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Sample records for single-spin optimal control

  1. Electrical control of single spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petta, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Over ten years ago, Daniel Loss and David DiVincenzo proposed using the spin of a single electron as a quantum bit. At the time of the proposal, it was not possible to trap a single electron in a device and measure its spin, let alone demonstrate control of quantum coherence. In this talk I will describe recent progress in the field, focusing on two new methods for single spin control that have been developed by my group at Princeton. The first method is based on quantum interference and implements spin-interferometry on a chip. The second method utilizes the strong spin-orbit coupling of InAs. By shifting the orbital position of the electronic wavefunction at gigahertz frequencies, we can control the orientation of a single electron spin and measure the full g-tensor, which exhibits a large anisotropy due to spin-orbit interactions. Both methods for single spin control are orders of magnitude faster than conventional electron spin resonance and allow investigations of single spin coherence in the presence of fluctuating nuclear and spin-orbit fields. I will also describe recent efforts to transfer these methods to silicon quantum dots, where the effects of fluctuating nuclear fields are much smaller.

  2. Heralded Control of Mechanical Motion by Single Spins.

    PubMed

    Rao, D D Bhaktavatsala; Momenzadeh, S Ali; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-12

    We propose a method to achieve a high degree of control of nanomechanical oscillators by coupling their mechanical motion to single spins. Manipulating the spin alone and measuring its quantum state heralds the cooling or squeezing of the oscillator even for weak spin-oscillator couplings. We analytically show that the asymptotic behavior of the oscillator is determined by a spin-induced thermal filter function whose overlap with the initial thermal distribution of the oscillator determines its cooling, heating, or squeezing. Counterintuitively, the rate of cooling dependence on the instantaneous thermal occupancy of the oscillator renders robust cooling or squeezing even for high initial temperatures and damping rates. We further estimate how the proposed scheme can be used to control the motion of a thin diamond cantilever by coupling it to its defect centers at low temperature. PMID:27563995

  3. Heralded Control of Mechanical Motion by Single Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Momenzadeh, S. Ali; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method to achieve a high degree of control of nanomechanical oscillators by coupling their mechanical motion to single spins. Manipulating the spin alone and measuring its quantum state heralds the cooling or squeezing of the oscillator even for weak spin-oscillator couplings. We analytically show that the asymptotic behavior of the oscillator is determined by a spin-induced thermal filter function whose overlap with the initial thermal distribution of the oscillator determines its cooling, heating, or squeezing. Counterintuitively, the rate of cooling dependence on the instantaneous thermal occupancy of the oscillator renders robust cooling or squeezing even for high initial temperatures and damping rates. We further estimate how the proposed scheme can be used to control the motion of a thin diamond cantilever by coupling it to its defect centers at low temperature.

  4. Quantum nanophotonics: Controlling a photon with a single spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waks, Edo

    The implementation of quantum network and distributive quantum computation replies on strong interactions between stationary matter qubits and flying photons. The spin of a single electron confined in a quantum dot is considered as a promising matter qubit as it possesses microsecond coherence time and allows picosecond timescale control using optical pulses. The quantum dot spin can also interact with a photon by controlling the optical response of a strongly coupled cavity. In this talk I will discuss our recent work on an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum phase switch using a single spin in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a photonic crystal cavity. We show large modulation of the cavity reflection spectrum by manipulating the spin states of the quantum dot, which enables us to control the quantum state of a reflected photon. We also show the complementary effect where the presence of a single photon switches the quantum state of the spin. The reported spin-photon quantum phase operation can switch spin or photon states in picoseconds timescale, representing an important step towards GHz semiconductor based quantum logic devices on-a-chip and solid-state implementations of quantum networks. Shuo Sun, Hyochul Kim, Glenn Solomon, co-authors.

  5. Quantum Optical Control of Single Spins in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yale, Christopher Gordon

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has garnered great interest over the past decade as its electronic spin shows promise as a quantum bit (qubit) and nanoscale sensor. Consisting of a substitutional nitrogen adjacent to a vacant site within the carbon lattice of diamond, this defect exhibits millisecond-long spin coherence times extending beyond room temperature, spin-dependent optical addressability, coupling to intrinsic and nearby nuclear spins, and it can be controlled and manipulated through electrical, magnetic, and optical means. In particular, at cryogenic temperatures (T < 25 K), the NV center's excited state becomes sharp and optically resolvable, providing a solid-state quantum optical testbed. In this thesis, I describe several experiments that explore this quantum optical interface to facilitate the development of a photonic network of single spins linked and controlled by light. We begin by exploring how electric fields tune the orbital levels within the NV center through the DC Stark effect, finding a surprising photo-induced field that aids in the ability to tune multiple NV centers' optical transitions to degeneracy. We then develop techniques to fully control the spin state of the NV center by coupling through a lambda system, an energy configuration consisting of two lower levels coupled to one of higher energy. When a lambda system is optically driven, the spin becomes trapped in a dark state, or the eigenstate of the system that is not coupled to the light fields through destructive interference, forming the basis for the various types of control demonstrated. We demonstrate arbitrary-basis initialization and readout of the spin state through coherent population trapping, as well as the ability to rotate about any arbitrary basis through stimulated Raman transitions. Combining these techniques, we measure the NV center's spin coherence through a completely optical measurement. We then extend these lambda system techniques to

  6. Quantum control and engineering of single spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyli, David M.

    The past two decades have seen intensive research efforts aimed at creating quantum technologies that leverage phenomena such as coherence and entanglement to achieve device functionalities surpassing those attainable with classical physics. While the range of applications for quantum devices is typically limited by their cryogenic operating temperatures, in recent years point defects in semiconductors have emerged as potential candidates for room temperature quantum technologies. In particular, the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has gained prominence for the ability to measure and control its spin under ambient conditions and for its potential applications in magnetic sensing. Here we describe experiments that probe the thermal limits to the measurement and control of single NV centers to identify the origin of the system's unique temperature dependence and that define novel thermal sensing applications for single spins. We demonstrate the optical measurement and coherent control of the spin at temperatures exceeding 600 K and show that its addressability is eventually limited by thermal quenching of the optical spin readout. These measurements provide important information for the electronic structure responsible for the optical spin initialization and readout processes and, moreover, suggest that the coherence of the NV center's spin states could be harnessed for thermometry applications. To that end, we develop novel quantum control techniques that selectively probe thermally induced shifts in the spin resonance frequencies while minimizing the defect's interactions with nearby nuclear spins. We use these techniques to extend the NV center's spin coherence for thermometry by 45-fold to achieve thermal sensitivities approaching 10 mK Hz-1/2 . We show the versatility of these techniques by performing measurements in a range of magnetic environments and at temperatures as high as 500 K. Together with diamond's ideal thermal, mechanical, and chemical

  7. Coherent control of single spins in a silicon carbide pn junction device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Widmann, Matthias; Booker, Ian; Niethammer, Matthias; Ohshima, Takeshi; Gali, Adam; Son, Nguyen T.; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Joerg

    Spins in single defects have been studied for quantum information science and quantum metrology. It has been proven that spins of the single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond can be used as a quantum bit, and a single spin sensor operating at ambient conditions. Recently, there has been a growing interest in a new material in which color centers similar to NV centers can be created and whose electrical properties can also be well controlled, thus existing electronic devices can easily be adapted as a platform for quantum applications. We recently reported that single spins of negatively charged silicon vacancies in SiC can be coherently controlled and long-lived at room temperature. As a next step, we isolated single silicon vacancies in a SiC pn junction device and investigated how the change in Fermi level, induced by applying bias, alters the charge state of silicon vacancies, thus affects the spin state control. This study will allow us to envision quantum applications based on single defects incorporated in modern electronic devices.

  8. Addressable single-spin control in multiple quantum dots coupled in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is promising building block of quantum computers for its controllability and potential scalability. Recent experiments on GaAs QDs have demonstrated necessary ingredients of universal quantum gate operations: single-spin rotations by electron spin resonance (ESR) which is virtually free from the effect of nuclear spin fluctuation, and pulsed control of two-spin entanglement. The scalability of this architecture, however, has remained to be demonstrated in the real world. In this talk, we will present our recent results on implementing single-spin-based qubits in triple, quadruple, and quintuple QDs based on a series coupled architecture defined by gate electrodes. Deterministic initialization of individual spin states and spin-state readout were performed by the pulse operation of detuning between two neighboring QDs. The spin state was coherently manipulated by ESR, where each spin in different QDs is addressed by the shift of the resonance frequency due to the inhomogeneous magnetic field induced by the micro magnet deposited on top of the QDs. Control of two-spin entanglement was also demonstrated. We will discuss key issues for implementing quantum algorithms based on three or more qubits, including the effect of a nuclear spin bath, single-shot readout fidelity, and tuning of multiple qubit devices. Our approaches to these issues will be also presented. This research is supported by Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST) from JSPS, IARPA project ``Multi-Qubit Coherent Operations'' through Copenhagen University, and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from JSPS.

  9. Coherent control of single spins in silicon carbide at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Rendler, Torsten; Son, Nguyen Tien; Fedder, Helmut; Paik, Seoyoung; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Sen; Booker, Ian; Denisenko, Andrej; Jamali, Mohammad; Momenzadeh, S Ali; Gerhardt, Ilja; Ohshima, Takeshi; Gali, Adam; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Spins in solids are cornerstone elements of quantum spintronics. Leading contenders such as defects in diamond or individual phosphorus dopants in silicon have shown spectacular progress, but either lack established nanotechnology or an efficient spin/photon interface. Silicon carbide (SiC) combines the strength of both systems: it has a large bandgap with deep defects and benefits from mature fabrication techniques. Here, we report the characterization of photoluminescence and optical spin polarization from single silicon vacancies in SiC, and demonstrate that single spins can be addressed at room temperature. We show coherent control of a single defect spin and find long spin coherence times under ambient conditions. Our study provides evidence that SiC is a promising system for atomic-scale spintronics and quantum technology. PMID:25437256

  10. Measurement and control of single spins in diamond above 600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyli, David M.

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond stands out among spin qubit systems in large part because its spin can be controlled under ambient conditions whereas most other solid state qubits operate only at cryogenic temperatures. However, despite the intense interest in the NV center's room temperature properties for nanoscale sensing and quantum information applications, the ultimate thermal limits to its measurement and control have been largely unknown. We demonstrate that the NV center's spin can be optically addressed and coherently controlled at temperatures exceeding 600 K and show that its addressability is eventually limited by thermal quenching of the optical spin readout. These measurements, in combination with computational studies, provide important information about the electronic states that facilitate the optical spin measurement and, moreover, suggest that the coherence of the NV center's spin states could be utilized for thermometry. We infer that single spins in diamond offer temperature sensitivities better than 100 mK/√{ Hz} up to 600 K using conventional sensing techniques and show that advanced measurement schemes provide a pathway to reach 10 mK/√{ Hz} sensitivities. Together with diamond's ideal thermal and mechanical properties, these results suggest that NV center thermometers could be applied in cellular thermometry and scanning thermal microscopy. This work was funded by AFOSR, ARO, and DARPA.

  11. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  12. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  13. Electrically controlling single-spin qubits in a continuous microwave field

    PubMed Central

    Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha T.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan P.; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E.; Veldhorst, Menno; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale quantum computers must be built upon quantum bits that are both highly coherent and locally controllable. We demonstrate the quantum control of the electron and the nuclear spin of a single 31P atom in silicon, using a continuous microwave magnetic field together with nanoscale electrostatic gates. The qubits are tuned into resonance with the microwave field by a local change in electric field, which induces a Stark shift of the qubit energies. This method, known as A-gate control, preserves the excellent coherence times and gate fidelities of isolated spins, and can be extended to arbitrarily many qubits without requiring multiple microwave sources. PMID:26601166

  14. Electrically controlling single-spin qubits in a continuous microwave field.

    PubMed

    Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha T; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A; Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan P; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E; Veldhorst, Menno; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Itoh, Kohei M; Jamieson, David N; McCallum, Jeffrey C; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale quantum computers must be built upon quantum bits that are both highly coherent and locally controllable. We demonstrate the quantum control of the electron and the nuclear spin of a single (31)P atom in silicon, using a continuous microwave magnetic field together with nanoscale electrostatic gates. The qubits are tuned into resonance with the microwave field by a local change in electric field, which induces a Stark shift of the qubit energies. This method, known as A-gate control, preserves the excellent coherence times and gate fidelities of isolated spins, and can be extended to arbitrarily many qubits without requiring multiple microwave sources. PMID:26601166

  15. Controlled rephasing of single spin-waves in a quantum memory based on cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Heinze, Georg; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Quantum Photonics With Solids; Atoms Team

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories for light allow a reversible transfer of quantum information between photons and long lived matter quantum bits. In atomic ensembles, this information is commonly stored in the form of single collective spin excitations (spin-waves). In this work we demonstrate that we can actively control the dephasing of the spin-waves created in a quantum memory based on a cold Rb87 atomic ensemble. The control is provided by an external magnetic field gradient, which induces an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic hyperfine levels. We show that acting on this gradient allows to control the dephasing of individual spin-waves and to induce later a rephasing. The spin-waves are then mapped into single photons, and we demonstrate experimentally that the active rephasing preserves the sub-Poissonian statistics of the retrieved photons. Finally we show that this rephasing control enables the creation and storage of multiple spin-waves in different temporal modes, which can be selectively readout. This is an important step towards the implementation of a functional temporally multiplexed quantum memory for quantum repeaters. We acknowledge support from the ERC starting grant, the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, the Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, and the International PhD- fellowship program ``la Caixa''-Severo Ochoa @ICFO.

  16. Single-spin CCD.

    PubMed

    Baart, T A; Shafiei, M; Fujita, T; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Vandersypen, L M K

    2016-04-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics relies on the ability to store, transport and manipulate electron spin polarization with great precision. In its ultimate limit, information is stored in the spin state of a single electron, at which point quantum information processing also becomes a possibility. Here, we demonstrate the manipulation, transport and readout of individual electron spins in a linear array of three semiconductor quantum dots. First, we demonstrate single-shot readout of three spins with fidelities of 97% on average, using an approach analogous to the operation of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Next, we perform site-selective control of the three spins, thereby writing the content of each pixel of this 'single-spin charge-coupled device'. Finally, we show that shuttling an electron back and forth in the array hundreds of times, covering a cumulative distance of 80 μm, has negligible influence on its spin projection. Extrapolating these results to the case of much larger arrays points at a diverse range of potential applications, from quantum information to imaging and sensing. PMID:26727201

  17. Single-spin CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, T. A.; Shafiei, M.; Fujita, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-04-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics relies on the ability to store, transport and manipulate electron spin polarization with great precision. In its ultimate limit, information is stored in the spin state of a single electron, at which point quantum information processing also becomes a possibility. Here, we demonstrate the manipulation, transport and readout of individual electron spins in a linear array of three semiconductor quantum dots. First, we demonstrate single-shot readout of three spins with fidelities of 97% on average, using an approach analogous to the operation of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Next, we perform site-selective control of the three spins, thereby writing the content of each pixel of this ‘single-spin charge-coupled device’. Finally, we show that shuttling an electron back and forth in the array hundreds of times, covering a cumulative distance of 80 μm, has negligible influence on its spin projection. Extrapolating these results to the case of much larger arrays points at a diverse range of potential applications, from quantum information to imaging and sensing.

  18. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  19. Optimizing the spin sensitivity of grain boundary junction nanoSQUIDs—towards detection of small spin systems with single-spin resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölbing, R.; Schwarz, T.; Müller, B.; Nagel, J.; Kemmler, M.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an optimization study of the spin sensitivity of nano superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on resistively shunted grain boundary Josephson junctions. In addition the direct current SQUIDs contain a narrow constriction onto which a small magnetic particle can be placed (with its magnetic moment in the plane of the SQUID loop and perpendicular to the grain boundary) for efficient coupling of its stray magnetic field to the SQUID loop. The separation of the location of optimum coupling from the junctions allows for an independent optimization of the coupling factor {{φ }μ } and junction properties. We present different methods for calculating {{φ }μ } (for a magnetic nanoparticle placed 10 nm above the constriction) as a function of device geometry and show that those yield consistent results. Furthermore, by numerical simulations we obtain a general expression for the dependence of the SQUID inductance on geometrical parameters of our devices, which allows to estimate their impact on the spectral density of flux noise {{S}Φ } of the SQUIDs in the thermal white noise regime. Our analysis of the dependence of {{S}Φ } and {{φ }μ } on the geometric parameters of the SQUID layout yields a spin sensitivity Sμ 1/2=SΦ 1/2/{{φ }μ } of a few {{μ }B} H{{z}-1/2} ({{μ }B} is the Bohr magneton) for optimized parameters, respecting technological constraints. However, by comparison with experimentally realized devices we find significantly larger values for the measured white flux noise, as compared to our theoretical predictions. Still, a spin sensitivity on the order of 10 {{μ }B} H{{z}-1/2} for optimized devices seems to be realistic.

  20. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  1. Optimal control computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solution of the optimal control problem, even with low order dynamical systems, can usually strain the analytical ability of most engineers. The understanding of this subject matter, therefore, would be greatly enhanced if a software package existed that could simulate simple generic problems. Surprisingly, despite a great abundance of commercially available control software, few, if any, address the part of optimal control in its most generic form. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to present a simple computer program that will perform simulations of optimal control problems that arise from the first necessary condition and the Pontryagin's maximum principle.

  2. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  3. Fuzzy logic controller optimization

    DOEpatents

    Sepe, Jr., Raymond B; Miller, John Michael

    2004-03-23

    A method is provided for optimizing a rotating induction machine system fuzzy logic controller. The fuzzy logic controller has at least one input and at least one output. Each input accepts a machine system operating parameter. Each output produces at least one machine system control parameter. The fuzzy logic controller generates each output based on at least one input and on fuzzy logic decision parameters. Optimization begins by obtaining a set of data relating each control parameter to at least one operating parameter for each machine operating region. A model is constructed for each machine operating region based on the machine operating region data obtained. The fuzzy logic controller is simulated with at least one created model in a feedback loop from a fuzzy logic output to a fuzzy logic input. Fuzzy logic decision parameters are optimized based on the simulation.

  4. Single-Spin Asymmetries at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harutyun

    2003-05-01

    Single spin asymmetries (SSA) are crucial tools in the study of the spin structure of hadrons in pion electroproduction, since they are directly related to some hot topics,including transverse polarization distribution functions, fragmentation of polarized quarks and generalized parton distribution functions. At low beam energies, when the virtual photon has a relatively large angle with respect to the initial spin direction, the measured single-target spin-dependent sin φ moment in the cross section for the longitudinally polarized target contain contributions from the target spin components, both longitudinal and transverse with respect to the photon direction.This contribution presents preliminary results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam and target SSA in pion azimuthal distributions in one particle inclusive electroproduction in the DIS regime (Q2 > 1GeV 2,W > 2GeV ) off a polarized NH3 target.

  5. Single Spin Asymmetry in Charmonium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rohini M.; Kaushik, Abhiram; Misra, Anuradha; Rawoot, Vaibhav

    2015-09-01

    We present estimates of single spin asymmetry (SSA) in the electroproduction of taking into account the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution of the gluon Sivers function and using Color Evaporation Model of charmonium production. We estimate SSA for JLab, HERMES, COMPASS and eRHIC energies using recent parameters for the quark Sivers functions which are fitted using an evolution kernel in which the perturbative part is resummed up to next-to-leading logarithms accuracy. We find that these SSAs are much smaller as compared to our first estimates obtained using DGLAP evolution but are comparable to our estimates obtained using TMD evolution where we had used approximate analytical solution of the TMD evolution equation for the purpose.

