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1

Decontamination and decommissioning experience at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

A continuing concern within the DOE complex is how to address the retirement contains special of a facility which nuclear material (SNM). When the life expectancy of a facility has been reached, decisions must be made pertaining to (1) rial from the facility, removing the mate (2) accounting for the material and (3) final disposition of the material. This paper will discuss such a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) process which we are presently dealing with at the Savannah River Site. The process must follow DOE Order 5633.3A as well as internal Company procedures regarding MC&A. In some D&D cases the material can be exempt from the DOE Order when all of the following criteria are met: (1) the material has been declared waste, (2) the material has been written off the MC&A books, and (3) the material is under the control of a waste management organization.

Monson, R.W.

1994-07-01

2

Public experiences of mass casualty decontamination.  

PubMed

In this article, we analyze feedback from simulated casualties who took part in field exercises involving mass decontamination, to gain an understanding of how responder communication can affect people's experiences of and compliance with decontamination. We analyzed questionnaire data gathered from 402 volunteers using the framework approach, to provide an insight into the public's experiences of decontamination and how these experiences are shaped by the actions of emergency responders. Factors that affected casualties' experiences of the decontamination process included the need for greater practical information and better communication from responders, and the need for privacy. Results support previous findings from small-scale incidents that involved decontamination in showing that participants wanted better communication from responders during the process of decontamination, including more practical information, and that the failure of responders to communicate effectively with members of the public led to anxiety about the decontamination process. The similarity between the findings from the exercises described in this article and previous research into real incidents involving decontamination suggests that field exercises provide a useful way to examine the effect of responder communication strategies on the public's experiences of decontamination. Future exercises should examine in more detail the effect of various communication strategies on the public's experiences of decontamination. This will facilitate the development of evidence-based communication strategies intended to reduce anxiety about decontamination and increase compliance among members of the public during real-life incidents that involve mass decontamination. PMID:22823588

Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

2012-07-23

3

Decontamination Analysis of a Radiologically Contaminated Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nucl...

D. L. Strenge J. J. Tawil

1984-01-01

4

Soil Washing Experiment for Decontamination of Contaminated NPP Soil  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary experiment was performed to obtain the operating conditions of soil washing decontamination process such as decontamination agent, decontamination temperature, decontamination time and ratio of soil and decontamination agent. To estimate decontamination efficiency, particle size of soil was classified into three categories; {>=} 2.0 mm, 2.0 {approx} 0.21 mm and {<=} 0.21 mm. Major target of this experiment was decontamination of Cs-137. The difference of decontamination efficiency using water and neutral salts as decontamination agent is not high. It is concluded that the best temperature of decontamination agent is normal temperature and the best decontamination time was about 60 minutes. And the best ratio of soil and decontamination agent is 1:10. In case of Cs decontamination for fine soils, the decontamination results using neutral salts such as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows some limits while using strong acid such as sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid shows high decontamination efficiency ({>=}90%). But we conclude that decontamination using strong acid is also inappropriate because of the insufficiency of decontamination efficiency for highly radioactive fine soils and the difficulty for treatment of secondary liquid waste. It is estimated that the best decontamination process is to use water as decontamination agent for particles which can be decontaminated to clearance level, after particle size separation. (authors)

Son, J.K.; Kang, K.D.; Kim, K.D.; Ha, J.H.; Song, M.J. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, P.O. Box 149, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01

5

GUIDE FOR DECONTAMINATING BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES, AND EQUIPMENT AT SUPERFUND SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

General guidelines for decontaminating buildings, structures, and equipment at Superfund sites are described in this report. Information includes stepwise guidance for developing a cost-effective decontamination strategy, descriptions of various methods for treating or removing c...

6

Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal

G. B. Ulrich; H. W. Berry

1995-01-01

7

Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the shutdown of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel gloveboxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) salt were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup Syst...

J. L. Maienschein F. Garcia R. G. Garza R. L. Kanna S. R. Mayhugh

1991-01-01

8

Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal changes were made to correct these problems: (1) the foil annealing temperature was reduced from 1375{degrees} to 1250{degrees}C, (2) the decontamination cover fabrication procedure (including visual inspection for surface imperfections and elimination of superfluous operations) was improved, (3) the postforming dye penetrant inspection procedure was revised for increased sensitivity, (4) a postforming (prewelding) 1250{degrees}C/1 h vacuum stress-relief operation was added, (5) a poststress relief (prewelding) decontamination cover piece-part leak test was implemented, (6) the hold-down fixture used during the decontamination cover-to-cup weld was modified, and concomitantly, and (7) the foil fabrication process was changed from the extruding and rolling of 63-mm-diam vacuum arc-remelted ingots (extrusion process) to the rolling of 19-mm-square arc-melted drop castings (drop cast process). Since these changes were incorporated, the decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield has been 91 %. Most importantly, more than 99% of the decontamination covers welded onto vent cup assemblies were acceptable. The drastic yield improvement is attributed primarily to the change in the foil annealing temperature from 1375{degrees} to 1250{degrees}C and secondarily to the improvements in the decontamination cover fabrication procedure.

Ulrich, G.B.; Berry, H.W.

1995-02-01

9

GUIDELINES FOR DECONTAMINATING BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES, AND EQUIPMENT AT SUPERFUND SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper identifies contaminants most likely to occur in buildings and structures or on removal equipment at remedial sites. Steps for developing a general decontamination strategy are enumerated. The paper also announces a User's Guide or handbook that will be published by the...

10

Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the shutdown of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel gloveboxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) salt were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. Further surface decontamination was performed by scrubbing the interior with paper towels and ethyl alcohol or Swish{trademark}. The surface contamination, as shown by swipe surveys, was reduced from 4{times}10{sup 4}--10{sup 6} disintegrations per minute (dpm)/cm{sup 2} to 2{times}10{sup 2}--4{times}10{sup 4} dpm/cm{sup 2}. Details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given.

Maienschein, J.L.; Garcia, F.; Garza, R.G.; Kanna, R.L.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Taylor, D.T.

1991-07-01

11

Decontamination analysis of the NUWAX-83 accident site using DECON  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the site restoration options for the NUWAX-83 site, at which an exercise was conducted involving a simulated nuclear weapons accident. This analysis was performed using a computer program deveoped by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are used in this report demonstrate its potential usefulness as a site restoration planning tool. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) employing a Quick-Vac option, under which selected surfaces are vacuumed before they can be rained on; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring specific methods to be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying of the cleanup standards according to expected exposure to surface.

Tawil, J.J.

1983-11-01

12

Accelerated Decontamination and Decommissioning at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has over 100 facilities that have been declared surplus and are scheduled to be decommissioned. In addition to these surplus facilities, there is a significant number of facilities that are currently being shut down, deactivated, and transferred to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) program. In the last year, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, have developed and implemented an initiative to accelerate the D&D work at the Hanford Site. The strategy associated with accelerated D&D is to reduce the number of surplus facilities, eliminate potential safety hazards, demonstrate meaningful cleanup progress, and recycle materials for other uses. This initiative has been extremely successful and has resulted in the safe demolition of 13 facilities in fiscal year (FY) 1993. In addition, four facilities have been completed in FY 1994 and demolition of several other facilities is currently underway.

Hughes, M.C.; Douglas, L.M.; Marske, S.G.

1994-01-01

13

Experience in decontamination of radioactive soil on the grounds of the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience gained at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute in decontamination of contaminated soil at old storage\\u000a sites for radwastes during rehabilitation of the grounds is described. The sequence of the work is described. The particulars\\u000a and results of the technology for handling contaminated soil, including a primary assessment of the composition of the contamination\\u000a and the volume of

V. G. Volkov; A. S. Danilovich; Yu. A. Zverkov; O. P. Ivanov; S. M. Koltyshev; A. V. Lemus; V. N. Potapov; S. G. Semenov; V. E. Stepanov; A. V. Chesnokov; A. D. Shisha

2011-01-01

14

Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs.

Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

1985-08-01

15

Interim Report on Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered clean following deco...

J. H. Sorensen B. Muller Vogt

2000-01-01

16

Benefits of integrating decontamination and decommissioning RCRA\\/CERCLA site cleanup actions at Hanford  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are currently over 100 surplus facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at the Hanford Site. These include eight production reactors, two fuels processing facilities, and miscellaneous support structures. All of these facilities are located within what are known as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and\\/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA)

M. C. Hughes; T. M. Wintczak; K. N. Jordan

1993-01-01

17

Conversion of transuranic waste to low level waste by decontamination: a site specific update  

SciTech Connect

As a followup to an FY-1984 cost/benefit study, a program was conducted in FY-1985 to transfer to the relevant DOE sites the information and technology for the direct conversion of transuranic (TRU) waste to low-level waste (LLW) by decontamination. As part of this work, the economic evaluation of the various TRUW volume reduction and conversion options was updated and expanded to include site-specific factors. The results show, for the assumptions used, that size reduction, size reduction followed by decontamination, or in situ decontamination are cost effective compared with the no-processing option. The technology transfer activities included site presentations and discussions with operations and waste management personnel to identify application opportunities and site-specific considerations and constraints that could affect the implementation of TRU waste conversion principles. These discussions disclosed definite potential for the beneficial application of these principles at most of the sites, but also confirmed the existence of site-specific factors ranging from space limitations to LLW disposal restrictions that could preclude particular applications or diminish expected benefits. 8 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Allen, R.P.; Hazelton, R.F.

1985-09-01

18

Audit of the deactivation, decontamination, and disposal of surplus facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse) is responsible for managing the Department of Energy`s (Department) surplus facilities at the Savannah River Site (Site). In Fiscal Year (FY) 1996, the Site had 162 surplus facilities and anticipated that 118 more would become surplus within the next 5 years. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) and Westinghouse had economically and promptly deactivated, decontaminated, and disposed of surplus facilities at the Site. Departmental regulations require that surplus facilities be deactivated, decontaminated, and disposed of economically and promptly. However, Westinghouse only disposed of one facility and did not completely deactivate or decontaminate any of the 162 facilities identified as surplus at the Site in FY 1996. This occurred because the Operations Office did not compile a Site-wide list, establish priorities, or provide sufficient funding for the deactivation, decontamination, and disposal of surplus facilities. As a result, the Department incurred unnecessary costs for the surveillance and maintenance of surplus facilities. For example, the Department could have avoided annual costs of about $1.3 million in surveillance and maintenance costs by spending $1.2 million to perform a deactivation project on the P-Reactor process-water storage tanks. The Operations Office could have funded the project out of its unobligated FY 1996 operating funds. However, it returned the unobligated funds to the Department`s Headquarters at the end of the fiscal year. The Operations Office concurred with the finding and recommendations and initiated corrective action.

NONE

1997-10-23

19

Decontamination and Decommissioning Experience at a Sellafield Uranium Purification Plant  

SciTech Connect

Built in the 1950's, this plant was originally designed to purify depleted uranyl nitrate solution arising from reprocessing operations at the Primary Separation and Head End Plant (Fig. 1). The facility was used for various purposes throughout its life cycle such as research, development and trial based processes. Test rigs were operated in the building from the 1970's until 1984 to support development of the process and equipment now used at Sellafield's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP). The extensive decommissioning program for this facility began over 15 years ago. Many challenges have been overcome throughout this program such as decommissioning the four main process cells, which were very highly alpha contaminated. The cells contained vessels and pipeline systems that were contaminated to such levels that workers had to use pressurized suits to enter the cells. Since decommissioning at Sellafield was in its infancy, this project has trialed various decontamination/decommissioning methods and techniques in order to progress the project, and this has provided valuable learning for other decommissioning projects. The project has included characterization, decontamination, dismantling, waste handling, and is now ready for demolition during late 2005, early 2006. This will be the first major facility within the historic Separation Area at Sellafield to be demolished down to base slab level. The lessons learnt from this project will directly benefit numerous decommissioning projects as the cleanup at Sellafield continues. (authors)

Prosser, J.L. [British Nuclear Group Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, England, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01

20

Nevada Test Site Decontamination and Decommissioning Program History, Regulatory Framework, and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of radiologically and/or chemically contaminated facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Facilities identified for D&D are listed in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and closed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act process. This paper discusses the NTS D&D program, including facilities history, D&D regulatory framework, and valuable lessons learned.

Michael R. Kruzic, Bechtel Nevada; Patrick S. Morris, Bechtel Nevada; Jerel G. Nelson, Polestar Applied Technology, Inc.

2005-08-07

21

The Inventory of College Students' Recent Life Experiences: A decontaminated hassles scale for a special population  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development and validation of a new decontaminated hassles measure, the Inventory of College Students' Recent Life Experiences, are described. An initial pool of 85 items was administered to 100 undergraduates along with the Perceived Stress Scale. Forty-nine items were selected based on significant correlations against the Perceived Stress Scale. The alpha reliability of the resultant final form of the

Paul M. Kohn; Kathryn Lafreniere; Maria Gurevich

1990-01-01

22

Interim Status of the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) teamed to establish the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (ID&D) project to increase the use of improved technologies in D&D operations. The project is making the technologies more readily available, providing training, putting the technologies to use, and spreading information about improved performance. The improved technologies are expected to reduce cost, schedule, radiation exposure, or waste volume over currently used baseline methods. They include some of the most successful technologies proven in the large-scale demonstrations and in private industry. The selected technologies are the Pipe Explorer, the GammaCam, the Decontamination Decommissioning and Remediation Optimal Planning System (DDROPS), the BROKK Demolition Robot, the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS), the Oxy-Gasoline Torch, the Track-Mounted Shear, and the Hand-Held Shear.

A. M Smith; G. E. Matthern; R. H. Meservey

1998-11-01

23

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

C. M. Obi

2000-12-01

24

Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department  

SciTech Connect

This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

NONE

1995-12-31

25

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration, site characterization plan: Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes.

NONE

1996-08-01

26

Post-decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) characterization report for CFA-669 site  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of post-decontamination and dismantling (D&D) characterization surveys performed by EG&G Idaho, Inc. (EG&G Idaho), at Central Facilities Area (CFA)-669, which was the Hot Laundry Facility. The site was characterized to determine and document the radiological and chemical conditions of the site following D&D and to determine if the site satisfies the release criteria. Constructed in 1950, CFA-669 served as the ``hot`` and ``cold`` laundry for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site contractors until the boiler exploded in 1981. The building was shut down at that time. Before D&D activities began in 1992, the facility was characterized and the results documented. D&D activities were completed in July 1994. The post-D&D radiological characterization consisted of radiation measurements and analyses of soil samples to identify man-made radionuclides and determine the specific activity of each sample. The chemical characterization consisted of toxicity characterization leaching procedure (TCLP) analysis for metals and for volatile and semivolatile organic contamination.

Smith, D.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-01-01

27

Summary of the Hanford Site decontamination, decommissioning, and cleanup, FY 1974--FY 1990  

SciTech Connect

At the end of World War II, the demand for more production along with process and military surveillance changes at the Hanford Site caused a continuing cycle of building and obsolescence. This trend continued until 1964, when the cutback in plutonium production began. The cutback caused the shutdown of excess production facilities. The last of eight reactors was shut down in 1971. Since that time, N Reactor has been the only production reactor that has operated. In addition, changes in the method of separating plutonium caused a number of excess facilities in the 200 Areas. Before 1973, no structured program existed for the disposal of unusable facilities or for general cleanup. Following a plant-wide safety and housekeeping inspection in 1973, a program was developed for the disposal of all surplus facilities. Since the start of FY 1974, a total of 46 radioactively contaminated sites have been demolished and disposed of. In addition, 28 buildings have been decontaminated for in situ disposal or for reuse, 21 contaminated sites have been stabilized, 131 clean structures have been removed, and 93 clean sites have received special remedial action to eliminate potential safety and/or environmental hazards. This report summarizes these activities. 3 refs, 1 fig., 18 tabs.

Wahlen, R.K.

1991-08-01

28

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01

29

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Plan, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which will be conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations OffIce (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The objectives of the planned activities are to: o Obtain sufficient, ample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies maybe developed for the site. o Obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. All references to regulations contained in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and Mound the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site . . characterization and waste management purposes.

NONE

1996-08-12

30

Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A, Characterization, decontamination, dismantlement  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

Fellows, R.L. [ed.

1993-02-26

31

The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 2006, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The 30-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, as well as worker safety issues associated with the removal of the reactor's domed structure. The LOFT facility was located

James P. Floerke; Thomas F. Borschel; L. Kelly Rhodes

2007-01-01

32

DECONTAMINATION TECHNIQUES FOR MOBILE RESPONSE EQUIPMENT USED AT WASTE SITES (STATE-OF-THE-ART SURVEY)  

EPA Science Inventory

A state-of-the-art review of facility and equipment decontamination, contamination assessment, and contamination avoidance has been conducted. The review, based on an intensive literature search and a survey of various equipment manufacturers, provides preliminary background mate...

33

Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiment Site (GLEES), a 600 ha research watershed at 3200-3400 m elevation in the Snowy Range of SE Wyoming, has been established to examine the effects of atmospheric deposition on alpine and subalpine ecosystems. This docu...

R. C. Musselman

1994-01-01

34

Clinical aspects of percutaneous poisoning by the chemical warfare agent VX: effects of application site and decontamination.  

PubMed

O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) is an extremely toxic organophosphate nerve agent that has been weaponized and stockpiled in a number of different countries, and it has been used in recent terrorist events. It differs from other well-known organophosphate nerve agents in that its primary use is as a contact poison rather than as an inhalation hazard. For this reason, we examined the effects of application site and skin decontamination on VX toxicity in anesthetized domestic swine after topical application. VX applied to the surface of the ear rapidly resulted in signs of toxicity consistent with the development of cholinergic crisis, including apnea and death. VX on the epigastrium resulted in a marked delayed development of toxic signs, reduced toxicity, and reduction in the rate of cholinesterase depression compared with animals exposed on the ear. Skin decontamination (15 minutes post-VX on the ear) arrested the development of clinical signs and prevented further cholinesterase inhibition and death. These results confirm earlier work that demonstrates the importance of exposure site on the resultant toxicity of this agent and they also show that decontamination postexposure has the potential to be an integral and extremely important component of medical countermeasures against this agent. PMID:15605929

Hamilton, Murray G; Hill, Ira; Conley, John; Sawyer, Thomas W; Caneva, Duane C; Lundy, Paul M

2004-11-01

35

Environmental decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

1981-02-01

36

Decontamination and recovery of materials at nuclear facilites - operating history  

SciTech Connect

Non-Destructive Cleaning (NDC) Mobile CO{sub 2} Decontamination Facilities have more than 120 months of operational time conducting radioactive decontamination at Nuclear Power Stations and U.S. Department of Energy sites. During this time, we have compiled an extensive database on what has been decontaminated and the cost savings realized. The following are areas of interest: (1) how the CO{sub 2} decontamination process works; (2) how radioactive wastes are minimized and radioactive exposure to personnel is reduced with the use of the NDC Decontamination Facility; (3) how the self-contained Mobile Decontamination Facility works to provide adequate containment and control of the radioactive materials; (4) what kinds of items have been decontaminated, ranging from tools to underwater television cameras and from electric motors to lead shielding; (5) liquid radioactive waste volume reduction; (6) mixed-waste volume reduction; and (7) achievements in dose reduction to radiation levels that are as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) The design and operating features and performance of the Mobile Decontamination Facility, as well as the actual volumes of materials decontaminated, the decontamination factors achieved, the amounts and types of things that are free released, and the actual cost savings in all of these areas have been assessed. The data that was used is actual utility data and not the vendor`s data. All the experiences were from actual power plants.

Gillis, P.J. Jr.

1994-12-31

37

DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Four hand-held tools were tested for failed high-level waste melter decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The forces felt by the tools during operation were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer since they will be operated by a remote manipulator. The efficiency of the tools was also recorded. Melter D&D consists of three parts: (1) glass fracturing: removing from the furnace the melted glass that can not be poured out through normal means, (2) glass cleaning: removing the thin layer of glass that has formed over the surface of the refractory material, and (3) K-3 refractory breakup: removing the K-3 refractory material. Surrogate glass, from a formula provided by the Savannah River Site, was melted in a furnace and poured into steel containers. K-3 refractory material, the same material used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, was utilized for the demonstrations. Four K-3 blocks were heated at 1150 C for two weeks with a glass layer on top to simulate the hardened glass layer on the refractory surface in the melter. Tools chosen for the demonstrations were commonly used D&D tools, which have not been tested specifically for the different aspects of melter D&D. A jackhammer and a needle gun were tested for glass fracturing; a needle gun and a rotary grinder with a diamond face wheel (diamond grinder) were tested for glass cleaning; and a jackhammer, diamond grinder, and a circular saw with a diamond blade were tested for refractory breakup. The needle gun was not capable of removing or fracturing the surrogate glass. The diamond grinder only had a removal rate of 3.0 x 10-4 kg/s for K-3 refractory breakup and needed to be held firmly against the material. However, the diamond grinder was effective for glass cleaning, with a removal rate of 3.9 cm2/s. The jackhammer was successful in fracturing glass and breaking up the K-3 refractory block. The jackhammer had a glass-fracturing rate of 0.40 kg/s. The jackhammer split the K-3 refractory block into two pieces: one weighing 12.7 kg and the other 16.8 kg. However, it was not capable of fracturing smaller pieces off the block except when the chisel was applied at the edges of the block or at the fissure of the split. The circular saw successfully cut the K-3 refractory material at a rate of 0.29 cm3/s or a line at 4.1 cm/s. A Fourier transform was performed on the acceleration data to obtain the frequency domain results.

Weger, Hans, Ph.D.; Kodanda, Raja Tilek Meruva; Mazumdar, Anindra; Srivastava, Rajiv Ph.D.; Ebadian, M.A. Ph.D.

2003-02-27

38

Experiments on Controlled Decontamination of Water Mixture of Long-Lived Active Isotopes in Biological Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, the process of direct controlled decontamination of highly active long-lived isotopes by the action of growing microbiological systems has been studied. For the first time the accelerated controlled deactivation of Cs137 isotope was observed.

Vysotskii, Vladimir I.; Odintsov, Alexei; Pavlovich, Vladimir N.; Tashirev, Alexandr B.; Kornilova, Alla A.

2006-02-01

39

In situ dental implant installation after decontamination in a previously peri-implant diseased site: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of this study was to examine whether a previous peri-implantitis site can affect osseointegration, by comparing implant placement at a site where peri-implantitis was present and at a normal bone site. A second aim of this study was to identify the tissue and bone reaction after treating the contaminated implant surface to determine the optimal treatment for peri-implant diseases. Methods A peri-implant mucositis model for dogs was prepared to determine the optimal treatment option for peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis. The implants were inserted partially to a length of 6 mm. The upper 4 mm part of the dental implants was exposed to the oral environment. Simple exposure for 2 weeks contaminated the implant surface. After 2 weeks, the implants were divided into three groups: untreated, swabbed with saline, and swabbed with H2O2. Three implants from each group were placed to the full length in the same spot. The other three implants were placed fully into newly prepared bone. After eight weeks of healing, the animals were sacrificed. Ground sections, representing the mid-buccal-lingual plane, were prepared for histological analysis. The analysis was evaluated clinically and histometrically. Results The untreated implants and H2O2-swabbed implants showed gingival inflammation. Only the saline-swabbed implant group showed re-osseointegration and no gingival inflammation. There was no difference in regeneration height or bone-to-implant contact between in situ implant placement and implant placement in the new bone site. Conclusions It can be concluded that cleaning with saline may be effective in implant decontamination. After implant surface decontamination, implant installation in a previous peri-implant diseased site may not interfere with osseointegration.

Kim, Young-Taek; Cha, Jae-Kook; Park, Jung-Chul; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Cho, Kyoo-Sung

2012-01-01

40

DECONTAMINATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SUBSTANCES FROM SPILLS AND UNCONTROLLED WASTE SITES BY RADIO FREQUENCY IN SITU HEATING  

EPA Science Inventory

The radio frequency (RF) heating process can be used to volumetrically heat and thus decontaminate uncontrolled landfills and hazardous substances from spills. After the landfills are heated, decontamination of the hazardous substances occurs due to thermal decomposition, vaporiz...

41

Preliminary safety analysis report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the ARVFS (Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site) NaK  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the safety analysis for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the contaminated NaK (sodium-potassium) eutectic solution stored at the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS). The D and D activity of processing NaK has been planned and designed to meet appropriate safety standards. A plan to process four containers of contaminated NaK eutectic solution (180 gallons of liquid metal), including transuranics, into a waste form acceptable for disposal has been developed. The NaK is stored in two 55-gallon drums and two vessels fabricated from pipe sections. The containers have been stored in an underground bunker at the ARVFS located near the center of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 9 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Mobley, E.V.

1987-09-01

42

Evaluation of gas-phase technetium decontamination and safety related experiments during FY 1994. A report of work in progress  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory activities for FY94 included: evaluation of decontamination of Tc by gas-phase techniques, evaluation of diluted ClF{sub 3} for removing U deposits, evaluation of potential hazard of wet air inlekage into a vessel containing ClF{sub 3}, planning and preparation for experiments to assess hazard of rapid reaction of ClF{sub 3} and hydrated UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} or powdered Al, and preliminary evaluation of compatibility of Tenic valve seat material.

Simmons, D.W.; Munday, E.B.

1995-05-01

43

EXPERIENCES IN DECONTAMINATION & DEMOLITION OF A FORMER PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY HANFORD RESERVATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility received plutonium nitrate paste from the nearby Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Facility and concentrated the plutonium for shipment to Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant. Operations ceased in 1967 and the Facility languished in a state of minimal maintenance until the mid-1990's when a decision was made to decontaminate and demolish (D&D) it. This work is being performed as

2002-01-01

44

Fracturing Experiments: Nevada Test Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this program is to develop techniques for efficient and economic recovery of natural gas from low permeability reservoirs in both Western US basins and the Eastern Appalachian area. Experiments have been conducted at G-tunnel to improve thi...

N. R. Warpinski T. Y. Chu

1987-01-01

45

Choice experiments, site similarity and benefits transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Choice experiments are designed to account for variations in environmental resources and site characteristics, as well as\\u000a potential implications of these variations for willingness to pay. As a result, choice experiment results may be well suited\\u000a for benefits transfer. It is unclear, however, whether the flexibility of choice experiments renders the similarity of study\\u000a and transfer sites less critical for

Robert J. Johnston

2007-01-01

46

Fracturing experiments: Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program is to develop techniques for efficient and economic recovery of natural gas from low permeability reservoirs in both Western US basins and the Eastern Appalachian area. Experiments have been conducted at G-tunnel to improve this conventional technology and to develop novel techniques for improved recovery. These experiments offer a unique opportunity to perform fracturing research under conditions combining the best aspects of field tests and laboratory experiments; they are conducted under realistic in situ conditions, yet mining allows for direct observation. The development of controlled-pulse fracturing technology has been the major focus of the program the last two years. We find that explosive fracturing can often have detrimental results such as crushing, a stress cage, and reduced permeability. Hydraulic fracturing produces a single fracture which may not adequately drain a naturally fractured reservoir. A controlled-pulse-fracturing stimulation can result in multiple fratures extending in all directions. This is attractive for draining naturally fractured reservoirs. 11 refs.

Warpinski, N.R.; Chu, T.Y.

1987-01-01

47

Site participation in the small community experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Small Community Solar Thermal Experiment, planned to test a small, developmental solar thermal power plant in a small community application, is assessed. The baseline plan is to install a field of parabolic dishes with distributed generation to provide 1 MWe of experimental power. Participation by the site proposer is an integral element of the experiment; the proposer will provide a ten-acre site, a connection to the electrical distributional system serving the small community, and various services. In addition to the primary participant, site study efforts may be pursued at as many as five alternative sites.

Holbeck, H. J.; Fellows, M.

1981-05-01

48

EXPERIENCES IN DECONTAMINATION & DEMOLITION OF A FORMER PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY HANFORD RESERVATION  

SciTech Connect

The 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility received plutonium nitrate paste from the nearby Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Facility and concentrated the plutonium for shipment to Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant. Operations ceased in 1967 and the Facility languished in a state of minimal maintenance until the mid-1990's when a decision was made to decontaminate and demolish (D&D) it. This work is being performed as a pilot project that integrates DOE nuclear safety analysis and worker safety requirements with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements under CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, 1980). The pilot project is a CERCLA non-time critical removal action. Difficulties were encountered during D&D. These included conflict between the development of the safety basis as an EPA pilot project and DOE requirements for safety analysis reports, updating the safety analysis to keep it current with field conditions, and major difficulties with nondestructive assays (NDA) of the contaminated waste. No demonstrable benefit has been obtained by integrating the EPA and DOE safety methodologies.

BISHOP, G.E.

2002-06-01

49

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01

50

Site specific health and safety plan, 233-S decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility, located in the 200 Area at the Hanford Site, is the subject of this Health and Safety Plan.The 233-S Facility operated from January 1952 until July 1967 at which time the building entered the U.S. Department of Energy`s Surplus Facility Management Program as a retired facility. The facility has since undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. Additionally, the weather caused existing cracks in concrete structures of the building to lengthen, thereby increasing the potential for failed confinement of the radioactive material in the building. Differential settlement has also occurred causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure, increasing the potential for release of radioactive material to the environment. An expedited response is proposed to remove this threat and ensure protection of human health and the environment. On this premise it is intended that the 233-S Facility removal action be performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Time-Critical Project being conducted under the Pilot Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Initiative

J. E. Fasso

1997-12-31

51

Calvert Cliffs refueling pool decontamination; An update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company described its first experience with the use of Sigma Engineering's WEPA mechanical cleaning equipment for a refueling pool decontamination in the April 1984 issue of Radiation Protection Management. Since the initial refueling pool decontamination at Unit 1 of the Calbert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in 1983, three additional refuelings and subsequent refueling pool decontaminations have

B. A. Watson; D. L. Montana

1986-01-01

52

Decontamination and recovery of materials at nuclear facilites - operating history  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-Destructive Cleaning (NDC) Mobile COâ Decontamination Facilities have more than 120 months of operational time conducting radioactive decontamination at Nuclear Power Stations and U.S. Department of Energy sites. During this time, we have compiled an extensive database on what has been decontaminated and the cost savings realized. The following are areas of interest: (1) how the COâ decontamination process works;

Gillis; P. J. Jr

1994-01-01

53

One year of Puma Painting: site experiences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PumaPaint project is a web robot that allows users to create original artwork on the World Wide Web. The site allows control of a PUMA 760 robot equipped with four paintbrushes; jars of red, green, blue and yellow paint and white paper attached to an easel. Users must download a JavaTM interface allowing interactive control of the robot. This interface contains two windows showing live camera views of the work site and various controls for connecting and disconnecting to the robot, viewing the task status and controlling the painting task. During the first year of operation of the site, June 3rd, 1998 to June 2nd 1999, approximately 5,000 users produced 390 canvases. This paper presents summary data from one year of operation, discusses the author's experiences in operating the site and examines some of the artwork produced.

Stein, Matthew R.

1999-11-01

54

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand 1 Decontamination Pad, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand-1 Decontamination Pad, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 252 consists of only one Corrective Action Site (25-07-04, Decontamination Pad). This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary at CAU 252. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because the potential contaminants of concern were either not detected during the corrective action investigation or were only present at naturally occurring concentrations. Based on the field results, neither corrective action or a corrective action plan is required at this site. A Notice of Completion to DOE/NV is being requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 252, as well as a request that this site be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO. Further, no use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU.

