-up of an innovative single pass right ventricular defibrillation lead capable of bipolar sensing and pacing in the right atrium and ventricle. Implantation of this single pass right ventricular defibrillation lead was successful in all 13 patients (age 63 +/- 8 years; LVEF 0.44 +/- 0.16; New York Heart Association [NYHA] 2.4 +/- 0.4, previous open heart surgery in all patients). The operation time was 79 +/- 29 minutes, the fluoroscopy time 4.7 +/- 3.1 minutes. No perioperative complications occurred. The intraoperative atrial sensing was 1.7 +/- 0.5 mV, the atrial pacing threshold product was 0.20 +/- 0.14 V/ms (range 0.03-0.50 V/ms). The defibrillation threshold was 8.8 +/- 2.7 J. At prehospital discharge and at 1-month and 3-month follow-up, atrial sensing was 1.9 +/- 0.9, 2.1 +/- 0.5, and 2.7 +/- 0.6 mV, respectively, (P = NS, P < 0.05, P < 0.05 to implant, respectively), the mean atrial threshold product 0.79, 1.65, and 1.29 V/ms, respectively. In two patients, an intermittent exit block occurred in different body postures. All spontaneous and induced ventricular arrhythmias were detected and terminated appropriately. Thus, in a highly selected patient group, atrial and ventricular sensing and pacing with a single lead is possible under consideration of an atrial pacing dysfunction in 17% of patients. PMID:11341077

  4. High-Accuracy Elevation Data at Large Scales from Airborne Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Guy; Moller, Delwyn; Mentgen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential data sets for disaster risk management and humanitarian relief services as well as many environmental process models. At present, on the hand, globally available DEMs only meet the basic requirements and for many services and modeling studies are not of high enough spatial resolution and lack accuracy in the vertical. On the other hand, LiDAR-DEMs are of very high spatial resolution and great vertical accuracy but acquisition operations can be very costly for spatial scales larger than a couple of hundred square km and also have severe limitations in wetland areas and under cloudy and rainy conditions. The ideal situation would thus be to have a DEM technology that allows larger spatial coverage than LiDAR but without compromising resolution and vertical accuracy and still performing under some adverse weather conditions and at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we present a novel single pass In-SAR technology for airborne vehicles that is cost-effective and can generate DEMs with a vertical error of around 0.3 m for an average spatial resolution of 3 m. To demonstrate this capability, we compare a sample single-pass In-SAR Ka-band DEM of the California Central Valley from the NASA/JPL airborne GLISTIN-A to a high-resolution LiDAR DEM. We also perform a simple sensitivity analysis to floodplain inundation. Based on the findings of our analysis, we argue that this type of technology can and should be used to replace large regions of globally available lower resolution DEMs, particularly in coastal, delta and floodplain areas where a high number of assets, habitats and lives are at risk from natural disasters. We conclude with a discussion on requirements, advantages and caveats in terms of instrument and data processing.

  5. High resolution interferometer with multiple-pass optical configuration.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeongho; Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kang, Chu-Shik; Kim, Jae-Wan; Kim, Soohyun

    2009-11-01

    An interferometer having fourteen times higher resolution than a conventional single-pass interferometer has been developed by making multiple-pass optical path. To embody the multiple-pass optical configuration, a two-dimensional corner cube array block was designed, and its symmetric structure minimized the measurement error. The effect from the alignment error and the imperfection of corner cube is calculated as picometer level. An experiment proves that the suggested interferometer has about 45 nm of optical resolution and its nonlinearity is about 0.5 nm in peak-to-valley. PMID:19997342

  6. Aerosol Nanoencapsulation: Single-Pass Floating Self-Assembly of Biofunctional Hybrid Nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-07-20

    Multifunctional nanoplatforms were prepared via floating self-assembly using a hard nanoparticle (NP) as the core and a modified-polymer (MP, cholesterol-chitosan linked with polyethylenimine) droplet as the shell in a single-pass aerosol nanoencapsulation process. The floating hard NPs (silica, calcium carbonate, gold-decorated graphene oxide, and thiol-capped gold) were directly injected into MP droplets at the opening of a spraying device. Subsequently, the solvent was thermally extracted from the droplets, resulting in the formation of biofunctional nanoplatforms. Measured in vitro, the genes complexed with the nanoplatforms were transfected into target cells, exhibiting higher efficiencies for the MP particles alone without a significant increase in in vitro cell cytotoxicity. The aerosol encapsulation could be further extended to prepare other combinations [gold-silica and gold-calcium carbonate including doxorubicin (Dox)] using the MP, and their hybrid natures demonstrated photothermal cancer cell killing and chemo-thermal Dox release capabilities through surface plasmon resonance heating. PMID:27383730

  7. Augmented Binary Substitution: Single-pass CDR germ-lining and stabilization of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Sue; Fennell, Brian J; Apgar, James R; Lambert, Matthew; McDonnell, Barry; Grant, Joanne; Wade, Jason; Franklin, Edward; Foy, Niall; Ní Shúilleabháin, Deirdre; Fields, Conor; Darmanin-Sheehan, Alfredo; King, Amy; Paulsen, Janet E; Hickling, Timothy P; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Cunningham, Orla; Finlay, William J J

    2015-12-15

    Although humanized antibodies have been highly successful in the clinic, all current humanization techniques have potential limitations, such as: reliance on rodent hosts, immunogenicity due to high non-germ-line amino acid content, v-domain destabilization, expression and formulation issues. This study presents a technology that generates stable, soluble, ultrahumanized antibodies via single-step complementarity-determining region (CDR) germ-lining. For three antibodies from three separate key immune host species, binary substitution CDR cassettes were inserted into preferred human frameworks to form libraries in which only the parental or human germ-line destination residue was encoded at each position. The CDR-H3 in each case was also augmented with 1 ± 1 random substitution per clone. Each library was then screened for clones with restored antigen binding capacity. Lead ultrahumanized clones demonstrated high stability, with affinity and specificity equivalent to, or better than, the parental IgG. Critically, this was mainly achieved on germ-line frameworks by simultaneously subtracting up to 19 redundant non-germ-line residues in the CDRs. This process significantly lowered non-germ-line sequence content, minimized immunogenicity risk in the final molecules and provided a heat map for the essential non-germ-line CDR residue content of each antibody. The ABS technology therefore fully optimizes the clinical potential of antibodies from rodents and alternative immune hosts, rendering them indistinguishable from fully human in a simple, single-pass process. PMID:26621728

  8. Intestinal permeability of forskolin by in situ single pass perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Jun; Jiang, Dong-bo; Tian, Lu-Lu; Yin, Jia-Jun; Huang, Jian-Ming; Weng, Wei-Yu

    2012-05-01

    The intestinal permeability of forskolin was investigated using a single pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in rats. SPIP was performed in different intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon) with three concentrations of forskolin (11.90, 29.75, and 59.90 µg/mL). The investigations of adsorption and stability were performed to ensure that the disappearance of forskolin from the perfusate was due to intestinal absorption. The results of the SPIP study indicated that forskolin could be absorbed in all segments of the intestine. The effective permeability (P (eff)) of forskolin was in the range of drugs with high intestinal permeability. The P (eff) was highest in the duodenum as compared to other intestinal segments. The decreases of P (eff) in the duodenum and ileum at the highest forskolin concentration suggested a saturable transport process. The addition of verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, significantly enhanced the permeability of forskolin across the rat jejunum. The absorbed fraction of dissolved forskolin after oral administration in humans was estimated to be 100 % calculated from rat P (eff). In conclusion, dissolved forskolin can be absorbed readily in the intestine. The low aqueous solubility of forskolin might be a crucial factor for its poor oral bioavailability. PMID:22411728

  9. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Shashank; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Suresh, Kurra

    2013-12-01

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  10. Texture Evolution of Single-Pass Hot-Rolled 5052/AZ31/5052 Clad Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Huihui; Liang, Wei; Yang, Fuqian; Zheng, Liuwei; Li, Xianrong; Fan, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Three-layered 5052/AZ31/5052 clad sheets with maximum rolling reductions of 33% and 48% were prepared, using single-pass hot rolling followed by thermal annealing at 200°C for 1 h. The evolutions of microstructures and textures were analyzed. The experimental results show that the AZ31 layer exhibited a typical deformation microstructure with rolling-induced twins. The AZ31 layer with the 33% rolling reduction possessed a texture with the basal pole tilting about 35° away from normal direction to transverse direction and the majority of twins consists of {10 bar{1} 1}-{10 bar{1} 2} double twins and {10 bar{1} 2} tensile twins. The AZ31 layer with the 48% rolling reduction possessed a typical basal texture because {10 bar{1} 1} compression twins were activated by c-axis strain to compete with the tensile twins. No intermetallics were observed after annealing, and recrystallization occurred preferentially at the interface between AZ31 and 5052. The typical rolling texture of the 5052 layer disappeared, and the stable {001} <110> rotation cube component was dominant. The tensile test of the rolled three-layered 5052/AZ31/5052 clad sheets was performed. The tensile experimental results show that the annealed clad sheets with 33% rolling reduction and smaller degree of recrystallization have the largest elongation of 22.5% and larger ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than the annealed clad sheets with 48% rolling reduction.

  11. Single-pass environmental chamber for quantifying human responses to airborne chemicals.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Joseph C; Warmath, D Stan; Koetz, Kurt P; Hood, Alison F; Thompson, Mark L; Kendal-Reed, Martin S; Walker, Dianne B; Walker, James C

    2005-03-01

    Despite increasing interest in the short-term effects of airborne environmental contaminants, experimental findings are generated at a very slow pace. This is due in part to the expense and complexity of most environmental chambers, which are needed for quantifying effects of wholebody exposures. We lessened this obstacle by designing, constructing, and testing a single-pass, 10-m3 stainless-steel chamber. Compressed air is purified before being sent to an air dilution olfactometer, which supplies 1000 L (1 m3) per minute (referenced to STP) while maintaining 40% relative humidity (RH) and 22.6 degrees C. Precise control of all stimulus parameters is greatly simplified since air is not recirculated. Vapor-phase odorant concentrations are achieved by varying the proportion of total airflow passing through one or more saturators, and are verified in real time by an infrared (IR) spectrometer. An adjoining 5-m3 anteroom is used for introducing known intensities of more chemically complex vapor and/or particulate stimuli into the chamber. Prior to the point that air is exhausted from the chamber, all components are made of stainless steel, Teflon, or glass. A LabView program contains feedback loops that achieve document chamber conditions and document performance. Additional instrumentation and computer systems provide for the automated collection of perceptual, respiratory, eye blink, heart rate, blood pressure, psychological state, and cognitive data. These endpoints are now being recorded, using this facility, in response to ranges of concentrations of propionic acid and environmental tobacco smoke. PMID:15788378

  12. Single-pass GPU-raycasting for structured adaptive mesh refinement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehler, Ralf; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) is a popular numerical technique to study processes with high spatial and temporal dynamic range. It reduces computational requirements by adapting the lattice on which the underlying differential equations are solved to most efficiently represent the solution. Particularly in astrophysics and cosmology such simulations now can capture spatial scales ten orders of magnitude apart and more. The irregular locations and extensions of the refined regions in the SAMR scheme and the fact that different resolution levels partially overlap, poses a challenge for GPU-based direct volume rendering methods. kD-trees have proven to be advantageous to subdivide the data domain into non-overlapping blocks of equally sized cells, optimal for the texture units of current graphics hardware, but previous GPU-supported raycasting approaches for SAMR data using this data structure required a separate rendering pass for each node, preventing the application of many advanced lighting schemes that require simultaneous access to more than one block of cells. In this paper we present the first single-pass GPU-raycasting algorithm for SAMR data that is based on a kD-tree. The tree is efficiently encoded by a set of 3D-textures, which allows to adaptively sample complete rays entirely on the GPU without any CPU interaction. We discuss two different data storage strategies to access the grid data on the GPU and apply them to several datasets to prove the benefits of the proposed method.

  13. An interpretation and guide to single-pass beam shaping methods using SLMs and DMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Exquisite manipulations of light can be performed with devices such as spatial light modulators (SLMs) and digital micromirror devices (DMDs). These devices can be used to simulate transverse paraxial beam wavefunction eigenstates such as the Hermite–Laguerre–Gaussian mode families. We investigate several beam shaping methods in terms of the wavefunctions of scattered light. Our analysis of the efficiency, behaviour and limitations of beam shaping methods is applied to both theory and experiment. The deviation from the ideal output from a valid beam shaping method is shown to be due to experimental factors which are not necessarily being accounted for. Incident beam mode shape, aberration, and the amplitude/phase transfer functions of the DMD and SLM impact the distribution of scattered light and hence the effectiveness and efficiency of a beam shaping method. Correcting for these particular details of the optical system accounts for all differences in efficiency and mode fidelity between experiment and theory. We explicitly show the impact of experimental parameter variations so that these problems may be diagnosed and corrected in an experimental beam shaping apparatus. We show that several beam shaping methods can be used for the production of beam modes in a single pass and the choice is based on the particular experimental conditions.

  14. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections. PMID:26628124

  15. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  16. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Shashank E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Suresh, Kurra E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2013-12-16

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  17. Augmented Binary Substitution: Single-pass CDR germ-lining and stabilization of therapeutic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Sue; Fennell, Brian J.; Apgar, James R.; Lambert, Matthew; McDonnell, Barry; Grant, Joanne; Wade, Jason; Franklin, Edward; Foy, Niall; Ní Shúilleabháin, Deirdre; Fields, Conor; Darmanin-Sheehan, Alfredo; King, Amy; Paulsen, Janet E.; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Cunningham, Orla; Finlay, William J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Although humanized antibodies have been highly successful in the clinic, all current humanization techniques have potential limitations, such as: reliance on rodent hosts, immunogenicity due to high non-germ-line amino acid content, v-domain destabilization, expression and formulation issues. This study presents a technology that generates stable, soluble, ultrahumanized antibodies via single-step complementarity-determining region (CDR) germ-lining. For three antibodies from three separate key immune host species, binary substitution CDR cassettes were inserted into preferred human frameworks to form libraries in which only the parental or human germ-line destination residue was encoded at each position. The CDR-H3 in each case was also augmented with 1 ± 1 random substitution per clone. Each library was then screened for clones with restored antigen binding capacity. Lead ultrahumanized clones demonstrated high stability, with affinity and specificity equivalent to, or better than, the parental IgG. Critically, this was mainly achieved on germ-line frameworks by simultaneously subtracting up to 19 redundant non-germ-line residues in the CDRs. This process significantly lowered non-germ-line sequence content, minimized immunogenicity risk in the final molecules and provided a heat map for the essential non-germ-line CDR residue content of each antibody. The ABS technology therefore fully optimizes the clinical potential of antibodies from rodents and alternative immune hosts, rendering them indistinguishable from fully human in a simple, single-pass process. PMID:26621728

  18. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  19. Walk off compensation, multicrystal, cascaded, single pass, second harmonic generation in LBO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, B.; Zheng, X. S.; Cai, Z. P.; Xu, H. Y.; Jia, F. Q.

    2012-09-01

    Walk off compensation and multi crystal (MC) cascaded single pass second harmonic generation (SP-SHG) in LBO was combined to improve the SHG conversion efficiency. We report a simple and compact implementation for (SP-SHG) of radiation, based on a cascaded multicrystal (MC) scheme that can provide high conversion efficiency without other focusing device, the enhancement factor of 2.9 was realized. At an incident pump power of 20 W, the average power of 6.1 W and pulse width of 12 ns green laser was obtained at a repetition rate of 42.4 kHz, corresponding to a peak power of 12 kW and single pulse energy of 144 μJ. The optical to optical conversion efficiency from diode to green and from IR to green laser are about 30.5 and 67.8%, the whole length of this system is about 150 mm, the output fluctuation of this system is less than 5% in 2 h.

  20. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 10(6) RLU mg(-1)) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 10(6) RLU mg(-1)), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s(-1) T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL(-1)] depended on particle concentration (0.5-6.0 mg mL(-1)). PMID:27507668

  1. Study on a test of optical stochastic cooling scheme in a single pass beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Kim, C.; Massoletti, D.; Zholents, A.

