Science.gov

Sample records for single-photon quantum cryptography

  1. Quantum Overloading Cryptography Using Single-Photon Nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yong-Gang; Cai, Qing-Yu; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2007-08-01

    Using the single-photon nonlocality, we propose a quantum novel overloading cryptography scheme, in which a single photon carries two bits information in one-way quantum channel. Two commutative modes of the single photon, the polarization mode and the spatial mode, are used to encode secret information. Strict time windows are set to detect the impersonation attack. The spatial mode which denotes the existence of photons is noncommutative with the phase of the photon, so that our scheme is secure against photon-number-splitting attack. Our protocol may be secure against individual attack.

  2. Faint laser pulses versus a single-photon source in free space quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter we present estimates for the distance of secret key transmission through free space for three different protocols of quantum key distribution: for BB84 and phase time-coding protocols in the case of a strictly single-photon source, and for the relativistic quantum key distribution protocol in the case of faint laser pulses.

  3. Quantum-tomographic cryptography with a semiconductor single-photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszlikowski, D.; Yang, L.J.; Yong, L.S.; Willeboordse, F.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-09-15

    We analyze the security of so-called quantum-tomographic cryptography with the source producing entangled photons via an experimental scheme proposed by Fattal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 37903 (2004)]. We determine the range of the experimental parameters for which the protocol is secure against the most general incoherent attacks.

  4. Intrinsic imperfection of self-differencing single-photon detectors harms the security of high-speed quantum cryptography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Sun, Shi-Hai; Tang, Guang-Zhao; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to the high-speed self-differencing single-photon detector (SD-SPD), the secret key rate of quantum key distribution (QKD), which can, in principle, offer unconditionally secure private communications between two users (Alice and Bob), can exceed 1 Mbit/s. However, the SD-SPD may contain loopholes, which can be exploited by an eavesdropper (Eve) to hack into the unconditional security of the high-speed QKD systems. In this paper, we analyze the fact that the SD-SPD can be remotely controlled by Eve in order to spy on full information without being discovered, then proof-of-principle experiments are demonstrated. Here, we point out that this loophole is introduced directly by the operating principle of the SD-SPD, thus, it cannot be removed, except for the fact that some active countermeasures are applied by the legitimate parties.

  5. Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruß, D.; Meyer, T.

    The Greek words "kryptos" ≡ "hidden" and "logos" ≡ "word" are the etymological sources for "cryptology," the science of secure communication. Within cryptology, one distinguishes cryptography (or "code-making") and cryptanalysis (or "code-breaking"). The aim of cryptography is to ensure secret or "secure" communication between a sender, traditionally called Alice, and a receiver, called Bob. The encryption and decryption of a so-called plain text into a cipher text and back is achieved using a certain key (not necessarily the same for Alice and Bob), as illustrated in Fig. 1. Here, "secure" means that an eavesdropper, called Eve, has no information on the message. In this chapter we will show that in classical cryptography (using classical signals), security relies on the assumed difficulty to solve certain mathematical tasks, whereas in quantum cryptography (using quantum signals), security arises from the laws of quantum physics.

  6. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.

    1997-08-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as {open_quotes}key{close_quotes} material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible. We have also constructed a quantum key distribution system for free-space, line-of-sight transmission using single-photon polarization states, which is currently undergoing laboratory testing. 7 figs.

  7. Heralded single photon sources: a route towards quantum communication technology and photon standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, S. A.; Scholten, R. E.

    2008-03-01

    Single photon counting, based on single photon sources and detectors, is a key ingredient for certain applications aiming at new quantum information technologies. Quantum cryptography, quantum radiometry, distributed quantum computing, as well as adjacent technologies such as biomedical and astronomical imaging, and low power classical communication also rely on single-photon technology. This paper reviews the present status of single photon sources and related counting measurement techniques, based on correlated (or heralded) photons in parametric down-conversion, and their possible impact on the above mentioned technologies, as well as an assessment for photon standards in the future.

  8. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, C. Glen; Simmons, Charles M.

    1997-07-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as `key' material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenburg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single- photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over `open' multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible.

  9. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  10. Quantum Cryptography Without Quantum Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2002-06-01

    Quantum cryptography aims at transmitting a random key in such a way that the presence of a spy eavesdropping the communication would be revealed by disturbances in the transmission of the message. In standard quantum cryptography, this unavoidable disturbance is a consequence of the uncertainty principle of Heisenberg. We propose in this paper to replace quantum uncertainties by generalised, technological uncertainties, and discuss the realisability of such an idea. The proposed protocol can be considered as a simplification, but also as a generalisation of the standard quantum cryptographic protocols.

  11. Efficient single-photon entanglement concentration for quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lan; Sheng, Yu-Bo

    2014-02-01

    We present two entanglement concentration protocols for single-photon entanglement. The first protocol is implemented with linear optics. With the help of the 50:50 beam splitter, variable beam splitter and an auxiliary photon, a less-entangled single-photon state can be concentrated into a maximally single-photon entangled state with some probability. The second protocol is implemented with the cross-Kerr nonlinearity. With the help of the cross-Kerr nonlinearity, the sophisticated single photon detector is not required. Moreover, the second protocol can be reused to get higher success probability. All these advantages may make the protocols useful in the long-distance quantum communication.

  12. Single-photon quantum router with multiple output ports.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei-Bin; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    The routing capability is a requisite in quantum network. Although the quantum routing of signals has been investigated in various systems both in theory and experiment, the general form of quantum routing with many output terminals still needs to be explored. Here we propose a scheme to achieve the multi-channel quantum routing of the single photons in a waveguide-emitter system. The channels are composed by the waveguides and are connected by intermediate two-level emitters. By adjusting the intermediate emitters, the output channels of the input single photons can be controlled. This is demonstrated in the cases of one output channel, two output channels and the generic N output channels. The results show that the multi-channel quantum routing of single photons can be well achieved in the proposed system. This offers a scheme for the experimental realization of general quantum routing of single photons. PMID:24769619

  13. Quantum Cryptography Over 24 km of Underground Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard; Luther, Gabriel; Morgan, George; Peterson, Charles; Simmons, Charles

    1997-04-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as ''key'' material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We are performing quantum cryptography over 24-km of underground optical fiber using non-orthogonal single-photon interference states. Key material is built up by transmitting a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. Our experiment demonstrates that secure, real-time key generation over "open" multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is feasible.

  14. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Nazin, S. S.

    2003-07-01

    The problem of unconditional security of quantum cryptography (i.e. the security which is guaranteed by the fundamental laws of nature rather than by technical limitations) is one of the central points in quantum information theory. We propose a relativistic quantum cryptosystem and prove its unconditional security against any eavesdropping attempts. Relativistitic causality arguments allow to demonstrate the security of the system in a simple way. Since the proposed protocol does not empoly collective measurements and quantum codes, the cryptosystem can be experimentally realized with the present state-of-art in fiber optics technologies. The proposed cryptosystem employs only the individual measurements and classical codes and, in addition, the key distribution problem allows to postpone the choice of the state encoding scheme until after the states are already received instead of choosing it before sending the states into the communication channel (i.e. to employ a sort of "antedate" coding).

  15. Interferometric Quantum-Nondemolition Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Peter; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Two interferometric quantum-nondemolition (QND) devices have been proposed: (1) a polarization-independent device and (2) a polarization-preserving device. The prolarization-independent device works on an input state of up to two photons, whereas the polarization-preserving device works on a superposition of vacuum and single- photon states. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode would also be populated by a single photon. Like other QND devices, the proposed devices are potentially useful for a variety of applications, including such areas of NASA interest as quantum computing, quantum communication, detection of gravity waves, as well as pedagogical demonstrations of the quantum nature of light. Many protocols in quantum computation and quantum communication require the possibility of detecting a photon without destroying it. The only prior single- photon-detecting QND device is based on quantum electrodynamics in a resonant cavity and, as such, it depends on the photon frequency. Moreover, the prior device can distinguish only between one photon and no photon. The proposed interferometric QND devices would not depend on frequency and could distinguish between (a) one photon and (b) zero or two photons. The first proposed device is depicted schematically in Figure 1. The input electromagnetic mode would be a superposition of a zero-, a one-, and a two-photon quantum state. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode also would be populated by a single photon.

  16. Quantum interference of independently generated telecom-band single photons

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Monika; Altepeter, Joseph B.; Huang, Yu-Ping; Oza, Neal N.; Kumar, Prem

    2014-12-04

    We report on high-visibility quantum interference of independently generated telecom O-band (1310 nm) single photons using standard single-mode fibers. The experimental data are shown to agree well with the results of simulations using a comprehensive quantum multimode theory without the need for any fitting parameter.

  17. A versatile source of single photons for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förtsch, Michael; Fürst, Josef U.; Wittmann, Christoffer; Strekalov, Dmitry; Aiello, Andrea; Chekhova, Maria V.; Silberhorn, Christine; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    The generation of high-quality single-photon states with controllable narrow spectral bandwidths and central frequencies is key to facilitate efficient coupling of any atomic system to non-classical light fields. Such an interaction is essential in numerous experiments for fundamental science and applications in quantum communication and information processing, as well as in quantum metrology. Here we implement a fully tunable, narrow-band and efficient single-photon source based on a whispering gallery mode resonator. Our disk-shaped, monolithic and intrinsically stable resonator is made of lithium niobate and supports a cavity-assisted spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. The generated photon pairs are emitted into two highly tunable resonator modes. We verify wavelength tuning over 100 nm of both modes with controllable bandwidth between 7.2 and 13 MHz. Heralding of single photons yields anti-bunching with g(2)(0)<0.2.

  18. Single-Atom Single-Photon Quantum Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, David; Bochmann, Joerg; Muecke, Martin; Specht, Holger; Weber, Bernhard; Wilk, Tatjana; Rempe, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    By combining atom trapping techniques and cavity cooling schemes we are able to trap a single neutral atom inside a high-finesse cavity for several tens of seconds. We show that our coupled atom-cavity system can be used to generate single photons in a controlled way. With our long trapping times and high single-photon production efficiency, the non-classical properties of the emitted light can be shown in the photon correlations of a single atom. In a similar atom-cavity setup, we investigate the interface between atoms and photons by entangling a single atom with a single photon emitted into the cavity and by further mapping the quantum state of the atom onto a second single photon. These schemes are intrinsically deterministic and establish the basic element required to realize a distributed quantum network with individual atoms at rest as quantum memories and single flying photons as quantum messengers. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the European Union SCALA and CONQUEST programs. D. L. M. acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  19. Quantum Probability Cancellation Due to a Single-Photon State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Z. Y.

    1996-01-01

    When an N-photon state enters a lossless symmetric beamsplitter from one input port, the photon distribution for the two output ports has the form of Bernouli Binormial, with highest probability at equal partition (N/2 at one outport and N/2 at the other). However, injection of a single photon state at the other input port can dramatically change the photon distribution at the outputs, resulting in zero probability at equal partition. Such a strong deviation from classical particle theory stems from quantum probability amplitude cancellation. The effect persists even if the N-photon state is replaced by an arbitrary state of light. A special case is the coherent state which corresponds to homodyne detection of a single photon state and can lead to the measurement of the wave function of a single photon state.

  20. Operating quantum waveguide circuits with superconducting single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, C. M.; Peruzzo, A.; Miki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Wang, Z.; Baek, B.; Nam, S.; Hadfield, R. H.; O'Brien, J. L.

    2010-05-01

    Advanced quantum information science and technology (QIST) applications place exacting demands on optical components. Quantum waveguide circuits offer a route to scalable QIST on a chip. Superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) provide infrared single-photon sensitivity combined with low dark counts and picosecond timing resolution. In this study, we bring these two technologies together. Using SSPDs we observe a two-photon interference visibility of 92.3±1.0% in a silica-on-silicon waveguide directional coupler at λ =804 nm—higher than that measured with silicon detectors (89.9±0.3%). We further operated controlled-NOT gate and quantum metrology circuits with SSPDs. These demonstrations present a clear path to telecom-wavelength quantum waveguide circuits.

  1. Twenty Seven Years of Quantum Cryptography!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    2011-03-01

    One of the fundamental goals of cryptographic research is to minimize the assumptions underlying the protocols that enable secure communications between pairs or groups of users. In 1984, building on earlier research by Stephen Wiesner, Charles Bennett and Gilles Brassard showed how quantum physics could be harnessed to provide information-theoretic security for protocols such as the distribution of cryptographic keys, which enables two parties to secure their conventional communications. Bennett and Brassard and colleagues performed a proof-of-principle quantum key distribution (QKD) experiment with single-photon quantum state transmission over a 32-cm air path in 1991. This seminal experiment led other researchers to explore QKD in optical fibers and over line-of-sight outdoor atmospheric paths (``free-space''), resulting in dramatic increases in range, bit rate and security. These advances have been enabled by improvements in sources and single-photon detectors. Also in 1991 Artur Ekert showed how the security of QKD could be related to quantum entanglement. This insight led to a deeper understanding and proof of QKD security with practical sources and detectors in the presence of transmission loss and channel noise. Today, QKD has been implemented over ranges much greater than 100km in both fiber and free-space, multi-node network testbeds have been demonstrated, and satellite-based QKD is under study in several countries. ``Quantum hacking'' researchers have shown the importance of extending security considerations to the classical devices that produce and detect the photon quantum states. New quantum cryptographic protocols such as secure identification have been proposed, and others such as quantum secret splitting have been demonstrated. It is now possible to envision quantum cryptography providing a more secure alternative to present-day cryptographic methods for many secure communications functions. My talk will survey these remarkable developments.

  2. Transform-limited single photons from a single quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Prechtel, Jonathan H.; Houel, Julien; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing a quantum photonics network requires a source of very-high-fidelity single photons. An outstanding challenge is to produce a transform-limited single-photon emitter to guarantee that single photons emitted far apart in the time domain are truly indistinguishable. This is particularly difficult in the solid-state as the complex environment is the source of noise over a wide bandwidth. A quantum dot is a robust, fast, bright and narrow-linewidth emitter of single photons; layer-by-layer growth and subsequent nano-fabrication allow the electronic and photonic states to be engineered. This represents a set of features not shared by any other emitter but transform-limited linewidths have been elusive. Here, we report transform-limited linewidths measured on second timescales, primarily on the neutral exciton but also on the charged exciton close to saturation. The key feature is control of the nuclear spins, which dominate the exciton dephasing via the Overhauser field. PMID:26348157

  3. Quantum private query based on single-photon interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng-Wei; Sun, Ying; Lin, Song

    2016-08-01

    Quantum private query (QPQ) has become a research hotspot recently. Specially, the quantum key distribution (QKD)-based QPQ attracts lots of attention because of its practicality. Various such kind of QPQ protocols have been proposed based on different technologies of quantum communications. Single-photon interference is one of such technologies, on which the famous QKD protocol GV95 is just based. In this paper, we propose two QPQ protocols based on single-photon interference. The first one is simpler and easier to realize, and the second one is loss tolerant and flexible, and more practical than the first one. Furthermore, we analyze both the user privacy and the database privacy in the proposed protocols.

  4. Authenticated Quantum Key Distribution with Collective Detection using Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Bing-Jie; Duan, Ji-Tong; Liu, Bin; Su, Qi; He, Yuan-Hang; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2016-05-01

    We present two authenticated quantum key distribution (AQKD) protocols by utilizing the idea of collective (eavesdropping) detection. One is a two-party AQKD protocol, the other is a multiparty AQKD protocol with star network topology. In these protocols, the classical channels need not be assumed to be authenticated and the single photons are used as the quantum information carriers. To achieve mutual identity authentication and establish a random key in each of the proposed protocols, only one participant should be capable of preparing and measuring single photons, and the main quantum ability that the rest of the participants should have is just performing certain unitary operations. Security analysis shows that these protocols are free from various kinds of attacks, especially the impersonation attack and the man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack.

  5. Quantum private query based on single-photon interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng-Wei; Sun, Ying; Lin, Song

    2016-05-01

    Quantum private query (QPQ) has become a research hotspot recently. Specially, the quantum key distribution (QKD)-based QPQ attracts lots of attention because of its practicality. Various such kind of QPQ protocols have been proposed based on different technologies of quantum communications. Single-photon interference is one of such technologies, on which the famous QKD protocol GV95 is just based. In this paper, we propose two QPQ protocols based on single-photon interference. The first one is simpler and easier to realize, and the second one is loss tolerant and flexible, and more practical than the first one. Furthermore, we analyze both the user privacy and the database privacy in the proposed protocols.

  6. Strong Single-Photon Coupling in Superconducting Quantum Magnetomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Via, Guillem; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Romero-Isart, Oriol

    2015-04-01

    We show that the inductive coupling between the quantum mechanical motion of a superconducting microcantilever and a flux-dependent microwave quantum circuit can attain the strong single-photon nanomechanical coupling regime with feasible experimental parameters. We propose to use a superconducting strip, which is in the Meissner state, at the tip of a cantilever. A pickup coil collects the flux generated by the sheet currents induced by an external quadrupole magnetic field centered at the strip location. The position-dependent magnetic response of the superconducting strip, enhanced by both diamagnetism and demagnetizing effects, leads to a strong magnetomechanical coupling to quantum circuits.

  7. Single-photon experiments with liquid crystals for quantum science and quantum engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Bissell, Luke J.; Gehring, George M.; Winkler, Justin M.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2015-03-01

    We present here our results on using liquid crystals in experiments with nonclassical light sources: (1) single-photon sources exhibiting antibunching (separation of all photons in time), which are key components for secure quantum communication systems, and (2) entangled photon source with photons exhibiting quantum interference in a Hong-Ou- Mandel interferometer. In the first part, cholesteric liquid crystal hosts were used to create definite circular polarization of antibunched photons emitted by nanocrystal quantum dots. If the photon has unknown polarization, filtering it through a polarizer to produce the desired polarization for quantum key distribution with bits based on polarization states of photons will reduce by half the efficiency of a quantum cryptography system. In the first part, we also provide our results on observation of a circular polarized microcavity resonance in nanocrystal quantum dot fluorescence in a 1-D chiral photonic bandgap cholesteric liquid crystal microcavity. In the second part of this paper with indistinguishable, time-entangled photons, we demonstrate our experimental results on simulating quantum-mechanical barrier tunnelling phenomena. A Hong-Ou-Mandel dip (quantum interference effect) is shifted when a phase change was introduced on the way of one of entangled photons in pair (one arm of the interferometer) by inserting in this arm an electrically controlled planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal layer between two prisms in the conditions close to a frustrated total internal reflection. By applying different AC-voltages to the planar-aligned nematic layer and changing its refractive index, we can obtain various conditions for incident photon propagation - from total reflection to total transmission. Measuring changes of tunnelling times of photon through this structure with femtosecond resolution permitted us to answer some unresolved questions in quantum-mechanical barrier tunnelling phenomena.

  8. Single-Photon Superradiance from a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël S.; Lehmann, Tau B.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Lodahl, Peter; Stobbe, Søren

    2016-04-01

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron and the hole comprising the exciton gives rise to an anharmonic spectrum, which we exploit to prepare the superradiant quantum state deterministically with a laser pulse. We observe a fivefold enhancement of the oscillator strength compared to conventional quantum dots. The enhancement is limited by the base temperature of our cryostat and may lead to oscillator strengths above 1000 from a single quantum emitter at optical frequencies.

  9. Single-Photon Superradiance from a Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël S; Lehmann, Tau B; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Lodahl, Peter; Stobbe, Søren

    2016-04-22

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron and the hole comprising the exciton gives rise to an anharmonic spectrum, which we exploit to prepare the superradiant quantum state deterministically with a laser pulse. We observe a fivefold enhancement of the oscillator strength compared to conventional quantum dots. The enhancement is limited by the base temperature of our cryostat and may lead to oscillator strengths above 1000 from a single quantum emitter at optical frequencies. PMID:27152804

  10. Quantum-dot-spin single-photon interface.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, S T; Fallahi, P; Imamoğlu, A

    2010-07-16

    Using background-free detection of spin-state-dependent resonance fluorescence from a single-electron charged quantum dot with an efficiency of 0.1%, we realize a classical single spin-photon interface where the detection of a scattered photon with 300 ps time resolution projects the quantum dot spin to a definite spin eigenstate with fidelity exceeding 99%. The bunching of resonantly scattered photons reveals information about electron spin dynamics. High-fidelity fast spin-state initialization heralded by a single photon enables the realization of quantum information processing tasks such as nondeterministic distant spin entanglement. Given that we could suppress the measurement backaction to well below the natural spin-flip rate, realization of a quantum nondemolition measurement of a single spin could be achieved by increasing the fluorescence collection efficiency by a factor exceeding 10 using a photonic nanostructure. PMID:20867763

  11. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-03-15

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  12. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  13. Multi-group dynamic quantum secret sharing with single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Ma, Haiqiang; Wei, Kejin; Yang, Xiuqing; Qu, Wenxiu; Dou, Tianqi; Chen, Yitian; Li, Ruixue; Zhu, Wu

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel scheme for the realization of single-photon dynamic quantum secret sharing between a boss and three dynamic agent groups. In our system, the boss can not only choose one of these three groups to share the secret with, but also can share two sets of independent keys with two groups without redistribution. Furthermore, the security of communication is enhanced by using a control mode. Compared with previous schemes, our scheme is more flexible and will contribute to a practical application.

  14. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Michael G; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H

    2014-03-24

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack. PMID:24664022

  15. Quantum Erasure Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Hatim

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenon of quantum erasure has long intrigued physicists, but has surprisingly found limited practical application. Here, we propose a protocol for quantum key distribution (QKD) based on quantum erasure, promising inherent security against detector attacks. We particularly demonstrate its security against a powerful detector-blinding attack.