  6. Timing optimization control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.; Leung, C.; Schira, J.J.

    1983-03-01

    A closed loop timing optimization control for an internal combustion engine closed about the instantaneous rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft is disclosed herein. The optimization control computes from the instantaneous rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft, a signal indicative of the angle at which the crankshaft has a maximum rotational velocity for the torque impulses imparted to the engine's crankshaft by the burning of an air/fuel mixture in each of the engine's combustion chambers and generates a timing correction signal for each of the engine's combustion chambers. The timing correction signals, applied to the engine timing control, modifies the time at which the ignition signal, injection signals or both are generated such that the rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft has a maximum value at a predetermined angle for each torque impulse generated optimizing the conversion of the combustion energy to rotational torque.

  7. Concept for room temperature single-spin tunneling force microscopy with atomic spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Adam

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy (AFM) system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated defect states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  8. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  9. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on themore » universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.« less

  10. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.

  11. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  12. Metacognitive Control and Optimal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Lisa K.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    The notion of optimality is often invoked informally in the literature on metacognitive control. We provide a precise formulation of the optimization problem and show that optimal time allocation strategies depend critically on certain characteristics of the learning environment, such as the extent of time pressure, and the nature of the uptake…

  13. Unvail the Mysterious of the Single Spin Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2010-01-05

    Single transverse-spin asymmetry in high energy hadronic reaction has been greatly investigated from both experiment and theory sides in the last few years. In this talk, I will summarize some recent theoretical developments, which, in my opinion, help to unvail the mysterious of the single spin asymmetry.

  14. Supercomputer optimizations for stochastic optimal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Siu-Leung; Hanson, Floyd B.; Xu, Huihuang

    1991-01-01

    Supercomputer optimizations for a computational method of solving stochastic, multibody, dynamic programming problems are presented. The computational method is valid for a general class of optimal control problems that are nonlinear, multibody dynamical systems, perturbed by general Markov noise in continuous time, i.e., nonsmooth Gaussian as well as jump Poisson random white noise. Optimization techniques for vector multiprocessors or vectorizing supercomputers include advanced data structures, loop restructuring, loop collapsing, blocking, and compiler directives. These advanced computing techniques and superconducting hardware help alleviate Bellman's curse of dimensionality in dynamic programming computations, by permitting the solution of large multibody problems. Possible applications include lumped flight dynamics models for uncertain environments, such as large scale and background random aerospace fluctuations.

  15. Fuel consumption in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, Jim; Silverberg, Larry

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for comparing three optimal control strategies based on fuel consumption. A general cost function minimization procedure was developed by applying two theorems associated with convex sets. Three cost functions associated with control saturation, pseudofuel, and absolute fuel are introduced and minimized. The first two cost functions led to the bang-bang and continuous control strategies, and the minimization of absolute fuel led to an impulsive strategy. The three control strategies were implemented on two elementary systems and a comparison of fuel consumption was made. The impulse control strategy consumes significantly less fuel than the continuous and bang-bang control strategies. This comparison suggests a potential for fuel savings in higher-order systems using impulsive control strategies. However, since exact solutions to fuel-optimal control for large-order systems are difficult if not impossible to achieve, the alternative is to develop near-optimal control strategies.

  16. Single spin optically detected magnetic resonance with 60-90 GHz (E-band) microwave resonators.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Stöhr, Rainer; Neumann, Philipp; Scheffler, Marc; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance with ensembles of electron spins is commonly performed around 10 GHz, but also at frequencies above 240 GHz and in corresponding magnetic fields of over 9 T. However, experiments with single electron and nuclear spins so far only reach into frequency ranges of several 10 GHz, where existing coplanar waveguide structures for microwave (MW) delivery are compatible with single spin readout techniques (e.g., electrical or optical readout). Here, we explore the frequency range up to 90 GHz, with magnetic fields of up to ≈3 T for single spin magnetic resonance in conjunction with optical spin readout. To this end, we develop MW resonators with optical single spin access. In our case, rectangular 60-90 GHz (E-band) waveguides guarantee low-loss supply of microwaves to the resonators. Three dimensional cavities, as well as coplanar waveguide resonators, enhance MW fields by spatial and spectral confinement with a MW efficiency of 1.36 mT/√W. We utilize single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers as hosts for optically accessible spins and show that their properties regarding optical spin readout known from smaller fields (<0.65 T) are retained up to fields of 3 T. In addition, we demonstrate coherent control of single nuclear spins under these conditions. Furthermore, our results extend the applicable magnetic field range of a single spin magnetic field sensor. Regarding spin based quantum registers, high fields lead to a purer product basis of electron and nuclear spins, which promises improved spin lifetimes. For example, during continuous single-shot readout, the (14)N nuclear spin shows second-long longitudinal relaxation times. PMID:26133855

  17. Optimal control for electron shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Greenman, Loren; Deng, Xiaotian; Hayes, Ian M.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we apply an optimal control technique to derive control fields that transfer an electron between ends of a chain of donors or quantum dots. We formulate the transfer as an optimal steering problem, and then derive the dynamics of the optimal control. A numerical algorithm is developed to effectively generate control pulses. We apply this technique to transfer an electron between sites of a triple quantum dot and an ionized chain of phosphorus dopants in silicon. Using the optimal pulses for the spatial shuttling of phosphorus dopants, we then add hyperfine interactions to the Hamiltonian and show that a 500 G magnetic field will transfer the electron spatially as well as transferring the spin components of two of the four hyperfine states of the electron-nuclear spin pair.

  18. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhaïl; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10−3 degrees due to poor spin–photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin–photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by ±6° when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  19. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhaïl; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10(-3) degrees due to poor spin-photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin-photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by ± 6° when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  20. Optimal control of motorsport differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremlett, A. J.; Massaro, M.; Purdy, D. J.; Velenis, E.; Assadian, F.; Moore, A. P.; Halley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modern motorsport limited slip differentials (LSD) have evolved to become highly adjustable, allowing the torque bias that they generate to be tuned in the corner entry, apex and corner exit phases of typical on-track manoeuvres. The task of finding the optimal torque bias profile under such varied vehicle conditions is complex. This paper presents a nonlinear optimal control method which is used to find the minimum time optimal torque bias profile through a lane change manoeuvre. The results are compared to traditional open and fully locked differential strategies, in addition to considering related vehicle stability and agility metrics. An investigation into how the optimal torque bias profile changes with reduced track-tyre friction is also included in the analysis. The optimal LSD profile was shown to give a performance gain over its locked differential counterpart in key areas of the manoeuvre where a quick direction change is required. The methodology proposed can be used to find both optimal passive LSD characteristics and as the basis of a semi-active LSD control algorithm.

  1. Optimal control of native predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; O'Connell, Allan F.; Kendall, William L.; Runge, Michael C.; Simons, Theodore R.; Waldstein, Arielle H.; Schulte, Shiloh A.; Converse, Sarah J.; Smith, Graham W.; Pinion, Timothy; Rikard, Michael; Zipkin, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply decision theory in a structured decision-making framework to evaluate how control of raccoons (Procyon lotor), a native predator, can promote the conservation of a declining population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Our management objective was to maintain Oystercatcher productivity above a level deemed necessary for population recovery while minimizing raccoon removal. We evaluated several scenarios including no raccoon removal, and applied an adaptive optimization algorithm to account for parameter uncertainty. We show how adaptive optimization can be used to account for uncertainties about how raccoon control may affect Oystercatcher productivity. Adaptive management can reduce this type of uncertainty and is particularly well suited for addressing controversial management issues such as native predator control. The case study also offers several insights that may be relevant to the optimal control of other native predators. First, we found that stage-specific removal policies (e.g., yearling versus adult raccoon removals) were most efficient if the reproductive values among stage classes were very different. Second, we found that the optimal control of raccoons would result in higher Oystercatcher productivity than the minimum levels recommended for this species. Third, we found that removing more raccoons initially minimized the total number of removals necessary to meet long term management objectives. Finally, if for logistical reasons managers cannot sustain a removal program by removing a minimum number of raccoons annually, managers may run the risk of creating an ecological trap for Oystercatchers.

  2. Single-Spin Asymmetries and Transversity in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon exchange, normally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, as well as nuclear shadowing and antishadowing-leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. The physics of such processes thus require the understanding of QCD at the amplitude level; in particular, the physics of spin requires an understanding of the phase structure of final-state and initial-state interactions, as well as the structure of the basic wavefunctions of hadrons themselves. I also discuss transversity in exclusive channels, including how one can use single-spin asymmetries to determine the relative phases of the timelike baryon form factors, as well as the anomalous physics of the normal-normal spin-spin correlation observed in large-angle proton-proton elastic scattering. As an illustration of the utility of light-front wavefunctions, the transversity distribution of a single electron is computed, as defined from its two-particle QED quantum fluctuations.

  3. Unifying process control and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    2005-09-01

    About 40% of US generation is now subject to wholesale competition. To intelligently bid into these new markets, real-time prices must be aligned with real-time costs. It is time to integrate the many advanced applications, sensors, and analyzers used for control, automation, and optimization into a system that reflects process and financial objectives. The paper reports several demonstration projects in the USA revealing what is being done in the area of advanced process optimization (by Alliant Energy, American Electric Power, PacifiCorp, Detroit Edison and Tennessee Valley Authority). In addition to these projects US DOE's NETL has funded the plant environment and cost optimization system, PECOS which combines physical models, neural networks and fuzzy logic control to provide operators with least cost setpoints for controllable variables. At Dynegy Inc's Baldwin station in Illinois the DOE is subsidizing a project where real time, closed-loop IT systems will optimize combustion, soot-blowing and SCR performance as well as unit thermal performance and plant economic performance. Commercial products such as Babcock and Wilcox's Flame Doctor, continuous emissions monitoring systems and various real-time predictive monitoring systems are also available. 4 figs.

  4. Optimal woofer tweeter control demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, B.; El Hadi, K.; NDiaye, M.; Gray, M.

    2011-09-01

    Large aperture telescope adaptive optics incorporates several deformable and active mirrors. Several options have been proposed for several DM adaptive optics systems. We study an optimal control approach for these woofer tweeter systems based on a Kalman filtering method. This approach allows to share out the spatial energy of correction between the mirrors and to deal with different temporal response time. The approach is presented and a validation of the control method is carried out in a numerical simulation. We finally present the experimental validation of such control solutions for woofer-tweeter systems. The validation bench and the optical components are presented and the first experimental results are shown.

  5. Optimal control of hydroelectric facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangzhi

    This thesis considers a simple yet realistic model of pump-assisted hydroelectric facilities operating in a market with time-varying but deterministic power prices. Both deterministic and stochastic water inflows are considered. The fluid mechanical and engineering details of the facility are described by a model containing several parameters. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for optimizing either the total energy produced or the total cash generated by these plants. The algorithm allows us to give the optimal control strategy as a function of time and to see how this strategy, and the associated plant value, varies with water inflow and electricity price. We investigate various cases. For a single pumped storage facility experiencing deterministic power prices and water inflows, we investigate the varying behaviour for an oversimplified constant turbine- and pump-efficiency model with simple reservoir geometries. We then generalize this simple model to include more realistic turbine efficiencies, situations with more complicated reservoir geometry, and the introduction of dissipative switching costs between various control states. We find many results which reinforce our physical intuition about this complicated system as well as results which initially challenge, though later deepen, this intuition. One major lesson of this work is that the optimal control strategy does not differ much between two differing objectives of maximizing energy production and maximizing its cash value. We then turn our attention to the case of stochastic water inflows. We present a stochastic dynamic programming algorithm which can find an on-average optimal control in the face of this randomness. As the operator of a facility must be more cautious when inflows are random, the randomness destroys facility value. Following this insight we quantify exactly how much a perfect hydrological inflow forecast would be worth to a dam operator. In our final chapter we discuss the

  6. Combined control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Milman, M.; Bruno, R.; Scheid, R.; Gibson, S.

    1989-01-01

    An approach for combined control-structure optimization keyed to enhancing early design trade-offs is outlined and illustrated by numerical examples. The approach employs a homotopic strategy and appears to be effective for generating families of designs that can be used in these early trade studies. Analytical results were obtained for classes of structure/control objectives with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) costs. For these, researchers demonstrated that global optima can be computed for small values of the homotopy parameter. Conditions for local optima along the homotopy path were also given. Details of two numerical examples employing the LQR control cost were given showing variations of the optimal design variables along the homotopy path. The results of the second example suggest that introducing a second homotopy parameter relating the two parts of the control index in the LQG/LQR formulation might serve to enlarge the family of Pareto optima, but its effect on modifying the optimal structural shapes may be analogous to the original parameter lambda.

  7. Optimal control and Galois theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zelikin, M I; Kiselev, D D; Lokutsievskiy, L V

    2013-11-30

    An important role is played in the solution of a class of optimal control problems by a certain special polynomial of degree 2(n−1) with integer coefficients. The linear independence of a family of k roots of this polynomial over the field Q implies the existence of a solution of the original problem with optimal control in the form of an irrational winding of a k-dimensional Clifford torus, which is passed in finite time. In the paper, we prove that for n≤15 one can take an arbitrary positive integer not exceeding [n/2] for k. The apparatus developed in the paper is applied to the systems of Chebyshev-Hermite polynomials and generalized Chebyshev-Laguerre polynomials. It is proved that for such polynomials of degree 2m every subsystem of [(m+1)/2] roots with pairwise distinct squares is linearly independent over the field Q. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  8. Optimal control in a macroeconomic problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, V. K.; Shatov, G. L.

    2007-08-01

    The Pontryagin maximum principle is used to develop an original algorithm for finding an optimal control in a macroeconomic problem. Numerical results are presented for the optimal control and optimal trajectory of the development of a regional economic system. For an optimal control satisfying a certain constraint, an invariant of a macroeconomic system is derived.

  9. Nanoscale imaging of paramagnetic spin labels using a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Myers, Bryan; Pelliccione, Matthew; Jayich, Ania

    Spin-labeling molecules with paramagnetic species is a powerful technique for probing molecular structure. However, current techniques are ensemble measurements, inherently lacking the sensitivity to detect a single spin or the conformational properties of a single biomolecule. In this talk, we demonstrate an imaging technique that has the promise of single-spin imaging and ultimately molecular structure imaging. We present two-dimensional nanoscale imaging of a monolayer of gadolinium (Gd) atomic spin labels at ambient conditions. The sensing element is a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. A patterned monolayer of Gd atoms self-assembled on a Si atomic force microscopy tip is controllably interacted with and detected by the NV center. The fluctuating magnetic field generated by GHz-scale Gd spin flips relaxes the NV center in a manner that depends strongly on the Gd-NV separation. Using this technique, we demonstrate a Gd-induced reduction of the T1 relaxation time of the NV center with nm spatial resolution. Our results indicate that nanometer-scale imaging of individual electronic spins at ambient conditions is within reach. This will ultimately enable the study of structural and functional studies of single biomolecules in their native, folded state.

  10. Calculation of TMD Evolution for Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mert Aybat, Ted Rogers, Alexey Prokudin

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we show that it is necessary to include the full treatment of QCD evolution of Transverse Momentum Dependent parton densities to explain discrepancies between HERMES data and recent COMPASS data on a proton target for the Sivers transverse single spin asymmetry in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS). Calculations based on existing fits to TMDs in SIDIS, and including evolution within the Collins-Soper-Sterman with properly defined TMD PDFs are shown to provide a good explanation for the discrepancy. The non-perturbative input needed for the implementation of evolution is taken from earlier analyses of unpolarized Drell-Yan (DY) scattering at high energy. Its success in describing the Sivers function in SIDIS data at much lower energies is strong evidence in support of the unifying aspect of the QCD TMD-factorization formalism.

  11. Global fitting of single spin asymmetry: an attempt

    SciTech Connect

    Alexey Prokudin,Zhong-Bo Kang

    2012-04-01

    We present an attempt of global analysis of Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) $\\ell p^\\uparrow \\to \\ell' \\pi X$ data on single spin asymmetries and data on left-right asymmetry $A_N$ in $p^\\uparrow p \\to \\pi X$ in order to simultaneously extract information on Sivers function and twist-three quark-gluon Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman (ETQS) function. We explore different possibilities such as node of Sivers function in $x$ or $k_\\perp$ in order to explain ``sign mismatch'' between these functions. We show that $\\pi^\\pm$ SIDIS data and $\\pi^0$ STAR data can be well described in a combined TMD and twist-3 fit, however $\\pi^\\pm$ BRAHMS data are not described in a satisfactory way. This leaves open a question to the solution of the ``sign mismatch''. Possible explanations are then discussed.

  12. Optimal control of overdamped systems.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; DeWeese, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Nonequilibrium physics encompasses a broad range of natural and synthetic small-scale systems. Optimizing transitions of such systems will be crucial for the development of nanoscale technologies and may reveal the physical principles underlying biological processes at the molecular level. Recent work has demonstrated that when a thermodynamic system is driven away from equilibrium then the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized inverse diffusion tensor. We derive a simple, compact expression for the inverse diffusion tensor that depends solely on equilibrium information for a broad class of potentials. We use this formula to compute the minimal dissipation for two model systems relevant to small-scale information processing and biological molecular motors. In the first model, we optimally erase a single classical bit of information modeled by an overdamped particle in a smooth double-well potential. In the second model, we find the minimal dissipation of a simple molecular motor model coupled to an optical trap. In both models, we find that the minimal dissipation for the optimal protocol of duration τ is proportional to 1/τ, as expected, though the dissipation for the erasure model takes a different form than what we found previously for a similar system. PMID:26465436

  13. HCCI Engine Optimization and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Rolf D. Reitz

    2005-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

  14. Adaptive, predictive controller for optimal process control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.K.; Baum, C.C.; Bowling, P.S.; Buescher, K.L.; Hanagandi, V.M.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Jones, R.D.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    One can derive a model for use in a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) from first principles or from experimental data. Until recently, both methods failed for all but the simplest processes. First principles are almost always incomplete and fitting to experimental data fails for dimensions greater than one as well as for non-linear cases. Several authors have suggested the use of a neural network to fit the experimental data to a multi-dimensional and/or non-linear model. Most networks, however, use simple sigmoid functions and backpropagation for fitting. Training of these networks generally requires large amounts of data and, consequently, very long training times. In 1993 we reported on the tuning and optimization of a negative ion source using a special neural network[2]. One of the properties of this network (CNLSnet), a modified radial basis function network, is that it is able to fit data with few basis functions. Another is that its training is linear resulting in guaranteed convergence and rapid training. We found the training to be rapid enough to support real-time control. This work has been extended to incorporate this network into an MPC using the model built by the network for predictive control. This controller has shown some remarkable capabilities in such non-linear applications as continuous stirred exothermic tank reactors and high-purity fractional distillation columns[3]. The controller is able not only to build an appropriate model from operating data but also to thin the network continuously so that the model adapts to changing plant conditions. The controller is discussed as well as its possible use in various of the difficult control problems that face this community.