    1997-01-01

    A feasibility study of an experiment to test the principle of optical stochastic cooling is presented. We propose to build a new beamline in the extraction area of the ALS Booster synchrotron, where we will include a bypass lattice similar to the lattice that could be used in the cooling insertion in a storage ring. Of course, in the single pass beamline we cannot achieve cooling, but we can test all the functions of the bypass lattice that are required to achieve cooling in a storage ring. As it is stated in, there are stringent requirements on the time-of-flight properties of the bypass lattice employed in a cooling scheme. The pathlengths of particle trajectories in the bypass must be fairly insensitive to the standard set of errors that usually affect the performance of storage rings. Namely, it is necessary to preserve all fluctuations in the longitudinal particle density within the beam from the beginning to the end of the bypass lattice with the accuracy of {lambda}/2{pi}, where A is the carrying (optical) wavelength. According to, cooling will completely vanish if a combined effect of all kinds of errors will produce a spread of the pathlengths of particle trajectories larger than {lambda}/2 and the cooling time will almost double if the spread of the pathlengths is {lambda}/2{pi}. At a first glance, {lambda}/2{pi} {approx_equal} 0.1/{mu}m is such a small value that satisfying this accuracy looks nearly impossible. However, simulations show that a carefully designed bypass can meet all the requirements even with rather conservative tolerance to errors.

  2. Intestinal permeability of chlorpyrifos using the single-pass intestinal perfusion method in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cook, Thomas J; Shenoy, Smriti S

    2003-03-01

    The intestinal transport of chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organothiophosphate pesticide, was investigated using the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in male, Sprague-Dawley rats. SPIP was performed in each isolated region of the small intestine (i.e. duodenum, jejunum and ileum) with three concentrations of CPF (0.1, 2.0 and 10 microM) at a flow rate of 0.25 ml/min. Preliminary binding and stability studies were conducted to ensure that the loss of CPF in the SPIP study can be attributed to intestinal absorption. The effective permeability (P(eff)) of CPF was determined for each segment and concentration. CPF exhibits a high intestinal permeability over the length of the small intestine indicative of compounds that are well absorbed. Decreases in permeability values at the highest CPF concentration studied in the duodenum and ileum suggest a saturable transport process. Based on these results, passive, transcellular diffusion dominates the intestinal transport mechanism of CPF, with a saturable transport process evident in the duodenum and ileum. The P(eff) of CPF is in the range of drugs with high intestinal permeability and high fraction of dose absorbed indicating that CPF readily crosses the intestine. The dependence of CPF's P(eff) on concentration in the duodenum and ileum suggests that CPF is transported by a combination of mechanisms across the intestine. Using established relationships, the human fraction dose absorbed for CPF was estimated to be >99%. The permeability values obtained from this study may be useful in models of exposure assessment. PMID:12499115

  3. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-08-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 106 RLU mg‑1) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 106 RLU mg‑1), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s‑1 T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL‑1] depended on particle concentration (0.5–6.0 mg mL‑1).

  4. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 106 RLU mg−1) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 106 RLU mg−1), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s−1 T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL−1] depended on particle concentration (0.5–6.0 mg mL−1). PMID:27507668

  5. Modeling and optimization of single-pass laser amplifiers for high-repetition-rate laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira; Udem, Thomas; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Haensch, Theodor W.; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2010-09-15

    We propose a model for a continuously pumped single-pass amplifier for continuous and pulsed laser beams. The model takes into account Gaussian shape and focusing geometry of pump and seed beam. As the full-wave simulation is complex we have developed a largely simplified numerical method that can be applied to rotationally symmetric geometries. With the tapered-shell model we treat (focused) propagation and amplification of an initially Gaussian beam in a gain crystal. The implementation can be done with a few lines of code that are given in this paper. With this code, a numerical parameter optimization is straightforward and example results are shown. We compare the results of our simple model with those of a full-wave simulation and show that they agree well. A comparison of model and experimental data also shows good agreement. We investigate in detail different regimes of amplification, namely the unsaturated, the fully saturated, and the intermediate regime. Because the amplification process is affected by spatially varying saturation and exhibits a nonlinear response against pump and seed power, no analytical expression for the expected output is available. For modeling of the amplification we employ a four-level system and show that if the fluorescence lifetime of the gain medium is larger than the inverse repetition rate of the seed beam, continuous-wave amplification can be employed to describe the amplification process of ultrashort pulse trains. We limit ourselves to this regime, which implies that if titanium:sapphire is chosen as gain medium the laser repetition rate has to be larger than a few megahertz. We show detailed simulation results for titanium:sapphire for a large parameter set.

  6. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  7. Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    At the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, NASA astronomers have linked the two 10-meter (33-foot) telescopes at the W. M. Keck Observatory. The linked telescopes, which together are called the Keck Interferometer, make up the world's most powerful optical telescope system. The Keck Interferometer will search for planets around nearby stars and study dust clouds around those stars that may hamper future space-based searches for habitable, Earthlike planets. The Keck Interferometer is part of NASA's Origins program, which seeks to answer two fundamental questions: How did we get here? Are we alone?

  8. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography Mission (SWOT): the Ka-band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn) for water level measurements at all scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto; Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission will study ocean mesoscale and submesoscale phenomena and provide an inventory of storage change and discharge for fresh water bodies and rivers. In this paper, we examine the combination of measurements that will be used by SWOT to achieve a globally consistent data set. We introduce a new channel in the SWOT measurement that combines data transmitted by the interferometer antennas and received by the radiometer antenna allows the closing of the SWOT nadir coverage gap. This new mode also allows for improved calibration between the nadir altimeter and the interferometer, resulting in consistent range measurements. Consistency in the phase measurements is achieved using a mixture of cross-over calibration combined with optimal estimation of system error drift.

  9. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  10. Investigating the light absorption in a single pass through the photoreceptor layer by means of the lipofuscin fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pedro M; McLellan, James S; Burns, Stephen A

    2005-07-01

    Reflection densitometry has been widely used to measure the density difference of the bleachable cone photopigments in human eyes. Most such measurements make a series of assumptions concerning the amount of scattered light to derive an estimate of the true cone photopigment density from the density difference measurements. The current study made three types of measurements of the light returning from the eye before and after bleaching: the amount of light returning in the "directed" reflection, which is a double-pass estimate of the cone photopigment density; the amount of light in undirected or diffuse reflection; and the amount of fluorescence from lipofuscin in the RPE, which provides a single-pass measurement of optical density difference. For a 1 deg foveally fixated field, the density difference estimates for the three measurements were 0.68, 0.21, and 0.22 respectively. The lipofuscin fluorescence was found to be unguided. The background density difference was non-negligible and very close to the single pass estimate from fluorescence. These measurements each involve potentially different pathways of light through the retina, and therefore place different constraints on models of these pathways. A simple model comparing the directional and the fluorescence optical densities produced retinal coverage estimates around 70-75%. Estimates of the shape factor of the single pass optical Stiles-Crawford effect were evaluated from the dark-adapted and bleached fluorescence measurements. The values were closer to those obtained from psychophysical methods than to the double pass optical Stiles-Crawford shape factors obtained directly from retinal reflectometry. PMID:15820514

  11. Single pass, THz spectral range free-electron laser driven by a photocathode hybrid rf linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Yu.; Friedman, A.; Pinhasi, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A single pass, THz spectral range free-electron laser (FEL) driven by a photocathode hybrid rf-LINAC is considered, taking the Israeli THz FEL project developed in Ariel University as an example. Two possible configurations of such FEL are discussed: an enhanced coherent spontaneous emission FEL, and a prebunched FEL utilizing periodically modulated short electron beam pulses. A general study of the FEL configurations is carried out in the framework of a space-frequency approach, realized in WB3D numerical code. The configurations are studied and compared based on preliminary parameters of a drive hybrid rf-LINAC gun under development in University of California, Los Angeles.

  12. Generation of coherent soft x-rays using a single-pass free-electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.F.; Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; McVey, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    We consider a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier, driven by an rf-linac followed by a damping ring for reduced emittance, for use in generating coherent light in the soft x-ray region. The dependence of the optical gain on electron-beam quality, studied with the three-dimensional FEL simulation code FELEX, is given and related to the expected power of self-amplified spontaneous emission. We discuss issues for the damping ring designed to achieve the required electron beam quality. The idea of a multipass regenerative amplifier is also presented.

  13. Investigation of fluoride removal from low-salinity groundwater by single-pass constant-voltage capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; Cao, Baichuan; Waite, T David

    2016-08-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is attracting increasing attention as an emerging technology for the facile removal of ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride removal from low-salinity groundwaters by single-pass constant-voltage CDI was investigated and a model developed to describe the dynamic fluoride electrosorption behavior. Effects of operating parameters including charging voltage and pump flow rate as well as impact of fluoride and chloride feed concentrations on the effluent fluoride concentration and equilibrium fluoride adsorption capacity were studied and the obtained data used to validate the model. Using the validated model, the effects of various design parameters, including arrangement of multiple CDI cells, on fluoride removal were assessed. Single-pass constant-voltage CDI was found to be effective in removing fluoride from low-salinity groundwaters but, as expected, removal efficiency was compromised in waters of high salinity. The relatively simple electrosorption model developed here provided a satisfactory description of both fluoride removal and current evolution and would appear to be a useful tool for prediction of CDI performance over a range of operating conditions, cell arrangements and feed water compositions though scope for model improvement exists. PMID:27151285

  14. Using a Ground Based radar interferometer during emergency: the case of A3 motorway (Salerno Reggio-Calabria) treated by landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ventisette, Chiara; Intrieri, Emanuele; Luzi, Guido; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    An application of Ground Based radar interferometry (GB-InSAR) technique to monitor a landslide threatening infrastructures in emergency conditions is presented. During December 2008 and January 2009 intense rainfalls occurred in Italy, especially in the southern regions. These rain events occurred in the last days of January, worsened the already critical hydrogeological conditions of some areas and triggered many landslides. One of these landslides, named Santa Trada landslide, is located close to a periodical stream called Fiumara di Santa Trada, near Villa San Giovanni municipality (Reggio Calabria, Calabria Region). The volume involved is about 100 000 m3. This estimate represents the case of a collapse of the landslide which destabilize a larger part of the slope, involving other areas delimited by some fractures observed upstream. Nevertheless the landslide does not directly threaten the roadway, its complete collapse would hit the pillars of a motorway viaduct. Through GB-InSAR data it has been possible to obtain an overview of the area affected by movement and to quantify the displacements magnitude. The main benefit of the system was not only limited to the capability of fully characterizing the landslide in spatial terms, it also permitted emergency operators to follow, during the whole campaign, the evolution of the mass movement and to study its cinematic behaviour. This aspect is fundamental to evaluate the volume of the material involved and to assess the temporal evolution of the risk scenario. The GB-InSAR installed at Santa Trada points up toward the landslide from a distance of 250 m. The apparatus produces a synthesized radar image of the observed area every 6 minutes, night and day, with a pixel resolution of about 0.75 m in range and 1.2 m on average in cross range, performing a millimeter accuracy on the final displacement maps. The interferometric analysis of sequences of consecutive images allows the operator to derive the entire line of

  15. Lucretia: A Matlab-Based Toolbox for the Modellingand Simulation of Single-Pass Electron Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    We report on Lucretia, a new simulation tool for the study of single-pass electron beam transport systems. Lucretia supports a combination of analytic and tracking techniques to model the tuning and operation of bunch compressors, linear accelerators, and beam delivery systems of linear colliders and linac-driven Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. Extensive use of Matlab scripting, graphics, and numerical capabilities maximize the flexibility of the system, and emphasis has been placed on representing and preserving the fixed relationships between elements (common girders, power supplies, etc.) which must be respected in the design of tuning algorithms. An overview of the code organization, some simple examples, and plans for future development are discussed.

  16. Three-colour entanglement produced by the single-pass quasi-phase-matching fourth harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youbin; Wang, HuaiJun; Zhao, Junwei; Ji, Fengmin; Wang, Yajuan

    2016-08-01

    Three-colour continuous-variable entanglement produced by single-pass cascaded quasi-phase-matching fourth harmonic generation is investigated. The fourth harmonic can be generated through cascaded double-frequency processes in a quasiperiodic optical superlattice by using quasi-phase-matching technology. The conversion dynamics of the cascaded double-frequency processes is studied using quantum stochastic methods. The nature of the entanglement is discussed by applying a necessary and sufficient criterion for continuous-variable entanglement. Strong three-colour entanglement among the fundamental, second-, and fourth-harmonic beams with a double frequency interval can be produced without an optical oscillator cavity. This is experimentally feasible and has potential applications in quantum communication and computation networks.

  17. {open_quotes}Optical Guiding{close_quotes} limits on extraction efficiencies of single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1995-08-01

    Single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers have an attractive feature of being able, in theory at least, of extracting a large portion of the electron beam energy into light. In circumstances where an optical FEL wiggler length is significantly longer than the Rayleigh length Z{sub R} corresponding to the electron beam radius, diffraction losses must be controlled via the phenomenon of optical guiding. Since the strength of the guiding depends upon the effective refractive index n exceeding one, and since (n-1) is inversely proportional to the optical electric field, there is a natural limiting mechanism to the on-axis field strength and thus the rate at which energy may be extracted from the electron beam. In particular, the extraction efficiency for a prebunched beam asymptotically grows linearly with z rather than quadratically. We present analytical and numerical simulation results concerning this behavior and discuss its applicability to various FEL designs including oscillator/amplifier-radiator configurations.

  18. Michelson Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The Michelson Interferometer is a device used in many applications, but here it was used to measure small differences in distance, in the milli-inch range, specifically for defects in the Orbiter windows. In this paper, the method of using the Michelson Interferometer for measuring small distances is explained as well as the mathematics of the system. The coherence length of several light sources was calculated in order to see just how small a defect could be measured. Since white light is a very broadband source, its coherence length is very short and thus can be used to measure small defects in glass. After finding the front and back reflections from a very thin glass slide with ease and calculating the thickness of it very accurately, it was concluded that this system could find and measure small defects on the Orbiter windows. This report also discusses a failed attempt for another use of this technology as well as describes an area of promise for further analysis. The latter of these areas has applications for finding possible defects in Orbiter windows without moving parts.

  19. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission: Introduction to Special Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Werner, M.; Kobrick, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies. The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60^o north and 56^o south latitude. The DEM has 30 m horizontal resolution and better than 15 m vertical errors. Two ortho-rectified C-band image mosaics are also produced. SRTM used a modification of the radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory that flew twice on the Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the interferometric data, a 60 m mast, additional C-band antenna, and improved tracking and navigation devices were added. A second X-band antenna was also added by the German Space Agency, and produced higher resolution topographic measurements in strips nested within the full, C-band coverage. First results indicate that the radars and ancillary instruments worked very well. Data played back to the ground during the flight were processed to DEMs and preliminary products released hours after acquisition. Precision processing of the C-band data was completed at the end of 2002. An extensive program for calibration and verification of the SRTM data is now underway. Data have been released so far for the US and a few test areas for scientific analysis. Public release of the data will occur in stages throughout 2003. Products are being transferred to the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Center for civilian archive and distribution. NIMA will handle Department of Defense distribution. X-band data are being processed at the German and Italian Space Agencies. As of late 2002, Europe and Africa had been completed and the remaining continents were on schedule to be completed by the end of 2003. This special session will highlight applications of this new high-resolution view of the

  20. The in vitro growth of a three-dimensional human dermal replacement using a single-pass perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, C R; Hardin, R; Bezverkov, K; Snyder, D; Allen, L; Landeen, L

    1994-04-01

    A human dermal replacement has been developed by seeding human neonatal dermal fibroblasts onto a biosorbable polyglactin (polyglycolide/polylactide) mesh and culturing in a bioreactor. The mesh provides the proper environment for the cells to attach, grow in a three-dimensional array, and establish a tissue matrix over a 2- to 3-week culture period. The dermal replacement has been characterized and found to contain a variety of naturally occurring dermal matrix proteins, including fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans, and collagen types I and III. To efficiently and reproducibly produce this dermal tissue equivalent, a closed, single-pass perfusion system was developed and compared with a static process. In the single-pas perfusion system, growth medium (containing ascorbic acid) was perfused around the 4 x 6 in. pieces of mesh at specific flow rates determined by nutrient consumption and waste production rates. The flow rates used for this system indicate that a diffusion-limited regime exists with a mean residence time greater than 1 h for essential nutrients and factors. By controlling glucose concentrations in the system to a delta of 0.70 g/L from the inlet to the outlet of the bioreactor, it took 6 fewer days to grow a tissue similar to that produced by the static system. PMID:18615797

  1. Merits of a sub-harmonic approach to a single-pass, 1.5-{Angstrom} FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Bonifacio, R.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1995-03-01

    SLAC/SSRL and collaborators elsewhere are studying th physics of a single-pass, FEL amplifier operating in th 1 -- 2 {Angstrom}, wavelength region based on electron beams from the SLAC linac at {approximately} 15 GeV energy. Hoping to reduce the total wiggler length needed to reach saturation when starting from shot noise, we have examined the benefits of making the first part of the wiggler resonant at a subharmonic wavelength (e.g. 4.5 {Angstrom}) at which the gain length can be significantly shorter. This leads to bunching of the electron beam at both the subharmonic and fundaments wavelengths, thus providing a strong coherent ``seed`` for exponential growth of radiation at the fundamental in the second part of the wiggler. Using both multi-harmonic and multi-frequency 2D FEL simulation codes, we have examined the predicted performance of such devices and the sensitivity to electron beam parameters such as current, emittance, and instantaneous energy spread.