DOE /NV

2000-10-11

55

Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop  

SciTech Connect

Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors.

Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.; Currier, A.J.

1980-05-28

56

Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, December 2000)  

SciTech Connect

This document is an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) that has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD) Decontamination Facility. CAU 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. The purpose of this addendum is to provide a rationale for the recommendation of a revised preferred alternative corrective action for CAU 254. This preferred alternative corrective action, Alternative 3, consists of the removal of accessible soil/sediment and all building material above ground level from the CAU 254 Site. This alternative is being recommended because a cost-effective technology is now available to dismantle the contaminated building and ensure complete removal of all CAU 254 CADD-identified contaminants of concern and any associated contamination. This preferred closure method alternative reduces the potential for future exposure pathways. Procedures will be developed, presented in the Corrective Action Plan, and implemented to ensure worker health and safety, protection of human health and the environment, and to meet all unrestricted release requirements in accordance with applicable state and federal regulations.

DOE /NV

2000-12-12

57

Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Report of the decontamination of Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented a program to decontaminate radioactively contaminated sites that were formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for activities that included handling of radioactive material. This program is referred to as the ''Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program'' (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, Kent Chemical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Since 1977, the University of Chicago decontaminated Kent Chemical Laboratory as part of a facilities renovation program. All areas of Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory that had been identified as contaminated in excess of current guidelines in the 1976-1977 surveys were decontaminated to levels where no contamination could be detected relative to natural backgrounds. All areas that required defacing to achieve this goal were restored to their original condition. The radiological evaluation of the sewer system, based primarily on the radiochemical analyses of sludge and water samples, indicated that the entire sewer system is potentially contaminated. While this evaluation was defined as part of this project, the decontamination of the sewer system was not included in the purview of this effort. The documentation included in this report substantiates the judgment that all contaminated areas identified in the earlier reports in the three structures included in the decontamination effort (Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory) were cleaned to levels commensurate with release for unrestricted use.

Wynuveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-08-01

58

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1994-05-27

59

Residual Methamphetamine in Decontaminated Clandestine Drug Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot cross-sectional study examined three previously decontaminated residential clandestine drug laboratories (CDLs) in Washington State to determine the distribution and magnitude of residual methamphetamine concentrations relative to the state decontamination standard. A total of 159 discrete random methamphetamine wipe samples were collected from the three CDLs, focusing on the master bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen at each site.

Glen Patrick; William Daniell; Charles Treser

2009-01-01

60

Soil decontamination criteria report, November 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program to access the extent of transuranic soil contamination at DOE sites and to develop methods for their decontamination is underway at Rocky Flats. As part of this program, acceptable soil contamination levels for plutonium proposed by a number of authorities over the past couple of decades were reviewed. From this review, goals for soil decontamination work are proposed.

1980-01-01

61

Feedback from members on decontamination services.  

PubMed

In February 2007 AfPP asked its members for their feedback on decontamination services. For example, decontamination services to perioperative areas and issues experienced on a daily basis, particularly service issues from those outsourced services. AfPP asked its members to share their experiences, concerns and issues - both positive and negative. PMID:18710125

Gilmour, Diane; Cooper, Richard

2008-07-01

62

Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes  

SciTech Connect

LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized.

Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

1983-01-01

63

Experiences in building an open area test site  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses experience gained from the construction of an open-area test site (OATS) in an urban area with high ambient radiofrequency wave levels. It is shown that a high-quality site (as determined by site attenuation measurements) can be achieved by adhering to basic design practices and using conservative design practices when uncertain. The design approach taken to minimize site

F. Tarico

1989-01-01

64

Infiltration and Injection Sites and Example Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this paper are: (1) design a characterization and monitoring strategy for vadose zone infiltration and aquifer injection sites; and (2) track spatial and temporal evolution of water and reactive chemicals through vadose zone and aquifer.

Mark Rockhold

2007-04-19

65

History of critical experiments at Pajarito Site  

SciTech Connect

This account describes critical and subcritical assemblies operated remotely at the Pajarito Canyon Site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Earliest assemblies, directed exclusively toward the nuclear weapons program, were for safety tests. Other weapon-related assemblies provided neutronic information to check detailed weapon calculations. Topsy, the first of these critical assemblies, was followed by Lady Godiva, Jezebel, Flattop, and ultimately Big Ten. As reactor programs came to Los Alamos, design studies and mockups were tested at Pajarito Site. For example, nearly all 16 Rover reactors intended for Nevada tests were preceded by zero-power mockups and proof tests at Pajarito Site. Expanded interest and capability led to fast-pulse assemblies, culminating in Godiva IV and Skua, and to the Kinglet and Sheba solution assemblies.

Paxton, H.C.

1983-03-01

66

On-Site Disposition of Concrete During Decommissioning and Decontamination: A Data Quality Objective-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

On-site disposition of concrete derived during decommissioning and demolition (D and D) of buildings at industrial sites is a cost-effective, waste minimization alternative to off-site disposal. Because the concrete is to be left on-site it becomes part of the solid matrix of the site and is subject to the compositional constraints governing site soils. In addition, the concrete and its contained-in materials may be subject to physical constraints such as size and shape which do not apply to soils. When considering on-site disposition of concrete, the data quality objective (DQO) process should be used to determine the compositional and physical constraints on the concrete and for developing the characterization approach to determine whether those constraints have been met. The information inputs to the compositional and physical constraints on the concrete constitute the concrete acceptance criteria (CAC) which become the basis for developing decision rules - the yes/no statements that unequivocally state the compositional and physical conditions under which concrete may be left on site. An important DQO boundary concept is concrete classification. The cost of concrete characterization can be minimized with a thorough data gap assessment by focusing resources on the concrete most in need of characterization. Concrete for which a yes/no decision can be made with reasonable certainty based on a comparison of existing data to the CAC receives a lesser amount of characterization scrutiny than does concrete for which existing data is non-existent or ambiguous relative to the CAC. In conclusion: Developing acceptance criteria for the on-site disposition of concrete through the DQO process provides a systematic methodology for determining and documenting what decisions will be made and what information is necessary to support those decisions. At each step in the process, input from all individuals or organizations that have a role in making the ultimate decision must be invited. The primary goal of the DQO process is the development of a clear and defensible set of decision rules that are acceptable, unanimously agreed upon, and approved by all decision makers. By conducting the DQO process in an analytical and systematic manner, unexpected and, perhaps, costly changes to an operational program resulting from last minute second-guessing can be prevented. (authors)

Salpas, P.A. [Salpas Consulting, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, K.M. [Perot Systems Government Services, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stephens, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dunning, D.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01

67

Selection of promising sites for magma energy experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Long Valley and Coso Hot Springs areas of California have been identified as the most promising sites for conducting a magma energy extraction experiment. These two locations were selected from among the potential sites on the basis of several factors that are critical to the success of the proposed long-term energy extraction experiment. These factors include the likelihood of the existence of shallow magma targets as well as several other drilling, energy extraction and programmatic considerations. As the magma energy extraction program continues, these sites will be analyzed in detail so that one can be selected as the site for the planned magma experiment.

Carson, C.C.

1985-01-01

68

[Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].  

PubMed

Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis. PMID:19122437

Seto, Yasuo

2009-01-01

69

Nonchemical decontamination techniques  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination techniques summarized in this article represent a variety of surface cleaning methods developed or adapted for component and facility-type decontamination applications ranging from small hand tools to reactor cavities and other large surface areas. Representative nonchemical decontamination techniques include: ultrasonics, abrasive cleaning, high-pressure Freon cleaning, and vibratory finishing.

Allen, R.P.

1985-06-01

70

Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

2001-07-01

71

Coordinated Seismic Study of the Multi-Well Experiment Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A series of seismic studies was performed at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment site to delineate the character of the beds within the Mesaverde group in western Colorado. The experiment consisted of a three-dimensional seismic survey of the a...

1983-01-01

72

Decontamination of sodium cyanide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small?scale DecontaminationAqueous sodium cyanide, buffered with ammonium chloride, was decontaminated by portionwise addition of calcium hypochlorite while the temperature of the mixture was held below 12°C.Large?scale DecontaminationThe cyanide waste pH is raised to 10.0 and hypochlorite from any source used to convert cyanide to cyanate or even carbon dioxide and nitrogen if desired.

D. E. Pearson; T. M. Laher; S. Campagna

1981-01-01

73

Decontamination and Restoration Technology Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Through the Project of (sup D)econtamination and Restoration Technology Development(sup ,) the followings were studied. 1. Electrochemical preparation of LOMI decontamination reagent. 2. LOMI decontamination process. 3. Regeneration of spent LOMI decontam...

W. J. Oh J. H. Jung J. K. Moon S. Y. Park J. B. Shim

1994-01-01

74

Off-gas recycle for long-term low temperature gas phase uranium decontamination  

SciTech Connect

In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile UF{sub 6}, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric ClF{sub 3} for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of using LTLT gas phase decontamination with ClF{sub 3} to remove uranium deposits from this equipment. A mobile gas phase system is being designed to demonstrate the decontamination process on a full scale. If used to decontaminate the GDPs, the LTLT process would use large amounts of ClF{sub 3} and exhaust large volumes of by-product gases (ClF, C1O{sub 2}F, etc.). Initially, the excess ClF{sub 3} and reaction byproducts will be destroyed in a KOH scrubber. This paper describes a proposed system that could recover the excess ClF{sub 3}and regenerate the reaction by-products into ClF{sub 3} for use in decontamination of additional equipment. Use of this regeneration and recovery system would reduce raw material costs and also reduce the waste scrubber sludge disposal costs by reducing the amount of corrosive gases fed to the scrubber.

Bundy, R.D.; Bunch, D.H.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1994-07-01

75

NPOx Decontamination System  

SciTech Connect

The nitric acid/potassium permanganate/oxalic acid (NPOx) Phase II system is being prepared for remote operation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Several tests have been conducted to prepare the system for remote operation. This system performs very well with high decontamination efficiencies and very low quantities of waste generated during decontamination.

Archibald, K.; Demmer, R.; Argyle, M.; Ancho, M.; Hai-Pao, J.

2002-02-25

76

Redox decontamination performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since start-up of the Redox Plant, different types of decontamination difficulties have been experienced and corrective measures taken. Current decontamination performance is superior to that ever experienced before. However, with the apparent need for the for elimination of the permanganate Head-End process for the IAF oxidation, several modifications to the plant flowsheet and equipment have been planned in order to

1954-01-01

77

US food and drug administration Indian site inspections: An experience  

PubMed Central

Since 2005, USFDA has begun inspections of Indian clinical trial investigator sites. This paper reports experience of an FDA inspection performed at two Indian centers. The inspection started with an in-depth discussion with the investigator and his team about the conduct of the clinical trial at the site and was followed by a tour of the important locations - registration, outpatient department, specialty clinic, medical record section, and special procedure department. The inspector reviewed the critical processes - protocol compliance, ethics committee approval, informed consent process, case record form and source documents completion, investigational product accountability, serious adverse events documentation and reporting. The inspector reviewed all documents from the investigator site file and conducted audit of all subjects enrolled at both the sites. As the Indian sites are not exposed to regulatory inspections, it is vital for the sponsor to conduct preinspection audit, provide training and support to face the FDA inspection.

Mahajan, Pooja; D'Souza, Natasha; Bhatt, Arun; Halbe, Vipul; Sharma, Richa; Narayanswamy, Shweta; Bughediwala, Murtuza

2012-01-01

78

Reactive decontamination formulation  

DOEpatents

The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

Giletto, Anthony (College Station, TX); White, William (College Station, TX); Cisar, Alan J. (Cypress, TX); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Bryan, TX); Fyffe, James (Bryan, TX)

2003-05-27

79

Equipment decontamination: A brief survey of the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

Deactivation at DOE facilities has left a tremendous amount of contaminated equipment behind. In-situ methods are needed to decontaminate the interiors of the equipment sufficiently to allow either free release or land disposal. A brief survey was completed of the DOE complex on their needs for equipment decontamination with in-situ technology to determine (1) the types of contamination problems within the DOE complex, (2) decontamination processes that are being used or are being developed within the DOE, and (3) the methods that are available to dispose of spent decontamination solutions. In addition, potential sites for testing decontamination methods were located. Based on the information obtained from these surveys, the Rocky Flats Plant and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory appear to be best suited to complete the initial testing of the decontamination processes.

Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B; Chen, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1995-03-01

80

Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials  

SciTech Connect

Using the electrolytic method, the authors have demonstrated removal of Pu from contaminated conductive material. At EG&G Rocky Flats, they electrolytically decontaminated stainless steel. Results from this work show removal of fixed contamination, including the following geometries: planar, large radius, bolt holes, glove ports, and protruding studs. More specifically, fixed contamination was reduced from levels ranging > 1,000,000 counts per minute (cpm) down to levels ranging from 1,500 to < 250 cpm with the electrolytic method. More recently, the electrolytic work has continued at LANL as a joint project with EG&G. Impressively, electrolytic decontamination experiments on removal of Pu from oralloy coupons have shown decreases in swipable contamination that initially ranged from 500,000 to 1,500,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) down to 0--2 dpm.

Nelson, T.O.; Campbell, G.M.; Parker, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Getty, R.H.; Hergert, T.R.; Lindahl, K.A.; Peppers, L.G. [EG& G/Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-10-01

81

Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution

D. M. Leaphart; S. R. Reed; W. N. Rankin

1995-01-01

82

EXPERIENCE FROM TWO SMALL QUANTITY RH-TRU WASTE SITES IN NAVIGATING THROUGH AN EVOLVING REGULATORY LANDSCAPE  

SciTech Connect

Two small quantity transuranic (TRU) waste generator sites have gained considerable experience in navigating through a changing regulatory landscape in their efforts to remove the TRU waste from their sites and proceed with site remediation. The Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) has the objectives of decontaminating nuclear research buildings and associated grounds and remediating to a level of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. As directed by Congress, BCLDP must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006. This schedule requires the containerization of all TRU waste in 2002. BCLDP will generate a total of approximately 27 cubic meters (m3) of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Similarly, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is scheduled to close in 2006 pursuant to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Boeing Canoga Park, the management and operating contractor for ETEC. ETEC had 11.0 m3 of RH-TRU and contact-handled (CH) TRU waste in storage, with the requirement to remove this waste in 2002 in order to meet their site closure schedule. The individual milestones for BCLDP and ETEC necessitated the establishment of site-specific programs to direct packaging and characterization of RH-TRU waste before the regulatory framework for the WIPP disposal of RH-TRU waste is finalized. The lack of large infrastructure for characterization activities, as well as the expedited schedules needed to meet regulatory milestones, provided both challenges and opportunities that are unique to small quantity sites. Both sites have developed unique programs for waste characterization based on the same premise, which directs comprehensive waste data collection efforts such that additional characterization will not be required following the finalization of the WIPP RH-TRU waste program requirements. This paper details the BCLDP program evolution in terms of strategy, innovative solutions to waste characterization, and development of alternative transportation options. Preliminary indications from various regulatory and oversight agencies and professional organizations are that the BCLDP RH-TRU waste characterization program is the ''model WIPP certification program'' and will satisfy anticipated regulatory expectations. This paper also summarizes how BCLDP lessons learned and their development of new resources were applied to the RH-TRU waste characterization and disposition program at ETEC.

Biedscheid, Jennifer; Devarakonda, Murthy; Eide, Jim; Kneff, Dennis

2003-02-27

83

Concrete decontamination scoping tests  

SciTech Connect

This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete.

Archibald, K.E.

1995-01-01

84

Plant Decontamination Methods Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document details the decontamination techniques currently employed at nuclear power generating stations and areas of research and development currently being performed by private and government laboratories. This information was obtained by surveying...

J. F. Remark

1981-01-01

85

Skin decontamination of mustards and organophosphates: comparative efficiency of RSDL and Fuller's earth in domestic swine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in skin decontamination and therapy of chemical warfare agents has been a difficult problem due to the simultaneous requirement of rapid action and non-aggressive behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of two decontaminating systems: the Canadian Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) and the Fuller's Earth (FE). The experiment was conducted with domestic swine, as

L. Taysse; S. Daulon; S. Delamanche; B. Bellier; P. Breton

2007-01-01

86

Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid

Sylvia Smith Talmage; Annetta Paule Watson; Veronique Hauschild; Nancy B Munro; J. King

2007-01-01

87

Decontamination Scheduling Procedures for Radef Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents a decontamination scheduling procedure that permits the user to correlate target analysis results, shelter protection factors, and decontamination data and systematically obtain feasible decontamination assignments and decontamination ...

H. Lee

1966-01-01

88

Update on building and structure decontamination  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the nation's hazardous waste sites is a top environmental priority. Since the ultimate objective of many cleanup programs is to return the contaminated site and buildings on the site to active use, additional information regarding both established and emerging technologies for building decontamination is needed. A pilot scale study was performed at an actual Superfund Site to evaluate, side by side, the efficacy of PCB removal using two decontamination processes. One process entails use of a shotblasting technique in which contaminated concrete surfaces are cut away and physically removed. The other process involves application of an alkali metal/polyethylene glycolate mixture directly to contaminated concrete surfaces for insitu degradation of PCBs.

Barkley, N.P. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

1990-08-01

89

Source physics experiments at the Nevada Test Site.  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. capability to monitor foreign underground nuclear test activities relies heavily on measurement of explosion phenomena, including characteristic seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and acoustic signals. Despite recent advances in each of these fields, empirical, rather than physics-based, approaches are used to predict and explain observations. Seismologists rely on prior knowledge of the variations of teleseismic and regional seismic parameters such as p- and s-wave arrivals from simple one-dimensional models for the teleseismic case to somewhat more complicated enhanced two-dimensional models for the regional case. Likewise, radionuclide experts rely on empirical results from a handful of limited experiments to determine the radiological source terms present at the surface after an underground test. To make the next step in the advancement of the science of monitoring we need to transform these fields to enable predictive, physics-based modeling and analysis. The Nevada Test Site Source Physics Experiments (N-SPE) provide a unique opportunity to gather precise data from well-designed experiments to improve physics-based modeling capability. In the seismic experiments, data collection will include time domain reflectometry to measure explosive performance and yield, free-field accelerometers, extensive seismic arrays, and infrasound and acoustic measurements. The improved modeling capability that we will develop using this data should enable important advances in our ability to monitor worldwide for nuclear testing. The first of a series of source physics experiments will be conducted in the granite of Climax Stock at the NTS, near the locations of the HARD HAT and PILE DRIVER nuclear tests. This site not only provides a fairly homogeneous and well-documented geology, but also an opportunity to improve our understanding of how fractures, joints, and faults affect seismic wave generation and propagation. The Climax Stock experiments will consist of a 220 lb (TNT equivalent) calibration shot and a 2200 lb (TNT equivalent) over-buried shot conducted in the same emplacement hole. An identical 2200 lb shot at the same location will follow to investigate the effects of pre-conditioning. These experiments also provide an opportunity to advance capabilities for near-field monitoring, and on-site inspections (OSIs) of suspected testing sites. In particular, geologic, physical, and cultural signatures of underground testing can be evaluated using the N-SPE activities as case studies. Furthermore, experiments to measure the migration of radioactive noble gases to the surface from underground explosions will enable development of higher fidelity radiological source term models that can predict migration through a variety of geologic conditions. Because the detection of short-lived radionuclides is essential to determining if an explosion was nuclear or conventional, a better understanding of the gaseous and particulate radionuclide source terms that reach the surface from underground testing is critical to development of OSI capability.

Lee, Ping (Nuclear Security Technologies, Inc.); Snelson, Catherine (Nuclear Security Technologies, Inc.); Abbott, Robert; Coblentz, David D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Corbell, Robert; Bowyer, Theodore W. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory); Sussman, Aviva J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Carrigan, Charles R. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Bradley, Christopher R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Patton, Howard J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Seifert, Carolyn E. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory); Sweeney, Jerry J. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Brunish, Wendee M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Hawkins, Ward L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Antoun,Tarabay H. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Wohletz, Kenneth H. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Zucca, John Jay (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)

2010-10-01

90

OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

2010-11-11

91

Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit.

Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L. [and others

1995-11-01

92

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and

Lussiez

1993-01-01

93

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and

Lussiez

1994-01-01

94

Low concentration NP preoxidation condition for PWR decontamination.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To use preoxidation condition with low concentration NP (nitric acid permanganate) instead of conventional high concentration AP (alkline permanganate ) for PWR oxidation decontamination (POD) was summarized. Experiments including three parts have been pe...

F. Huang D. Yu J. Lu D. Ding Y. Zhao

1991-01-01

95

Emergency department external decontamination for hazardous chemical exposure  

SciTech Connect

Although external decontamination is an integral aspect of the emergency management of hazardous chemicals exposure, no standard protocol or report of human experience is available. We performed a retrospective review of all patients decontaminated in our emergency department over a 6-y period for hazardous chemicals exposure. Patients were treated by a universal substances protocol in a specially designed decontamination area. Ocular irrigation utilizing 1500 ml of normal saline po was employed in 27 patients. Oral mucosal irrigation utilizing 1500 ml water was employed in 2 patients. All 72 patients received skin and hair decontamination. Skin was washed 3 times with detergent and cornmeal mixture, and water irrigation or shower for 3 min. Hair was shampooed 3 times with mild soap for 3 min. A subset of patients (n = 31) received pre-decontamination and post-decontamination skin swabbing. Swabs were analyzed by a certified analytical chemistry laboratory utilizing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Positive pre-decontamination swabs were seen for pesticides and PCBs. All post-decontamination swab analyses were negative, indicating that the method utilized was effective.

Lavoie, F.W.; Coomes, T.; Cisek, J.E.; Fulkerson, L. (Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, KY (United States))

1992-02-01

96

Decontaminating metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g.,>600 g/l of NaNO.sub.3, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH<6.

Childs, Everett L. (Boulder, CO)

1984-11-06

97

Decontaminating metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

Childs, E.L.

1984-01-23

98

Savannah River Site Operating Experience with Transuranic (TRU) Waste Retrieval  

SciTech Connect

Drums of TRU Waste have been stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on concrete pads from the 1970's through the 1980's. These drums were subsequently covered with tarpaulins and then mounded over with dirt. Between 1996 and 2000 SRS ran a successful retrieval campaign and removed some 8,800 drums, which were then available for venting and characterization for WIPP disposal. Additionally, a number of TRU Waste drums, which were higher in activity, were stored in concrete culverts, as required by the Safety Analysis for the Facility. Retrieval of drums from these culverts has been ongoing since 2002. This paper will describe the operating experience and lessons learned from the SRS retrieval activities. (authors)

Stone, K.A.; Milner, T.N. [BNG America, Savannah River Corporation, P.O. Box 616, Bldg 704-60 E, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2006-07-01

99

Evaluation of Five Decontamination Methods for Filtering Facepiece Respirators  

PubMed Central

Concerns have been raised regarding the availability of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) during an influenza pandemic. One possible strategy to mitigate a respirator shortage is to reuse FFRs following a biological decontamination process to render infectious material on the FFR inactive. However, little data exist on the effects of decontamination methods on respirator integrity and performance. This study evaluated five decontamination methods [ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), ethylene oxide, vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP), microwave oven irradiation, and bleach] using nine models of NIOSH-certified respirators (three models each of N95 FFRs, surgical N95 respirators, and P100 FFRs) to determine which methods should be considered for future research studies. Following treatment by each decontamination method, the FFRs were evaluated for changes in physical appearance, odor, and laboratory performance (filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance). Additional experiments (dry heat laboratory oven exposures, off-gassing, and FFR hydrophobicity) were subsequently conducted to better understand material properties and possible health risks to the respirator user following decontamination. However, this study did not assess the efficiency of the decontamination methods to inactivate viable microorganisms. Microwave oven irradiation melted samples from two FFR models. The remainder of the FFR samples that had been decontaminated had expected levels of filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance. The scent of bleach remained noticeable following overnight drying and low levels of chlorine gas were found to off-gas from bleach-decontaminated FFRs when rehydrated with deionized water. UVGI, ethylene oxide (EtO), and VHP were found to be the most promising decontamination methods; however, concerns remain about the throughput capabilities for EtO and VHP. Further research is needed before any specific decontamination methods can be recommended.

Bergman, Michael S.; Eimer, Benjamin C.; Shaffer, Ronald E.

2009-01-01

100

INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION (IVOD) SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The deactivation and decommissioning of 1200 buildings within the U.S. Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management complex will require the disposition of a large quantity of contaminated concrete and metal surfaces. It has been estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete and over 600,000 tons of metal will need disposition. The disposition of such large quantities of material presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The final disposition of this large amount of material will take time and money as well as risk to the D&D work force. A single automated system that would decontaminate and characterize surfaces in one step would not only reduce the schedule and decrease cost during D&D operations but would also protect the D&D workers from unnecessary exposures to contaminated surfaces. This report summarizes the activities performed during FY00 and describes the planned activities for FY01. Accomplishments for FY00 include the following: Development and field-testing of characterization system; Completion of Title III design of deployment platform and decontamination unit; In-house testing of deployment platform and decontamination unit; Completion of system integration design; Identification of deployment site; and Completion of test plan document for deployment of IVOD at Rancho Seco nuclear power facility.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

2001-01-01

101

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01

102

Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart  

SciTech Connect

Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

Munday, E.B.

1993-12-01

103

Benefits of automated surface decontamination of a radioiodine ward.  

PubMed

A floor-washing robot has been acquired to assist physicists with decontamination of radioiodine therapy ward rooms after discharge of the patient at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The effectiveness of the robot in decontaminating the ward has been evaluated. A controlled experiment was performed by deliberately contaminating a polyvinyl chloride flooring offcut with 131I followed by automated decontamination with the robot. The extent of fixed and removable contamination was assessed before and after decontamination by two methods: (1) direct Geiger-Mueller counting and (2) beta-counting wipe tests. Surface contamination was also assessed in situ on the ward by Geiger-Mueller counting and wipe testing. Contamination maps confirmed that contamination was removed rather than spread around by the robot. Wipe testing revealed that the robot was successful in clearing approximately 60-80% of removable contamination. The robotic floor-washing device was considered suitable to provide effective automated decontamination of the radioiodine ward. In addition, the robot affords other benefits: the time spent by the physicists decontaminating the room is greatly reduced offering financial and occupational safety and health benefits. The robot has also found utility in other decontamination applications in the healthcare environment. PMID:22249471

Westcott, Eliza; Broadhurst, Alicia; Crossley, Steven; Lee, Lloyd; Phan, Xuyen; Scharli, Rainer; Xu, Yan

2012-02-01

104

Surgical site infections in ambulatory surgery: A 5-year experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the ambulatory surgical site infection rate and risk factors associated with surgical site infection. Methods: We conducted a case-control analysis of all ambulatory surgeries between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1997. The frequency of surgical site infection per 100 surgeries was calculated. The odds ratio (OR) was estimated by using logistic regression analysis. Setting: A 140-bed

Diana Vilar-Compte; Rodrigo Roldán; Silvia Sandoval; Rebeca Corominas; Margarita de la Rosa; Patricia Gordillo; Patricia Volkow

2001-01-01

105

40 CFR 170.250 - Decontamination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.250 Section 170.250...Pesticide Handlers § 170.250 Decontamination. (a) Requirement. During...in accordance with this section, decontamination supplies for washing off...

2009-07-01

106

40 CFR 170.250 - Decontamination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.250 Section 170.250...Pesticide Handlers § 170.250 Decontamination. (a) Requirement. During...in accordance with this section, decontamination supplies for washing off...

2010-07-01

107

Decontamination of the Shaft no.1 and cleaning container of 2. block NPP Paks  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Meanwhile cleaning fuel assemblies on Paks NPP Unit 2. in 2003 year, the fuel assemblies were damaged, followed by contamination of cleaning container and operating shaft No. 1., in which was the container. As a part of the task - to restore operation NPP Paks, Unit 2, VUJE and.. realized decontamination of the wall of shaft prior to withdrawal of the defected fuel, decontamination of cleaning tank and in consequence decontamination of full shaft No. 1. Solution rest at finished conceptual decontamination proposal, fabrication of special purpose furnished, necessary documentation according to national legislative exigency. Real facilities on decontamination were examined on the stand and on shaft No. 1 in real conditions. This paper describes access method decontaminating procedure, applied facilities assigned on decontamination and present achievement results from decontamination shaft No. 1 realized in August 2006 and February 2007, respectively. Decontamination procedures were chosen on the base of experiments realized in laboratories VUJE and in Paks NPP. Laboratory experiments were realized on the sample of tube used for measurement of neutron flow, from NPP Paks, located in the shaft No.1 in time of event (INES-3). In NPP Paks were realized experiments on cover of cleaning container, which was in time of event situated on cleaning container. To compare decontaminated factors, the chemical and electrochemical procedures for decontamination were tested, and most effective practices were selected. Equipment ROS-740 can be used for the top part of the shaft decontamination. It allows high-pressure admission, rinse and chemical decontamination. Manipulator MAOS-170 is assigned for high-pressure admission of central part of the shaft. (authors)

Bolcha, Jan; Mala, Zuzana [VUJE Trnava, Inc. (Slovakia); Tilky, Peter [NPP Paks PA Zrt. (Hungary)

2007-07-01

108

Laparoendoscopic single site surgery in urology: A single centre experience  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To analyze our experience of 87 cases with single port surgery, which is also known as laparoendoscopic single site surgery (LESS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Case records of all LESS procedures performed between December 2007 and June 2010 were analysed. The procedures performed were donor nephrectomy (n=45), simple nephrectomy (n=27), radical nephrectomy (n=5), pyeloplasty (n=9), and ureteroneocystostomy (n=1). Parameters analysed were operating room (OR) time, estimated blood loss (EBL), visual analogue score (VAS), and complications in all patients undergoing LESS procedure and additionally, warm ischaemia time (WIT) and graft outcome in patients undergoing LESS donor nephrectomy. In reconstructive procedures, the functional assessment was performed with a diuretic renogram at 6 months. RESULTS: In LESS donor nephrectomy, the mean WIT was 6.9 ± 1.9 min. Mean serum creatinine in recipients at 1 month was 0.96 ± 0.21 mg%. We encountered one instance each of renal artery injury, renal vein injury, large bowel injury, minor cortical laceration at the upper pole and two instances of diaphragmatic injury. In LESS simple nephrectomy, the average OR time was 148.7 ± 52.2 min and hospital stay was 3.7 ± 1.2 days. There was one instance of large bowel injury during specimen retrieval. In LESS radical nephrectomy, the average OR time was 202.5 ± 35.7 min and average hospital stay was 4.2 ± 1.3 days. 6 patients of LESS pyeloplasty completed follow up with a diuretic renogram showing a good drainage. LESS ureteroneocystostomy could also be performed successfully without any complications. CONCLUSION: LESS surgery can be accomplished safely in nephrectomy and reconstructive procedures such as pyeloplasty and ureteroneocystostomy with equivalent outcomes as standard laparoscopy and with added benefits of cosmesis and quicker convalescence. LESS donor nephrectomy is a technically feasible procedure; current status of procedure needs to be proved with randomised controlled studies.