  15. Global fitting of single spin asymmetry: An attempt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Prokudin, Alexei

    2012-04-01

    We present an attempt of global analysis of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering ℓp↑→ℓ'πX data on single spin asymmetries and data on left-right asymmetry AN in p↑p→πX in order to simultaneously extract information on the Sivers function and the twist-three quark-gluon Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman function. We explore different possibilities such as the node of the Sivers function in x or k⊥ in order to explain “sign mismatch” between these functions. We show that π± semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering data and π0 STAR data can be well described in a combined fit based on both the transverse momentum dependent and collinear twist-three factorization formalisms; however, π± BRAHMS data are not described in a satisfactory way. This leaves the question open of a solution to the “sign mismatch.” Possible explanations are then discussed.

  16. Single-spin precessing gravitational waveform in closed form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Andrew; O'Shaughnessy, R.

    2014-02-01

    In coming years, gravitational-wave detectors should find black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries, potentially coincident with astronomical phenomena like short gamma ray bursts. These binaries are expected to precess. Gravitational-wave science requires a tractable model for precessing binaries, to disentangle precession physics from other phenomena like modified strong field gravity, tidal deformability, or Hubble flow; and to measure compact object masses, spins, and alignments. Moreover, current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries use templates where the binary does not precess and are ill-suited for detection of generic precessing sources. In this paper we provide a closed-form representation of the single-spin precessing waveform in the frequency domain by reorganizing the signal as a sum over harmonics, each of which resembles a nonprecessing waveform. This form enables simple analytic calculations of the Fisher matrix for use in template bank generation and coincidence metrics, and jump proposals to improve the efficiency of Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. We have verified that for generic BH-NS binaries, our model agrees with the time-domain waveform to 2%. Straightforward extensions of the derivations outlined here (and provided in full online) allow higher accuracy and error estimates.

  17. Experimental Study of Single Spin Asymmetries and TMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Single Spin Asymmetries and Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) distribution study has been one of the main focuses of hadron physics in recent years. The initial exploratory Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (SIDIS) experiments with transversely polarized proton and deuteron targets from HERMES and COMPASS attracted great attention and lead to very active efforts in both experiments and theory. A SIDIS experiment on the neutron with a polarized 3He target was performed at JLab. Recently published results as well as new preliminary results are shown. Precision TMD experiments are planned at JLab after the 12 GeV energy upgrade. Three approved experiments with a new SoLID spectrometer on both the proton and neutron will provide high precision TMD data in the valence quark region. In the long-term future, an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) as proposed in US (MEIC@JLab and E-RHIC@BNL) will provide precision TMD data of the gluons and the sea. A new opportunity just emerged in China that a low-energy EIC (1st stage EIC@HIAF) may provide precision TMD data in the sea quark region, complementary to the proposed EIC in US.

  18. Optimal control of sun tracking solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. O.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the modern control theory to derive an optimal sun tracking control for a point focusing solar concentrator is presented. A standard tracking problem converted to regulator problem using a sun rate input achieves an almost zero steady state tracking error with the optimal control formulation. However, these control techniques are costly because optimal type algorithms require large computing systems, thus they will be used mainly as comparison standards for other types of control algorithms and help in their development.

  19. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkowitz, S.; Safira, A.; High, A. A.; Devlin, R. C.; Choi, S.; Unterreithmeier, Q. P.; Patterson, D.; Zibrov, A. S.; Manucharyan, V. E.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm’s law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems.

  20. Fuzzy logic control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng

    2012-04-17

    A control system (300) for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input signal (369) and an output for outputting an output signal (367), and a hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) operably connected to the chemical loop. The hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) includes a plurality of fuzzy controllers (330). The hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) receives the output signal (367), optimizes the input signal (369) based on the received output signal (367), and outputs an optimized input signal (369) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  1. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  2. Optimal singular control with applications to trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the problem of singular control is presented. Singular control enters an optimal trajectory when the so called switching function vanishes identically over a finite time interval. Using the concept of domain of maneuverability, the problem of optical switching is analyzed. Criteria for the optimal direction of switching are presented. The switching, or junction, between nonsingular and singular subarcs is examined in detail. Several theorems concerning the necessary, and also sufficient conditions for smooth junction are presented. The concepts of quasi-linear control and linearized control are introduced. They are designed for the purpose of obtaining approximate solution for the difficult Euler-Lagrange type of optimal control in the case where the control is nonlinear.

  3. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    PubMed Central

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights. PMID:27067020

  4. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control.

    PubMed

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights. PMID:27067020

  5. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  6. Mixed-Strategy Chance Constrained Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel chance constrained optimal control (CCOC) algorithm that chooses a control action probabilistically. A CCOC problem is to find a control input that minimizes the expected cost while guaranteeing that the probability of violating a set of constraints is below a user-specified threshold. We show that a probabilistic control approach, which we refer to as a mixed control strategy, enables us to obtain a cost that is better than what deterministic control strategies can achieve when the CCOC problem is nonconvex. The resulting mixed-strategy CCOC problem turns out to be a convexification of the original nonconvex CCOC problem. Furthermore, we also show that a mixed control strategy only needs to "mix" up to two deterministic control actions in order to achieve optimality. Building upon an iterative dual optimization, the proposed algorithm quickly converges to the optimal mixed control strategy with a user-specified tolerance.

  7. Optimal management strategies in variable environments: Stochastic optimal control methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic optimization was used to investigate the optimal defoliation of salt desert shrubs in north-western Utah. Management was formulated in the context of optimal stochastic control theory, with objective functions composed of discounted or time-averaged biomass yields. Climatic variability and community patterns of salt desert shrublands make the application of stochastic optimal control both feasible and necessary. A primary production model was used to simulate shrub responses and harvest yields under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The simulation results then were used in an optimization model to determine optimal defoliation strategies. The latter model encodes an algorithm for finite state, finite action, infinite discrete time horizon Markov decision processes. Three questions were addressed: (i) What effect do changes in weather patterns have on optimal management strategies? (ii) What effect does the discounting of future returns have? (iii) How do the optimal strategies perform relative to certain fixed defoliation strategies? An analysis was performed for the three shrub species, winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). In general, the results indicate substantial differences among species in optimal control strategies, which are associated with differences in physiological and morphological characteristics. Optimal policies for big sagebrush varied less with variation in climate, reserve levels and discount rates than did either shadscale or winterfat. This was attributed primarily to the overwintering of photosynthetically active tissue and to metabolic activity early in the growing season. Optimal defoliation of shadscale and winterfat generally was more responsive to differences in plant vigor and climate, reflecting the sensitivity of these species to utilization and replenishment of carbohydrate reserves. Similarities could be seen in the influence of both

  8. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  9. Training Schrödinger's cat: quantum optimal control. Strategic report on current status, visions and goals for research in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Steffen J.; Boscain, Ugo; Calarco, Tommaso; Koch, Christiane P.; Köckenberger, Walter; Kosloff, Ronnie; Kuprov, Ilya; Luy, Burkhard; Schirmer, Sophie; Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Sugny, Dominique; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2015-12-01

    It is control that turns scientific knowledge into useful technology: in physics and engineering it provides a systematic way for driving a dynamical system from a given initial state into a desired target state with minimized expenditure of energy and resources. As one of the cornerstones for enabling quantum technologies, optimal quantum control keeps evolving and expanding into areas as diverse as quantum-enhanced sensing, manipulation of single spins, photons, or atoms, optical spectroscopy, photochemistry, magnetic resonance (spectroscopy as well as medical imaging), quantum information processing and quantum simulation. In this communication, state-of-the-art quantum control techniques are reviewed and put into perspective by a consortium of experts in optimal control theory and applications to spectroscopy, imaging, as well as quantum dynamics of closed and open systems. We address key challenges and sketch a roadmap for future developments.

  10. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  12. Role of controllability in optimizing quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Rebing; Hsieh, Michael A.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-06-15

    This paper reveals an important role that controllability plays in the complexity of optimizing quantum control dynamics. We show that the loss of controllability generally leads to multiple locally suboptimal controls when gate fidelity in a quantum control system is maximized, which does not happen if the system is controllable. Such local suboptimal controls may attract an optimization algorithm into a local trap when a global optimal solution is sought, even if the target gate can be perfectly realized. This conclusion results from an analysis of the critical topology of the corresponding quantum control landscape, which refers to the gate fidelity objective as a functional of the control fields. For uncontrollable systems, due to SU(2) and SU(3) dynamical symmetries, the control landscape corresponding to an implementable target gate is proven to possess multiple locally optimal critical points, and its ruggedness can be further increased if the target gate is not realizable. These results imply that the optimization of quantum dynamics can be seriously impeded when operating with local search algorithms under these conditions, and thus full controllability is demanded.

  13. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  14. Direct Optimal Control of Duffing Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Ramsey, John K.

    2002-01-01

    The "direct control method" is a novel concept that is an attractive alternative and competitor to the differential-equation-based methods. The direct method is equally well applicable to nonlinear, linear, time-varying, and time-invariant systems. For all such systems, the method yields explicit closed-form control laws based on minimization of a quadratic control performance measure. We present an application of the direct method to the dynamics and optimal control of the Duffing system where the control performance measure is not restricted to a quadratic form and hence may include a quartic energy term. The results we present in this report also constitute further generalizations of our earlier work in "direct optimal control methodology." The approach is demonstrated for the optimal control of the Duffing equation with a softening nonlinear stiffness.

  15. An intellignet controller for optimized sootblowing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldridge, D.; Bangham, M.; Gratcheva, K.

    1996-05-01

    Efficiency losses of over 200 Btu/KWH have been attributed to sub-optimal control of sootblowers in coal-fired boilers, frequently accounting for over 80% of the controllable losses. For a 500 MW power plant, this translates into yearly costs of over $1 M. The primary impediment to sootblowing optimization to date has been the difficulty associated with modeling the relationship between sootblowing, and boiler efficiency. New advances in neural network technology now provide an attractive approach to address this issue. This paper presents results to date of a project currently under way at DHR Technologies, Inc. (DHR), George Washington University (GWU), and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE), with funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE), to develop an Intelligent Controller for Optimized Sootblowing (ICOS). The ICOS system combines a neural network-based process model with an optimization algorithm to provide automated, optimized control of steam or compressed air sootblowers for fossil utility boilers. In Phase I of the project, the proposed optimization approach was tested and validated using data from BGE`s Brandon Shores Station. Phase I quantified the expected savings of the controller and verified the effectiveness of the proposed technical approach. In Phase II, the control algorithm will be incorporated into DHR`s TOPAZ{trademark} optimization system and interfaced with Brandon Shore`s Diamond Power sootblowing controller, and will be demonstrated and tested for closed-loop, optimal sootblowing control. The savings achieved through use of the ICOS controller during testing will also be quantified.

  16. Optimal torque control for SCOLE slewing maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Li, Feiyue

    1987-01-01

    The Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) was slewed from one attitude to the required attitude and an integral performance index which involves the control torques was minimized. Kinematic and dynamical equations, optimal control, two-point boundary-value problems, and estimation of unknown boundary conditions are presented.

  17. Optimal controller design for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun

    2005-03-01

    The virtual passive control technique has recently been applied to structural damage detection, where the virtual passive controller only uses the existing control devices, and no additional physical elements are attached to the tested structure. One important task is to design passive controllers that can enhance the sensitivity of the identified parameters, such as natural frequencies, to structural damage. This paper presents a novel study of an optimal controller design for structural damage detection. We apply not only passive controllers but also low-order and fixed-structure controllers, such as PID controllers. In the optimal control design, the performance of structural damage detection is based on the application of a neural network technique, which uses the pattern of the correlation between the natural frequency changes of the tested system and the damaged system.

  18. Modal insensitivity with optimality. [in feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Raman, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a constant gain, feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. Both full state and output feedback control are considered. A constraint is established for the feedback gain matrix that results in modal insensitivity, and necessary conditions for optimality subject to this constraint are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  19. Optimal control techniques for active noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Keeling, S. L.; Silcox, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Active suppression of noise in a bounded enclosure is considered within the framework of optimal control theory. A sinusoidal pressure field due to exterior offending noise sources is assumed to be known in a neighborhood of interior sensors. The pressure field due to interior controlling sources is assumed to be governed by a nonhomogeneous wave equation within the enclosure and by a special boundary condition designed to accommodate frequency-dependent reflection properties of the enclosure boundary. The form of the controlling sources is determined by considering the steady-state behavior of the system, and it is established that the control strategy proposed is stable and asymptotically optimal.

  20. Stochastic Optimal Control via Bellman's Principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Sun, Jian Q.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a method for finding optimal controls of nonlinear systems subject to random excitations. The method is capable to generate global control solutions when state and control constraints are present. The solution is global in the sense that controls for all initial conditions in a region of the state space are obtained. The approach is based on Bellman's Principle of optimality, the Gaussian closure and the Short-time Gaussian approximation. Examples include a system with a state-dependent diffusion term, a system in which the infinite hierarchy of moment equations cannot be analytically closed, and an impact system with a elastic boundary. The uncontrolled and controlled dynamics are studied by creating a Markov chain with a control dependent transition probability matrix via the Generalized Cell Mapping method. In this fashion, both the transient and stationary controlled responses are evaluated. The results show excellent control performances.

  1. Optimal control of the spine system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun; Reeves, N Peter; Cholewicki, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this work is to present methodology to first evaluate the performance of an in vivo spine system and then to synthesize optimal neuromuscular control for rehabilitation interventions. This is achieved (1) by determining control system parameters such as static feedback gains and delays from experimental data, (2) by synthesizing the optimal feedback gains to attenuate the effect of disturbances to the system using modern control theory, and (3) by evaluating the robustness of the optimized closed-loop system. We also apply these methods to a postural control task, with two different control strategies, and evaluate the robustness of the spine system with respect to longer latencies found in the low back pain population. This framework could be used for rehabilitation design. To this end, we discuss several future research needs necessary to implement our framework in practice. PMID:20459205

  2. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  3. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  4. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  5. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  6. Role of control constraints in quantum optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Dmitry V.; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-11-01

    The problems of optimizing the value of an arbitrary observable of a two-level system at both a fixed time and the shortest possible time is theoretically explored. Complete identification and classification along with comprehensive analysis of globally optimal control policies and traps (i.e., policies which are locally but not globally optimal) are presented. The central question addressed is whether the control landscape remains trap-free if control constraints of the inequality type are imposed. The answer is astonishingly controversial: Although the traps are proven always to exist in this case, in practice they become trivially escapable once the control time is fixed and chosen long enough.

  7. A reliable algorithm for optimal control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, powerful design tools for linear time-invariant multivariable control systems have been developed based on direct parameter optimization. In this report, an algorithm for reliable optimal control synthesis using parameter optimization is presented. Specifically, a robust numerical algorithm is developed for the evaluation of the H(sup 2)-like cost functional and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The method is specifically designed to handle defective degenerate systems and is based on the well-known Pade series approximation of the matrix exponential. Numerical test problems in control synthesis for simple mechanical systems and for a flexible structure with densely packed modes illustrate positively the reliability of this method when compared to a method based on diagonalization. Several types of cost functions have been considered: a cost function for robust control consisting of a linear combination of quadratic objectives for deterministic and random disturbances, and one representing an upper bound on the quadratic objective for worst case initial conditions. Finally, a framework for multivariable control synthesis has been developed combining the concept of closed-loop transfer recovery with numerical parameter optimization. The procedure enables designers to synthesize not only observer-based controllers but also controllers of arbitrary order and structure. Numerical design solutions rely heavily on the robust algorithm due to the high order of the synthesis model and the presence of near-overlapping modes. The design approach is successfully applied to the design of a high-bandwidth control system for a rotorcraft.

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The highly variable and intermittent pollutant concentrations and flowrates associated with wet-weather events in combined sewersheds necessitates the use of storage-treatment systems to control pollution.An optimized combined-sewer-overflow (CSO) control system requires a manage...

  9. Soft-Fermion-Pole Mechanism to Single Spin Asymmetry in Hadronic Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuji; Tomita, Tetsuya

    2009-08-04

    Single spin asymmetry (SSA) is a twist-3 observable in the collinear factorization approach. We present a twist-3 single-spin-dependent cross section formula for the pion production in pp-collision, p{sup a}rrow upp->piX, relevant to RHIC experiments. In particular, we calculate the soft-fermion-pole (SFP) contribution to the cross section from the quark-gluon correlation functions. We show that its effect can be as large as the soft-gluon-pole (SGP) contribution owing to the large SFP partonic hard cross section, even though the derivative of the SFP function does not participate in the cross section.

  10. Centralized Stochastic Optimal Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of online optimization of the supervisory power management control in parallel hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We model HEV operation as a controlled Markov chain using the long-run expected average cost per unit time criterion, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion online. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation and compared to the solution derived with dynamic programming using the average cost criterion.

  11. Algorithm For Optimal Control Of Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Garba, John A..; Utku, Senol

    1989-01-01

    Cost of computation appears competitive with other methods. Problem to compute optimal control of forced response of structure with n degrees of freedom identified in terms of smaller number, r, of vibrational modes. Article begins with Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of mechanics and use of quadratic cost functional. Complexity reduced by alternative approach in which quadratic cost functional expressed in terms of control variables only. Leads to iterative solution of second-order time-integral matrix Volterra equation of second kind containing optimal control vector. Cost of algorithm, measured in terms of number of computations required, is of order of, or less than, cost of prior algoritms applied to similar problems.

  12. Optimal integral controller with sensor failure accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, T.; Houlihan, T.

    1989-01-01

    An Optimal Integral Controller that readily accommodates Sensor Failure - without resorting to (Kalman) filter or observer generation - has been designed. The system is based on Navy-sponsored research for the control of high performance aircraft. In conjunction with a NASA developed Numerical Optimization Code, the Integral Feedback Controller will provide optimal system response even in the case of incomplete state feedback. Hence, the need for costly replication of plant sensors is avoided since failure accommodation is effected by system software reconfiguration. The control design has been applied to a particularly ill-behaved, third-order system. Dominant-root design in the classical sense produced an almost 100 percent overshoot for the third-order system response. An application of the newly-developed Optimal Integral Controller - assuming all state information available - produces a response with no overshoot. A further application of the controller design - assuming a one-third sensor failure scenario - produced a slight overshoot response that still preserved the steady state time-point of the full-state feedback response. The control design should have wide application in space systems.

  13. Advanced rotorcraft control using parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters is presented. The algorithm is part of a design algorithm for an optimal linear dynamic output feedback controller that minimizes a finite time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of a accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm has been included in a control design package for optimal robust low order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm has been demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  14. Stochastic time-optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W.; Elliot, D.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of stochastic time-optimal controls in a one-dimensional setting are considered. Multidimensional problems, in the case of complete state information available and the system modeled by stochastic differential equations, are studied under the formulation of minimizing the expected transient-response time. The necessary condition of optimality is the satisfaction for the value function of a parabolic partial differential equation with boundary conditions. The sufficient condition of optimality is also provided, based on Dynkin's formula. Finally, three examples are given.

  15. Road map to adaptive optimal control. [jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R.

    1980-01-01

    A building block control structure leading toward adaptive, optimal control for jet engines is developed. This approach simplifies the addition of new features and allows for easier checkout of the control by providing a baseline system for comparison. Also, it is possible to eliminate certain features that do not have payoff by being selective in the addition of new building blocks to be added to the baseline system. The minimum risk approach specifically addresses the need for active identification of the plant to be controlled in real time and real time optimization of the control for the identified plant.