  16. Quantum cryptography and applications in the optical fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuhui

    2005-09-01

    Quantum cryptography, as part of quantum information and communications, can provide absolute security for information transmission because it is established on the fundamental laws of quantum theory, such as the principle of uncertainty, No-cloning theorem and quantum entanglement. In this thesis research, a novel scheme to implement quantum key distribution based on multiphoton entanglement with a new protocol is proposed. Its advantages are: a larger information capacity can be obtained with a longer transmission distance and the detection of multiple photons is easier than that of a single photon. The security and attacks pertaining to such a system are also studied. Next, a quantum key distribution over wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical fiber networks is realized. Quantum key distribution in networks is a long-standing problem for practical applications. Here we combine quantum cryptography and WDM to solve this problem because WDM technology is universally deployed in the current and next generation fiber networks. The ultimate target is to deploy quantum key distribution over commercial networks. The problems arising from the networks are also studied in this part. Then quantum key distribution in multi-access networks using wavelength routing technology is investigated in this research. For the first time, quantum cryptography for multiple individually targeted users has been successfully implemented in sharp contrast to that using the indiscriminating broadcasting structure. It overcomes the shortcoming that every user in the network can acquire the quantum key signals intended to be exchanged between only two users. Furthermore, a more efficient scheme of quantum key distribution is adopted, hence resulting in a higher key rate. Lastly, a quantum random number generator based on quantum optics has been experimentally demonstrated. This device is a key component for quantum key distribution as it can create truly random numbers, which is an

  17. Realizing quantum advantage without entanglement in single-photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado Trapp, Alejandra; Solano, Pablo; Hu, Anzi; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum discord expresses quantum correlations beyond those associated with entanglement. Although it has been extensively studied theoretically, quantum discord has yet to become a standard tool in experimental studies of correlation. We propose a class of experiments in which quantum correlations are present in the absence of entanglement, and are best understood in terms of quantum discord.. These utilize X-states of two qubits, which correspond to the polarization and the optical path of a single photon within a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We show how to produce states with diverse measures of discord and entanglement, including the case of discord without entanglement. With these states we show how a classical random variable K can be encoded by Alice and decoded by Bob. Using our previous results we analytically study the correlations between the spin and path qubits and its relation with the information about K that can be decoded by Bob using local measurements with or without two-qubit gate operations.

  18. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Lamoreaux, Steve K.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, C. Glen

    1999-04-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as 'key' material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non- orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. We have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of approximately 1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, we examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  19. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-03-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as key material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). The authors have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. The authors have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, they examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  20. Security of counterfactual quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Zhenqiang; Li Hongwei; Chen Wei; Han Zhengfu; Guo Guangcan

    2010-10-15

    Recently, a 'counterfactual' quantum-key-distribution scheme was proposed by T.-G. Noh [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 230501 (2009)]. In this scheme, two legitimate distant peers may share secret keys even when the information carriers are not traveled in the quantum channel. We find that this protocol is equivalent to an entanglement distillation protocol. According to this equivalence, a strict security proof and the asymptotic key bit rate are both obtained when a perfect single-photon source is applied and a Trojan horse attack can be detected. We also find that the security of this scheme is strongly related to not only the bit error rate but also the yields of photons. And our security proof may shed light on the security of other two-way protocols.

  1. Single-photon-interference communication equivalent to Bell-state-basis cryptographic quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kaoru; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2000-11-01

    We propose a single-photon interferometer which provides cryptographic quantum communication equivalent to that obtained using a pair of polarization entangled photon twins as a carrier [Phys. Rev. A 60, 157 (1999)]. Instead of manipulating and measuring the internal states of entangled photon twins, cryptographic quantum communication is possible by manipulating a single photon in an extended interferometer. The use of the single-photon interferometer offers significant experimental advantages compared to our previous approach.

  2. Quantum Cryptography for Secure Communications to Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Twyeffort, E.; Simmons, C.M.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit. We have developed an experimental quantum cryptography system based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on in orbit.

  3. Information-holding quantum router of single photons using natural atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guo-An; Cai, Qing-Yu; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2016-04-01

    In a quantum network, a quantum router can play a key role that involves exchanging quantum information (quantum states) among different parties. In this paper, we propose a single-photon quantum router by using a four-level atom that is embedded in quantum multi-channels, which are composed of coupled-resonator waveguides. Single photons can be guided from one quantum channel to another by controlling an on-demand classical field. The fidelity of the routing atom recovers to a maximum after a time evolution cycle of the system; thus, the fidelity of the information-carrying single photon reaches unit at the same time. For the first time, we demonstrate that quantum information carried by single photons can be perfectly held after a quantum router.

  4. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing. PMID:26205309

  5. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  6. Quantum key distribution over 120 km using ultrahigh purity single-photon source and superconducting single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuya; Nambu, Yoshihiro; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yorozu, Shinichi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Advances in single-photon sources (SPSs) and single-photon detectors (SPDs) promise unique applications in the field of quantum information technology. In this paper, we report long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) by using state-of-the-art devices: a quantum-dot SPS (QD SPS) emitting a photon in the telecom band of 1.5 μm and a superconducting nanowire SPD (SNSPD). At the distance of 100 km, we obtained the maximal secure key rate of 27.6 bps without using decoy states, which is at least threefold larger than the rate obtained in the previously reported 50-km-long QKD experiment. We also succeeded in transmitting secure keys at the rate of 0.307 bps over 120 km. This is the longest QKD distance yet reported by using known true SPSs. The ultralow multiphoton emissions of our SPS and ultralow dark count of the SNSPD contributed to this result. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applicability of QD SPSs to practical telecom QKD networks. PMID:26404010

  7. Free-space quantum cryptography with quantum and telecom communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Klaus, Werner; Kunimori, Hiroo; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide

    2008-07-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new technique that uses the laws of physics to transmit information securely. In such systems, the vehicle to transfer quantum information is a single photon. However, the transmission distance is limited by the absorption of photons in an optical fiber in which the maximum demonstrated range is about 100 km. Free-space quantum cryptography between a ground station and a satellite is a way of sending the quantum information further distances than that with optical fibers since there is no birefringence effect in the atmosphere. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the laser communication demonstration between the NICT optical ground station and a low earth orbit satellite was successfully conducted in 2006. For such space communication links, free-space quantum cryptography is considered to be an important application in the future. We have developed a prototype system for free-space quantum cryptography using a weak coherent light and a telecom communication channel. The preliminary results are presented.

  8. Quantum-state purity of heralded single photons produced from frequency-anticorrelated biphotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shengwang

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the quantum-state purity of heralded single photons produced from frequency-anticorrelated biphotons. We find that the quantum-state purity in the time-frequency domain depends strongly on the response time uncertainty of the trigger-photon detector that heralds the generation of its paired photon. If the trigger response time is much shorter than the two-photon coherence time, the time-frequency quantum-state purity of heralded single photons approaches unity and the heralded single photon is in a nearly pure state. If the trigger response time is much longer than the two-photon coherence time, the heralded photon is then projected onto a mixed state. Making use of the time-frequency entanglement, heralded single photons with a well-defined temporal wave function or a frequency superposition state can be produced and engineered. This time-frequency entanglement allows for shaping heralded single photons through nonlocal spectral modulation.

  9. Dissipation-enabled efficient excitation transfer from a single photon to a single quantum emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.; Alber, G.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a scheme for triggering a dissipation-dominated highly efficient excitation transfer from a single-photon wave packet to a single quantum emitter. This single-photon-induced optical pumping turns dominant dissipative processes, such as spontaneous photon emission by the emitter or cavity decay, into valuable tools for quantum information processing and quantum communication. It works for an arbitrarily shaped single-photon wave packet with sufficiently small bandwidth provided a matching condition is satisfied which balances the dissipative rates involved. Our scheme does not require additional laser pulses or quantum feedback and does not rely on high finesse optical resonators. In particular, it can be used to enhance significantly the coupling of a single photon to a single quantum emitter implanted in a one-dimensional waveguide or even in a free space scenario. We demonstrate the usefulness of our scheme for building a deterministic quantum memory and a deterministic frequency converter between photonic qubits of different wavelengths.

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Quantum cryptography, and especially quantum key distribution (QKD), is steadily progressing to become a viable tool for cryptographic services. In recent years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the secure bit rate of QKD, as well as its extension to ever longer fibre- and air-based links and the emergence of metro-scale trusted networks. In the foreseeable future even global-scale communications may be possible using quantum repeaters or Earth-satellite links. A handful of start-ups and some bigger companies are already active in the field. The launch of an initiative to form industrial standards for QKD, under the auspices of the European Telecommunication Standards Institute, described in the paper by Laenger and Lenhart in this Focus Issue, can be taken as a sign of the growing commercial interest. Recent progress has seen an increase in the secure bit rate of QKD links, by orders of magnitude, to over 1 Mb s-1. This has resulted mainly from an improvement in the detection technology. Here changes in the way conventional semiconductor detectors are gated, as well as the development of novel devices based on non-linear processes and superconducting materials, are leading the way. Additional challenges for QKD at GHz clock rates include the design of high speed electronics, remote synchronization and high rate random number generation. Substantial effort is being devoted to increasing the range of individual links, which is limited by attenuation and other losses in optical fibres and air links. An important advance in the past few years has been the introduction of protocols with the same scaling as an ideal single-photon set-up. The good news is that these schemes use standard optical devices, such as weak laser pulses. Thanks to these new protocols and improvements in the detection technology, the range of a single fibre link can exceed a few hundred km. Outstanding issues include proving the unconditional security of some of the schemes. Much of the

  11. Ultrafast superconducting single-photon detectors for infrared wavelength quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verevkin, Aleksandr A.; Pearlman, Aaron; Slysz, Wojtek; Zhang, Jin; Sobolewski, Roman; Chulkova, Galina; Okunev, Oleg; Kouminov, Pavel; Drakinskij, Vladimir; Smirnov, Konstantin; Kaurova, Natalia; Voronov, Boris; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Currie, Marc

    2003-08-01

    We have developed a new class of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) for ultrafast counting of infrared (IR) photons for secure quantum communications. The devices are operated on the quantum detection mechanism, based on the photon-induced hotspot formation and subsequent appearance of a transient resistive barrier across an ultrathin and submicron-wide superconducting stripe. The detectors are fabricated from 3.5-nm-thick NbN films and they operate at 4.2 K inside a closed-cycle refrigerator or liquid helium cryostat. Various continuous and pulsed laser sources have been used in our experiments, enabling us to determine the detector experimental quantum efficiency (QE) in the photon-counting mode, response time, time jitter, and dark counts. Our 3.5-nm-thick SSPDs reached QE above 15% for visible light photons and 5% at 1.3 - 1.5 μm infrared range. The measured real-time counting rate was above 2 GHz and was limited by the read-out electronics (intrinsic response time is <30 ps). The measured jitter was <18 ps, and the dark counting rate was <0.01 per second. The measured noise equivalent power (NEP) is 2 x 10-18 W/Hz1/2 at λ = 1.3 μm. In near-infrared range, in terms of the counting rate, jitter, dark counts, and overall sensitivity, the NbN SSPDs significantly outperform their semiconductor counterparts. An ultrafast quantum cryptography communication technology based on SSPDs is proposed and discussed.

  12. Single-photon-level quantum image memory based on cold atomic ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    A quantum memory is a key component for quantum networks, which will enable the distribution of quantum information. Its successful development requires storage of single-photon light. Encoding photons with spatial shape through higher-dimensional states significantly increases their information-carrying capability and network capacity. However, constructing such quantum memories is challenging. Here we report the first experimental realization of a true single-photon-carrying orbital angular momentum stored via electromagnetically induced transparency in a cold atomic ensemble. Our experiments show that the non-classical pair correlation between trigger photon and retrieved photon is retained, and the spatial structure of input and retrieved photons exhibits strong similarity. More importantly, we demonstrate that single-photon coherence is preserved during storage. The ability to store spatial structure at the single-photon level opens the possibility for high-dimensional quantum memories. PMID:24084711

  13. Single-photon-level quantum image memory based on cold atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-10-01

    A quantum memory is a key component for quantum networks, which will enable the distribution of quantum information. Its successful development requires storage of single-photon light. Encoding photons with spatial shape through higher-dimensional states significantly increases their information-carrying capability and network capacity. However, constructing such quantum memories is challenging. Here we report the first experimental realization of a true single-photon-carrying orbital angular momentum stored via electromagnetically induced transparency in a cold atomic ensemble. Our experiments show that the non-classical pair correlation between trigger photon and retrieved photon is retained, and the spatial structure of input and retrieved photons exhibits strong similarity. More importantly, we demonstrate that single-photon coherence is preserved during storage. The ability to store spatial structure at the single-photon level opens the possibility for high-dimensional quantum memories.

  14. Quantum cryptography over underground optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.

    1996-05-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generated shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light whose security is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle. In this paper the authors describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from their experimental system with which they are generating key material over 14-km of underground optical fiber. These results show that optical-fiber based quantum cryptography could allow secure, real-time key generation over ``open`` multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links between secure ``islands.``

  15. Quantum random number generators and their applications in cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipcevic, Mario

    2012-06-01

    Random number generators (RNG) are an important resource in many areas: cryptography (both quantum and classical), probabilistic computation (Monte Carlo methods), numerical simulations, industrial testing and labeling, hazard games, scientific research etc. Because today's computers are deterministic, they can not create random numbers unless complemented with a physical RNG. Randomness of a RNG can be defined and scientifically characterized and measured. Especially valuable is the information-theoretic provable RNG which, at state of the art, seem to be possible only by harvest of randomness inherent to certain (simple) quantum systems and such a generator we call Quantum RNG (QRNG). On the other hand, current industry standards dictate use of RNGs based on free running oscillators (FRO) whose randomness is derived from electronics noise present in logic circuits and which, although quantum in nature, cannot be strictly proven. This approach is currently used in FPGA and ASIC chips. We compare weak and strong aspects of the two approaches for use in cryptography and in general. We also give an alternative definition of randomness, discuss usage of single photon detectors in realization of QRNGs and give several examples where QRNG can significantly improve security of a cryptographic system.

  16. Elliptical quantum dots as on-demand single photons sources with deterministic polarization states

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Demory, Brandon; Ku, Pei-Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Hill, Tyler A.; Deng, Hui

    2015-11-09

    In quantum information, control of the single photon's polarization is essential. Here, we demonstrate single photon generation in a pre-programmed and deterministic polarization state, on a chip-scale platform, utilizing site-controlled elliptical quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by a top-down approach. The polarization from the QD emission is found to be linear with a high degree of linear polarization and parallel to the long axis of the ellipse. Single photon emission with orthogonal polarizations is achieved, and the dependence of the degree of linear polarization on the QD geometry is analyzed.

  17. Elliptical quantum dots as on-demand single photons sources with deterministic polarization states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Zhang, Lei; Hill, Tyler A.; Demory, Brandon; Deng, Hui; Ku, Pei-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    In quantum information, control of the single photon's polarization is essential. Here, we demonstrate single photon generation in a pre-programmed and deterministic polarization state, on a chip-scale platform, utilizing site-controlled elliptical quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by a top-down approach. The polarization from the QD emission is found to be linear with a high degree of linear polarization and parallel to the long axis of the ellipse. Single photon emission with orthogonal polarizations is achieved, and the dependence of the degree of linear polarization on the QD geometry is analyzed.

  18. The organization and traffic engineering of a quantum cryptography network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, YuKang; Zhao, MeiSheng; Zhao, Yong; Chen, ZengBing

    2012-09-01

    How many users can a quantum cryptography network support when certain services are demanded? The answer to this question depends on three factors: the speed of quantum key distribution, the organization and traffic engineering of the quantum cryptography network, and the engineering of services. In this article we focus on the second factor which is lacked in the literature to our knowledge but in urgent need for constructing an optimized large-scale quantum cryptography network. In order to provide an overall understanding about a quantum cryptography network, we also briefly introduce the characteristics of quantum cryptography and service engineering.

  19. Single-photon emission from cubic GaN quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kako, Satoshi; Holmes, Mark; Sergent, Sylvain; Bürger, Matthias; As, Donat J.; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-06

    We report the demonstration of single-photon emission from cubic GaN/AlN quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We have observed spectrally clean and isolated emission peaks from these quantum dots. Clear single-photon emission was detected by analyzing one such peak at 4 K. The estimated g{sup (2)}[0] value is 0.25, which becomes 0.05 when corrected for background and detector dark counts. We have also observed the single-photon nature of the emission up to 100 K (g{sup (2)}[0] = 0.47). These results indicate that cubic GaN quantum dots are possible candidates for high-temperature operating UV single-photon sources with the possibility of integration into photonic nanostructures.

  20. Single photons on-demand from light-hole excitons in strain-engineered quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Huo, Yongheng; Rastelli, Armando; Zopf, Michael; Höfer, Bianca; Chen, Yan; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate for the first time on-demand and wavelength-tunable single-photon emission from light-hole (LH) excitons in strain engineered GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The LH photon emission from tensile-strained GaAs QDs is systematically investigated with polarization-resolved, power-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy, and photon-correlation measurements. By integrating QD-containing nanomembranes onto a piezo-actuator and driving single QDs with picosecond laser pulses, we achieve triggered and wavelength-tunable LH single-photon emission. Fourier transform spectroscopy is also performed, from which the coherence time of the LH single-photon emission is studied. We envision that this new type of LH exciton-based single-photon source (SPS) can be applied to realize an all-semiconductor based quantum interface in distributed quantum networks [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 096602]. PMID:25471544

  1. SU(3) quantum interferometry with single-photon input pulses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si-Hui; Gao, Yvonne Y; de Guise, Hubert; Sanders, Barry C

    2013-03-15

    We develop a framework for solving the action of a three-channel passive optical interferometer on single-photon pulse inputs to each channel using SU(3) group-theoretic methods, which can be readily generalized to higher-order photon-coincidence experiments. We show that features of the coincidence plots versus relative time delays of photons yield information about permanents, immanants, and determinants of the interferometer SU(3) matrix. PMID:25166532

  2. Free-Space Quantum Cryptography in a Hydrogen Fraunhofer Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel; Bienfang, Joshua; Mink, Alan; Hershman, Barry; Nakassis, Anastase; Tang, Xiao; Ma, Lijun; Su, David; Williams, Carl; Clark, Charles

    2006-05-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has shown the potential for the production of cryptographic key for ultra-secure communications. The performance of any QKD system is ultimately limited by the signal to noise ratio on the single-photon channel, and over most useful communications links the resulting in key rates are impractical for performing continuous one-time-pad encryption of today's broadband communications. We have adapted clock and data recovery techniques from modern telecommunications practice to increase the repetition rate of a free-space QKD system by roughly 2 orders of magnitude over previous demonstrations. We have also designed the system to operate in the H-α Fraunhofer window at 656.28 nm, where the solar background is reduced by roughly 7 dB. To achieve high repetition rates this system takes advantage of silicon single-photon avalanche photodiodes with < 50 ps timing resolution and high detection efficiency in the visible region. This free-space QKD system is designed to operate at a repetition rate of 2.5 GHz. We have identified scalable solutions for delivering sustained one-time-pad encryption at 10 Mbps, thus making it possible to integrate quantum cryptography with first-generation Ethernet protocols.

  3. Quantum routing of single photons with a cyclic three-level system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lan; Yang, Li-Ping; Li, Yong; Sun, C P

    2013-09-01

    We propose an experimentally accessible single-photon routing scheme using a △-type three-level atom embedded in quantum multichannels composed of coupled-resonator waveguides. Via the on-demand classical field being applied to the atom, the router can extract a single photon from the incident channel, and then redirect it into another. The efficient function of the perfect reflection of the single-photon signal in the incident channel is rooted in the coherent resonance and the existence of photonic bound states. PMID:25166667

  4. Single photon emission from site-controlled InGaN/GaN quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Hill, Tyler A.; Deng, Hui; Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Lee, Leung-Kway; Ku, Pei-Cheng

    2013-11-04

    Single photon emission was observed from site-controlled InGaN/GaN quantum dots. The single-photon nature of the emission was verified by the second-order correlation function up to 90 K, the highest temperature to date for site-controlled quantum dots. Micro-photoluminescence study on individual quantum dots showed linearly polarized single exciton emission with a lifetime of a few nanoseconds. The dimensions of these quantum dots were well controlled to the precision of state-of-the-art fabrication technologies, as reflected in the uniformity of their optical properties. The yield of optically active quantum dots was greater than 90%, among which 13%–25% exhibited single photon emission at 10 K.

  5. Ultrafast single photon emitting quantum photonic structures based on a nano-obelisk

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Je-Hyung; Ko, Young-Ho; Gong, Su-Hyun; Ko, Suk-Min; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in a single photon source is fast and efficient generation of a single photon flux with high light extraction efficiency. Significant progress toward high-efficiency single photon sources has been demonstrated by semiconductor quantum dots, especially using narrow bandgap materials. Meanwhile, there are many obstacles, which restrict the use of wide bandgap semiconductor quantum dots as practical single photon sources in ultraviolet-visible region, despite offering free space communication and miniaturized quantum information circuits. Here we demonstrate a single InGaN quantum dot embedded in an obelisk-shaped GaN nanostructure. The nano-obelisk plays an important role in eliminating dislocations, increasing light extraction, and minimizing a built-in electric field. Based on the nano-obelisks, we observed nonconventional narrow quantum dot emission and positive biexciton binding energy, which are signatures of negligible built-in field in single InGaN quantum dots. This results in efficient and ultrafast single photon generation in the violet color region. PMID:23828558

  6. Temporal Purity and Quantum Interference of Single Photons from Two Independent Cold Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Cao, Rong; Wen, Rong; Ou, Z. Y.; Chen, J. F.; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The temporal purity of single photons is crucial to the indistinguishability of independent photon sources for the fundamental study of the quantum nature of light and the development of photonic technologies. Currently, the technique for single photons heralded from time-frequency entangled biphotons created in nonlinear crystals does not guarantee the temporal-quantum purity, except using spectral filtering. Nevertheless, an entirely different situation is anticipated for narrow-band biphotons with a coherence time far longer than the time resolution of a single-photon detector. Here we demonstrate temporally pure single photons with a coherence time of 100 ns, directly heralded from the time-frequency entangled biphotons generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in cold atomic ensembles, without any supplemented filters or cavities. A near-perfect purity and indistinguishability are both verified through Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference using single photons from two independent cold atomic ensembles. The time-frequency entanglement provides a route to manipulate the pure temporal state of the single-photon source.