  2. Single-Pass Percutaneous Liver Biopsy for Diffuse Liver Disease Using an Automated Device: Experience in 154 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Sanfeliz, Gerant Kinney, Thomas B.; Rose, Steven C.; Agha, Ayad K.M.; Valji, Karim; Miller, Franklin J.; Roberts, Anne C.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose: To describe our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous liver biopsies using the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system.Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive percutaneous core liver biopsy procedures were performed in 153 men in a single institution over 37 months. The medical charts, pathology reports, and radiology files were retrospectively reviewed. The number of needle passes, type of guidance, change in hematocrit level, and adequacy of specimens for histologic analysis were evaluated.Results: All biopsies were performed for histologic staging of chronic liver diseases. The majority of patients had hepatitis C (134/153, 90.2%). All patients were discharged to home after 4 hr of postprocedural observation. In 145 of 154 (94%) biopsies, a single needle pass was sufficient for diagnosis. US guidance was utilized in all but one of the procedures (153/154, 99.4%). The mean hematocrit decrease was 1.2% (44.1-42.9%). Pain requiring narcotic analgesia, the most frequent complication, occurred in 28 of 154 procedures (18.2%). No major complications occurred. The specimens were diagnostic in 152 of 154 procedures (98.7%).Conclusions: Single-pass percutaneous US-guided liver biopsy with the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system is safe and provides definitive pathologic diagnosis of chronic liver disease. It can be performed on an outpatient basis. Routine post-biopsy monitoring of hematocrit level in stable, asymptomatic patients is probably not warranted.

  3. Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion (SPIP) and prediction of fraction absorbed and permeability in humans: A study with antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Dezani, Thaisa Marinho; Dezani, André Bersani; Junior, João Batista da Silva; Serra, Cristina Helena Dos Reis

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the prediction of oral drug absorption in humans has been a challenge for researchers and many techniques for permeability studies have been developed for several purposes, including biowaiver processes. The Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion (SPIP) method performed in rats can provide permeability results closest to in vivo condition. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal permeability of the antiretroviral drugs lamivudine, stavudine and zidovudine using the SPIP method in rats and to predict their permeability (Peff,humans) and fraction absorbed (Fa) in humans. Metoprolol and fluorescein were used as marker compounds of high and low permeability, respectively. The effective permeability (Peff) results showed that stavudine and zidovudine have high permeability characteristics while lamivudine presented the lowest result. From Peff values obtained in rats, the Peff,humans and Fa were calculated. The use of SPIP in rats and calculations for absorption prediction in humans may indicate the transport mechanisms and/or pre-systemic metabolism involved on permeation processes of drugs, since this model is the closest to in vivo conditions. PMID:27130787

  4. {open_quotes}Optical guiding{close_quotes} limits on extraction efficiencies of single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    Single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers have an attractive feature of being able, in theory at least, of extracting a large portion of the electron beam energy into light. In circumstances where an optical FEL`s wiggler length is significantly longer than the Rayleigh length Z{sub R} corresponding to the electron beam radius, diffraction losses must be controlled via the phenomenon of {open_quotes}optical guiding{close_quotes}. Since the strength of the guiding depends upon the effective refractive index {eta}{sub r} exceeding one, and since ({eta}{sub r}-1) is inversely proportional to the optical electric field, there is a natural {open_quotes}limiting{close_quotes} mechanism to the on-axis field strength and thus the rate at which energy may be extracted from the electron beam. In particular, the extraction efficiency for a prebunched beam asymptotically grows linearly with z rather than quadratically. We present analytical and numerical simulation results concerning this behavior and discuss its applicability to various FEL designs including oscillator/amplifier-radiator configurations.

  5. [Intestinal absorption of different combinations of active compounds from Gegenqinlian decoction by rat single pass intestinal perfusion in situ].

    PubMed

    An, Rui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yi-Zhu; Xu, Ran-Chi; Wang, Xin-Hong

    2012-12-01

    The aim is to study the intestinal absorption of different combinations of active compounds out of Gegenqinlian decoction. Rat single pass intestinal perfusion model with jugular vein cannulated was used. Samples were obtained continuously from the outlet perfusate and the mesenteric vein. The levels of puerarin, daidzin, liquilitin, baicalin, wogonoside, jatrorrhizine, berberine and palmatine were determined by LC-MS/MS and their permeability coefficients were calculated. The results showed that Glycyrrhiza could promote the absorption of the active ingredients in Pueraria which is the monarch herb; meanwhile, Pueraria also played a role in promoting the absorption of liquilitin. Based on the Gegenqinlian decoction and the different combinations experiments, the results concerning the absorption of baicalin and wogonoside were as follows. For baicalin, Pueraria and Glycyrrhiza could promote its absorption and the effect of Pueraria was more obvious. For wogonoside, Pueraria could also promote its absorption, while Glycyrrhiza played a opposite role. Pueraria and Glycyrrhiza both played a part in promoting the absorption of jateorhizine, berberine and palmatine, the effective compounds in Coptis. PMID:23460978

  6. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjarlin Jensen, Ole; Michael Petersen, Paul

    2013-09-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring cavity and another tapered diode laser is single-passed through a nonlinear crystal which is contained in the coupled ring cavity. Using this method, the single-pass conversion efficiency is more than 25%. In contrast to SFG in an external cavity, the system is entirely self-stabilized with no electronic locking.

  7. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: An Airborne Proof-of-concept Mapping Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Chuang, C.; Fisher, C.; Muellerschoen, R.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Rignot, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year activities. This was achieved by integrating a Ka-band single-pass interferometric synthetic radar on the NASA Dryden Gulfstream III for a coordinated deployment. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. This proof-of-concept demonstration was motivated by the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN) Instrument Incubator Program and furthermore, highly leveraged existing ESTO hardware and software assets (the Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) and processor and the PR2 (precipitation radar 2) RF assembly and power amplifier). Initial Ka-band test flights occurred in March and April of 2009 followed by the Greenland deployment. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. However, for this application the electromagnetic wave will penetrate an unknown amount into the snow cover thus producing an effective bias that must be calibrated. This penetration will be characterized as part of this program and is expected to vary as a function of snow wetness and radar incidence angle. To evaluate this, we flew a coordinated collection with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper on a transect from Greenland’s Summit its West coast. This flight included two field calibration sites at Colorado Institute for Research in Environmental Science’s Swiss Camp and the National Science Foundation’s Summit station. Additional collections entailed flying a grid over Jakobshavn glacier which were repeated after 6 days to reveal surface dynamics. In this time frame we were able to observe horizontal motion of over 1km on the glacier. While developed for

  8. An efficient continuous-wave and Q-switched single-pass two-stage Ho:YLF MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Jabczynski, Jan Karol; Zendzian, Waldemar

    2015-04-01

    We report on the efficient operation of an Ho:YLF laser single-pass in-band pumped by a Tm-doped fiber laser. The research in a continuous-wave (CW) operation in an oscillator scheme was done for a crystal of 0.5 at% Ho dopant concentration and the length of 30 mm for the output coupler transmittances of TOC=10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. At room temperature, for the output coupling transmission of 20%, the maximum CW output power of 24.5 W for 82.5 W of incident pump power, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 35.4% and optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 29.7% was achieved. The highest slope efficiency of 81.6% with respect to absorbed pump power was obtained. Carrying out the measurements of the laser spectrum, for the out-coupling transmittance of TOC=30%, we observed a very short time wavelength shift between 2051.5 and 2062.4 nm in an Ho:YLF laser operation. Trying to fully utilize the pump power unabsorbed by the active crystal in an oscillator stage, an amplifier system based on two additional Ho:YLF crystals was developed. For the output coupling transmission of 40% the slope efficiency increased from 31.5% in an oscillator scheme to 47.3% with respect to the incident pump power in a two-stage amplifier scheme with a beam quality parameter of M2 better than 1.1. For a Q-switched operation, for the maximum incident pump power and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 kHz, pulse energies of 18.5 mJ with a 22 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to 841 kW peak power in the amplifier system were recorded.

  9. Dissolution Kinetics of Titanium Pyrochlore Ceramics at 90?C by Single-Pass Flow-Through Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2000-12-01

    Corrosion resistances of titanium-based ceramics are quantified using single-pass flow-through (SPFT) experiments. The materials tested include simple pyrochlore group (B2Ti2O7, where B=Lu^3+ or Gd^3+) and complex multiphase materials that are either pyrochlore- (PY12) or zirconolite-dominated (BSL3). Experiments are conducted at 90?C over a range of pH-buffered conditions with typical duration of experiments in excess of 120 days. Apparent steady-state dissolution rates at pH=2 determined on the Gd2Ti2O7 and Lu2Ti2O7 samples indicate congruent dissolution, with rates of the former (1.3x10^-3 to 4.3x10^-3) slightly faster than the latter (4.4x10^-4 to 7.0x10^-4 g m^-2 d^-1). Rates for PY12 materials into pH=2 solutions are 5.9x10^-5 to 8.6x10^-5 g m^-2 d^-1. In contrast, experiments with BSL3 material do not reach steady-state conditions, and appear to undergo rapid physical and chemical corrosion into solution. At faster flow-through rates, dissolution rates display a shallow amphoteric behavior, with a minimum (4.6x10^-5 to 5.8x10^-5 g m^-2 d^-1) near pH values of 7. Dissolution rates display a measurable increase (~10X) with increasing flow-through rate indicating the strong influence that chemical affinity asserts on the system. These results step towards an evaluation of the corrosion mechanism and an evaluation of the long-term performance of Pu-bearing titanite engineered materials in the subsurface.

  10. Special relativity and interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1988-01-01

    A new generation of gravitational wave detectors is expected to be based on interferometers. Yurke et al. (1986) introduced a class of interferometers characterized by SU(1,1) which can in principle achieve a phase sensitivity approaching 1/N, where N is thte total number of photons entering the interferometer. It is shown here that the SU(1,1) interferometer can serve as an analog computer for Wigner's little group of the Poincare\\'| group.

  11. Accuracy of single-pass whole-body computed tomography for detection of injuries in patients with major blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Dirk; Ottersbach, Caspar; Matthes, Gerrit; Weigeldt, Moritz; Grundei, Simon; Rademacher, Grit; Tittel, Anja; Mutze, Sven; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias; Schmucker, Uli; Seifert, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography (also called “pan-scanning”) is considered to be a conclusive diagnostic tool for major trauma. We sought to determine the accuracy of this method, focusing on the reliability of negative results. Methods: Between July 2006 and December 2008, a total of 982 patients with suspected severe injuries underwent single-pass pan-scanning at a metropolitan trauma centre. The findings of the scan were independently evaluated by two reviewers who analyzed the injuries to five body regions and compared the results to a synopsis of hospital charts, subsequent imaging and interventional procedures. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of the pan-scan for each body region, and we assessed the residual risk of missed injuries that required surgery or critical care. Results: A total of 1756 injuries were detected in the 982 patients scanned. Of these, 360 patients had an Injury Severity Score greater than 15. The median length of follow-up was 39 (interquartile range 7–490) days, and 474 patients underwent a definitive reference test. The sensitivity of the initial pan-scan was 84.6% for head and neck injuries, 79.6% for facial injuries, 86.7% for thoracic injuries, 85.7% for abdominal injuries and 86.2% for pelvic injuries. Specificity was 98.9% for head and neck injuries, 99.1% for facial injuries, 98.9% for thoracic injuries, 97.5% for abdominal injuries and 99.8% for pelvic injuries. In total, 62 patients had 70 missed injuries, indicating a residual risk of 6.3% (95% confidence interval 4.9%–8.0%). Interpretation: We found that the positive results of trauma pan-scans are conclusive but negative results require subsequent confirmation. The pan-scan algorithms reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of missed injuries, and they should not replace close monitoring and clinical follow-up of patients with major trauma. PMID:22392949

  12. Intestinal absorption of forsythoside A in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion and in vitro Caco-2 cell models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Di, Liu-qing; Wang, Juan; Shan, Jin-jun; Liu, Shi-jia; Ju, Wen-zheng; Cai, Bao-chang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the intestinal absorption of the major bioactive component forsythoside A (FTA) extracted from Forsythiae fructus. Methods: An in vitro Caco-2 cell model and a single-pass intestinal perfusion in situ model in SD rats were used. Results: In the in vitro Caco-2 cell model, the mean apparent permeability value (Papp-value) was 4.15×10-7 cm/s in the apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) direction. At the concentrations of 2.6–10.4 μg/mL, the efflux ratio of FTA in the bi-directional transport experiments was approximately 1.00. After the transport, >96% of the apically loaded FTA was retained on the apical side, while >97% of the basolaterally loaded FTA was retained on the basolateral side. The Papp-values of FTA were inversely correlated with the transepithelial electrical resistance. The paracellular permeability enhancers sodium caprate and EDTA, the P-gp inhibitor verapamil and the multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) inhibitors cyclosporine and MK571 could concentration-dependently increase the Papp-values, while the uptake (OATP) transporter inhibitors diclofenac sodium and indomethacin could concentration-dependently decrease the Papp-values. The intake transporter SGLT1 inhibitor mannitol did not cause significant change in the Papp-values. In the in situ intestinal perfusion model, both the absorption rate constant (Ka) and the effective permeability (Peff-values) following perfusion of FTA 2.6, 5.2 and 10.4 μg/mL via the duodenum, jejunum and ileum had no significant difference, although the values were slightly higher for the duodenum as compared to those in the jejunum and ileum. The low, medium and high concentrations of verapamil caused the largest increase in the Peff-values for duodenum, jejunum and ileum, respectively. Sodium caprate, EDTA and cyclosporine resulted in concentration-dependent increase in the Peff-values. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin caused concentration-dependent decrease in the

  13. Evaluation of Intermittent Hemodialysis in Critically Ill Cancer Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Using Single-Pass Batch Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Torres da Costa e Silva, Verônica; Costalonga, Elerson C.; Oliveira, Ana Paula Leandro; Hung, James; Caires, Renato Antunes; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahão; Fukushima, Julia T.; Soares, Cilene Muniz; Bezerra, Juliana Silva; Oikawa, Luciane; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) in cancer patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and the adequacy of intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) in critically ill cancer patients with AKI. Methods and Findings In this observational prospective cohort study, 149 ICU cancer patients with AKI were treated with 448 single-pass batch IHD procedures and evaluated from June 2010 to June 2012. Primary outcomes were IHD complications (hypotension and clotting) and adequacy. A multiple logistic regression was performed in order to identify factors associated with IHD complications (hypotension and clotting). Patients were 62.2 ± 14.3 years old, 86.6% had a solid cancer, sepsis was the main AKI cause (51%) and in-hospital mortality was 59.7%. RRT session time was 240 (180–300) min, blood/dialysate flow was 250 (200–300) mL/min and UF was 1000 (0–2000) ml. Hypotension occurred in 25% of the sessions. Independent risk factors (RF) for hypotension were dialysate conductivity (each ms/cm, OR 0.81, CI 0.69–0.95), initial mean arterial pressure (each 10 mmHg, OR 0.49, CI 0.40–0.61) and SOFA score (OR 1.16, CI 1.03–1.30). Clotting and malfunctioning catheters (MC) occurred in 23.8% and 29.2% of the procedures, respectively. Independent RF for clotting were heparin use (OR 0.57, CI 0.33–0.99), MC (OR 3.59, CI 2.24–5.77) and RRT system pressure increase over 25% (OR 2.15, CI 1.61–4.17). Post RRT blood tests were urea 71 (49–104) mg/dL, creatinine 2.71 (2.10–3.8) mg/dL, bicarbonate 24.1 (22.5–25.5) mEq/L and K 3.8 (3.5–4.1) mEq/L. Conclusion IHD for critically ill patients with cancer and AKI offered acceptable hemodynamic stability and provided adequate metabolic control. PMID:26938932

  14. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  15. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  16. The Glacier and Ice Sheet Topography Interferometer: An Update on a Unique Sensor for High Accuracy Swath Mapping of Land Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Heavey, B.; Hensley, S.; Hodges, R.; Rengarajan, S.; Rignot, E.; Sadowy, G.; Simard, M.; Zawadzki, M.