  16. Multimodel methods for optimal control of aeroacoustics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guoquan; Collis, Samuel Scott

    2005-01-01

    A new multidomain/multiphysics computational framework for optimal control of aeroacoustic noise has been developed based on a near-field compressible Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a far-field linearized Euler solver both based on a discontinuous Galerkin formulation. In this approach, the coupling of near- and far-field domains is achieved by weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface that encloses all nonlinearities and noise sources. For optimal control, gradient information is obtained by the solution of an appropriate adjoint problem that involves the propagation of adjoint information from the far-field to the near-field. This computational framework has been successfully applied to study optimal boundary-control of blade-vortex interaction, which is a significant noise source for helicopters on approach to landing. In the model-problem presented here, the noise propagated toward the ground is reduced by 12dB.

  17. Optimal and multivariable control of a turbogenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoud, M. A.; Harley, R. G.; Secker, A.

    The use of modern control methods to design multivariable controllers which improve the performance of a turbogenerator was investigated. The turbogenerator nonlinear mathematical model from which a linearized model is deduced is presented. The inverse Nyquist Array method and the theory of optimal control are both applied to the linearized model to generate two alternative control schemes. The schemes are implemented on the nonlinear simulation model to assess their dynamic performance. Results from modern multivariable control schemes are compared with the classical automatic voltage regulator and speed governor system.

  18. Quadratic optimal cooperative control synthesis with flight control application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1984-01-01

    An optimal control-law synthesis approach is presented that involves simultaneous solution for two cooperating controllers operating in parallel. One controller's structure includes stochastic state estimation and linear feedback of the state estimates, while the other controller involves direct linear feedback of selected system output measurements. This structure is shown to be optimal under the constraint of linear feedback of system outputs in one controller. Furthermore, it is appropriate for flight control synthesis where the full-state optimal stochastic controller can be adjusted to be representative of an optimal control model of the human pilot in a stochastic regulation task. The method is experimentally verified in the case of the selection of pitch-damper gain for optimum pitch tracking, where optimum implies the best subjective pilot rating in the task. Finally, results from application of the method to synthesize a controller for a multivariable fighter aircraft are presented, and implications of the results of this method regarding the optimal plant dynamics for tracking are discussed.

  19. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  20. Optimal control with multiple human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Malik, Tufail; Imran, Mudassar; Jayaraman, Raja

    2016-03-21

    A two-sex, deterministic ordinary differential equations model for human papillomavirus (HPV) is constructed and analyzed for optimal control strategies in a vaccination program administering three types of vaccines in the female population: a bivalent vaccine that targets two HPV types and provides longer duration of protection and cross-protection against some non-target types, a quadrivalent vaccine which targets an additional two HPV types, and a nonavalent vaccine which targets nine HPV types (including those covered by the quadrivalent vaccine), but with lesser type-specific efficacy. Considering constant vaccination controls, the disease-free equilibrium and the effective reproduction number Rv for the autonomous model are computed in terms of the model parameters. Local-asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium is established in terms of Rv. Uncertainty and Sensitivity analyses are carried out to study the influence of various important model parameters on the HPV infection prevalence. Assuming the HPV infection prevalence in the population under the constant control, optimal control theory is used to devise optimal vaccination strategies for the associated non-autonomous model when the vaccination rates are functions of time. The impact of these strategies on the number of infected individuals and the accumulated cost is assessed and compared with the constant control case. Switch times from one vaccine combination to a different combination including the nonavalent vaccine are assessed during an optimally designed HPV immunization program. PMID:26796222

  1. Sensitivity of optimal control systems with bang-bang control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rootenberg, J.; Courtin, P.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of small parameter variations on the performance index of optimal control systems with initial and final target manifolds, free end time, and bang-bang control are analyzed in this paper. A new approach to the sensitivity equation is presented. This approach takes into account the pulse-shaped variation produced by the parameter change on the bang-bang control. An expression, that relates the variations of the performance index, the trajectory, the final time, and the parameter, is derived. This expression extends to the class of optimal systems with bang-bang control, a result previously obtained by Courtin and Rootenberg (1971).

  2. Optimal control of anthracnose using mixed strategies.

    PubMed

    Fotsa Mbogne, David Jaures; Thron, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose and study a spatial diffusion model for the control of anthracnose disease in a bounded domain. The model is a generalization of the one previously developed in [15]. We use the model to simulate two different types of control strategies against anthracnose disease. Strategies that employ chemical fungicides are modeled using a continuous control function; while strategies that rely on cultivational practices (such as pruning and removal of mummified fruits) are modeled with a control function which is discrete in time (though not in space). For comparative purposes, we perform our analyses for a spatially-averaged model as well as the space-dependent diffusion model. Under weak smoothness conditions on parameters we demonstrate the well-posedness of both models by verifying existence and uniqueness of the solution for the growth inhibition rate for given initial conditions. We also show that the set [0, 1] is positively invariant. We first study control by impulsive strategies, then analyze the simultaneous use of mixed continuous and pulse strategies. In each case we specify a cost functional to be minimized, and we demonstrate the existence of optimal control strategies. In the case of pulse-only strategies, we provide explicit algorithms for finding the optimal control strategies for both the spatially-averaged model and the space-dependent model. We verify the algorithms for both models via simulation, and discuss properties of the optimal solutions. PMID:26407644

  3. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1980-01-01

    Problem involves design of controls for linear time-invariant system disturbed by white noise. Solution is Kalman filter coupled through set of optimal regulator gains to produce desired control signal. Key to solution is solving matrix Riccati differential equation. LSOCE effectively solves problem for wide range of practical applications. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on IBM 360.

  4. Optimal control solutions to sodic soil reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Porporato, Amilcare

    2016-05-01

    We study the reclamation process of a sodic soil by irrigation with water amended with calcium cations. In order to explore the entire range of time-dependent strategies, this task is framed as an optimal control problem, where the amendment rate is the control and the total rehabilitation time is the quantity to be minimized. We use a minimalist model of vertically averaged soil salinity and sodicity, in which the main feedback controlling the dynamics is the nonlinear coupling of soil water and exchange complex, given by the Gapon equation. We show that the optimal solution is a bang-bang control strategy, where the amendment rate is discontinuously switched along the process from a maximum value to zero. The solution enables a reduction in remediation time of about 50%, compared with the continuous use of good-quality irrigation water. Because of its general structure, the bang-bang solution is also shown to work for the reclamation of other soil conditions, such as saline-sodic soils. The novelty in our modeling approach is the capability of searching the entire "strategy space" for optimal time-dependent protocols. The optimal solutions found for the minimalist model can be then fine-tuned by experiments and numerical simulations, applicable to realistic conditions that include spatial variability and heterogeneities.

  5. Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System

    SciTech Connect

    Hakan Yilmaz; Mark Christie; Anna Stefanopoulou

    2010-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a true Flex Fuel Vehicle capable of running on any blend of ethanol from 0 to 85% with reduced penalty in usable vehicle range. A research and development program, targeting 10% improvement in fuel economy using a direct injection (DI) turbocharged spark ignition engine was conducted. In this project a gasoline-optimized high-technology engine was considered and the hardware and configuration modifications were defined for the engine, fueling system, and air path. Combined with a novel engine control strategy, control software, and calibration this resulted in a highly efficient and clean FFV concept. It was also intended to develop robust detection schemes of the ethanol content in the fuel integrated with adaptive control algorithms for optimized turbocharged direct injection engine combustion. The approach relies heavily on software-based adaptation and optimization striving for minimal modifications to the gasoline-optimized engine hardware system. Our ultimate objective was to develop a compact control methodology that takes advantage of any ethanol-based fuel mixture and not compromise the engine performance under gasoline operation.

  6. RESOURCES ALLOCATION TO OPTIMIZE MINING POLLUTION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive model for mine drainage simulation and optimization of resource allocation to control mine acid pollution in a watershed has been developed. The model is capable of: (a) Producing a time trace of acid load and flow from acid drainage sources as a function of clima...

  7. Optimal decentralized control for multimachine power systems--

    SciTech Connect

    Quali, A. ); Fantin, J. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a method for determining an optimal decentralized control for multimachine power systems with quadratic performance measure. An iterative algorithm is developed whereby a local minimum is attained. The constraint of decentralization is tackled with in minimization algorithm by using the method of feasible directions. An example of three synchronous machines is given to illustrate the proposed algorithm.

  8. Mean-field sparse optimal control

    PubMed Central

    Fornasier, Massimo; Piccoli, Benedetto; Rossi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the rigorous limit process connecting finite dimensional sparse optimal control problems with ODE constraints, modelling parsimonious interventions on the dynamics of a moving population divided into leaders and followers, to an infinite dimensional optimal control problem with a constraint given by a system of ODE for the leaders coupled with a PDE of Vlasov-type, governing the dynamics of the probability distribution of the followers. In the classical mean-field theory, one studies the behaviour of a large number of small individuals freely interacting with each other, by simplifying the effect of all the other individuals on any given individual by a single averaged effect. In this paper, we address instead the situation where the leaders are actually influenced also by an external policy maker, and we propagate its effect for the number N of followers going to infinity. The technical derivation of the sparse mean-field optimal control is realized by the simultaneous development of the mean-field limit of the equations governing the followers dynamics together with the Γ-limit of the finite dimensional sparse optimal control problems. PMID:25288818

  9. Optimal and robust control of transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, T. R.; Agarwal, R.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal and robust control theories are used to determine feedback control rules that effectively stabilize a linearly unstable flow in a plane channel. Wall transpiration (unsteady blowing/suction) with zero net mass flux is used as the control. Control algorithms are considered that depend both on full flowfield information and on estimates of that flowfield based on wall skin-friction measurements only. The development of these control algorithms accounts for modeling errors and measurement noise in a rigorous fashion; these disturbances are considered in both a structured (Gaussian) and unstructured ('worst case') sense. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of the eigenmodes of the resulting controlled systems, and the sensitivity of individual eigenmodes to both control and observation is quantified.

  10. Optimal singular control for nonlinear semistabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Afflitto, Andrea; Haddad, Wassim M.

    2016-06-01

    The singular optimal control problem for asymptotic stabilisation has been extensively studied in the literature. In this paper, the optimal singular control problem is extended to address a weaker version of closed-loop stability, namely, semistability, which is of paramount importance for consensus control of network dynamical systems. Three approaches are presented to address the nonlinear semistable singular control problem. Namely, a singular perturbation method is presented to construct a state-feedback singular controller that guarantees closed-loop semistability for nonlinear systems. In this approach, we show that for a non-negative cost-to-go function the minimum cost of a nonlinear semistabilising singular controller is lower than the minimum cost of a singular controller that guarantees asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system. In the second approach, we solve the nonlinear semistable singular control problem by using the cost-to-go function to cancel the singularities in the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. For this case, we show that the minimum value of the singular performance measure is zero. Finally, we provide a framework based on the concepts of state-feedback linearisation and feedback equivalence to solve the singular control problem for semistabilisation of nonlinear dynamical systems. For this approach, we also show that the minimum value of the singular performance measure is zero. Three numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed singular semistabilisation frameworks.

  11. Single spin magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Nicholas Edward Kennedy

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a solid-state point defect with an electronic spin that has accessible quantum mechanical properties. At room temperature, the electronic ground state sub-levels of the NV center can be initialized and read out using optical pumping, as well as coherently controlled using microwave frequency fields. This thesis focuses on using the spin state of the NV center for highly-sensitive magnetometry under ambient conditions. In particular, when the diamond surface is properly prepared, we demonstrate that NV centers can be used to measure the magnetic fluctuations stemming from individual molecules and ions attached or adsorbed to the surface. This thesis begins by introducing the physical and electronic structure of the NV center at room temperature, followed by the fundamental measurements that allow us to use the NV center as a sensitive magnetometer. Combining our sensitive NV center magnetometer with techniques from chemistry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate the all-optical detection of a single-molecule electron spin at room temperature. Finally, we discuss the time-resolved detection of individual electron spins adsorbing onto the surface of nano-diamonds. By extending our techniques to nano-diamonds, we move closer towards textit{in vitro} magnetic field sensing that could be pivotal for better disease diagnosis and drug development.

  12. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  13. Quantum electronics. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Kolkowitz, S; Safira, A; High, A A; Devlin, R C; Choi, S; Unterreithmeier, Q P; Patterson, D; Zibrov, A S; Manucharyan, V E; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm's law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems. PMID:25636797

  14. Active control of combustion for optimal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    Combustion-zone stoichiometry and fuel-air premixing were actively controlled to optimize the combustor performance over a range of operating conditions. The objective was to maximize the combustion temperature, while maintaining NO{sub x} within a specified limit. The combustion system consisted of a premixer located coaxially near the inlet of a water-cooled shroud. The equivalence ratio was controlled by a variable-speed suction fan located downstream. The split between the premixing air and diffusion air was governed by the distance between the premixer and shroud. The combustor performance was characterized by a cost function evaluated from time-averaged measurements of NO{sub x} and oxygen concentrations in products. The cost function was minimized by downhill simplex algorithm employing closed-loop feedback. Experiments were conducted at different fuel flow rates to demonstrate that the controller optimized the performance without prior knowledge of the combustor behavior.

  15. Optimality principles in sensorimotor control (review)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    The sensorimotor system is a product of evolution, development, learning, adaptation – processes that work on different time scales to improve behavioral performance. Consequenly, many theories of motor function are based on the notion of optimal performance: they quantify the task goals, and apply the sophisticated tools of optimal control theory to obtain detailed behavioral predictions. The resulting models, although not without limitations, has explained a wider range of empirical phenomena than any other class of models. Traditional emphasis has been on optimizing average trajectories while ignoring sensory feedback. Recent work has redefined optimality on the level of feedback control laws, and focused on the mechanisms that generate behavior online. This has made it possible to fit a number of previously unrelated concepts and observations into what may become a unified theoretical framework for interpreting motor function. At the heart of the framework is the relationship between high-level goals, and the realtime sensorimotor control strategies most suitable for accomplishing those goals. PMID:15332089

  16. Algorithms for optimizing CT fluence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to customize the incident x-ray fluence in CT via beam-shaping filters or mA modulation is known to improve image quality and/or reduce radiation dose. Previous work has shown that complete control of x-ray fluence (ray-by-ray fluence modulation) would further improve dose efficiency. While complete control of fluence is not currently possible, emerging concepts such as dynamic attenuators and inverse-geometry CT allow nearly complete control to be realized. Optimally using ray-by-ray fluence modulation requires solving a very high-dimensional optimization problem. Most optimization techniques fail or only provide approximate solutions. We present efficient algorithms for minimizing mean or peak variance given a fixed dose limit. The reductions in variance can easily be translated to reduction in dose, if the original variance met image quality requirements. For mean variance, a closed form solution is derived. The peak variance problem is recast as iterated, weighted mean variance minimization, and at each iteration it is possible to bound the distance to the optimal solution. We apply our algorithms in simulations of scans of the thorax and abdomen. Peak variance reductions of 45% and 65% are demonstrated in the abdomen and thorax, respectively, compared to a bowtie filter alone. Mean variance shows smaller gains (about 15%).

  17. Simultaneous structure and control optimization of tensegrities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper concerns optimization of prestress of a tensegrity structure to achieve the optimal mixed dynamic and control performance. A linearized dynamic model of the structure is derived. The force density variables that parameterize prestress of the structure appear linearly in the model. The feasible region of these parameters is defined in terms of the extreme directions of the prestress cone. Several properties of the problem are established inside the feasible region of the parameters. The problem is solved using a gradient method that provides a monotonic decrease of the objective function inside the feasible region. A numerical example of a cantilevered planar tensegrity beam is shown.

  18. Helicopter trajectory planning using optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.; Kim, E.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for optimal trajectory planning, useful in the nap-of-the-earth guidance of helicopters, is presented. This approach uses an adjoint-control transformation along with a one-dimensional search scheme for generating the optimal trajectories. In addition to being useful for helicopter nap-of-the-earth guidance, the trajectory planning solution is of interest in several other contexts, such as robotic vehicle guidance and terrain-following guidance for cruise missiles and aircraft. A distinguishing feature of the present research is that the terrain constraint and the threat envelopes are incorporated in the equations of motion. Second-order necessary conditions are examined.

  19. Monotonic convergent quantum optimal control method with exact equality constraints on the optimized control fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-05-01

    We present a monotonic convergent quantum optimal control method that can be utilized to optimize the control field while exactly enforcing multiple equality constraints for steering quantum systems from an initial state towards desired quantum states. For illustration, special consideration is given to finding optimal control fields with (i) exact zero area and (ii) exact zero area along with constant pulse fluence. The method combined with these two types of constraints is successfully employed to maximize the state-to-state transition probability in a model vibrating diatomic molecule.

  20. Perturbation analysis of optimal integral controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The application of linear optimal control to the design of systems with integral control action on specified outputs is considered. Using integral terms in a quadratic performance index, an asymptotic analysis is used to determine the effect of variable quadratic weights on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the closed loop system. It is shown that for small integral terms the placement of integrator poles and gain calculation can be effectively decoupled from placement of the primary system eigenvalues. This technique is applied to the design of integral controls for a STOL aircraft outer loop guidance system.

  1. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  2. Modal methods in optimal control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, A. E., Jr.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for solving linear smoother-follower problems with quadratic criteria are presented. For time-invariant systems, the algorithm consists of one backward integration of a linear vector equation and one forward integration of another linear vector equation. Furthermore, the backward and forward Riccati matrices can be expressed in terms of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Euler-Lagrange equations. Hence, the gains of the forward and backward Kalman-Bucy filters and of the optimal state-feedback regulator can be determined without integration of matrix Riccati equations. A computer program has been developed, based on this method of determining the gains, to synthesize the optimal time-invariant compensator in the presence of random disturbance inputs and random measurement errors. The program also computes the rms state and control variables of the optimal closed-loop system.

  3. Optimal control of multiplicative control systems arising from cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K.; Kim, M.

    1975-01-01

    This study deals with ways of curtailing the rapid growth of cancer cell populations. The performance functional that measures the size of the population at the terminal time as well as the control effort is devised. With use of the discrete maximum principle, the Hamiltonian for this problem is determined and the condition for optimal solutions are developed. The optimal strategy is shown to be a bang-bang control. It is shown that the optimal control for this problem must be on the vertices of an N-dimensional cube contained in the N-dimensional Euclidean space. An algorithm for obtaining a local minimum of the performance function in an orderly fashion is developed. Application of the algorithm to the design of antitumor drug and X-irradiation schedule is discussed.

  4. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  5. Optimal Control via Self-Generated Stochasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    The problem of global maxima of functionals has been examined. Mathematical roots of local maxima are the same as those for a much simpler problem of finding global maximum of a multi-dimensional function. The second problem is instability even if an optimal trajectory is found, there is no guarantee that it is stable. As a result, a fundamentally new approach is introduced to optimal control based upon two new ideas. The first idea is to represent the functional to be maximized as a limit of a probability density governed by the appropriately selected Liouville equation. Then, the corresponding ordinary differential equations (ODEs) become stochastic, and that sample of the solution that has the largest value will have the highest probability to appear in ODE simulation. The main advantages of the stochastic approach are that it is not sensitive to local maxima, the function to be maximized must be only integrable but not necessarily differentiable, and global equality and inequality constraints do not cause any significant obstacles. The second idea is to remove possible instability of the optimal solution by equipping the control system with a self-stabilizing device. The applications of the proposed methodology will optimize the performance of NASA spacecraft, as well as robot performance.