  7. Temporal Purity and Quantum Interference of Single Photons from Two Independent Cold Atomic Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Cao, Rong; Wen, Rong; Ou, Z Y; Chen, J F; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The temporal purity of single photons is crucial to the indistinguishability of independent photon sources for the fundamental study of the quantum nature of light and the development of photonic technologies. Currently, the technique for single photons heralded from time-frequency entangled biphotons created in nonlinear crystals does not guarantee the temporal-quantum purity, except using spectral filtering. Nevertheless, an entirely different situation is anticipated for narrow-band biphotons with a coherence time far longer than the time resolution of a single-photon detector. Here we demonstrate temporally pure single photons with a coherence time of 100 ns, directly heralded from the time-frequency entangled biphotons generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in cold atomic ensembles, without any supplemented filters or cavities. A near-perfect purity and indistinguishability are both verified through Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference using single photons from two independent cold atomic ensembles. The time-frequency entanglement provides a route to manipulate the pure temporal state of the single-photon source. PMID:27419568

  8. Quantum cryptography on optical fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Paul D.

    1998-07-01

    Quantum cryptography exploits the fact that an unknown quantum state cannot be accurately copied or measured without disturbance. By using such elementary quantum states to represent binary information it is possible, therefore, to construct communication systems with verifiable levels of security that are 'guaranteed' by fundamental quantum mechanical laws. This paper describes recent progress at BT Laboratories in the development of practical optical fiber- based quantum cryptography system. These developments include interferometric systems operating in the 1.3 micrometers - wavelength fiber transparency window over point-to-point links up to approximately 50km in length and on multi-user passive optical networks. We describe how this technology performs on fiber links installed in BT's public network and discuss issues such as cross-talk with conventional data channels propagating at different wavelengths in the same fiber.

  9. Quantum three-pass cryptography protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Wu, Ling-An; Liu, Songhao

    2002-09-01

    We present a new kind of quantum cryptography protocol based on Shamir's three-pass protocol of classical cryptography, which allows the transmission of qubits directly and secretly via the aid of an unjammable classical channel. In this protocol we implement the encryption and decryption transformations via rotations on the Poincare sphere of the photons polarization parameters. The key technique is that Bob's encryption rotation must be commutative with Alice s decryption rotation; this means that the axes of these two rotations must be parallel. We also present a security analysis of the protocol under a man-in-the-middle attack.

  10. Conditional efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Peng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2002-02-01

    We propose a conditional quantum key distribution scheme with three nonorthogonal states. Combined with the idea presented by Lo et al. (H.-K. Lo, H. F. Chau, and M. Ardehali, e-print arXiv: quant-ph/0011056), the efficiency of this scheme is increased to tend to 100%. Also, such a refined data analysis guarantees the security of our scheme against the most general eavesdropping strategy. Then, based on the scheme, we present a quantum cryptography network with the addition of a device called ``space optical switch.'' Moreover, we give out a realization of a quantum random number generator. Thus, a feasible experimental scheme of this efficient quantum cryptography network is completely given.

  11. Femtosecond Laser--Pumped Source of Entangled Photons for Quantum Cryptography Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, D.; Donaldson, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    2007-07-31

    We present an experimental setup for generation of entangled-photon pairs via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, based on the femtosecond-pulsed laser. Our entangled-photon source utilizes a 76-MHz-repetition-rate, 100-fs-pulse-width, mode-locked, ultrafast femtosecond laser, which can produce, on average, more photon pairs than a cw laser of an equal pump power. The resulting entangled pairs are counted by a pair of high-quantum-efficiency, single-photon, silicon avalanche photodiodes. Our apparatus is intended as an efficient source/receiver system for the quantum communications and quantum cryptography applications.

  12. Nonperturbative quantum solutions to resonant four-wave mixing of two single-photon wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, Mattias; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2003-08-01

    We analyze both analytically and numerically the resonant four-wave mixing of two co-propagating single-photon wave packets. We present analytic expressions for the two-photon wave function, and show that quantum solutions exist which display a shape-preserving oscillatory exchange of excitations between the modes. Potential applications including quantum-information processing are discussed.

  13. Heralded linear optical quantum Fredkin gate based on one auxiliary qubit and one single photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chang-Hua; Cao, Xin; Quan, Dong-Xiao; Pei, Chang-Xing

    2014-08-01

    Linear optical quantum Fredkin gate can be applied to quantum computing and quantum multi-user communication networks. In the existing linear optical scheme, two single photon detectors (SPDs) are used to herald the success of the quantum Fredkin gate while they have no photon count. But analysis results show that for non-perfect SPD, the lower the detector efficiency, the higher the heralded success rate by this scheme is. We propose an improved linear optical quantum Fredkin gate by designing a new heralding scheme with an auxiliary qubit and only one SPD, in which the higher the detection efficiency of the heralding detector, the higher the success rate of the gate is. The new heralding scheme can also work efficiently under a non-ideal single photon source. Based on this quantum Fredkin gate, large-scale quantum switching networks can be built. As an example, a quantum Beneš network is shown in which only one SPD is used.

  14. Characterization of photon statistics in a single-photon source via variable attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shengli; Zou Xubo; Li Chuanfeng; Guo Guangcan; Jin Chenhui

    2009-10-15

    We propose a simple but effective scheme for characterizing photon-number statistics of a practical single-photon source. In this scheme, the variable attenuation method which frequently appears in decoy state quantum cryptography is utilized here to enhance the estimation of photon-number statistics. A much stricter bound for vacuum and single-photon proportions is obtained and this result, in turn, is shown to be applicable to the unconditional secure quantum cryptographic communication with single-photon devices.

  15. Characterization of photon statistics in a single-photon source via variable attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Zou, Xubo; Li, Chuanfeng; Jin, Chenhui; Guo, Guangcan

    2009-10-01

    We propose a simple but effective scheme for characterizing photon-number statistics of a practical single-photon source. In this scheme, the variable attenuation method which frequently appears in decoy state quantum cryptography is utilized here to enhance the estimation of photon-number statistics. A much stricter bound for vacuum and single-photon proportions is obtained and this result, in turn, is shown to be applicable to the unconditional secure quantum cryptographic communication with single-photon devices.

  16. Generating single-photon catalyzed coherent states with quantum-optical catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xue-xiang; Yuan, Hong-chun

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically generate single-photon catalyzed coherent states (SPCCSs) by means of quantum-optical catalysis based on the beam splitter (BS) or the parametric amplifier (PA). These states are obtained in one of the BS (or PA) output channels if a coherent state and a single-photon Fock state are present in two input ports and a single photon is registered in the other output port. The success probabilities of the detection (also the normalization factors) are discussed, which is different for BS and PA catalysis. In addition, we prove that the generated states catalyzed by BS and PA devices are actually the same quantum states after analyzing photon number distribution of the SPCCSs. The quantum properties of the SPCCSs, such as sub-Poissonian distribution, anti-bunching effect, quadrature squeezing effect, and the negativity of the Wigner function are investigated in detail. The results show that the SPCCSs are non-Gaussian states with an abundance of nonclassicality.

  17. Quantum teleportation through an entangled state composed of displaced vacuum and single-photon states

    SciTech Connect

    Podoshvedov, S. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study a teleportation protocol of an unknown macroscopic qubit by means of a quantum channel composed of the displaced vacuum and single-photon states. The scheme is based on linear optical devices such as a beam splitter and photon number resolving detectors. A method based on conditional measurement is used to generate both the macroscopic qubit and entangled state composed from displaced vacuum and single-photon states. We show that such a qubit has both macroscopic and microscopic properties. In particular, we investigate a quantum teleportation protocol from a macroscopic object to a microscopic state.

  18. Single photon transport in two waveguides chirally coupled by a quantum emitter.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mu-Tian; Ma, Xiao-San; Zhang, Jia-Yan; Wang, Bing

    2016-08-22

    We investigate single photon transport in two waveguides coupled to a two-level quantum emitter (QE). With the deduced analytical scattering amplitudes, we show that under condition of the chiral coupling between the QE and the photon in the two waveguides, the QE can play the role of ideal quantum router to redirect a single photon incident from one waveguide into the other waveguide with a probability of 100% in the ideal condition. The influences of cross coupling between two waveguides and dissipations on the routing are also shown. PMID:27557274

  19. Quantum cryptography in real-life applications: Assumptions and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi

    Quantum cryptography, or quantum key distribution (QKD), provides a means of unconditionally secure communication. The security is in principle based on the fundamental laws of physics. Security proofs show that if quantum cryptography is appropriately implemented, even the most powerful eavesdropper cannot decrypt the message from a cipher. The implementations of quantum crypto-systems in real life may not fully comply with the assumptions made in the security proofs. Such discrepancy between the experiment and the theory can be fatal to the security of a QKD system. In this thesis we address a number of these discrepancies. A perfect single-photon source is often assumed in many security proofs. However, a weak coherent source is widely used in a real-life QKD implementation. Decoy state protocols have been proposed as a novel approach to dramatically improve the performance of a weak coherent source based QKD implementation without jeopardizing its security. Here, we present the first experimental demonstrations of decoy state protocols. Our experimental scheme was later adopted by most decoy state QKD implementations. In the security proof of decoy state protocols as well as many other QKD protocols, it is widely assumed that a sender generates a phase-randomized coherent state. This assumption has been enforced in few implementations. We close this gap in two steps: First, we implement and verify the phase randomization experimentally; second, we prove the security of a QKD implementation without the coherent state assumption. In many security proofs of QKD, it is assumed that all the detectors on the receiver's side have identical detection efficiencies. We show experimentally that this assumption may be violated in a commercial QKD implementation due to an eavesdropper's malicious manipulation. Moreover, we show that the eavesdropper can learn part of the final key shared by the legitimate users as a consequence of this violation of the assumptions.

  20. Single-photon router: Implementation of Information-Holding of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guo-an; Lu, Hua; Chen, Ai-xi

    2016-07-01

    The quantum router is an indispensable element in the future quantum network. In this study, by calculating the fidelity of the atom, we show that the quantum router proposed by J. Lu et al. (Phys. Rev. A 89, 013805, 2014) achieves quantum information-holding. After the single photon passes through the atom, the fidelity of the atom decreases from the maximum value after a period of time and rises to the maximum value of 1. Even upon changing the size of the classical field, this phenomenon will not disappear, only undergo a cycle change. This means such a single-photon quantum router can be applied experimentally since quantum state can be perfectly held after the routing.

  1. Single-photon router: Implementation of Information-Holding of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guo-an; Lu, Hua; Chen, Ai-xi

    2016-03-01

    The quantum router is an indispensable element in the future quantum network. In this study, by calculating the fidelity of the atom, we show that the quantum router proposed by J. Lu et al. (Phys. Rev. A 89, 013805, 2014) achieves quantum information-holding. After the single photon passes through the atom, the fidelity of the atom decreases from the maximum value after a period of time and rises to the maximum value of 1. Even upon changing the size of the classical field, this phenomenon will not disappear, only undergo a cycle change. This means such a single-photon quantum router can be applied experimentally since quantum state can be perfectly held after the routing.

  2. Single-photon non-linear optics with a quantum dot in a waveguide.

    PubMed

    Javadi, A; Söllner, I; Arcari, M; Hansen, S Lindskov; Midolo, L; Mahmoodian, S; Kiršanskė, G; Pregnolato, T; Lee, E H; Song, J D; Stobbe, S; Lodahl, P

    2015-01-01

    Strong non-linear interactions between photons enable logic operations for both classical and quantum-information technology. Unfortunately, non-linear interactions are usually feeble and therefore all-optical logic gates tend to be inefficient. A quantum emitter deterministically coupled to a propagating mode fundamentally changes the situation, since each photon inevitably interacts with the emitter, and highly correlated many-photon states may be created. Here we show that a single quantum dot in a photonic-crystal waveguide can be used as a giant non-linearity sensitive at the single-photon level. The non-linear response is revealed from the intensity and quantum statistics of the scattered photons, and contains contributions from an entangled photon-photon bound state. The quantum non-linearity will find immediate applications for deterministic Bell-state measurements and single-photon transistors and paves the way to scalable waveguide-based photonic quantum-computing architectures. PMID:26492951

  3. Single-photon non-linear optics with a quantum dot in a waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, A.; Söllner, I.; Arcari, M.; Hansen, S. Lindskov; Midolo, L.; Mahmoodian, S.; Kiršanskė, G; Pregnolato, T.; Lee, E. H.; Song, J. D.; Stobbe, S.; Lodahl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Strong non-linear interactions between photons enable logic operations for both classical and quantum-information technology. Unfortunately, non-linear interactions are usually feeble and therefore all-optical logic gates tend to be inefficient. A quantum emitter deterministically coupled to a propagating mode fundamentally changes the situation, since each photon inevitably interacts with the emitter, and highly correlated many-photon states may be created. Here we show that a single quantum dot in a photonic-crystal waveguide can be used as a giant non-linearity sensitive at the single-photon level. The non-linear response is revealed from the intensity and quantum statistics of the scattered photons, and contains contributions from an entangled photon–photon bound state. The quantum non-linearity will find immediate applications for deterministic Bell-state measurements and single-photon transistors and paves the way to scalable waveguide-based photonic quantum-computing architectures. PMID:26492951

  4. Heralded single-photon sources for quantum-key-distribution applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Matteo; Vallone, Giuseppe; Ticozzi, Francesco; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon sources (SPSs) are a fundamental building block for optical implementations of quantum information protocols. Among SPSs, multiple crystal heralded single-photon sources seem to give the best compromise between high pair production rate and low multiple photon events. In this work, we study their performance in a practical quantum-key-distribution experiment, by evaluating the achievable key rates. The analysis focuses on the two different schemes, symmetric and asymmetric, proposed for the practical implementation of heralded single-photon sources, with attention on the performance of their composing elements. The analysis is based on the protocol proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984 and on its improvement exploiting decoy state technique. Finally, a simple way of exploiting the postselection mechanism for a passive, one decoy state scheme is evaluated.

  5. Quantum cryptography on multiuser optical fibre networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    To establish a secure communication channel, it is necessary to distribute between two users a key which allows safe encryption and decryption of messages. But because decryption is a simple task for any key holder, it is crucial that the key remains secret during distribution. Secrecy cannot be guaranteed if distribution occurs on the basis of classical physical mechanisms, as it is impossible to know whether the key has been intercepted during transmission. Quantum cryptography1-3 provides a fundamental solution to this problem. When quantum-mechanical processes are used to establish the key, any eavesdropping during transmission leads to an unavoidable and detectable disturbance in the received key information. Quantum cryptography has been demonstrated using standard telecommunication fibres linking single pairs of users4-8, but practical implementations will require communication networks with many users9. Here I introduce a practical scheme for multi-user quantum cryptography, and demonstrate its operation on an optical fibre network. The scheme enables a single controller on the network to establish, and regularly update, a distinct secret key with each network user. These keys can then be used to securely encrypt conventional data transmissions that are broadcast on the network.

  6. Quantum discord as a resource for quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Quantum discord is the minimal bipartite resource which is needed for a secure quantum key distribution, being a cryptographic primitive equivalent to non-orthogonality. Its role becomes crucial in device-dependent quantum cryptography, where the presence of preparation and detection noise (inaccessible to all parties) may be so strong to prevent the distribution and distillation of entanglement. The necessity of entanglement is re-affirmed in the stronger scenario of device-independent quantum cryptography, where all sources of noise are ascribed to the eavesdropper. PMID:25378231

  7. Quantum dots in photonic crystals: from quantum information processing to single photon nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2009-05-01

    Quantum dots in photonic crystals are interesting both as a testbed for fundamental cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) experiments, as well as a platform for quantum and classical information processing. Quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity QED has been probed both in photoluminescence and coherently, by resonant light scattering from such a system [1]. In the latter case, both intensity and photon statistics of the reflected beam have been analyzed as a function of wavelength, leading to observation of effects such as photon blockade and photon induced tunneling - for the first time in solid state [2]. The system has also been employed to achieve a controlled phase and amplitude modulation between two modes of light at the single photon level [3] - nonlinearity observed so far only in atomic physics systems. These demonstrations lie at the core of a number of proposals for quantum information processing, and could also be employed to build novel devices, such as optical switches controlled at a single photon level. [4pt] [1] Dirk Englund, Andrei Faraon, Ilya Fushman, Nick Stoltz, Pierre Petroff, and Jelena Vuckovic, ``Controlling cavity reflectivity with a single quantum dot," Nature ,ol. 450, No. 7171, pp. 857-861, December 2007[0pt] [2] Andrei Faraon, Ilya Fushman, Dirk Englund, Nick Stoltz, Pierre Petroff, and Jelena Vuckovic, ``Coherent generation of nonclassical light on a chip via photon-induced tunneling and blockade," Nature Physics ,ol. 4, pp. 859 - 863 (2008)[0pt] [3] Ilya Fushman, Dirk Englund, Andrei Faraon, Nick Stoltz, Pierre Petroff, and Jelena Vuckovic, ``Controlled phase shift with a single quantum dot," Science ,ol. 320, number 5877, pp. 769-772 ( 2008)

  8. Generating single photons at gigahertz modulation-speed using electrically controlled quantum dot microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Schmidt, R.; Hopfmann, C.; Schulze, J.-H.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T.; Gantz, L.; Schmidgall, E. R.; Gershoni, D.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the generation of single-photon pulse trains at a repetition rate of up to 1 GHz. We achieve this speed by modulating the external voltage applied on an electrically contacted quantum dot microlens, which is optically excited by a continuous-wave laser. By modulating the photoluminescence of the quantum dot microlens using a square-wave voltage, single-photon emission is triggered with a response time as short as (281 ± 19) ps, being 6 times faster than the radiative lifetime of (1.75 ± 0.02) ns. This large reduction in the characteristic emission time is enabled by a rapid capacitive gating of emission from the quantum dot, which is placed in the intrinsic region of a p-i-n-junction biased below the onset of electroluminescence. Here, since our circuit acts as a rectifying differentiator, the rising edge of the applied voltage pulses triggers the emission of single photons from the optically excited quantum dot. The non-classical nature of the photon pulse train generated at GHz-speed is proven by intensity autocorrelation measurements with g(2)(0) = 0.3 ± 0.1. Our results combine optical excitation with fast electrical gating and thus show promise for the generation of indistinguishable single photons at rates exceeding the limitations set by the intrinsic radiative lifetime.

  9. Quantum teleportation of the angular spectrum of a single-photon field

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, S. P.; Ether, D. S.; Matos Filho, R. L. de; Zagury, N.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a quantum teleportation scheme for the angular spectrum of a single-photon field, which allows for the transmission of a large amount of information. Our proposal also provides a method to tune the frequencies of spatially entangled fields, which is useful for interactions with stationary qubits.

  10. Ultrafast Room-Temperature Single Photon Emission from Quantum Dots Coupled to Plasmonic Nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang B; Akselrod, Gleb M; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2016-01-13

    Efficient and bright single photon sources at room temperature are critical components for quantum information systems such as quantum key distribution, quantum state teleportation, and quantum computation. However, the intrinsic radiative lifetime of quantum emitters is typically ∼10 ns, which severely limits the maximum single photon emission rate and thus entanglement rates. Here, we demonstrate the regime of ultrafast spontaneous emission (∼10 ps) from a single quantum emitter coupled to a plasmonic nanocavity at room temperature. The nanocavity integrated with a single colloidal semiconductor quantum dot produces a 540-fold decrease in the emission lifetime and a simultaneous 1900-fold increase in the total emission intensity. At the same time, the nanocavity acts as a highly efficient optical antenna directing the emission into a single lobe normal to the surface. This plasmonic platform is a versatile geometry into which a variety of other quantum emitters, such as crystal color centers, can be integrated for directional, room-temperature single photon emission rates exceeding 80 GHz. PMID:26606001

  11. FREE-SPACE QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY IN DAYLIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  12. Loss-tolerant position-based quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing; Siopsis, George

    2015-04-01

    Position-based quantum cryptography (PBQC) allows a party to use its geographical location as its only credential to implement various cryptographic protocols. Such a protocol may lead to important applications in practice. Although it has been shown that any PBQC protocol is breakable if the adversaries pre-share an arbitrarily large entangled state, the security of PBQC in the bounded-quantum-storage model is still an open question. In this paper, we study the performance of various PBQC protocols over a lossy channel under the assumption that no entanglement is pre-shared between adversaries. By introducing the decoy state idea, we show that an extended Bennett-Brassard-1984-type PBQC protocol implemented with a weak coherent source and realistic single-photon detectors can tolerate an overall loss (including both the channel loss and the detection efficiency) of 13 dB if the intrinsic quantum bit error rate is 1%. We also study a few continuous variable PBQC protocols and show that they suffer from a 3-dB loss limitation.

  13. Developing a Parametric Downconversion Apparatus for Single-Photon Experiments in Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diiorio, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We report our progress toward developing a parametric downconversion apparatus for studying single-photon quantum optics in undergraduate laboratory classes, following the model of Galvez et al.. We pump a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal with a 405 nm diode laser to produce correlated pairs of single-photons that we detect using avalanche photodiodes (APD). We can conduct coincidence and anti-coincidence counts and a measurement of the degree of second-order coherence with the apparatus, and we expect to report on single- and bi-photon interferometry experiments.