Ganpule, Arvind P; Sharma, Rajan; Kurien, Abraham; Mishra, Shashikant; Muthu, V; Sabnis, Ravindra; Desai, Mahesh R

2012-01-01

109

Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the decontamination process(es). In the case of an entire building, the value may be obvious; it's costly to replace the structure. For a smaller item such as a vehicle or painting, the cost versus benefit of decontamination needs to be evaluated. This will be determined on a case by case basis and again is beyond the scope of this report, although some thoughts on decontamination of unique, personal and high value items are given. But, this is clearly an area that starting discussions and negotiations early on will greatly benefit both the economics and timeliness of the clean up. In addition, high value assets might benefit from pre-event protection such as protective coatings or HEPA filtered rooms to prevent contaminated outside air from entering the room (e.g., an art museum).

Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

2009-06-30

110

Facility Decontamination Technology Workshop. Volume II. Discussion Groups.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information on the decontamination of Three Mile Island-2 reactor is presented concerning remote decontamination techniques; exotic decontamination techniques; decontamination waste management techniques; hands-on decontamination; health physics practices...

1982-01-01

111

Liquid-abrasive decontamination is versatile, safe, and effective  

SciTech Connect

The safety hazards inherent in electropolishing are eliminated by using liquid abrasives. Electropolishing requires high currents and electrolytes consisting of low-pH acids. In addition, the process generates hydrogen and oxygen. Under these conditions, electropolishing has an inherently high hazard potential, and elaborate precautions are necessary to protect the operating technician. The liquid-abrasive system isolates the operating technician from both direct contact with decontamination solutions and the atmosphere around those solutions. The entire process takes place in an enclosed area, and no corrosive, flammable, or explosive chemicals are involved. Most decontamination operations do not result in true cost savings because of slow processing times, marginal ability to decontaminate to free-release limits, and generation of large volumes of secondary waste. Experience shows that liquid-abrasive decontamination reduces these inadequacies to a minimum. The result is a truly costeffective, volume-reducing operation.

Mis, F.J.; Voit, R.E.

1983-10-01

112

CERCLA integration with site operations the Fernald experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major transition in the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site mission has occurred over the past few years. The production capabilities formally provided by the FEMP are being transferred to private industry through a vendor qualification program. Environmental compliance and site cleanup are now the primary focus. In line with this program, the production of uranium products at the

S. W. Coyle; R. S. Shirley; B. D. Varchol

1991-01-01

113

CERCLA integration with site operations: The Fernald experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major transition in the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site mission has occurred over the past few years. The production capabilities formally provided by the FEMP are being transferred to private industry through a vendor qualification program. Environmental compliance and site cleanup are now the primary focus. In line with this program, the production of uranium products at the

K. R. Kolthoff; R. S. Shirley; B. D. Varchol

1992-01-01

114

Uncertainty Analysis with Site Specific Groundwater Models: Experiences and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater flow and transport predictions are a major component of remedial action evaluations for contaminated groundwater at the Savannah River Site. Because all groundwater modeling results are subject to uncertainty from various causes; quantification of the level of uncertainty in the modeling predictions is beneficial to project decision makers. Complex site-specific models present formidable challenges for implementing an uncertainty analysis.

Brewer, K.

2003-07-15

115

Operatives’ experiences of cultural diversity on Australian construction sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Construction sites are among Australia’s most culturally diverse workplaces. A survey of 1155 construction operatives on Australian construction sites investigated, for the first time, the extent of this diversity and how it is experienced by workers. Results show that while cultural diversity presents organizational challenges by segregating the workforce, operatives’ cultural groups also perform positive functions such as maintaining positive

Martin Loosemore; Florence Phua; Kevin Dunn; Umut Ozguc

2010-01-01

116

INNOVATIVE SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION: THE SITE PROGRAM EXPERIENCE  

EPA Science Inventory

The SITE program of the USEPA has been bringing together the private sector, EPA, and other federal and state agencies to succedssfully address complex hazardous waste problems. For more than 15 years, the SITE Program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization ...

117

Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to answer the following questions concerning response to a future anthrax release (or suspected release) in a building: 1. Based on past experience, what rules of thumb can be determined concerning: (a) the amount of sampling that may be needed to determine the extent of contamination within a given building; (b) what portions of a building should be sampled; (c) the cost per square foot to decontaminate a given type of building using a given method; (d) the time required to prepare for, and perform, decontamination; (e) the effectiveness of a given decontamination method in a given type of building? 2. Based on past experience, what resources will be spent on evaluating the extent of contamination, performing decontamination, and assessing the effectiveness of the decontamination in abuilding of a given type and size? 3. What are the trade-offs between cost, time, and effectiveness for the various sampling plans, sampling methods, and decontamination methods that have been used in the past?

Price, Phillip N.; Hamachi, Kristina; McWilliams, Jennifer; Sohn, Michael D.

2008-09-12

118

Decontamination solution development studies  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement.

Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

1993-09-01

119

Newly Developed Gaseous Decontamination Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive wastes generated by atomic power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and nuclear research institutes has proven to be extremely difficult. With regard to two cases of heavy metals and hydrogen isotope (tritium), two kinds of newly developed gas-phase decontamination technology based on gaseous reactions are introduced. One is based on utilizing volatile properties

Katsuyoshi Tatenuma

120

Sulfate regional experiment documentation of SURE sampling sites  

SciTech Connect

Detailed information is provided that is supplementary to the discussions on SURE site locations in Section 2 of EPRI Report EA-1901. Air quality was measured at these ground stations. The deployment and specific map locations are given for the 56 stations. Large scale maps are provided for the vicinity of the Class I stations together with photographs of surroundings seen in the four compass directions from the roof of each station. Descriptions of the surroundings are given for each of the 45 regular Class II sites and for two substitute sites. Some of the Class II sites were located in the general area of non-urban industrial complexes. Tables of frequency distributions for 24-hr sulfate and 1-hr sulfur dioxide concentrations measured from August 1977 through October 1978 are given for these sites. Compliance of the Class I sites with the SURE and other siting criteria was evaluated. Unavoidable exceptions and their potential influence on the resulting data were evaluated and need to be considered when analyzing the data from the SURE.

Mueller, P.K.; Hidy, G.M.

1982-06-01

121

Innovative Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a novel laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination. Another aim is to make this surface decontamination technology becomes economically feasible for large scale decontamination.

Chen, Winston C. H.

2003-06-01

122

Testing site size requirements in chemisorption: experiment and theory  

SciTech Connect

''Ensemble requirements'' in surface chemistry refer to the number and shape of contiguous empty sites necessary for chemisorption of a particular molecule. Ensemble effects can play a major role in directing the course of surface reactions, leading, for example, to dramatic changes in catalytic selectivity when the active metal component is diluted upon alloying with an inert metal. We will review here fundamental surface science studies that have attempted to probe this site size requirement by diluting active sites on a single crystal surface with an inert metal overlayer. We will emphasize recent results in our lab on the interaction of simple molecules (CO, H/sub 2/, O/sub 2/) with Cu-, Ag-, and Bi-dosed Pt(111). Theoretical models based upon Monte-Carlo simulations will be summarized which, when compared to such data, allow more accurate determination of ensemble sizes. These models predict uptake curves that deviate strongly from the commonly used (1-theta)/sup A/ law (A = number of sites in ensemble), which is valid only for an array of isolated ensembles. 32 refs., 3 figs.

Campbell, C.T.; Paffett, M.T.; Voter, A.F.

1985-01-01

123

Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.  

PubMed

Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination. PMID:22851522

Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

2012-07-30

124

Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System  

SciTech Connect

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system.

Charles A. Gentile; John J. Parker; Gregory L. Guttadora; Lloyd P. Ciebiera

2002-02-11

125

Stainless steel decontamination manipulators  

SciTech Connect

Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions).

Sullivan, R.J.

1986-01-01

126

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01

127

Granulated decontamination formulations  

DOEpatents

A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-02

128

Facility siting and compensation: Lessons from the Massachusetts experience  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, Massachusetts enacted a unique and comprehensive process for siting hazardous waste facilities. No facility has been constructed or approved since then, however, so it seems appropriate to ask whether the process was fundamentally flawed in concept, implemented imperfectly, or whether some other lesson can be drawn. The authors of this study were closely involved with the legislation at its inception, and Sanderson has stayed involved with it professionally, most recently as manager of the Clean Harbors project. In this essay they combine analysis and memoir to examine the reasons why the Massachusetts siting process has not yet delivered a facility. They argue that the critical factors were both specific design defects of the law itself and general characteristics of the Massachusetts public decisionmaking process. The Massachusetts negotiated compensation model of facility siting is so complicated in practice, and so contingent on local factors, that no one can judge confidently whether it is on the whole hopeless, flawed but correctable, or merely unlucky. We believe its principal liability is that it offers two fatal temptations: to public officials, it appears to offer an alternative to taking leadership risks; and to frightened citizens, it appears to offer a way to avoid, rather than confront and control, physical risks and anxiety. Specific features of the process - its complexity, the inherent delay, the unfortunate design of the siting council - might be corrected with good effect. But we see larger and more pervasive forces as the real obstacle. The NIMBY problem is, at heart, symptomatic of the pessimistic expectations; raising those expectations is not a task that can be accomplished by any legislated decision process. 4 refs., 1 tabs.

O'Hare, M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Sanderson, D. (EIP Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-01-01

129

SITES OF EXPERIENCE: THE FUNCTIONS OF URBAN TOURISM PRECINCTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban tourists seek out and spend a large proportion of their time in tourism precincts. Because tourists are constrained by time, the precincts must perform a variety of functions if tourists are to have a satisfying and fulfilling experience of the city overall (Griffin and Hayllar 2007). To date, however, there have been few attempts to identify and understand these

Deborah Edwards; Katie Small; Tony Griffin; Bruce Hayllar

130

Decontamination of Canister and Overpack.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the solidification of waste in glass, it is assumed that the primary container (Canister) and the secondary container (Overpack) will become radioactively contaminated. Decontamination will therefore be required. For the in-can melting concept the Cani...

R. S. Ondrejcin

1979-01-01

131

KEWB facilities decontamination and disposition. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination and disposition of the KEWB facilities, Buildings 073, 643, 123, and 793, are complete. All of the facility equipment, including reactor enclosure, reactor vessel, fuel handling systems, controls, radioactive waste systems, exhaust systems, electrical services, and protective systems were removed from the site. Buildings 643, 123, and 793 were completely removed, including foundations. The floor and portions of the walls of Building 073 were covered over by final grading. Results of the radiological monitoring and the final survey are presented. 9 tables, 19 figures. (auth)

Ureda, B.F.

1976-02-25

132

Large-bore pipe decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

Ebadian, M.A.

1998-01-01

133

LARGE-BORE PIPE DECONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination and characterization of large-bore pipe is difficult because of the various geometries and diameters of pipe and its different material types. A robust decontamination system must be capable of adapting to different pipe diameters (project scope is 6 inches to 24 inches), cleaning surfaces with various surface conditions and material types (i.e., painted, rusted, carbon steel, or stainless steel), and be cost-effective to operate and maintain. The characterization system must be capable of handling the different pipe parameters and detecting contamination on the inside and outside surfaces. It must also operate in a cost-effective manner. Current technology options do not provide a robust system to meet these objectives. The purpose of this project is to verify the need for this technology through determining quantities of pipe available for decontamination (completed FY97), perform a technology screening process to select technologies for decontamination (completed FY97) and characterization (completed FY98), perform treatability studies to collect required performance data (completed FY97), and design and fabricate a prototype system to decontaminate and characterize the internal and external surfaces of large-bore pipe. A field mobile system capable of performing decontamination and characterization operations will be the main deliverable for this project. A summary of activities completed during FY97 is provided to understand the project development and implementation process.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-01-01

134

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01

135

Geology of the Source Physics Experiment Site, Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

A test bed for a series of chemical explosives tests known as Source Physics Experiments (SPE) was constructed in granitic rock of the Climax stock, in northern Yucca Flat at the Nevada National Security Site in 2010-2011. These tests are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's National Center for Nuclear Security. The test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves, and will provide data that will improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. Abundant geologic data are available for the area, primarily as a result of studies performed in conjunction with the three underground nuclear tests conducted in the Climax granite in the 1960s and a few later studies of various types. The SPE test bed was constructed at an elevation of approximately 1,524 meters (m), and consists of a 91.4-centimeter (cm) diameter source hole at its center, surrounded by two rings of three 20.3-cm diameter instrument holes. The inner ring of holes is positioned 10 m away from the source hole, and the outer ring of holes is positioned 20 m from the source hole. An initial 160-m deep core hole was drilled at the location of the source hole that provided information on the geology of the site and rock samples for later laboratory testing. A suite of geophysical logs was run in the core hole and all six instruments holes to obtain matrix and fracture properties. Detailed information on the character and density of fractures encountered was obtained from the borehole image logs run in the holes. A total of 2,488 fractures were identified in the seven boreholes, and these were ranked into six categories (0 through 5) on the basis of their degree of openness and continuity. The analysis presented here considered only the higher-ranked fractures (ranks 2 through 5), of which there were 1,215 (approximately 49 percent of all fractures identified from borehole image logs). The fractures were grouped into sets based on their orientation. The most ubiquitous fracture set (50 percent of all higher-ranked fractures) is a group of low-angle fractures (dips 0 to 30 degrees). Fractures with dips of 60 to 90 degrees account for 38 percent of high-ranked fractures, and the remaining 12 percent are fractures with moderate dips (30 to 60 degrees). The higher-angle fractures are further subdivided into three sets based on their dip direction: fractures of Set 1 dip to the north-northeast, fractures of Set 2 dip to the south-southwest, and Set 3 consists of high-angle fractures that dip to the southeast and strike northeast. The low-angle fractures (Set 4) dip eastward. Fracture frequency does not appear to change substantially with depth. True fracture spacing averages 0.9 to 1.2 m for high-angle Sets 1, 2, and 3, and 0.6 m for Set 4. Two significant faults were observed in the core, centered at the depths of 25.3 and 32.3 m. The upper of these two faults dips 80 degrees to the north-northeast and, thus, is related to the Set-1 fractures. The lower fault dips 79 degrees to the south-southwest and is related to SPE Set-2 fractures. Neither fault has an identifiable surface trace. Groundwater was encountered in all holes drilled on the SPE test bed, and the fluid level averaged about 15.2 to 18.3 m below ground surface. An informal study of variations in the fluid level in the holes conducted during various phases of construction of the test bed concluded that groundwater flow through the fractured granitic rocks is not uniform, and appears to be controlled by variations in the orientation and degree of interconnectedness of the fractures. It may also be possible that an aplite dike or quartz vein may be present in the test bed, which could act as a barrier to groundwater flow and, thus, could account for anisotropy seen in the groundwater recovery measurements.

Townsend, M., Prothro, L. B., Obi, C.

2012-03-15

136

SIMPLE AND EFFECTIVE CHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION OF RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED LEAD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of pounds of lead has been used by the DOE and their contractors as radioactive shielding over the last fifty years. In the process, radioisotopes in different chemical forms have adhered or adsorbed into the surface corrosion matrices, making the lead metal a hazard and expensive to stabilize and bury at approved sites. Physical decontamination methods are generally applicable

Thomas C. Zietlow

137

Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requ...

D. M. Leaphart S. R. Reed W. N. Rankin

1995-01-01

138

Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory East Area Radioactively Contaminated Surplus Facilities: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

ANL has decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) seven radiologically contaminated surplus facilities at its Illinois site: a ''Hot'' Machine Shop (Building 17) and support facilities; Fan House No. 1 (Building 37), Fan House No. 2 (Building 38), the P...

W. H. Kline G. F. Fassnacht H. J. Moe

1987-01-01

139

Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of {sup 99}Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying <400 V and <1 A for 1--3 h (energy consumption of 0.4--12 kWh/ft{sup 2}).

Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-03-01

140

MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

2001-01-01

141

Experiences from site-specific landslide early warning systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landslide early warning systems (EWSs) have to be implemented in areas with large risk for populations or infrastructures when classical structural remediation measures cannot be set up. This paper aims to gather experiences of existing landslide EWSs, with a special focus on practical requirements (e.g., alarm threshold values have to take into account the smallest detectable signal levels of deployed sensors before being established) and specific issues when dealing with system implementations. Within the framework of the SafeLand European project, a questionnaire was sent to about one-hundred institutions in charge of landslide management. Finally, we interpreted answers from experts belonging to 14 operational units related to 23 monitored landslides. Although no standard requirements exist for designing and operating EWSs, this review highlights some key elements, such as the importance of pre-investigation work, the redundancy and robustness of monitoring systems, the establishment of different scenarios adapted to gradual increasing of alert levels, and the necessity of confidence and trust between local populations and scientists. Moreover, it also confirms the need to improve our capabilities for failure forecasting, monitoring techniques and integration of water processes into landslide conceptual models.

Michoud, C.; Bazin, S.; Blikra, L. H.; Derron, M.-H.; Jaboyedoff, M.

2013-10-01

142

Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species, Composition, and Growth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Wa...

P. J. Hanson

2001-01-01

143

Developing an energy policy on power plant siting: the Utah experiment  

SciTech Connect

This article surveys the site selection experiences of the Kaiparowits Project and the Intermountain Power Project in Utah. It also traces the development of an energy policy for the state and the establishment of a unique intergovernmental coordination mechanism, the Utah Interagency Task Force on Power Plant Siting. The Utah experience affords a case study in policy adaptation designed to minimize unproductive political confrontation in regulatory forums. 76 references.

Hamilton, M.S.

1982-01-01

144

DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE  

SciTech Connect

As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

2003-02-27

145

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.

1994-02-01

146

Satellite Instructional Television Experiment: Television Comes to Village. An Evaluation of SITE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This evaluation of India's Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) investigated the process of existing rural communication, the role of television as a new medium of communication in SITE instructional areas, and the process of change brought about by television in the rural structure at the micro-level. The report includes…

Agrawal, Binod C.

147

Multiple-use management of forest recreation sites: a spatially explicit choice experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined visitors’ preferences for forest management at five adjacent municipal recreation sites in Finland, using a spatially explicit choice experiment. The study design accounted for changes in scenery and biodiversity indices in the forest environment resulting from forest management practices. Respondents were asked to choose their preferred management option from alternative management regimes for the sites. The options

Paula Horne; Peter C. Boxall; Wiktor L. Adamowicz

2005-01-01

148

Ultrasound to decontaminate heavy metals in dredged sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediments contaminated with heavy metals due to past disposal practices threaten the environment and require remediation. This study was an attempt to develop a technology to decontaminate heavy metals in dredged sediments using ultrasound coupled with vacuum pressure. A set of laboratory scale experiments were conducted using dredged sediments obtained from New York\\/New Jersey harbor. This sediment sample is considered

Jay N Meegoda; Ruvini Perera

2001-01-01

149

Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L{sup -1} and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process.

Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1996-12-31

150

Innovative Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a novel laser ablation in liquid technology for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination.

Chen, Winston C. H.

2002-06-01

151

Testing, expanding and implementing pollution prevention tools for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pollution Prevention (P2) programs and projects within the DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Programs have been independently developed and implemented at various sites. As a result, unique, innovative solutions used at one site may not be known to other sites, and other sites may continue to duplicate efforts to develop and implement similar solutions.

J. A. Roybal; D. McInroy; J. Watson; J. Mizner

1998-01-01

152

Decontamination of the Curium Source Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Curium Source Fabrication Facility (CSFF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was decontaminated to acceptable contamination levels for maintenance activities, using standard decontamination techniques. Solid- and liquid-waste volumes were controlled to minimize discharge to the ORNL Waste Systems. This program required two years of decontamination effort at a total cost of $580K.

Schaich, R.W.

1982-01-01

153

46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154... Safety Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references...carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that:...

2012-10-01

154

46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154... Safety Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references...carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that:...

2011-10-01

155

Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital  

SciTech Connect

Freestanding radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstruction. Because of the development of nuclear power plants in relatively remote areas and widespread transportation of radioactive materials it is important for hospitals and physicians to be prepared to handle radiation accident victims. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Ridge Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. It is important that the team leader be knowledgeable in radiation accident management and have personnel trained in radiation accident management as members of this team. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important. Periodic drills are necessary for this mobilization and the smooth operation of the unit.

Waldron, R.L.; Danielson, R.A.; Shultz, H.E.; Eckert, D.E.; Hendricks, K.O.

1981-05-01

156

Decontaminating a nuclear power plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a large-scale cleanup using a dilute solvent significantly reduced radiation fields in a pressurized water reactor, improving productivity and worker safety. The first full system chemical decontamination of an operating commercial nuclear power plant in the United States was conducted in March by the Consolidated Edison Co. of New York Inc. during a scheduled outage at its

S. A. Trovato; J. O. Parry; W. A. Monti; J. M. Burger

1995-01-01

157

Decontamination of sludge by the METIX-AC process. Part II: effects on maize growth and bioaccumulation of metals.  

PubMed

Given the fact that, according to our knowledge, no study has compared the agro-environmental use of decontaminated with non-decontaminated sludge, a greenhouse experiment was carried out to test the growth of maize (Zea mays L., G-4011 Hybrid) and bioaccumulation of metals in the presence of four different sludges (MUC, QUC, BEC and DAI), before and after their decontamination by a novel process (METIX-AC). Data showed that decontaminated sludge ameliorated plant growth and biomass production, and decreased bioaccumulation of metals, more than control soil, inorganic chemical fertilization, or conventional non-decontaminated sludge. Since chemicals used by the METIX-AC process contained S and Fe, decontaminated sludge introduced large amounts of these elements, while the overall presence of metals was reduced. Often, sludge dose also affected maize growth and bioaccumulation of metals. Overall, no toxicity to plants was noticed and bioaccumulation and transfer of many metals remained below the limits reported in the literature. PMID:17382537

Barraoui, Driss; Labrecque, Michel; Blais, Jean-François

2007-03-26

158

Chemical decontamination of BWR fuel and core materials  

SciTech Connect

A previous EPRI project decontaminated two discharged BWR fuel assemblies using the AP-LOMI and AP-CAN-DECON processes at Commonwealth Edison's Quad-Cities Nuclear Power Site. The two decontaminated assemblies and a third control assembly were shipped to the B W Hot Cell Facility in Lynchburg, Virginia. The three assemblies were partially disassembled in the hot cells and several rods extracted for nondestructive oxide measurement and visual examination. Various components were removed from the two decontaminated fuel assemblies for destructive examination to search for possible deleterious effects of chemical cleaning. The AP-LOMI process removed essentially all of the crud which normally covers a BWR bundle and channel. The AP-CAN-DECON process removed most of the crud, but left a thin layer on the rods and components in the central region of the bundle between the top and bottom spacer grids. Neither decontamination process appeared to damage the Zircaloy-2 fuel and water rods, or the Zircaloy-4 channels and spacers. An adherent zirconium oxide layer still covered all of the Zircaloy surfaces which were examined. The increase in hydrogen content of the channels and fuel rods was low. The AP-LOMI process did not appear to damage the Inconel X-750 fuel rod expansion springs, spacer lantern springs or channel finger spring. A thin, adherent oxide layer was found on all components.

Beauregard, R.J. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (USA))

1989-09-01

159

DOE decontamination and decommissioning program experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 475 United States government-owned facilities used in national defense and energy development programs have been shutdown and declared excess to present needs. These facilities include nuclear reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, waste treatment systems, laboratory facilities, and liquid and solid waste disposal grounds. Many of the facilities contain large quantities of man-made radioactive materials. Some of the facilities were constructed

Dabrowski

1983-01-01

160

Recent chemical engineering requirements as the result of TMI on-site experience  

SciTech Connect

From the experiences gained from the on-site experience at TMI, it is apparent that the role of chemical engineers should increase in order for the nuclear option to proceed in a safe and efficient fashion. It is also obvious that as the results of the reports investigating the causes and effects of the accident come to light and attempts to backfit system designs to prevent a recurrence are studied, more technical demands will be placed on the profession.

Brooksbank, R.E. Sr.

1980-01-01

161

Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program at West Virginia University consists of research and development associated with hazardous waste remediation problems at the Department of Energy complex and elsewhere. This program seeks to facilitate expedited development and implementation of solutions to the nation`s hazardous waste clean-up efforts. By a unique combination of university research and private technology development efforts, new paths toward implementing technology and speeding clean-ups are achievable. Mechanisms include aggressive industrial tie-ins to academic development programs, expedited support of small business technology development efforts, enhanced linkages to existing DOE programs, and facilitated access to hazardous waste sites. The program topically falls into an information component, which includes knowledge acquisition, technology evaluation and outreach activities and an R and D component, which develops and implements new and improved technologies. Projects began in February 1993 due to initiation of a Cooperative Agreement between West Virginia University and the Department of Energy.

Berg, M.; Sack, W.A.; Gabr, M. [and others

1994-12-31

162

Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; K. Rule; M. Viola; M. Williams; R. Strykowsky

1999-11-01

163

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-radioactive Process Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre-decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with hotographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael Clair

2001-09-01

164

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-Radioactive Process Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre- decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with photographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael C.

2001-09-30

165

Advanced Collaboration Tools To Support Integration & Steering of Multi-site Experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our aim is to construct, refine and deploy a prototype Virtual Research Environment (VRE) to enable teams of material scientists, academic and industrial engineers and instrument scientists to work together in undertaking, compiling, analysing, interrogating and visualizing multiple experiments on components of high complexity at different sites. These proof of concept tools will support multidisciplinary and geographically distributed teams. They

Kevin T. W. Tan; Michael W. Daley; Daniela K. Tsaneva; Nick J. Avis; Philip J. Withers

166

In-Situ Stress Measurements at DOE'S Multi-Well Experiment Site, Mesaverde Group, Rifle, CO.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Measurements of the vertical distribution of the minimum principal in situ stress in the lower Mesaverde group (7300 to 8100 ft depth) at DOE's Multi-Well Experiment site have been made by conducting small-volume, hydraulic-fracture stress tests through p...

N. R. Warpinski

1983-01-01

167

Stress wave propagationin the site 12 hydraulic\\/explosive fracturing experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Site 12 experiment was a heavily instrumented field event performed to examine the hydraulic\\/explosive fracturing concept for preparing an underground oil shale bed for true in situ processing. One of the key phases of this fracturing concept is the blasting operation which involves the insertion and detonation of slurry explosive in a pre-formed system of hydrofractures. To obtain a

R. R. Boade; R. P. Reed

1980-01-01

168

Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced

S. W. Mead; F. T. Wang; D. H. Stuermer

1981-01-01

169

MINERAL WEATHERING RATES FROM SMALL-PLOT EXPERIMENTS, WMP SITE, BEAR BROOKS, MAINE  

EPA Science Inventory

The pH-dependence of silicate mineral weathering rates was measured in small-plot experiments at the Bear Brooks Watershed Manipulation Project site in Maine, U.S.A. ix 2 m2 plots were acidified with solutions of HCL in deionized water at pH values of 2, 2.5, and 3. Acid applicat...

170

A Constructivist Learning Experience: Reconstructing a Web Site Using Web Based Multimedia Authoring Tools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Uses multimedia to create a constructivist learning experience and to innovate a multimedia constructivist learning model based on a course at Multimedia University (Malaysia). Assessed students' problem solving skills and ability to evaluate a Web site's design, creativity, and navigational structure by requiring them to reconstruct and improve…

Neo, Ken T. K.; Neo, Mai

2001-01-01

171

System for decontaminating compressed gas  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a system for decontaminating compressed gas. It comprises: twin desiccant-containing towers each alternatable between and relatively alternatable in decontaminating and regenerating cycles, a coalescer-containing precoalescer upstream and connected to an inlet port on an inlet manifold of the towers and alternatable between coalescing and purge cycles, a pair of inlet valves and a pair of solenoid valves in the manifold one for each tower. The towers and precoalescer each having a drain valve and in a lower part of a housing thereof an upwardly acting compactor supplied with actuating gas from an outlet in the inlet manifold, means for cycling the towers and precoalescer in response to timer-control of the solenoid valves, and means for preventing the cycling when the pressure of the gas is below a predetermined minimum.

Frantz, V.L.

1990-01-02

172

Lessons Learned from Bacterial Transport Experiments at the South Oyster Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a high?level review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi?investigator, multi?institution, multi?disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy. The experiments considered were conducted during the time period 1999?2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: 1) Quantification of bacterial transport in physically and biogeochemically heterogeneous aquifers, 2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, 3) scale effects in bacterial transport, 4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, 5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and 6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort.

Scheibe, Timothy D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Deflaun, Mary F.

2011-09-27

173

Alfalfa Seed Decontamination in Salmonella Outbreak  

PubMed Central

Based on in vitro data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends chemical disinfection of raw sprout seeds to reduce enteric pathogens contaminating the seed coats. However, little is known about the effectiveness of decontamination at preventing human disease. In 1999, an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Mbandaka occurred in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and California. Based on epidemiologic and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis evidence from 87 confirmed cases, the outbreak was linked to contaminated alfalfa seeds grown in California’s Imperial Valley. Trace-back and trace-forward investigations identified a single lot of seeds used by five sprout growers during the outbreak period. Cases of salmonellosis were linked with two sprout growers who had not employed chemical disinfection; no cases were linked to three sprout growers who used disinfection. This natural experiment provides empiric evidence that chemical disinfection can reduce the human risk for disease posed by contaminated seed sprouts.

Gill, Christopher J.; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C.; Farrar, Jeff A.; Waller, Patti L.; Hahn, Christine G.; Cieslak, Paul R.

2003-01-01

174

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring an...

1995-01-01

175

Efficacy of hexafluorine for emergent decontamination of hydrofluoric acid eye and skin splashes.  

PubMed

Hexafluorine is an amphoteric, hypertonic, polyvalent compound for decontaminating hydrofluoric acid (HF) eye and skin splashes. In a German metallurgy facility during the period of 1994-1998, all eye or skin splashes with 40% HF alone or with a 6% HF/15% HNO3 mixture were initially decontaminated with Hexafluorine within 2 min following the splash at the accident site by the victims themselves or co-workers who witnessed the accident. Eleven workers using 40% HF or a 6% HF/15% HNO3 mixture sustained eye (2 cases) or skin (10 cases) splashes (1 combined) during 1994-1998. Hexafluorine was used within 2 min, and a second Hexafluorine decontamination was done on arrival at the plant infirmary. No further medical or surgical treatment was needed, no workers developed chemical burns, and none lost work time. These II cases demonstrate the efficacy of Hexafluorine in decontaminating HF or combined HF/HNO3 splashes. PMID:11577928

Mathieu, L; Nehles, J; Blomet, J; Hall, A H

2001-10-01

176

Decontamination of a canyon crane at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination of the crane is reviewed in terms of the health physics aspects, controls during decontamination efforts, and the resultant radiation exposure rates for decontamination efforts. 17 figs., (ACR)

Stevenson, D A; Moore, D B; Bowers, J W; Brown, D L

1985-01-01

177

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-Radioactive Process Decontamination.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the results of a test of the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during nonradioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination...

M. C. Swenson

2001-01-01

178

41 CFR 101-45.001 - Demilitarization and decontamination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 true Demilitarization and decontamination. 101-45.001 Section 101-45...101-45.001 Demilitarization and decontamination. (a) Dangerous material...use. (b) Demilitarization or decontamination of property to be donated to...

2010-07-01

179

An estimation of the social costs of landfill siting using a choice experiment.  