  6. Optimal control and optimal trajectories of regional macroeconomic dynamics based on the Pontryagin maximum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, V. K.; Strigunov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The Pontryagin maximum principle is used to prove a theorem concerning optimal control in regional macroeconomics. A boundary value problem for optimal trajectories of the state and adjoint variables is formulated, and optimal curves are analyzed. An algorithm is proposed for solving the boundary value problem of optimal control. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by computing an optimal control and the corresponding optimal trajectories.

  7. Optimization approaches to nonlinear model predictive control

    SciTech Connect

    Biegler, L.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rawlings, J.B. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    With the development of sophisticated methods for nonlinear programming and powerful computer hardware, it now becomes useful and efficient to formulate and solve nonlinear process control problems through on-line optimization methods. This paper explores and reviews control techniques based on repeated solution of nonlinear programming (NLP) problems. Here several advantages present themselves. These include minimization of readily quantifiable objectives, coordinated and accurate handling of process nonlinearities and interactions, and systematic ways of dealing with process constraints. We motivate this NLP-based approach with small nonlinear examples and present a basic algorithm for optimization-based process control. As can be seen this approach is a straightforward extension of popular model-predictive controllers (MPCs) that are used for linear systems. The statement of the basic algorithm raises a number of questions regarding stability and robustness of the method, efficiency of the control calculations, incorporation of feedback into the controller and reliable ways of handling process constraints. Each of these will be treated through analysis and/or modification of the basic algorithm. To highlight and support this discussion, several examples are presented and key results are examined and further developed. 74 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Intermittent locomotion as an optimal control strategy

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Birds, fish and other animals routinely use unsteady effects to save energy by alternating between phases of active propulsion and passive coasting. Here, we construct a minimal model for such behaviour that can be couched as an optimal control problem via an analogy to travelling with a rechargeable battery. An analytical solution of the optimal control problem proves that intermittent locomotion has lower energy requirements relative to steady-state strategies. Additional realistic hypotheses, such as the assumption that metabolic cost at a given power should be minimal (the fixed gear hypothesis), a nonlinear dependence of the energy storage rate on propulsion and/or a preferred average speed, allow us to generalize the model and demonstrate the flexibility of intermittent locomotion with implications for biological and artificial systems. PMID:24711718

  9. Cancer Behavior: An Optimal Control Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Pedro J.; Russo, Irma H.; Russo, J.

    2009-01-01

    With special attention to cancer, this essay explains how Optimal Control Theory, mainly used in Economics, can be applied to the analysis of biological behaviors, and illustrates the ability of this mathematical branch to describe biological phenomena and biological interrelationships. Two examples are provided to show the capability and versatility of this powerful mathematical approach in the study of biological questions. The first describes a process of organogenesis, and the second the development of tumors. PMID:22247736

  10. Rényi information flow in the Ising model with single-spin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zehui; Wu, Jinshan; Guo, Wenan

    2014-12-01

    The n-index Rényi mutual information and transfer entropies for the two-dimensional kinetic Ising model with arbitrary single-spin dynamics in the thermodynamic limit are derived as functions of ensemble averages of observables and spin-flip probabilities. Cluster Monte Carlo algorithms with different dynamics from the single-spin dynamics are thus applicable to estimate the transfer entropies. By means of Monte Carlo simulations with the Wolff algorithm, we calculate the information flows in the Ising model with the Metropolis dynamics and the Glauber dynamics, respectively. We find that not only the global Rényi transfer entropy, but also the pairwise Rényi transfer entropy, peaks in the disorder phase. PMID:25615223

  11. Rényi information flow in the Ising model with single-spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zehui; Wu, Jinshan; Guo, Wenan

    2014-12-01

    The n -index Rényi mutual information and transfer entropies for the two-dimensional kinetic Ising model with arbitrary single-spin dynamics in the thermodynamic limit are derived as functions of ensemble averages of observables and spin-flip probabilities. Cluster Monte Carlo algorithms with different dynamics from the single-spin dynamics are thus applicable to estimate the transfer entropies. By means of Monte Carlo simulations with the Wolff algorithm, we calculate the information flows in the Ising model with the Metropolis dynamics and the Glauber dynamics, respectively. We find that not only the global Rényi transfer entropy, but also the pairwise Rényi transfer entropy, peaks in the disorder phase.

  12. Charge noise, spin-orbit coupling, and dephasing of single-spin qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Bermeister, Adam; Keith, Daniel; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2014-11-10

    Quantum dot quantum computing architectures rely on systems in which inversion symmetry is broken, and spin-orbit coupling is present, causing even single-spin qubits to be susceptible to charge noise. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the combined action of noise and spin-orbit coupling on a single-spin qubit, identify the mechanisms behind dephasing, and estimate the free induction decay dephasing times T{sub 2}{sup *} for common materials such as Si and GaAs. Dephasing is driven by noise matrix elements that cause relative fluctuations between orbital levels, which are dominated by screened whole charge defects and unscreened dipole defects in the substrate. Dephasing times T{sub 2}{sup *} differ markedly between materials and can be enhanced by increasing gate fields, choosing materials with weak spin-orbit, making dots narrower, or using accumulation dots.

  13. Single-spin asymmetries in inclusive deep inelastic scattering and multiparton correlations in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, A.; Pitonyak, D.; Schäfer, A.; Schlegel, M.; Vogelsang, W.; Zhou, J.

    2012-11-01

    Transverse single-spin asymmetries in inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering can be generated through multiphoton exchange between the leptonic and the hadronic part of the process. Here we consider the two-photon exchange and mainly focus on the transverse target spin asymmetry. In particular, we investigate the case where two photons couple to different quarks. Such a contribution involves a quark-photon-quark correlator in the nucleon, which has a (model-dependent) relation to the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman quark-gluon-quark correlator TF. Using different parametrizations for TF we compute the transverse target spin asymmetries for both a proton and a neutron target and compare the results to recent experimental data. In addition, potential implications for our general understanding of single-spin asymmetries in hard scattering processes are discussed.

  14. Single-spin asymmetries in inclusive DIS and in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schaefer, Andreas; Zhou, Jian; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner

    2013-04-15

    Transverse single-spin asymmetries in inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering can be generated through multi-photon exchange between the leptonic and the hadronic part of the process. Here we consider two-photon exchange and mainly focus on the transverse target spin asymmetry. In particular, we investigate the case where two photons couple to different quarks. Such a contribution involves a quark-photon-quark correlator in the nucleon, which has a (modeldependent) relation to the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman quark-gluon-quark correlator T{sub F}. Using different parameterizations for T{sub F} we compute the transverse target spin asymmetries for both a proton and a neutron target and compare the results to recent experimental data. In addition, potential implications for our general understanding of single-spin asymmetries in hard scattering processes are discussed.

  15. Single Spin Asymmetries in Inclusive Dis and Multi-Parton Correlations in the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schäfer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    Transverse single spin asymmetries in inclusive deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering can be generated through multi-photon exchange between the leptonic and the hadronic part of the process. Here we consider two-photon exchange, and mainly focus on the transverse target spin asymmetry. In particular, we investigate the case where two photons couple to different quarks. Such a contribution involves a quark-photon-quark correlator in the nucleon, which has a (model-dependent) relation to the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman quark-gluon-quark correlator TF. Using different parameterizations for TF we compute the transverse target spin asymmetry for both a proton and a neutron target, and compare the results to recent experimental data. Potential implications on our general understanding of single spin asymmetries in hard scattering processes are discussed as well.

  16. Single-spin asymmetries in inclusive DIS and in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schäfer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2013-04-01

    Transverse single-spin asymmetries in inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering can be generated through multi-photon exchange between the leptonic and the hadronic part of the process. Here we consider two-photon exchange and mainly focus on the transverse target spin asymmetry. In particular, we investigate the case where two photons couple to different quarks. Such a contribution involves a quark-photon-quark correlator in the nucleon, which has a (modeldependent) relation to the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman quark-gluon-quark correlator TF. Using different parameterizations for TF we compute the transverse target spin asymmetries for both a proton and a neutron target and compare the results to recent experimental data. In addition, potential implications for our general understanding of single-spin asymmetries in hard scattering processes are discussed.

  17. Recent Results of Target Single-Spin Asymmetry Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    We report recent results from Jefferson Lab Hall A “Neutron Transversity” experiment (E06-010). Transversely polarized target single-spin asymmetry AUT and beam-target double-spin asymmetry A{sub LT} have been measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) reactions on a polarized neutron ({sup 3}He) target. Collins-type and Sivers-type asymmetries have been extracted from A{sub UT} for charged pion SIDIS productions, which are sensitive to quark transversity and Sivers distributions, correspondingly. Double spin asymmetry A{sub LT} is sensitive to a specific quark transverse momentum dependent parton distribution (TMD), the so-called “ transverse helicity” (g{sub 1T} ) distributions. In addition, target single-spin asymmetries A{sub y} in inclusive electron scattering on a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target in quasi-elastic and deep inelastic kinematics were also measured in Hall A.

  18. QUANTUM INFORMATION. Coherent coupling of a single spin to microwave cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Viennot, J J; Dartiailh, M C; Cottet, A; Kontos, T

    2015-07-24

    Electron spins and photons are complementary quantum-mechanical objects that can be used to carry, manipulate, and transform quantum information. To combine these resources, it is desirable to achieve the coherent coupling of a single spin to photons stored in a superconducting resonator. Using a circuit design based on a nanoscale spin valve, we coherently hybridize the individual spin and charge states of a double quantum dot while preserving spin coherence. This scheme allows us to achieve spin-photon coupling up to the megahertz range at the single-spin level. The cooperativity is found to reach 2.3, and the spin coherence time is about 60 nanoseconds. We thereby demonstrate a mesoscopic device suitable for nondestructive spin readout and distant spin coupling. PMID:26206930

  19. Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently we proposed a new approach which potentially has single spin sensitivity, sub-nanometer spatial resolution, and ability to operate at room temperature (J. Appl. Phys. 97, 014903 (2005); U.S. Patent No. 7,305,869, 2007). In our approach a nanoscale photoluminescent center exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of magnetic moment in the sample related with unpaired individual electron or nuclear spins, or ensemble of spins. We consider as a sensor material that exhibit ODMR properties nitrogen-vacancy (N-V) centers in diamond. N-V centers in diamond has serious advantage having extraordinary chemical and photostability, very long spin lifetimes, and ability single-spin detection at room temperature. The variety of possible scanning schemes has been considered. The potential application to 3D imaging of biological structure has been analyzed.

  20. Transverse single spin asymmetries at small x and the anomalous magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian

    2014-04-01

    We show that in the McLerran-Venugopalan model an axial asymmetrical valence quark distributions in the transverse plane of a transversely polarized proton can give rise to a spin-dependent odderon. Such polarized odderon is responsible for the transverse single spin asymmetries for jet production in the backward region of pp collisions and open charm production in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process.

  1. Single-spin asymmetries from two-photon exchange in elastic electron proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Afanasev; N.P. Merenkov

    2005-02-01

    The parity-conserving single-spin beam asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering is induced by an absorptive part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. We demonstrate that this asymmetry has logarithmic and double-logarithmic enhancement due to contributions of hard collinear quasi-real photons. An optical theorem is used to evaluate the asymmetry in terms of the total photoproduction cross section on the proton.

  2. Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

    2013-06-20

    In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

  3. Final-state interaction as origin of single-spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.S.

    2005-05-06

    Recent measurements from the HERMES, SMC, CLAS and COMPASS collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p{up_arrow} {yields} {pi}X. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sub p}{sup z} = {+-}(1/2) to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum Lz of the proton's constituents and is thus distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. We then find that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system lead to single-spin asymmetries at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality Q2 at fixed xbj.

  4. Adaptive hybrid optimal quantum control for imprecisely characterized systems.

    PubMed

    Egger, D J; Wilhelm, F K

    2014-06-20

    Optimal quantum control theory carries a huge promise for quantum technology. Its experimental application, however, is often hindered by imprecise knowledge of the input variables, the quantum system's parameters. We show how to overcome this by adaptive hybrid optimal control, using a protocol named Ad-HOC. This protocol combines open- and closed-loop optimal control by first performing a gradient search towards a near-optimal control pulse and then an experimental fidelity estimation with a gradient-free method. For typical settings in solid-state quantum information processing, adaptive hybrid optimal control enhances gate fidelities by an order of magnitude, making optimal control theory applicable and useful. PMID:24996074

  5. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  6. Optimal control of HIV/AIDS dynamic: Education and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A mathematical model which describes the transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS is developed. The optimal control representing education and treatment for this model is explored. The existence of optimal Control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations suggest that education and treatment for the infected has a positive impact on HIV/AIDS control.

  7. Optimal Control of Flows in Moving Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Liao, Wenyuan; Glander, Donn

    2006-11-01

    This investigation concerns adjoint--based optimization of viscous incompressible flows (the Navier-Stokes problem) coupled with heat conduction involving change of phase (the Stefan problem) and occurring in domains with moving boundaries such as the free and solidification surfaces. This problem is motivated by optimization of advanced welding techniques used in automotive manufacturing. We characterize the sensitivity of a suitable cost functional defined for the system with respect to control (the heat input) using adjoint equations. Given that the shape of the domain is also a dependent variable, characterizing sensitivities necessitates the introduction of ``non-cylindrical'' calculus required to differentiate a cost functional defined on a variable domain. As a result, unlike the forward problem, the adjoint system is defined on a domain with a predetermined evolution in time and also involves ordinary differential equations defined on the domain boundary (``the adjoint transverse system''). We will discuss certain computational issues related to numerical solution of such adjoint problems.

  8. Coherent optimal control of photosynthetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, F.; Montangero, S.; Calarco, T.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that open-loop quantum optimal control techniques can provide efficient tools for the verification of various quantum coherent transport mechanisms in natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes under realistic experimental conditions. To assess the feasibility of possible biocontrol experiments, we introduce the main settings and derive optimally shaped and robust laser pulses that allow for the faithful preparation of specified initial states (such as localized excitation or coherent superposition, i.e., propagating and nonpropagating states) of the photosystem and probe efficiently the subsequent dynamics. With these tools, different transport pathways can be discriminated, which should facilitate the elucidation of genuine quantum dynamical features of photosystems and therefore enhance our understanding of the role that coherent processes may play in actual biological complexes.

  9. Optimal control strategies for coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Esa; Putaja, Antti; Mardoukhi, Yousof

    2013-09-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are ideal candidates for quantum information applications in solid-state technology. However, advanced theoretical and experimental tools are required to coherently control, for example, the electronic charge in these systems. Here we demonstrate how quantum optimal control theory provides a powerful way to manipulate the electronic structure of coupled quantum dots with an extremely high fidelity. As alternative control fields we apply both laser pulses as well as electric gates, respectively. We focus on double and triple quantum dots containing a single electron or two electrons interacting via Coulomb repulsion. In the two-electron situation we also briefly demonstrate the challenges of timedependent density-functional theory within the adiabatic local-density approximation to produce comparable results with the numerically exact approach.

  10. Optimization and Control of Plasma Doping Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, Deven M.; Godet, Ludovic; Chamberlain, Nicholas; Hadidi, Kamal; Singh, Vikram; Papasouliotis, George D.

    2011-01-07

    Plasma doping (PLAD) is a well characterized alternative to beam-line technology, which has already been adopted in high volume manufacturing in the ultra high dose, low energy regime for advanced DRAM technology nodes. As semiconductor technology evolves, the demand for ever lower energy, higher dose implants will continue to grow, and the requirements for process control will become increasingly stringent. During plasma immersion ion implantation, ionized species present in the plasma are extracted and implanted into the wafer, while other processes, such as deposition, etching and sputtering, are competing in parallel. The dopant profile into the substrate results from contributions of all these mechanisms. Using the hardware and plasma composition control features present in the PLAD system to balance the contributions of the above processes, the dopant profile can be modified and dopant retention can be optimized. In this paper, we detail the process control approach used to optimize process performance for low energy, high dose implants, and validate it with plasma and wafer state data.

  11. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  12. Optimal digital control of multirate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amit, N.; Powell, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Many digitally controlled aerospace systems have widely separated time constants and thus can benefit from the use of two or more sample rates. In this paper, the analysis and synthesis of multirate systems is accomplished by creating an equivalent single rate system and applying existing techniques. The optimal steady state solution of the single rate system is obtained by eigenvector decomposition and then used to compute the periodic solution to the Riccati equation of the original multirate system. An example shows when multirate analysis is necessary and the penalty of various levels of approximations to the exact multirate solution.

  13. Feedback Implementation of Zermelo's Optimal Control by Sugeno Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, C.; Homaifax, A.; Bikdash, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to implement optimal control laws of nonlinear systems in real time. Our methodology does not require solving two-point boundary value problems online and may not require it off-line either. The optimal control law is learned using the original Sugeno controller (OSC) from a family of optimal trajectories. We compare the trajectories generated by the OSC and the trajectories yielded by the optimal feedback control law when applied to Zermelo's ship steering problem.

  14. Hypersonic Vehicle Trajectory Optimization and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, S. N.; Shen, J.; Grohs, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Two classes of neural networks have been developed for the study of hypersonic vehicle trajectory optimization and control. The first one is called an 'adaptive critic'. The uniqueness and main features of this approach are that: (1) they need no external training; (2) they allow variability of initial conditions; and (3) they can serve as feedback control. This is used to solve a 'free final time' two-point boundary value problem that maximizes the mass at the rocket burn-out while satisfying the pre-specified burn-out conditions in velocity, flightpath angle, and altitude. The second neural network is a recurrent network. An interesting feature of this network formulation is that when its inputs are the coefficients of the dynamics and control matrices, the network outputs are the Kalman sequences (with a quadratic cost function); the same network is also used for identifying the coefficients of the dynamics and control matrices. Consequently, we can use it to control a system whose parameters are uncertain. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the potential of these methods.

  15. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  16. Optimal Feedback Controlled Assembly of Perfect Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xun; Rupp, Bradley; Yang, Yuguang; Edwards, Tara D; Grover, Martha A; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-07-26

    Perfectly ordered states are targets in diverse molecular to microscale systems involving, for example, atomic clusters, protein folding, protein crystallization, nanoparticle superlattices, and colloidal crystals. However, there is no obvious approach to control the assembly of perfectly ordered global free energy minimum structures; near-equilibrium assembly is impractically slow, and faster out-of-equilibrium processes generally terminate in defective states. Here, we demonstrate the rapid and robust assembly of perfect crystals by navigating kinetic bottlenecks using closed-loop control of electric field mediated crystallization of colloidal particles. An optimal policy is computed with dynamic programming using a reaction coordinate based dynamic model. By tracking real-time stochastic particle configurations and adjusting applied fields via feedback, the evolution of unassembled particles is guided through polycrystalline states into single domain crystals. This approach to controlling the assembly of a target structure is based on general principles that make it applicable to a broad range of processes from nano- to microscales (where tuning a global thermodynamic variable yields temporal control over thermal sampling of different states via their relative free energies). PMID:27387146

  17. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  18. The neural optimal control hierarchy for motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, T.; Eliasmith, C.