  14. Achieving nonreciprocal unidirectional single-photon quantum transport using the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Luqi; Xu, Shanshan; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-11-15

    We show that nonreciprocal unidirectional single-photon quantum transport can be achieved with the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The system consists of a 1D waveguide coupling to two three-level atoms of the V-type. The two atoms, in addition, are each driven by an external coherent field. We show that the phase of the external coherent field provides a gauge potential for the photon states. With a proper choice of the phase difference between the two coherent fields, the transport of a single photon can exhibit unity contrast in its transmissions for the two propagation directions. PMID:26565819

  15. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  16. Electronic-state-controlled reset operation in quantum dot resonant-tunneling single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; Zhu, Z. Q.; An, Z. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2014-02-03

    The authors present a systematic study of an introduced reset operation on quantum dot (QD) single photon detectors operating at 77 K. The detectors are based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diode with an adjacent layer of self-assembled InAs QDs. Sensitive single-photon detection in high (dI)/(dV) region with suppressed current fluctuations is achieved. The dynamic detection range is extended up to at least 10{sup 4} photons/s for sensitive imaging applications by keeping the device far from saturation by employing an appropriate reset frequency.

  17. Theoertical investigation of quantum waveform shaping for single photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Pedrotti, Leno M; Agha, Imad

    2016-07-25

    We investigate a new technique for quantum-compatible waveform shaping that extends the time lens method, and relies only on phase operations. Under realistic experimental conditions, we show that it is possible to both temporally compress and shape optical waveforms in the nanosecond to tens of picoseconds range, which is generally difficult to achieve using standard dispersive pulse-shaping techniques. PMID:27464122

  18. Quantum non-Gaussianity of frequency up-converted single photons.

    PubMed

    Baune, Christoph; Schönbeck, Axel; Samblowski, Aiko; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Schnabel, Roman

    2014-09-22

    Nonclassical states of light are an important resource in today's quantum communication and metrology protocols. Quantum up-conversion of nonclassical states is a promising approach to overcome frequency differences between disparate subsystems within a quantum information network. Here, we present the generation of heralded narrowband single photons at 1550 nm via cavity enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) and their subsequent up-conversion to 532 nm. Quantum non-Gaussianity (QNG), which is an important feature for applications in quantum information science, was experimentally certified for the first time in frequency up-converted states. PMID:25321750

  19. Realizing quantum advantage without entanglement in single-photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Trapp, Alejandra; Solano, Pablo; Hu, Anzi; Clark, Charles W.

    Correlations allow us to measure, and quantitatively study, the properties of physical systems, their evolution and their interactions. Quantum discord expresses quantum correlations beyond those associated with entanglement. However, discord has not yet been adopted as a standard subject of study by the experimental community. Here we propose a feasible optical setup to generate symmetric two-qubit X-states with controllable coherences, where the two qubits correspond to the spin and path of a photon. With these states we show how a classical random variable K can be encoded by Alice and decoded by Bob. Using our previous results we study the correlations between the spin and path qubits and its relation with the information about K that can be decoded by Bob using local measurements with or without two-qubit gate operations. Discord is the mutual information contained in the coherences of the system, and it is possible to exploit it for quantum advantage even in the absence of entanglement.

  20. Fault tolerant filtering and fault detection for quantum systems driven by fields in single photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Dong, Daoyi; Petersen, Ian R.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve the fault tolerant filtering and fault detection problem for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. Optimal estimates of both the system observables and the fault process are simultaneously calculated and characterized by a set of coupled recursive quantum stochastic differential equations.

  1. Conceptual designs of onboard transceivers for ground-to-satellite quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Kunimori, Hiroo; Takeoka, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide

    2009-05-01

    A free-space quantum key distribution system is being developed by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) in Koganei, Japan. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for transmitting information where the security is guaranteed by the laws of physics. In such systems, a single photon is used for the quantum information. However, since the transmission distance in optical fibers is limited by the absorption of photons by the fiber, the maximum demonstrated range has been limited to about 100 km. Free-space quantum cryptography between an optical ground station and a satellite is a possible solution to extend the distance for a quantum network beyond the limits of optical fibers. At NICT, a laser communication demonstration between the NICT optical ground station and a low earth orbit satellite was successfully conducted in 2006. The use of free-space quantum key distribution for such space communication links is considered an important future application. This paper presents conceptual designs for the onboard transceivers for satellite quantum cryptography

  2. Simplified quantum bit commitment using single photon nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang Ping

    2014-10-01

    We simplified our previously proposed quantum bit commitment (QBC) protocol based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, by replacing symmetric beam splitters with asymmetric ones. It eliminates the need for random sending time of the photons; thus, the feasibility and efficiency are both improved. The protocol is immune to the cheating strategy in the Mayers-Lo-Chau no-go theorem of unconditionally secure QBC, because the density matrices of the committed states do not satisfy a crucial condition on which the no-go theorem holds.

  3. Quantum witness of high-speed low-noise single-photon detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Huang, Kun; Liang, Yan; Chen, Jie; Shi, Xueshun; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrate high-speed and low-noise near-infrared single-photon detection by using a capacitance balancing circuit to achieve a high spike noise suppression for an InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode. The single-photon detector could operate at a tunable gate repetition rate from 10 to 60 MHz. A peak detection efficiency of 34% has been achieved with a dark count rate of 9 × 10⁻³ per gate when the detection window was set to 1 ns. Additionally, quantum detector tomography has also been performed at 60 MHz of repetition rate and for the detection window of 1 ns, enabling to witness the quantum features of the detector with the help of a negative Wigner function. By varying the bias voltage of the detector, we further demonstrated a transition from the full-quantum to semi-classical regime. PMID:26698977

  4. Bright single photon source based on self-aligned quantum dot-cavity systems.

    PubMed

    Maier, Sebastian; Gold, Peter; Forchel, Alfred; Gregersen, Niels; Mørk, Jesper; Höfling, Sven; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin

    2014-04-01

    We report on a quasi-planar quantum-dot-based single-photon source that shows an unprecedented high extraction efficiency of 42% without complex photonic resonator geometries or post-growth nanofabrication. This very high efficiency originates from the coupling of the photons emitted by a quantum dot to a Gaussian shaped nanohill defect that naturally arises during epitaxial growth in a self-aligned manner. We investigate the morphology of these defects and characterize the photonic operation mechanism. Our results show that these naturally arising coupled quantum dot-defects provide a new avenue for efficient (up to 42% demonstrated) and pure (g(2)(0) value of 0.023) single-photon emission. PMID:24718190

  5. Interference with a quantum dot single-photon source and a laser at telecom wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Felle, M.; Huwer, J. Stevenson, R. M.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Ward, M. B.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Penty, R. V.

    2015-09-28

    The interference of photons emitted by dissimilar sources is an essential requirement for a wide range of photonic quantum information applications. Many of these applications are in quantum communications and need to operate at standard telecommunication wavelengths to minimize the impact of photon losses and be compatible with existing infrastructure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the quantum interference of telecom-wavelength photons from an InAs/GaAs quantum dot single-photon source and a laser; an important step towards such applications. The results are in good agreement with a theoretical model, indicating a high degree of indistinguishability for the interfering photons.

  6. Protocols for a quantum network based on single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Susanne; O'Brien, Christopher; Reich, Daniel; Lauk, Nikolai; Koch, Christiane; Fleischhauer, Michael; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    Two protocols for interfacing single optical photons with individual qubits are theoretically discussed. The first is a protocol which allows one to interface a single optical photon with a superconducting qubit. It makes use of a a spin ensemble, where the individual emitters possess both an optical and a magnetic dipole transition. Reversible frequency conversion is realized by combining optical photon storage, for instance by means of EIT, with the controlled switching on and off the coupling of the magnetic dipole transition with a microwave cavity, which in turn couples to a superconducting qubit. We test various strategies and compare their efficiencies in terms of robustness and transfer time. The second protocol aims at achieving perfect absorption of a photon by a single trapped atom, or solid-state emitter, by means of optimal control theory. We make use of the Krotov algorithm for the purpose of identifying pulses driving the atom, that maximize the efficiency and fidelity of absorption in the setup of. These protocols contribute to the development of a toolbox for quantum networks using hybrid platforms.

  7. Entanglement-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-03-01

    Quantum entanglement, to Erwin Schroedinger the essential feature of quantum mechanics, has become a central resource in various quantum communication protocols including quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. From a fundamental point of view what is exploited in these experiments is the very fact which led Schroedinger to his statement namely that in entangled states joint properties of the entangled systems may be well defined while the individual subsystems may carry no information at all. In entanglement-based quantum cryptography it leads to the most elegant possible solution of the classic key distribution problem. It implies that the key comes into existence at spatially distant location at the same time and does not need to be transported. A number recent developments include for example highly efficient, robust and stable sources of entangled photons with a broad bandwidth of desired features. Also, entanglement-based quantum cryptography is successfully joining other methods in the work towards demonstrating quantum key distribution networks. Along that line recently decoy-state quantum cryptography over a distance of 144 km between two Canary Islands was demonstrated successfully. Such experiments also open up the possibility of quantum communication on a really large scale using LEO satellites. Another important possible future branch of quantum communication involves quantum repeaters in order to cover larger distances with entangled states. Recently the connection of two fully independent lasers in an entanglement swapping experiment did demonstrate that the timing control of such systems on a femtosecond time scale is possible. A related development includes recent demonstrations of all-optical one-way quantum computation schemes with the extremely short cycle time of only 100 nanoseconds.

  8. Quantum detector tomography of a single-photon frequency upconversion detection system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianhui; Chen, Xiuliang; Hu, Huiqin; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally presented a full quantum detector tomography of a synchronously pumped infrared single-photon frequency upconversion detector. A maximum detection efficiency of 37.6% was achieved at the telecom wavelength of 1558 nm with a background noise about 1.0 × 10-3 counts/pulse. The corresponding internal quantum conversion efficiency reached as high as 84.4%. The detector was then systematically characterized at different pump powers to investigate the quantum decoherence behavior. Here the reconstructed positive operator valued measure elements were equivalently illustrated with the Wigner function formalism, where the quantum feature of the detector is manifested by the presence of negative values of the Wigner function. In our experiment, pronounced negativities were attained due to the high detection efficiency and low background noise, explicitly showing the quantum feature of the detector. Such quantum detector could be useful in optical quantum state engineering, quantum information processing and communication. PMID:27607700

  9. Linearly polarized single photon antibunching from a site-controlled InGaN quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Jemsson, Tomas; Machhadani, Houssaine; Karlsson, K. Fredrik; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Holtz, Per-Olof

    2014-08-25

    We report on the observation of linearly polarized single photon antibunching in the excitonic emission from a site-controlled InGaN quantum dot. The measured second order coherence function exhibits a significant dip at zero time difference, corresponding to g{sub m}{sup 2}(0)=0.90 under continuous laser excitation. This relatively high value of g{sub m}{sup 2}(0) is well understood by a model as the combination of short exciton life time (320 ps), limited experimental timing resolution and the presence of an uncorrelated broadband background emission from the sample. Our result provides the first rigorous evidence of InGaN quantum dot formation on hexagonal GaN pyramids, and it highlights a great potential in these dots as fast polarized single photon emitters if the background emission can be eliminated.

  10. Channel analysis for single photon underwater free space quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peng; Zhao, Shi-Cheng; Gu, Yong-Jian; Li, Wen-Dong

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the optical absorption and scattering properties of underwater media pertinent to our underwater free space quantum key distribution (QKD) channel model. With the vector radiative transfer theory and Monte Carlo method, we obtain the attenuation of photons, the fidelity of the scattered photons, the quantum bit error rate, and the sifted key generation rate of underwater quantum communication. It can be observed from our simulations that the most secure single photon underwater free space QKD is feasible in the clearest ocean water. PMID:26366645

  11. Comment on "Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Authentication Expansion Using Single Photons"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Jia, Xin; Xia, Juan; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Hua

    2012-12-01

    The security of the quantum secure direct communication protocol with authentication expansion using single photons is analyzed. It is shown that an eavesdropper can obtain or even modify the transmitted secret without introducing any error by implementing a simple man-in-the-middle attack after the authentication is successfully carried out. Furthermore, a denial-of-service attack is also discussed. The particular attack strategy is demonstrated and an improved protocol is presented.

  12. Quantum Simulation of Multiple-Exciton Generation in a Nanocrystal by a Single Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Witzel, Wayne M.; Shabaev, Andrew; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Jacobs, Verne L.; Efros, Alexander L.

    2010-09-22

    We have shown theoretically that efficient multiple-exciton generation (MEG) by a single photon can be observed in small nanocrystals. Our quantum simulations that include hundreds of thousands of exciton and multiexciton states demonstrate that the complex time-dependent dynamics of these states in a closed electronic system yields a saturated MEG effect on a picosecond time scale. Including phonon relaxation confirms that efficient MEG requires the exciton-biexciton coupling time to be faster than exciton relaxation time.

  13. Free-space quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1998-12-31

    An experimental free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been tested over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km under nighttime conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system employs the Bennett 92 protocol; here the authors give a brief overview of this protocol, and describe the experimental implementation of it. An analysis of the system efficiency is presented, as well as a description of the error detection protocol, which employs a two-dimensional parity check scheme. Finally, the susceptibility of this system to eavesdropping by various techniques is determined. Possible applications include the rekeying of satellites in low earth orbit.

  14. On-chip interference of single photons from an embedded quantum dot and an external laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prtljaga, N.; Bentham, C.; O'Hara, J.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Wilson, L. R.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the on-chip two-photon interference between single photons emitted by a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot and an external laser. The quantum dot is embedded within one arm of an air-clad directional coupler which acts as a beam-splitter for incoming light. Photons originating from an attenuated external laser are coupled to the second arm of the beam-splitter and then combined with the quantum dot photons, giving rise to two-photon quantum interference between dissimilar sources. We verify the occurrence of on-chip Hong-Ou-Mandel interference by cross-correlating the optical signal from the separate output ports of the directional coupler. This experimental approach allows us to use a classical light source (laser) to assess in a single step the overall device performance in the quantum regime and probe quantum dot photon indistinguishability on application realistic time scales.

  15. Quantum Router for Single Photons Carrying Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Dong; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2016-06-01

    Quantum router is an essential element in the quantum network. Here, we present a fully quantum router based on interaction free measurement and quantum dots. The signal photonic qubit can be routed to different output ports according to one control electronic qubit. Besides, our scheme is an interferometric method capable of routing single photons carrying either spin angular momentum (SAM) or orbital angular momentum (OAM), or simultaneously carrying SAM and OAM. Then we describe a cascaded multi-level quantum router to construct a one-to-many quantum router. Subsequently we analyze the success probability by using a tunable controlled phase gate. The implementation issues are also discussed to show that this scheme is feasible.

  16. Quantum Router for Single Photons Carrying Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Dong; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Quantum router is an essential element in the quantum network. Here, we present a fully quantum router based on interaction free measurement and quantum dots. The signal photonic qubit can be routed to different output ports according to one control electronic qubit. Besides, our scheme is an interferometric method capable of routing single photons carrying either spin angular momentum (SAM) or orbital angular momentum (OAM), or simultaneously carrying SAM and OAM. Then we describe a cascaded multi-level quantum router to construct a one-to-many quantum router. Subsequently we analyze the success probability by using a tunable controlled phase gate. The implementation issues are also discussed to show that this scheme is feasible. PMID:27256772

  17. Quantum Router for Single Photons Carrying Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Dong; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Quantum router is an essential element in the quantum network. Here, we present a fully quantum router based on interaction free measurement and quantum dots. The signal photonic qubit can be routed to different output ports according to one control electronic qubit. Besides, our scheme is an interferometric method capable of routing single photons carrying either spin angular momentum (SAM) or orbital angular momentum (OAM), or simultaneously carrying SAM and OAM. Then we describe a cascaded multi-level quantum router to construct a one-to-many quantum router. Subsequently we analyze the success probability by using a tunable controlled phase gate. The implementation issues are also discussed to show that this scheme is feasible. PMID:27256772

  18. High-performance diamond-based single-photon sources for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2009-11-01

    Quantum communication places stringent requirements on single-photon sources. Here we report a theoretical study of the cavity Purcell enhancement of two diamond point defects, the nickel-nitrogen (NE8) and silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers, for high-performance, near on-demand single-photon generation. By coupling the centers strongly to high-finesse optical photonic-band-gap cavities with modest quality factor Q=O(104) and small mode volume V=O(λ3) , these system can deliver picosecond single-photon pulses at their zero-phonon lines with probabilities of 0.954 (NE8) and 0.812 (SiV) under a realistic optical excitation scheme. The undesirable blinking effect due to transitions via metastable states can also be suppressed with O(10-4) blinking probability. We analyze the application of these enhanced centers, including the previously studied cavity-enhanced nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center, to long-distance Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol quantum key distribution (QKD) in fiber-based, open-air terrestrial and satellite-ground setups. In this comparative study, we show that they can deliver performance comparable with decoy state implementation with weak coherent sources, and are most suitable for open-air communication.

  19. Controlling single-photon transport with three-level quantum dots in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Jia, Wen-Zhi; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate how to control single-photon transport along the photonic crystal waveguide with the recent experimentally demonstrated artificial atoms [i.e., Λ-type quantum dots (QDs)] [S. G. Carter et al., Nat. Photon. 7, 329 (2013), 10.1038/nphoton.2013.41] in an all-optical way. Adopting full quantum theory in real space, we analytically calculate the transport coefficients of single photons scattered by a Λ-type QD embedded in single- and two-mode photonic crystal cavities (PCCs), respectively. Our numerical results clearly show that the photonic transmission properties can be exactly manipulated by adjusting the coupling strengths of waveguide-cavity and QD-cavity interactions. Specifically, for the PCC with two degenerate orthogonal polarization modes coupled to a Λ-type QD with two degenerate ground states, we find that the photonic transmission spectra show three Rabi-splitting dips and the present system could serve as single-photon polarization beam splitters. The feasibility of our proposal with the current photonic crystal technique is also discussed.

  20. Generation of single photons with highly tunable wave shape from a cold atomic quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Georg; Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Ho, Melvyn; Chavez, Matias; Teo, Colin; Sangouard, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We report on a single photon source with highly tunable photon shape based on a cold ensemble of Rubidium atoms. We follow the DLCZ scheme to implement an emissive quantum memory, which can be operated as a photon pair source with controllable delay. We find that the temporal wave shape of the emitted read photon can be precisely controlled by changing the shape of the driving read pulse. We generate photons with temporal durations varying over three orders of magnitude up to 10 μs without a significant change of the read-out efficiency. We prove the non-classicality of the emitted photons by measuring their antibunching, showing near single photon behavior at low excitation probabilities. We also show that the photons are emitted in a pure state by measuring unconditional autocorrelation functions. Finally, to demonstrate the usability of the source for realistic applications, we create ultra-long single photons with a rising exponential or doubly peaked time-bin wave shape which are important for several quantum information tasks. ICREA-Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona, Spain.

  1. In situ tuning the single photon emission from single quantum dots through hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xuefei; Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Zhou, Pengyu; Ni, Haiqiao; Niu, Zhichuan; Jiang, Desheng; Sun, Baoquan

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate that exciton emission wavelength in InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) can be shifted up to 160 nm using hydrostatic pressure (0.4–4 GPa) in situ in an optical cryostat through an improved diamond anvil cell driven by piezoelectric actuator. It is confirmed that the high pressure does not destroy the photon anti-bunching properties of single QD emitter. Exciton emission intensity is not obviously weakened under the pressure range of 0–4 GPa. Such a tunable QD single photon emitter enables a flexibly tuned source for quantum optical experiments.

  2. Time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packets for free-space quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, N; Alber, G; Agarwal, G S; Leuchs, G

    2015-05-01

    Readout and retrieval processes are proposed for efficient, high-fidelity quantum state transfer between a matter qubit, encoded in the level structure of a single atom or ion, and a photonic qubit, encoded in a time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packet. They are based on controlling spontaneous photon emission and absorption of a matter qubit on demand in free space by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. As these processes do not involve mode selection by high-finesse cavities or photon transport through optical fibers, they offer interesting perspectives as basic building blocks for free-space quantum-communication protocols. PMID:25978231

  3. Time-Reversal-Symmetric Single-Photon Wave Packets for Free-Space Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.; Alber, G.; Agarwal, G. S.; Leuchs, G.

    2015-05-01

    Readout and retrieval processes are proposed for efficient, high-fidelity quantum state transfer between a matter qubit, encoded in the level structure of a single atom or ion, and a photonic qubit, encoded in a time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packet. They are based on controlling spontaneous photon emission and absorption of a matter qubit on demand in free space by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. As these processes do not involve mode selection by high-finesse cavities or photon transport through optical fibers, they offer interesting perspectives as basic building blocks for free-space quantum-communication protocols.

  4. Efficient Quantum Secure Direct Communication Using the Orbital Angular Momentum of Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Zhuo-Ru; Jin, Guang-Sheng; Wang, Tie-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is to transmit information directly through quantum channels without generating secret keys. The efficiencies of QSDC rely on the capacity of qubits. Exploiting orbital angular momentum of single photons, we proposed a high-capacity one-time pad QSDC protocol. The information is encoded on the Hermite-Gauss mode and transmitted directly on the Laguerre-Gauss mode of the photon pluses. The proposed system provides a high coding space, and the proposed protocol is robust against collective-dephasing channel noise.

  5. Scheme for realizing passive quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2016-03-01

    We present a scheme for realizing passive quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources. In this scheme, the idler light from the parametric down-conversion process is split into two parts and sent into two local detectors individually. Then all the clicking and nonclicking events are used to herald the arrival and nonarrival of the signal light. As a result, a precise estimation of the behavior of the single-photon pulses can be achieved without changing the light intensity. Furthermore, we compare our scheme with other existing methods with the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol through numerical simulations. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of our scheme can greatly overcome other existing practical methods and approach very close to the asymptotic case of using infinite-decoy-state methods.