PubMed

This paper examines public preferences on siting landfills using a choice experiment. A choice experiment is a method that elicits public preferences directly through questionnaires. This paper focuses on possible negative effects of a hypothetical landfill siting on residents who are assumed to live around the landfill. The results of this analysis clearly show that the residents evaluate accepting waste originating from outside their community quite negatively, especially industrial waste originating from the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. Large external costs also are seen for siting landfills near areas that are sources of drinking water. In addition, the results show that the NIMBY syndrome of the residents weakens as the hypothetical landfill site is farther away. Considering three hypothetical siting plans, external costs based on public preferences are estimated. The social costs, which are the sum of the private costs and external costs, are then calculated. The results of the case study indicate that the option with the lowest private cost it is not always the option with the lowest social cost. PMID:15381227

Sasao, Toshiaki

2004-01-01

180

Impact of three biological decontamination methods on filtering facepiece respirator fit, odor, comfort, and donning ease.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine if ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), moist heat incubation (MHI), or microwave-generated steam (MGS) decontamination affects the fitting characteristics, odor, comfort, or donning ease of six N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) models. For each model, 10 experienced test subjects qualified for the study by passing a standard OSHA quantitative fit test. Once qualified, each subject performed a series of fit tests to assess respirator fit and completed surveys to evaluate odor, comfort, and donning ease with FFRs that were not decontaminated (controls) and with FFRs of the same model that had been decontaminated. Respirator fit was quantitatively measured using a multidonning protocol with the TSI PORTACOUNT Plus and the N95 Companion accessory (designed to count only particles resulting from face to face-seal leakage). Participants' subjective appraisals of the respirator's odor, comfort, and donning ease were captured using a visual analog scale survey. Wilcoxon signed rank tests compared median values for fit, odor, comfort, and donning ease for each FFR and decontamination method against their respective controls for a given model. Two of the six FFRs demonstrated a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.05) in fit after MHI decontamination. However, for these two FFR models, post-decontamination mean fit factors were still ? 100. One of the other FFRs demonstrated a relatively small though statistically significant increase (p < 0.05) in median odor response after MHI decontamination. These data suggest that FFR users with characteristics similar to those in this study population would be unlikely to experience a clinically meaningful reduction in fit, increase in odor, increase in discomfort, or increased difficulty in donning with the six FFRs included in this study after UVGI, MHI, or MGS decontamination. Further research is needed before decontamination of N95 FFRs for purposes of reuse can be recommended. PMID:21732856

Viscusi, Dennis J; Bergman, Michael S; Novak, Debra A; Faulkner, Kimberly A; Palmiero, Andrew; Powell, Jeffrey; Shaffer, Ronald E

2011-07-01

181

An Analysis of NSF Geosciences 2009 Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct research at different institutions and in areas that may not be available in their home campuses. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with undergraduate majors and facilitates discovery of the multidisciplinary nature of the Geosciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the 50 active REU Sites; over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, but the survey did not distinguish among different tools like websites, emails, social networks, etc. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. A few Sites include rising sophomores. At least 40% of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution is balanced, with a slightly larger number of female participants. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; more than 75% of the participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic well activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings), networking and social activities. There are some clear similarities among REU Sites managed by the three divisions in the Directorate of Geosciences (e.g. recruitment tools, academic level of participants, and enrichment activities), but other aspects vary among the Sites managed by the different divisions (e.g. admissions rate, diversity, and distribution among research disciplines). The results from this survey will be used to examine strengths in the REU Sites in the Geosciences, opportunities that may be under utilized, and community needs to enhance this NSF wide program.

Sanchez, S. C.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Weiler, S. C.

2009-12-01

182

Muon Detectors at the Near Site of Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) is designed to make precision measurement of ?? -> ?e oscillations and increase understanding of CP violation. Critical to this experiment is detection of the initial neutrino flux at the near site facility at Fermilab. By understanding the flux, energy, and composition of the tertiary muon beam the characteristics of the initial neutrino beam can be extrapolated. There are three detectors at the near site for muon measurement: muon ionization counter, muon Cherenkov detectors, and stopped muon detectors. The muon ionization provides a basic flux profile. The muon Cherenkov detectors provide information on the energy distribution of the muon beam. The stopped muon detectors are small Cherenkov detectors that provide information about the spectrum and normalization of the muon beam. The focus of this talk will be on the design and expected performance of each of these muon detectors.

Poulson, Daniel

2013-04-01

183

The effect of site-based preservice experiences on elementary science teaching self-efficacy beliefs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current reform in science education has focused on the need for improvement of preservice teacher training (National Science Education Standards, 1996). As a situation specific construct (Bandura, 1977), self-efficacy studies have been conducted to investigate factors that impact preservice teachers' sense of confidence as it relates to their ability to become successful science teachers. This descriptive study identified factors in the site based experiences that affected preservice elementary teachers' self-efficacy as measured by the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBL-B) (Enochs and Riggs, 1990). The sample consisted of the entire population of undergraduate elementary preservice teachers in the site based teacher education program during the fall semester of 1997 at a large south central urban university. The 131 paired, pretest posttests of the entire STEBL-B and the two constructs were analyzed for significance in mean score gains. Results of the paired t test yielded a t value of 11.52 which was significant at p <.001. An analysis of covariance using the pretest as the covariate yielded an F value of 6.41 which was statistically significant at p <.001. These quantitative results were supported by interviews and by written comments on questionnaires that determined ratings for the extent of impact on self-efficacy from site based experiences. Results of this study indicate that the experiences of the site based program has a significant positive impact on the preservice teachers' self-efficacy. The implication for teacher educators is that this specific affective dimension can be significantly enhanced. The site based program can provide the four factors Bandura identified as sources of information used to determine self-efficacy. These include performance accomplishments through authentic teaching experiences, vicarious experiences through observation of the site based teachers, and verbal persuasion and physiological states from feedback given by the university coordinators. The majority of these preservice teachers started the semester with a negative attitude toward teaching science, but ended the semester with a positive view of themselves as effective science teachers in the future.

Wingfield, Mary E.

184

Decontamination of the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Hot Cells  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility decommissioning project recently completed a major milestone with the successful decontamination of seven hot cells. The cells included thick concrete walls and leaded glass windows, manipulator arms, inter cell dividing walls, and roof slabs. There was also a significant amount of embedded conduit and piping that had to be cleaned and surveyed. Prior to work starting evaluation studies were performed to determine whether it was more cost effective to do this work using a full up removal approach (rip and ship) or to decontaminate the cells to below required clean up levels, leaving the bulk of the material in place. This paper looks at that decision process, how it was implemented, and the results of that effort including the huge volume of material that can now be used as fill during site restoration rather than being disposed of as LLRW. (authors)

Peecook, K.M. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, OH (United States)

2008-07-01

185

Decontamination and Decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is dedicated to the safe and cost effective D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. There is currently a backlog of more than 7,000 contaminated US Department of Energy facilities nationwide. Added to this are 110 licensed commercial nuclear power reactors operated by utilities learning to cope with deregulation and an aging infrastructure that supports the commercial nuclear power industry, as well as medical and other uses of radioactive materials. With this volume it becomes easy to understand the importance of addressing the unique issues and objectives associated with the D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. This photobriefing book summarizes the decontamination and decommissioning projects and activities either completed or continuing at the ANL-E site during the year.

NONE

1998-04-01

186

In-situ stress measurements at DOE's MultiWell Experiment site, Mesaverde group, Rifle, Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of the vertical distribution of the minimum principal in-situ stress in the lower Mesaverde group (7300-8100 ft depth, 2225-2470 m) at DOE's Multi-Well Experiment site have been made by conducting small-volume, hydraulic-fracture stress tests through perforations. Accurate, reproducible results were obtained by conducting a number of repeat injections in each zone of interest using a specially designed pump system,

N. R. Warpinski; P. Branagan; R. Wilmer

1983-01-01

187

Cathodic protection system operating experience for underground piping at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Cathodic protection has been used on underground radioactive waste lines at the Hanford Site for more than 40 years. Studies were performed at the time the cathodic protection system was installed. This document reviews some of the historical studies and describes the old cathodic protection system. In addition, it describes the new system, a typical cathodic protection installation, relates improvements of the new system over the old system and some operating experience with the new system, and present recommendations for improvements.

Carlos, W.C.

1992-02-01

188

Microearthquakes induced during hydraulic fracturing at the Fenton Hill HDR site: the 1982 experiments  

SciTech Connect

The on-site real-time processing of microearthquake signals that occur during massive hydraulic fracturing provides a notion of the location and growth of the fracture system being created. This enables quick decisions to be made in regard to the ongoing operations. The analytical results and impact of the hypocenter mapping during the 1982 fracturing experiments in the Fenton Hill Phase II Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir are reported.

Keppler, H.; Pearson, C.F.; Potter, R.M.; Albright, J.N.

1983-01-01

189

In-Situ Stress Measurements at U. S. DOE's Multiwell Experiment Site, Mesaverde Group, Rifle, Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vertical distribution measurements of the minimum principal in-situ stress in the lower Mesaverde group (7,300to 8,100-ft (2225- to 2470-m) depth) at the U.S. DOE's Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site have been made by conducting small-volume, hydraulic-fracture stress tests through perforations. Accurate, reproducible results were obtained by conducting repeated injections in each zone of interest with a specially designed pump system, modified

Norman Warpinski; Paul Branagan; Roy Wilmer

1985-01-01

190

Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Surgeries: A Single-Center Experience of 171 Consecutive Cases  

PubMed Central

Purpose We report our experience to date with 171 patients who underwent laparoendoscopic single-site surgery for diverse urologic diseases in a single institution. Materials and Methods Between December 2008 and August 2010, we performed 171 consecutive laparoendoscopic single-site surgeries. These included simple nephrectomy (n=18; robotic surgeries, n=1), radical nephrectomy (n=26; robotic surgeries, n=2), partial nephrectomy (n=59; robotic surgeries, n=56), nephroureterectomy (n=20; robotic surgeries, n=12), pyeloplasty (n=4), renal cyst decortications (n=22), adrenalectomy (n=4; robotic surgeries, n=2), ureterolithotomy (n=10), partial cystectomy (n=3), ureterectomy (n=1), urachal mass excision (n=1), orchiectomy (n=1), seminal vesiculectomy (n=1), and retroperitoneal mass excision (n=1). All procedures were performed by use of a homemade single-port device with a wound retractor and surgical gloves. A prospective study was performed to evaluate outcomes in 171 cases. Results Of the 171 patients, 98 underwent conventional laparoendoscopic single-site surgery and 73 underwent robotic laparoendoscopic single-site surgery. Mean patient age was 53 years, mean operative time was 190.8 minutes, and mean estimated blood loss was 204 ml. Intraoperative complications occurred in seven cases (4.1%), and postoperative complications in nine cases (5.3%). There were no complications classified as Grade IIIb or higher (Clavien-Dindo classification for surgical complications). Conversion to mini-incision open surgery occurred in seven (4.1%) cases. Regarding oncologic outcomes, no cancer-related events occurred during follow-up other than one aggressive progression of Ewing sarcoma. Conclusions Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery is technically feasible and safe for various urologic diseases; however, surgical experience and long-term follow-up are needed to test the superiority of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery.

Choi, Kyung Hwa; Ham, Won Sik; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Jae Won; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Arkoncel, Francis Raymond P.; Yang, Seung Choul

2011-01-01

191

Magnetic separation for soil decontamination  

SciTech Connect

High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Tolt, T.L. (Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (United States))

1993-01-01

192

Magnetic separation for soil decontamination  

SciTech Connect

High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolt, T.L. [Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (United States)

1993-02-01

193

DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah River Site to demonstrate the processing of genuine plutonium contaminated wastes.

Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

2002-08-01

194

Decontamination of Three Mile Island Unit 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This compendium of previously published works, supplemented with discussion based on current perspective, summarizes the methods and equipment employed to decontaminate Three Mile Island Unit 2 from the accident of March 28, 1979 through May 1988. Early decontamination efforts are described to clarify the lessons learned from these activities when viewed from the present perspective. New developments in conventional technology,

M. D. II Pavelek; J. S. Epler; R. J. Vallem

1989-01-01

195

Decon2 (Decon Squared): Deconstructing Decontamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decon is short for decontamination (e.g. stripdown and washdown in response to anthrax scares, etc.), but the term decon is also a short form for deconstruction (literary criticism asserting multiple conflicting interpretations of philosophical, political or social implications rather than an author's intention). The author describes an anthrax ready mailroom exhibit that included mass casualty decontamination showers, which he built

Steve Mann

2003-01-01

196

DECONTAMINATION OF ZIRCALOY SPENT FUEL CLADDING HULLS  

SciTech Connect

The reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generates a Zircaloy cladding hull waste which requires disposal as a high level waste in the geologic repository. The hulls are primarily contaminated with fission products and actinides from the fuel. During fuel irradiation, these contaminants are deposited in a thin layer of zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) which forms on the cladding surface at the elevated temperatures present in a nuclear reactor. Therefore, if the hulls are treated to remove the ZrO{sub 2} layer, a majority of the contamination will be removed and the hulls could potentially meet acceptance criteria for disposal as a low level waste (LLW). Discard of the hulls as a LLW would result in significant savings due to the high costs associated with geologic disposal. To assess the feasibility of decontaminating spent fuel cladding hulls, two treatment processes developed for dissolving fuels containing zirconium (Zr) metal or alloys were evaluated. Small-scale dissolution experiments were performed using the ZIRFLEX process which employs a boiling ammonium fluoride (NH{sub 4}F)/ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) solution to dissolve Zr or Zircaloy cladding and a hydrofluoric acid (HF) process developed for complete dissolution of Zr-containing fuels. The feasibility experiments were performed using Zircaloy-4 metal coupons which were electrochemically oxidized to produce a thin ZrO{sub 2} layer on the surface. Once the oxide layer was in place, the ease of removing the layer using methods based on the two processes was evaluated. The ZIRFLEX and HF dissolution processes were both successful in removing a 0.2 mm (thick) oxide layer from Zircaloy-4 coupons. Although the ZIRFLEX process was effective in removing the oxide layer, two potential shortcomings were identified. The formation of ammonium hexafluorozirconate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}ZrF{sub 6}) on the metal surface prior to dissolution in the bulk solution could hinder the decontamination process by obstructing the removal of contamination. The thermal decomposition of this material is also undesirable if the cladding hulls are melted for volume reduction or to produce waste forms. Handling and disposal of the corrosive off-gas stream and ZrO{sub 2}-containing dross must be addressed. The stability of Zr{sup 4+} in the NHF{sub 4}/NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution is also a concern. Precipitation of ammonium zirconium fluorides upon cooling of the dissolving solution was observed in the feasibility experiments. Precipitation of the solids was attributed to the high fluoride to Zr ratios used in the experiments. The solubility of Zr{sup 4+} in NH{sub 4}F solutions decreases as the free fluoride concentration increases. The removal of the ZrO{sub 2} layer from Zircaloy-4 coupons with HF showed a strong dependence on both the concentration and temperature. Very rapid dissolution of the oxide layer and significant amounts of metal was observed in experiments using HF concentrations {ge} 2.5 M. Treatment of the coupons using HF concentrations {le} 1.0 M was very effective in removing the oxide layer. The most effective conditions resulted in dissolution rates which were less than approximately 2 mg/cm{sup 2}-min. With dissolution rates in this range, uniform removal of the oxide layer was obtained and a minimal amount of Zircaloy metal was dissolved. Future HF dissolution studies should focus on the decontamination of actual spent fuel cladding hulls to determine if the treated hulls meet criteria for disposal as a LLW.

Rudisill, T; John Mickalonis, J

2006-09-27

197

Hairy skin exposure to VX in vitro: effectiveness of delayed decontamination.  

PubMed

The chemical warfare agents such as VX represent a threat for both military and civilians, which involves an immediate need of effective decontamination systems. Since human scalp is usually unprotected compared to other body regions covered with clothes, it could be a preferential site of exposure in case of terrorist acts. The purpose of this study was to determine if skin decontamination could be efficient when performed more than 1h after exposure. In addition, the impact of hairs in skin contamination was investigated. By using in vitro skin models, we demonstrated that about 75% of the applied quantity of VX was recovered on the skin surface 2h after skin exposition, which means that it is worth decontaminating even if contamination occurred 2h before. The stratum corneum reservoir for VX was quickly established and persistent. In addition, the presence of hairs modified the percutaneous penetration of the nerve agent by binding of VX to hairs. Hair shaft has thus to be taken into account in the decontamination process. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) and Fuller's Earth (FE) were active in the skin decontamination 45min post-exposure, but RSDL was more efficient in reducing the amount of VX either in the skin or in the hair. PMID:22926045

Rolland, P; Bolzinger, M-A; Cruz, C; Josse, D; Briançon, S

2012-08-17

198

Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination.  

PubMed

Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, foodborne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, healthcare and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. PMID:20924122

Lemyre, Louise; Johnson, Colleen; Corneil, Wayne

2010-10-05

199

Infiltration experiment for closure cap evaluation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses several large waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site which are being closed. These facilities include two seepage basins and the low-level waste disposal facility. The key element of the closures is the construction of a cap system to limit the infiltration of water which might reach the disposed waste. Cap designs have been modeled using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code. This code was developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers for the Environmental Protection Agency to model the effects of various cap and liner designs on the water balance at landfills. A field experiment has been set up which will allow the results of the HELP Code to be verified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by measuring the actual water balance created by closure cap configurations which will be used in waste site closures at SRS. Two of the caps will be similar to those used for the planned closure activities. Each one has a specific closure arrangement. Once operational, the experiment will be evaluated for a five-year period.

Roddy, N.S.; Cook, J.R.

1990-12-31

200

Infiltration experiment for closure cap evaluation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses several large waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site which are being closed. These facilities include two seepage basins and the low-level waste disposal facility. The key element of the closures is the construction of a cap system to limit the infiltration of water which might reach the disposed waste. Cap designs have been modeled using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code. This code was developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers for the Environmental Protection Agency to model the effects of various cap and liner designs on the water balance at landfills. A field experiment has been set up which will allow the results of the HELP Code to be verified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by measuring the actual water balance created by closure cap configurations which will be used in waste site closures at SRS. Two of the caps will be similar to those used for the planned closure activities. Each one has a specific closure arrangement. Once operational, the experiment will be evaluated for a five-year period.

Roddy, N.S.; Cook, J.R.

1990-01-01

201

Injection-site reactions upon Kineret (anakinra) administration: experiences and explanations.  

PubMed

Anakinra (Kineret), a recombinant form of human interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in combination with methotrexate. Kineret is self-administered by daily subcutaneous injections in patients with active RA. The mechanism of action of anakinra is to competitively inhibit the local inflammatory effects of IL-1. Kineret is generally safe and well tolerated and the only major treatment-related side effects that appear are skin reactions at the injection site. Due to the relatively short half-life of anakinra, daily injection of the drug is required. This, in combination with the comparably high rates of injection-site reactions (ISRs) associated with the drug, can become a problem for the patient. The present review summarises published data concerning ISRs associated with Kineret and provides some explanations as to their cause. The objective is also to present some clinical experiences of how the ISRs can be managed. PMID:21881988

Kaiser, Christina; Knight, Ann; Nordström, Dan; Pettersson, Tom; Fransson, Jonas; Florin-Robertsson, Ebba; Pilström, Björn

2011-09-01

202

In vitro skin permeation and decontamination of the organophosphorus pesticide paraoxon under various physical conditions--evidence for a wash-in effect.  

PubMed

Misuse of various chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents, industrial chemicals or pesticides during warfare or terrorists attacks requires adequate protection. Thus, development and evaluation of novel decontamination dispositives and techniques are needed. In this study, in vitro permeation and decontamination of a potentially hazardous compound paraoxon, an active metabolite of organophosphorus pesticide parathion, was investigated. Skin permeation and decontamination experiments were carried out in modified Franz diffusion cells. Pig skin was used as a human skin model. Commercially produced detergent-based washing solutions FloraFree(™) and ArgosTM were used as decontamination means. The experiments were done under "warm", "cold", "dry" and "wet" skin conditions in order to determine an effect of various physical conditions on skin permeation of paraoxon and on a subsequent decontamination process. There was no significant difference in skin permeation of paraoxon under warm, cold and dry conditions, whereas wet conditions provided significantly higher permeation rates. In the selected conditions, decontamination treatments performed 1 h after a skin exposure did not decrease the agent volume that permeated through the skin. An exception were wet skin conditions with non-significant decontamination efficacy 18 and 28% for the FloraFree(™) and Argos(™) treatment, respectively. In contrast, the skin permeation of paraoxon under warm, cold and dry conditions increased up to 60-290% following decontamination compared to non-decontaminated controls. This has previously been described as a skin wash-in effect. PMID:22519880

Misik, Jan; Pavlikova, Ruzena; Josse, Denis; Cabal, Jiri; Kuca, Kamil

2012-05-23

203

Issues relating to the siting of tritium-fueled fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

A preconceptual design study and safety analysis of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was conducted in 1984 for the Department of Energy. This paper summarizes the calculations and comparisons related to TFCX siting and environmental issues such as radiological doses to the public living near the facility. Included are discussions of (a) routine and accidental releases of tritium, (b) routine releases of activated air, (c) direct radiation (including skyshine), and (d) seismic criteria. Other potential issues are also discussed including the amount of tritium that might be retained in the graphite armor in the torus, the possible severity of magnet accidents, and the extent of damage due to plasma disruptions. The conclusions drawn from these calculations should be applicable to some of the other planned ignited core experiments that have operating parameters similar to those of TFCX.

Reilly, H.J.; Holland, D.F.

1985-01-01

204

Decontaminating a nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a large-scale cleanup using a dilute solvent significantly reduced radiation fields in a pressurized water reactor, improving productivity and worker safety. The first full system chemical decontamination of an operating commercial nuclear power plant in the United States was conducted in March by the Consolidated Edison Co. of New York Inc. during a scheduled outage at its Indian Point 2 plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) located in Buchanan, NY, about 25 miles north of New York City. A low-cost supplier of energy to New York City and Westchester County, the 980-megawatt plant recently completed an industry record 616-day continuous operating run. The plant account8ed for 20 percent of the utility`s electric output in 1994. Considering fuel and variable cost indices, Indian Point 2 is the least expensive generating plant to run in the Con Edison system.

Trovato, S.A.; Parry, J.O.; Monti, W.A.; Burger, J.M. [Consolidated Edison Co. of New York Inc., New York, NY (United States); Burger, J.M. [Empire State Electric Energy Research Corp, New York, NY (United States)

1995-06-01

205

Surface decontamination of solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes work in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination system that can minimize the volume of surface-contaminated metallic and nonmetallic waste requiring geologic disposal. Vibratory finishing is a mass finishing process used in the metal finishing industry to debur, clean and improve surface finishes. The process combines a mechanical scrubbing action of a solid medium with the cleaning action of a liquid compound. The process takes place in a vibrating tub. Tests have demonstrated the ability to rapidly reduce contamination levels of transuranic-contaminated waste to substantially less than 10 nCi/g, the current limit for transuranic waste. The process is effective on a wide range of materials including stainless steel, Plexiglas, Neoprene, and Hypalon, the principal materials in Hanford glove boxes.

McCoy, M.W.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.

1980-04-01

206

Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive  

DOEpatents

A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

2007-10-16

207

Hydrogeological characterization of a bank filtration experiment site at the Rio Grande, El Paso, Texas, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experiment site was constructed along an artificial channel of the Rio Grande in El Paso, Texas. The experiment was funded by the EPA and is designed to measure the effectiveness of bank filtration in an arid environment. Regionally, the experiment is important because of the hundreds of thousands of people drinking water from shallow wells drilled in close proximity to septic systems. A pumping well was drilled 17 meters from the stream bank and screened from 3.5 to 8 m depth. A cruciform array of observation wells with several multilevel completions allows detection of downstream and vertical movement of water as well as flow from the stream to the well. All of the wells were continuously cored during drilling. Analysis of the cores reveals that the site consists of two stacked channels filled with sand deposited from the meandering Rio Grande. A grid of ground-penetrating radar lines provided three-dimensional coverage between wells and showed bedding to 6.5 m depth. Constant head hydraulic conductivities show that the aquifer consists of two more permeable units separated by the less permeable upper fill of the lower channel complex, with vertical hydraulic conductivities of (1x10-6 to 2x10-6 m/s?). The intervals above and below this interval have the highest vertical conductivities (up to 3.5x10-5 m/s). A multiple pumping and tracer test was conducted using the cruciform array of the field site that consisted of a pumping well, 16 observation wells, and a stream sampling point. The average hydraulic conductivity of the geological media at the field site was about 2 x 10-3 m/s based on pumping test analysis. However, the type curve responses revealed significant heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity throughout the field site. For the tracer test, bromide and microspheres were used as tracers. Microspheres were used to mimic the behavior of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. The tracers (bromide and microspheres of different sizes and colors) were injected in one observation wells screened into the riverbank, one observation wells screened into the geological medium at the field site, and into one piezometer pushed into the stream sediments within the stream. The bromide recovery in the pumping well and in the deeper observation wells showed an early and a late peak with a long tail indicating the possibility that the geological medium at the field site behaves like a double-porosity medium allowing the tracer to move relatively quickly through the higher conductivity units while being significantly retarded in the low hydraulic conductivity units. The analysis of the microspheres in the laboratory, which is not yet complete, will shed more light on the transport behavior of pathogens at the field site.

Langford, R.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Pillai, S.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Widmer, K.

2003-04-01

208

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01

209

HECTR (Hydrogen Event: Containment Transient Response) analyses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) premixed combustion experiments  

SciTech Connect

The HECTR (Hydrogen Event: Containment Transient Response) computer code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to predict the transient pressure and temperature responses within reactor containments for hypothetical accidents involving the transport and combustion of hydrogen. Although HECTR was designed primarily to investigate these phenomena in LWRs, it may also be used to analyze hydrogen transport and combustion experiments as well. It is in this manner that HECTR is assessed and empirical correlations, such as the combustion completeness and flame speed correlations for the hydrogen combustion model, if necessary, are upgraded. In this report, we present HECTR analyses of the large-scale premixed hydrogen combustion experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comparison with the test results. The existing correlations in HECTR version 1.0, under certain conditions, have difficulty in predicting accurately the combustion completeness and burn time for the NTS experiments. By combining the combustion data obtained from the NTS experiments with other experimental data (FITS, VGES, ACUREX, and Whiteshell), a set of new and better combustion correlations was generated. HECTR prediction of the containment responses, using a single-compartment model and EPRI-provided combustion completeness and burn time, compares reasonably well against the test results. However, HECTR prediction of the containment responses using a multicompartment model does not compare well with the test results. This discrepancy shows the deficiency of the homogeneous burning model used in HECTR. To overcome this deficiency, a flame propagation model is highly recommended. 16 refs., 84 figs., 5 tabs.

Wong, C.C.

1988-11-01

210

Development of the Decontamination Approach for the West Valley Demonstration Project Decontamination Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

This paper details the development of a decontamination approach for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), Decontamination Project Plan (Plan). The WVDP is operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO), a subsidiary of Westinghouse Government and Environmental Services, and its parent companies Washington Group International and British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL). The WVDP is a waste management effort being conducted by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing facility to have operated in the United States. This facility is part of the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC), which is owned by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). As authorized by Congress in 1980 through the West Valley Demonstration Project Act (WVDP Act, Public Law 96-368), the DOE's primary mission at the WVDP is to solidify high-level liquid nuclear waste safely; transport the high-level waste (HLW) to a federal repository; and decontaminate and decommission the facilities and hardware used to solidify the HLW and conduct the WVDP. This includes a provision for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic waste (TRU) produced during processing of the HLW. Continuation of the effort to reduce the hazard and risk associated with historic operations to the extent needed to ensure the health and safety of the public and the environment will see a change in focus from stabilization of liquid HLW to stabilization of former plutonium and uranium extraction (PUREX) reprocessing plant facilities. This will be achieved through the activities of in-cell component removal and packaging, and preparation for long-term disposal of the long- lived radionuclides. These radionuclides are associated with the former PUREX facility operations, including, and upstream from, facilities utilized in the primary separation and first plutonium/uranium split cycles. The closure strategy for the WVDP is subject to ongoing evaluation and decision-making involving DOE and NYSERDA. Implementation will be subject to a future Record of Decision (ROD) and an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

Milner, T. N.; Watters, W. T.

2002-02-25

211

Decontamination par des Methodes Chimiques, Electrochimiques et au Jet d'Eau (Decontamination by Chemical and Electrochemical Methods and with a Water Jet).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Decontamination experiments have been carried out using representative samples from the primary circuit of a P.W.R. reactor, and on samples taken from the water supply pipes of the German Isar B.W.R. reactor. In the primary circuits of the P.W.R. reactors...

J. P. Gauchon P. Mordenti C. Bezia P. Fuentes Y. Kervegabt

1986-01-01

212

Barriers to Expanding Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Site Availability in an Experiential Education Consortium  

PubMed Central

Objectives To compare 2006-2007 and projected 2010-2011 advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) availability and needs for 4 colleges and schools of pharmacy in Georgia and Alabama and to examine barriers and offer potential solutions to increase APPE site and preceptor availability. Methods Data on APPE needs and availability were gathered prospectively and evaluated relative to current and projected enrollment and planned programmatic changes. Results Combined 2006-2007 non-community APPE needs and availabilities were 3,590 and 4,427, respectively, with a surplus availability of 837. Combined projected 2010-2011 non-community APPEs were estimated at 4,309. Assuming 2006-2007 non-community availability remained unchanged, the surplus availability declined to 118. Conclusions The need for quality experiential education represents a significant barrier and rate-limiting step to the matriculation of the increased numbers of pharmacists. Barriers to expanding APPE availability include: introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) and APPE expansion, growth of new and existing pharmacy programs, financial instability of acute care facilities, and lack of preceptor development resources. Regional experiential education consortiums can provide a constructive approach to improve access to quality sites and preceptors through standardizing processes and leveraging resources.

Byrd, Debbie C.; Duke, Lori J.; Fetterman, James W.; Unterwagner, Whitney L.; Staton, April G.; Miller, Mindi S.; Sheffield, Melody C.; Kennedy, William K.; McDuffie, Charles H.; Stevenson, T. Lynn; Thompson, Paula A.; McCullough, Elizabeth S.

2009-01-01

213

Integrated experiment activity monitoring for wLCG sites based on GWT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this work is to develop a High Level Monitoring (HLM) where to merge the distributed computing activities of an LHC experiment (ATLAS). ATLAS distributed computing is organized in clouds, where the Tier-Is (primary centers) provide services to the associated Tier-2s centers (secondaries) so they are all seen as a cloud by the experiment. Computing activities and sites stability monitoring services are numerous and delocalized. It would be very useful for a cloud manager to have a single place where to aggregate available monitoring information. The idea presented in this paper is to develop a set of collectors to gather information regarding site status and performance on data distribution, data processing and Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) tests (Service Availability Monitoring), store them in specific databases, process the results and show it in a single HLM page. Once having it, one can investigate further by interacting with the front-end, which is fed by the stats stored on databases.

Guinó Feijóo, Alejandro; Espinal, Xavier

2011-12-01

214

Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

J. L. Traynor

2001-03-01

215

Decon Green, the Environmentally-Friendly Decontaminant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A simple solution of hydrogen peroxide, potassium carbonate, potassium molybdate, propylene carbonate and Triton(tradmark) X-100 (a non- ionic surfactant) affords the rapid, broad-spectrum decontamination of chemical warfare agents, even at low temperatur...