    2011-10-01

    Our empirical, neuroscientific understanding of biological motor systems has been rapidly growing in recent years. However, this understanding has not been systematically mapped to a quantitative characterization of motor control based in control theory. Here, we attempt to bridge this gap by describing the neural optimal control hierarchy (NOCH), which can serve as a foundation for biologically plausible models of neural motor control. The NOCH has been constructed by taking recent control theoretic models of motor control, analyzing the required processes, generating neurally plausible equivalent calculations and mapping them on to the neural structures that have been empirically identified to form the anatomical basis of motor control. We demonstrate the utility of the NOCH by constructing a simple model based on the identified principles and testing it in two ways. First, we perturb specific anatomical elements of the model and compare the resulting motor behavior with clinical data in which the corresponding area of the brain has been damaged. We show that damaging the assigned functions of the basal ganglia and cerebellum can cause the movement deficiencies seen in patients with Huntington's disease and cerebellar lesions. Second, we demonstrate that single spiking neuron data from our model's motor cortical areas explain major features of single-cell responses recorded from the same primate areas. We suggest that together these results show how NOCH-based models can be used to unify a broad range of data relevant to biological motor control in a quantitative, control theoretic framework.

  19. Clocked single-spin source based on a spin-split superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    We propose an accurate clocked single-spin source for ac-spintronic applications. Our device consists of a superconducting island covered by a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) layer through which it is coupled to superconducting leads. Single-particle transfer relies on the energy gaps and the island's charging energy, and is enabled by a bias and a time-periodic gate voltage. Accurate spin transfer is achieved by the FI layer which polarizes the island, provides spin-selective tunneling barriers and improves the precision by suppressing Andreev reflection. We analyze realistic material combinations and experimental requirements which allow for a clocked spin current in the MHz regime.

  20. Single Spin Asymmetry in Inclusive Hadron Production in pp Scattering from Collins Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng; Yuan, Feng

    2008-04-14

    We study the Collins mechanism contribution to the single transverse spin asymmetry in inclusive hadron production in pp scattering p{up_arrow}p {yields} {pi}X from the leading jet fragmentation. The azimuthal asymmetric distribution of hadron in the jet leads to a single spin asymmetry for the produced hadron in the Lab frame. The effect is evaluated in a transverse momentum dependent model that takes into account the transverse momentum dependence in the fragmentation process. We find the asymmetry is comparable in size to the experimental observation at RHIC at {radical}s = 200GeV.

  1. Azimuthal and single spin asymmetry in deep-inelasticlepton-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zuo-tang; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2006-09-21

    The collinear expansion technique is generalized to thefactorization of unintegrated parton distributions and other higher twistparton correlations from the corresponding collinear hard parts thatinvolve multiple parton final state interaction. Such a generalizedfactorization provides a consistent approach to the calculation ofinclusive and semi-inclusive cross sections of deep-inelasticlepton-nucleon scattering. As an example, the azimuthal asymmetry iscalculated to the order of 1/Q in semi-inclusive deeply inelasticlepton-nucleon scattering with transversely polarized target. Anon-vanishing single-spin asymmetry in the "triggered inclusive process"is predicted to be 1/Q suppressed with a part of the coefficient relatedto a moment of the Sivers function.

  2. Twist-3 Single-Spin Asymmetry for SIDIS and its Azimuthal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2009-08-04

    We derive the complete twist-3 single-spin-dependent cross section for semi-inclusive DIS, ep{sup {up_arrow}}{yields}e{pi}X, associated with the complete set of the twist-3 quark-gluon correlation functions in the transversely polarized nucleon, extending our previous study. The cross section consists of five independent structure functions with different azimuthal dependences, consistently with the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization approach in the low q{sup T} region. Correspondence with the inclusive DIS limit and comparison with the TMD approach are briefly discussed.

  3. Optimal control of a delayed SLBS computer virus model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijuan; Hattaf, Khalid; Sun, Jitao

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a delayed SLBS computer virus model is firstly proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to discuss the optimal control of the SLBS model. By using the optimal control strategy, we present an optimal strategy to minimize the total number of the breakingout computers and the cost associated with toxication or detoxication. We show that an optimal control solution exists for the control problem. Some examples are presented to show the efficiency of this optimal control.

  4. Computational methods to obtain time optimal jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Dynamic Programming and the Fletcher-Reeves Conjugate Gradient Method are two existing methods which can be applied to solve a general class of unconstrained fixed time, free right end optimal control problems. New techniques are developed to adapt these methods to solve a time optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints. Specifically, they are applied to compute a time optimal control for a jet engine control problem.

  5. Optimal control of thermally coupled Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi; Scroggs, Jeffrey S.; Tran, Hien T.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal boundary temperature control of the stationary thermally coupled incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is considered. Well-posedness and existence of the optimal control and a necessary optimality condition are obtained. Optimization algorithms based on the augmented Lagrangian method with second order update are discussed. A test example motivated by control of transport process in the high pressure vapor transport (HVPT) reactor is presented to demonstrate the applicability of our theoretical results and proposed algorithm.

  6. Optimized exposure control in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shramchenko, Nataliya; Blin, Philippe; Mathey, Claude; Klausz, Remy

    2004-05-01

    A method for the determination of optimal operating points of digital mammography systems is described. The digital mammography equipment uses a flat panel detector and a bi-metal molybdenum/rhodium x-ray tube. An operating point is defined by the selection of the x-ray tube target material, x-ray filtration, kVp and detector entrance dose. Breast thickness and composition are estimated from a low dose pre-exposure, then used to index tables containing sets of operating points. The operating points are determined using a model of the image chain, which computes contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and average glandular dose (AGD) for all possible exposure conditions and breast thickness and composition combinations. The selected operating points are those which provide the required CNR for the lowest AGD. An AGD reduction of 30% to 50% can be achieved for comparable Image Quality, relative to current operating points. Resulting from the optimization process, the rhodium target is used in more than 75% of cases. Measurements of CNR and AGD have been performed on various tissue equivalent materials with good agreement between calculated and measured values. The proposed method provides full Image Quality benefit of digital mammography while minimizing dose to patients in a controlled and predictive way.

  7. Optimal control of orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.

    1983-01-01

    During the past two decades, considerable research effort has been spent to convincingly prove that the use of aerodynamic forces to assist in the orbital transfer can significantly reduce the fuel consumption as compared to the pure propulsive mode. Since in this aeroassisted mode, preliminary maneuvers in the vacuum effect the resulting performance in the atmospheric phase, and vice versa, the two, space and atmospheric maneuvers, are, to a great extent, coupled. This paper summarizes, via optimal control theory, the fundamental results in the problem of orbital transfer using combined propulsive and aerodynamic forces. For the atmospheric phase, the use of Chapman's variables reduced the number of the physical characteristics of the vehicle and the atmosphere to a minimum and hence allows a better generalization of the results. The paper concludes with some illustrative examples.

  8. Feed Forward Neural Network and Optimal Control Problem with Control and State Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ova, Maria

    2009-09-09

    A feed forward neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The paper extends adaptive critic neural network architecture proposed by [5] to the optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. The proposed simulation method is illustrated by the optimal control problem of nitrogen transformation cycle model. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  9. On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, Daniela; Mugnai, Dimitri

    2015-10-15

    We consider a non-quadratic optimal control problem associated to a nonlinear elliptic variational inequality, where the obstacle is the control itself. We show that, fixed a desired profile, there exists an optimal solution which is not far from it. Detailed characterizations of the optimal solution are given, also in terms of approximating problems.

  10. Skinner Rusk unified formalism for optimal control systems and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero-Liñán, María; Echeverría-Enríquez, Arturo; Martín de Diego, David; Muñoz-Lecanda, Miguel C.; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2007-10-01

    A geometric approach to time-dependent optimal control problems is proposed. This formulation is based on the Skinner and Rusk formalism for Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems. The corresponding unified formalism developed for optimal control systems allows us to formulate geometrically the necessary conditions given by a weak form of Pontryagin's maximum principle, provided that the differentiability with respect to controls is assumed and the space of controls is open. Furthermore, our method is also valid for implicit optimal control systems and, in particular, for the so-called descriptor systems (optimal control problems including both differential and algebraic equations).

  11. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control.

    PubMed

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications. PMID:26274112

  12. Optimization and quality control of computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Charles E.; Weiser, John C.; Leckie, Robert G.; Romlein, John R.; Norton, Gary S.

    1994-05-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is a relatively new technique for projection radiography. Few hospitals have CR devices in routine service and only a handful have more than one CR unit. As such, the clinical knowledge base does not yet exist to establish quality control (QC) procedures for CR devices. Without assurance that CR systems are operating within nominal limits, efforts to optimize CR performance are limited in value. A complete CR system includes detector plates that vary in response, cassettes, an electro-optical system for developing the image, computer algorithms for processing the raw image, and a hard copy output device. All of these subsystems are subject to variations in performance that can degrade image quality. Using CR manufacturer documentation, we have defined acceptance protocols for two different Fuji CR devices, the FCR 7000 and the AC1+, and have applied these tests to ten individual machines. We have begun to establish baseline performance measures and to determine measurement frequencies. CR QC is only one component of the overall quality control for totally digital radiology departments.

  13. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    ., Nuruzzaman

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system

  14. Beam normal single spin asymmetry in forward angle inelastic electron-proton scattering using the q-weak apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, FNU

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (Bn) on H2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic Bn is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of Bn background studies, we made the first measurement of Bn in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be Bn = 42.82 +- 2.45 (stat) +- 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy Ebeam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 degrees, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. Bn from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma*DeltaDelta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ˜10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system has

  15. Optimal and suboptimal control technique for aircraft spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic investigation has been made of procedures for effecting recovery from equilibrium spin conditions for three assumed aircraft configurations. Three approaches which utilize conventional aerodynamic controls are investigated. Included are a constant control recovery mode, optimal recoveries, and a suboptimal control logic patterned after optimal recovery results. The optimal and suboptimal techniques are shown to yield a significant improvement in recovery performance over that attained by using a constant control recovery procedure.

  16. Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols - GOAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assémat, Elie; Machnes, Shai; Tannor, David; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank

    Quantum optimal control becomes a necessary step in a number of studies in the quantum realm. Recent experimental advances showed that superconducting qubits can be controlled with an impressive accuracy. However, most of the standard optimal control algorithms are not designed to manage such high accuracy. To tackle this issue, a novel quantum optimal control algorithm have been introduced: the Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols (GOAT). It avoids the piecewise constant approximation of the control pulse used by standard algorithms. This allows an efficient implementation of very high accuracy optimization. It also includes a novel method to compute the gradient that provides many advantages, e.g. the absence of backpropagation or the natural route to optimize the robustness of the control pulses. This talk will present the GOAT algorithm and a few applications to transmons systems.

  17. Decentralized optimal control of dynamical systems under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabasov, R.; Dmitruk, N. M.; Kirillova, F. M.

    2011-07-01

    The problem of optimal control of a group of interconnected dynamical objects under uncertainty is considered. The cases are examined in which the centralized control of the group of objects is impossible due to delay in the channel for information exchange between the group members. Optimal self-control algorithms in real time for each dynamical object are proposed. Various types of a priori and current information about the behavior of the group members and about uncertainties in the system are examined. The proposed methods supplement the earlier developed optimal control methods for an individual dynamical system and the methods of decentralized optimal control of deterministic objects. The results are illustrated with examples.

  18. A Multiobjective Optimization Framework for Stochastic Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas; Maroulas, Vasileios; Xiong, Professor Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of subsystems that interact with each other and the environment. We treat the stochastic control problem as a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution is an optimal control policy that minimizes the average cost criterion for the entire system. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those we study here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value in deriving online an optimal control policy in complex systems.

  19. Optimal spacecraft attitude control using collocation and nonlinear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, A. L.; Conway, B. A.

    1992-10-01

    Direct collocation with nonlinear programming (DCNLP) is employed to find the optimal open-loop control histories for detumbling a disabled satellite. The controls are torques and forces applied to the docking arm and joint and torques applied about the body axes of the OMV. Solutions are obtained for cases in which various constraints are placed on the controls and in which the number of controls is reduced or increased from that considered in Conway and Widhalm (1986). DCLNP works well when applied to the optimal control problem of satellite attitude control. The formulation is straightforward and produces good results in a relatively small amount of time on a Cray X/MP with no a priori information about the optimal solution. The addition of joint acceleration to the controls significantly reduces the control magnitudes and optimal cost. In all cases, the torques and acclerations are modest and the optimal cost is very modest.

  20. Optimal stochastic control in natural resource management: Framework and examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1982-01-01

    A framework is presented for the application of optimal control methods to natural resource problems. An expression of the optimal control problem appropriate for renewable natural resources is given and its application to Markovian systems is presented in some detail. Three general approaches are outlined for determining optimal control of infinite time horizon systems and three examples from the natural resource literature are used for illustration.

  1. Optimizing the controllability of arbitrary networks with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to optimize networks' controllability has become a common and urgent problem. In this paper, we develop an efficient genetic algorithm oriented optimization tool to optimize the controllability of arbitrary networks consisting of both state nodes and control nodes under Popov-Belevitch-Hautus rank condition. The experimental results on a number of benchmark networks show the effectiveness of this method and the evolution of network topology is captured. Furthermore, we explore how network structure affects its controllability and find that the sparser a network is, the more control nodes are needed to control it and the larger the differences between node degrees, the more control nodes are needed to achieve the full control. Our framework provides an alternative to controllability optimization and can be applied to arbitrary networks without any limitations.

  2. Optimal dynamic control of resources in a distributed system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Kang G.; Krishna, C. M.; Lee, Yann-Hang

    1989-01-01

    The authors quantitatively formulate the problem of controlling resources in a distributed system so as to optimize a reward function and derive optimal control strategies using Markov decision theory. The control variables treated are quite general; they could be control decisions related to system configuration, repair, diagnostics, files, or data. Two algorithms for resource control in distributed systems are derived for time-invariant and periodic environments, respectively. A detailed example to demonstrate the power and usefulness of the approach is provided.

  3. Single-Spin Asymmetries AULsinϕh in Semi-Inclusive Pions Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhun; Mao, Wenjuan

    2016-02-01

    The single-spin asymmetry AULsinϕh of charged and neutral pion production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering on longitudinally polarized nucleon targets is studied. We particularly consider the effects of the twist-3 transverse-momentum dependent distribution functions fL⊥ and hL, which are calculated in two different spectator-diquark models. We estimate the asymmetry for π+, π‑ and π0 produced off the proton target at HERMES and compare the results with the HERMES measurements. We also predict the same asymmetric moment for different pions at the kinematics of CLAS 5.5 GeV on a proton target, as well as at COMPASS on a deuteron target for comparison.

  4. Fluorescence thermometry enhanced by the quantum coherence of single spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Toyli, David M.; de las Casas, Charles F.; Christle, David J.; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav V.; Awschalom, David D.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate fluorescence thermometry techniques with sensitivities approaching 10 mK⋅Hz−1/2 based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. These techniques use dynamical decoupling protocols to convert thermally induced shifts in the NV center's spin resonance frequencies into large changes in its fluorescence. By mitigating interactions with nearby nuclear spins and facilitating selective thermal measurements, these protocols enhance the spin coherence times accessible for thermometry by 45-fold, corresponding to a 7-fold improvement in the NV center’s temperature sensitivity. Moreover, we demonstrate these techniques can be applied over a broad temperature range and in both finite and near-zero magnetic field environments. This versatility suggests that the quantum coherence of single spins could be practically leveraged for sensitive thermometry in a wide variety of biological and microscale systems. PMID:23650364

  5. Cluster VS. Single-Spin ALGORITHMS—WHICH are More Efficient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, N.; Kohring, G. A.

    A comparison between single-cluster and single-spin algorithms is made for the Ising model in 2 and 3 dimensions. We compare the amount of computer time needed to achieve a given level of statistical accuracy, rather than the speed in terms of site updates per second or the dynamical critical exponents. Our main result is that the cluster algorithms become more efficient when the system size, Ld, exceeds, L~70-300 for d=2 and l~80-200 for d=3. The exact value of the crossover is dependent upon the computer being used. The lower end of the crossover range is typical of workstations while the higher end is typical of vector computers. Hence, even for workstations, the system sizes needed for efficient use of the cluster algorithm is relatively large.

  6. Entangled absorption of a single photon with a single spin in diamond.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hideo; Niikura, Naeko

    2015-02-01

    Quantum entanglement, a key resource for quantum information science, is inherent in a solid. It has been recently shown that entanglement between a single optical photon and a single spin qubit in a solid is generated via spontaneous emission. However, entanglement generation by measurement is rather essential for quantum operations. We here show that the physics behind the entangled emission can be time reversed to demonstrate entangled absorption mediated by an inherent spin-orbit entanglement in a single nitrogen vacancy center in diamond. Optical arbitrary spin state preparation and complete spin state tomography reveal the fidelity of the entangled absorption to be 95%. With the entangled emission and absorption of a photon, materials can be spontaneously entangled or swap their quantum state based on the quantum teleportation scheme. PMID:25699440

  7. Transverse single spin asymmetry in hadronic ηc,b production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Andreas; Zhou, Jian

    2013-07-01

    We study the transverse single spin asymmetry in ηc,b production in polarized hadron collisions, employing the collinear twist-3 approach in combination with the color singlet model. Our main focus lies on the contribution from the twist-3 Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman function. By extrapolating the derived spin-dependent cross section to the small transverse momentum region, consistency between the collinear twist-3 approach and the transverse-momentum-dependent factorization approach is confirmed. As a byproduct of this work, we identify a term contributing to the scale evolution of trigluon correlations in the flavor-singlet case which was originally missed, see also V. M. Braun, A. N. Manashov, and B. Pirnay [Phys. Rev. D 80, 114002 (2009); PRVDAQ1550-799886, 119902(E) (2012)].

  8. Single spin channels in Fe-doped CoTiSb semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. Y.; Dai, X. F.; Wang, X. T.; Li, P. P.; Xia, Q. L.; Zhang, Y.; Cui, Y. T.; Liu, G. D.

    2015-07-01

    The Fe-based single atomic chains are designed in the semiconductive CoTiSb matrix by continuously substituting Fe for Ti, Ti-Sb or Co in [0 0 1] crystallographic direction. The electronic structures and magnetic properties of CoTiSb supercells with the Fe-based single atomic chains have been investigated using the first-principles calculations. We predict that the single atomic chains of Fe-Sb (achieved by substituting Fe for Ti) and Fe-vacancy (achieved by substituting Fe for Co) show a 100% spin polarization and form a very small single spin channel. The single atomic chains of Fe-Fe (achieved by substituting Fe for Ti and Sb) show a spin-gapless characteristic.

  9. Real Time Magnetic Field Sensing and Imaging Using a Single Spin in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Rolf Simon; Harneit, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The Zeeman splitting of a localized single spin can be used to construct a highly sensitive magnetometer offering almost atomic spatial resolution. While sub-μT sensitivity can be obtained in principle using pulsed techniques and long measurement times, a fast and easy method without laborious data postprocessing is desirable for a scanning-probe approach with high spatial resolution. In order to measure the resonance frequency in real time, we applied a field-frequency lock to the optically detected magnetic resonance signal of a single electron spin in a nanodiamond. We achieved a sampling rate of up to 100 readings per sec with a sensitivity of 6μT/Hz. Images of the field distribution around a magnetic wire were acquired with ˜30μT resolution and 4096 submicron sized pixels in 10 min. The response of several spins was used to reconstruct the field orientation.

  10. Single-spin asymmetries in the leptoproduction of transversely polarized Λ hyperons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanazawa, K.; Metz, A.; Pitonyak, D.; Schlegel, M.