  6. Near-Transform-Limited Single Photons from an Efficient Solid-State Quantum Emitter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Duan, Z-C; Li, Y-H; Chen, Si; Li, J-P; He, Y-M; Chen, M-C; He, Yu; Ding, X; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-05-27

    By pulsed s-shell resonant excitation of a single quantum dot-micropillar system, we generate long streams of 1000 near-transform-limited single photons with high mutual indistinguishability. The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of two photons is measured as a function of their emission time separation varying from 13 ns to 14.7  μs, where the visibility slightly drops from 95.9(2)% to a plateau of 92.1(5)% through a slow dephasing process occurring at a time scale of 0.7  μs. A temporal and spectral analysis reveals the pulsed resonance fluorescence single photons are close to the transform limit, which are readily useful for multiphoton entanglement and interferometry experiments. PMID:27284656

  7. Note: An ultranarrow bandpass filter system for single-photon experiments in quantum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höckel, David; Martin, Eugen; Benson, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    We describe a combined ultranarrow bandpass filtering setup for single-photon experiments in quantum optics. The filter is particularly suitable for single-photon electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) experiments, but can also be used in several similar applications. A multipass planar Fabry-Pérot etalon together with polarization filters and spatial filtering allows 114 dB pump beam suppression, while the signal beam is attenuated by just 4 dB, although both wavelengths are only separated by 0.025 nm (9.2 GHz). The multipass etalon alone accounts for 46 dB suppression while it has a peak transmission of 65%. We demonstrate EIT experiments in Cs vapor at room temperature with probe power in the femtowatt regime using this filter.

  8. Electrically pumped single-photon emission at room temperature from a single InGaN/GaN quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Saniya; Frost, Thomas; Hazari, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a semiconductor quantum dot based electrically pumped single-photon source operating at room temperature. Single photons emitted in the red spectral range from single In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN quantum dots exhibit a second-order correlation value g{sup (2)}(0) of 0.29, and fast recombination lifetime ∼1.3 ±0.3 ns at room temperature. The single-photon source can be driven at an excitation repetition rate of 200 MHz.

  9. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  10. Strong connections between quantum encodings, nonlocality, and quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Jamie; Chailloux, André; Kerenidis, Iordanis

    2014-02-01

    Encoding information in quantum systems can offer surprising advantages but at the same time there are limitations that arise from the fact that measuring an observable may disturb the state of the quantum system. In our work, we provide an in-depth analysis of a simple question: What happens when we perform two measurements sequentially on the same quantum system? This question touches upon some fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, namely the uncertainty principle and the complementarity of quantum measurements. Our results have interesting consequences, for example, they can provide a simple proof of the optimal quantum strategy in the famous Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt game. Moreover, we show that the way information is encoded in quantum systems can provide a different perspective in understanding other fundamental aspects of quantum information, like nonlocality and quantum cryptography. We prove some strong equivalences between these notions and provide a number of applications in all areas.

  11. Quantum key distribution over 120 km using ultrahigh purity single-photon source and superconducting single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Kazuya; Nambu, Yoshihiro; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yorozu, Shinichi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Advances in single-photon sources (SPSs) and single-photon detectors (SPDs) promise unique applications in the field of quantum information technology. In this paper, we report long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) by using state-of-the-art devices: a quantum-dot SPS (QD SPS) emitting a photon in the telecom band of 1.5 μm and a superconducting nanowire SPD (SNSPD). At the distance of 100 km, we obtained the maximal secure key rate of 27.6 bps without using decoy states, which is at least threefold larger than the rate obtained in the previously reported 50-km-long QKD experiment. We also succeeded in transmitting secure keys at the rate of 0.307 bps over 120 km. This is the longest QKD distance yet reported by using known true SPSs. The ultralow multiphoton emissions of our SPS and ultralow dark count of the SNSPD contributed to this result. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applicability of QD SPSs to practical telecom QKD networks.

  12. Quantum key distribution over 120 km using ultrahigh purity single-photon source and superconducting single-photon detectors

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kazuya; Nambu, Yoshihiro; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yorozu, Shinichi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Advances in single-photon sources (SPSs) and single-photon detectors (SPDs) promise unique applications in the field of quantum information technology. In this paper, we report long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) by using state-of-the-art devices: a quantum-dot SPS (QD SPS) emitting a photon in the telecom band of 1.5 μm and a superconducting nanowire SPD (SNSPD). At the distance of 100 km, we obtained the maximal secure key rate of 27.6 bps without using decoy states, which is at least threefold larger than the rate obtained in the previously reported 50-km-long QKD experiment. We also succeeded in transmitting secure keys at the rate of 0.307 bps over 120 km. This is the longest QKD distance yet reported by using known true SPSs. The ultralow multiphoton emissions of our SPS and ultralow dark count of the SNSPD contributed to this result. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applicability of QD SPSs to practical telecom QKD networks. PMID:26404010

  13. Superlinear threshold detectors in quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Lydersen, Lars; Maroey, Oystein; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Jain, Nitin; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2011-09-15

    We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear toward the end of the gate. For systems expecting substantial loss, or for systems not monitoring loss, this would allow eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.

  14. Multiparty quantum sealed-bid auction using single photons as message carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jie; Wang, Hai-Bin; Yuan, Gong-Lin; Xu, Yong; Chen, Zhen-Yu; An, Xing-Xing; Ji, Fu-Gao; Gnitou, Gnim Tchalim

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a novel multiparty quantum sealed-bid auction protocol using the single photons as the message carrier of bids is proposed, followed by an example of three-party auction. Compared with those protocols based on the entangled states (GHZ state, EPR pairs, etc.), the present protocol is more economic and feasible within present technology. In order to guarantee the security and the fairness of the auction, the decoy photon checking technique and an improved post-confirmation mechanism with EPR pairs are introduced, respectively.

  15. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  16. A controllable single photon beam-splitter as a node of a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Gaurav; Kumar, Santosh; Ghosh, Saikat; Kumar, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    A model for a controlled single-photon beam-splitter is proposed and analyzed. It consists of two crossed optical-cavities with overlapping waists, dynamically coupled to a single flying atom. The system is shown to route a single photon with near-unity efficiency in an effective ‘weak-coupling’ regime. Furthermore, two such nodes, forming a segment of a quantum network, are shown to perform several controlled quantum operations. All one-qubit operations involve a transfer of a photon from one cavity to another in a single node, while two-qubit operations involve transfer from one node to a next one, coupled via an optical fiber. Novel timing protocols for classical optical fields are found to simplify possible experimental realizations along with achievable effective parameter regime. Though our analysis here is based on a cavity-QED scenario, basic features of the model can be extended to various other physical systems including gated quantum dots, circuit-QED or opto-mechanical elements.

  17. A controllable single photon beam-splitter as a node of a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Gautam, Gaurav; Ghosh, Saikat; Kumar, Deepak; Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India Collaboration; Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for a controlled single-photon beam-splitter is proposed and analysed. It consists of two crossed optical-cavities with overlapping waists, dynamically coupled to a single flying atom. The system is shown to route a single photon with near-unity efficiency in an effective ``weak-coupling'' regime. Furthermore, two such nodes, forming a segment of a quantum network, are shown to perform several controlled quantum operations. All one-qubit operations involve a transfer of a photon from one cavity to another in a single node, while two-qubit operations involve transfer from one node to a next one, coupled via an optical fiber. Novel timing protocols for classical optical fields are found to simplify possible experimental realizations along with achievable effective parameter regime. This model can be extended to various other physical systems including gated quantum dots, circuit-QED or opto-mechanical elements. This work is supported by DST-SERB, and DAE, Government of India.

  18. Cryptographic robustness of practical quantum cryptography: BB84 key distribution protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2008-07-15

    In real fiber-optic quantum cryptography systems, the avalanche photodiodes are not perfect, the source of quantum states is not a single-photon one, and the communication channel is lossy. For these reasons, key distribution is impossible under certain conditions for the system parameters. A simple analysis is performed to find relations between the parameters of real cryptography systems and the length of the quantum channel that guarantee secure quantum key distribution when the eavesdropper's capabilities are limited only by fundamental laws of quantum mechanics while the devices employed by the legitimate users are based on current technologies. Critical values are determined for the rate of secure real-time key generation that can be reached under the current technology level. Calculations show that the upper bound on channel length can be as high as 300 km for imperfect photodetectors (avalanche photodiodes) with present-day quantum efficiency ({eta} {approx} 20%) and dark count probability (p{sub dark} {approx} 10{sup -7})

  19. Electrically driven single photon emission from a CdSe/ZnSSe single quantum dot at 200 K

    SciTech Connect

    Quitsch, Wolf; Kümmell, Tilmar; Bacher, Gerd; Gust, Arne; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef

    2014-09-01

    High temperature operation of an electrically driven single photon emitter based on a single epitaxial quantum dot is reported. CdSe/ZnSSe/MgS quantum dots are embedded into a p-i-n diode architecture providing almost background free excitonic and biexcitonic electroluminescence from individual quantum dots through apertures in the top contacts. Clear antibunching with g{sup 2}(τ = 0) = 0.28 ± 0.20 can be tracked up to T = 200 K, representing the highest temperature for electrically triggered single photon emission from a single quantum dot device.

  20. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel. PMID:26972678

  1. On the complexity of search for keys in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The trace distance is used as a security criterion in proofs of security of keys in quantum cryptography. Some authors doubted that this criterion can be reduced to criteria used in classical cryptography. The following question has been answered in this work. Let a quantum cryptography system provide an ɛ-secure key such that ½‖ρ XE - ρ U ⊗ ρ E ‖1 < ɛ, which will be repeatedly used in classical encryption algorithms. To what extent does the ɛ-secure key reduce the number of search steps (guesswork) as compared to the use of ideal keys? A direct relation has been demonstrated between the complexity of the complete consideration of keys, which is one of the main security criteria in classical systems, and the trace distance used in quantum cryptography. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of search steps for the determination of the actual key have been presented.

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Quantum cryptography, and especially quantum key distribution (QKD), is steadily progressing to become a viable tool for cryptographic services. In recent years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the secure bit rate of QKD, as well as its extension to ever longer fibre- and air-based links and the emergence of metro-scale trusted networks. In the foreseeable future even global-scale communications may be possible using quantum repeaters or Earth-satellite links. A handful of start-ups and some bigger companies are already active in the field. The launch of an initiative to form industrial standards for QKD, under the auspices of the European Telecommunication Standards Institute, described in the paper by Laenger and Lenhart in this Focus Issue, can be taken as a sign of the growing commercial interest. Recent progress has seen an increase in the secure bit rate of QKD links, by orders of magnitude, to over 1 Mb s-1. This has resulted mainly from an improvement in the detection technology. Here changes in the way conventional semiconductor detectors are gated, as well as the development of novel devices based on non-linear processes and superconducting materials, are leading the way. Additional challenges for QKD at GHz clock rates include the design of high speed electronics, remote synchronization and high rate random number generation. Substantial effort is being devoted to increasing the range of individual links, which is limited by attenuation and other losses in optical fibres and air links. An important advance in the past few years has been the introduction of protocols with the same scaling as an ideal single-photon set-up. The good news is that these schemes use standard optical devices, such as weak laser pulses. Thanks to these new protocols and improvements in the detection technology, the range of a single fibre link can exceed a few hundred km. Outstanding issues include proving the unconditional security of some of the schemes. Much of the

  3. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn ``photon-switches'' to ``OFF'' state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished.

  4. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn “photon-switches” to “OFF” state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished. PMID:25797442

  5. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn "photon-switches" to "OFF" state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished. PMID:25797442

  6. Single-photon absorption and dynamic control of the exciton energy in a coupled quantum-dot-cavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Johne, R.; Fiore, A.

    2011-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic interaction of a quantum dot in a nanocavity with time-symmetric single-photon pulses. The simulations, based on a wave-function approach, reveal that almost perfect single-photon absorption occurs for quantum-dot-cavity systems operating on the edge between strong- and weak-coupling regimes. The computed maximum absorption probability is close to unity for pulses with a typical length comparable to half of the Rabi period. Furthermore, the dynamic control of the quantum-dot energy via electric fields allows the freezing of the light-matter interaction, leaving the quantum dot in its excited state. Shaping of single-photon wave packets by the electric field control is limited by the occurrence of chirping of the single-photon pulse. This understanding of the interaction of single-photon pulses with the quantum-dot-cavity system provides the basis for the development of advanced protocols for quantum-information processing in the solid state.

  7. Spatially resolved quantum nano-optics of single photons using an electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tizei, L H G; Kociak, M

    2013-04-12

    We report on the experimental demonstration of single-photon state generation and characterization in an electron microscope. In this aim we have used low intensity relativistic (energy between 60 and 100 keV) electrons beams focused in a ca. 1 nm probe to excite diamond nanoparticles. This triggered individual neutral nitrogen-vacancy centers to emit photons which could be gathered and sent to a Hanbury Brown-Twiss intensity interferometer. The detection of a dip in the correlation function at small time delays clearly demonstrates antibunching and thus the creation of nonclassical light states. Specifically, we have also demonstrated single-photon states detection. We unveil the mechanism behind quantum states generation in an electron microscope, and show that it clearly makes cathodoluminescence the nanometer scale analog of photoluminescence. By using an extremely small electron probe size and the ability to monitor its position with subnanometer resolution, we also show the possibility of measuring the quantum character of the emitted beam with deep subwavelength resolution. PMID:25167267

  8. Observation of the quantum paradox of separation of a single photon from one of its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, James M.; Schwarz, Peter D.; Schlosshauer, Maximilian

    2016-07-01

    We report an experimental realization of the quantum paradox of the separation of a single photon from one of its properties (the so-called "quantum Cheshire cat"). We use a modified Sagnac interferometer with displaced paths to produce appropriately pre- and postselected states of heralded single photons. Weak measurements of photon presence and circular polarization are performed in each arm of the interferometer by introducing weak absorbers and small polarization rotations and analyzing changes in the postselected signal. The absorber is found to have an appreciable effect only in one arm of the interferometer, while the polarization rotation significantly affects the signal only when performed in the other arm. We carry out both sequential and simultaneous weak measurements and find good agreement between measured and predicted weak values. In the language of Aharonov et al. and in the sense of the ensemble averages described by weak values, the experiment establishes the separation of a particle from one its properties during the passage through the interferometer.

  9. Quantum teleportation of multiple degrees of freedom of a single photon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Cai, Xin-Dong; Su, Zu-En; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Dian; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-02-26

    Quantum teleportation provides a 'disembodied' way to transfer quantum states from one object to another at a distant location, assisted by previously shared entangled states and a classical communication channel. As well as being of fundamental interest, teleportation has been recognized as an important element in long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum networks and measurement-based quantum computation. There have been numerous demonstrations of teleportation in different physical systems such as photons, atoms, ions, electrons and superconducting circuits. All the previous experiments were limited to the teleportation of one degree of freedom only. However, a single quantum particle can naturally possess various degrees of freedom--internal and external--and with coherent coupling among them. A fundamental open challenge is to teleport multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously, which is necessary to describe a quantum particle fully and, therefore, to teleport it intact. Here we demonstrate quantum teleportation of the composite quantum states of a single photon encoded in both spin and orbital angular momentum. We use photon pairs entangled in both degrees of freedom (that is, hyper-entangled) as the quantum channel for teleportation, and develop a method to project and discriminate hyper-entangled Bell states by exploiting probabilistic quantum non-demolition measurement, which can be extended to more degrees of freedom. We verify the teleportation for both spin-orbit product states and hybrid entangled states, and achieve a teleportation fidelity ranging from 0.57 to 0.68, above the classical limit. Our work is a step towards the teleportation of more complex quantum systems, and demonstrates an increase in our technical control of scalable quantum technologies. PMID:25719668

  10. Quantum teleportation of multiple degrees of freedom of a single photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Cai, Xin-Dong; Su, Zu-En; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Dian; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Quantum teleportation provides a `disembodied' way to transfer quantum states from one object to another at a distant location, assisted by previously shared entangled states and a classical communication channel. As well as being of fundamental interest, teleportation has been recognized as an important element in long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum networks and measurement-based quantum computation. There have been numerous demonstrations of teleportation in different physical systems such as photons, atoms, ions, electrons and superconducting circuits. All the previous experiments were limited to the teleportation of one degree of freedom only. However, a single quantum particle can naturally possess various degrees of freedom--internal and external--and with coherent coupling among them. A fundamental open challenge is to teleport multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously, which is necessary to describe a quantum particle fully and, therefore, to teleport it intact. Here we demonstrate quantum teleportation of the composite quantum states of a single photon encoded in both spin and orbital angular momentum. We use photon pairs entangled in both degrees of freedom (that is, hyper-entangled) as the quantum channel for teleportation, and develop a method to project and discriminate hyper-entangled Bell states by exploiting probabilistic quantum non-demolition measurement, which can be extended to more degrees of freedom. We verify the teleportation for both spin-orbit product states and hybrid entangled states, and achieve a teleportation fidelity ranging from 0.57 to 0.68, above the classical limit. Our work is a step towards the teleportation of more complex quantum systems, and demonstrates an increase in our technical control of scalable quantum technologies.

  11. Efficient recycling strategies for preparing large Fock states from single-photon sources: Applications to quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motes, Keith R.; Mann, Ryan L.; Olson, Jonathan P.; Studer, Nicholas M.; Bergeron, E. Annelise; Gilchrist, Alexei; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Berry, Dominic W.; Rohde, Peter P.

    2016-07-01

    Fock states are a fundamental resource for many quantum technologies such as quantum metrology. While much progress has been made in single-photon source technologies, preparing Fock states with a large photon number remains challenging. We present and analyze a bootstrapped approach for nondeterministically preparing large photon-number Fock states by iteratively fusing smaller Fock states on a beamsplitter. We show that by employing state recycling we are able to exponentially improve the preparation rate over conventional schemes, allowing the efficient preparation of large Fock states. The scheme requires single-photon sources, beamsplitters, number-resolved photodetectors, fast-feedforward, and an optical quantum memory.

  12. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  13. Proposal for founding mistrustful quantum cryptography on coin tossing

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Adrian

    2003-07-01

    A significant branch of classical cryptography deals with the problems which arise when mistrustful parties need to generate, process, or exchange information. As Kilian showed a while ago, mistrustful classical cryptography can be founded on a single protocol, oblivious transfer, from which general secure multiparty computations can be built. The scope of mistrustful quantum cryptography is limited by no-go theorems, which rule out, inter alia, unconditionally secure quantum protocols for oblivious transfer or general secure two-party computations. These theorems apply even to protocols which take relativistic signaling constraints into account. The best that can be hoped for, in general, are quantum protocols which are computationally secure against quantum attack. Here a method is described for building a classically certified bit commitment, and hence every other mistrustful cryptographic task, from a secure coin-tossing protocol. No security proof is attempted, but reasons are sketched why these protocols might resist quantum computational attack.

  14. Coherent-pulse implementations of quantum cryptography protocols resistant to photon-number-splitting attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Acin, Antonio; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    We propose a class of quantum cryptography protocols that are robust against photon-number-splitting attacks (PNS) in a weak coherent-pulse implementation. We give a quite exhaustive analysis of several eavesdropping attacks on these schemes. The honest parties (Alice and Bob) use present-day technology, in particular an attenuated laser as an approximation of a single-photon source. The idea of the protocols is to exploit the nonorthogonality of quantum states to decrease the information accessible to Eve due to the multiphoton pulses produced by the imperfect source. The distance at which the key distribution becomes insecure due to the PNS attack is significantly increased compared to the existing schemes. We also show that strong-pulse implementations, where a strong pulse is included as a reference, allow for key distribution robust against photon-number-splitting attacks.

  15. Efficient single-photon emitters based on Bragg microcavities containing selectively positioned InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gaisler, V. A. Gaisler, A. V.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Derebezov, I. A.; Kachanova, M. M.; Zhivodkov, Yu. A.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Medvedev, A. S.; Nenasheva, L. A.; Grachev, K. V.; Sandyrev, V. K.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Shayahmetov, V. M.; Kalagin, A. K.; Bakarov, A. K.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Shcheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Aseev, A. L.

    2015-01-15

    A semiconductor Bragg microcavity structure for single photon emitters is designed and implemented. The design provides the efficient current pumping of selectively positioned InAs quantum dots within a micrometer-size aperture, high external quantum yield, and low divergence of the emitted radiation.

  16. Detection of single photons by a resonant tunneling heterostructure with a quantum dot layer

    SciTech Connect

    Khanin, Yu. N. Vdovin, E. E.

    2010-08-15

    Light absorption by GaAs/AlAs heterostructures with a layer of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) at resonant tunneling through an energy-selected QD has been investigated. A high sensitivity of the current through this selected tunneling channel to the absorption of single photons with a wavelength {lambda} {<=} 860 nm up to a temperature of 50 K is demonstrated; this sensitivity is caused by the Coulomb effect of the photoexcited holes captured by surrounding QDs on the resonance conditions. It is shown that single-photon absorption can discretely change the current through the system under study by a factor of more than 50. The captured-hole lifetimes have been measured, and a model has been developed to qualitatively describe the experimental data. It is also demonstrated that the InAs monolayer can effectively absorb photons. The properties of the heterostructure studied can be used not only to detect photons but also to design logical valves and optical memory devices.