D. C. Sorrick G. W. Wagner L. R. Procell V. D. Henderson Y. Yang

2003-01-01

216

Testing and comparison of seventeen decontamination chemicals  

SciTech Connect

This report details the testing and evaluation of seventeen decontamination chemicals. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, overall corrosion potential for plant equipment, interim waste generation and final waste generation.

Demmer, R.L.

1996-09-01

217

Lotus LADM Based Self-Decontaminating Surfaces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent events have lead to new concerns about biowarfare, bioterrorism, chemical warfare and chemical terrorism. Because of the potential range of agents that could be used, a non-specific decontamination system is desirable. Of particular interest are ma...

G. Churchward J. L. Lombardi R. Connors S. Michielsen

2007-01-01

218

Advances in Sterilization and Decontamination: A Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent technical advances made in the field of sterilization and decontamination and their applicability to private and commercial interests are discussed. Government-sponsored programs by NASA produced the bulk of material presented in this survey. The s...

1978-01-01

219

Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution  

SciTech Connect

PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, P.O.Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, Korea, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01

220

Decontamination and disposal of PCB wastes.  

PubMed Central

Decontamination and disposal processes for PCB wastes are reviewed. Processes are classed as incineration, chemical reaction or decontamination. Incineration technologies are not limited to the rigorous high temperature but include those where innovations in use of oxident, heat transfer and residue recycle are made. Chemical processes include the sodium processes, radiant energy processes and low temperature oxidations. Typical processing rates and associated costs are provided where possible.

Johnston, L E

1985-01-01

221

PROCESS OF DECONTAMINATING MATERIAL CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVITY  

DOEpatents

A process is described for decontaminating metallic objects, such as stainless steel equipment, which consists in contacting such objects with nltric acid in a concentration of 35 to 60% to remove the major portion of the contamination; and thereafter contacting the partially decontaminated object with a second solution containing up to 20% of alkali metal hydroxide and up to 20% sodium tartrate to remove the remaining radioactive contaminats.

Overholt, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.; Acken, M.F.

1958-09-16

222

Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration  

DOEpatents

An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

Anstine, Larry D. (San Jose, CA); James, Dean B. (Saratoga, CA); Melaika, Edward A. (Berkeley, CA); Peterson, Jr., John P. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01

223

Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix  

SciTech Connect

Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared to published velocities. The lower end of the range of 14C correction factors falls within the range of reported velocities. From these results, future experimental studies (both laboratory and field scale) to support 14C groundwater age dating should focus on obtaining better estimates of aquifer properties including matrix and fracture porosities.

Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

2003-03-01

224

Rank-statistics based enrichment-site prediction algorithm developed for chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip experiments  

PubMed Central

Background High density oligonucleotide tiling arrays are an effective and powerful platform for conducting unbiased genome-wide studies. The ab initio probe selection method employed in tiling arrays is unbiased, and thus ensures consistent sampling across coding and non-coding regions of the genome. Tiling arrays are increasingly used in chromatin immunoprecipitation (IP) experiments (ChIP on chip). ChIP on chip facilitates the generation of genome-wide maps of in-vivo interactions between DNA-associated proteins including transcription factors and DNA. Analysis of the hybridization of an immunoprecipitated sample to a tiling array facilitates the identification of ChIP-enriched segments of the genome. These enriched segments are putative targets of antibody assayable regulatory elements. The enrichment response is not ubiquitous across the genome. Typically 5 to 10% of tiled probes manifest some significant enrichment. Depending upon the factor being studied, this response can drop to less than 1%. The detection and assessment of significance for interactions that emanate from non-canonical and/or un-annotated regions of the genome is especially challenging. This is the motivation behind the proposed algorithm. Results We have proposed a novel rank and replicate statistics-based methodology for identifying and ascribing statistical confidence to regions of ChIP-enrichment. The algorithm is optimized for identification of sites that manifest low levels of enrichment but are true positives, as validated by alternative biochemical experiments. Although the method is described here in the context of ChIP on chip experiments, it can be generalized to any treatment-control experimental design. The results of the algorithm show a high degree of concordance with independent biochemical validation methods. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm have been characterized via quantitative PCR and independent computational approaches. Conclusion The algorithm ranks all enrichment sites based on their intra-replicate ranks and inter-replicate rank consistency. Following the ranking, the method allows segmentation of sites based on a meta p-value, a composite array signal enrichment criterion, or a composite of these two measures. The sensitivities obtained subsequent to the segmentation of data using a meta p-value of 10-5, an array signal enrichment of 0.2 and a composite of these two values are 88%, 87% and 95%, respectively.

Ghosh, Srinka; Hirsch, Heather A; Sekinger, Edward; Struhl, Kevin; Gingeras, Thomas R

2006-01-01

225

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory East Area radioactively contaminated surplus facilities: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

ANL has decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) seven radiologically contaminated surplus facilities at its Illinois site: a ''Hot'' Machine Shop (Building 17) and support facilities; Fan House No. 1 (Building 37), Fan House No. 2 (Building 38), the Pangborn Dust Collector (Building 41), and the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (Building 34) for exhaust air from machining of radioactive materials.

W. H. Kline; G. F. Fassnacht; H. J. Moe

1987-01-01

226

Assessing ecosystem impacts from simulant and decontaminant use. Contractor report, March-September 1985  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemicals for simulation and decontamination of chemical warfare agents may alter the ecosystems of training sites and their environs. Little information is available on the ecotoxicology of those chemicals. This report presents methods from the literature and proposes a newly devised approach to rank those chemicals for damage potential. Further data necessary to reduce ranking errors are identified, and chemical

H. W. Kerster; D. J. Schaeffer; K. A. Reinbold

1988-01-01

227

Off-gas recycle for long-term low temperature gas phase uranium decontamination.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker...

R. D. Bundy D. H. Bunch E. B. Munday D. W. Simmons

1994-01-01

228

A Battery of Toxicity Tests as Indicators of Decontamination in Composting Oily Waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterogenous oily waste from an old dumping site was composted in three windrows constructed from different proportions of waste, sewage sludge, and bark. The objectives of this pilot study were to examine the usefulness of composting as a treatment method for this particular waste and to study decontamination in the composting process by using a battery of toxicity tests. Five

Risto Juvonen; Esko Martikainen; Eija Schultz; Anneli Joutti; Jukka Ahtiainen; Markku Lehtokari

2000-01-01

229

Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

2002-01-18

230

Rock Springs Site 12 hydraulic/explosive true in situ oil shale fracturing experiment  

SciTech Connect

The experiment plan involved the creation and characterization of three horizontal hydraulic fractures, followed by the insertion and simultaneous detonation of slurry explosive in the two lower fractures. Core analyses, wellbore logging, and airflow and /sup 85/Kr tracer tests were used for site characterization and assessment of the hydraulic and explosive fracturing. Tiltmeters, wellhead pressure and flow gages, and in-formation pressure, flow and crack-opening sensors were used to monitor hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion. Explosive detonation diagnostic data were taken with stress and time-of-arrival gages and surface and in-formation accelerometers. The post-fracturing assessments indicated that: (1) hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion and detonation were accomplished essentially as planned; (2) induced fractures were randomly distributed through the shale with no extensively fractured regions or dislocation of shale; and (3) enhancement of permeability was limited to enlargement of the explosive-filled fractures.

Parrish, R.L.; Boade, R.R.; Stevens, A.L.; Long, A. Jr.; Turner, T.F.

1980-06-01

231

Instructor Experiences with a Social Networking Site in a Higher Education Setting: Expectations, Frustrations, Appropriation, and Compartmentalization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Researchers and practitioners have suggested that the use of social networking sites in formal education may be a worthwhile endeavor. Toward this goal, emerging learning platforms have included social networking features. Nevertheless, empirical literature examining user experiences, and more specifically instructor experiences, with these tools…

Veletsianos, George; Kimmons, Royce; French, Karen D.

2013-01-01

232

Solidification in cement of ion-exchange resins from LOMI (Low Oxidation State Metal Ion) decontamination  

SciTech Connect

Chemical decontamination of operating nuclear power plants is performed to remove radioactive metal oxides from pipes and equipment thereby reducing the radiation exposure to personnel performing inspection and maintenance. The LOMI (Low Oxidation State Metal Ion) process is widely used to perform this decontamination. At the end of the decontamination operations, the chemicals remaining in solution are removed by ion exchange resins. The resins are subsequently solidified in metal liners using cement, transported and buried at an approved burial site. The work covered by this report was undertaken because of an incomplete solidification of the ion exchange resins. The details of the decontamination operations have been described. At the time the problem arose, a preliminary investigation led to the conclusion that the unsolidified resin resulted from inadequate mixing caused by the formation of hydrated gel. The purpose of this project was to develop an understanding of the variables affecting the formation of the gel and to devise methods to avoid its formation. Additionally, safe limits would be defined that would assure the complete solidification in cement of ion exchange resins used in LOMI chemical decontaminations. 5 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1990-08-01

233

Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) for the decontamination of chemical warfare agent (CWA) dermal exposure.  

PubMed

Rapid decontamination of the skin is the single most important action to prevent dermal absorption of chemical contaminants in persons exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWA) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) as a result of accidental or intentional release. Chemicals on the skin may be removed by mechanical means through the use of dry sorbents or water. Recent interest in decontamination systems which both partition contaminants away from the skin and actively neutralize the chemical has led to the development of several reactive decontamination solutions. This article will review the recently FDA-approved Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) and will summarize the toxicity and efficacy studies conducted to date. Evidence of RSDL's superior performance against vesicant and organophosphorus chemical warfare agents compared to water, bleach, and dry sorbents, suggests that RSDL may have a role in mass human exposure chemical decontamination in both the military and civilian arenas. PMID:22352732

Schwartz, M D; Hurst, C G; Kirk, M A; Reedy, S J D; Braue, E H

2012-08-01

234

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan  

SciTech Connect

This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The LSFF was established to investigate fire fighting and safety associated with alkali metal fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities. The decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan identifies the decontamination procedures, sampling locations, any special handling requirements, quality control samples, required chemical analysis, and data validation needed to meet the requirements of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Knaus, Z.C.

1995-06-12

235

Tools for decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities requires many different tools. These can vary from small hand tools to the heavy equipment used to remove concrete and soil. Tools for D and D should be reliable, versatile, economical, and easily disposed of in case they become contaminated. The experiences and information used as background for this paper where gained at the Mound Facility of the Monsanto Research Corporation in Miamisburg, Ohio. In the search to find tools to do the work proficiently, many tools were considered. The scheduled D and D tasks and the tools and equipment required for them are described.

Hermetz, R.E.

1986-01-01

236

The technical basis for air pathway assessment of resuspended radioactive aerosols: LLNL experiences at seven sites around the world  

SciTech Connect

There is a large uncertainty in quantifying the inhalation pathway and the aerosol emission rate in human health assessments of radioactive-contamination sites. The need for site-specific assessments led to formation of our team of specialists at LLNL, who have participated in numerous field campaigns around the world. Our goal was to obtain all the information necessary for determining potential human exposures and to estimate source terms for turbulent transport of the emissions during both normal and disturbed soil conditions. That is, measurements were made of the key variables to quantify the suspended aerosols at the actual contamination sites, but different scenarios for habitation, site management, and site cleanup were included. The most notable locations of these site-investigations were the Marshall Islands (Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap), Nevada Test Site (GMX, Little Feller, Palanquin, and Plutonium Valley), Tonopah (Nevada--site of Roller Coaster), Savannah River Lab (South Carolina--H-Area site), Johnston Island (cleanup of rocket-impact site), Chernobyl (Ukraine--grass field end sandy beach sites near Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4), and Palomares (Spain--site of aircraft accident). This discussion will review the variables quantified, methods developed, general results, uncertainty of estimations, and recommendations for future research that are a result of our experience in these field studies.

Shinn, J.H.

1993-09-01

237

Electrochemical ion exchange of LOMI decontamination solutions  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the LOMI Electrochemical Ion Exchange (ELOMIX) process is to reduce the volume of waste arising from LOMI decontamination operations. This is achieved by using the conventional ion exchange resin as an intermediate, rather than a final waste form. Radioactive and metal ion constitutents removed during the decontamination are converted by the process to a metallic form. In its simplest form the ELOMIX cell consists of three compartments, (anode, cathode and resin) separated by cation permeable membranes. In the resin compartment, radioactive and chemical components are removed from the flowing solution by the resin. These components are then migrated under the influence of an electric field into the cathode compartment where metallic elements are deposited. After successful laboratory testing a pilot scale ELOMIX unit was constructed and shipped to Commonwealth Edison's Dresden Unit 2 LOMI decontamination in October 1990. The pilot-scale cell was tied in to the decontamination equipment. The cell operated successfully during three LOMI steps, processing a total of 165 resin bed volumes of solution, far exceeding the normal capacity of the ion exchange resin. Removal efficiencies for iron and radioactivity were good throughout the test. The ELOMIX unit was successfully operated in the time, operational and safety constraints of a reactor decontamination. The main benefits of the process are reduced waste volume, and greater chemical and radiation stability of the waste, which is particularly relevant to full system decontamination. Although the testing to date has focused on the LOMI process, the ELOMIX technique could in principle be applied to be other decontamination processes. 13 figs., 1 tab.

Bradbury, D.; Elder, G.R. (Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (UK))

1991-05-01

238

Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Concrete surfaces contaminated with radionuclides present a significant challenge during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process. As structures undergo D and D, coating layers and/or surface layers of the concrete containing the contaminants must be removed for disposal in such a way as to present little to no risk to human health or the environment. The selection of a concrete decontamination technology that is safe, efficient, and cost-effective is critical to the successful D and D of contaminated sites. To support U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management objectives and to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the best-suited concrete floor decontamination technology(s) for a given site, two innovative and three baseline technologies have been assessed under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The innovative technologies assessed include the Pegasus Coating Removal System and Textron's Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling System. The three baseline technologies assessed include: the Wheelabrator Blastrac model 1-15D, the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model GPx-1O-18 HO Rider, and the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model EC-7-2. These decontamination technology assessments provide directly comparable performance data that have previously been available for only a limited number of technologies under restrictive site-specific constraints. Some of the performance data collected during these technology assessments include: removal capability, production rate, removal gap, primary and secondary waste volumes, and operation and maintenance requirements. The performance data generated by this project is intended to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives.

Ebadian, M.A. Ross, T.L.

1998-01-01

239

Bleaching process preferred to decontaminate odorants  

SciTech Connect

The problem of decontaminating and disposing of out-of-service gas odorizers has long faced both gas transmission and distribution companies since the early 1980s. Finding a methodology to safely and effectively decontaminate odorant-contaminated equipment has caused many companies to simply cap the equipment and put it in storage. The recommended process of decontamination by odorant manufacturers is currently a bleaching-type process. A sodium hypochlorite solution is added to water and either circulated or left standing in the contaminated equipment. The sodium hypochlorite effectively neutralizes the smell of the odorant and slightly corrodes the inside of the equipment to neutralize any odorant which has permeated the metal. The waste sodium hypochlorite and water is then shipped as hazardous waste (pH of 12.5) or non-hazardous waste after the pH has been adjusted. The bleaching process has proven cost-effective and less time-consuming than most other methods including bioremediation. To effectively use it, there are several problems to overcome--most importantly the removal of residual product and the release of vapors into the atmosphere. River Valley Technologies, a contractor located in Cincinnati, OH, specializing in odorant-equipment decontamination, has developed several methods and engineering controls to eliminate most of the problems associated with decontaminating odorant equipment. The paper describes these methods.

NONE

1996-10-01

240

Laboratory Demonstration of Radiological Decontamination Using Radpro  

SciTech Connect

In the event of terrorist activity involving the explosive dispersion of radioactive materials (a 'dirty' bomb), a number of different types of surfaces and substrates, including concrete, granite, brick, cinder block, tile, asphalt, wood, glass, plastic, iron, and steel, may become radiologically contaminated. Incident cleanup is assumed to involve decontamination of these surfaces. Laboratory testing was conducted using samples of concrete, ferrous metal, steel, aluminum, lead, tin, glass, lexan, vinyl, asphalt shingle, wood, and rubber surfaces. The surfaces were sprayed with Cs-137 or Co-60 solutions to simulate contamination. The entire surface area of the samples was surveyed using a Ludlum Model 2360 scaler/ratemeter with Ludlum Model 43-93-2 100 cm{sup 2} open area alpha/beta scintillation probe. The surfaces were then decontaminated using RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology that is currently field proven and ready to deploy. The entire surface area of the samples was re-surveyed following decontamination. The RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology was able to remove virtually all of the removable contamination and over 90% of the fixed contamination from these surfaces during the laboratory testing. (authors)

Lear, P.; Greene, R.; Isham, J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Martin, R.; Norton, C. [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Keene, NH (United States)

2007-07-01

241

Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007  

SciTech Connect

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

NONE

2008-01-15

242

Release limits and decontamination efficacy for tritium: lessons learned outside nuclear power operations.  

PubMed

Various pieces of equipment in use by the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) contain radiation-emitting components. One such piece is a sight knob used on light artillery. At the request of the DND's Director General Nuclear Safety (DGNS-DND's internal nuclear regulatory agency), the authors were contacted to remove the luminous tritium-impregnated paint strip from over 300 sight knobs. This paper discusses the physical description of the sight knobs, the protocol developed for decontaminating the sight knobs, the rationale for the release limits used, and experience gained in using and modifying the decontamination protocol. PMID:18049243

Waller, Edward J; Cole, David; Jamieson, Terry

2007-11-01

243

Pilot scale, alpha disassembly and decontamination facility at the Savannah River Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An alpha-contained pilot facility is being built at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for research into the disassembly and dcontamination of noncombustible, Transuranic (TRU) waste. The design and program objectives for the facility are presented along with the initial test results from laboratory scale decontamination experiments with Pu-238 and Cm-244.

Cadieux, J R; Becker, Jr, G W; Richardson, G W; Coogler, A L

1982-01-01

244

Polonium decontamination performance of stainless steel mesh filter for lead alloy-cooled reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lead–Bismuth eutectic (LBE) has many good characteristics as a coolant for fast reactors. One of the issues remaining to be solved, however, is the polonium issue. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the decontamination performance of a polonium filter by experiment in the penetration condition. Two types of stainless steel wire meshes, fine wire mesh and loose

Toru Obara; Yu Yamazawa; Toshinobu Sasa

2011-01-01

245

Biotechnological Slurry Process for the Decontamination of Excavated Polluted Soils.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the thesis the development of a new biotechnological slurry process for the decontamination of excavated polluted soils is described. The slurry process is especially designed to decontaminate soils polluted with organic compounds (e.g. oil). Crucial i...

R. Kleijntjens

1991-01-01

246

Review of the MDF-LSA 100 Spray Decontamination System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

DSTO were given a sample of the Modec Decontamination Foam (MDF)-LSA 100 Spray Decontamination System and two Force 1 Decon products (surfactant and sodium hypochlorite) to evaluate and determine their effectiveness against chemical warfare agents (CWAs)....

R. Sferopoulos

2011-01-01

247

MICROBIOLOGICAL DECONTAMINATION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL-CONTAMINATED NATURAL WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Inoculation of pentachlorophenol-contaminated natural waters with cells of a pentachlorophenol-degrading Flavobacterium was shown to be an effective method for decontamination of PCB-polluted aquatic environments. Numerous types of waters were decontaminated, including: river wat...

248

Action description memorandum relative to the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Boiling Water Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The action described in this memorandum is the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at the Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois (ANL-IL) site. This action will accomplish the removal of all radioactive material associated with the facility from the Laboratory site and permit the release of the EBWR containment building for unrestricted use. The

R. N. Brooks; C. L. Cheever; W. H. Kline

1985-01-01

249

PROPERTIES AND BEHAVIOR OF 238PU RELEVANT TO DECONTAMINATION OF BUILDING 235-F  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to document the physical, chemical and radiological properties of plutonium oxide materials that were processed in the Plutonium Fuel Form Facility (PuFF) in building 235-F at the Savannah River Plant (now known as the Savannah River Site) in the late 1970s and early 1980s. An understanding of these properties is needed to support current project planning for the safe and effective decontamination and deactivation (D&D) of PuFF. The PuFF mission was production of heat sources to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in space craft. The specification for the PuO{sub 2} used to fabricate the heat sources required that the isotopic content of the plutonium be 83 {+-} 1% Pu-238 due to its high decay heat of 0.57 W/g. The high specific activity of Pu-238 (17.1 Ci/g) due to alpha decay makes this material very difficult to manage. The production process produced micron-sized particles which proved difficult to contain during operations, creating personnel contamination concerns and resulting in the expenditure of significant resources to decontaminate spaces after loss of material containment. This report examines high {sup 238}Pu-content material properties relevant to the D&D of PuFF. These relevant properties are those that contribute to the mobility of the material. Physical properties which produce or maintain small particle size work to increase particle mobility. Early workers with {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} felt that, unlike most small particles, Pu-238 oxide particles would not naturally agglomerate to form larger, less mobile particles. It was thought that the heat generated by the particles would prevent water molecules from binding to the particle surface. Particles covered with bound water tend to agglomerate more easily. However, it is now understood that the self-heating effect is not sufficient to prevent adsorption of water on particle surfaces and thus would not prevent agglomeration of particles. Operational experience at PuFF indicates that the Pu-238 contamination was observed to move along surfaces and through High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters over time. Recent research into the phenomenon known as alpha recoil offers a potential explanation for this observed behavior. Momentum is conserved when an alpha particle is ejected from a Pu-238 atom due to radioactive decay. Consequently, the entire particle of which that Pu-238 atom is a constituent experiences a movement similar to the recoil of a gun when a bullet is ejected. Furthermore, the particle often fractures in response to Pu-238 atom disintegration (yielding an alpha particle), with a small particle fragment also being ejected in order to conserve momentum. This process results in the continuous size reduction and transport of particles containing Pu-238 atoms, thus explaining movement of contamination along surfaces and through HEPA filters. A better understanding of the thermal behavior of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles is needed to inform the planning process for the PuFF D&D project at the 235-F facility. There has been a concern that the surface temperature of individual particles may be high enough to cause problems with decontamination equipment and materials as a result of heat generation due to radioactive decay. A calculation under conservative assumptions shows that the surface temperature of particles less than about 100 {micro}m diameter is not appreciably above ambient. Since most particles in PuFF are on order of 1 {micro}m in diameter, the effect of particle surface temperature on decontamination equipment and materials is expected to be minimal. The result of this calculation also indicates that thermal imaging, which has been under consideration as a method to monitor the progress of system decontamination efforts would not likely be effective. The use of strippable coating was suggested as a possible alternative to other decontamination techniques. One particular system (i.e., Decon Gel 1101) may offer significant advantages over conventional liquid decontamination solut

Duncan, A.; Kane, M.

2009-11-24

250

Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

1996-04-01

251

DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL USE OF DREDGED MATERIALS.  

SciTech Connect

Our group is leading a large-sale demonstration of dredged material decontamination technologies for the New York/New Jersey Harbor. The goal of the project is to assemble a complete system for economic transformation of contaminated dredged material into an environmentally-benign material used in the manufacture of a variety of beneficial use products. This requires the integration of scientific, engineering, business, and policy issues on matters that include basic knowledge of sediment properties, contaminant distribution visualization, sediment toxicity, dredging and dewatering techniques, decontamination technologies, and product manufacturing technologies and marketing. A summary of the present status of the system demonstrations including the use of both existing and new manufacturing facilities is given here. These decontamination systems should serve as a model for use in dredged material management plans of regions other than NY/NJ Harbor, such as Long Island Sound, where new approaches to the handling of contaminated sediments are desirable.

STERN, E.A.; LODGE, J.; JONES, K.W.; CLESCERI, N.L.; FENG, H.; DOUGLAS, W.S.

2000-12-03

252

Proceedings of the workshop on transite decontamination dismantlement and recycle/disposal  

SciTech Connect

On February 3--4, 1993, a workshop was conducted to examine issues associated with the decontamination, dismantlement, and recycle/disposal of transite located at the US Department of Energy Fernald site near Cincinnati, OH. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a Superfund Site currently undergoing remediation. A major objective of the workshop was to assess the state-of-the-art of transite remediation, and generate concepts that could be useful to the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Co. (FERMCO) for remediation of transite. Transite is a building material consisting of asbestos fiber and cement and may be radioactively contaminated as a result of past uranium processing operations at the FEMP. Many of the 100 buildings within the former uranium production area were constructed of transite siding and roofing and consequently, over 180,000 m{sup 2} of transite must be disposed or recycled. Thirty-six participants representing industry, academia, and government institutions such as the EPA and DOE assembled at the workshop to present their experience with transite, describe work in progress, and address the issues involved in remediating transite.

Not Available

1993-12-31

253

Defensive and simultaneous actions of glycoconjugates during spore decontamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimated $1 billion was lost in decontaminating areas exposed to anthrax in the 2001 attacks. To counter the threat of biological attacks, an effective ‘green’ decontaminant is vital to minimize the consequences of such attacks. The objective of our research was to study the ability of glycoconjugate ligands to decontaminate Bacillus cereus spores on hard surfaces. Polyvalent glycoconjugates (also

Olga Tarasenko; Samea Lone; Pierre Alusta

2008-01-01

254

Sodium technology: 1-sodium removal and decontamination of components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaporation of sodium from crevices, tensile specimens, and an IHX tube bundle mockup was studied. Glycolic acid-citric acid solutions were selected for decontaminating 304SS hot leg components. The use of 316 SS as well as 304SS to fabricate components will introduce complications to the decontamination process. The feasibility of glow discharge sputtering for decontamination is being evaluated. 14 figures, 5

F. H. Welch; O. P. Steele; E. Hill

1977-01-01

255

Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties.

Nemtanu, Monica R.; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Minea, R.

2005-10-01

256

DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL  

DOEpatents

A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

1959-12-22

257

Two-step chemical decontamination technology  

SciTech Connect

An improved two-step chemical decontamination technique was recently developed at INEL. This memorandum documents the addition of this technology to the SRTC arsenal of decontamination technology. A two-step process using NAOH, KMnO{sub 4} followed by HNO{sub 3} was used for cleaning doorstops (small casks) in the SRTC High Level Caves in 1967. Subsequently, more aggressive chemical techniques have been found to be much more effective for our applications. No further work on two-step technology is planned.

Rankin, W.N.

1992-08-14

258

Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a hypothetical maximally exposed individual at the closest NTS boundary to the proposed Divine Strake experiment, as estimated by the CAP88-PC model, was 0.005 mrem with wind blowing directly towards that location. Boundary dose, as modeled by NARAC, ranged from about 0.006 to 0.007 mrem. Potential doses to actual offsite populated locations were generally two to five times lower still, or about 40 to 100 times lower then the 0.1 mrem level at which EPA approval is required pursuant to Section 61.96.

Ron Warren

2006-12-01

259

Testing heterogeneity in faunal assemblages from archaeological sites. Tumbling and trampling experiments at the early-Middle Pleistocene site of Gesher Benot Ya’aqov (Israel)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current paper reports an experimental case study to test the heterogeneity of faunal assemblages from the Early-Middle Pleistocene Layers V-5 and V-6 of the Gesher Benot Ya’aqov Acheulian site (Israel). Tumbling and trampling experiments were initiated to gain qualitative insight into processes of bone modification and to assess the timing of the biostratonomic chronology, as it was assumed that

Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser; Lutz Kindler; Rivka Rabinovich; Naama Goren-Inbar

2010-01-01

260

Applying best practices in web site redesign: the Queens College Libraries experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the best practices in web site redesign the authors established for its two interconnected parts, the web development process and web design. The paper demonstrates how best practices were applied to coordinate a library web site redesign project and to engineer the web site for optimum usability, resulting in the

James T. Mellone; David J. Williams

2010-01-01

261

Seismic aftershock monitoring for on-site inspection purposes. Experience from Integrated Field Exercise 2008.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the sub-goals of the Integrated Field Experiment in 2008 (IFE08) in Kazakhstan was testing the prototype elements of the Seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) for on-site inspection purposes. The task of the SAMS is to collect the facts, which should help to clarify nature of the triggering event. Therefore the SAMS has to be capable to detect and identify events as small as magnitude -2 in the inspection area size up to 1000 km2. Equipment for 30 mini-arrays and 10 3-component stations represented the field equipment of the SAMS. Each mini-array consisted of a central 3-component seismometer and 3 vertical seismometers at the distance about 100 m from the central seismometer. The mini-arrays covered approximately 80% of surrogate inspection area (IA) on the territory of former Semipalatinsk test site. Most of the stations were installed during the first four days of field operations by the seismic sub-team, which consisted of 10 seismologists. SAMS data center comprised 2 IBM Blade centers and 8 working places for data archiving, detection list production and event analysis. A prototype of SAMS software was tested. Average daily amount of collected raw data was 15-30 GB and increased according to the amount of stations entering operation. Routine manual data screening and data analyses were performed by 2-6 subteam members. Automatic screening was used for selected time intervals. Screening was performed using the Sonoview program in frequency domain and using the Geotool and Hypolines programs for screening in time domain. The screening results were merged into the master event list. The master event list served as a basis of detailed analysis of unclear events and events identified to be potentially in the IA. Detailed analysis of events to be potentially in the IA was performed by the Hypoline and Geotool programs. In addition, the Hyposimplex and Hypocenter programs were also used for localization of events. The results of analysis were integrated in the visual form using the Seistrain/geosearch program. Data were fully screened for the period 5.-13.9.2008. 360 teleseismic, regional and local events were identified. Results of the detection and analysis will be presented and consequences for further SAMS development will be discussed.

Labak, P.; Arndt, R.; Villagran, M.

2009-04-01

262

Elemental analyses of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment sensor surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to break down the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SIO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results were used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade,' 'natural,' or 'indeterminate.' The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters of these features. Thus far a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF have been analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or East, side), 18 from tray C-3 (Trailing (wake), or West, side), 12 from tray B-12 (North side), 4 from tray D-6 (South side), 3 from tray H-11 (Space end), and 6 from tray G-10 (Earth end). Residue from manmade debris was identified in craters on all trays. (Aluminum oxide particle residues were not detectable on the Al/Si substrates.) These results were consistent with the IDE impact record which showed highly variable long term microparticle impact flux rates on the West, Space and Earth sides of the LDEF which could not be ascribed to astronomical variability of micrometeorite density. The IDE record also showed episodic bursts of microparticle impacts on the East, North, and South sides of the satellite, denoting passage through orbital debris clouds or rings.

Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, Jim J.; Brownlee, D. E.

1993-04-01

263

Wide Area Decontamination: CB Decontamination Technologies, Equipment and Projects - Literature Search and Market Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this literature search and market survey effort was to conduct a detailed literature search using the CBIAC, DTIC and other available CB related information sources of CB decontamination activities. The literature search identified U.S. a...

1999-01-01

264

The DOE`s National Program for Surplus Facility Decontamination and dismantlement under environmental restoration  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental restoration program is to ensure that risks to human health and safety and to the environment posed by contaminated inactive waste sites and surplus facilities are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed, safe levels. The program is concerned with all aspects of assessment and remediation activities where sites and facilities are no longer associated with active nuclear-related production or research operations. Remedial action comprises assessment and remediation of inactive waste sites and correction of a release or spill problems. Decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) entails assessment, decontamination, reuse, or dismantlement of surplus contaminated facilities that are no longer active.