    2007-12-01

    We discuss the innovative concept and technology development of a Ka-band (35 GHz) radar for mapping the surface topography of glaciers and ice sheets. The "Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer" (GLISTIN) is a single-pass, single platform interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) with an 8mm wavelength, which minimizes snow penetration yet remains relatively impervious to atmospheric attenuation. Such a system has the potential for delivering topographic maps at high spatial resolution, high vertical accuracy, independent of cloud cover, with a subseasonal update and would greatly enhance current observational and modeling capabilities of ice mass-balance and glacial retreat. To enable such measurements, a digitally beamformed antenna array is utilized to provide a wide measurement swath at a technologically feasible transmit power. To prove this concept and advance the technology readiness of this design we are currently funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to build and test a 1m x 1m digitally-beamformed (DBF) Ka-band slotted waveguide antenna with integrated digital receivers. This antenna provides 16 simultaneous receive beams, effectively broadening the swath without reducing receive antenna gain. The implementation of such a large aperture at Ka-band presents many design, manufacturing and calibration challenges which are addressed as part of this IIP. The integrated DBF array will be fielded at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's antenna range to demonstrate the overall calibration, beamforming and interferometric performance through creation of topographic imagery of the local Arroyo Seco. Currently entering the third year of the program, we will overview the system concept, array implementation and status of the technology. While the IIP addresses the development of the major technology challenges, an additional effort will demonstrate the phenomenology of the measurement by

  17. Lens collimation and testing using a Twyman-Green interferometer with a self-pumped phase-conjugating mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Ordinarily Twyman-Green interferometers are employed testing optical elements. In a modification of the basic configuration, the ordinary mirror in the test arm is replaced with a self-pumped phase-conjugating mirror using a barium titanate crystal. It is shown that, with a redefinition of components, the new configuration permits retention and improvement of the optical element testing function while simultaneously serving as a sensitive test for collimation. The optical path difference resulting from the double pass in the original Twyman-Green interferometer approximately equals that of the single pass and phase conjugation in the modification.

  18. Ultrasonic Interferometers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2007-03-01

    I have been tinkering with ultrasonic transducers once more. In earlier notes I reported on optics-like experiments performed with ultrasonics, described a number of ultrasonic interferometers,2 and showed how ultrasonic transducers can be used for Fourier analysis.3 This time I became interested in trying the technique of using two detectors in acoustic interferometers instead of the usual one.

  19. 1.5 W green light generation by single-pass second harmonic generation of a single-frequency tapered diode laser.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E; Sumpf, Bernd; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Erbert, Götz; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2009-04-13

    More than 1.5 W of green light at 531 nm is generated by single-pass second harmonic generation in periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. The pump laser is a high power tapered laser with a distributed Bragg reflector etched in the ridge section of the laser to provide wavelength selectivity. The output power of the single-frequency tapered laser is 9.3 W in continuous wave operation. A conversion efficiency of 18.5 % was achieved in the experiments. PMID:19365478

  20. Calculation of ocular single-pass modulation transfer function and retinal image simulation from measurements of the polarized double-pass ocular point spread function.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuhiko; Shibutani, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Gaku; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko; Miyake, Yoichi; Negishi, Kazuno; Ohno, Kenji; Noda, Toru

    2004-01-01

    The single-pass modulation transfer function (MTF(sgl)) is an important numerical parameter that can help elucidate the performance and some processes of the human visual system. In previous studies, the MTF(sgl) was calculated from double-pass point spread function (PSF) measurements. These measurements include a depolarized reflection component from the retina that introduces a measurement artifact, and they require long acquisition times to allow averaging to reduce speckle. To solve these problems, we developed a new ocular PSF analysis system (PSFAS) that uses polarization optics to eliminate the depolarized retinal reflection component, and a rotating prism to increase measurement speed. Validation experiments on one patient showed that the MTF(sgl) measured by PSFAS agrees closely with the MTF calculated from contrast sensitivity measurements. A simulated retinal image was calculated by convolution of Landolt rings with the calculated single-pass PSF provided by the PSFAS. The contrast characteristic then was calculated from the simulated retinal images. These results indicate that the MTF(sgl) obtained using the PSFAS may be a reliable measure of visual performance of the optics of the eye, including the optical effects of the retina. The simulated retinal images and contrast characteristics are useful for evaluating visual performance. PMID:14715068

  1. Compact deep UV laser system at 222.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Norman; Müller, André; Eppich, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) lasers emitting below 300 nm are of great interest for many applications, for instance in medical diagnostics or for detecting biological agents. Established DUV lasers, e.g. gas lasers or frequency quadrupled solid-state lasers, are relatively bulky and have high power consumptions. A compact and reliable laser diode based system emitting in the DUV could help to address applications in environments where a portable and robust light source with low power consumption is needed. In this work, a compact DUV laser system based on single-pass frequency doubling of highpower GaN diode laser emission is presented. A commercially available high-power GaN laser diode from OSRAM Opto Semiconductors serves as a pump source. The laser diode is spectrally stabilized in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) setup in Littrow configuration. The ECDL system reaches a maximum optical output power of 700 mW, maintaining narrowband emission below 60 pm (FWHM) at 445 nm over the entire operating range. By direct single pass frequency doubling in a BBO crystal with a length of 7.5 mm a maximum DUV output power of 16 μW at a wavelength of 222.5 nm is generated. The presented concept enables compact and efficient diode laser based light sources emitting in the DUV spectral range that are potentially suitable for in situ applications where a small footprint and low power consumption is essential.

  2. Continuous-wave, single-pass, single-frequency second-harmonic-generation at 266 nm based on birefringent-multicrystal scheme.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kavita; Parsa, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2016-04-18

    We report the implementation of a compact cascaded multicrystal scheme based on birefringent crystals in critical phase-matching, for the generation of continuous-wave (cw) radiation in the deep ultraviolet (UV). The approach comprises a cascade of 4 single-pass second-harmonic-generation (SHG) stages in β-BaB2O4 (BBO) pumped by a single-frequency cw green source at 532 nm. A deep-UV cw output power of 37.7 mW at 266 nm has been obtained with a high passive power stability of 0.12% rms over more than 4 hours. Characterization and optimization of the system in each stage has been systematically performed. Angular phase-matching acceptance bandwidth under tight focusing in BBO, and spectral properties of the deep-UV radiation, have been studied. Theoretical calculations for SHG in the cascaded scheme based on birefringent phase-matching have been performed, and enhancement in UV power compared to single-stage single-pass scheme are studied. Theoretical comparison of BBO with other potential crystals for deep-UV generation in cascaded multicrystal scheme is also presented. PMID:27137310

  3. Sub-Aperture Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sub-aperture interferometers -- also called wavefront-split interferometers -- have been developed for simultaneously measuring displacements of multiple targets. The terms "sub-aperture" and "wavefront-split" signify that the original measurement light beam in an interferometer is split into multiple sub-beams derived from non-overlapping portions of the original measurement-beam aperture. Each measurement sub-beam is aimed at a retroreflector mounted on one of the targets. The splitting of the measurement beam is accomplished by use of truncated mirrors and masks, as shown in the example below

  4. Warm Vapor Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant; Wheeler, David; Jau, Yuan-Yu; McGuinness, Hayden

    2014-05-01

    We present a light pulse atom interferometer using room temperature rubidium vapor. Doppler sensitive stimulated Raman transitions forming the atom optical elements inherently select a cold velocity group for the interferometer. The interferometer is configured to be sensitive to accelerations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Fizeau plasma interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a technique by which the sensitivity of plasma interferometers can be increased. Stabilization and fractional fringe measurement techniques have improved to the point where additional optical sensitivity could be useful. (MOW)

  6. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. M.; Wallace, J. K.; Hines, B. E.; Gursel, Y.; Malbet, F.; Palmer, D. L.; Pan, X. P.; Shao, M.; Yu, J. W.; Boden, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) is a long-baseline infrared interferometer located at Palomar Observatory, California. It was built as a testbed for interferometric techniques applicable to the Keck Interferometer. First fringes were obtained in 1995 July. PTI implements a dual-star architecture, tracking two stars simultaneously for phase referencing and narrow-angle astrometry. The three fixed 40 cm apertures can be combined pairwise to provide baselines to 110 m. The interferometer actively tracks the white-light fringe using an array detector at 2.2 microns and active delay lines with a range of +/-38 m. Laser metrology of the delay lines allows for servo control, and laser metrology of the complete optical path enables narrow-angle astrometric measurements. The instrument is highly automated, using a multiprocessing computer system for instrument control and sequencing.

  7. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  8. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  9. Michelson and His Interferometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankland, Robert S.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a brief historical account of Michelson's invention of his interferometer with some subsequent ingenious applications of its capabilities for precise measurement discussed in details, including the experiment on detrmination of the diameters for heavenly bodies. (CC)

  10. Dual surface interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Pardue, Robert M.; Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarter-wave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  11. Dual surface interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  12. Single-pass UV generation at 222.5 nm based on high-power GaN external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, N; Müller, A; Eppich, B; Güther, R; Maiwald, M; Sumpf, B; Erbert, G; Tränkle, G

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact system for single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser radiation. The deep UV laser light at 222.5 nm is generated in a β-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal. A high-power GaN external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system in Littrow configuration with narrowband emission at 445 nm is used as pump source. At a pump power of 680 mW, a maximum UV power of 16 μW in continuous-wave operation at 222.5 nm is achieved. This concept enables a compact diode laser-based system emitting in the deep ultraviolet spectral range. PMID:25927802

  13. Frictional coefficients of ion-implanted alumina against ion-implanted beta-titanium in the low load, low velocity, single pass regime.

    PubMed

    Kusy, R P; Tobin, E J; Whitley, J Q; Sioshansi, P

    1992-05-01

    The frictional coefficients were measured for four wire alloys against the flats of polycrystalline alumina cylinders using a low load, low velocity, single pass device. Ion-implantations of titanium into polycrystalline alumina flats and nitrogen into beta-titanium wires reduced the static and kinetic coefficients from 0.50 and 0.44 before implantation to 0.20 and 0.25 after implantation, respectively. These results are similar in magnitude to frictional coefficients for unimplanted, control couples of stainless steel, cobalt-chromium, and nickel titanium wires against polycrystalline alumina flats. For orthodontic applications, we conclude that more efficient and reproducible appliances can be engineered for tooth movement if ion-implantation is used to reduce the abrasion of beta-titanium by polycrystalline alumina. PMID:1521704

  14. N-isopropyl-(/sup 123/I)p-iodoamphetamine: single-pass brain uptake and washout; binding to brain synaptosomes; and localization in dog and monkey brain

    SciTech Connect

    Winchell, H.S.; Horst, W.D.; Braun, L.; Oldendorf, W.H.; Hattner, R.; Parker, H.

    1980-10-01

    The kinetics of N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)iodoamphetamine in rat brains were determined by serial measurements of brain uptake index (BUI) after intracarotid injection; also studied were its effects on amine uptake and release in rat's brain cortical synaptosomes; and its in vivo distribution in the dog and monkey. No specific localization in brain nuclei of the dog was seen, but there was progressive accumulation in the eyes. Rapid initial brain uptake in the ketamine-sedated monkey was noted, and further slow brain uptake occurred during the next 20 min but without retinal localization. High levels of brain activity were maintained for several hours. The quantitative initial single-pass clearance of the agent in the brain suggests its use in evaluation of regional brain perfusion. Its interaction with brain amine-binding sites suggests its possible application in studies of cerebral amine metabolism.

  15. High-power, high-repetition-rate performance characteristics of β-BaB₂O₄ for single-pass picosecond ultraviolet generation at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Casals, J Canals; Wei, Junxiong; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2015-10-19

    We report a systematic study on the performance characteristics of a high-power, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet (UV) source at 266 nm based on β-BaB2O4 (BBO). The source, based on single-pass fourth harmonic generation (FHG) of a compact Yb-fiber laser in a two-crystal spatial walk-off compensation scheme, generates up to 2.9 W of average power at 266 nm at a pulse repetition rate of ~80 MHz with a single-pass FHG efficiency of 35% from the green to UV. Detrimental issues such as thermal effects have been studied and confirmed by performing relevant measurements. Angular and temperature acceptance bandwidths in BBO for FHG to 266 nm are experimentally determined, indicating that the effective interaction length is limited by spatial walk-off and thermal gradients under high-power operation. The origin of dynamic color center formation due to two-photon absorption in BBO is investigated by measurements of intensity-dependent transmission at 266 nm. Using a suitable theoretical model, two-photon absorption coefficients as well as the color center densities have been estimated at different temperatures. The measurements show that the two-photon absorption coefficient in BBO at 266 nm is ~3.5 times lower at 200°C compared to that at room temperature. The long-term power stability as well as beam pointing stability is analyzed at different output power levels and focusing conditions. Using cylindrical optics, we have circularized the generated elliptic UV beam to a circularity of >90%. To our knowledge, this is the first time such high average powers and temperature-dependent two-photon absorption measurements at 266 nm are reported at repetition rates as high as ~80 MHz. PMID:26480467

  16. Evaluation of a potential generator-produced PET tracer for cerebral perfusion imaging: Single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and imaging with radiolabeled Cu-PTSM

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, C.J.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.; Mintun, M.A.; Lich, L.L.; McGuire, A.H.; Zinn, K.R.; John, E.K.; Green, M.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM2), and copper(II) ethylglyoxal bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ETSM), have been proposed as PET tracers for cerebral blood flow (CBF) when labeled with generator-produced 62Cu (t1/2 = 9.7 min). To evaluate the potential of Cu-PTSM for CBF PET studies, baboon single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and PET imaging were carried out with the use of 67Cu (t1/2 = 2.6 days) and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr), respectively. All three chelates were extracted into the brain with high efficiency. There was some clearance of all chelates in the 10-50-sec time frame and Cu-PTSM2 continued to clear. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ETSM have high residual brain activity. PET imaging of baboon brain was carried out with the use of (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM. For comparison with the 64Cu brain image, a CBF (15O-labeled water) image (40 sec) was first obtained. Qualitatively, the H2(15)O and (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM images were very similar; for example, a comparison of gray to white matter uptake resulted in ratios of 2.42 for H2(15)O and 2.67 for Cu-PTSM. No redistribution of 64Cu was observed in 2 hr of imaging, as was predicted from the single-pass study results. Quantitative determination of blood flow using Cu-PTSM showed good agreement with blood flow determined with H2(15)O. This data suggests that (62Cu)-Cu-PTSM may be a useful generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for blood flow studies with PET.

  17. PDX multichannel interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, R.; Ernst, W.; Cutsogeorge, G.

    1980-10-01

    A 10 channel, 140 GHz homodyne interferometer is described for use on PDX. One feature of this interferometer is the separation of the signal source and electronics from the power splitters, delay line, and receiving systems. The latter is situated near the upper and lower vacuum ports between the toroidal field magnets. A second feature is the signal stabilization of the EIO source by means of an AFC system. The complete interferometer is described including block diagrams, circuit diagrams, test data, and magnetic field test conducted on the preamplifiers, microwave diodes, isolators, etc., to determine the extent of magnetic shielding required. The description of the tracking filters and digital phase display circuit is referenced to accompanying reports.

  18. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  19. Optical interferometer testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwood, Gary H.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on optical interferometer testbed presented at the MIT Space Research Engineering Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include: space-based optical interferometer; optical metrology; sensors and actuators; real time control hardware; controlled structures technology (CST) design methodology; identification for MIMO control; FEM/ID correlation for the naked truss; disturbance modeling; disturbance source implementation; structure design: passive damping; low authority control; active isolation of lightweight mirrors on flexible structures; open loop transfer function of mirror; and global/high authority control.