  17. Storage of multiple single-photon pulses emitted from a quantum dot in a solid-state quantum memory

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian-Shun; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Tao; Li, Yu-Long; Liu, Xiao; Hua, Yi-Lin; Zou, Yang; Wang, Shuang; He, De-Yong; Chen, Geng; Sun, Yong-Nan; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeaters are critical components for distributing entanglement over long distances in presence of unavoidable optical losses during transmission. Stimulated by the Duan–Lukin–Cirac–Zoller protocol, many improved quantum repeater protocols based on quantum memories have been proposed, which commonly focus on the entanglement-distribution rate. Among these protocols, the elimination of multiple photons (or multiple photon-pairs) and the use of multimode quantum memory are demonstrated to have the ability to greatly improve the entanglement-distribution rate. Here, we demonstrate the storage of deterministic single photons emitted from a quantum dot in a polarization-maintaining solid-state quantum memory; in addition, multi-temporal-mode memory with 1, 20 and 100 narrow single-photon pulses is also demonstrated. Multi-photons are eliminated, and only one photon at most is contained in each pulse. Moreover, the solid-state properties of both sub-systems make this configuration more stable and easier to be scalable. Our work will be helpful in the construction of efficient quantum repeaters based on all-solid-state devices. PMID:26468996

  18. Experimental demonstration of optimal universal asymmetric quantum cloning of polarization states of single photons by partial symmetrization

    SciTech Connect

    Cernoch, Antonin; Soubusta, Jan; Celechovska, Lucie; Dusek, Miloslav; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2009-12-15

    We report on experimental implementation of the optimal universal asymmetric 1->2 quantum cloning machine for qubits encoded into polarization states of single photons. Our linear-optical machine performs asymmetric cloning by partially symmetrizing the input polarization state of signal photon and a blank copy idler photon prepared in a maximally mixed state. We show that the employed method of measurement of mean clone fidelities exhibits strong resilience to imperfect calibration of the relative efficiencies of single-photon detectors used in the experiment. Reliable characterization of the quantum cloner is thus possible even when precise detector calibration is difficult to achieve.

  19. Title: Development of Single photon Quantum Optical Experiments using Type-I and Type-II Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laugharn, Andrew; Maleki, Seyfollah

    We constructed a quantum optical apparatus to control and detect single photons. We generated these photons via Type-I and Type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion by pumping a GaN laser (405nm) incident on a BBO crystal. We detected the two down converted photons (810nm), denoted signal and idler, in coincidence so as to measure and control single photons. We implemented a coincidence counting unite onto an Altera DE2 board and used LabView for data acquisition. We used these photon pairs to demonstrate quantum entanglement and indistinguishability using multiple optical experiments.

  20. Single-Photon Source for Quantum Information Based on Single Dye Molecule Fluorescence in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Knox, R.P.; Freivald, P.; McNamara, A.; Boyd, R.W.; Stroud, Jr., C.R.; Schmid, A.W.; Marshall, K.L.

    2006-08-18

    This paper describes a new application for liquid crystals: quantum information technology. A deterministically polarized single-photon source that efficiently produces photons exhibiting antibunching is a pivotal hardware element in absolutely secure quantum communication. Planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts deterministically align the single dye molecules which produce deterministically polarized single (antibunched) photons. In addition, 1-D photonic bandgap cholesteric liquid crystals will increase single-photon source efficiency. The experiments and challenges in the observation of deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules in planar-aligned glassy nematic-liquid-crystal oligomer as well as photon antibunching in glassy cholesteric oligomer are described for the first time.

  1. Multiple intrinsically identical single-photon emitters in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Jahnke, K D; Teraji, T; Marseglia, L; Müller, C; Naydenov, B; Schauffert, H; Kranz, C; Isoya, J; McGuinness, L P; Jelezko, F

    2014-01-01

    Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single-photon emitters are required. However, typical solid-state single-photon sources are inherently dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here we demonstrate bright silicon vacancy (SiV(-)) centres in low-strain bulk diamond, which show spectral overlap of up to 91% and nearly transform-limited excitation linewidths. This is the first time that distinct single-photon emitters in the solid state have shown intrinsically identical spectral properties. Our results have impact on the application of single-photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography. PMID:25162729

  2. Illustration of quantum complementarity using single photons interfering on a grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, V.; Lai, N. D.; Dréau, A.; Zheng, D.; Chauvat, D.; Treussart, F.; Grangier, P.; Roch, J.-F.

    2008-12-01

    A recent experiment performed by Afshar et al (2007 Found. Phys. 37 295-305) has been interpreted as a violation of Bohr's complementarity principle between interference visibility and which-path information (WPI) in a two-path interferometer. We have reproduced this experiment, using true single-photon pulses propagating in a two-path wavefront-splitting interferometer realized with a Fresnel's biprism, and followed by a grating with adjustable transmitting slits. The measured values of interference visibility V and WPI, characterized by the distinguishability parameter D, are found to obey the complementarity relation V2+D2<=1. This result demonstrates that the experiment can be perfectly explained by the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics.

  3. A quantum dot single-photon source with on-the-fly all-optical polarization control and timed emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Dirk; Breddermann, Dominik; Zrenner, Artur; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Sources of single photons are key elements for applications in quantum information science. Among the different sources available, semiconductor quantum dots excel with their integrability in semiconductor on-chip solutions and the potential that photon emission can be triggered on demand. Usually, the photon is emitted from a single-exciton ground state. Polarization of the photon and time of emission are either probabilistic or pre-determined by electronic properties of the system. Here, we study the direct two-photon emission from the biexciton. The two-photon emission is enabled by a laser pulse driving the system into a virtual state inside the band gap. From this intermediate state, the single photon of interest is then spontaneously emitted. We show that emission through this higher-order transition provides a versatile approach to generate a single photon. Through the driving laser pulse, polarization state, frequency and emission time of the photon can be controlled on-the-fly.

  4. Nanoscale optical positioning of single quantum dots for bright and pure single-photon emission

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Luca; Davanço, Marcelo; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled, epitaxially grown InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are promising semiconductor quantum emitters that can be integrated on a chip for a variety of photonic quantum information science applications. However, self-assembled growth results in an essentially random in-plane spatial distribution of QDs, presenting a challenge in creating devices that exploit the strong interaction of single QDs with highly confined optical modes. Here, we present a photoluminescence imaging approach for locating single QDs with respect to alignment features with an average position uncertainty <30 nm (<10 nm when using a solid-immersion lens), which represents an enabling technology for the creation of optimized single QD devices. To that end, we create QD single-photon sources, based on a circular Bragg grating geometry, that simultaneously exhibit high collection efficiency (48%±5% into a 0.4 numerical aperture lens, close to the theoretically predicted value of 50%), low multiphoton probability (g(2)(0) <1%), and a significant Purcell enhancement factor (≈3). PMID:26211442

  5. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Reithmaier, G; Lichtmannecker, S; Reichert, T; Hasch, P; Müller, K; Bichler, M; Gross, R; Finley, J J

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems. PMID:23712624

  6. Ultrafast superconducting single-photon detectors for near-infrared-wavelength quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verevkin, A.; Pearlman, A.; Słysz, W.; Zhang, J.; Currie, M.; Korneev, A.; Chulkova, G.; Okunev, O.; Kouminov, P.; Smirnov, K.; Voronov, B.; Gol'Tsman, G. N.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2004-09-01

    The paper reports progress on the design and development of niobium-nitride, superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) for ultrafast counting of near-infrared photons for secure quantum communications. The SSPDs operate in the quantum detection mode, based on photon-induced hotspot formation and subsequent appearance of a transient resistive barrier across an ultrathin and submicron-width superconducting stripe. The devices are fabricated from 3.5 nm thick NbN films and kept at cryogenic (liquid helium) temperatures inside a cryostat. The detector experimental quantum efficiency in the photon-counting mode reaches above 20% in the visible radiation range and up to 10% at the 1.3-1.55 µm infrared range. The dark counts are below 0.01 per second. The measured real-time counting rate is above 2 GHz and is limited by readout electronics (the intrinsic response time is below 30 ps). The SSPD jitter is below 18 ps, and the best-measured value of the noise-equivalent power (NEP) is 2 × 10-18 W/Hz1/2 at 1.3 µm. In terms of photon-counting efficiency and speed, these NbN SSPDs significantly outperform semiconductor avalanche photodiodes and photomultipliers.

  7. Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kent A G; England, Duncan G; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Bustard, Philip J; Resch, Kevin J; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    The spectral manipulation of photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion. PMID:27045988

  8. Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Kent A. G.; England, Duncan G.; Maclean, Jean-Philippe W.; Bustard, Philip J.; Resch, Kevin J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-04-01

    The spectral manipulation of photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.

  9. Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kent A. G.; England, Duncan G.; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W.; Bustard, Philip J.; Resch, Kevin J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The spectral manipulation of photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion. PMID:27045988

  10. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors

    PubMed Central

    Reithmaier, G.; Lichtmannecker, S.; Reichert, T.; Hasch, P.; Müller, K.; Bichler, M.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems. PMID:23712624

  11. Nanoscale optical positioning of single quantum dots for bright and pure single-photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapienza, Luca; Davanço, Marcelo; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-07-01

    Self-assembled, epitaxially grown InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are promising semiconductor quantum emitters that can be integrated on a chip for a variety of photonic quantum information science applications. However, self-assembled growth results in an essentially random in-plane spatial distribution of QDs, presenting a challenge in creating devices that exploit the strong interaction of single QDs with highly confined optical modes. Here, we present a photoluminescence imaging approach for locating single QDs with respect to alignment features with an average position uncertainty <30 nm (<10 nm when using a solid-immersion lens), which represents an enabling technology for the creation of optimized single QD devices. To that end, we create QD single-photon sources, based on a circular Bragg grating geometry, that simultaneously exhibit high collection efficiency (48%+/-5% into a 0.4 numerical aperture lens, close to the theoretically predicted value of 50%), low multiphoton probability (g(2)(0) <1%), and a significant Purcell enhancement factor (~3).

  12. Free-space quantum cryptography in the H-alpha Fraunhofer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. J.; Bienfang, J. C.; Mink, A.; Hershman, B. J.; Nakassis, A.; Tang, X.; Ma, L.; Su, D. H.; Williams, Carl J.; Clark, Charles W.

    2006-08-01

    Free-space Quantum key distribution (QKD) has shown the potential for the practical production of cryptographic key for ultra-secure communications. The performance of any QKD system is ultimately limited by the signal to noise ratio on the single-photon channel, and over most useful communications links the resulting key rates are impractical for performing continuous one-time-pad encryption of today's broadband communications. We have adapted clock and data recovery techniques from modern telecommunications practice, combined with a synchronous classical free-space optical communications link operating in parallel, to increase the repetition rate of a free-space QKD system by roughly 2 orders of magnitude over previous demonstrations. We have also designed the system to operate in the H-alpha Fraunhofer window at 656.28 nm, where the solar background is reduced by roughly 7 dB. This system takes advantage of high efficiency silicon single-photon avalanche photodiodes with <50ps timing resolution that are expected to enable operation at a repetition rate of 2.5 GHz. We have identified scalable solutions for delivering sustained one-time-pad encryption at 10 Mbps, thus making it possible to integrate quantum cryptography into first-generation Ethernet protocols.

  13. Three-party Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in both Polarization and Spatial-mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, LiLi; Ma, WenPing; Wang, MeiLing; Shen, DongSu

    2016-05-01

    We present an efficient three-party quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol with single photos in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The three legal parties' messages can be encoded on the polarization and the spatial-mode states of single photons independently with desired unitary operations. A party can obtain the other two parties' messages simultaneously through a quantum channel. Because no extra public information is transmitted in the classical channels, the drawback of information leakage or classical correlation does not exist in the proposed scheme. Moreover, the comprehensive security analysis shows that the presented QSDC network protocol can defend the outsider eavesdropper's several sorts of attacks. Compared with the single photons with only one degree of freedom, our protocol based on the single photons in two degrees of freedom has higher capacity. Since the preparation and the measurement of single photon quantum states in both the polarization and the spatial-mode degrees of freedom are available with current quantum techniques, the proposed protocol is practical.

  14. Coupling and single-photon purity of a quantum dot-cavity system studied using hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P. Y.; Wu, X. F.; Ding, K.; Dou, X. M.; Zha, G. W.; Ni, H. Q.; Niu, Z. C.; Zhu, H. J.; Jiang, D. S.; Zhao, C. L.; Sun, B. Q.

    2015-01-07

    We propose an approach to tune the emission of a single semiconductor quantum dot (QD) to couple with a planar cavity using hydrostatic pressure without inducing temperature variation during the process of measurement. Based on this approach, we studied the influence of cavity mode on the single-photon purity of an InAs/GaAs QD. Our measurement demonstrates that the single-photon purity degrades when the QD emission resonates with the cavity mode. This negative influence of the planar cavity is mainly caused by the cavity feeding effect.

  15. Microwave-Controlled Generation of Shaped Single Photons in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechal, M.; Huthmacher, L.; Eichler, C.; Zeytinoǧlu, S.; Abdumalikov, A. A.; Berger, S.; Wallraff, A.; Filipp, S.

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale quantum information processors or quantum communication networks will require reliable exchange of information between spatially separated nodes. The links connecting these nodes can be established using traveling photons that need to be absorbed at the receiving node with high efficiency. This is achievable by shaping the temporal profile of the photons and absorbing them at the receiver by time reversing the emission process. Here, we demonstrate a scheme for creating shaped microwave photons using a superconducting transmon-type three-level system coupled to a transmission line resonator. In a second-order process induced by a modulated microwave drive, we controllably transfer a single excitation from the third level of the transmon to the resonator and shape the emitted photon. We reconstruct the density matrices of the created single-photon states and show that the photons are antibunched. We also create multipeaked photons with a controlled amplitude and phase. In contrast to similar existing schemes, the one we present here is based solely on microwave drives, enabling operation with fixed frequency transmons.

  16. Analysis of limiting information characteristics of quantum-cryptography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Sych, D V; Grishanin, Boris A; Zadkov, Viktor N

    2005-01-31

    The problem of increasing the critical error rate of quantum-cryptography protocols by varying a set of letters in a quantum alphabet for space of a fixed dimensionality is studied. Quantum alphabets forming regular polyhedra on the Bloch sphere and the continual alphabet equally including all the quantum states are considered. It is shown that, in the absence of basis reconciliation, a protocol with the tetrahedral alphabet has the highest critical error rate among the protocols considered, while after the basis reconciliation, a protocol with the continual alphabet possesses the highest critical error rate. (quantum optics and quantum computation)

  17. Quantum cryptography on multi-user network architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumavor, Patrick D.; Beal, Alan C.; Yelin, Susanne; Donkor, Eric; Wang, Bing C.

    2006-05-01

    Quantum cryptography applies the uncertainty principle and the no-cloning theorem to allow to parties to share a secret key over an ultra-secure link. Present quantum cryptography technologies provide encryption key distribution only between two users. However, practical implementations of encryption key distribution schemes require establishing secure quantum communications amongst multiple users. This paper looks at some of the advantages and drawbacks of some common network topologies that could be used in sending cryptographic keys across a network consisting of multiple users. These topologies are the star, ring, and bus networks. Their performances are compared and analyzed using quantum bit error rate analysis. The paper also presents an experimental demonstration of a six-user quantum key distribution network implemented on a bus topology.

  18. Quantum teleportation between a single-rail single-photon qubit and a coherent-state qubit using hybrid entanglement under decoherence effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Bae, Seunglee; Choi, Seongjeon

    2016-02-01

    We study quantum teleportation between two different types of optical qubits using hybrid entanglement as a quantum channel under decoherence effects. One type of qubit employs the vacuum and single-photon states for the basis, called a single-rail single-photon qubit, and the other utilizes coherent states of opposite phases. We find that teleportation from a single-rail single-photon qubit to a coherent-state qubit is better than the opposite direction in terms of fidelity and success probability. We compare our results with those using a different type of hybrid entanglement between a polarized single-photon qubit and a coherent state.

  19. Controlling single-photon Fock-state propagation through opaque scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Thomas J.; Huisman, Simon R.; Mosk, Allard P.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2014-09-01

    The control of light scattering is essential in many quantum optical experiments. Wavefront shaping is a technique used for ultimate control over wave propagation through multiple-scattering media by adaptive manipulation of incident waves. We control the propagation of single-photon Fock states through opaque scattering media by spatial phase modulation of the incident wavefront. We enhance the probability that a single photon arrives in a target output mode with a factor 30. Our proof-of-principle experiment shows that the propagation of quantum light through multiple-scattering media can be controlled, with prospective applications in quantum communication and quantum cryptography.

  20. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  1. Security of two quantum cryptography protocols using the same four qubit states

    SciTech Connect

    Branciard, Cyril; Gisin, Nicolas; Kraus, Barbara; Scarani, Valerio

    2005-09-15

    The first quantum cryptography protocol, proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984 (BB84), has been widely studied in recent years. This protocol uses four states (more precisely, two complementary bases) for the encoding of the classical bit. Recently, it has been noticed that by using the same four states, but a different encoding of information, one can define a protocol which is more robust in practical implementations, specifically when attenuated laser pulses are used instead of single-photon sources [V. Scarani et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 057901 (2004), referred to as the SARG04 protocol]. We present a detailed study of SARG04 in two different regimes. In the first part, we consider an implementation with a single-photon source: we derive bounds on the error rate Q for security against all possible attacks by the eavesdropper. The lower and the upper bound obtained for SARG04 (Q < or approx. 10.95% and Q > or approx. 14.9%, respectively) are close to those obtained for BB84 (Q < or approx. 12.4% and Q > or approx. 14.6%, respectively). In the second part, we consider a realistic source consisting of an attenuated laser and improve on previous analysis by allowing Alice to optimize the mean number of photons as a function of the distance. The SARG04 protocol is found to perform better than BB84, both in secret-key rate and in maximal achievable distance, for a wide class of Eve's attacks.

  2. Efficient Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in Both Polarization and Spatial-Mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Ma, W. P.; Shen, D. S.; Wang, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    With single photos in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom,we present an efficient bidirectional quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol is proposed. The participants' secret messages can be transmitted directly in a quantum channel through performing different local unitary operations, which are chosen by the two participants separately from the Pauli operations and Hadamard operations, on the polarization states and the spatial-mode states of single photons. Each single photon in two degrees of freedom can carry two bits of information. Thus the capacity of quantum communication of our protocol is improved. Moreover, we discuss the security of our QSDC network protocol comprehensively. It is showed that the proposed scheme not only can defend several outsider eavesdropper's attacks but also can remove the drawback of information leakage, which prevents the secret messages being leaked out to other people through the public information. In addition, our protocol is practical since the preparation and the measurement of single photon quantum states in both the polarization and the spatial-mode degrees of freedom are available with current quantum techniques.

  3. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S; Tanner, Michael G; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H; Fejer, Martin M; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances. PMID:26597223

  4. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M.; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S.; Tanner, Michael G.; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H.; Fejer, Martin M.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances.

  5. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M.; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S.; Tanner, Michael G.; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H.; Fejer, Martin M.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances. PMID:26597223

  6. Indistinguishability of independent single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F. W.; Wong, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    The indistinguishability of independent single photons is presented by decomposing the single photon pulse into the mixed state of different transform-limited pulses. The entanglement between single photons and outer environment or other photons induces the distribution of the center frequencies of those transform-limited pulses and makes photons distinguishable. Only the single photons with the same transform-limited form are indistinguishable. In details, the indistinguishability of single photons from the solid-state quantum emitter and spontaneous parametric down-conversion is examined with two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. Moreover, experimental methods to enhance the indistinguishability are discussed, where the usage of spectral filter is highlighted.

  7. Single-photon routing by time-division phase modulation in a Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunyuan; Wu, Guang; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2003-07-01

    In this letter, we report the experimental demonstration of a single-photon router based on a time-division Sagnac interferometer, wherein differential phase shifts are applied on either the clockwise or counterclockwise quasi-single-photon pulses to determine the single photon interference and consequently output photon routing. High fidelity (>85%) of single-photon routing was demonstrated over a long-distance Sagnac loop. Stable performance was guaranteed by passive compensation of stress and temperature dependent drifts of the fiber-optic path. Experimental data show that time-division single-photon routing can be realized by controlling the applied electric pulses on the integrated phase modulators in the Sagnac loop, which makes this setup suitable for a practical quantum cryptography system.

  8. The photonic nanowire: an emerging platform for highly efficient single-photon sources for quantum information applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Niels; Munsch, Mathieu; Malik, Nitin S.; Bleuse, Joël.; Dupuy, Emmanuel; Delga, Adrien; Mørk, Jesper; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Claudon, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Efficient coupling between a localized quantum emitter and a well defined optical channel represents a powerful route to realize single-photon sources and spin-photon interfaces. The tailored fiber-like photonic nanowire embedding a single quantum dot has recently demonstrated an appealing potential. However, the device requires a delicate, sharp needle-like taper with performance sensitive to minute geometrical details. To overcome this limitation we demonstrate the photonic trumpet, exploiting an opposite tapering strategy. The trumpet features a strongly Gaussian far-field emission. A first implementation of this strategy has lead to an ultra-bright single-photon source with a first-lens external efficiency of 0.75 +/- 0.1 and a predicted coupling to a Gaussian beam of 0.61 +/- 0.08.

  9. Controlled quantum secure communication protocol with single photons in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Wenping

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) protocol with single photons in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. Based on the defined local collective unitary operations, the sender’s secret messages can be transmitted directly to the receiver through encoding secret messages on the particles. Only with the help of the third side, the receiver can reconstruct the secret messages. Each single photon in two degrees of freedom can carry two bits of information, so the cost of our protocol is less than others using entangled qubits. Moreover, the security of our QSDC network protocol is discussed comprehensively. It is shown that our new CQSDC protocol cannot only defend the outsider eavesdroppers’ several sorts of attacks but also the inside attacks. Besides, our protocol is feasible since the preparation and the measurement of single photon quantum states in both the polarization and the spatial-mode degrees of freedom are available with current quantum techniques.

  10. Prospects for storage and retrieval of a quantum-dot single photon in an ultracold 87Rb ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakher, Matthew T.; Warburton, Richard J.; Treutlein, Philipp

    2013-11-01

    Epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs) are promising sources of nonclassical states of light such as single photons and entangled photons. However, in order for them to be used as a resource for long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum computation, or linear optics quantum computing, these photons must be coupled efficiently to long-lived quantum memories as part of a quantum repeater network. Here, we theoretically examine the prospects for efficient storage and retrieval of a QD-generated single photon with a 1-ns lifetime in a multilevel atomic system. We calculate using an experimentally demonstrated optical depth of 150 that the storage (total) efficiency can exceed 46% (28%) in a dense, ultracold ensemble of 87Rb atoms. Furthermore, we find that the optimal control pulse required for storage and retrieval can be obtained using a diode laser and an electro-optic modulator rather than a mode-locked, pulsed laser source. Increasing the optical depth, for example, by using Bose-condensed ensembles or an optical cavity, can increase the efficiencies to near unity. Aside from enabling a high-speed quantum network based on QDs, such an efficient optical interface between an atomic ensemble and a QD can also lead to entanglement between collective spin-wave excitations of atoms and the spin of an electron or hole confined in the QD.