Warren, S.; Kluk, T.; Gerusky, T. [Dept. of Energy, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lilly, J. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Buller, J.

1994-12-31

265

Preliminary analyses of the excavation investigation experiments proposed for the exploratory shaft at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. Three excavation experiments, Shaft Convergence, Demonstration Breakout Rooms, and Sequential Drift Mining, will provide some of the data required to (1) assess the mechanical behavior of repository-size openings and (2) validate numerical models that may be used in the repository design process. In this report, the results of preliminary analyses of the three excavation experiments are presented. The major objective of these analyses was to provide some guidance to the experiment planners regarding the expected displacements and stresses near the experimental drifts so that selection and placement of instrumentation could be optimized. Further, successful completion of these analyses demonstrates the ability to model the experiments, given the simplifying assumptions presented. Limitations of the analyses performed and the experiments as currently designed are also discussed. Finally, the results of these analyses provided some indication of how the variation of some key geometric and material parameters would affect the predicted results. Once the experiment design is finalized and site-specific material data are collected, pretest predictive analyses will be conducted using the mechanical and material models that require validation. 15 refs., 123 figs., 13 tabs.

Costin, L.S.; Bauer, S.J.

1988-12-01

266

Elemental analyses of hypervelocity micro-particle impact sites on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity micro-particles that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 to 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. These discharge features, which include 50 micron diameter areas where the aluminum top layer has been vaporized, facilitate the location of the impacts. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allow detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of micro-particle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts are corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results are used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural' or 'indeterminate'. The last classification results from the presence of too little impactor residue (a frequent occurrence on leading edge impacts), analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon residue, the limited usefulness of data on aluminum in the central craters, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. A total of 35 impacts on leading edge sensors and 22 impacts on trailing edge sensors were analyzed.

Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, Jim J.

1992-06-01

267

Remotely operated robot for decontamination tasks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Engineers in the Robotics Development Group at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) have developed a robot which will be used to decontaminate a pipe gallery of a tank farm used for nuclear waste storage. Personnel access is required into this p...

A. M. Dudar R. C. Vandewalle

1994-01-01

268

DWTF (decontamination and waste treatment facilities) assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the adequacy of present and proposed decontamination and waste treatment facilities (DWTF) at LLNL, to determine the cost effectiveness for proposed improvements, and possible alternatives for accomplishing these improvements. To the extent possible, we have also looked at some of the proposed environmental compliance and cleanup (ECC) projects.

Maimoni, A.

1986-10-06

269

Solvent Decontamination of PCB Electrical Equipment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) which are used as dielectric fluids in transformers and capacitors, are toxic relatively inert materials which are persistent and widespread in the environment and biomagnified in the food chain. Disposal of contaminated electrical equipment requires removal of the majority of PCB's. Various solvent cleaning techniques have been investigated for decontamination of intact transformers and shredded capacitors. The

S. Hugh Hawthorne

1982-01-01

270

Decontamination of Large Horizontal Concrete Surfaces Outdoors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study is being conducted of the resources and planning that would be required to clean up an extensive contamination of the outdoor environment. As part of this study, an assessment of the fleet of machines needed for decontaminating large outdoor surfa...

C. V. Chester M. M. Barbier

1980-01-01

271

Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel. Feasibility study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel is an expeditious way to reduce radiation exposures resulting in a minimal volume of waste. The fuel assemblies are set up in the fuel preparation machine one at a time and treated without prior disassemblage. By...

A. Berg A. Libal J. Norbaeck B. Wegemar

1995-01-01

272

Hand decontamination: nurses' opinions and practices.  

PubMed

Infection is spread in hospital mainly by hands, making hand decontamination the most important means of preventing dissemination. There is some evidence to suggest that when access to hand-decontaminating agents is poor or the agents available are disliked, hands are washed too seldom, increasing risks of cross-infection. However, little attention has been paid to the use of towels and factors which promote their use, although it is known that damp hands transfer bacteria more readily than dry ones and that hands which become sore through poor drying have higher bacterial counts, contributing to the risk of cross-infection. This paper reports the results of the Nursing Times Hand Drying survey designed to assess nurses' access to hand decontamination agents and towels. The results suggest that the 112 nurses who participated were aware of the need for attention to hand hygiene but that access to both hand-decontaminating agents and paper towels was variable. Forty-one per cent complained of a shortage of soap and although nearly all used paper towels, these were in many cases of poor quality. Such towels were perceived as damaging to hands, leaving them feeling damp and sore. Good-quality, soft, paper towels were much appreciated by respondents in this sample. It is concluded that the quality of paper towels contributes to good infection control practice. PMID:7753663

Gould, D

273

Biological Decontamination Using Pulsed Filamentary Microplasma Jet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microplasma jet for the generation of pulsed filamentary discharge at atmospheric pressure has been devised for biological decontamination as well as for modification of surface properties. Long plasma-filament is generated inside a quartz tube and characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, current voltage measurements, numerical simulations and microphotography. Efficiency of our plasma source for the decontamination on inner surface of the tube as well as on objects placed in proximity of plasma effluent is studied. Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and spores of Bacillus atrophaeus (Gram-positive bacteria) are used for the decontamination studies. Decontamination of Bacillus atrophaeus endospores, which are layered on PET polymer material, and placed in the proximity of plasma effluent, shows the mean logarithmic bacterial reduction of 3.67 for the treatment time of 120 s. Inactivation of Escherichia coli coated on inner surface of the tube shows the mean logarithmic bacterial reduction of about 5 for the treatment time of 30 s. In addition to this, inhibition studies of bacteria coated on agar plate are also carried out. It shows plasma effluent generated in our plasma source is very effective for the inhibition of bacterial colonization.

Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Keil, Gernot; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

274

Process for decontaminating gas containing radioactive iodine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vent gas containing radioactive iodine and methyl iodide is effectively decontaminated by chemically adsorbing the iodine contained in the vent gas onto an activated carbon layer at first, then physically adsorbing the methyl iodide contained in the vent gas onto another activated carbon layer separately disposed from the former activated carbon layer, and retaining the radioactive iodine and radioactive

M. Hirano; M. Takeshima; T. Saito; A. Shimozato

1977-01-01

275

Analytical solution for aquifer decontamination by pumping  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model dealing with aquifer decontamination by pumping is developed. The pumping well with a constant flow rate is taken into account as a mathematical sink located at the center of the plume to be removed. The analytical solution detecting concentration variation inside the aquifer is determined in closed forms with the Green's function approach and the Laplace transform

Chia-Shyun Chen; Greg D. Woodside

1988-01-01

276

Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the

T. L. White; D. Jr. Foster; C. T. Wilson; C. R. Schaich

1995-01-01

277

Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use o...

T. L. White D. Foster C. T. Wilson C. R. Schaich

1995-01-01

278

Decontamination of Terrorist-Dispersed Radionuclides from Surfaces in Urban Environments  

SciTech Connect

Research is currently underway at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to advance the basic scientific knowledge of radionuclide-substrate interactions in the urban environment. Investigations have focused on more optimized decontamination agents for cesium (Cs) and americium (Am) specifically for use in mass transit infrastructure and urban environments. This project is designed to enhance the capability of the United States to effectively respond to a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) attack. The work addresses recognized data gaps by advancing the basic scientific knowledge of radionuclide-substrate interactions in the urban environment and provides a solution to a national need. The research is focused in four major areas: (1) a better understanding of urban surface conditions that influence the efficacy of decontamination processes, (2) development of prototype decontamination agents for Am and Cs optimized for use in urban environments, (3) the development of capabilities to realistically contaminate surfaces at both the real world and laboratory scale and (4) a validated model for radionuclide-surface interactions. The decontamination of urban surfaces following the detonation of an RDD presents a number of challenges. The following key points are found to be critical for the efficiency of decontamination agents in an urban environment: - Particle size and surface deposition of radionuclide particles on urban surface materials. - Interactions between radionuclides and urban materials. - The presence of grime and carbonation/alteration layers on the surface of urban surfaces. - Post-detonation penetration of radionuclides strongly affected by the dynamic wetting/drying processes. A laboratory scale contamination system has been developed allowing for samples to be contaminated and radionuclide interactions to be studied. In combination with laboratory scale experiments, a real scale outdoor test is scheduled for the spring of 2007. In conclusion, integrated laboratory, field, and numerical approaches are utilized to better understand the radionuclide behavior and the development/utility of decontamination agents.

Fischer, Robert; Sutton, Mark; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Gray, Jeremy; Hu, Qinhong; McNab, Walt; Viani, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-620, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (925) 422-3004 (United States)

2008-01-15

279

SAS Code for Calculating Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and Effect Size Benchmarks for Site-Randomized Education Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When evaluators plan site-randomized experiments, they must conduct the appropriate statistical power analyses. These analyses are most likely to be valid when they are based on data from the jurisdictions in which the studies are to be conducted. In this method note, we provide software code, in the form of a SAS macro, for producing statistical…

Brandon, Paul R.; Harrison, George M.; Lawton, Brian E.

2013-01-01

280

Heart valve allograft decontamination with antibiotics: impact of the temperature of incubation on efficacy.  

PubMed

Heart valve allografts are typically processed at 4°C in North America, including the step of antibiotic decontamination. In our own experience with heart valve banking, we often observe persistent positive cultures following decontamination at wet ice temperature. We hypothesized that warmer temperatures of incubation might increase the efficacy of the decontamination procedure. In a first series of experiments, 12 different bacterial species were grown overnight, frozen in standardized aliquots and used directly to inoculate antibiotic cocktail aliquots at 10? colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. The antibiotic cocktail contains vancomycin (50 ?g/ml), gentamicin (80 ?g/ml) and cefoxitin (240 ?g/ml) in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium. Inoculated aliquots were incubated at 4, 22 and 37°C and CFUs were determined at regular intervals up to 24 h post-inoculation. In a second set of experiments, 10 heart valves were spiked with 5000 CFU/ml and incubated with antibiotics at 4 and 37°C for 24 h. The final rinse solutions of these heart valves were filtered and tested for bacterial growth. After 24 h of incubation, CFUs of all 12 bacterial species were reduced by a factor of only one to two logs at 4°C whereas log reductions of 3.7 and 5.0 or higher were obtained at 22 and 37°C, respectively. Most microorganisms, including Staphylococcus epidermidis, Lactococcus lactis lactis and Propionibacterium acnes survived well the 24-h antibiotic treatment at 4°C (< 1 Log reduction). All 10 heart valves that were spiked with microorganisms had positive final rinse solutions after antibiotic soaking at 4°C, whereas 8 out of 10 cultures were negative when antibiotic decontamination was done at 37°C. These experiments show that a wet ice temperature greatly reduces the efficacy of the allograft decontamination process as microorganisms survived well to a 24-h 4°C antibiotic treatment. This could explain the high rate of positive post-processing cultures obtained with our routine tissue decontamination procedure. Increasing the decontamination temperature from 4 to 37°C may significantly reduce the incidence of post-disinfection bacterial contamination of heart valves. PMID:20390362

Germain, Marc; Thibault, Louis; Jacques, Annie; Tremblay, Jacynthe; Bourgeois, Rémi

2010-05-01

281

Electrolytic decontamination of the 3013 inner can  

SciTech Connect

Disposition of plutonium recovered from nuclear weapons or production residues must be stored in a manner that ensures safety. The criteria that has been established to assure the safety of stored materials for a minimum of 50 years is DOE-STD-3013. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a containment package in accordance with the DOE standard. The package consists of an optional convenience (food pack) can, a welded type 304L stainless steel inner (primary) can, and a welded type 304L stainless steel outer (secondary) can. With or without the food pack can, the material is placed inside the primary can and welded shut under a helium atmosphere. This activity takes place totally within the confinement of the glove box line. Following the welding process, the can is checked for leaks and then sent down the line for decontamination. Once decontaminated, the sealed primary can may be removed from the glove box line. Welding of the secondary container takes place outside the glove box line. The highly automated decontamination process that has been developed to support the packaging of Special Nuclear Materials is based on an electrolytic process similar to the wide spread industrial technique of electropolishing. The can is placed within a specially designed stainless steel fixture built within a partition of a glove box. This fixture is then filled with a flowing electrolyte solution. A low DC electric current is made to flow between the can, acting as the anode, and the fixture, acting as the cathode. Following the decontamination, the system provides a flow of rinse water through the fixture to rinse the can of remaining salt residues. The system then carried out a drying cycle. Finally, the fixture is opened from the opposite side of the partition and the can surface monitored directly and through surface smears to assure that decontamination is adequate.

Wedman, D.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Rivera, Y.; Weisbrod, K.; Martinez, H.E.; Limback, S.

1998-12-31

282

Electrolytic decontamination of the 3013 inner can  

SciTech Connect

Disposition of plutonium recovered from nuclear weapons or production residues must be stored in a manner that ensures safety. The criteria that has been established to assure the safety of stored materials for a minimum of 50 years is DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies both the requirements for containment and furthermore specifies that the inner container be decontaminated to a level of {le}20 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} swipable and {le}500 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} direct alpha such that a failure of the outer containment barrier will have a lower probability of resulting in a spread of contamination. The package consists of an optional convenience (food pack) can, a welded type 304L stainless steel inner (primary) can, and a welded type 304L stainless steel outer (secondary) can. Following the welding process, the can is checked for leaks and then sent down the line for decontamination. Once decontaminated, the sealed primary can may be removed from the glove box line. Welding of the secondary container takes place outside the glove box line. The highly automated decontamination process that has been developed to support the packaging of Special Nuclear Materials is based on an electrolytic process similar to the wide spread industrial technique of electropolishing. The can is placed within a specially designed stainless steel fixture built within a partition of a glove box. The passage of current through this electrolytic cell results in a uniform anodic dissolution of the surface metal layers of the can. This process results in a rapid decontamination of the can. The electrolyte is fully recyclable, and the separation of the chromium from the actinides results in a compact, non RCRA secondary waste product.

Wedman, D.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Rivera, Y.; Weisbrod, K.; Martinez, H.E.; Limback, S.

1998-12-31

283

The Pajarito Site operating procedures for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility  

SciTech Connect

Operating procedures consistent with DOE Order 5480.6, and the American National Standard Safety Guide for the Performance of Critical Experiments are defined for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These operating procedures supersede and update those previously published in 1983 and apply to any criticality experiment performed at the facility. 11 refs.

Malenfant, R.E.

1991-12-01

284

Using a stress audit: The construction site manager experience in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to conduct a stress audit among construction industry site managers in the UK as a precursor to a stress management intervention programme. Qualitative data were obtained from in-dept interviews with a total of 36 male middle and senior construction site managers; and aquantitative data were obtained by questionnaire. Based on the analysis of 561

Valerie Sutherland; Marilyn J. Davidson

1993-01-01

285

Web site design, trust, satisfaction and e-loyalty: the Indian experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – With the rapid expansion of global online markets including India, researchers and practitioners are challenged to understand drivers of customer satisfaction, trust and loyalty towards web sites. The paper aims to focus on web site design, which is expected to influence whether customers revisit an online vendor. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Participants in India evaluated a local and foreign web

Dianne Cyr; Gurprit S. Kindra; Satyabhusan Dash

2008-01-01

286

Development of improved method for isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from bulk tank milk: Effect of age of milk, centrifugation, and decontamination  

PubMed Central

Abstract Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease in cattle and it has been suggested that this organism may be associated with Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows at the advanced stage of the disease shed this organism into both their milk and feces. The objective of this study was to develop a more efficient procedure for isolating MAP from bulk tank raw milk. Bulk tank raw milk (50 mL) samples 3 to 13 d old after collection without spiking were investigated to evaluate the effects of milk age on the efficacy of decontamination. Milk samples, 2 to 3 d old, were seeded with MAP at levels of 50 to 200 colony forming units/mL in experiments involving factorial design to evaluate 1) the effects of different decontaminating reagents and decontamination procedures on recovery of MAP, and 2) partition MAP in milk fractions after centrifugation in raw milk. Decontamination in 20 mL of 0.75% hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HPC) at room temperature (22°C) for 2 to 5 h, with shaking, at intervals was found to be the most effective procedure for decontaminating milk 2 to 3 d old. Prolonged exposure to decontaminants, additional incubations in antibiotics, or at higher temperature (37°C) significantly reduced recovery of live MAP. Enhanced growth of microbial contaminants was noticed in samples decontaminated overnight at room temperature compared to those decontaminated for 2 to 5 h. Decontamination of 6 d old milk samples required extra incubation in antibiotic brew. Decontamination of milk samples that are 8 d and older was not effective in removing microbial contaminants. The MAP cells preferentially partitioned into the cream fraction after centrifugation, and combining the milk cream and pellet fractions enhanced recovery of MAP. A recovery rate of 16.6% was estimated with the use of our improved protocol.

2005-01-01

287

Research site monitoring for compliance with ethics regulatory standards: review of experience from Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background On site monitoring of research is one of the most effective ways to ensure compliance during research conduct. However, it is least carried out primarily for two reasons: presumed high costs both in terms of human resources and finances; and the lack of a clear framework for undertaking site monitoring. In this paper we discuss a model for research site monitoring that may be cost effective and feasible in low resource settings. Methods This was a retrospective review of research site monitoring reports covering a period of four years. Results The monitoring was conducted by the Uganda National Council for Science and Technology, the National Drug Authority and the National HIV/AIDS Research and Ethics Committee over the period 2007 to 2010. The monitoring team was usually three members comprising of two experts in research ethics and an assistant. A total of 28 site monitoring visits covering 40 research projects were reviewed. 25% of the site monitoring reports revealed violation of the regulatory requirement for valid ethical approval. 36% of the site reports showed some instances of informed consent violation, 28% showed violation of the rights and welfare of research participants, 38% revealed that sites did not report SAEs to regulatory authorities and many sites lacked adequate GCP and GCLP. However, most of the sites monitored had adequate facilities to conduct the respective studies and good working practices. Conclusion This model employed by the monitoring teams to evaluate research compliance is effective in auditing ethical practice. Compliance monitoring is feasible and affordable in a resource limited setting. Research protocol non compliance is still a major problem in Uganda, and there is need for a pro-active approach to this vice by all stake holders if ethical conduct of research is to be achieved.

2013-01-01

288

Environmental assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment on the proposed decontamination and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania. Based on the environmental assessment, which is available to the public on request, the Department has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, no environmental impact statement is required. The proposed action is to decontaminate and decommission the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division fuel fabrication facilities (the Plutonium Laboratory - Building 7, and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory - Building 8). Decontamination and decommissioning of the facilities would require removal of all process equipment, the associated service lines, and decontamination of the interior surfaces of the buildings so that the empty buildings could be released for unrestricted use. Radioactive waste generated during these activities would be transported in licensed containers by truck for disposal at the Department's facility at Hanford, Washington. Useable non-radioactive materials would be sold as excess material, and non-radioactive waste would be disposed of by burial as sanitary landfill at an approved site.

Not Available

1980-12-01

289

UNIQUE RADIOANALYTICAL PROTOCOLS FOR CHARACTERIZATION AND VERIFICATION DURING DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

In order to successfully decontaminate, deactivate and decommission surplus Department of Energy (DOE) facilities throughout the Savannah River Site (SRS), a variety of characterizations must be completed to sufficiently identify and quantify potential contaminants of concern. The ultimate goal is to rapidly and efficiently characterize, decontaminate (if necessary), and verify that the remnants meet specified limits established by either an industrial worker model or a groundwater model. To meet this end, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a series of radioanalytical strategies and methodologies which can be used to characterize targeted facilities and prove that decontamination has been sufficient. To our knowledge, this is the first application of this novel methodology within the DOE complex. This methodology has been successfully utilized with nearly 1000 samples from over a dozen facilities. The application of this approach to just a single facility shortened the schedule by 30 days and resulted in non-labor dollar savings of over $60K. Cost savings for a second facility was determined to be $375K. Based on the success of this methodology at SRS, this approach will be valuable to other nuclear facilities in the USA and abroad involved with the decontamination and decommissioning process.

Diprete, C; David Diprete, D; Wooten Simpson, W

2007-01-05

290

Progress on Fuel Receiving and Storage Decontamination Work at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) removed the last of its spent nuclear fuel assemblies from an on-site storage pool last year and is now decontaminating its Fuel Receiving and Storage (FRS) Facility. The decontamination project will reduce the long-lived curie inventory, associated radiological hazards, and the operational costs associated with the maintenance of this facility. Workers at the WVDP conducted the first phase of the FRS decontamination project in late 2001 by removing 149 canisters that previously contained spent fuel assemblies from the pool. Removal of the canisters from the pool paved the way for nuclear divers to begin removing canister storage racks and other miscellaneous material from the FRS pool in February 2002. This was only the third time in the history of the WVDP that nuclear divers were used to perform underwater work. After decontaminating the pool, it will be drained slowly until all of the water is removed. The water will be processed through an ion exchanger to remove radioactive contaminants as it is being drained, and a fixative will be applied to the walls above the water surface to secure residual contamination.

Jablonski, J. F.; Al-Daouk, A. M.; Moore, H. R.

2003-02-25

291

Decontamination of ultrasound equipment used for peripheral ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.  

PubMed

Portable ultrasound machines are frequently used in operating theatres for peripheral single-shot nerve block procedures. This equipment must be decontaminated by reducing the microbial load to a sufficient level to reduce the risk of nosocomial infection. In our institution we use a simple three-step decontamination protocol utilising 70% isopropyl alcohol as chemical disinfectant. We performed a prospective, quality assurance study to assess the efficacy of this protocol, as it is unclear if this is suitable for disinfecting semi-critical equipment. The primary endpoint was presence of microbial contamination prior to re-use of equipment. Over a four-week period, 120 swabs were taken from multiple sites on our ultrasound machines and linear array transducers for microbial culture. Swabs were taken after decontamination and immediately prior to patient contact. Any pathogenic and environmental bacterial organisms were isolated and identified. No pathogenic organisms were grown from any of the collected swabs. In 85% (n=102) of cultures, no growth was detected. Of the remaining 15% (n=18), commensal organisms commonly found on skin, oral and environmental surfaces were isolated. Our results suggest that our decontamination protocol may be an effective, rapid and cost-effective method of cleaning ultrasound equipment used for peripheral invasive single-shot nerve blocks. Further guidance from national bodies is required to define appropriate cleaning protocols for these machines. PMID:23808514

Chuan, A; Tiong, C; Maley, M; Descallar, J; Ziochos, H

2013-07-01

292

Support for the delisting of decontaminated liquid chemical surety materials as listed hazardous waste from specific sources (state) MD02 in COMAR 10. 51. 02. 16-1. Technical report, December 1987February 1988  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maryland recently enacted regulations that listed decontaminated residues of certain chemical warfare agents as hazardous wastes. The State would consider delisting if the Army document the effects of its decontamination procedures. Army specialists at U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center (CRDEC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, have had exhaustive experience in this area since 1918 when chemical agents were

H. D. Durst; E. W. Sarver; H. W. Yurow; W. T. Beaudry; P. A. DEramo

1988-01-01

293

Flycatchers Copy Conspecifics in Nest-Site Selection but Neither Personal Experience nor Frequency of Tutors Have an Effect  

PubMed Central

Using the behavior of others in guiding one's own behavior is a common strategy in animals. The prevailing theory predicts that young age and the inexperience of an individual are expected to increase the probability of adopting the behaviors of others. Also, the most common behavior in the population should be copied. Here, we tested the above predictions by examining social information use in the selection of nest-site features with a field experiment using a wild cavity nesting bird, the collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis). We used an experimental design in which geometric symbols depict nest-site features. By manipulating the apparent symbol choices of early settled individuals and monitoring the choices of later arriving birds, we can study social information use without bias from learned or innate preferences. Flycatchers were found to use social information in the selection of nest-site features, with about 60% of the population preferring the manipulated conspecific choices. However, age and experience as explanatory factors suggested by the social information use theory did not explain the choices. The present result, in concert with earlier similar experiments, implies that flycatchers may in some situations rely more on interspecific information in the selection of nest-site characteristics.

Jaakkonen, Tuomo; Kari, Annemari; Forsman, Jukka T.

2013-01-01

294

Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination  

SciTech Connect

DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB`s, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives.

Kasevich, R.S.; Vaux, W.G.; Nocito, T.

1995-12-01

295

Telesurveillance of circular frame pin sites: one year's experience at a specialist unit.  

PubMed

Circular frame treatment for limb reconstruction involves repeated follow-up visits, and a substantial number of these appointments are for pin site review only. We have encouraged our frame patients to take photographs of their pin sites when they carry out their weekly dressing changes. The photographs are taken with mobile phones or digital cameras by the patients themselves, and the images sent to us by email. We reply within 24 hours, with either reassurance or appropriate instructions as indicated. In the past 12 months, five patients have had their pin sites reviewed remotely using this method, and have expressed a high level of satisfaction. These early results are encouraging. PMID:21398388

Khan, Sameer K; Abraham, Alwyn

2011-03-11

296

Influence of site-specific geology on oil shale fragmentation experiments at the Colony Mine, Garfield County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory executed 19 intermediate scale cratering experiments in oil shale at the Colony Mine in Garfield County, Colorado. These experiments have led to a better understanding of fracture characteristics and fragmentation of in situ oil shale by use of a conventional high explosive. Geologic site characterization included detailed mapping, coring, and sample analyses. Site-specific geology was observed to be a major influence on the resulting crater geometry. The joint patterns at the experimental site frequently defined the final crater symmetry. Secondary influences included vugs, lithology changes, and grade fluctuations in the local stratigraphy. Most experiments, in both the rib and floor, were conducted to obtain data to investigate the fragmentation results within the craters. The rubble was screened for fragment-size distributions. Geologic features in proximity to the explosive charge had minimal effect on the rubble due to the overpowering effect of the detonation. However, these same features became more influential on the fracture and rubble characteristics with greater distances from the shothole. Postshot cores revealed a direct relationship between the grade of the oil shale and its susceptibility to fracturing. The Colony Mine experiments have demonstrated the significant role of geology in high explosive/oil shale interaction. It is probable that this role will have to be considered for larger applications to blast patterns and potential problems in retort stability in the future of oil shale development.

Ray, J.M.; Harper, M.D.; Craig, J.L.; Edwards, C.L.

1982-01-01

297

Cathodic protection system operating experience for underground piping at the Hanford Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Cathodic protection has been used on underground radioactive waste lines at the Hanford Site for more than 40 years. Studies were performed at the time the cathodic protection system was installed. This document reviews some of the historical studies and ...

W. C. Carlos

1992-01-01

298

Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D&D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and it daughters), and {sup 60}Co, followed closely by {sup 90}Sr and tritium, which account for {minus}30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope.

Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01

299

Solvent decontamination of PCB electrical equipment  

SciTech Connect

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) which are used as dielectric fluids in transformers and capacitors, are toxic relatively inert materials which are persistent and widespread in the environment and biomagnified in the food chain. Disposal of contaminated electrical equipment requires removal of the majority of PCB's. Various solvent cleaning techniques have been investigated for decontamination of intact transformers and shredded capacitors. The PCB content of transformers which originally contained 180-270 kg PCB was reduced by 99.72-99.96 percent. The relatively small amount of retained PCB resides primarily in the interstices and absorbent material of the core and coil assembly. Shredded power factor correction capacitors were decontaminated using trichlorethylene in a multistage cocurrent batch extraction process. The PCB content was reduced by 99.9 percent, leaving a residual PCB content of 0.01 kg per capacitor.

Hawthorne, S.H.

1982-11-01

300

Remote methods for decontamination and decommissioning operations. [Fission Product Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Three methods for the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described along with operational experience associated with each method. Each method described in some way reduces radiation exposure to the operating personnel involved. Electrochemical decontamination of process tanks is described using an in-situ method. Descriptions of two processes, electropolishing and cerium redox decontamination, are listed. A method of essentially smokeless cutting of process piping using a plasma-arc cutting torch is described. In one technique, piping is cut remotely from a distance using a specially modified torch holder. In another technique, cutting is done with master-slave manipulators inside a hot cell. Finally, a method for remote cutting and scarification of contaminated concrete is described. This system, which utilizes high-pressure water jets, is coupled to a cutting head or rotating scarification head. The system is suited for cutting contaminated concrete for removal or removing a thin layer in a controlled manner for decontamination. 4 refs., 6 figs.

DeVore, J.R.

1986-01-01

301

Decontamination of Chemical/Biological Warfare (CBW) Agents Using an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure, uniform glow discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g. He/O_2/H_2O) which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains metastables (e.g. O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g. O, OH). These reactive species have been shown to be effective neutralizers of surrogates for anthrax spores, mustard blister agent and VX nerve gas. Unlike conventional, wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion of most surfaces and does not damage wiring, electronics, nor most plastics. This makes it highly suitable for decontamination of high value sensitive equipment such as is found in vehicle interiors (i.e. tanks, planes...) for which there is currently no good decontamination technique. Furthermore, the reactive species rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful byproducts. Physics of the APPJ will be discussed and results of surface decontamination experiments using simulant and actual CBW agents will be presented.

Herrmann, Hans W.

1998-11-01

302

Experiences with unexploded ordnance discrimination using magnetometry at a live-site in Montana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced discrimination methods and careful optimization of operational procedures are critical for efficient remediation of unexploded ordnance (UXO) contaminated sites. In this paper, we report on our experiences with a 200 acre magnetic survey that was collected and processed under production survey conditions at Chevallier Ranch, Montana. All anomalies with fitted moments above 0.05 Am2 were excavated. During the survey the magnetic remanence metric was predicted but not used to guide the discrimination. The retrospective analysis presented here reveals that discrimination using remanence would have significantly reduced the total number of anomalies (with good dipolar fits) that needed to be excavated, from 524 to 290 while still recovering all 69 UXO. The false alarm rate (FAR = number of non-UXOs excavated divided / number of UXO found) was reduced from 6.3 to 2.9. At a cut-off of 75% remanence, 77% of anomalies due to shrapnel and metallic debris and 64% of geological anomalies were rejected. Geological anomalies due to variations in magnetite concentration introduced a significant human-element into the interpretation process. Three different interpreters added a total of 305 additional anomalies that were not fit with a dipole model and which were later found to be non-UXO. Between 40 and 50% of anomalies picked by the two relatively inexperienced interpreters who analyzed the data turned out to be geology, as compared to 14% for an experienced interpreter. Critical analysis of results, operator training and feedback from the UXO technicians validating the anomaly are essential components towards improving the quality and consistency of the anomaly interpretations. This is consistent with the tenants of Total Quality Management (TQM). We compare the actual FAR that resulted during the survey when there was little feedback between UXO technician validation results, to a hypothetical result that could have been achieved had there been a constant feedback system in place at the onset of operations. Feedback would have significantly reduced the number of geological anomalies and decreased the FAR from 10.7 to 4.0. The hypothetical results presented here demonstrate the value of using TQM principles to guide the UXO remediation process. They further show that improvements in the efficiency and costs of UXO remediation require both technological advances and operational optimization of the technology when implemented in a production setting. Furthermore, by treating geophysical modeling and UXO validation as separate entities, both with respect to contracting and operational reporting, there is little incentive for the geophysicist to leave an anomaly off the dig-sheet. Only potential negative consequences will result if that anomaly is later found to be a UXO. An incentive based mechanism that rewards the geophysicist for reductions in follow-on costs would have a strong potential to reduce the number of unnecessary excavations, and hence reduce the total cost of the UXO remediation effort.