  20. Preliminary Results from the 2015 NMT Interferometer Campaign in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The New Mexico Tech Broadband Interferometer was deployed within the eastern portion of the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array between May 20 and June 13, 2015. The location was such that the CHILL radar could provide coverage for select storms. The 20 to 80 MHz VHF broadband interferometer was augmented by fast and slow antenna data for discerning both impulsive and overall charge motion. A substantial fraction of the flashes recorded during the Colorado campaign were observed to be inverted intraclouds. This was particularly true of a close tornadic storm on June 6 which was also distinguished by a large number of precursor events. We will detail some illuminative examples from this and other storms. We will also analyze the effect substantially longer baseline lengths and increased sensitivity had on the performance of the interferometer relative to previous campaigns as well as in comparison to the Lightning Mapping Array.

  1. Ultrasonic Interferometers Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    I have been tinkering with ultrasonic transducers once more. In earlier notes I reported on optics-like experiments performed with ultrasonics, described a number of ultrasonic interferometers, and showed how ultrasonic transducers can be used for Fourier analysis. This time I became interested in trying the technique of using two detectors in…

  2. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  3. Laser interferometer micrometer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logue, S. H.

    1969-01-01

    Laser micrometer measures dimensions of precision gyro and gas bearing parts using the principle of measuring light phase changes rather than a direct fringe count. The system uses light beams to eliminate errors due to deformations and surface irregularities, and three interferometers.

  4. Absorption characteristic of paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Jun; Asenso, James; Ma, Yong; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    1. Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) was synthesized to improve the poor oral absorption of paeoniflorin (Pae). 2. This study was performed to investigate the absorptive behavior and mechanism of CP-25 in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats, using Pae as a control. 3. The results showed that intestinal absorption of CP-25 was neither segmental nor sex dependent. However, the main segment of intestine that absorbed Pae was the duodenum. Furthermore, passive transport was confirmed to be the main absorption pattern of CP-25. More importantly, the absorption of CP-25 was much higher than Pae in the small intestine. 4. Among the ABC transporter inhibitors, the absorption rate of Pae increased in the presence of P-gp inhibitors verapamil and GF120918, which indicated that Pae was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), however, such was not observed in the presence of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Finally, the ABC transporter inhibitors did not have any significant impact on CP-25 as demonstrated in the parallel studies. 5. CP-25 could improve the poor absorption of Pae, which may be attributed to both the lipid solubility enhancement and its resistance to P-gp-mediated efflux. PMID:26711120

  5. Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

    2013-01-01

    Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

  6. Comparison of the gravimetric, phenol red, and 14C-PEG-3350 methods to determine water absorption in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion model.

    PubMed

    Sutton, S C; Rinaldi, M T; Vukovinsky, K E

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the gravimetric method provided an accurate measure of water flux correction and to compare the gravimetric method with methods that employ nonabsorbed markers (eg, phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350). Phenol red,14C-PEG-3350, and 4-[2-[[2-(6-amino-3-pyridinyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]ethoxy]-, methyl ester, (R)-benzene acetic acid (Compound I) were co-perfused in situ through the jejunum of 9 anesthetized rats (single-pass intestinal perfusion [SPIP]). Water absorption was determined from the phenol red,14C-PEG-3350, and gravimetric methods. The absorption rate constant (ka) for Compound I was calculated. Both phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350 were appreciably absorbed, underestimating the extent of water flux in the SPIP model. The average +/- SD water flux microg/h/cm) for the 3 methods were 68.9 +/- 28.2 (gravimetric), 26.8 +/- 49.2 (phenol red), and 34.9 +/- 21.9 (14C-PEG-3350). The (average +/- SD) ka for Compound I (uncorrected for water flux) was 0.024 +/- 0.005 min(-1). For the corrected, gravimetric method, the average +/- SD was 0.031 +/- 0.001 min(-1). The gravimetric method for correcting water flux was as accurate as the 2 "nonabsorbed" marker methods. PMID:11741276

  7. A 7.5 W quasi-continuous-wave sodium D2 laser generated from single-pass sum-frequency generation in LBO crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Bo, Y.; Xu, J.; Shen, Y.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Yang, F.; Peng, Q.; Cui, D.; Zhang, J.; Xu, Z.

    2011-03-01

    We report a high-power, narrow linewidth and tunable quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) yellow laser system at 589.159 nm. The system is of a design employing single-pass sum-frequency generation (SFG) in a LBO crystal by mixing the 1064 nm with 1319 nm lines from a two diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) laser system. With the pump power of 35 W at 1064 nm and 25 W at 1319 nm, a 7.5 W QCW output of the SFG yellow laser at 589.159 nm, which is the vacuum wavelength of a general sodium D2 line, is obtained with a linewidth less than 0.7 GHz and a beam-quality factor M 2=1.2. The wavelength of the laser can be precisely step-tuned from 589.148 to 589.167 nm with an increment of 0.13 pm by means of a temperature-controlled etalon.

  8. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN): A Novel Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn K.; Heavey, Brandon; Hodges, Richard; Rengarajan, Sembiam; Rignot, Eric; Rogez, Francois; Sadowy, Gregory; Simard, Marc; Zawadzki, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers on Earth is a problem of considerable scientific and societal importance. A key measurement to understanding, monitoring and forecasting these changes is ice-surface topography, both for ice-sheet and glacial regions. As such NASA identified 'ice topographic mapping instruments capable of providing precise elevation and detailed imagery data for measurements on glacial scales for detailed monitoring of ice sheet, and glacier changes' as a science priority for the most recent Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) opportunities. Funded under this opportunity is the technological development for a Ka-Band (35GHz) single-pass digitally beamformed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Unique to this concept is the ability to map a significant swath impervious of cloud cover with measurement accuracies comparable to laser altimeters but with variable resolution as appropriate to the differing scales-of-interest over ice-sheets and glaciers.

  9. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  10. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  11. 5.7  W cw single-frequency laser at 671  nm by single-pass second harmonic generation of a 17.2  W injection-locked 1342  nm Nd : YVO4 ring laser using periodically poled MgO : LiNbO3.

    PubMed

    Koch, Peter; Ruebel, Felix; Bartschke, Juergen; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate a continuous wave single-frequency laser at 671.1 nm based on a high-power 888 nm pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser at 1342.2 nm. Unidirectional operation of the fundamental ring laser is achieved with the injection-locking technique. A Nd:YVO4 microchip laser serves as the injecting seed source, providing a tunable single-frequency power of up to 40 mW. The ring laser emits a single-frequency power of 17.2 W with a Gaussian beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2<1.1. A 60-mm-long periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal is used to generate the second harmonic in a single-pass scheme. Up to 5.7 W at 671.1 nm with a Gaussian shaped beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2<1.2 are obtained, which is approximately twice the power of previously reported lasers. This work opens possibilities in cold atoms experiments with lithium, allowing the use of larger ensembles in magneto-optical traps or higher diffraction orders in atomic beam interferometers. PMID:26836563

  12. The Keck Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colavita, M. M.; Wizinowich, P. L.; Akeson, R. L.; Ragland, S.; Woillez, J. M.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Serabyn, E.; Abajian, M.; Acton, D. S.; Appleby, E.; Beletic, J. W.; Beichman, C. A.; Bell, J.; Berkey, B. C.; Berlin, J.; Boden, A. F.; Booth, A. J.; Boutell, R.; Chaffee, F. H.; Chan, D.; Chin, J.; Chock, J.; Cohen, R.; Cooper, A.; Crawford, S. L.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Dahl, W.; Eychaner, G.; Fanson, J. L.; Felizardo, C.; Garcia-Gathright, J. I.; Gathright, J. T.; Hardy, G.; Henderson, H.; Herstein, J. S.; Hess, M.; Hovland, E. E.; Hrynevych, M. A.; Johansson, E.; Johnson, R. L.; Kelley, J.; Kendrick, R.; Koresko, C. D.; Kurpis, P.; Le Mignant, D.; Lewis, H. A.; Ligon, E. R.; Lupton, W.; McBride, D.; Medeiros, D. W.; Mennesson, B. P.; Moore, J. D.; Morrison, D.; Nance, C.; Neyman, C.; Niessner, A.; Paine, C. G.; Palmer, D. L.; Panteleeva, T.; Papin, M.; Parvin, B.; Reder, L.; Rudeen, A.; Saloga, T.; Sargent, A.; Shao, M.; Smith, B.; Smythe, R. F.; Stomski, P.; Summers, K. R.; Swain, M. R.; Swanson, P.; Thompson, R.; Tsubota, K.; Tumminello, A.; Tyau, C.; van Belle, G. T.; Vasisht, G.; Vause, J.; Vescelus, F.; Walker, J.; Wallace, J. K.; Wehmeier, U.; Wetherell, E.

    2013-10-01

    The Keck Interferometer (KI) combined the two 10 m W. M. Keck Observatory telescopes on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, as a long-baseline near- and mid-infrared interferometer. Funded by NASA, it operated from 2001 until 2012. KI used adaptive optics on the two Keck telescopes to correct the individual wavefronts, as well as active fringe tracking in all modes for path-length control, including the implementation of cophasing to provide long coherent integration times. KI implemented high sensitivity fringe-visibility measurements at H (1.6 μm), K (2.2 μm), and L (3.8 μm) bands, and nulling measurements at N band (10 μm), which were used to address a broad range of science topics. Supporting these capabilities was an extensive interferometer infrastructure and unique instrumentation, including some additional functionality added as part of the NSF-funded ASTRA program. This paper provides an overview of the instrument architecture and some of the key design and implementation decisions, as well as a description of all of the key elements and their configuration at the end of the project. The objective is to provide a view of KI as an integrated system, and to provide adequate technical detail to assess the implementation. Included is a discussion of the operational aspects of the system, as well as of the achieved system performance. Finally, details on V2 calibration in the presence of detector nonlinearities as applied in the data pipeline are provided.

  13. Comparison of the results of short-term static tests and single-pass flow-through tests with LRM glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2007-01-29

    Static dissolution tests were conducted to measure the forward dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 C and pH(RT) 11.7 {+-} 0.1 for comparison with the rate measured with single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests in an interlaboratory study (ILS). The static tests were conducted with monolithic specimens having known geometric surface areas, whereas the SPFT tests were conducted with crushed glass that had an uncertain specific surface area. The error in the specific surface area of the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests, which was calculated by modeling the particles as spheres, was assessed based on the difference in the forward dissolution rates measured with the two test methods. Three series of static tests were conducted at 70 C following ASTM standard test method C1220 using specimens with surfaces polished to 600, 800, and 1200 grit and a leachant solution having the same composition as that used in the ILS. Regression of the combined results of the static tests to the affinity-based glass dissolution model gives a forward rate of 1.67 g/(m{sup 2}d). The mean value of the forward rate from the SPFT tests was 1.64 g/(m{sup 2}d) with an extended uncertainty of 1.90 g/(m{sup 2}d). This indicates that the calculated surface area for the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests is less than 2% higher than the actual surface area, which is well within the experimental uncertainties of measuring the forward dissolution rate using each test method. These results indicate that the geometric surface area of crushed glass calculated based on the size of the sieves used to isolate the fraction used in a test is reliable. In addition, the C1220 test method provides a means for measuring the forward dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses that is faster, easier, and more economical than the SPFT test method.

  14. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  15. Atom-Light Hybrid Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Qiu, Cheng; Chen, Shuying; Guo, Jinxian; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-07-24

    A new type of hybrid atom-light interferometer is demonstrated with atomic Raman amplification processes replacing the beam splitting elements in a traditional interferometer. This nonconventional interferometer involves correlated optical and atomic waves in the two arms. The correlation between atoms and light developed with the Raman process makes this interferometer different from conventional interferometers with linear beam splitters. It is observed that the high-contrast interference fringes are sensitive to the optical phase via a path change as well as the atomic phase via a magnetic field change. This new atom-light correlated hybrid interferometer is a sensitive probe of the atomic internal state and should find wide applications in precision measurement and quantum control with atoms and photons. PMID:26252684

  16. An Interferometric Ka-band Synthetic Aperture Radar: A New Technique for Glacier and Ice- sheet Topography Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D. K.; Aaron, K.; Gim, Y.; Heavey, B.; Hodges, R.; Nicolson, A.; Rengarajan, S.; Rignot, E.; Rogez, F.; Sadowy, G.; Simard, M.; Zawadzki, M.

    2006-12-01

    The estimation of the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers on Earth is a problem of considerable scientific and societal importance. The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets together hold enough ice to raise global sea level by 80 m. The annual exchange of mass on the ice sheets is equivalent to 8mm/yr sea level, so that any fluctuation in that level of exchange is significant on the global scale. A key measurement to understanding, monitoring and forecasting these changes is ice-surface topography, both for ice-sheet and glacial regions. As such NASA identified "ice topographic mapping instruments capable of providing precise elevation and detailed imagery data for measurements on glacial scales for detailed monitoring of ice sheet, and glacier changes" as a science priority for the most recent ESTO- Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) opportunities. Funded under this opportunity is the technological development for a Ka-Band (35GHz) single-pass digitally beamformed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Unique to this concept is the ability to map a significant swath impervious of cloud cover with measurement accuracies comparable to lidar altimeters but with variable resolution as appropriate to the differing scales-of-interest over ice-sheets and glaciers. By diverging from the more traditional profiling measurements employed to date (ie radar altimeters and lidars) we are able to offer the potential to significantly advance the spaciotemporal observational capabilities of both ice sheets and glaciers. Dubbed the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN), the instrument and mission presents several significant challenges. In particular, under the IIP program we are designing, building and demonstrating a large Ka-band antenna array with integrated digital receivers and utilizing digital beamforming to preserve both antenna gain and swath. These technology items will ultimately be integrated into a complete interferometric

  17. The Stress-Relief Cracking Susceptibility of a New Ferritic Steel - Part I: Single-Pass Heat-Affected Zone Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    NAWROCKI,J.G.; DUPONT,J.N.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; MARDER,A.R.

    1999-12-15

    The stress-relief cracking susceptibility of single-pass welds in a new ferritic steel, HCM2S, has been evaluated and compared to 2.25Cr-1Mo steel using Gleeble techniques. Simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zones (CGHAZ) were produced under a range of energy inputs and tested at various post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures. Both alloys were tested at a stress of 325 MPa. The 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel was also tested at 270 MPa to normalize for the difference in yield strength between the two materials. Light optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the CGHAZ microstructure. The ''as-welded'' CGHAZ of each alloy consisted of lath martensite or bainite and had approximately equal prior austenite grain sizes. The as-welded hardness of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel CGHAZ was significantly higher than that of the HCM2S alloy. Over the range studied energy input had no effect on the as-welded microstructure or hardness of either alloy. The energy input also had no effect on the stress-relief cracking susceptibility of either material. Both alloys failed intergranularly along prior austenite grain boundaries under all test conditions. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel samples experienced significant macroductility and some microductility when tested at 325 MPa. The ductility decreased significantly when tested at 270 MPa but was still higher that than of HCM2S at each test condition. The time to failure decreased with increasing PWHT Temperature for each material. There was no significant difference in the times to failure between the two materials. Varying energy input and stress had no effect on the time-to failure. The ductility, as measured by reduction in are% increased with increasing PWHT temperature for 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel tested at both stresses. However, PWHT temperature had no effect on the ductility of HCM2S. The hardness of the CGHAZ for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel decreased significantly after PWHT, but remained constant for HCM2S. The differences in stress

  18. Improved Skin Friction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved system for measuring aerodynamic skin friction which uses a dual-laser-beam oil-film interferometer was developed. Improvements in the optical hardware provided equal signal characteristics for each beam and reduced the cost and complexity of the system by replacing polarization rotation by a mirrored prism for separation of the two signals. An automated, objective, data-reduction procedure was implemented to eliminate tedious manual manipulation of the interferometry data records. The present system was intended for use in two-dimensional, incompressible flows over a smooth, level surface without pressure gradient, but the improvements discussed are not limited to this application.

  19. Laser interferometer calibration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolmi, R. W.; Krupski, S. J.

    1981-10-01

    The laser interferometer is a versatile tool, used for calibration over both long and short distances. It is considered traceable to the National Bureau of Standards. The system developed under this project was to be capable of providing for the calibration of many types of small linear measurement devices. The logistics of the original concept of one location for calibration of all mics, calipers, etc. at a large manufacturing facility proved unworkable. The equipment was instead used for the calibration of the large machines used to manufacture cannon tubes.

  20. Infrared lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O.

    1980-04-01

    Recently IR interferometry has received much attention for its special capabilities of testing IR materials, diamond-turned metal mirrors, deep aspherics, unpolished rough surface optics, and other unconventional optics. A CW CO2 laser is used as a coherent light source at 10.6 microns, and germanium and zinc selenide optics are used for lenses and beam splitters. A pyroelectric vidicon (PEV) detects the modulated interference pattern through a TV monitor and video recorder-player. This paper presents three methods of IR lateral shear interferometry using (1) a germanium plane-parallel plate, (2) a Ronchi ruling, and (3) a double-grating lateral shear interferometer.