  11. Coherent eavesdropping strategies for the four state quantum cryptography protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirac, J. I.; Gisin, N.

    1997-02-01

    An elementary derivation of best eavesdropping strategies for the four state BB84 quantum cryptography protocol is presented, for both incoherent and two-qubit coherent attacks. While coherent attacks do not help Eve to obtain more information, they are more powerful to reveal the whole message sent by Alice. Our results are based on symmetric eavesdropping strategies, which we show to be sufficient to analyze these kind of problems.

  12. The statistical fluctuation analysis for the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xing-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we carry out statistical fluctuation analysis for the new proposed measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources and further compare its performance with the mostly often used light sources, i.e., the weak coherent source. Due to a significantly lower probability for events with two photons present on the same side of the beam splitter in former than in latter, it gives drastically reduced quantum bit error rate in the X basis and can thus show splendid behavior in real-life implementations even when taking statistical fluctuations into account.

  13. Practical Quantum Cryptography for Secure Free-Space Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  14. Security of a two-parameter quantum cryptography system using time-shifted states against photon-number splitting attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, D. A.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2009-10-01

    A new family of two-parameter quantum key distribution protocols is discussed where eavesdropping is detected by using two parameters: bit error rate Q and photon count rate q in control time slots. When a single-photon source is used and mutually orthogonal states are prepared in each basis, the protocol’s maximum tolerable error rate for secure key distribution is the highest, reaching a theoretical upper limit of 50%. When the signal states emitted by the source of attenuated laser light include multiphoton coherent states, the protocol also guarantees secure key distribution over the longest distance as compared to other quantum cryptography systems, up to the channel length for which the channel losses are sufficiently high that all five-photon pulses can be blocked by an eavesdropper.

  15. Linear optical quantum metrology with single photons: exploiting spontaneously generated entanglement to beat the shot-noise limit.

    PubMed

    Motes, Keith R; Olson, Jonathan P; Rabeaux, Evan J; Dowling, Jonathan P; Olson, S Jay; Rohde, Peter P

    2015-05-01

    Quantum number-path entanglement is a resource for supersensitive quantum metrology and in particular provides for sub-shot-noise or even Heisenberg-limited sensitivity. However, such number-path entanglement has been thought to be resource intensive to create in the first place--typically requiring either very strong nonlinearities, or nondeterministic preparation schemes with feedforward, which are difficult to implement. Very recently, arising from the study of quantum random walks with multiphoton walkers, as well as the study of the computational complexity of passive linear optical interferometers fed with single-photon inputs, it has been shown that such passive linear optical devices generate a superexponentially large amount of number-path entanglement. A logical question to ask is whether this entanglement may be exploited for quantum metrology. We answer that question here in the affirmative by showing that a simple, passive, linear-optical interferometer--fed with only uncorrelated, single-photon inputs, coupled with simple, single-mode, disjoint photodetection--is capable of significantly beating the shot-noise limit. Our result implies a pathway forward to practical quantum metrology with readily available technology. PMID:25978219

  16. An Online Banking System Based on Quantum Cryptography Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-gui; Li, Wei; Huan, Tian-tian; Shen, Chen-yi; Li, Hai-sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an online banking system has been built. Based on quantum cryptography communication, this system is proved unconditional secure. Two sets of GHZ states are applied, which can ensure the safety of purchase and payment, respectively. In another word, three trading participants in each triplet state group form an interdependent and interactive relationship. In the meantime, trading authorization and blind signature is introduced by means of controllable quantum teleportation. Thus, an effective monitor is practiced on the premise that the privacy of trading partners is guaranteed. If there is a dispute or deceptive behavior, the system will find out the deceiver immediately according to the relationship mentioned above.

  17. On-Demand Single Photons with High Extraction Efficiency and Near-Unity Indistinguishability from a Resonantly Driven Quantum Dot in a Micropillar.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xing; He, Yu; Duan, Z-C; Gregersen, Niels; Chen, M-C; Unsleber, S; Maier, S; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Scalable photonic quantum technologies require on-demand single-photon sources with simultaneously high levels of purity, indistinguishability, and efficiency. These key features, however, have only been demonstrated separately in previous experiments. Here, by s-shell pulsed resonant excitation of a Purcell-enhanced quantum dot-micropillar system, we deterministically generate resonance fluorescence single photons which, at π pulse excitation, have an extraction efficiency of 66%, single-photon purity of 99.1%, and photon indistinguishability of 98.5%. Such a single-photon source for the first time combines the features of high efficiency and near-perfect levels of purity and indistinguishabilty, and thus opens the way to multiphoton experiments with semiconductor quantum dots. PMID:26824530

  18. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  19. QUANTUM OPTICS AND QUANTUM COMPUTATION: Analysis of limiting information characteristics of quantum-cryptography protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, D. V.; Grishanin, Boris A.; Zadkov, Viktor N.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of increasing the critical error rate of quantum-cryptography protocols by varying a set of letters in a quantum alphabet for space of a fixed dimensionality is studied. Quantum alphabets forming regular polyhedra on the Bloch sphere and the continual alphabet equally including all the quantum states are considered. It is shown that, in the absence of basis reconciliation, a protocol with the tetrahedral alphabet has the highest critical error rate among the protocols considered, while after the basis reconciliation, a protocol with the continual alphabet possesses the highest critical error rate.

  20. Infeasibility of Quantum Cryptography Without Eavesdropping Check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Huang, Liusheng; Song, Fang; Wang, Qiyan

    Secure key distribution is impossible in pure classical environment. Unconditional secure key distribution is available when quantum means are introduced, assisted by a classical communication channel. What is possible when a quantum key distribution scheme is without classical communication? We present a general model with this constraint and show that quantum key distribution without classical eavesdropping check is in principle impossible. For an adversary can always succeed in obtaining the secret key via a special case of man-in-the-middle attack, namely intercept-and-forward attack without any risk of being captured.

  1. Some conservative estimates in quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2006-08-15

    Relationship is established between the security of the BB84 quantum key distribution protocol and the forward and converse coding theorems for quantum communication channels. The upper bound Q{sub c} {approx} 11% on the bit error rate compatible with secure key distribution is determined by solving the transcendental equation H(Q{sub c})=C-bar({rho})/2, where {rho} is the density matrix of the input ensemble, C-bar({rho}) is the classical capacity of a noiseless quantum channel, and H(Q) is the capacity of a classical binary symmetric channel with error rate Q.

  2. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task—the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction has been the introduction of measurement-device independence, where the secret key between two parties is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. Unfortunately, although qubit-implemented protocols can reach long distances, their key rates are typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network. Here we show, theoretically and experimentally, that a solution can come from the use of continuous-variable systems. We design a coherent-state network protocol able to achieve remarkably high key rates at metropolitan distances, in fact three orders of magnitude higher than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers.

  3. Quantum cryptography: Round-robin with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Bernd; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2015-12-01

    Last year the common notion that signal disturbance has to be monitored in a quantum cryptographic link to guarantee secrecy was challenged by a new protocol. The formidable task of demonstrating it experimentally has now been achieved.

  4. Practical implementation of multilevel quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Kulik, S. P. Maslennikov, G. A.; Moreva, E. V.

    2006-05-15

    The physical principles of a quantum key distribution protocol using four-level optical systems are discussed. Quantum information is encoded into polarization states created by frequency-nondegenerate spontaneous parametric down-conversion in collinear geometry. In the scheme under analysis, the required nonorthogonal states are generated in a single nonlinear crystal. All states in the selected basis are measured deterministically. The results of initial experiments on transformation of the basis polarization states of a four-level optical system are discussed.

  5. Deterministic and efficient quantum cryptography based on Bell's theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zengbing; Pan Jianwei; Zhang Qiang; Bao Xiaohui; Schmiedmayer, Joerg

    2006-05-15

    We propose a double-entanglement-based quantum cryptography protocol that is both efficient and deterministic. The proposal uses photon pairs with entanglement both in polarization and in time degrees of freedom; each measurement in which both of the two communicating parties register a photon can establish one and only one perfect correlation, and thus deterministically create a key bit. Eavesdropping can be detected by violation of local realism. A variation of the protocol shows a higher security, similar to the six-state protocol, under individual attacks. Our scheme allows a robust implementation under the current technology.

  6. Several experimental realizations of symmetric phase-covariant quantum cloners of single-photon qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubusta, Jan; Bartůšková, Lucie; Černoch, Antonín; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Dušek, Miloslav

    2007-10-01

    We compare several optical implementations of phase-covariant cloning machines. The experiments are based on copying of the polarization state of a single photon in bulk optics by a special unbalanced beam splitter or by a balanced beam splitter accompanied by a state filtering. Also the all-fiber-based setup is discussed, where the information is encoded into spatial modes, i.e., the photon can propagate through two optical fibers. Each of the four implementations possesses some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed.

  7. Several experimental realizations of symmetric phase-covariant quantum cloners of single-photon qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Soubusta, Jan; Cernoch, Antonin; Bartuskova, Lucie; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Dusek, Miloslav

    2007-10-15

    We compare several optical implementations of phase-covariant cloning machines. The experiments are based on copying of the polarization state of a single photon in bulk optics by a special unbalanced beam splitter or by a balanced beam splitter accompanied by a state filtering. Also the all-fiber-based setup is discussed, where the information is encoded into spatial modes, i.e., the photon can propagate through two optical fibers. Each of the four implementations possesses some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed.

  8. High-fidelity teleportation of continuous-variable quantum states using delocalized single photons.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ulrik L; Ralph, Timothy C

    2013-08-01

    Traditional continuous-variable teleportation can only approach unit fidelity in the limit of an infinite (and unphysical) amount of squeezing. We describe a new method for continuous-variable teleportation that approaches unit fidelity with finite resources. The protocol is not based on squeezed states as in traditional teleportation but on an ensemble of single photon entangled states. We characterize the teleportation scheme with coherent states, mesoscopic superposition states, and two-mode squeezed states and we find several situations in which near-unity teleportation fidelity can be obtained with modest resources. PMID:23952378

  9. Device-independent quantum cryptography for continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kevin; Weedbrook, Christian

    2014-10-01

    We present a device-independent quantum cryptography protocol for continuous variables. Our scheme is based on the Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding scheme whereby a qubit is embedded in the infinite-dimensional space of a quantum harmonic oscillator. The application of discrete-variable device-independent quantum key distribution to this encoding enables a continuous-variable analog. Since the security of this protocol is based on discrete variables we inherit by default security against collective attacks and, under certain memoryless assumptions, coherent attacks. We find that our protocol is valid over the same distances as its discrete-variable counterpart, except that we are able to take advantage of high efficiency commercially available detectors where, for the most part, only homodyne detection is required. This offers the prospect of closing the loopholes associated with Bell inequalities.

  10. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD,more » together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.« less

  11. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.

  12. Practical position-based quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Leverrier, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    We study a general family of quantum protocols for position verification and present a class of attacks based on the Clifford hierarchy. These attacks outperform current strategies based on port-based teleportation for a large class of practical protocols. We then introduce the interleaved product protocol, a scheme for position verification involving only the preparation and measurement of single qubit states for which the best available attacks have a complexity exponential in the number of classical bits transmitted.

  13. Boson sampling with displaced single-photon Fock states versus single-photon-added coherent states: The quantum-classical divide and computational-complexity transitions in linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadreesan, Kaushik P.; Olson, Jonathan P.; Motes, Keith R.; Rohde, Peter P.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2015-02-01

    Boson sampling is a specific quantum computation, which is likely hard to implement efficiently on a classical computer. The task is to sample the output photon-number distribution of a linear-optical interferometric network, which is fed with single-photon Fock-state inputs. A question that has been asked is if the sampling problems associated with any other input quantum states of light (other than the Fock states) to a linear-optical network and suitable output detection strategies are also of similar computational complexity as boson sampling. We consider the states that differ from the Fock states by a displacement operation, namely the displaced Fock states and the photon-added coherent states. It is easy to show that the sampling problem associated with displaced single-photon Fock states and a displaced photon-number detection scheme is in the same complexity class as boson sampling for all values of displacement. On the other hand, we show that the sampling problem associated with single-photon-added coherent states and the same displaced photon-number detection scheme demonstrates a computational-complexity transition. It transitions from being just as hard as boson sampling when the input coherent amplitudes are sufficiently small to a classically simulatable problem in the limit of large coherent amplitudes.

  14. Repeat-until-success distributed quantum computation by using single-photon interference at a beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xun-Li; Qian, Jun; Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-07-01

    A repeat-until-success (RUS) measurement-based scheme for the implementation of the distributed quantum computation by using single-photon interference at a 50:50 beam splitter is proposed. It is shown that the 50:50 beam splitter can naturally project a suitably encoded matter-photon state to either a desired entangling gate-operated state of the matter qubits or to their initial state when the photon is detected. The recurrence of the initial state permits us to implement the desired entangling gate in a RUS way. To implement a distributed quantum computation we suggest an encoding method by means of the effect of dipole-induced transparency proposed recently [E. Waks and J. Vuckovic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 153601 (2006)]. The effects of the unfavorable factors on our scheme are also discussed.

  15. Quantum non-Gaussianity dynamics of two-mode single-photon squeezed Bell states based on cumulant theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shao-Hua; Wen, Wei; Zhao, Yu-Jing; Song, Ke-Hui

    2016-06-01

    We characterize the non-Gaussianity of continuous-variable quantum states in terms of the cumulant theory and derive the exact formula of the cumulant of any order for such states. Exploiting the fourth-order cumulant method, we evaluate the quantum non-Gaussianity of two-mode single-photon squeezed Bell states and investigate their dynamics under the influence of two different types of decoherence models. It is shown that in a two-reservoir model, all the fourth-order cumulants of these states are very fragile, while in single-reservoir model, the fourth-order cumulants of one such state are insensitive to thermal noise, showing the time-invariant non-Gaussianity.

  16. Storage and retrieval of THz-bandwidth single photons using a room-temperature diamond quantum memory.

    PubMed

    England, Duncan G; Fisher, Kent A G; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Bustard, Philip J; Lausten, Rune; Resch, Kevin J; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2015-02-01

    We report the storage and retrieval of single photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of a room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded photons are generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is g((2))(0)=0.65±0.07, demonstrating a preservation of nonclassical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low noise, high speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications. PMID:25699439

  17. Practical free-space quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.M.

    1998-12-01

    An experimental free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been tested over an outdoor optical path of {approx} 1 km under nighttime conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system employs the Bennett 92 protocol; here the authors give a brief overview of this protocol, and describe the experimental implementation of it. An analysis of the system efficiency is presented, as well as a description of the error detection protocol, which employs a two-dimensional parity check scheme. Finally, the susceptibility of this system to eavesdropping by various techniques is determined, and the effectiveness of privacy amplification procedures is discussed. The conclusions are that free-space QKD is both effective and secure; possible applications include the rekeying of satellites in low earth orbit.

  18. Quantum storage of heralded single photons in a praseodymium-doped crystal.

    PubMed

    Rieländer, Daniel; Kutluer, Kutlu; Ledingham, Patrick M; Gündoğan, Mustafa; Fekete, Julia; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2014-01-31

    We report on experiments demonstrating the reversible mapping of heralded single photons to long-lived collective optical atomic excitations stored in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. A cavity-enhanced spontaneous down-conversion source is employed to produce widely nondegenerate narrow-band (≈2  MHz) photon pairs. The idler photons, whose frequency is compatible with telecommunication optical fibers, are used to herald the creation of the signal photons, compatible with the Pr3+ transition. The signal photons are stored and retrieved using the atomic frequency comb protocol. We demonstrate storage times up to 4.5  μs while preserving nonclassical correlations between the heralding and the retrieved photon. This is more than 20 times longer than in previous realizations in solid state devices, and implemented in a system ideally suited for the extension to spin-wave storage. PMID:24580428

  19. Information Leakage Problem in Efficient Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in Both Polarization and Spatial-Mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Han-Wu; Liu, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    The information leakage problem in the efficient bidirectional quantum secure direct communication protocol with single photons in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom is pointed out. Next, a way to revise this protocol to a truly secure one is given. We hope people pay more attention to the information leakage problem in order to design truly secure quantum communication protocols.

  20. Experimental quantum-cryptography scheme based on orthogonal states

    SciTech Connect

    Avella, Alessio; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Traina, Paolo

    2010-12-15

    Since, in general, nonorthogonal states cannot be cloned, any eavesdropping attempt in a quantum-communication scheme using nonorthogonal states as carriers of information introduces some errors in the transmission, leading to the possibility of detecting the spy. Usually, orthogonal states are not used in quantum-cryptography schemes since they can be faithfully cloned without altering the transmitted data. Nevertheless, L. Goldberg and L. Vaidman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1239 (1995)] proposed a protocol in which, even if the data exchange is realized using two orthogonal states, any attempt to eavesdrop is detectable by the legal users. In this scheme the orthogonal states are superpositions of two localized wave packets traveling along separate channels. Here we present an experiment realizing this scheme.

  1. Experimental quantum cryptography scheme based on orthogonal states: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Alessio; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Traina, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Since, in general, non-orthogonal states cannot be cloned, any eavesdropping attempt in a Quantum Communication scheme using non-orthogonal states as carriers of information introduces some errors in the transmission, leading to the possibility of detecting the spy. Usually, orthogonal states are not used in Quantum Cryptography schemes since they can be faithfully cloned without altering the transmitted data. Nevertheless, L. Goldberg and L. Vaidman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (7), pp. 12391243, 1995] proposed a protocol in which, even if the data exchange is realized using two orthogonal states, any attempt to eavesdrop is detectable by the legal users. In this scheme the orthogonal states are superpositions of two localized wave packets which travel along separate channels, i.e. two different paths inside a balanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Here we present an experiment realizing this scheme.

  2. Experimental quantum-cryptography scheme based on orthogonal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Alessio; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Traina, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    Since, in general, nonorthogonal states cannot be cloned, any eavesdropping attempt in a quantum-communication scheme using nonorthogonal states as carriers of information introduces some errors in the transmission, leading to the possibility of detecting the spy. Usually, orthogonal states are not used in quantum-cryptography schemes since they can be faithfully cloned without altering the transmitted data. Nevertheless, L. Goldberg and L. Vaidman [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1239 75, 1239 (1995)] proposed a protocol in which, even if the data exchange is realized using two orthogonal states, any attempt to eavesdrop is detectable by the legal users. In this scheme the orthogonal states are superpositions of two localized wave packets traveling along separate channels. Here we present an experiment realizing this scheme.

  3. Tight finite-key analysis for quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomamichel, Marco; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Gisin, Nicolas; Renner, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Despite enormous theoretical and experimental progress in quantum cryptography, the security of most current implementations of quantum key distribution is still not rigorously established. One significant problem is that the security of the final key strongly depends on the number, M, of signals exchanged between the legitimate parties. Yet, existing security proofs are often only valid asymptotically, for unrealistically large values of M. Another challenge is that most security proofs are very sensitive to small differences between the physical devices used by the protocol and the theoretical model used to describe them. Here we show that these gaps between theory and experiment can be simultaneously overcome by using a recently developed proof technique based on the uncertainty relation for smooth entropies.

  4. Tight finite-key analysis for quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Tomamichel, Marco; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Gisin, Nicolas; Renner, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Despite enormous theoretical and experimental progress in quantum cryptography, the security of most current implementations of quantum key distribution is still not rigorously established. One significant problem is that the security of the final key strongly depends on the number, M, of signals exchanged between the legitimate parties. Yet, existing security proofs are often only valid asymptotically, for unrealistically large values of M. Another challenge is that most security proofs are very sensitive to small differences between the physical devices used by the protocol and the theoretical model used to describe them. Here we show that these gaps between theory and experiment can be simultaneously overcome by using a recently developed proof technique based on the uncertainty relation for smooth entropies. PMID:22252558

  5. Effect of source tampering in the security of quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2015-08-01

    The security of source has become an increasingly important issue in quantum cryptography. Based on the framework of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), the source becomes the only region exploitable by a potential eavesdropper (Eve). Phase randomization is a cornerstone assumption in most discrete-variable (DV) quantum communication protocols (e.g., QKD, quantum coin tossing, weak-coherent-state blind quantum computing, and so on), and the violation of such an assumption is thus fatal to the security of those protocols. In this paper, we show a simple quantum hacking strategy, with commercial and homemade pulsed lasers, by Eve that allows her to actively tamper with the source and violate such an assumption, without leaving a trace afterwards. Furthermore, our attack may also be valid for continuous-variable (CV) QKD, which is another main class of QKD protocol, since, excepting the phase random assumption, other parameters (e.g., intensity) could also be changed, which directly determine the security of CV-QKD.

  6. Discriminating single-photon states unambiguously in high dimensions.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Megan; Bolduc, Eliot; Resch, Kevin J; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Leach, Jonathan

    2014-07-11

    The ability to uniquely identify a quantum state is integral to quantum science, but for nonorthogonal states, quantum mechanics precludes deterministic, error-free discrimination. However, using the nondeterministic protocol of unambiguous state discrimination enables the error-free differentiation of states, at the cost of a lower frequency of success. We discriminate experimentally between nonorthogonal, high-dimensional states encoded in single photons; our results range from dimension d=2 to d=14. We quantify the performance of our method by comparing the total measured error rate to the theoretical rate predicted by minimum-error state discrimination. For the chosen states, we find a lower error rate by more than 1 standard deviation for dimensions up to d=12. This method will find immediate application in high-dimensional implementations of quantum information protocols, such as quantum cryptography. PMID:25062151

  7. Accidental cloning of a single-photon qubit in two-channel continuous-variable quantum teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, Toshiki; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2007-06-15

    The information encoded in the polarization of a single photon can be transferred to a remote location by two-channel continuous-variable quantum teleportation. However, the finite entanglement used in the teleportation causes random changes in photon number. If more than one photon appears in the output, the continuous-variable teleportation accidentally produces clones of the original input photon. In this paper, we derive the polarization statistics of the N-photon output components and show that they can be decomposed into an optimal cloning term and completely unpolarized noise. We find that the accidental cloning of the input photon is nearly optimal at experimentally feasible squeezing levels, indicating that the loss of polarization information is partially compensated by the availability of clones.