    2015-04-13

    We analyze single-spin asymmetries (SSAs) in the leptoproduction of transversely polarized Λ hyperons within the collinear twist-3 formalism. We calculate both the distribution and fragmentation terms in two different gauges (lightcone and Feynman) and show that the results are identical. This is the first time that the fragmentation piece has been analyzed for transversely polarized hadron production within the collinear twist-3 framework. In lightcone gauge we use the same techniques that were employed in computing the analogous piece in p↑ p → π X, which has become an important part to that reaction. With this in mind, we also verifymore » the gauge invariance of the formulas for the transverse SSA in the leptoproduction of pions. (author)« less

  11. Single-spin asymmetries in the leptoproduction of transversely polarized Λ hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, K.; Metz, A.; Pitonyak, D.; Schlegel, M.

    2015-04-13

    We analyze single-spin asymmetries (SSAs) in the leptoproduction of transversely polarized Λ hyperons within the collinear twist-3 formalism. We calculate both the distribution and fragmentation terms in two different gauges (lightcone and Feynman) and show that the results are identical. This is the first time that the fragmentation piece has been analyzed for transversely polarized hadron production within the collinear twist-3 framework. In lightcone gauge we use the same techniques that were employed in computing the analogous piece in p↑ p → π X, which has become an important part to that reaction. With this in mind, we also verify the gauge invariance of the formulas for the transverse SSA in the leptoproduction of pions. (author)

  12. Single-spin asymmetry in pp and pA-collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental data on the transverse single-spin asymmetry AN in the collisions of polarized protons with protons and nuclear targets are analyzed. The existing data are compared with predictions from the chromomagnetic polarization of quarks (CPQ) model for the processes of π±, K±, p and antiproton production in the inclusive reactions. The results of An calculations for the above processes are presented in the following kinematic region: 8.77 ≤ √s ≤ 500 GeV, 0 < xF ≤ 0.83, 0 ≤ pT ≤ 9 GeV/c. Predictions of the CPQ model can be used for planning of experiments SPASCHARM(IHEP), SPD(JINR), STAR and PHENIX.

  13. Optimal coordination and control of posture and movements.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Rolf; Fransson, Per-Anders; Magnusson, Måns

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of stability and coordination of posture and locomotion, together with algorithms for continuous-time quadratic optimization of motion control. Explicit solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for optimal control of rigid-body motion are obtained by solving an algebraic matrix equation. The stability is investigated with Lyapunov function theory and it is shown that global asymptotic stability holds. It is also shown how optimal control and adaptive control may act in concert in the case of unknown or uncertain system parameters. The solution describes motion strategies of minimum effort and variance. The proposed optimal control is formulated to be suitable as a posture and movement model for experimental validation and verification. The combination of adaptive and optimal control makes this algorithm a candidate for coordination and control of functional neuromuscular stimulation as well as of prostheses. Validation examples with experimental data are provided. PMID:19671443

  14. Multi-rate optimal controller design for electromagnetic suspension systems via linear matrix inequality optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. H.; Park, H. J.; Lee, J.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K. D.

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a discrete optimal control based on the multi-rate observer method for electromagnetic suspension systems in order to levitate the vehicle, maintaining the desired gap. The proposed multi-rate compensator consists of two parts which are the discrete Kalman filter and the optimal control law. The Kalman filter estimates all states with fast sampling rate time, using a slowly measured output from the gap sensor. The optimal control law is determined by linear matrix inequality optimization for the discrete time multiple input system obtained by the lifting operator. The proposed multi-rate controller has the advantages to guarantee the stability of the slow-rate optimal control and maintain the performance of fast-rate control. The simulation and experiment show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  15. A multiple objective optimization approach to aircraft control systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabak, D.; Schy, A. A.; Johnson, K. G.; Giesy, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The design of an aircraft lateral control system, subject to several performance criteria and constraints, is considered. While in the previous studies of the same model a single criterion optimization, with other performance requirements expressed as constraints, has been pursued, the current approach involves a multiple criteria optimization. In particular, a Pareto optimal solution is sought.

  16. Predictions on the Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries at Subleading Twist of Pion Production in Semi-Inclusive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenjuan; Lu, Zhun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We estimate the single-spin asymmetries with sin ϕS and sin(2ϕh ‑ ϕS) angular dependencies for electroproduction of pions in transversely polarized semi-inclusive DIS process. We consider the effect of the twist-3 transverse momentum dependent distributions which convoluted with twist-2 fragmentation functions. We calculate these distributions in a spectator-diquark model, and predict the corresponding single-spin asymmetries at the kinematics of HERMES, JLab and COMPASS. We find that the numerical estimates show that the asymmetries are sizable, and the T-odd twist-3 TMDs play an important role in these asymmetries.

  17. H2-optimal control with generalized state-space models for use in control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Several advances are provided solving combined control-structure optimization problems. The author has extended solutions from H2 optimal control theory to the use of generalized state space models. The generalized state space models preserve the sparsity inherent in finite element models and hence provide some promise for handling very large problems. Also, expressions for the gradient of the optimal control cost are derived which use the generalized state space models.

  18. Optimal control of blending and melting of copper concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanbekova, Ulzhan; Hotra, Oleksandra; Koshimbayev, Shamil; Popiel, Piotr; Tanaś, Jacek

    2015-09-01

    The mathematical models of the melting process, the optimization criterion and constraints on the input and controlling variables and the values of the conductivities of the melt under the electrodes and the phase voltages are used to solve the optimization problem of the electrical regime of the electric furnace. In this paper the optimal variant of the electrical regime of the furnace for the electromelting and blending processing of copper concentrates is considered, which can be provided by the optimal immersion of electrodes. The optimal parameters of the technological process of electromelting and blending are calculated. The proposed mathematical model could be applied for melting process optimization.

  19. Particle swarm optimization for discrete-time inverse optimal control of a doubly fed induction generator.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cruz, Riemann; Sanchez, Edgar N; Ornelas-Tellez, Fernando; Loukianov, Alexander G; Harley, Ronald G

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the authors propose a particle swarm optimization (PSO) for a discrete-time inverse optimal control scheme of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). For the inverse optimal scheme, a control Lyapunov function (CLF) is proposed to obtain an inverse optimal control law in order to achieve trajectory tracking. A posteriori, it is established that this control law minimizes a meaningful cost function. The CLFs depend on matrix selection in order to achieve the control objectives; this matrix is determined by two mechanisms: initially, fixed parameters are proposed for this matrix by a trial-and-error method and then by using the PSO algorithm. The inverse optimal control scheme is illustrated via simulations for the DFIG, including the comparison between both mechanisms. PMID:24273145

  20. Nonlinear model predictive control based on collective neurodynamic optimization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    In general, nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) entails solving a sequential global optimization problem with a nonconvex cost function or constraints. This paper presents a novel collective neurodynamic optimization approach to NMPC without linearization. Utilizing a group of recurrent neural networks (RNNs), the proposed collective neurodynamic optimization approach searches for optimal solutions to global optimization problems by emulating brainstorming. Each RNN is guaranteed to converge to a candidate solution by performing constrained local search. By exchanging information and iteratively improving the starting and restarting points of each RNN using the information of local and global best known solutions in a framework of particle swarm optimization, the group of RNNs is able to reach global optimal solutions to global optimization problems. The essence of the proposed collective neurodynamic optimization approach lies in the integration of capabilities of global search and precise local search. The simulation results of many cases are discussed to substantiate the effectiveness and the characteristics of the proposed approach. PMID:25608315

  1. Stochastic Optimal Control for Series Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for improving fuel economy and reducing emissions has stimulated significant research and investment in hybrid propulsion systems. In this paper, we address the problem of optimizing online the supervisory control in a series hybrid configuration by modeling its operation as a controlled Markov chain using the average cost criterion. We treat the stochastic optimal control problem as a dual constrained optimization problem. We show that the control policy that yields higher probability distribution to the states with low cost and lower probability distribution to the states with high cost is an optimal control policy, defined as an equilibrium control policy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed controller in a series hybrid configuration and compare it with a thermostat-type controller.

  2. A Framework for Optimal Control Allocation with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Jutte, Christine V.; Burken, John J.; Trinh, Khanh V.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aircraft generally employ mixing algorithms or lookup tables to determine control surface deflections needed to achieve moments commanded by the flight control system. Control allocation is the problem of converting desired moments into control effector commands. Next generation aircraft may have many multipurpose, redundant control surfaces, adding considerable complexity to the control allocation problem. These issues can be addressed with optimal control allocation. Most optimal control allocation algorithms have control surface position and rate constraints. However, these constraints are insufficient to ensure that the aircraft's structural load limits will not be exceeded by commanded surface deflections. In this paper, a framework is proposed to enable a flight control system with optimal control allocation to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints. A proof of concept simulation that demonstrates the framework in a simulation of a generic transport aircraft is presented.

  3. Optimizing Sensor and Actuator Arrays for ASAC Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of an approach to optimizing the locations for arrays of sensors and actuators in active noise control systems. A type of directed combinatorial search, called Tabu Search, is used to select an optimal configuration from a much larger set of candidate locations. The benefit of using an optimized set is demonstrated. The importance of limiting actuator forces to realistic levels when evaluating the cost function is discussed. Results of flight testing an optimized system are presented. Although the technique has been applied primarily to Active Structural Acoustic Control systems, it can be adapted for use in other active noise control implementations.

  4. Pilot-optimal multivariable control synthesis by output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1981-01-01

    A control system design approach for optimal stability augmentation, systems, using limited state feedback theory with the specific inclusion of the human pilot in the loop is presented. The methodology is especially suitable for application to flight vehicles exhibiting nonconventional dynamic characteristics and for which quantitative handling qualities specifications are not available. The design is based on a correlation between pilot ratings and objective function of the optimal control model of the human pilot. Simultaneous optimization for augmentation and pilot gains are required.

  5. A quadratic weight selection algorithm. [for optimal flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is presented which determines a positive semi-definite state weighting matrix in the linear-quadratic optimal control design problem. The algorithm chooses the weighting matrix by placing closed-loop eigenvalues and eigenvectors near desired locations using optimal feedback gains. A simplified flight control design example is used to illustrate the algorithms capabilities.

  6. Finding Optimal Gains In Linear-Quadratic Control Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical method based on Volterra factorization leads to new approximations for optimal control gains in finite-time linear-quadratic control problem of system having infinite number of dimensions. Circumvents need to analyze and solve Riccati equations and provides more transparent connection between dynamics of system and optimal gain.

  7. EFFICIENCY OPTIMIZATION CONTROL OF AC INDUCTION MOTORS: INITIAL LABORATORY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of a fuzzy logic, energy-optimizing controller to improve the efficiency of motor/drive combinations that operate at varying loads and speeds. his energy optimizer is complemented by a sensorless speed controller that maintains motor shaft rev...

  8. A criterion for joint optimization of identification and robust control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Yam, Y.; Mettler, E.

    1992-01-01

    A criterion for system identification is developed that is consistent with the intended used of the fitted model for modern robust control synthesis. Specifically, a joint optimization problem is posed which simultaneously solves the plant model estimate and control design, so as to optimize robust performance over the set of plants consistent with a specified experimental data set.

  9. Educational Tool for Optimal Controller Tuning Using Evolutionary Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona Morales, D.; Jimenez-Hornero, J. E.; Vazquez, F.; Morilla, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal tuning tool is presented for control structures based on multivariable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control, using genetic algorithms as an alternative to traditional optimization algorithms. From an educational point of view, this tool provides students with the necessary means to consolidate their knowledge on…

  10. Attitude Control Optimization for ROCSAT-2 Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Wu, A.-M.

    one revolution. The purpose of this paper is to present the attitude control design optimization such that the maximum solar energy is ingested while minimum maneuvering energy is dissipated. The strategy includes the maneuvering sequence design, the minimization of angular path, the sizing of three magnetic torquers, and the trade-off of the size, number and orientations arrangement of momentum wheels.

  11. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009)], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects. PMID:25375546

  12. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.228702], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects.

  13. Matching trajectory optimization and nonlinear tracking control for HALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangjong; Jang, Jieun; Ryu, Hyeok; Lee, Kyun Ho

    2014-11-01

    This paper concerns optimal trajectory generation and nonlinear tracking control for stratospheric airship platform of VIA-200. To compensate for the mismatch between the point-mass model of optimal trajectory and the 6-DOF model of the nonlinear tracking problem, a new matching trajectory optimization approach is proposed. The proposed idea reduces the dissimilarity of both problems and reduces the uncertainties in the nonlinear equations of motion for stratospheric airship. In addition, its refined optimal trajectories yield better results under jet stream conditions during flight. The resultant optimal trajectories of VIA-200 are full three-dimensional ascent flight trajectories reflecting the realistic constraints of flight conditions and airship performance with and without a jet stream. Finally, 6-DOF nonlinear equations of motion are derived, including a moving wind field, and the vectorial backstepping approach is applied. The desirable tracking performance is demonstrated that application of the proposed matching optimization method enables the smooth linkage of trajectory optimization to tracking control problems.

  14. New Applications of Variational Analysis to Optimization and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordukhovich, Boris S.

    We discuss new applications of advanced tools of variational analysis and generalized differentiation to a number of important problems in optimization theory, equilibria, optimal control, and feedback control design. The presented results are largely based on the recent work by the author and his collaborators. Among the main topics considered and briefly surveyed in this paper are new calculus rules for generalized differentiation of nonsmooth and set-valued mappings; necessary and sufficient conditions for new notions of linear subextremality and suboptimality in constrained problems; optimality conditions for mathematical problems with equilibrium constraints; necessary optimality conditions for optimistic bilevel programming with smooth and nonsmooth data; existence theorems and optimality conditions for various notions of Pareto-type optimality in problems of multiobjective optimization with vector-valued and set-valued cost mappings; Lipschitzian stability and metric regularity aspects for constrained and variational systems.

  15. Optimization and Control of Electric Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Molzahn, Daniel K.

    2014-10-17

    The analysis and optimization needs for planning and operation of the electric power system are challenging due to the scale and the form of model representations. The connected network spans the continent and the mathematical models are inherently nonlinear. Traditionally, computational limits have necessitated the use of very simplified models for grid analysis, and this has resulted in either less secure operation, or less efficient operation, or both. The research conducted in this project advances techniques for power system optimization problems that will enhance reliable and efficient operation. The results of this work appear in numerous publications and address different application problems include optimal power flow (OPF), unit commitment, demand response, reliability margins, planning, transmission expansion, as well as general tools and algorithms.

  16. Exact optimal solution for a class of dual control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Suping; Qian, Fucai; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers a discrete-time stochastic optimal control problem for which only measurement equation is partially observed with unknown constant parameters taking value in a finite set of stochastic systems. Because of the fact that the cost-to-go function at each stage contains variance and the non-separability of the variance is so complicated that the dynamic programming cannot be successfully applied, the optimal solution has not been found. In this paper, a new approach to the optimal solution is proposed by embedding the original non-separable problem into a separable auxiliary problem. The theoretical condition on which the optimal solution of the original problem can be attained from a set of solutions of the auxiliary problem is established. In addition, the optimality of the interchanging algorithm is proved and the analytical solution of the optimal control is also obtained. The performance of this controller is illustrated with a simple example.

  17. A pseudospectral method for optimal control of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Jr-Shin; Ruths, Justin; Stefanatos, Dionisis

    2009-10-28

    In this paper, we present a unified computational method based on pseudospectral approximations for the design of optimal pulse sequences in open quantum systems. The proposed method transforms the problem of optimal pulse design, which is formulated as a continuous-time optimal control problem, to a finite-dimensional constrained nonlinear programming problem. This resulting optimization problem can then be solved using existing numerical optimization suites. We apply the Legendre pseudospectral method to a series of optimal control problems on open quantum systems that arise in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in liquids. These problems have been well studied in previous literature and analytical optimal controls have been found. We find an excellent agreement between the maximum transfer efficiency produced by our computational method and the analytical expressions. Moreover, our method permits us to extend the analysis and address practical concerns, including smoothing discontinuous controls as well as deriving minimum-energy and time-optimal controls. The method is not restricted to the systems studied in this article and is applicable to optimal manipulation of both closed and open quantum systems. PMID:19894930

  18. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  19. Applying new optimization algorithms to more predictive control

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    The connections between optimization and control theory have been explored by many researchers and optimization algorithms have been applied with success to optimal control. The rapid pace of developments in model predictive control has given rise to a host of new problems to which optimization has yet to be applied. Concurrently, developments in optimization, and especially in interior-point methods, have produced a new set of algorithms that may be especially helpful in this context. In this paper, we reexamine the relatively simple problem of control of linear processes subject to quadratic objectives and general linear constraints. We show how new algorithms for quadratic programming can be applied efficiently to this problem. The approach extends to several more general problems in straightforward ways.

  20. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  1. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  2. Extracting W Single Spin Asymmetry in Longitudinally Polarized pp Collisions at PHENIX forward arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meles, Abraham

    2014-09-01

    The parity-violating longitudinal single spin asymmetry AL in the production of W bosons in p + p collisions at √{ s} = 510 GeV is sensitive to the polarization of light quarks and anti-quarks in the proton. However, identifying the muons from the decay of the W is challenging due to a great background of hadronic processes and other muon producing processes. In the forward and backward hemispheres of PHENIX at RHIC, the muon spectrometers have been recently upgraded in order to provide additional trigger and tracking information to suppress those backgrounds. One of those upgrades is the Forward Vertex (FVTX) detector, a silicon-strip tracker. In 2013, PHENIX collected approximately 240 pb-1 of polarized p + p collisions at √{ s} = 510 GeV with a beam polarization of 56 %. The ability of the FVTX to improve the W signal will be reviewed, over view of the analysis techniques used to extract the signal from the data in RHIC 2013 run will be discussed. The parity-violating longitudinal single spin asymmetry AL in the production of W bosons in p + p collisions at √{ s} = 510 GeV is sensitive to the polarization of light quarks and anti-quarks in the proton. However, identifying the muons from the decay of the W is challenging due to a great background of hadronic processes and other muon producing processes. In the forward and backward hemispheres of PHENIX at RHIC, the muon spectrometers have been recently upgraded in order to provide additional trigger and tracking information to suppress those backgrounds. One of those upgrades is the Forward Vertex (FVTX) detector, a silicon-strip tracker. In 2013, PHENIX collected approximately 240 pb-1 of polarized p + p collisions at √{ s} = 510 GeV with a beam polarization of 56 %. The ability of the FVTX to improve the W signal will be reviewed, over view of the analysis techniques used to extract the signal from the data in RHIC 2013 run will be discussed. Support from US Department of Energy.

  3. Polyhedral Interpolation for Optimal Reaction Control System Jet Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefert, Leon P.; Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for interpolating optimal values for spacecraft Reaction Control System jet firing duty cycles. The algorithm uses the symmetrical geometry of the optimal solution to reduce the number of calculations and data storage requirements to a level that enables implementation on the small real time flight control systems used in spacecraft. The process minimizes acceleration direction errors, maximizes control authority, and minimizes fuel consumption.

  4. Control optimization, stabilization and computer algorithms for aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research related to reliable aircraft design is summarized. Topics discussed include systems reliability optimization, failure detection algorithms, analysis of nonlinear filters, design of compensators incorporating time delays, digital compensator design, estimation for systems with echoes, low-order compensator design, descent-phase controller for 4-D navigation, infinite dimensional mathematical programming problems and optimal control problems with constraints, robust compensator design, numerical methods for the Lyapunov equations, and perturbation methods in linear filtering and control.