Billings, Stephen; Youmans, Clifton

2007-03-01

303

Advanced robotics for decontamination and dismantlement  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) robotics technology application area of the US Department of Energy`s Robotics Technology Development Program is explained and described. D&D robotic systems show real promise for the reduction of human exposure to hazards, for improvement of productivity, and for the reduction of secondary waste generation. Current research and development pertaining to automated floor characterization, robotic equipment removal, and special inspection is summarized. Future research directions for these and emerging activities is given.

Hamel, W.R.; Haley, D.C.

1994-06-01

304

Method for the decontamination of metallic surfaces  

DOEpatents

A method of decontaminating a radioactively contaminated oxide on a surface. The radioactively contaminated oxide is contacted with a diphosphonic acid solution for a time sufficient to dissolve the oxide and subsequently produce a precipitate containing most of the radioactive values. Thereafter, the diphosphonic solution is separated from the precipitate. HEDPA is the preferred diphosphonic acid and oxidizing and reducing agents are used to initiate precipitation. SFS is the preferred reducing agent.

Purohit, Ankur (Darien, IL); Kaminski, Michael D. (Lockport, IL); Nunez, Luis (Elmhurst, IL)

2003-01-01

305

Method for electrochemical decontamination of radioactive metal  

DOEpatents

A decontamination method for stripping radionuclides from the surface of stainless steel or aluminum material comprising the steps of contacting the metal with a moderately acidic carbonate/bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing sodium or potassium ions and thereafter electrolytically removing the radionuclides from the surface of the metal whereby radionuclides are caused to be stripped off of the material without corrosion or etching of the material surface.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

2008-06-10

306

[Decontamination of chemical warfare agents by photocatalysis].  

PubMed

Photocatalysis has been widely applied to solar-energy conversion and environmental purification. Photocatalyst, typically titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), produces active oxygen species under irradiation of ultraviolet light, and can decompose not only conventional pollutants but also different types of hazardous substances at mild conditions. We have recently started the study of photocatalytic decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under collaboration with the National Research Institute of Police Science. This article reviews environmental applications of semiconductor photocatalysis, decontamination methods for CWAs, and previous photocatalytic studies applied to CWA degradation, together with some of our results obtained with CWAs and their simulant compounds. The data indicate that photocatalysis, which may not always give a striking power, certainly helps detoxification of such hazardous compounds. Unfortunately, there are not enough data obtained with real CWAs due to the difficulty in handling. We will add more scientific data using CWAs in the near future to develop useful decontamination systems that can reduce the damage caused by possible terrorism. PMID:19122438

Hirakawa, Tsutomu; Mera, Nobuaki; Sano, Taizo; Negishi, Nobuaki; Takeuchi, Koji

2009-01-01

307

Preliminary experience with intensity modulated radiation therapy for abdominopelvic tumor sites: a comparison with 3D radiotherapy plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. To report our preliminary experience using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in abdominopelvic tumors and to\\u000a compare IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans for various pelvic sites.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods. Nine IMRT procedures were performed in 8 patients between June 2000 and June 2001. Tumor diagnosis was rectal carcinoma\\u000a in 5 (local relapses in 4 and primary in

Marta Moreno Jiménez; Ignacio Azinovic Gamo; J. Diego Azcona Armendáriz; J. J. Aristu; Mauricio Cambeiro Vázquez; Ágata Pérez Ochoa; Leire Arbea Moreno; José María López-Picazo González; Salvador Martín Algarra; Rafael Martínez Monge

2004-01-01

308

Plasma Decontamination of Uranium From the Interior of Aluminum Objects  

SciTech Connect

RF plasma glow discharges are being investigated for removing and recovering radioactive elements from contaminated objects, especially those contaminated with transuranic (TRU) materials. These plasmas, using nitrogen trifluoride as the working gas, have been successful at removing uranium and plutonium contaminants from test coupons of stainless steel and aluminum surfaces, including small cracks and crevices, and the interior surfaces of relatively hard to reach aluminum pipes. Contaminant removal exceeded 99.9% from simple surfaces and contaminant recovery using cryogenic traps has exceeded 50%. Work continues with the objective of demonstrating that transuranic contaminated waste can be transformed to low level waste (LLW) and to better understand the physics of the interaction between plasma and surface contaminants. This work summarizes the preliminary results from plasma decontamination from the interior of aluminum objects--the nooks and crannies experiments.

Veilleux, J.M.; Munson, C.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Chamberlin, E.P.; El-Genk, M.S.

1997-04-21

309

Aquatic toxicity of the decontamination agent: Multipurpose (DAM) decontamination solution. Final report, May-December 1992  

SciTech Connect

A new formulation, Decontaminating Agent: Multipurpose (DAM) Decontamination Solution, is being considered as a replacement to the DS-2 decontaminating solution. The new formulation is composed of calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone. Since this is a new formulation little environmental data exists. To estimate potential impact to an aquatic environment, Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum (a luminescent marine bacterium) were exposed to the DAM solution and to the individual components (Calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone). The toxicity of the DAM solution to D. magna and P. phosphoreum was 5000 and 0.00053, respectively (highly toxic). The toxicity of calcium hypochlorite' and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone to daphnia was 0.04 mg/L (highly toxic) and 107 mg/L (moderately toxic), respectively.

Haley, M.V.; Kurnas, C.W.; Chester, N.A.; Muse, W.T.

1994-05-01

310

Total decontamination cost of the anthrax letter attacks.  

PubMed

All of the costs associated with decontamination following the 2001 anthrax letter attacks were summarized, estimated, and aggregated based on existing literature and news media reports. A comprehensive list of all affected structures was compiled. Costs were analyzed by building class and decontamination type. Sampling costs and costs of worker relocation were also included. Our analysis indicates that the total cost associated with decontamination was about $320 million. PMID:22313022

Schmitt, Ketra; Zacchia, Nicholas A

2012-02-07

311

PERSONAL DECONTAMINATION IN CASES OF CHEMICAL TERRORIST ATTACKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Main features of the R&D resulting in the new means for primary decontamination of chemical warfare agents based on the chemisorption\\u000a principle introduced into the Czech Army's individual decontamination mean IPB-80 and into the Czech Civil Protection first\\u000a aid kit ZPJ-80, and in the upgrading of sets for secondary decontamination PCHB-60-P and PCHP-60-P are presented. First results\\u000a of R&D on

Ji?í Matoušek

312

Planning guidance for nuclear-power-plant decontamination. [PWR; BWR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct and indirect costs of decontamination are considered in the benefit-cost analysis. A generic form of the benefit-cost ratio is evaluated in monetary and nonmonetary terms, and values of dollar per man-rem are cited. Federal and state agencies that may have jurisiction over various aspects of decontamination and waste disposal activities are identified. Methods of decontamination, their general effectiveness, and

L. F. Munson; J. R. Divine; J. B. Martin

1983-01-01

313

Rock Springs Site 12 Hydraulic/Explosive True in Situ Oil Shale Fracturing Experiment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The experiment plan involved the creation and characterization of three horizontal hydraulic fractures, followed by the insertion and simultaneous detonation of slurry explosive in the two lower fractures. Core analyses, wellbore logging, and airflow and ...

R. L. Parrish R. R. Boade A. L. Stevens A. Long T. F. Turner

1980-01-01

314

Getsumen Yuujin Kyoten Ni Okeru Eclss Jikken (ECLSS Experiments at Manned Lunar Surface Sites).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Conceptual study of ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support System) experiment plans and equipment for developing water recycling technology, one of the technologies which constitute the base for constructing the foundation for enlargement of lunar ...

T. Kanemura J. Inagaki S. Oono

1991-01-01

315

Solar Total Energy: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia Site. Annual Report, June 1978-June 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A background summary and a complete description of the progress and current status of activities relative to the Cooperative Agreement for the Solar Total Energy - Large Scale Experiment at the Bleyle Knitwear Plant at Shenandoah, Georgia are presented. A...

E. J. Ney

1979-01-01

316

Reflections on the "Site of Struggle": Girls' Experience of Secondary Education in the Late 1950s  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brian Simon used the phrase 'site of struggle' to describe the class-based inequalities that were played out in the provisions for English compulsory education. In the nineteenth century, the growth of the state system for the working class alongside the predominantly middle-class independent sector simply confirmed existing class hierarchies with…

Spencer, Stephanie

2004-01-01

317

Critical massess: augmented virtual experiences and the xenoplastic at Australia's cold war and nuclear heritage sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

CRITICAL MASSES is a multidisciplinary pilot project that seeks to graphically represent and mediate the histories, spaces and narratives informing former nuclear installations within central Australia. These include the abandoned British atomic test sites at Emu Field and Maralinga, the ICBM\\/IRBM rocket launchers at Woomera, and the decommissioned US National Security Agency early-warning satellite base at Nurrungar. Significantly, each of

Mick Broderick; Mark Cypher; Jim Macbeth

2007-01-01

318

Expanding medical abortion in Tunisia: women's experiences from a multi-site expansion study  

Microsoft Academic Search

From November 2000 to July 2001, 321 consenting women were enrolled at four sites across the country in an effort to demonstrate that mifepristone medical abortion could safely be used by providers throughout Tunisia. Women who met the study's inclusion criteria were given 200 mg oral mifepristone and offered the choice of taking 400 ?g oral misoprostol 2 days later

Selma Hajri; Jennifer Blum; Nabiha Gueddana; Habib Saadi; Leila Maazoun; Hela Chélli; Rasha Dabash; Beverly Winikoff

2004-01-01

319

Experiences in the coordination and training of off-site support agencies for emergency planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development and implementation of radiological emergency plans and procedures for a research reactor facility requires the participation and cooperation of several off-site support agencies. Included are municipal fire and police departments, hospitals, emergency medical and ambulance services, and local governmental agencies. The Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center encountered numerous obstacles in securing the necessary support required

1980-01-01

320

Reflections on the "Site of Struggle": Girls' Experience of Secondary Education in the Late 1950s  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Brian Simon used the phrase 'site of struggle' to describe the class-based inequalities that were played out in the provisions for English compulsory education. In the nineteenth century, the growth of the state system for the working class alongside the predominantly middle-class independent sector simply confirmed existing class hierarchies…

Spencer, Stephanie

2004-01-01

321

Teenagers’ Experiences With Social Network Sites: Relationships to Bridging and Bonding Social Capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have examined the relationship between social network sites (SNSs) and the development of social capital. However, most studies to date have only considered college and adult populations. This study examines the patterns of SNS use in an urban, teenage sample in the United States. It tests the hypothesis that use of SNSs is related to higher levels of

June Ahn

2012-01-01

322

Surveillance of Surgical Site Infections: Decade of Experience at a Colombian Tertiary Care Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A protocol for surveillance of surgical site infections (SSIs) was established in a tertiary care center in 1991 in Bogota, Colombia and followed for 10 years. Wounds were classified according to the Centers for Disease Control guidelines. The National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance and Study of the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control scores for risk factors were included from June 1999.

Cesar A. Arias; Gustavo Quintero; Blanca E. Vanegas; Clara Luz Rico; Jose Felix Patiño

2003-01-01

323

Preliminary standard review guide for Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning safety analyses  

SciTech Connect

The review guide is based on the shared experiences, approaches, and philosophies of the Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning (ER/D&D) subgroup members. It is presented in the form of a review guide to maximize the benefit to both the safety analyses practitioner and reviewer. The guide focuses on those challenges that tend to be unique to ER/D&D cleanup activities. Some of these experiences, approaches, and philosophies may find application or be beneficial to a broader spectrum of activities such as terminal cleanout or even new operations. Challenges unique to ER/D&D activities include (1) consent agreements requiring activity startup on designated dates; (2) the increased uncertainty of specific hazards; and (3) the highly variable activities covered under the broad category of ER/D&D. These unique challenges are in addition to the challenges encountered in all activities; e.g., new and changing requirements and multiple interpretations. The experiences in approaches, methods, and solutions to the challenges are documented from the practitioner and reviewer`s perspective, thereby providing the viewpoints on why a direction was taken and the concerns expressed. Site cleanup consent agreements with predetermined dates for restoration activity startup add the dimension of imposed punitive actions for failure to meet the date. Approval of the safety analysis is a prerequisite to startup. Actions that increase expediency are (1) assuring activity safety; (2) documenting that assurance; and (3) acquiring the necessary approvals. These actions increase the timeliness of startup and decrease the potential for punitive action. Improvement in expediency has been achieved by using safety analysis techniques to provide input to the line management decision process rather than as a review of line management decisions. Expediency is also improved by sharing the safety input and resultant decisions with reviewers and regulators.

Ellingson, D.R.

1993-06-01

324

Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1995 and 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. The Act transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as of July 1, 1993, and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

NONE

1996-02-21

325

Los Alamos DP West Plutonium Facility decontamination project  

SciTech Connect

The DP West Plutonium Facility operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decontaminated between April 1978 and April 1981. The facility was constructed in 1944 to 1945 to produce plutonium metal and fabricate parts for nuclear weapons. It was continually used as a plutonium processing and research facility until mid-1978. Decontamination operations included dismantling and removing gloveboxes and conveyor tunnels; removing process systems, utilities, and exhaust ducts; and decontaminating all remaining surfaces. This report describes glovebox and conveyor tunnel separations, decontamination techniques, health and safety considerations, waste management procedures, and costs of the operation.

Garde, R.; Cox, E.J.; Valentine, A.M.

1982-01-01

326

41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? 102-75.955 Section...PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75...responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? The landholding...

2013-01-01

327

Immobilization of Russian VX skin depots by localized cooling: implications for decontamination and medical countermeasures.  

PubMed

The chemical weapon nerve agent known as Russian VX (VR) is a potent organophosphorus (OP) compound that is much less studied than its VX analogue with respect to toxicity, as well as to the effectiveness of several known countermeasures against it. An anaesthetized domestic swine model was utilized to assess several approaches in mitigating its toxicity, including the utility of cooling VR treated skin to increase the therapeutic window for treatment. The 6h LD?? for VR topically applied on the ear was 100 ?g/kg. Treatment of VR exposed animals (5 × LD??) with pralidoxime (2PAM) very poorly regenerated inhibited blood cholinesterase activity, but was partially effective in preventing signs of OP poisoning and increasing survival. In contrast, treatment with the Hagedorn oxime HI-6 reactivated cholinesterase, eliminated all signs of poisoning and prevented death. Decontamination with the Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) 15 min after VR exposure was completely effective in preventing death. Cooling of the VR exposure sites for 2 or 6h prevented signs of OP poisoning and death during the cooling period. However, these animals died very quickly after the cessation of cooling, unless they were treated with oxime or decontaminated with RSDL. Blood analyses showed that cooling of agent exposure sites delayed the entry of VR into the bloodstream. Medical treatment with HI-6 and to a lesser extent 2PAM, or decontamination with RSDL are effective in protecting against the toxic effects of cutaneous exposure to VR. Immobilizing this agent (and related compounds) within the dermal reservoir by cooling the exposure sites, dramatically increases the therapeutic window in which these medical countermeasures are effective. PMID:21704135

Mikler, J; Tenn, C; Worek, F; Reiter, G; Thiermann, H; Garrett, M; Bohnert, S; Sawyer, T W

2011-06-16

328

Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center  

SciTech Connect

The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D&D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D&D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D&D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D&D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D&D will be made available on request.

Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

1992-08-19

329

Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center  

SciTech Connect

The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D D will be made available on request.

Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

1992-08-19

330

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25

331

In-Situ Biological Decontamination of an Ice Melting Probe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major concern in space and even many terrestrial missions is the forward contamination of the alien environment with microbes and biological molecules, transported on spacecraft from Earth. Furthermore, organisms and molecules can be brought to the sampling place from the surface. All this can lead to serious misinterpretations of the obtained data and more impor-tantly, could irreversibly alter the pristine nature of the extraterrestrial environments. These issues were addressed and are constantly updated in COSPAR planetary protection policy (20 October 2002; Amended 24 March 2005; 20 July 2008). The objective of our study was to investigate the efficacy of different in-situ decontamination protocols in the conditions of thermo-mechanical ice-melting. We evaluated survival rate of microorganisms on the melting probe as a function of both time and penetration depth. Special focus was made on deter-mination of the optimal concentration of chemical decontaminants (hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite) the peculiarities of their antimicrobial action at low temperatures (-80 to 0C) combined with constant dilution with melted ice and mechanical abrasion. Common, non-pathogenic microbial strains belonging to different morphological and metabolic groups (Pseudomonas, Micrococcus, Escherichia, Bacillus and others) were chosen as test objects for this study. The working part of the melting probe was first controllably contaminated by in-cubation in suspension of microbial cells. After appropriate sedimentation of microbial cells had been reached, the drilling-melting process was started using specially prepared sterile ice blocks. Every 2 minutes the samples were taken and analyzed. In the control tests, 1 mL of distilled water was injected into the penetration site at the onset of drilling. In the other tests, 1 mL of hydrogen peroxide (30Collected data suggest high efficacy of both used compounds in respect of all tested microbial groups. Typically, 99.9

Digel, Ilya

332

RCRA closure experience with radioactive mixed waste 183 H Solar Evaporation Basins at the Hanford Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) closure work of the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, at the Hanford Site for the Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. A detailed description of how the hazardous wastes and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) were treated (i.e., sludge removal methods, liquid solidification process, and

E. W. Powers; G. W. Jackson

1990-01-01

333

Decontamination of concrete surfaces in Building 3019, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. [After Nov. 20, 1959 incident  

SciTech Connect

This building was built in 1943 to serve as a pilot plant for separating isotopes from irradiated fuels. A chemical explosion leading to widespread Pu contamination occurred on Nov. 20, 1959, and the steps taken to treat the building afterwards are discussed, in particular the floor and the cells. The experience shows how hard it is to decontaminate concrete; smooth coatings should be utilized. (DLC)

Parrott, J.R. Sr.

1980-01-01

334

Use of an Intergenic Region in Pseudomonas syringae pv. Syringae B728a for Site-Directed Genomic Marking of Bacterial Strains for Field Experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

To construct differentially-marked derivatives of our model wild-type strain, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a (a causal agent of bacterial brown spot disease in snap bean plants), for field experiments, we selected a site in the gacS-cysM intergenic region for site-directed insertion of antibiotic resistance marker cassettes. In each of three field experiments, population sizes of the site-directed chromosomally marked B728a

SUSAN S. HIRANO; DAVID K. WILLIS; MURRAY K. CLAYTON; CHRISTEN D. UPPER

2001-01-01

335

Blended Learning Environments: Using Social Networking Sites to Enhance the First Year Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explores blending virtual and physical learning environments to enhance the experience of first year by immersing students into university culture through social and academic interaction between peers. It reports on the progress made from 2008 to 2009 using an existing academic platform, the first year design elective course "Imaging…

McCarthy, Joshua

2010-01-01

336

Solar total energy: large scale experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia Site. Annual report, June 1978June 1979  

Microsoft Academic Search

A background summary and a complete description of the progress and current status of activities relative to the Cooperative Agreement for the Solar Total Energy - Large Scale Experiment at the Bleyle Knitwear Plant at Shenandoah, Georgia are presented. A statement of objectives and an abstract of progress to date are included. This is followed by a short introduction containing

Ney

1979-01-01

337

Career Field Experience: A Look at On-site Usage by High School Communication Class.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The career field experience program at a midwestern high school places broadcasting students on location for observation of the profession and optional job training or work. In addition to radio and television stations, field locations include advertising agencies with production studios, corporate production facilities, recording studios, cable…

Kaye, Thomas

338

Career Field Experience: A Look at On-site Usage by High School Communication Class.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The career field experience program at a midwestern high school places broadcasting students on location for observation of the profession and optional job training or work. In addition to radio and television stations, field locations include advertising agencies with production studios, corporate production facilities, recording studios, cable…

Kaye, Thomas

339

Using grounded theory to model visitor experiences at heritage sites : Methodological and practical issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present grounded theory as an alternative approach for conceptualizing and modelling the consumer experience. The basic theoretical tenets of the grounded theory approach are contrasted with more traditional assumptions and methods used in consumer research. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The approach is based on qualitative methods and a series of systematic ethnographic procedures,

Jaruwan Daengbuppha; Nigel Hemmington; Keith Wilkes

2006-01-01

340

Blended Learning Environments: Using Social Networking Sites to Enhance the First Year Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores blending virtual and physical learning environments to enhance the experience of first year by immersing students into university culture through social and academic interaction between peers. It reports on the progress made from 2008 to 2009 using an existing academic platform, the first year design elective course "Imaging…

McCarthy, Joshua

2010-01-01

341

HECTR (Hydrogen Event: Containment Transient Response) analyses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) premixed combustion experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HECTR (Hydrogen Event: Containment Transient Response) computer code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to predict the transient pressure and temperature responses within reactor containments for hypothetical accidents involving the transport and combustion of hydrogen. Although HECTR was designed primarily to investigate these phenomena in LWRs, it may also be used to analyze hydrogen transport and combustion experiments

1988-01-01

342

Stochastic analysis of concentration measurements in the transport experiment at Twin Lake site  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure to identify the parameters characterizing flow and transport in heterogeneous aquifers with the aid of concentration measurements in tracer field experiments is developed. Unlike previous studies, which employed the measured plume spatial moments at different times and their theoretical expressions, we rely here on breakthrough curves and temporal moments in order to analyze the field tests at Chalk

G. Dagan; P. Indelman; G. Moltyaner

1997-01-01

343

Stochastic analysis of concentration measurements in the transport experiment at Twin Lake Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure to identify the parameters characterizing flow and transport in heterogeneous aquifers with the aid of concentration measurements in tracer field experiments is developed. Unlike previous studies, which employed the measured plume spatial moments at different times and their theoretical expressions, we rely here on breakthrough curves and temporal moments in order to analyze the field tests at Chalk

G. Dagan; P. Indelman; G. Moltyaner

1997-01-01

344

Cyclodextrines as functional agents for decontamination of the skin contaminated by nerve agents.  

PubMed

Three decontamination solutions of beta-cyclodextrines were prepared. Their abilities to decontamine rat skin contamined with nerve agent soman were tested. Decontamination efficacy of the tested cyclodextrine solutions was compared with the same decontamination means but without the cyclodextrines. The efficacy of tested decontaminants was evaluated by the assessment of the ID50 values. Two decontamination prescriptions with cyclodextrines (tetraborate buffer and tetraborate buffer with acetone) do not show significantly better decontamination efficacies in comparison with prescriptions without cyclodextrines. Only in case of aqueous solution of 2-aminoethanol the addition of beta-cyclodextrine resulted in significant increase (32%) in decontamination efficacy. PMID:15446361

Cabal, Jirí; Kuca, Kamil; Sevelová-Bartosová, Lucie; Dohnal, Vlastimil

2004-01-01

345

Biological decontamination by oxygen plasma.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxygen plasma sustained at 13.56 MHz in a standardized reactor with a planar induction coil was used for biological sterilization experiments. Optical emission and mass spectrometry was applied for detection of excited species and ion energy/flux analysis. A plasma mode transition in the ranges of 13-67 Pa and 100-330 W was observed. At higher pressure and lower power, the plasma was in a dim mode (primarily stray capacitive coupling). A primarily inductive bright mode was attained at lower pressure and higher power. This transition was identified using combined diagnostics and then recognized by emission spectroscopy on a scaled down reactor for biological degradation tests. Plasmid DNA removal was 25% more efficient in the bright versus dim mode at the same power. The fast degradation was attributed to photo- and ion-assisted etching by oxygen atoms and perhaps O2 metastable molecules. Volatilization rates of the decomposition products (CO_2, CO, N_2, OH, H) evolving from the Deinococcus radiodurans microbe and polypeptide samples were compared.

Bol'Shakov, A. A.; Cruden, B. A.; Mogul, R.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, S. P.; Meyyappan, M.

2002-10-01

346

The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

2011-09-01

347

Nitrogen effects on decomposition: a five-year experiment in eight temperate sites.  

PubMed

The influence of inorganic nitrogen (N) inputs on decomposition is poorly understood. Some prior studies suggest that N may reduce the decomposition of substrates with high concentrations of lignin via inhibitory effects on the activity of lignin-degrading enzymes, although such inhibition has not always been demonstrated. I studied the effects of N addition on decomposition of seven substrates ranging in initial lignin concentrations (from 7.4% to 25.6%) over five years in eight different grassland and forest sites in central Minnesota, USA. I predicted that N would stimulate the decomposition of lignin-poor substrates but retard the decomposition of lignin-rich substrates. Across these sites, N had neutral or negative effects on decomposition rates. However, in contrast to my hypothesis, effects of N on decomposition were independent of substrate initial lignin concentrations, and decomposition of the lignin fraction was unaffected by N fertilization. Rather, substrate-site combinations that exhibited more rapid decomposition rates in the control treatment were affected more negatively by addition of N fertilization. Taken together, these results suggest that decreased decomposition with added N did not result from inhibition of lignin-degrading enzyme activity, but may have resulted from abiotic interactions between N fertilizer and products of microbial degradation or synthesis or from N effects on the decomposer community. Low initial substrate N concentrations and N fertilization both stimulated N immobilization, but the differences among substrates were generally much larger than the effects of fertilization. This study suggests that atmospheric N addition could stimulate ecosystem carbon sequestration in some ecosystems as a result of reduced rates of forest floor decomposition. PMID:18831184

Hobbie, Sarah E

2008-09-01

348

The Seveso II experience in the application of generic substance criteria to identify major hazard sites.  

PubMed

Europe is currently in the process of finalising legislation to align its criteria for classifying and labelling dangerous substances with the new Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS), replacing the criteria that have been in place within the European Union since the establishment in 1967 of Directive 67/548/EC on the Classification and Labelling of Dangerous Substances. The Seveso II Directive is potentially the piece of EU legislation most affected by this re-classification because coverage of sites under the Directive is determined to a large extent on the basis of the presence of certain generic categories of substances on site as defined by 67/548/EC. The European Commission in concert with the Member States has launched an initiative to review the current Seveso generic classifications with the view to adjusting these provisions as appropriate in light of the pending GHS-EU harmonisation. In doing so, it must foresee and take into account the inevitable inequalities that may result when the general conditions of a generalised approach are altered. This paper gives an overview of the Seveso qualifying criteria and corrective measures that have been used in the past to address its limitations in relation to specific substances and categories of substances. Adaptation of the criteria to the GHS classification is not likely to alter these limitations, but could generate new cases where they are again in evidence. Therefore, this analysis offers insight on what types of potential unforeseen and unintended consequences that changes to the current generic criteria (i.e., certain sites are inappropriately covered or not covered, as the case may be) may entail, while also highlighting how well different structural and administrative elements may function to address these situations. PMID:19632041

Wood, Maureen Heraty

2009-06-06

349

Development and Evaluation of an On-Line Hide Decontamination Procedure for Use in a Commercial Beef Processing Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hides of cattle are the source of Escherichia coli O157:H7 that contaminates beef carcasses during commercial beef processing. Therefore, effective interventions that reduce hide contamination should reduce subsequent carcass contamination. The first objective of this study was to identify the most effective reagents for decontamination of beef hides. Cattle hides draped over barrels were used for in vitro experiments

JOSEPH M. BOSILEVAC; XIANGWU NOU; MATTHEW S. OSBORN; DELL M. ALLEN; MOHAMMAD KOOHMARAIE

350

An overview of plutonium-238 decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects at Mound  

SciTech Connect

Mound is currently decontaminating for restricted reuse and/or decommissioning for conditional release four major plutonium-238 contaminated facilities that contained 1700 linear feet of gloveboxes and associated equipment and services. Several thousand linear feet of external underground piping, associated tanks, and contaminated soil are being removed. Two of the facilities contain ongoing operations and will be reused for both radioactive and nonradioactive programs. Two others will be completely demolished and the land area will become available for future DOE building sites. An overview of the successful techniques and equipment used in the decontamination and decommissioning of individual pieces of equipment, gloveboxes, services, laboratories, sections of buildings, entire buildings, and external underground piping, tanks, and soil in a highly populated residential area is described and pictorially presented.

Bond, W.H.; Davis, W.P.; Draper, D.G.; Geichman, J.R.; Harris, J.C.; Jaeger, R.R.; Sohn, R.L.

1987-01-01

351

DECISION ANALYSIS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS FOR METAL AND MASONRY DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative analysis of innovative technologies for the non-aggressive removal of coatings from metal and masonry surfaces and the aggressive removal of one-quarter to one-inch thickness of surface from structural masonry. The technologies tested should be capable of being used in nuclear facilities. Innovative decontamination technologies are being evaluated under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the FIU-HCET technology assessment site in Miami, Florida. This study is being performed to support the OST, the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, and the environmental restoration of DOE facilities throughout the DOE complex by providing objective evaluations of currently available decontamination technologies.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01

352

MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01

353

MISTY ECHO tunnel dynamics experiment data report; Volume 2, Appendices: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01

354

Elemental analyses of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment sensor surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to break down the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SIO2 insulator layer separating the silicon

Charles G. Simon; J. L. Hunter; D. P. Griffis; V. Misra; D. A. Ricks; Jim J. Wortman; D. E. Brownlee

1993-01-01

355

Elemental analyses of hypervelocity micro-particle impact sites on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity micro-particles that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 to 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A

Charles G. Simon; J. L. Hunter; D. P. Griffis; V. Misra; D. R. Ricks; Jim J. Wortman

1992-01-01

356

Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed.

Pin, F.G.

1985-01-01

357

Shear wave experiments at the US site at the Grimsel laboratory  

SciTech Connect

As part of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) cooperative project with the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) of Switzerland, there have been a series of studies carried out at the Nagra underground test facility at Grimsel. The Grimsel test facility is several 3.5 meter diameter tunnels excavated with a tunnel boring machine in the southern Swiss Alps. The rock type is granitic, although there is a large variation in the granitic fabric throughout the facility. The work described here was the first phase of a multiyear project to evaluate and develop seismic imaging techniques for fracture detection and characterization for the use in siting underground nuclear waste facilities. Data from a crosshole tomographic survey in the Underground Seismic (US) site at the Nagra Grimsel test facility in Switzerland and successfully reprocessed to enhance the S-wave arrivals. The results indicate that in a saturated granite Vp/Vs ratios approach 2.0 in the fractured rock. These results indicate that S-wave data would be very useful for fracture detection, especially in detecting thinner fractures.

Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Bluemling, P.; Sattel, G. (Swiss National Cooperative for the Storage of Nuclear Waste, Baden (Switzerland))

1990-07-01

358

Continuous analysis for vanadium in LOMI decontamination  

SciTech Connect

Methods were investigated for the determination of vanadium ions in aqueous solutions used in the LOMI (Low Oxidation-state Metal Ion) process for the chemical decontamination of piping systems in nuclear power plants. In the LOMI process, a dilute solution of vanadous formate and picolinic acid is circulated at elevated temperature in the system to be cleaned. The vanadous formate reduces metal oxides in the scale on the equipment, causing the scale to break up and become suspended. The picolinic acid chelates these materials and renders them soluble, so they can later be removed by ion exchange. The progress of the LOMI is followed by laboratory analysis of samples of the circulating fluid for metal ions and radioactivity. When the values stop increasing, the decontamination is terminated. At present, it cannot be determined if the values are no longer changing because all of the scale has been removed or because of vanadous ion depletion. It is believed that on-line vanadous ion analysis may lead to improvements in the process. It was found that the complex formed by V(II) with picolinic acid could be used for colorimetric analysis for V(II) in the concentration range used in the LOMI process. Those findings were used to develop an on-line colorimeter for continuously monitoring V(II) concentration in LOMI solutions. When evaluated in the field it was found to be subject to excessive interference by colored materials which were present in the circulating solution. A titrimetric method was investigated in which V(II) was titrated with ferric iron using potentiometric electrodes to follow the course of the reaction. An on-line titrimeter using that approach was assembled, tested in the laboratory under simulated LOMI conditions, and was successfully evaluated in the field during a LOMI decontamination.