  8. On-chip beamsplitter operation on single photons from quasi-resonantly excited quantum dots embedded in GaAs rib waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Rengstl, U.; Schwartz, M.; Herzog, T.; Hargart, F.; Paul, M.; Portalupi, S. L.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2015-07-13

    We present an on-chip beamsplitter operating on a single-photon level by means of a quasi-resonantly driven InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot. The single photons are guided by rib waveguides and split into two arms by an evanescent field coupler. Although the waveguides themselves support the fundamental TE and TM modes, the measured degree of polarization (∼90%) reveals the main excitation and propagation of the TE mode. We observe the preserved single-photon nature of a quasi-resonantly excited quantum dot by performing a cross-correlation measurement on the two output arms of the beamsplitter. Additionally, the same quantum dot is investigated under resonant excitation, where the same splitting ratio is observed. An autocorrelation measurement with an off-chip beamsplitter on a single output arm reveal the single-photon nature after evanescent coupling inside the on-chip splitter. Due to their robustness, adjustable splitting ratio, and their easy implementation, rib waveguide beamsplitters with embedded quantum dots provide a promising step towards fully integrated quantum circuits.

  9. Quantum cryptography and authentication with low key-consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, A.; Pacher, C.; Lorünser, T.; Larsson, J.-Å.; Peev, M.

    2011-11-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD - also referred to as Quantum Cryptography) is a technique for secret key agreement. It has been shown that QKD rigged with Information-Theoretic Secure (ITS) authentication (using secret key) of the classical messages transmitted during the key distribution protocol is also ITS. Note, QKD without any authentication can trivially be broken by man-in-the-middle attacks. Here, we study an authentication method that was originally proposed because of its low key consumption; a two-step authentication that uses a publicly known hash function, followed by a secret strongly universal2 hash function, which is exchanged each round. This two-step authentication is not information-theoretically secure but it was argued that nevertheless it does not compromise the security of QKD. In the current contribution we study intrinsic weaknesses of this approach under the common assumption that the QKD adversary has access to unlimited resources including quantum memories. We consider one implementation of Quantum Cryptographic protocols that use such authentication and demonstrate an attack that fully extract the secret key. Even including the final key from the protocol in the authentication does not rule out the possibility of these attacks. To rectify the situation, we propose a countermeasure that, while not information-theoretically secure, restores the need for very large computing power for the attack to work. Finally, we specify conditions that must be satisfied by the two-step authentication in order to restore information-theoretic security.

  10. Telecommunication Wavelength-Band Single-Photon Emission from Single Large InAs Quantum Dots Nucleated on Low-Density Seed Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ze-Sheng; Ma, Ben; Shang, Xiang-Jun; He, Yu; Zhang, Li-Chun; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Wang, Jin-Liang; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Single-photon emission in the telecommunication wavelength band is realized with self-assembled strain-coupled bilayer InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a planar microcavity on GaAs substrate. Low-density large QDs in the upper layer active for ~1.3 μm emission are fabricated by precisely controlling the indium deposition amount and applying a gradient indium flux in both QD layers. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) intensity suggested that the radiative lifetime of their exciton emission is 1.5~1.6 ns. The second-order correlation function of g (2)(0) < 0.5 which demonstrates a pure single-photon emission. PMID:27576522

  11. Electroluminescence from localized defects in zinc oxide: toward electrically driven single photon sources at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sumin; Berhane, Amanuel M; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-18

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography, and quantum communications. However, the majority of room temperature emitters to date are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically driven light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit in the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open possibilities for building new ZnO-based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies. PMID:25741632

  12. Heralded high-efficiency quantum repeater with atomic ensembles assisted by faithful single-photon transmission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeater is one of the important building blocks for long distance quantum communication network. The previous quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optical elements can only be performed with a maximal success probability of 1/2 during the entanglement creation and entanglement swapping procedures. Meanwhile, the polarization noise during the entanglement distribution process is harmful to the entangled channel created. Here we introduce a general interface between a polarized photon and an atomic ensemble trapped in a single-sided optical cavity, and with which we propose a high-efficiency quantum repeater protocol in which the robust entanglement distribution is accomplished by the stable spatial-temporal entanglement and it can in principle create the deterministic entanglement between neighboring atomic ensembles in a heralded way as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Meanwhile, the simplified parity-check gate makes the entanglement swapping be completed with unity efficiency, other than 1/2 with linear optics. We detail the performance of our protocol with current experimental parameters and show its robustness to the imperfections, i.e., detuning and coupling variation, involved in the reflection process. These good features make it a useful building block in long distance quantum communication. PMID:26502993

  13. Heralded high-efficiency quantum repeater with atomic ensembles assisted by faithful single-photon transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeater is one of the important building blocks for long distance quantum communication network. The previous quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optical elements can only be performed with a maximal success probability of 1/2 during the entanglement creation and entanglement swapping procedures. Meanwhile, the polarization noise during the entanglement distribution process is harmful to the entangled channel created. Here we introduce a general interface between a polarized photon and an atomic ensemble trapped in a single-sided optical cavity, and with which we propose a high-efficiency quantum repeater protocol in which the robust entanglement distribution is accomplished by the stable spatial-temporal entanglement and it can in principle create the deterministic entanglement between neighboring atomic ensembles in a heralded way as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Meanwhile, the simplified parity-check gate makes the entanglement swapping be completed with unity efficiency, other than 1/2 with linear optics. We detail the performance of our protocol with current experimental parameters and show its robustness to the imperfections, i.e., detuning and coupling variation, involved in the reflection process. These good features make it a useful building block in long distance quantum communication. PMID:26502993

  14. Fast Purcell-enhanced single photon source in 1,550-nm telecom band from a resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang; Sumikura, Hisashi; Matsuo, Shinji; Taniyama, Hideaki; van Veldhoven, Peter J.; Nötzel, Richard; Notomi, Masaya

    2012-03-01

    High-bit-rate nanocavity-based single photon sources in the 1,550-nm telecom band are challenges facing the development of fibre-based long-haul quantum communication networks. Here we report a very fast single photon source in the 1,550-nm telecom band, which is achieved by a large Purcell enhancement that results from the coupling of a single InAs quantum dot and an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. At a resonance, the spontaneous emission rate was enhanced by a factor of 5 resulting a record fast emission lifetime of 0.2 ns at 1,550 nm. We also demonstrate that this emission exhibits an enhanced anti-bunching dip. This is the first realization of nanocavity-enhanced single photon emitters in the 1,550-nm telecom band. This coupled quantum dot cavity system in the telecom band thus provides a bright high-bit-rate non-classical single photon source that offers appealing novel opportunities for the development of a long-haul quantum telecommunication system via optical fibres.

  15. Nonlinear interaction between single photons.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, T; Martin, A; Sanguinetti, B; Pelc, J S; Langrock, C; Fejer, M M; Gisin, N; Zbinden, H; Sangouard, N; Thew, R T

    2014-10-24

    Harnessing nonlinearities strong enough to allow single photons to interact with one another is not only a fascinating challenge but also central to numerous advanced applications in quantum information science. Here we report the nonlinear interaction between two single photons. Each photon is generated in independent parametric down-conversion sources. They are subsequently combined in a nonlinear waveguide where they are converted into a single photon of higher energy by the process of sum-frequency generation. Our approach results in the direct generation of photon triplets. More generally, it highlights the potential for quantum nonlinear optics with integrated devices and, as the photons are at telecom wavelengths, it opens the way towards novel applications in quantum communication such as device-independent quantum key distribution. PMID:25379916

  16. Quantum Optics with Superconducting Circuits: From Single Photons to Schrodinger Cats

    SciTech Connect

    Schoelkopf, Rob

    2013-01-09

    Over the last decade and a half, superconducting circuits have advanced to the point where we can generate and detect highly-entangled states, and perform universal quantum gates. Meanwhile, the coherence properties of these systems have improved more than 10,000-fold. I will describe recent experiments, such as the latest advance in coherence using a three-dimensional implementation of qubits interacting with microwave cavities, called “3D circuit QED.” The control and strong interactions possible in superconducting circuits make it possible to generate non-classical states of light, including large superpositions known as “Schrodinger cat” states. This field has many interesting prospects both for applications in quantum information processing, and fundamental investigations of the boundary between the macroscopic classical world and the microscopic world of the quantum.

  17. Quantum Interference of Single Photons from Remote Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahigil, A.; Goldman, M. L.; Togan, E.; Chu, Y.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Zibrov, A. S.; Kubanek, A.; Lukin, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate quantum interference between indistinguishable photons emitted by two nitrogen-vacancy centers in distinct diamond samples separated by two meters. Macroscopic solid immersion lenses are used to enhance photon collection efficiency. Quantum interference is verified by measuring a value of the second-order cross-correlation function g(2)(0)=0.35±0.04<0.5. In addition, optical transition frequencies of two separated nitrogen-vacancy centers are tuned into resonance with each other by applying external electric fields. An extension of the present approach to generate entanglement of remote solid-state qubits is discussed.

  18. A carrier relaxation bottleneck probed in single InGaAs quantum dots using integrated superconducting single photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reithmaier, G. Flassig, F.; Hasch, P.; Lichtmannecker, S.; Kaniber, M.; Müller, K.; Vučković, J.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2014-08-25

    Using integrated superconducting single photon detectors, we probe ultra-slow exciton capture and relaxation dynamics in single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs ridge waveguide. Time-resolved luminescence measurements performed with on- and off-chip detection reveal a continuous decrease in the carrier relaxation time from 1.22 ± 0.07 ns to 0.10 ± 0.07 ns upon increasing the number of non-resonantly injected carriers. By comparing off-chip time-resolved spectroscopy with spectrally integrated on-chip measurements, we identify the observed dynamics in the rise time (τ{sub r}) as arising from a relaxation bottleneck at low excitation levels. From the comparison with the temporal dynamics of the single exciton transition with the on-chip emission signal, we conclude that the relaxation bottleneck is circumvented by the presence of charge carriers occupying states in the bulk material and the two-dimensional wetting layer continuum. A characteristic τ{sub r} ∝ P{sup −2∕3} power law dependence is observed suggesting Auger-type scattering between carriers trapped in the quantum dot and the two-dimensional wetting layer continuum which circumvents the phonon relaxation bottleneck.

  19. The (in)adequacy of applicative use of quantum cryptography in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkanović, Muhamed; Hölbl, Marko

    2014-10-01

    Recently quantum computation and cryptography principles are exploited in the design of security systems for wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which are consequently named as quantum WSN. Quantum cryptography is presumably secure against any eavesdropper and thus labeled as providing unconditional security. This paper tries to analyze the aspect of the applicative use of quantum principles in WSN. The outcome of the analysis elaborates a summary about the inadequacy of applicative use of quantum cryptography in WSN and presents an overview of all possible applicative challenges and problems while designing quantum-based security systems for WSN. Since WSNs are highly complex frameworks, with many restrictions and constraints, every security system has to be fully compatible and worthwhile. The aim of the paper was to contribute a verdict about this topic, backed up by equitable facts.

  20. Non-blinking single-photon generation with anisotropic colloidal nanocrystals: towards room-temperature, efficient, colloidal quantum sources.

    PubMed

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Leménager, Godefroy; Martiradonna, Luigi; Carbone, Luigi; Vezzoli, Stefano; Desfonds, Pascal; Cozzoli, Pantaleo Davide; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; Bramati, Alberto

    2013-04-11

    Blinking and single-photon emission can be tailored in CdSe/CdS core/shell colloidal dot-in-rods. By increasing the shell thickness it is possible to obtain almost non-blinking nanocrystals, while the shell length can be used to control single-photon emission probability. PMID:23334905

  1. Polariton lasing in a multilevel quantum dot strongly coupled to a single photon mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Carlos Andrés; Vinck-Posada, Herbert; González, Augusto

    2009-09-01

    We present an approximate analytic expression for the photoluminescence spectral function of a model polariton system, which describes a quantum dot, with a finite number of fermionic levels, strongly interacting with the lowest photon mode of a pillar microcavity. Energy eigenvalues and wave functions of the electron-hole-photon system are obtained by numerically diagonalizing the Hamiltonian. Pumping and photon losses through the cavity mirrors are described with a master equation, which is solved in order to determine the stationary density matrix. The photon first-order correlation function, from which the spectral function is found, is computed with the help of the quantum regression theorem. The spectral function qualitatively describes the polariton lasing regime in the model, corresponding to pumping rates two orders of magnitude lower than those needed for ordinary (photon) lasing. The second-order coherence functions for the photon and the electron-hole subsystems are computed as functions of the pumping rate.

  2. Quantum Coherence of Optomechanical Systems in the Single-photon Strong Coupling Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Huang, Shang-Yu; Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Optomechanical systems with ultrastrong coupling could demonstrate nonlinear optical effects such as photon blockade. The system-bath couplings in these systems play an essential role in observing these effects. In this work, we use a dressed-state master equation approach to study the quantum coherence of an optomechanical system. In this approach, the system-bath couplings are decomposed in terms of the eigenbasis of the optomechanical system, where the mechanical state is displaced by finite photon occupation. Compared with the standard master equation often seen in the literature, our master equation includes photon-number-dependent terms that induce dephasing. We calculate cavity dephasing, second-order photon correlation, and two-cavity entanglement using the dressed-state master equation. At high temperature, our master equation predicts faster decay of the quantum coherence than with the standard master equation. The second-order photon correlation derived with our master equation shows less antibunching than that with the standard master equation. This work is supported by awards from DARPA, NSF, JSPS (Japan), MOST (Taiwan) and NTU (Taiwan).

  3. Quantum cryptography using coherent states: Randomized encryption and key generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corndorf, Eric

    With the advent of the global optical-telecommunications infrastructure, an increasing number of individuals, companies, and agencies communicate information with one another over public networks or physically-insecure private networks. While the majority of the traffic flowing through these networks requires little or no assurance of secrecy, the same cannot be said for certain communications between banks, between government agencies, within the military, and between corporations. In these arenas, the need to specify some level of secrecy in communications is a high priority. While the current approaches to securing sensitive information (namely the public-key-cryptography infrastructure and deterministic private-key ciphers like AES and 3DES) seem to be cryptographically strong based on empirical evidence, there exist no mathematical proofs of secrecy for any widely deployed cryptosystem. As an example, the ubiquitous public-key cryptosystems infer all of their secrecy from the assumption that factoring of the product of two large primes is necessarily time consuming---something which has not, and perhaps cannot, be proven. Since the 1980s, the possibility of using quantum-mechanical features of light as a physical mechanism for satisfying particular cryptographic objectives has been explored. This research has been fueled by the hopes that cryptosystems based on quantum systems may provide provable levels of secrecy which are at least as valid as quantum mechanics itself. Unfortunately, the most widely considered quantum-cryptographic protocols (BB84 and the Ekert protocol) have serious implementation problems. Specifically, they require quantum-mechanical states which are not readily available, and they rely on unproven relations between intrusion-level detection and the information available to an attacker. As a result, the secrecy level provided by these experimental implementations is entirely unspecified. In an effort to provably satisfy the cryptographic

  4. Quantum cryptography for WDM networks: Encryption with coherent states and key generation with fiber based entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chuang

    and demonstrated. Fiber-based polarization entangled photon-pairs are experimentally analyzed and characterized with various single-photon detectors. In an effort to satisfy the cryptographic objective of key generation, a keyed protocol of entanglement-based key generation is experimentally studied in wavelength-division-multiplexing lines wherein classical optical signals co-exist with entangled photons. Telecom-band correlated photon-pair generation at 9.95 GHz is also demonstrated for the first time. Such high operation rate demonstrates the feasibility of future high speed quantum communications.

  5. High-dimensional quantum cryptography with twisted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Rodenburg, Brandon; Malik, Mehul; Lavery, Martin P. J.; Padgett, Miles J.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) systems often rely on polarization of light for encoding, thus limiting the amount of information that can be sent per photon and placing tight bounds on the error rates that such a system can tolerate. Here we describe a proof-of-principle experiment that indicates the feasibility of high-dimensional QKD based on the transverse structure of the light field allowing for the transfer of more than 1 bit per photon. Our implementation uses the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons and the corresponding mutually unbiased basis of angular position (ANG). Our experiment uses a digital micro-mirror device for the rapid generation of OAM and ANG modes at 4 kHz, and a mode sorter capable of sorting single photons based on their OAM and ANG content with a separation efficiency of 93%. Through the use of a seven-dimensional alphabet encoded in the OAM and ANG bases, we achieve a channel capacity of 2.05 bits per sifted photon. Our experiment demonstrates that, in addition to having an increased information capacity, multilevel QKD systems based on spatial-mode encoding can be more resilient against intercept-resend eavesdropping attacks.

  6. Topics in quantum cryptography, quantum error correction, and channel simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhicheng

    In this thesis, we mainly investigate four different topics: efficiently implementable codes for quantum key expansion [51], quantum error-correcting codes based on privacy amplification [48], private classical capacity of quantum channels [44], and classical channel simulation with quantum side information [49, 50]. For the first topic, we propose an efficiently implementable quantum key expansion protocol, capable of increasing the size of a pre-shared secret key by a constant factor. Previously, the Shor-Preskill proof [64] of the security of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) [6] quantum key distribution protocol relied on the theoretical existence of good classical error-correcting codes with the "dual-containing" property. But the explicit and efficiently decodable construction of such codes is unknown. We show that we can lift the dual-containing constraint by employing the non-dual-containing codes with excellent performance and efficient decoding algorithms. For the second topic, we propose a construction of Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) [19, 68] quantum error-correcting codes, which are originally based on pairs of mutually dual-containing classical codes, by combining a classical code with a two-universal hash function. We show, using the results of Renner and Koenig [57], that the communication rates of such codes approach the hashing bound on tensor powers of Pauli channels in the limit of large block-length. For the third topic, we prove a regularized formula for the secret key assisted capacity region of a quantum channel for transmitting private classical information. This result parallels the work of Devetak on entanglement assisted quantum communication capacity. This formula provides a new family protocol, the private father protocol, under the resource inequality framework that includes the private classical communication without the assisted secret keys as a child protocol. For the fourth topic, we study and solve the problem of classical channel

  7. Polaron master equation theory of pulse-driven phonon-assisted population inversion and single-photon emission from quantum-dot excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, Ross; Roy-Choudhury, Kaushik; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    We introduce an intuitive and semianalytical polaron master equation approach to model pulse-driven population inversion and emitted single photons from a quantum dot exciton. The master equation theory allows one to identify important phonon-induced scattering rates analytically and fully includes the role of the time-dependent pump field. As an application of the theory, we first study a quantum dot driven by a time-varying laser pulse on and off resonance, showing the population inversion caused by acoustic phonon emission in direct agreement with recent experiments of Quilter et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 137401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.137401]. We then model quantum dots in weakly coupled cavities and show the difference in population response between exciton-driven and cavity-driven systems. Finally, we assess the nonresonant phonon-assisted loading scheme with a quantum dot resonantly coupled to a cavity as a deterministic single-photon source. We also compare and contrast the important single photon figures of merit with direct Rabi oscillation of the population using a resonant π pulse, and show that the resonant scheme is much more efficient.

  8. Single-photon emission of InAs/InP quantum dashes at 1.55 μm and temperatures up to 80 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanowski, Ł.; Syperek, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Somers, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Sek, G.

    2016-04-01

    We report on single photon emission from a self-assembled InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dash emitting at 1.55 μm at the elevated temperatures. The photon auto-correlation histograms of the emission from a charged exciton indicate clear antibunching dips with as-measured g(2)(0) values significantly below 0.5 recorded at temperatures up to 80 K. It proves that the charged exciton complex in a single quantum dash of the mature InP-based material system can act as a true single photon source up to at least liquid nitrogen temperature. This demonstrates the huge potential of InAs on InP nanostructures as the non-classical light emitters for long-distance fiber-based secure communication technologies.

  9. Photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot single-photon detector based on resonant tunneling effect with near-infrared response

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; An, Z. H. E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Xiong, D. Y.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhang, B.; Chen, P. P.; Li, T. X.; Lu, W. E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn

    2014-07-21

    We present the photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot (QD) single-photon detector using a reset technique which eliminates the QD's “memory effect.” By applying a proper reset frequency and keeping the detector in linear-response region, the detector's responses to different monochromatic light are resolved which reflects different detection efficiencies. We find the reset photocurrent tails up to 1.3 μm wavelength and near-infrared (∼1100 nm) single-photon sensitivity is demonstrated due to interband transition of electrons in QDs, indicating the device a promising candidate both in quantum information applications and highly sensitive imaging applications operating in relative high temperatures (>80 K).

  10. Security proof of counterfactual quantum cryptography against general intercept-resend attacks and its vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Jian; Tang, Chao-Jing

    2012-06-01

    Counterfactual quantum cryptography, recently proposed by Noh, is featured with no transmission of signal particles. This exhibits evident security advantages, such as its immunity to the well-known photon-number-splitting attack. In this paper, the theoretical security of counterfactual quantum cryptography protocol against the general intercept-resend attacks is proved by bounding the information of an eavesdropper Eve more tightly than in Yin's proposal [Phys. Rev. A 82 042335 (2010)]. It is also shown that practical counterfactual quantum cryptography implementations may be vulnerable when equipped with imperfect apparatuses, by proving that a negative key rate can be achieved when Eve launches a time-shift attack based on imperfect detector efficiency.