  5. Robust control systems design by H-infinity optimization theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, B. C.; Li, X. P.; Banda, S. S.; Yeh, H. H.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, step-by-step procedures of applying the H-infinity theory to robust control systems design are given. The objective of the paper is to eliminate the possible difficulties a control engineer may encounter in applying H-infinity control theory and to clear up some misconceptions about H-infinity theory like high-gain controller and numerical obstacles, etc. An efficient algorithm is used to compute the optimal H-infinity norm. The Glover and Doyle (1988) controller formulas are slightly modified and used to construct an optimal controller without any numerical difficulties.

  6. Theory of Optimal Phase-Unlocked Pump-Dump Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yijing

    1997-04-01

    A novel theory of optimal control via a pair of phase-unlocked pump-dump fields is developed. We first derive a pair of coupled nonlinear control equations for mixed or dissipative quantum systems in the strong response regime. These equations should be solved iteratively, resulting in a locally optimal pair of fields that are however usually too complicated to be realizable. To facilitate this problem, we further develop a hierarchy of reduction and arrive at a variety of simplified control equation pairs. In the weak response regime, we obtain a pair of coupled semi-linear control equations in which the globally optimal pump field at any given pump field, or vice verse, can be evaluated in a non-iterative manor. However, it still requires an iterative solution to the semi-globally optimal pair of pump-dump fields. Further reduction is then devised to consider the pure state control system in the weak response regime. In this case, we derive a generalized eigenequation for the non-iterative solution to the complete set of optimal control field pairs, and further identify the globally optimal one unambiguously. The existence of certain symmetry relation between the pump and dump fields in any optimal pair is also analyzed in the stimulate Raman pumping control configuration and demonstrated numerically.

  7. Control strategy optimization of HVAC plants

    SciTech Connect

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Zanfardino, Antonella; Martini, Fabrizio; Pirozzi, Salvatore; Ubertini, Stefano

    2015-03-10

    In this paper we present a methodology to optimize the operating conditions of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) plants to achieve a higher energy efficiency in use. Semi-empiric numerical models of the plant components are used to predict their performances as a function of their set-point and the environmental and occupied space conditions. The optimization is performed through a graph-based algorithm that finds the set-points of the system components that minimize energy consumption and/or energy costs, while matching the user energy demands. The resulting model can be used with systems of almost any complexity, featuring both HVAC components and energy systems, and is sufficiently fast to make it applicable to real-time setting.

  8. Optimal control of Atlantic population Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauser, C.E.; Runge, M.C.; Cooch, E.G.; Johnson, F.A.; Harvey, W.F., IV

    2007-01-01

    Management of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) can be a balance between providing sustained harvest opportunity while not allowing populations to become overabundant and cause damage. In this paper, we focus on the Atlantic population of Canada geese and use stochastic dynamic programming to determine the optimal harvest strategy over a range of plausible models for population dynamics. There is evidence to suggest that the population exhibits significant age structure, and it is possible to reconstruct age structure from surveys. Consequently the harvest strategy is a function of the age composition, as well as the abundance, of the population. The objective is to maximize harvest while maintaining the number of breeding adults in the population between specified upper and lower limits. In addition, the total harvest capacity is limited and there is uncertainty about the strength of density-dependence. We find that under a density-independent model, harvest is maximized by maintaining the breeding population at the highest acceptable abundance. However if harvest capacity is limited, then the optimal long-term breeding population size is lower than the highest acceptable level, to reduce the risk of the population growing to an unacceptably large size. Under the proposed density-dependent model, harvest is maximized by maintaining the breeding population at an intermediate level between the bounds on acceptable population size; limits to harvest capacity have little effect on the optimal long-term population size. It is clear that the strength of density-dependence and constraints on harvest significantly affect the optimal harvest strategy for this population. Model discrimination might be achieved in the long term, while continuing to meet management goals, by adopting an adaptive management strategy.

  9. Improving Vortex Models via Optimal Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar; Eldredge, Jeff; Speyer, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing kinematics, common in biological flight, can allow for agile flight maneuvers. On the other hand, we currently lack sufficiently accurate low-order models that enable such agility in man-made micro air vehicles. Low-order point vortex models have had reasonable success in predicting the qualitative behavior of the aerodynamic forces resulting from such maneuvers. However, these models tend to over-predict the force response when compared to experiments and high-fidelity simulations, in part because they neglect small excursions of separation from the wing's edges. In the present study, we formulate a constrained minimization problem which allows us to relax the usual edge regularity conditions in favor of empirical determination of vortex strengths. The optimal vortex strengths are determined by minimizing the error with respect to empirical force data, while the vortex positions are constrained to evolve according to the impulse matching model developed in previous work. We consider a flat plate undergoing various canonical maneuvers. The optimized model leads to force predictions remarkably close to the empirical data. Additionally, we compare the optimized and original models in an effort to distill appropriate edge conditions for unsteady maneuvers.

  10. Optimal control of plates using incompatible strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. W.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    A flat plate will bend into a curved shell if it experiences an inhomogeneous growth field or if constrained appropriately at a boundary. While the forward problem associated with this process is well studied, the inverse problem of designing the boundary conditions or growth fields to achieve a particular shape is much less understood. We use ideas from variational optimization theory to formulate a well posed version of this inverse problem to determine the optimal growth field or boundary condition that will give rise to an arbitrary target shape, optimizing for both closeness to the target shape and for smoothness of the growth field. We solve the resulting system of PDE numerically using finite element methods with examples for both the fully non-symmetric case as well as for simplified one-dimensional and axisymmetric geometries. We also show that the system can also be solved semi-analytically by positing an ansatz for the deformation and growth fields in a circular disk with given thickness profile, leading to paraboloidal, cylindrical and saddle-shaped target shapes, and show how a soft mode can arise from a non-axisymmetric deformation of a structure with axisymmetric material properties.

  11. Studies on controllability of directed networks with extremal optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jin; Lu, Yong-Zai; Chu, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Almost all natural, social and man-made-engineered systems can be represented by a complex network to describe their dynamic behaviors. To make a real-world complex network controllable with its desired topology, the study on network controllability has been one of the most critical and attractive subjects for both network and control communities. In this paper, based on a given directed-weighted network with both state and control nodes, a novel optimization tool with extremal dynamics to generate an optimal network topology with minimum control nodes and complete controllability under Kalman’s rank condition has been developed. The experimental results on a number of popular benchmark networks show the proposed tool is effective to identify the minimum control nodes which are sufficient to guide the whole network’s dynamics and provide the evolution of network topology during the optimization process. We also find the conclusion: “the sparse networks need more control nodes than the dense, and the homogeneous networks need fewer control nodes compared to the heterogeneous” (Liu et al., 2011 [18]), is also applicable to network complete controllability. These findings help us to understand the network dynamics and make a real-world network under the desired control. Moreover, compared with the relevant research results on structural controllability with minimum driver nodes, the proposed solution methodology may also be applied to other constrained network optimization problems beyond complete controllability with minimum control nodes.

  12. Time-optimal maneuvering control of a rigid spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Li-Chun; Yang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ju

    2007-05-01

    The time-optimal rest-to-rest maneuvering control problem of a rigid spacecraft is studied in this paper. By utilizing an iterative procedure, this problem is formulated and solved as a constrained nonlinear programming (NLP) one. In this novel method, the count of control steps is fixed initially and the sampling period is treated as a variable in the optimization process. The optimization object is to minimize the sampling period below a specific minimum value, which is set in advance considering the accuracy of discretization. To generate initial feasible solutions of the NLP problem, a genetic-algorithm-based is also proposed such that the optimization process can be started from many different points to find the globally optimal solution. With the proposed method, one can find a time-optimal rest-to-rest maneuver of the rigid spacecraft between two attitudes. To show the feasibility of the proposed method, simulation results are included for illustration.

  13. Time-optimal control of the magnetically levitated photolithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Tucker, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes two approaches to time-optimal control of a nonlinear magnetically levitated platen. The system of interest is a candidate technology for next-generation photolithography machines used in the manufacture of integrated circuits. The dynamics and the variable peak control force of the electro-magnetic actuators preclude the direct application of classical time-optimal control methodologies for determining optimal rest-to-rest maneuver strategies. Therefore, this study explores alternate approaches using a previously developed computer simulation. In the first approach, conservative estimates of the available control forces are used to generate suboptimal switching curves. In the second approach, exact solutions are determined iteratively and used as a training set for an artificial neural network. The trained network provides optimal actuator switching times that incorporate the full nonlinearities of the magnetic levitation actuators. Sample problems illustrate the effectiveness of these techniques as compared to traditional proportional-derivative control.

  14. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  15. Time dependent optimal switching controls in online selling models

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Cohen, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to incorporate dishonesty in online selling via a stochastic optimal control problem. In our framework, the seller wishes to maximize her average wealth level W at a fixed time T of her choosing. The corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellmann (HJB) equation is analyzed for a basic case. For more general models, the admissible control set is restricted to a jump process that switches between extreme values. We propose a new approach, where the optimal control problem is reduced to a multivariable optimization problem.

  16. A duality framework for stochastic optimal control of complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of interactive subsystems. We formulate a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems and provide a duality framework to prove that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion of the system. We provide the conditions of existence and a geometric interpretation of the solution. For practical situations having constraints consistent with those studied here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value when we seek to derive online the optimal control policy in complex systems.

  17. Optimal control of a harmonic oscillator: Economic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janová, Jitka; Hampel, David

    2013-10-01

    Optimal control is a popular technique for modelling and solving the dynamic decision problems in economics. A standard interpretation of the criteria function and Lagrange multipliers in the profit maximization problem is well known. On a particular example, we aim to a deeper understanding of the possible economic interpretations of further mathematical and solution features of the optimal control problem: we focus on the solution of the optimal control problem for harmonic oscillator serving as a model for Phillips business cycle. We discuss the economic interpretations of arising mathematical objects with respect to well known reasoning for these in other problems.

  18. Optimal active control for Burgers equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Yutaka

    1994-01-01

    A method for active fluid flow control based on control theory is discussed. Dynamic programming and fixed point successive approximations are used to accommodate the nonlinear control problem. The long-term goal of this project is to establish an effective method applicable to complex flows such as turbulence and jets. However, in this report, the method is applied to stochastic Burgers equation as an intermediate step towards this goal. Numerical results are compared with those obtained by gradient search methods.

  19. Deterministic methods for multi-control fuel loading optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Fariz B. Abdul

    We have developed a multi-control fuel loading optimization code for pressurized water reactors based on deterministic methods. The objective is to flatten the fuel burnup profile, which maximizes overall energy production. The optimal control problem is formulated using the method of Lagrange multipliers and the direct adjoining approach for treatment of the inequality power peaking constraint. The optimality conditions are derived for a multi-dimensional multi-group optimal control problem via calculus of variations. Due to the Hamiltonian having a linear control, our optimal control problem is solved using the gradient method to minimize the Hamiltonian and a Newton step formulation to obtain the optimal control. We are able to satisfy the power peaking constraint during depletion with the control at beginning of cycle (BOC) by building the proper burnup path forward in time and utilizing the adjoint burnup to propagate the information back to the BOC. Our test results show that we are able to achieve our objective and satisfy the power peaking constraint during depletion using either the fissile enrichment or burnable poison as the control. Our fuel loading designs show an increase of 7.8 equivalent full power days (EFPDs) in cycle length compared with 517.4 EFPDs for the AP600 first cycle.

  20. Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry of π0 and η Mesons at RHIC/PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    We presented measurements of the transverse single spin asymmetries (AN) for neutral π and η meson at forward rapidities and central rapidity with the PHENIX detector at RHIC at 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV. At mid-rapidity, π0 and eta are reconstructed from di-photon decay. At forward rapidities, π0 and eta meson are measured using di-photons decays and electromagnetic clusters due to the photon merging effects are significant for energy E > 20GeV. The neutral-pion measurement of AN at mid-rapidity is consistent with zero with uncertainties a factor of 20 smaller than previous publications, which will lead to improved constraints on the gluon Sivers function. At higher rapidities, both neutral π and η AN exhibit sizable asymmetries. The origin of the forward AN is presently not understood quantitatively. We also measured η meson cross section for 0.5 < pT < 5.0 GeV/c and 3.0 < η < 3.8. It is well described by a NLO pQCD calculation.

  1. Accessing sea quark's angular momentum through polarized target Drell-Yan single-spin asymmetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaodong; P-1039 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A Letter-Of-Intent (P-1039) has been submitted to the Fermilab's Program Advisory Committee in May 2013, for a measurement of transversely polarized proton target (NH3) single-spin asymmetry (SSA) in Drell-Yan reaction with a 120 GeV/c unpolarized proton beam using a similar setup as in the ongoing unpolarized target experiment (E906). The goal of this LOI is to clearly pin down the u -quark Sivers distribution in the x range of 0.1-0.3, where a large sea flavor asymmetry (d / u) has been observed. A non-vanishing quark Sivers distribution arises from the imaginary piece of amplitudes interference between quark angular momentum L = 0 , and L ≠ 0 wave functions. Existing semi-inclusive DIS Sivers-type SSA data from HERMES, COMPASS and JLab-Hall A, while sensitive to valence quarks' Sivers distributions, do not provide much constrains on sea quarks' Sivers distributions. In the case that u -quark carries zero angular momentum, one expects u -quark's Sivers distribution to vanish, therefore observing a zero target SSA in Drell-Yan reaction in P-1039.

  2. Freezing motion-induced dephasing for single spin-state stored in atomic ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Jun, Rui; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Atomic-ensemble quantum memories are well considered as a promising approach of long-distance quantum communication and computation for strong light-matter interaction. While the storage lifetime is limited by the motion-induced dephasing. Spin-echo technique, increasing wavelength of spin-wave, as well as optical lattice are used commonly to overcome this dephasing process. However, these techniques either need extremely high fidelity of echo pulse or put high restriction on filter and experimental complexity. In this poster, we demonstrate a convenient technique to freeze the motion-induced dephasing without population inversion and can be used in large storage angles. Combined with ``clock states'', the lifetime is extended by one order of magnitude to the limit of the thermal expansion. What's more, high non-classical correlation above 20 has been achieved to guarantee the memory in quantum regime.By making the advance from passive engineering to coherent manipulation of single spin-wave states, our work enriches the experimental toolbox of harnessing atomic ensembles for high-performance quantum memories, especially for holographic quantum memories where many spin-waves with different wave-vectors are used.

  3. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in the N-to-Delta Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, Nuruzzaman; Qweak Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, QWp,through the precision measurement of the parity-violating (PV) asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at low momentum transfer. The data are currently under analysis. There is a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (An) on H2 with a sin(φ) -like dependence due to 2- γ exchange. The size of An is few ppm, so a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, in addition to potentially small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, might lead to few ppb corrections to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of An background studies, we made the first measurement of An in the N-to-Delta transition using the Q-weak apparatus. An from electron-nucleon scattering is also a unique tool to study the γ* ΔΔ form factors. Status of the analysis will be presented. Supported in part by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation

  4. Optimal actuator location of minimum norm controls for heat equation with general controlled domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Xu, Yashan; Yang, Dong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study optimal actuator location of the minimum norm controls for a multi-dimensional heat equation with control defined in the space L2 (Ω × (0 , T)). The actuator domain is time-varying in the sense that it is only required to have a prescribed Lebesgue measure for any moment. We select an optimal actuator location so that the optimal control takes its minimal norm over all possible actuator domains. We build a framework of finding the Nash equilibrium so that we can develop a sufficient and necessary condition to characterize the optimal relaxed solutions for both actuator location and corresponding optimal control of the open-loop system. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal classical solutions are therefore concluded. As a result, we synthesize both optimal actuator location and corresponding optimal control into a time-varying feedbacks.

  5. Coupled Low-thrust Trajectory and System Optimization via Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrina, Matthew A.; Englander, Jacob Aldo; Ghosh, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of low-thrust trajectories is tightly coupled with the spacecraft hardware. Trading trajectory characteristics with system parameters ton identify viable solutions and determine mission sensitivities across discrete hardware configurations is labor intensive. Local independent optimization runs can sample the design space, but a global exploration that resolves the relationships between the system variables across multiple objectives enables a full mapping of the optimal solution space. A multi-objective, hybrid optimal control algorithm is formulated using a multi-objective genetic algorithm as an outer loop systems optimizer around a global trajectory optimizer. The coupled problem is solved simultaneously to generate Pareto-optimal solutions in a single execution. The automated approach is demonstrated on two boulder return missions.

  6. A Numerical Optimization Approach for Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Garg, Devendra P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a method to tune fuzzy controllers using numerical optimization. The main attribute of this approach is that it allows fuzzy logic controllers to be tuned to achieve global performance requirements. Furthermore, this approach allows design constraints to be implemented during the tuning process. The method tunes the controller by parameterizing the membership functions for error, change-in-error and control output. The resulting parameters form a design vector which is iteratively changed to minimize an objective function. The minimal objective function results in an optimal performance of the system. A spacecraft mounted science instrument line-of-sight pointing control is used to demonstrate results.

  7. Towards fault-tolerant optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chizeck, H. J.; Willsky, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper considers the design of fault-tolerant controllers that may endow systems with dynamic reliability. Results for jump linear quadratic Gaussian control problems are extended to include random jump costs, trajectory discontinuities, and a simple case of non-Markovian mode transitions.

  8. Optimal Control of the Parametric Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, B.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Nulton, J.; Tsirlin, A.; Salamon, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a solution to the minimum time control problem for a classical harmonic oscillator to reach a target energy E[subscript T] from a given initial state (q[subscript i], p[subscript i]) by controlling its frequency [omega], [omega][subscript min] less than or equal to [omega] less than or equal to [omega][subscript max]. A brief synopsis…

  9. Optimize control of natural gas plants

    SciTech Connect

    Treiber, S.; Walker, J.; Tremblay, M. de ); Delgadillo, R.L.; Velasquez, R.N.; Valarde, M.J.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Multivariable constraint control (MCS) has a very beneficial and profitable impact on the operation of natural gas plants. The applications described operate completely within a distributed control system (DCS) or programmable logic controllers (PLCs). That makes MCS accessible to almost all gas plant operators. The technology's relative ease of use, low maintenance effort and software sensor,'' make it possible to operate these control applications without increasing technical support staff. MCS improves not only profitability but also regulatory compliance of gas plants. It has been applied to fractionation units, cryogenic units, amine treaters, sulfur recovery units and utilities. The application typically pay for the cost of software and engineering in less than one month. If a DCS is installed within such a project the advanced control applications can generate a payout in less than one year. In the case here (an application on the deethanizers of a 500 MMscfd gas plant) product revenue increased by over $2 million/yr.

  10. Optimized synthesis of concurrently checked controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Leveugle, R.; Saucier, G. )

    1990-04-01

    Dedicated controllers (or FSM's) with concurrent checking capabilities are of prime importance in highly dependable applications. This paper presents a new method for introducing on-line test facilities in a controller with a very low overhead. This on-line test consists in detecting illegal paths in the control flow graph. These illegal paths may be due either to permanent faults or to transient errors. The state code flow is compacted through polynomial division. An implicit justifying signature method is applied at the state code level and ensures identical signatures before each join node of the control flow graph. The signatures are then independent of the path followed previously in the graph and the comparison to reference data is greatly facilitated. This property is obtained by a clever state assignment, nearly without area overhead. The controllers can then be checked by signature analysis, either by a built-in monitor or by an external checker.