  1. Automotive radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohling, Hermann

    2004-07-01

    Radar networks for automtovie short-range applications (up to 30m) based on powerful but inexpensive 24GHz high range resolution pulse or FMCW radar systems have been developed at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg. The described system has been integrated in to an experimental vehicle and tested in real street environment. This paper considers the general network design, the individual pulse or FMCW radar sensors, the network signal processing scheme, the tracking procedure and possible automotive applications, respectively. Object position estimation is accomplished by the very precise range measurement of each individual sensor and additional trilateration procedures. The paper concludes with some results obtained in realistic traffic conditions with multiple target situations using 24 GHz radar network.

  2. Radar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  3. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  4. Evaluation of the Long-Term Performance of Titanate Ceramics for Immobilization of Excess Weapons Plutonium: Results from Pressurized Unsaturated Flow and Single Pass Flow-Through Testing

    SciTech Connect

    BP McGrail; HT Schaef; JP Icenhower; PF Martin; RD Orr; VL Legore

    1999-09-13

    This report summarizes our findings from pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and single-pass flow-through (SPFT) experiments to date. Results from the PUF test of a Pu-bearing ceramic with enclosing surrogate high-level waste glass show that the glass reacts rapidly to alteration products. Glass reaction causes variations in the solution pH in contact with the ceramic materials. We also document variable concentrations of Pu in solution, primarily in colloidal form, which appear to be related to secular variations in solution composition. The apparent dissolution rate of the ceramic waste form, based on Ba concentrations in the effluent, is estimated at {le} 10{sup {minus}5} g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d). Pu-bearing colloids were recovered in the size range of 0.2 to 2 {micro}m, but it is not clear that such entities would be transported in a system that is not advective-flow dominated. Results from SPFT experiments give information on the corrosion resistance of two surrogate Pu-ceramics (Ce-pyrochlore and Ce-zirconolite) at 90 C over a pH range of 2 to 12. The two ceramics were doped with minor quantities ({approximately}0.1 mass%) of MoO{sub 3}, so that concentrations of Mo in the effluent solution could be used to monitor the reaction behavior of the materials. The data obtained thus far from experiments with durations up to 150 d do not conclusively prove that the solid-aqueous solution systems have reached steady-state conditions. Therefore, the dissolution mechanism cannot be determined. Apparent dissolution rates of the two ceramic materials based on Ce, Gd, and Mo concentrations in the effluent solutions from the SPFT are nearly identical and vary between 1.1 to 8.5 x 10{sup {minus}4} g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d). In addition, the data reveal a slightly amphoteric dissolution behavior, with a minimum apparent rate at pH = 7 to 8, over the pH range examined. Results from two related ceramic samples suggest that radiation damage can have a measurable effect on

  5. Frequency doubling of cw 1560nm laser with single-pass, double-pass and cascaded MgO:PPLN crystals and frequency locking to Rb D2 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shanlong; Wang, Junmin; Han, Yashuai; He, Jun

    2013-05-01

    We implemented and compared three different quasi-phase-matching (QPM) frequency-doubling configurations for 1560nm laser of single pass, double pass and cascade by using of MgO:PPLN bulk crystals. Also a fiber-pigtailed MgO:PPLN waveguide is utilized in single-pass frequency doubling configuration in the case of low-power 1560nm fundamental wave (FW) laser. Employing the second-harmonic wave (SHW) output at 780nm and a rubidium (Rb) vapor cell, we also performed the modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS). MTS is insensitive to the fluctuation of laser intensity and the temperature drift of atomic vapor cell, so it is a good choice for laser frequency stabilization against atomic hyperfine transition line. The laser frequency stability is significantly improved after being locked via MTS scheme compared with the free-running case.

  6. The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G,; Huet, Hubert; Marzouk, Joe; Solyar, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed (FIT) is a collaborative effort between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, Sigma Space Corporation, and the University of Maryland. The testbed will be used to explore the principles of and the requirements for the full, as well as the pathfinder, Stellar Imager mission concept. It has a long term goal of demonstrating closed-loop control of a sparse array of numerous articulated mirrors to keep optical beams in phase and optimize interferometric synthesis imaging. In this paper we present the optical and data acquisition system design of the testbed, and discuss the wavefront sensing and control algorithms to be used. Currently we have completed the initial design and hardware procurement for the FIT. The assembly and testing of the Testbed will be underway at Goddard's Instrument Development Lab in the coming months.

  7. Radio Seeing Monitor Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiriart, David; Valdez, Jorge; Zaca, Placido; Medina, José L.

    2002-10-01

    A two-element interferometer for monitoring atmospheric phase fluctuations (radio seeing) is presented; this uses the unmodulated beacon signal at 11.715 GHz from a geostationary satellite. The system measures phase differences on the signal received by two small antennas separated by 50 m. The system incorporates the best features from previous designs: a heterodyne phase-lock receiver and an IQ demodulator system. Phase fluctuations measured at this frequency may be extrapolated to millimetric and submillimetric wavelengths since the atmosphere is not dispersive at these frequencies. The instrument has been tested at the Observatory San Pedro Martir (Mexico) at 2800 m above sea level. The final destination of the instrument is Cerro la Negra (Mexico), where the Large Millimeter Telescope is under construction, at an altitude of 4600 m.

  8. The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langille, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ward, W. E.

    2009-05-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI) is a new implementation of the imaging field-widened Michelson interferometer concept which images airglow signatures in the mesopause region and simultaneously records wind and intensity images. The scientific purpose of this instrument is to provide unambiguous information on gravity waves since the background horizontal wind and irradiance variations will be simultaneously obtained. Calibration and characterization of instrument parameters has been completed at a field site in Shigaraki Japan and initial observations have been taken. Co-located alongside MIADI are the MU radar, Na Lidar and several All-Sky Imagers. Observation campaigns are ongoing to acquire simultaneous data sets from these instruments. In this paper, the calibration and characterization results will be summarized. The initial measurements of winds and intensity will be presented and the scientific goals of the current observing campaign outlined.

  9. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, ED; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  10. The Keck Interferometer Nuller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.; Mennesson, B.; Colavita, M. M.; Koresko, C.; Kuchner, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN), the first operational separated-aperture infrared nulling interferometer, was designed to null the mid-infrared emission from nearby stars so as to ease the measurement of faint circumstellar emission. This paper describes the basis of the KIN's four-beam, two-stage measurement approach and compares it 10 the simpler case of a two-beam nuller. In the four-beam KIN system, the starlight is first nulled in a pair of nullers operating on parallel 85 m Keck-Keck baselines, after which "cross-combination" on 4 m baselines across the Keck apertures is used to modulate and detect residual coherent off-axis emission. Comparison to the constructive itellar fringe provides calibration. The response to an extended source is similar in the two cases, except that the four-beam response includes a term due to the visibility of the source on the cross-combiner baseline-a small effect for relatively compact sources. The characteristics of the dominant null depth errors are also compared for the two cases. In the two-beam nuller, instrumental imperfections and asymmetries lead to a series of quadratic, positivedefinite null leakage terms. For the four-beam nuller, the leakage is instead a series of correlation cross-tenns combining corresponding errors in each of the two nullers, which contribute offsets only to the extent that these errors are correlated on the timescale of the measurement. This four-beam architecture has allowed a significant (approx. order of magnitude) improvement in mid-infrared long-baseline fringe-visibility accuracies.

  11. The single antenna interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1990-01-15

    Air and space borne platforms using synthetic aperture radars (SAR) have made interferometric measurements by using either two physical antennas mounted on one air-frame or two passes of one antenna over a scene. In this paper, a new interferometric technique using one pass of a single-antenna SAR system is proposed and demonstrated on data collected by the NASA-JPL AirSAR. Remotely sensed L-band microwave data are used to show the sensitivity of this technique to ocean surface features as well as a baseline for comparison with work by others using two-antenna systems. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  13. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  14. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  15. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  16. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E.

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Stability of fringe counting interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, J. W.; Andrew, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two configurations of an automatic bidirectional, fringe-counting corner-cube interferometer are compared. They differ only in the method of quadrature phase introduction. The one using polarization coding has good phase stability at optical path differences as large as 955 mm, the one using adjacent beams has such poor phase stability as to render it useless at path differences greater than 700 mm. A useful well-defined alignment procedure is given for the corner-cube interferometer.

  18. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gero, Jonathan; Ermold, Brian; Gaustad, Krista; Koontz, Annette; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth’s atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols. The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3–19.2 μm (520–3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3–25.0 μm (400–3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  19. Michelson Interferometer (MINT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Carlson, Barbara

    1993-09-01

    MINT is a Michelson interferometer designed to measure the thermal emission from the earth at high spectral resolution (2/cm) over a broad spectral range (250-1700/cm, 6-40 mu m) with contiguous 3-pixel wide (12 mrad, 8 km field of view) along-track sampling. MINT is particularly well suited for monitoring cloud properties (cloud cover, effective temperature, optical thickness, ice/water phase, and effective particle size) both day and night, as well as tropospheric water vapor, ozone, and temperature. The key instrument characteristics that make MINT ideally suited for decadal monitoring purposes are: high wavelength to wavelength precision across the full IR spectrum with high spectral resolution; space-proven long-term durability and calibration stability; and small size, low cost, low risk instrument incorporating the latest detector and electronics technology. MINT also incorporates simplicity in design and operation by utilizing passively cooled DTGS detectors and nadir viewing geometry (with target motion compensation). MINT measurement objectives, instrument characteristics, and key advantages are summarized in this paper.

  20. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  1. Michelson Interferometer (MINT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Carlson, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    MINT is a Michelson interferometer designed to measure the thermal emission from the earth at high spectral resolution (2/cm) over a broad spectral range (250-1700/cm, 6-40 mu m) with contiguous 3-pixel wide (12 mrad, 8 km field of view) along-track sampling. MINT is particularly well suited for monitoring cloud properties (cloud cover, effective temperature, optical thickness, ice/water phase, and effective particle size) both day and night, as well as tropospheric water vapor, ozone, and temperature. The key instrument characteristics that make MINT ideally suited for decadal monitoring purposes are: high wavelength to wavelength precision across the full IR spectrum with high spectral resolution; space-proven long-term durability and calibration stability; and small size, low cost, low risk instrument incorporating the latest detector and electronics technology. MINT also incorporates simplicity in design and operation by utilizing passively cooled DTGS detectors and nadir viewing geometry (with target motion compensation). MINT measurement objectives, instrument characteristics, and key advantages are summarized in this paper.

  2. Status of the Jicamarca radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, T.

    1984-01-01

    The capabilities of the large 50-MHz radar at Jicamarca for mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere MST observations were discussed in some detail. Hence this description will be quite brief and will concentrate on recent improvements in the facility. The radar is located about 20 km from Lima, Peru. It is well shielded by surrounding mountains, and most of the ground clutter is restricted to ranges of 15 km or less. The antenna consists of 18,432 half-wave dipoles (9216 crossed pairs) covering an area of 290 m by 290 m and divided up into 64 independent modules which can be individually phased and/or used as separate antennas in any way desired. The whole array can be steered about 3 degrees from the on-axis position (the limit is the beam width of the individual modules, which cannot be steered), and any polarization can be arranged. Even with this limited steerability it is straightforward to determine vector wind velocities by pointing segments of the antenna in different directions. The radar can also be used as in interferometer.

  3. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  4. Interferometer mirror tilt correcting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An interferometer is described, having several means for automatically adjusting the angular tilt of a reflecting surface in one of two paths to maintain the exit beams from the two paths parallel to each other. Three detectors at the output of the interferometer were disposed on mutually perpendicular axes which define a plane normal to the nominal exit beam axis. One detector at the origin of the axes was used as a reference for separate phase difference comparison with the outputs of the other two detectors on the X and Y axes to develop servo error signals.

  5. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  6. Microwave interferometer controls cutting depth of plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Microwave interferometer system controls the cutting of plastic materials to a prescribed depth. The interferometer is mounted on a carriage with a spindle and cutting tool. A cross slide, mounted on the carriage, allows the interferometer and cutter to move toward or away from the plastic workpiece.

  7. Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

  8. Mesospheric wind measurements using a medium-frequency imaging Doppler interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. W.; scatterers.

    1986-01-01

    Wind results from a medium-frequency radar operated as an imaging Doppler interferometer are presented. Ten independent antennas, together with mesospheric wind motions, were used to Doppler-sort and then echo-locate individual scattering points. The three-dimensional location and radial velocity of each discrete scattering point was determined. Mean winds were then determined by a least squares fit to the radial velocities of the ensemble of scatterers.

  9. Holographic Twyman-Green interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. W.; Breckinridge, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A dichromated gelatin off-axis Fresnel zone plate was designed, fabricated, and used in a new type of interferometer for optical metrology. This single hologram optical element combines the functions of a beam splitter, beam diverger, and aberrated null lens. Data presented show the successful application for an interferometric test of an f/6, 200-mm diam parabolic mirror.

  10. Observation and theory of the radar aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Sahr, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma density irregularities occurring near the Aurora Borealis cause scattering of HF, VHF, and UHF radio waves. Analysis of the resulting radar signal provides great detail about the spatial and temporal characteristics of these auroral E region irregularities. Observations are presented of the radar aurora from recent campaigns in northern Sweden. After reviewing the basic theory and observations of auroral electrojet irregularities, a simple nonlinear fluid theory of electrojet ion-acoustic waves is introduced, and reduced to a form of the three-wave interaction equations. This theory provides a simple mechanism for excitation of linearly stable waves at large aspect and flow angles, as well as a prediction of the power spectra that a coherent scatter radar should observe. In addition, this theory may be able to account for type 3 waves without resorting to ion gyro modes, such as the electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave. During the course of the research a simple new radar transmitting mode and signal processing algorithm was generated which very simply solves a frequency aliasing problem that often occurs in CUPRI auroral radar studies. Several new radar data analysis routines were developed, including the principally cross-beam image and scatter plots of the second versus first moments of the power spectrum of the irregularities. Analysis of vertical interferometer data shows that type 3 waves originate at ordinary electrojet altitudes, not in the upper E region, from which it is concluded that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron mode does not generate type 3 waves. The measured height of type 3 waves and other spectral analyses provide support for the pure ion-acoustic theory of type 3 waves. Suggestions are offered for hardware improvements to the CUPRI radar, new experiments to test new and existing theories.

  11. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  12. Continuous-wave quasi-phase-matched generation of 60thinspthinspmW at 465thinspthinspnm by single-pass frequency doubling of a laser diode in backswitch-poled lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Batchko, R.G.; Fejer, M.M.; Byer, R.L.; Woll, D.; Wallenstein, R.; Shur, V.Y.; Erman, L.

    1999-09-01

    We report continuous-wave single-pass second-harmonic generation (SHG) in 4-{mu}m -period 0.5-mm-thick backswitch-poled lithium niobate. Pump sources at 920{endash}930thinspthinspnm include both Ti:sapphire and diode-oscillator{endash}amplifier lasers. SHG of a Ti:sapphire laser at 6.1{percent}/W efficiency, producing 61thinspthinspmW of power at 460thinspthinspnm, is demonstrated in 50-mm-long periodically poled lithium niobate samples with a nonlinear coefficient d{sub eff}{approx}9 pm/V , and 60thinspthinspmW at 465thinspthinspnm and 2.8{percent}/W efficiency is obtained by SHG of a laser-diode source. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital Optical Society of America}

  13. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  14. A Strontium87 Ion Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Archibald, James L., II; Jackson, Jarom; Anderson, Dean; Hermansen, Michael; Cunningham, Mark; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2011-05-01

    We describe a matter-wave interferometer based on Sr87+. The ions are generated from a laser-cooled strontium beam that is photo-ionized using a two-photon transition to an auto- ionizing state in the continuum. The ionization occurs between two electrodes, allowing us to accelerate the ions to any desired energy from a few meV to 20 keV. Each ion's quantum wave is split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine ground states of Sr87+. The two required optical frequencies for this transition are created by frequency-shifting a master laser in opposite directions by half of the 5 GHz ground-state hyperfine splitting. We can then determine the interferometer phase from the fluorescence of one of the ground states. We will discuss the theory of operation, experimental methods, and potential applications of the device. NSF, NIST

  15. A Slow Ion Strontium Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-10-01

    I will discuss an interferometer centered around a laser-cooled source of ^87Sr^+ ions, which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions. This will take place inside a conducting cylinder allowing the interferometer to measure electric and magnetic fields with unprecedented precision. Practical applications for the device include the precision measurement of the evolution of fields near solids to reveal their electronic structure. It will also be used for fundamental tests of the basic laws of electromagnetism and the search for a non-zero photon rest mass. The device should detect possible photon rest mass more than 100 times smaller than previous laboratory experiments. Both the details of the device and the theory connecting deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law to a theory of massive photons will be discussed.

  16. Fourier transform interferometer alignment method.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Naulleau, Patrick; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2002-08-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to facilitate the alignment of the image-plane components of point-diffraction interferometers, including the phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer. In real time, the Fourier transform of the detected image is used to calculate a pseudoimage of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where thecritical alignment o f variousoptical components is performed. Reconstruction of the pseudoimage is similar to off-axis, Fourier transform holography. Intermediate steps in the alignment procedure are described. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global-contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier transform. Additional applications include the alignment of image-plane apertures in general optical systems, the rapid identification of patterned image-plane alignment marks, and the probing of important image-plane field properties. PMID:12153074

  17. Nulling at the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. Mark; Serabyn, Gene; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2006-01-01

    The nulling mode of the Keck Interferometer is being commissioned at the Mauna Kea summit. The nuller combines the two Keck telescope apertures in a split-pupil mode to both cancel the on-axis starlight and to coherently detect the residual signal. The nuller, working at 10 um, is tightly integrated with the other interferometer subsystems including the fringe and angle trackers, the delay lines and laser metrology, and the real-time control system. Since first 10 um light in August 2004, the system integration is proceeding with increasing functionality and performance, leading to demonstration of a 100:1 on-sky null in 2005. That level of performance has now been extended to observations with longer coherent integration times. An overview of the overall system is presented, with emphasis on the observing sequence, phasing system, and differences with respect to the V2 system, along with a presentation of some recent engineering data.

  18. Lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-07-01

    A lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer (LRPDI) is proposed for dynamic wavefront measurement. The point diffraction interferometer is integrated on a small substrate with properly designed thin film, which is used for generating the interferogram with high carrier frequency at a CCD target. By lensless imaging, the complex amplitude at the CCD target can be propagated to the conjugated plane of the exit pupil of an incident wavefront, which not only avoids the edge diffraction in the interferogram, but also eliminates systematic error. The accuracy of LRPDI is demonstrated by simulation and experiment, and a precision better than 1/150 wavelength is achieved. The new design with lensless imaging processing is suitable for dynamic wavefront measurement. PMID:27409204

  19. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  20. Polarized-interferometer feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, F. H.

    1983-07-01

    The feasibility of using a polarized-interferometer system as a rendezvous and docking sensor for two cooperating spacecraft was studied. The polarized interferometer is a radio frequency system for long range, real time determination of relative position and attitude. Range is determined by round trip signal timing. Direction is determined by radio interferometry. Relative roll is determined from signal polarization. Each spacecraft is equipped with a transponder and an antenna array. The antenna arrays consist of four crossed dipoles that can transmit or receive either circularly or linearly polarized signals. The active spacecraft is equipped with a sophisticated transponder and makes all measurements. The transponder on the passive spacecraft is a relatively simple repeater. An initialization algorithm is developed to estimate position and attitude without any a priori information. A tracking algorithm based upon minimum variance linear estimators is also developed. Techniques to simplify the transponder on the passive spacecraft are investigated and a suitable configuration is determined. A multiple carrier CW signal format is selected. The dependence of range accuracy and ambiguity resolution error probability are derived and used to design a candidate system. The validity of the design and the feasibility of the polarized interferometer concept are verified by simulation.

  1. Polarized-interferometer feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raab, F. H.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using a polarized-interferometer system as a rendezvous and docking sensor for two cooperating spacecraft was studied. The polarized interferometer is a radio frequency system for long range, real time determination of relative position and attitude. Range is determined by round trip signal timing. Direction is determined by radio interferometry. Relative roll is determined from signal polarization. Each spacecraft is equipped with a transponder and an antenna array. The antenna arrays consist of four crossed dipoles that can transmit or receive either circularly or linearly polarized signals. The active spacecraft is equipped with a sophisticated transponder and makes all measurements. The transponder on the passive spacecraft is a relatively simple repeater. An initialization algorithm is developed to estimate position and attitude without any a priori information. A tracking algorithm based upon minimum variance linear estimators is also developed. Techniques to simplify the transponder on the passive spacecraft are investigated and a suitable configuration is determined. A multiple carrier CW signal format is selected. The dependence of range accuracy and ambiguity resolution error probability are derived and used to design a candidate system. The validity of the design and the feasibility of the polarized interferometer concept are verified by simulation.

  2. Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Schwartz, B. T.; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhang, He

    2013-12-01

    Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.

  3. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2014-10-30

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. In conclusion, we present the relevant theory and experimental results.

  4. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2014-10-01

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt-Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. We present the relevant theory and experimental results.

  5. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2014-10-30

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. In conclusion, wemore » present the relevant theory and experimental results.« less

  6. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P P; Goldberg, K A

    1999-06-01

    The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer has recently been developed and implemented at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to meet the significant metrology challenge of characterizing extreme ultraviolet projection lithography systems. Here we present a refined version of this interferometer that overcomes the original design's susceptibility to noise attributed to scattered light. The theory of the new hybrid spatial- and temporal-domain (dual-domain) point diffraction interferometer is described in detail and experimental results are presented. PMID:18319953

  7. Radar scattering from the summer polar mesosphere: Theory and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.Y.N.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalously large radar reflectivities observed in the summer polar mesosphere have eluded satisfactory explanation until now. The author proposes that the following chain of causality is responsible for the so-called polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE): The uniquely low temperature in the summer mesopause produce ice aerosols. Because the aerosols exist in a plasma, they become electrically charged. The ambient electrons become coupled to the aerosols through electric fields and their effective diffusivity is retarded due to the large size of the aerosols. The reduction in diffusivity allows electron density inhomogeneities to be maintained at the radar Bragg scales. The radar waves are then scattered by the inhomogeneities. The above concept is supported by developing a quantitative theory of ambipolar diffusion in the mesosphere. The results to isotropic turbulence and Fresnel radar scatter are applied to show that the observed radar reflectivities can be explained by the theory. It is shown that the presence of realistic charged aerosols are sufficient to explain PMSE. The author also shows that dressed aerosol radar scatter can only apply to echoes detected by UHF radars. The data is taken with the Sondrestrom 1.29-GHz radar and attribute it to dressed aerosol scatter. The author used the Cornell University portable radar interferometer (CUPRI) to observe the mesosphere while rockets carrying in situ sensors were flown through two PMSE occurrences and a noctilucent cloud/PMSE event. The first simultaneous height comparison between noctilucent clouds and PMSE show that the radar scattering region was near or slightly above the visible cloud layer. The author also infers from aspect sensitivity measurements and Doppler spectrograms that there were two distinct types of PMSE: Enhanced turbulent scatter and partial (Fresnel) reflection from steep edges in the electron density. Both mechanisms require an anomalously low electron diffusion coefficient.

  8. A Thermal-beam Calcium Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; van Zjill, Marshall; Washburn, Matthew; Archibald, James; Christensen, Dan; Birrell, Jeremiah; Burdett, Adam; Durfee, Dallin

    2007-06-01

    We report on the construction of a next-generation atom interferometer. Our research includes developing passive stabilization techniques, low-noise laser current drivers, high-speed scan-balancing lock circuits, and high-speed low-noise photo-detecting units. Our efforts have lead to developing an extremely stable laser locked to an ultra-high finesse optical cavity for use in a Ramsey-Bord'e interferometer scheme. The interferometer itself is based on a thermal calcium beam and will be upgraded in the future to a dual species Ca/Sr interferometer sensitive enough to improve measurements of possible time variance of the fine structure constant.

  9. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  10. Customizable Digital Receivers for Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn; Heavey, Brandon; Sadowy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Compact, highly customizable digital receivers are being developed for the system described in 'Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets' (NPO-43962), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (August 2007), page 72. The receivers are required to operate in unison, sampling radar returns received by the antenna elements in a digital beam-forming (DBF) mode. The design of these receivers could also be adapted to commercial radar systems. At the time of reporting the information for this article, there were no commercially available digital receivers capable of satisfying all of the operational requirements and compact enough to be mounted directly on the antenna elements. A provided figure depicts the overall system of which the digital receivers are parts. Each digital receiver includes an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a demultiplexer (DMUX), and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The ADC effects 10-bit band-pass sampling of input signals having frequencies up to 3.5 GHz. The input samples are demultiplexed at a user-selectable rate of 1:2 or 1:4, then buffered in part of the FPGA that functions as a first-in/first-out (FIFO) memory. Another part of the FPGA serves as a controller for the ADC, DMUX, and FIFO memory and as an interface between (1) the rest of the receiver and (2) a front-panel data port (FPDP) bus, which is an industry-standard parallel data bus that has a high data-rate capability and multichannel configuration suitable for DBF. Still other parts of the FPGA in each receiver perform signal-processing functions. The digital receivers can be configured to operate in a stand-alone mode, or in a multichannel mode as needed for DBF. The customizability of the receiver makes it applicable to a broad range of system architectures. The capability for operation of receivers in either a stand-alone or a DBF mode enables the use of the receivers in an unprecedentedly wide variety of radar systems.

  11. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  12. Spectropolarimetric analysis of differential interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Kazimierz

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents the principle of the operation of a spectropolarimetric interferometer. In the planar waveguide orthogonal modes of type TE and TM can be excited for the entire visible light. During the propagation the difference of the phases between the modes is determined, which is the function of the length of the path of propagation, the difference of the effective refractive index (NTM-NTE) and the wavelength. At the output of this system the spectral distribution of intensity is recorded, the shape of which depends on the value of the refractive index of the cover of the waveguides.

  13. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  14. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  15. Single-pass, efficient type-I phase-matched frequency doubling of high-power ultrashort-pulse Yb-fiber laser using LiB_3O_5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Kumar, Samir; Das, Ritwick

    2016-05-01

    We report 48 % efficient single-pass second harmonic generation of high-power ultrashort-pulse ({≈ }250 fs) Yb-fiber laser by utilizing type-I phase matching in LiB_3O_5 (LBO) crystal. The choice of LBO among other borate crystals for high-power frequency doubling is essentially motivated by large thermal conductivity, low birefringence and weak group velocity dispersion. By optimally focussing the beam in a 4-mm-long LBO crystal, we have generated about 2.3 W of average power at 532 nm using 4.8 W of available pump power at 1064 nm. The ultrashort green pulses were found out to be near-transform limited sech^2 pulses with a pulse width of Δ τ ≈ 150 fs and being delivered at 78 MHz repetition rate. Due to appreciably low spatial walk-off angle for LBO ({≈ }0.4°), we obtain M^2<1.26 for the SH beam which signifies marginal distortion in comparison with the pump beam (M^2<1.15). We also discuss the impact of third-order optical nonlinearity of the LBO crystal on the generated ultrashort SH pulses.

  16. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  17. Interferometer for Space Station Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Inspection of space station windows for micrometeorite damage would be a difficult task insitu using current inspection techniques. Commercially available optical profilometers and inspection systems are relatively large, about the size of a desktop computer tower, and require a stable platform to inspect the test object. Also, many devices currently available are designed for a laboratory or controlled environments requiring external computer control. This paper presents an approach using a highly developed optical interferometer to inspect the windows from inside the space station itself using a self- contained hand held device. The interferometer would be capable as a minimum of detecting damage as small as one ten thousands of an inch in diameter and depth while interrogating a relatively large area. The current developmental state of this device is still in the proof of concept stage. The background section of this paper will discuss the current state of the art of profilometers as well as the desired configuration of the self-contained, hand held device. Then, a discussion of the developments and findings that will allow the configuration change with suggested approaches appearing in the proof of concept section.

  18. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) invented to combine flexible control of liquid-crystal phase-shifts with robustness of point-diffraction interferometers. Produces interferograms indicative of shapes of wavefronts of laser beams having passed through or reflected from objects of interest. Interferograms combined in computers to produce phase maps describing wavefronts.

  19. Dual-prism interferometer for collimation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hii, King Ung; Kwek, Kuan Hiang

    2009-01-10

    An air-wedge lateral-shear interferometer using two prisms is presented. With a variable shear, the interferometer is suitable for testing collimation of a wide range of beam sizes down to a few millimeters in diameter. No antireflection coatings are necessary. Collimation for a light source with short coherent length is also demonstrated.

  20. MBI: Millimetre-wave bolometric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Rossinot, P.; Piccirillo, L.; Gear, W. K.; Mauskopf, P.; Ade, P.; Haynes, V.; Timbie, P.

    2002-05-01

    We present the design of the prototype of a millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI). This interferometer uses two arrays bolometers as detectors. The combination of high sensitivity bolometers and interferometric imaging appears to be well suited for precision measurements in observational cosmology. .

  1. CIST....CORRTEX interferometer simulation test

    SciTech Connect

    Heinle, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    Testing was performed in order to validate and cross calibrate an RF interferometer and the crush threshold of cable. Nitromethane was exploded (inside of PVC pipe). The explosion was used to crush the interferometer sensor cables which had been placed inside and outside the pipe. Results are described.

  2. Study Of Space-Based Optical Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Laskin, Robert A.; Breckenridge, William G.; Shao, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses calibration and operation of conceptual Focus Mission Interferometer (FMI), consisting of component instruments mounted at widely separated locations on large truss structure in orbit 1,400 km above Earth. Includes six telescopes in linear array. Outputs combined in pairlike fashion so FMI operates as three distinct two-telescope interferometers. Accurate enough for submilliarcsecond astrometry.

  3. Challenges to Airborne and Orbital Radar Sounding in the Presence of Surface Clutter: Lessons Learned (so far) from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    The search for life and in-situ resources for exploration on Mars targets both liquid and solid water, whether distributed or in reservoirs. Massive surface ice may cover potential habitats or other features of great interest. Ice-rich layering in the high latitudes holds clues to the climatic history of the planet. Multiple geophysical methods will clearly be necessary to fully characterize these various states of water (and other forms of ice), but radar sounding will be a critical component of the effort. Orbital radar sounders are already being employed and plans for surface-based and suborbital, above-surface radar sounders are being discussed. The difficulties in interpreting data from each type of platform are quite different. Given the lack of existing orbital radar sounding data from any planetary body, the analysis of airborne radar sounding data is quite useful for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of above-surface radar sounding on Mars. In addition to over 300,000 line-km of data collected over the Antarctic ice sheet by airborne radar sounding, we have recently analyzed data from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica where conditions and features emulate Mars in several respects. These airborne radar sounding data were collected over an ice-free area of Taylor Valley, ice-covered lakes, Taylor Glacier, and Beacon Valley. The pulsed radar (52.5 - 67.5 MHz chirp) was coherently recorded. Pulse compression and unfocused SAR processing were applied. One of the most challenging aspects of above-surface radar sounding is the determination of echo sources. This can, of course, be problematic for surface-based radar sounders given possible subsurface scattering geometries, but it is most severe for above-surface sounders because echoes from cross-track surface topography (surface clutter) can have similar time delays to those from the subsurface. We have developed two techniques to accomplish the identification of this surface clutter in single-pass airborne

  4. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  5. Orientational atom interferometers sensitive to gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lorek, Dennis; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Wicht, Andreas

    2010-02-15

    We present an atom interferometer that differs from common atom interferometers as it is not based on the spatial splitting of electronic wave functions, but on orienting atoms in space. As an example we present how an orientational atom interferometer based on highly charged hydrogen-like atoms is affected by gravitational waves. We show that a monochromatic gravitational wave will cause a frequency shift that scales with the binding energy of the system rather than with its physical dimension. For a gravitational wave amplitude of h=10{sup -23} the frequency shift is of the order of 110 {mu}Hz for an atom interferometer based on a 91-fold charged uranium ion. A frequency difference of this size can be resolved by current atom interferometers in 1 s.

  6. The wide swath ocean altimeter: radar interferometry for global ocean mapping with centimetric accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Brian D.; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Veilleux, Louise; Akins, Torry; Brown, Paula; Kitiyakara, Amirit; Zawadski, Mark

    2002-01-01

    We have developed an instrument concept that combines a conventional nadir altimeter with a radar interferometer to meet the above requirements. In this paper, we describe the overall mission concept and the interferometric radar design. We also describe several new technology developments that facilitate the inclusion of this instrument on a small, inexpensive spacecraft bus. Those include ultra-light, deployable reflectarray antennas for the radar interferometer; a novel five frequency feed horn for the radiometer and altimeter; a lightweight, low power integrated three frequency radiometer; and a field programmable gate array-based onboard data processor. Finally, we discuss recent algorithm developments for the onboard date processing, and present the expected instatements performance improvements over previously reported results.

  7. Interferometer real time control development for SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Charles E.

    2003-02-01

    Real Time Control (RTC) for the Space Interferometry Mission will build on the real time core interferometer control technology under development at JPL since the mid 1990s, with heritage from the ground based MKII and Palomar Testbed Interferometer projects developed in the late '80s and early '90s. The core software and electronics technology for SIM interferometer real time control is successfully operating on several SIM technology demonstration testbeds, including the Real-time Interferometer Control System Testbed, System Testbed-3, and the Microarcsecond Metrology testbed. This paper provides an overview of the architecture, design, integration, and test of the SIM flight interferometer real time control to meet challenging flight system requirements for the high processor throughput, low-latency interconnect, and precise synchronization to support microarcsecond-level astrometric measurements for greater than five years at 1 AU in Earth-trailing orbit. The electronics and software architecture of the interferometer real time control core and its adaptation to a flight design concept are described. Control loops for pointing and pathlength control within each of four flight interferometers and for coordination of control and data across interferometers are illustrated. The nature of onboard data processing to fit average downlink rates while retaining post-processed astrometric measurement precision and accuracy is also addressed. Interferometer flight software will be developed using a software simulation environment incorporating models of the metrology and starlight sensors and actuators to close the real time control loops. RTC flight software and instrument flight electronics will in turn be integrated utilizing the same simulation architecture for metrology and starlight component models to close real time control loops and verify RTC functionality and performance prior to delivery to flight interferometer system integration at Lockheed Martin

  8. Radar Interferometric Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J. L.; Nolan, M. C.

    1999-09-01

    High resolution imagery and a three-dimensional characterization of Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) can be obtained with ground-based radars. The Arecibo and Goldstone radar systems yield data at spatial resolutions comparable to the highest resolution spacecraft images of asteroids obtained to date. The use of radar interferometry techniques can further improve imaging and shape reconstruction algorithms [1],[2] and may allow direct measurements of the topography of NEAs. A two-element radar interferometer of appropriate baseline provides an observable, the interferometric phase, which can be used to extract three-dimensional information about the target [3], hence giving additional control in shape modeling procedures. The measurement of interferometric phase also opens the possibility of mapping the topography of an asteroid, in a manner similar to that applied recently to the Moon [4]. Simulations show that this is feasible when potential ambiguities in range-Doppler imaging are avoided, for instance when elongated objects are in a favorable orientation. Radar interferometric imaging of 6489 Golevka was attempted during its June 1999 close approach to Earth [5]. The Arecibo 305 m telescope was used to transmit, and the DSN 70 m antenna in Madrid formed the second element of the interferometer. The Arecibo-Madrid baseline defined an ideal fringe pattern for interferometric mapping, but technical difficulties prevented imaging of the Madrid data. Radar interferometry concepts and simulation results will be presented, as well as any new data acquired before the meeting. [1] R. S. Hudson and S. J. Ostro (1994). Science, 263, 940. [2] R. S. Hudson and S. J. Ostro (1995). Science, 270, 84. [3] I. I. Shapiro et al. (1972). Science, 178, 939. [4] J. L. Margot et al. (1999). Science, 284, 1658. [5] J. L. Margot and M. C. Nolan (1999). ACM Meeting, July 26-30, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

  9. The Condor equatorial electrojet campaign - Radar results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudeki, Erhan; Fejer, Bela G.; Farley, Donald T.; Hanuise, Christian

    1987-12-01

    The results of two Condor equatorial electrojet experiments (i.e., a daytime and a nighttime experiments on March 12, 1983), in which Condor rocked turbulence measurements were obtained simultaneously with VHF radar interferometer and HF radar backscatter observations, are discussed. The daytime Condor experiment showed that the electrojet could be made turbulent by either the gradient drift or the two-stream instability, or both. Pure two-stream turbulence was observed on the topside layer in the daytime electrojet suggesting that mode coupling processes should be included in nonlinear saturation theories of two-stream waves. In the nighttime experiment, radar data showed a bifurcated layer with the two parts having comparable echo strength but oppositely directed zonal drift velocities. The lower layer showed narrow backscatter spectra, while the upper layer was characterized by kilometer scale waves and vertically propagating type one waves. The characteristics of the topside large-scale waves were consistent with the predictions of nonlocal gradient drift instability theories.

  10. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  11. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  12. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Lassahn, Gordon D.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  13. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-07-27

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  14. Navy precision optical interferometer database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. K.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Hall, T.; Armstrong, J. T.; Hutter, D.; Mozurkewich, D.

    2012-07-01

    The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) has now been recording astronomical observations for the better part of two decades. During that time period hundreds of thousands of observations have been obtained, with a total data volume of multiple terabytes. Additionally, in the next few years the data rate from the NPOI is expected to increase significantly. To make it easier for NPOI users to search the NPOI observations and to make it easier for them to obtain data, we have constructed a easily accessible and searchable database of observations. The database is based on a MySQL server and uses standard query language (SQL). In this paper we will describe the database table layout and show examples of possible database queries.

  15. Interlaboratory study of the reproducibility of the single-pass flow-through test method : measuring the dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 {sup {degree}}C and pH 10.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-28

    An international interlaboratory study (ILS) was conducted to evaluate the precision with which single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests can be conducted by following a method to be standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials - International. Tests for the ILS were conducted with the low-activity reference material (LRM) glass developed previously for use as a glass test standard. Tests were conducted at 70 {+-} 2 C using a LiCl/LiOH solution as the leachant to impose an initial pH of about 10 (at 70 C). Participants were provided with LRM glass that had been crushed and sieved to isolate the -100 +200 mesh size fraction, and then washed to remove fines. Participants were asked to conduct a series of tests using different solution flow rate-to-sample mass ratios to generate a range of steady-state Si concentrations. The glass dissolution rate under each test condition was calculated using the steady-state Si concentration and solution flow rate that were measured in the test. The glass surface area was estimated from the mass of glass used in the test and the Si content of LRM glass was known. A linear relationship between the rate and the steady-state Si concentration (at Si concentrations less than 10 mg/L) was used to estimate the forward dissolution rate, which is the rate in the absence of dissolved Si. Participants were asked to sample the effluent solution at least five times after reaction times of between 3 and 14 days to measure the Si concentration and flow rate, and to verify that steady-state was achieved. Results were provided by seven participants and the data sets provided by five participants were sufficient to determine the forward rates independently.

  16. Rotation Sensing with an Atom Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lenef, A.; Hammond, T.D.; Smith, E.T.; Chapman, M.S.; Rubenstein, R.A.; Pritchard, D.E.

    1997-02-01

    We have measured the phase shift induced by rotation of an atom interferometer at rates of -2 to +2 earth rates and obtained 1{percent} agreement with the predicted Sagnac phase shift for atomic matter waves. The rotational rms noise of our interferometer was 42 milliearth rates for 1 sec of integration time, within 9{percent} of shot noise. The high sensitivity and agreement of predicted and measured behavior suggest useful future scientific applications of atom interferometers as inertial sensors. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. X-ray Interferometer Using Prism Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2004-05-12

    Two-beam X-ray interferometer using refractive optics has been developed. A prism made of acrylic resin is used as the beam deflector for hard X-ray wavefront dividing interferometer. This configuration is the same as that of the Fresnel's bi-prism interferometer or the Leith-Upatnieks type two-beam holography in visible light region. Therefore, quantitative analysis of the degree of transversal coherence can be performed by measuring the visibility of interference fringes. It is also possible to realize two-beam holographic imaging in hard X-ray regions.

  18. The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Novak, G.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P.; Tucker, G. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a proposed ground-based instrument designed for a wide range of cosmological and astrophysical observations including studies of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the advantages of two well-developed technologies - interferometers and bolometric detectors. Interferometers have many advantages over .filled-aperture telescopes and are particularly suitable for high resolution imaging. Cooled bolometers are the highest sensitivity detectors at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The combination of these two technologies results in an instrument with both high sensitivity and high angular resolution.

  19. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  20. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  1. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  2. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  4. The CryoSat Interferometer after 6 years in orbit: calibration and achievable performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scagliola, Michele; Fornari, Marco; De Bartolomei, Maurizio; Bouffard, Jerome; Parrinello, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    The main payload of CryoSat is a Ku-band pulse width limited radar altimeter, called SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter). When commanded in SARIn (synthetic aperture radar interferometry) mode, through coherent along-track processing of the returns received from two antennas, the interferometric phase related to the first arrival of the echo is used to retrieve the angle of arrival of the scattering in the across-track direction. In fact, the across-track echo direction can be derived by exploiting the precise knowledge of the baseline vector (i.e. the vector between the two antennas centers of phase) and simple geometry. The end-to-end calibration strategy for the CryoSat interferometer consists on in-orbit calibration campaigns following the approach described in [1]. From the beginning of the CryoSat mission, about once a year the interferometer calibration campaigns have been periodically performed by rolling left and right the spacecraft of about ±0.4 deg. This abstract is aimed at presenting our analysis of the calibration parameters and of the achievable performance of the CryoSat interferometer over the 6 years of mission. Additionally, some further studies have been performed to assess the accuracy of the roll angle computed on ground as function of the aberration (the apparent displacement of a celestial object from its true position, caused by the relative motion of the observer and the object) correction applied to the attitude quaternions, provided by the Star Tracker mounted on-board. In fact, being the roll information crucial to obtain an accurate estimate of the angle of arrival, the data from interferometer calibration campaigns have been used to verify how the application of the aberration correction affects the roll information and, in turns, the measured angle of arrival. [1] Galin, N.; Wingham, D.J.; Cullen, R.; Fornari, M.; Smith, W.H.F.; Abdalla, S., "Calibration of the CryoSat-2 Interferometer and Measurement of Across

  5. 1999 IEEE radar conference

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This conference addresses the stringent radar technology demands facing the next century: target detection, tracking and identification; changing target environment; increased clutter mitigation techniques; air traffic control; transportation; drug smuggling; remote sensing, and other consumer oriented applications. A timely discussion covers how to minimize costs for these emerging areas. Advanced radar technology theory and applications are also presented. Topics covered include: signal processing; space time adaptive processing/antennas; surveillance technology; radar systems; dual use; and phenomenology.

  6. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with planetary radar research reported during the time from 1979 to 1982. A brief synopsis of radar definitions and technical terminology is also provided. In connection with the proximity of the moon to earth, lunar radar studies have been performed over a wider range of wavelengths than radar investigations of other planetary targets. The most recent study of lunar quasispecular scattering is due to Simpson and Tyler (1982). The latest efforts to interpret the lunar radar maps focus on maria-highlands regolith differences and models of crater ejecta evolution. The highly successful Pioneer Venus Radar Mapper experiment has provided a first look at Venus' global distributions of topography, lambda 17-cm radar reflectivity, and rms surface slopes. Attention is given to recent comparisons of Viking Orbiter images of Mars to groundbased radar altimetry of the planet, the icy Galilean satellites, radar observations of asteroids and comets, and lambda 4-cm and lambda 13-cm observations of Saturn's rings.

  7. Development of newly designed VHF interferometer system for observing earthquake-related atmospheric anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Isao; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kamogawa, Masashi; Iyono, Atsushi; Kroumov, Valeri; Azakami, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Temporal correlation between atmospheric anomalies and earthquakes has recently been verified statistically through measuring VHF FM radio waves transmitted beyond the line-of-sight. In order to locate the sources of such atmospheric anomalies, we developed a VHF interferometer system (bistatic-radar type) capable of finding the arrival direction of FM radio waves scattered possibly by earthquake-related atmospheric anomalies. In general, frequency modulation of FM radio waves produces ambiguity of arrival direction. However, our system, employing high-sampling rates of the order of kHz, can precisely measure the arrival direction of FM radio waves by stacking received signals. PMID:20009381

  8. Interferometer Designs for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Dumont, P. J.; Colavita, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a space-based infrared interferometer that will combine high sensitivity and spatial resolution to detect and characterize planetary systems within 15 pc of our sun. TPF is a key element in NASA's Origins Program and is currently un- der study in its Pre-Project Phase. We review some of the interferometer designs that have been considered for starlight nulling, with particular attention to the architecture and subsystems of the central beam-combiner.

  9. Interferometer Designs for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Dumont, P. J.; Colavita, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a space-based infrared interferometer that will combine high sensitivity and spatial resolution to detect and characterize planetary systems within 15 pc of our sun. TPF is a key element in NASA's Origins Program and is currently under study in its Pre-Project Phase. We review some of the interferometer designs that have been considered for starlight nulling, with particular attention to the architecture and subsystems of the central beam-combiner.

  10. Single and double superimposing interferometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Interferometers which can imprint a coherent delay on a broadband uncollimated beam are described. The delay value can be independent of incident ray angle, allowing interferometry using uncollimated beams from common extended sources such as lamps and fiber bundles, and facilitating Fourier Transform spectroscopy of wide angle sources. Pairs of such interferometers matched in delay and dispersion can measure velocity and communicate using ordinary lamps, wide diameter optical fibers and arbitrary non-imaging paths, and not requiring a laser.

  11. Dual-beam skin friction interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A portable dual-laser beam interferometer is described that nonintrusively measures skin friction by monitoring the thickness change of an oil film at two locations while said oil film is subjected to shear stress. An interferometer flat is utilized to develop the two beams. Light detectors sense the beam reflections from the oil film and the surface thereunder. The signals from the detectors are recorded so that the number of interference fringes produced over a given time span may be counted.

  12. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, M.

    1994-04-19

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer is described for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ([open quotes]first[close quotes] interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources. 3 figures.

  13. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ("first" interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources.

  14. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2016-06-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca(2+) signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca(2+) signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  15. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca2+ signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca2+ signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  16. Radar illusion via metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results. PMID:21405918

  17. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  18. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  19. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  20. Decoders for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  1. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system

  2. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  3. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  4. Laser radar improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelalian, A. V.

    1981-11-01

    A short history of the uses of various laser radars is presented, and appropriate applications of laser and microwave radars are discussed. CO2 laser radar, operating at 10.6 microns, is considered for use in aircraft navigation systems, fire-control systems for armored vehicle and aircraft, missile guidance, severe storm research, line-of-sight command of missiles, wind turbine site surveys, clear-air turbulence monitors for aircraft, and satellite tracking. Microwave radar is all-weather, but is subject to multipath inaccuracies, countermeasures, and angular resolution limitations, so hybrid laser microwave systems look promising for microwave target acquisition and laser tracking. Advantages and disadvantages of the use of ruby, YAG, and CO2 lasers in varying atmospheric conditions are discussed. Development of a laser radar pod for obstacle detection, Doppler navigation, automatic terrain following, hover control, weapon delivery, and precision searching is noted.

  5. Intelligent radar data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbaur, Ulrich D.

    The application of artificial intelligence principles to the processing of radar signals is considered theoretically. The main capabilities required are learning and adaptation in a changing environment, processing and modeling information (especially dynamics and uncertainty), and decision-making based on all available information (taking its reliability into account). For the application to combat-aircraft radar systems, the tasks include the combination of data from different types of sensors, reacting to electronic counter-countermeasures, evaluation of how much data should be acquired (energy and radiation management), control of the radar, tracking, and identification. Also discussed are related uses such as monitoring the avionics systems, supporting pilot decisions with respect to the radar system, and general applications in radar-system R&D.

  6. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  7. The Einstein polarization interferometer for cosmology (EPIC) and the millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Tucker, G. S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ali, S.; Bierman, E.; Bunn, E. F.; Calderon, C.; Gault, A. C.; Hyland, P. O.; Keating, B. G.; Kim, J.; Korotkov, A.; Malu, S. S.; Mauskopf, P.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Piccirillo, L.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    We provide an overview of a mission concept study underway for the Einstein Inflation Probe (EIP). Our study investigates the advantages and tradeoffs of using an interferometer (EPIC) for the mission. We also report on the status of the millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI), a ground-based pathfinder optimized for degree-scale CMB polarization measurements at 90 GHz.

  8. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  9. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  10. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.