Kottle, S.; Stowe, R.A.; Bishop, J.V. [Omni Tech International Ltd., Midland, MI (United States)

1996-12-01

359

Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap  

SciTech Connect

The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF{sub 6}. This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

1996-12-01

360

Large area cold plasma applicator for decontamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cold plasma applicators have been used in the Medical community for several years for uses ranging from hemostasis ("stop bleeding") to tumor removal. An added benefit of this technology is enhanced wound healing by the destruction of infectious microbial agents without damaging healthy tissue. The beam is typically one millimeter to less than a centimeter in diameter. This technology has been adapted and expanded to large area applicators of potentially a square meter or more. Decontamination applications include both biological and chemical agents, and assisting in the removal of radiological agents, with minimal or no damage to the contaminated substrate material. Linear and planar multiemitter array plasma applicator design and operation is discussed.

Konesky, G. A.

2008-05-01

361

Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for decontamination purposes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced oxidation processes, especially induced by non-thermal plasmas, are widely known for their high sanitation efficiency. The paper presents general overview of atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) reactors for bactericidal decontamination purposes. In the conclusion part, the basic requirements for APPJ as a tool for biomedical applications including the treatment of living tissues are highlighted. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

Paw?at, Joanna

2013-02-01

362

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major interviews, articles and reports in this issue include: Increasing momentum, by Gary Taylor, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; An acceptable investment, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, Inc.; Fuel recycling for the U.S. and abroad, by Philippe Knoche, Areva, France; We're bullish on nuclear power, by Dan R. Keuter, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; Ten key actions for decommissioning, by Lawrence E. Boing, Argonne National Laboratory; Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning, by Dr. Claudio Pescatore and Torsten Eng, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), France; and, Plant profile: SONGS decommissioning.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-07-15

363

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2006-07-15

364

Decontamination of actinides and fission products from stainless steel surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven in situ decontamination processes were evaluated as possible candidates to reduce radioactivity levels in nuclear facilities throughout the DOE complex. These processes were tested using stainless steel coupons (Type 304) contaminated with actinides (Pu and Am) or fission products (a mixture of Cs, Sr, and Gd). The seven processes were decontamination with nitric acid, nitric acid plus hydrofluoric acid,

C. Mertz; D. B. Chamberlain; L. Chen; C. Conner; G. F. Vandegrift; D. Drockelman; M. Kaminski; S. Landsberger; J. Stubbins

1996-01-01

365

Evaluation of Five Decontamination Methods for Filtering Facepiece Respirators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns have been raised regarding the availability of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) during an influenza pandemic. One possible strategy to mitigate a respirator shortage is to reuse FFRs following a biological decontamination process to render infectious material on the FFR inactive. However, little data exist on the effects of decontamination methods

DENNIS J. VISCUSI; MICHAEL S. BERGMAN; BENJAMIN C. EIMER; RONALD E. SHAFFER

2009-01-01

366

THE RADIOACTIVE POLLUTED SOILS DECONTAMINATION USING THE ULTRASOUND FIELD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present contribution presents an intensive procedure used for the decontamination of the radioactively polluted soils. The procedure used was the washing in intensive conditions and the decontamination degree is comparatively presented depending on the ultrasounds presence and absence. The lab testes were performed on five types of soils, characterized of the size distribution, structural and chemical composition; all these

Eugenia Panturu; Rozalia Radulescu; Cosmin Jinescu; Gabriela Isopencu; Antoneta Filcenco-Olteanu; Gheorghita Jinescu

367

Decontamination of the digestive tract and oropharynx in ICU patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) are infection-prevention measures used in the treatment of some patients in intensive care, but reported effects on patient outcome are conflicting. METHODS: We evaluated the effectiveness of SDD and SOD in a crossover study using cluster randomization in 13 intensive care units (ICUs), all in The Netherlands. Patients with

A. M. G. A. de Smet; J. A. J. W. Kluytmans; B. S. Cooper; E. M. Mascini; R. F. J. Benus; T. S. van der Werf; J. G. van der Hoeven; P. Pickkers; D. Bogaers-Hofman; N. J. M. van der Meer; A. T. Bernards; E. J. Kuijper; J. C. A. Joore; M. A. Leverstein-van Hall; A. J. G. H. Bindels; A. R. Jansz; R. M. J. Wesselink; B. M. de Jongh; P. J. W. Dennesen; G. J. van Asselt; L. F. te Velde; I. H. M. E. Frenay; K. A. Kaasjager; F. H. Bosch; M. van Iterson; S. F. T. Thijsen; G. H. Kluge; W. Pauw; J. W. de Vries; J. A. Kaan; J. P. Arends; L. P. H. J. Aarts; P. D. J. Sturm; H. I. J. Harinck; A. Voss; E. V. Uijtendaal; H. E. M. Blok; E. S. Thieme Groen; M. E. Pouw; C. J. Kalkman; M. J. M. Bonten

2009-01-01

368

Antibacterial activity of decontamination treatments for pig carcasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prevention or reduction of carcass contamination with food-borne pathogens during slaughter is of particular importance. Antimicrobial intervention technologies are therefore gaining increasing interest in the slaughter process. In this review, we screened the available recent literature on the decontamination of pig carcasses and appraised the antibacterial activity of treatments. Compared to poultry and beef carcasses, data on decontamination treatments for

Marianne Loretz; Roger Stephan; Claudio Zweifel

2011-01-01

369

Sourcebook for chemical decontamination of nuclear power plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This sourcebook provides information on the chemical decontamination of nuclear power plants. An overview of the current status of the technology is given, including a brief description of commercially-available processes. BWR recirculation piping and PWR steam generator decontaminations are described, with a comparison of the two types of operation. Corrosion data, methods of reducing recontamination rates, and wastes issues are

C. J. Wood; C. N. Spalaris

1989-01-01

370

Electrolytic decontamination of stainless steel using a basic electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

An electrolytic plutonium decontamination process or stainless steel was developed for use as the final step in a proposed radioactive waste handling and decontamination facility to be construced at the Rockwell International Rocky Flats plutonium handling facility. This paper discusses test plan, which was executed to compare the basic electrolyte with phosphoric acid and nitric acid electrolytes. 1 ref.

Childs, E.L.; Long, J.L.

1981-08-01

371

Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-06-01

372

Putting up emotional (facebook) walls? Attachment status and emerging adults' experiences of social networking sites.  

PubMed

Social networking sites (SNS) like Facebook can increase interpersonal connections but also intensify jealousy, envy, and surveillance behaviors. Attachment styles may help explain differences in experiencing SNS. This study investigated the role of attachment in influencing emerging adults' perceptions and feelings about SNS and their disclosures on SNS. Disorganized and anxious attachment predicted subjects' use of SNS to avoid more personal face-to-face communication, suggesting individuals with these tendencies use SNS to hold relationships at a psychological arm's distance. Anxious attachment also predicted feelings of intimacy when using SNS, perhaps reflecting online needs for comfort from others. A case narrative is presented to show how those with insecure attachment patterns may struggle to avoid interpersonal conflict when being continuously presented with ambiguous social information. PMID:23996299

Nitzburg, George C; Farber, Barry A

2013-08-30

373

Establishing a health demographic surveillance site in Bhaktapur district, Nepal: initial experiences and findings  

PubMed Central

Background A health demographic surveillance system (HDSS) provides longitudinal data regarding health and demography in countries with coverage error and poor quality data on vital registration systems due to lack of public awareness, inadequate legal basis and limited use of data in health planning. The health system in Nepal, a low-income country, does not focus primarily on health registration, and does not conduct regular health data collection. This study aimed to initiate and establish the first HDSS in Nepal. Results We conducted a baseline survey in Jhaukhel and Duwakot, two villages in Bhaktapur district. The study surveyed 2,712 households comprising a total population of 13,669. The sex ratio in the study area was 101 males per 100 females and the average household size was 5. The crude birth and death rates were 9.7 and 3.9/1,000 population/year, respectively. About 11% of births occurred at home, and we found no mortality in infants and children less than 5 years of age. Various health problems were found commonly and some of them include respiratory problems (41.9%); headache, vertigo and dizziness (16.7%); bone and joint pain (14.4%); gastrointestinal problems (13.9%); heart disease, including hypertension (8.8%); accidents and injuries (2.9%); and diabetes mellitus (2.6%). The prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) was 4.3% (95% CI: 3.83; 4.86) among individuals older than 30 years. Age-adjusted odds ratios showed that risk factors, such as sex, ethnic group, occupation and education, associated with NCD. Conclusion Our baseline survey demonstrated that it is possible to collect accurate and reliable data in a village setting in Nepal, and this study successfully established an HDSS site. We determined that both maternal and child health are better in the surveillance site compared to the entire country. Risk factors associated with NCDs dominated morbidity and mortality patterns.

2012-01-01

374

Field-scale transplantation experiment to investigate structures of soil bacterial communities at pioneering sites.  

PubMed

Studies on the effect of environmental conditions on plants and microorganisms are a central issue in ecology, and they require an adequate experimental setup. A strategy often applied in geobotanical studies is based on the reciprocal transplantation of plant species at different sites. We adopted a similar approach as a field-based tool to investigate the relationships of soil bacterial communities with the environment. Soil samples from two different (calcareous and siliceous) unvegetated glacier forefields were reciprocally transplanted and incubated for 15 months between 2009 and 2010. Controls containing local soils were included. The sites were characterized over time in terms of geographical (bedrock, exposition, sunlight, temperature, and precipitation) and physicochemical (texture, water content, soluble and nutrients) features. The incubating local ("home") and transplanted ("away") soils were monitored for changes in extractable nutrients and in the bacterial community structure, defined through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA gene. Concentrations of soluble ions in most samples were more significantly affected by seasons than by the transplantation. For example, NO(3)(-) showed a seasonal pattern, increasing from 1 to 3 ?g NO(3)(-) (g soil dry weight)(-1) after the melting of snow but decreasing to <1 ?g NO(3)(-) (g soil dry weight)(-1) in autumn. Seasons, and in particular strong precipitation events occurring in the summer of 2010 (200 to 300 mm of rain monthly), were also related to changes of bacterial community structures. Our results show the suitability of this approach to compare responses of bacterial communities to different environmental conditions directly in the field. PMID:21965395

Lazzaro, Anna; Gauer, Andreas; Zeyer, Josef

2011-09-30

375

Field-Scale Transplantation Experiment To Investigate Structures of Soil Bacterial Communities at Pioneering Sites?†  

PubMed Central

Studies on the effect of environmental conditions on plants and microorganisms are a central issue in ecology, and they require an adequate experimental setup. A strategy often applied in geobotanical studies is based on the reciprocal transplantation of plant species at different sites. We adopted a similar approach as a field-based tool to investigate the relationships of soil bacterial communities with the environment. Soil samples from two different (calcareous and siliceous) unvegetated glacier forefields were reciprocally transplanted and incubated for 15 months between 2009 and 2010. Controls containing local soils were included. The sites were characterized over time in terms of geographical (bedrock, exposition, sunlight, temperature, and precipitation) and physicochemical (texture, water content, soluble and nutrients) features. The incubating local (“home”) and transplanted (“away”) soils were monitored for changes in extractable nutrients and in the bacterial community structure, defined through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA gene. Concentrations of soluble ions in most samples were more significantly affected by seasons than by the transplantation. For example, NO3? showed a seasonal pattern, increasing from 1 to 3 ?g NO3? (g soil dry weight)?1 after the melting of snow but decreasing to <1 ?g NO3? (g soil dry weight)?1 in autumn. Seasons, and in particular strong precipitation events occurring in the summer of 2010 (200 to 300 mm of rain monthly), were also related to changes of bacterial community structures. Our results show the suitability of this approach to compare responses of bacterial communities to different environmental conditions directly in the field.

Lazzaro, Anna; Gauer, Andreas; Zeyer, Josef

2011-01-01

376

A review of chemical decontamination systems for nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

With the downsizing of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, many of its buildings and facilities will be decommissioned and dismantled. As part of this decommissioning, some form of decontamination will be required. To develop an appropriate technology for in situ chemical decontamination of equipment interiors in the decommissioning of DOE nuclear facilities, knowledge of the existing chemical decontamination methods is needed. This paper attempts to give an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. This survey revealed that aqueous systems are the most widely used for the decontamination and cleaning of metal surfaces. We have subdivided the aqueous systems by types of chemical solvent: acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and proprietary. Two other systems, electropolishing and foams and gels, are also described in this paper.

Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1996-04-01

377

Agile methods in biomedical software development: a multi-site experience report  

PubMed Central

Background Agile is an iterative approach to software development that relies on strong collaboration and automation to keep pace with dynamic environments. We have successfully used agile development approaches to create and maintain biomedical software, including software for bioinformatics. This paper reports on a qualitative study of our experiences using these methods. Results We have found that agile methods are well suited to the exploratory and iterative nature of scientific inquiry. They provide a robust framework for reproducing scientific results and for developing clinical support systems. The agile development approach also provides a model for collaboration between software engineers and researchers. We present our experience using agile methodologies in projects at six different biomedical software development organizations. The organizations include academic, commercial and government development teams, and included both bioinformatics and clinical support applications. We found that agile practices were a match for the needs of our biomedical projects and contributed to the success of our organizations. Conclusion We found that the agile development approach was a good fit for our organizations, and that these practices should be applicable and valuable to other biomedical software development efforts. Although we found differences in how agile methods were used, we were also able to identify a set of core practices that were common to all of the groups, and that could be a focus for others seeking to adopt these methods.

Kane, David W; Hohman, Moses M; Cerami, Ethan G; McCormick, Michael W; Kuhlmman, Karl F; Byrd, Jeff A

2006-01-01

378

Summary of Radionuclide Reactive Transport Experiments in Fractured Tuff and Carbonate Rocks from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In the Yucca Flat basin of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), 747 shaft and tunnel nuclear detonations were conducted primarily within the tuff confining unit (TCU) or the overlying alluvium. The TCU in the Yucca Flat basin is hypothesized to inhibit radionuclide migration to the highly transmissive and regionally extensive lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) due to its wide-spread aerial extent, low permeability, and chemical reactivity. However, fast transport pathways through the TCU by way of fractures may provide a migration path for radionuclides to the LCA. Radionuclide transport in both TCU and the LCA fractures is likely to determine the location of the contaminant boundary for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). Radionuclide transport through the TCU may involve both matrix and fracture flow. However, radionuclide migration over significant distances is likely to be dominated by fracture transport. Transport through the LCA will almost certainly be dominated by fracture flow, as the LCA has a very dense, low porosity matrix with very low permeability. Because of the complex nature of reactive transport in fractures, a stepwise approach to identifying mechanisms controlling radionuclide transport was used. The simplest LLNL experiments included radionuclide transport through synthetic parallel-plate fractured tuff and carbonate cores. These simplified fracture transport experiments isolated matrix diffusion and sorption effects from all other fracture transport processes (fracture lining mineral sorption, heterogeneous flow, etc.). Additional fracture transport complexity was added by performing induced fractured LCA flowthrough experiments (effect of aperture heterogeneity) or iron oxide coated parallel plate TCU flowthrough experiments (effect of fracture lining minerals). Finally naturally fractured tuff and carbonate cores were examined at LLNL and LANL. All tuff and carbonate core used in the experiments was obtained from the USGS Core Library, Mercury, Nevada. Readers are referred to the original reports ''Radionuclide Transport in Tuff and Carbonate Fractures from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site'' (Zavarin et al., 2005) and ''Radionuclide Sorption and Transport in Fractured Rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site'' (Ware et al., 2005) for specific details not covered in this summary report.

Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Reimus, P; Johnson, M

2006-10-11

379

THE USE OF A TREATABILITY STUDY TO INVESTIGATE THE POTENTIAL FOR SELF HEATING & EXOTHERMIC REACTIONS IN DECONTAMINATION MATERIALS AT PFP  

SciTech Connect

Cerium Nitrate has been proposed for use in the decontamination of plutonium contaminated equipment at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington. A Treatability Study was conducted to determine the validity of this decontamination technology in terms of meeting its performance goals and to understand the risks associated with the use of Cerium Nitrate under the conditions found at the PFP. Fluor Hanford is beginning the decommissioning of the PFP at the Hanford site. Aggressive chemicals are commonly used to remove transuranic contaminants from process equipment to allow disposal as low level waste. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes in PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions that include acids, degreasers, and sequestering agents. Fluor's decontamination procedure involves application of the chemicals, followed by a wipe-down of the contaminated surfaces with rags. This process effectively transfers the decontamination liquids containing the transuranic materials to the rags, which can then be readily packaged for disposal as TRU waste. As part of a treatability study, Fluor Hanford and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have evaluated the potential for self-heating and exothermic reactions in the residual decontamination materials and the waste packages. Laboratory analyses and thermal-hydraulic modeling reveal a significant self-heating risk for cerium nitrate solutions when used with cotton rags. Exothermic reactions that release significant heat and off-gas have been discovered for cerium nitrate at higher temperatures. From these studies, limiting conditions have been defined to assure safe operations and waste packaging.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2005-02-23

380

Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 {und M} HNO{sub 3} could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test.

MJ Danielson; MR Elmore; SG Pitman

2000-08-15

381

FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Plasma agents in bio-decontamination by dc discharges in atmospheric air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bio-decontamination of water and surfaces contaminated by bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) was investigated in two types of positive dc discharges in atmospheric pressure air, in needle-to-plane geometry: the streamer corona and its transition to a novel regime called transient spark with short high current pulses of limited energy. Both generate a cold non-equilibrium plasma. Electro-spraying of treated water through a needle electrode was applied for the first time and resulted in fast bio-decontamination. Experiments providing separation of various biocidal plasma agents, along with the emission spectra and coupled with oxidation stress measurements in the cell membranes helped to better understand the mechanisms of microbial inactivation. The indirect exposure of contaminated surfaces to neutral active species was almost as efficient as the direct exposure to the plasma, whereas applying only UV radiation from the plasma had no biocidal effects. Radicals and reactive oxygen species were identified as dominant biocidal agents.

Machala, Zdenko; Chládeková, Lenka; Pelach, Michal

2010-06-01

382

Bio-Decontamination of Water and Surfaces by DC Discharges in Atmospheric Air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of DC-driven atmospheric air discharges, including a streamer corona and a transient spark with short high current pulses of limited energy, were employed for bio-decontamination of water and various surfaces (agar plates, plastic foils, human teeth) contaminated by bacteria or spores (Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus). Both discharges generate cold non-equilibrium plasma. The discharges combined with the electro-spraying of the treated water through the needle electrode lead to fast and efficient bio-decontamination. Experiments comparing direct and indirect plasma effects, oxidation stress measurements in the cell membranes, and chemical changes induced in the treated water enable assessment of the plasma agents being responsible for microbial inactivation. Radicals and reactive oxygen species seem to be dominant biocidal agents, although deeper understanding of the plasma-induced water chemistry and of the temporal evolution of the bio-inactivation processes is needed.

Machala, Zdenko; Tarabová, Barbora; Pelach, Michal; Šipoldová, Zuzana; Hensel, Karol; Janda, Mário; Šikurová, Libuša

383

Single-site incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy in children: a single-center initial experience.  

PubMed

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the standard approach in most pediatric surgical centers. In an attempt to further minimize the surgical trauma and improve cosmetic outcome, new techniques with a single incision through the umbilicus have been proposed. There are still few reports concerning this technique in the pediatric population. We evaluated the feasibility of the single incision for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in children. We performed the operation in 10 patients, with a mean age of 12 years, mean operating time of 122 minutes, and mean hospital stay of 2 days. No complications occurred, and no conversion to open surgery was needed. In 1 patient, an extra 5-mm port was necessary. The cosmetic results were very satisfactory. In our experience, despite its technical difficulty and initial learning curve, single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the pediatric population is a safe and feasible method. PMID:22152896

Mesas Burgos, Carmen; Ghaffarpour, Nader; Almström, Markus

2011-12-01

384

Laparoendoscopic Single Site (LESS) Radical Prostatectomy: a review of the initial experience  

PubMed Central

Surgical treatment for prostate cancer has changed dramatically in recent years due to the incorporation of minimally invasive techniques in the surgical armamentarium. Open surgical approaches to the prostate have largely given way to laparoscopic and robotic techniques. In order to further reduce incisional morbidity and improve cosmesis, there has been a recent interest in laparoendoscopic single site (LESS) approaches to the prostate. Despite a rising interest, there is little available data on these procedures. We performed a systematic review of the literature using MEDLINE, OVID, and Web of Science to identify all publications including LESS radical prostatectomy to date. Manual bibliographic review of cross-referenced items was also performed. We attempt to identify and summarize existing data on these procedures both with and without robotic assistance. Additionally, we review the emerging devices, instruments, cameras, and ports that have made these procedures possible. Next, we offer insight into how this rapidly moving field may transition in the future. Finally, we provide our commentary on this surgical approach, its impact on urology, and how it may help us evolve in the future.

Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Power, Nicholas E.; Touijer, Karim A.

2011-01-01

385

Designing an in-flight airborne calibration site using experience from vicarious radiometric satellite calibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laboratory calibration of electro-optical sensors is preferably complemented by regular in-flight verification. This checks whether the lab calibration parameters remain valid or recalibration is necessary. In-flight verification can be achieved by vicarious calibration using in-flight measurements of calibration targets. We intend to identify and design a set of suitable radiometric calibration targets. For this, we borrow from expertise gained with the PROBA-V satellite calibration system, which uses multiple vicarious methods relying on diverse natural on-ground targets. Besides reflectance based calibration using ground measurements, the PROBA-V calibration methods are unproven for use in airborne calibration. The selected targets should be suitable for the calibration of both multispectral and hyperspectral imagers. We start from general requirements for radiometric targets and investigate their applicability to airborne calibration. From this we identify two possible sets of natural calibration sites in Belgium. One set, located in the Campine region, contains small water bodies and sandy lakesides. Another set is located in the Westhoek region near the Belgian coast. It offers better suitable water bodies, as well as sandy areas, grass fields and dark targets. Airborne calibration lends itself to the use of smaller artifical targets. We propose to complement the natural targets with a portable target consisting of agricultural nets with different densities. The definition of sets of calibration targets, both natural and artificial can facilitate the investigation of the usability of vicarious targets and method for inflight radiometric verification.

Livens, Stefan; Debruyn, Walter; Sterckx, Sindy; Reusen, Ils

2011-10-01

386

AN EXPERIMENT TO LOCATE THE SITE OF TeV FLARING IN M87  

SciTech Connect

We describe a Chandra X-ray target-of-opportunity project designed to isolate the site of TeV flaring in the radio galaxy M87. To date, we have triggered the Chandra observations only once (2010 April) and by the time of the first of our nine observations, the TeV flare had ended. However, we found that the X-ray intensity of the unresolved nucleus was at an elevated level for our first observation. Of the more than 60 Chandra observations we have made of the M87 jet covering nine years, the nucleus was measured at a comparably high level only three times. Two of these occasions can be associated with TeV flaring, and at the time of the third event, there were no TeV monitoring activities. From the rapidity of the intensity drop of the nucleus, we infer that the size of the emitting region is of order a few light days Multiplication-Sign the unknown beaming factor; comparable to the same sort of estimate for the TeV emitting region. We also find evidence of spectral evolution in the X-ray band which seems consistent with radiative losses affecting the non-thermal population of the emitting electrons within the unresolved nucleus.

Harris, D. E.; Massaro, F. [SAO, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cheung, C. C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Horns, D.; Raue, M. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Stawarz, L. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan); Wagner, S. [Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Koenigstuhl, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Colin, P.; Wagner, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Mazin, D. [IFAE, Edifici Cn., Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Beilicke, M. [Department of Physics and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1105, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); LeBohec, S.; Hui, M. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt-Lake-City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Mukherjee, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2011-12-20

387

Site Characterization Work Plan for Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Project Gnome was the first nuclear experiment conducted under the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Plowshare Program. Gnome was part of a joint government-industry experiment focused on developing nuclear devices exclusively for peaceful purposes. The intent of the Gnome experiment was to evaluate the effects of a nuclear detonation in a salt medium. Historically, Project Gnome consisted of a single detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1961. Since the Gnome detonation, the AEC/DOE has conducted surface restoration, site reconnaissance, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the site. In addition, annual groundwater sampling is performed under a long-term hydrological monitoring program begun in 1980. Coach, an experiment to be located near the Gnome project, was initially scheduled for 1963. Although construction and rehabilitation were completed for Coach, the experiment was canceled and never executed. Known collectively as Project Gnome-Coach, the site is situated within the Salado Formation approximately 25 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in Eddy County, and is comprised of nearly 680 acres, of which 60 acres are disturbed from the combined AEC/DOE operations. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the project. The subsurface at the Gnome-Coach site has two contaminant sources that are fundamentally different in terms of both their stratigraphic location and release mechanism. The goal of this characterization is to collect data of sufficient quantity and quality to establish current site conditions and to use the data to identify and evaluate if further action is required to protect human health and the environment and achieve permanent closure of the site. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-02-13

388

Unexploded ordnance detection experiments at extensive fully ground-truthed test sites at Yuma Proving Ground and Eglin AFB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL), under the sponsorship of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, is conducting experiments to establish and enhance the ability of low-frequency, ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to detect and discriminate unexploded ordnance (UXO). Preliminary investigations using ARL's BoomSAR - a UWB radar mounted atop a mobile boom lift platform - concluded that the radar image texture and frequency-dependent scattering from mines and mine-like targets could be exploited in the development of automatic target detection algorithms. To support further investigations, ARL established extensive UXO test sites at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, and Eglin AFB, Florida. The soils at both test sties have been characterized in terms of physical, chemical and electromagnetic properties. Precise location, depth, and orientation information was recorded for each of the approximately 500 inert ordnance test targets at each site. This information helps researchers to better understand the phenomenology associated with UXO target scattering and to more accurately evaluate and modify data processing programs. The ultimate goal is to develop innovative automatic target detection algorithms that provide a high probability of detection with an acceptable false-alarm rate under varying environmental conditions and operational scenarios. This paper present details on the design and characterization of the two test sites and some initial results from BoomSAR data collections.

Deluca, Clyde C.; Marinelli, Vincent; Ressler, Marc A.; Ton, Tuan T.

1999-08-01

389

Analysis of the mine-by experiment, climax granite, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is conducting a generic test of retrievable geologic storage of nuclear spent fuel assemlbies, in an underground chamber, at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This generic test is located 420 m below the surface, in the Climax granitic stock. Eleven canisters of spent fuel approximately 2.5 years out of reactor core (about 1.6 kW/canister thermal output) are now emplaced in a storage drift, along with 6 electrical heaters which simulate fuel canisters. Two adjacent drifts contain other electrical heaters, which will be operated to simulate the thermal field of a large repository. An analysis of the mine-by at SFT-C was performed by means of refined finite element models using the JPLAXD code (Jointed, PLane and AXisymmetric, Dilatant). The input for the new models was derived from our field program, which is reported separately. Stress results obtained by modeling methods are compared. All models show that, during mining of the center drift, all caverns close vertically, and the center drift closes horizontally. The walls of the two heater drifts move toward the center drift, with a slight opening or a slight closing of the heater drifts, depending upon the geology. All calculations show both pillars expanding laterally during mine-by. The field-reported lateral contraction of the pillars leads to the very suspicious conclusion that the pillars end up in a state of tension. The field-reported values from horizontal MPEs and horizontal tapes appear to be inconsistent with each other. (DMC)

Heuze, F.E.; Butkovich, T.R.; Peterson, J.C.

1981-06-01

390

Decontamination Techniques and Fixative Coatings Evaluated in the Building 235-F Legacy Source Term Removal Study  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site Building 235-F was being considered for future plutonium storage and stabilization missions but the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) noted that large quantities of Plutonium-238 left in cells and gloveboxes from previous operations posed a potential hazard to both the existing and future workforce. This material resulted from the manufacture of Pu-238 heat sources used by the NASA space program to generate electricity for deep space exploration satellites. A multi-disciplinary team was assembled to propose a cost- effective solution to mitigate this legacy source term which would facilitate future DOE plutonium storage activities in 235-F. One aspect of this study involved an evaluation of commercially available radiological decontamination techniques to remove the legacy Pu-238 and fixative coatings that could stabilize any residual Pu-238 following decontamination activities. Four chemical methods were identified as most likely to meet decontamination objectives for this project and are discussed in detail. Short and long term fixatives will be reviewed with particular attention to the potential radiation damage caused by Pu-238, which has a high specific activity and would be expected to cause significant radiation damage to any coating applied. Encapsulants that were considered to mitigate the legacy Pu-238 will also be reviewed.

WAYNE, FARRELL

2005-04-21

391

Abrasive blasting, a technique for the industrial decontamination of metal components and concrete blocks from decommissioning to unconditional release levels  

SciTech Connect

When decommissioning nuclear installations, large quantities of metal components are produced as well as significant amounts of other radioactive materials, which mostly show low surface contamination. Having been used or having been brought for a while in a controlled area marks them as 'suspected material'. In view of the very high costs for radioactive waste processing and disposal, alternatives have been considered, and much effort has gone to recycling through decontamination, melting and unconditional release of metals. In a broader context, recycling of materials can considered to be a first order ecological priority in order to limit the quantities of radioactive wastes for final disposal and to reduce the technical and economic problems involved with the management of radioactive wastes. It will help as well to make economic use of primary material and to conserve natural resources of basic material for future generations. In a demonstration programme, Belgoprocess has shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, the unit cost for decontamination being only 30 % of the global cost for radioactive waste treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal. As a result, an industrial dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. At the end of December 2006, more than 1,128 Mg of contaminated metal has been treated as well as 313 Mg of concrete blocks. The paper gives an overview of the experience relating to the decontamination of metal material and concrete blocks at the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Dessel, Belgium as well from the decontamination of concrete containers by abrasive blasting. (authors)

Gills, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R. [Belgoprocess N.V., Gravenstraat 73, 2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01

392

Decontamination and Decommissioning Experience at a Sellafield Uranium Purification Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Built in the 1950's, this plant was originally designed to purify depleted uranyl nitrate solution arising from reprocessing operations at the Primary Separation and Head End Plant (Fig. 1). The facility was used for various purposes throughout its life cycle such as research, development and trial based processes. Test rigs were operated in the building from the 1970's until 1984

Prosser

2006-01-01

393

Decontamination of chemical warfare agents. Final report, June 1991August 1992  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews of the development of systems to decontaminate chemical warfare agents and of the chemical reactions involved in decontamination are presented in this report. Decontamination is defined as the rapid removal of agents from contaminated surfaces. Simple physical methods, such as evaporation, washing, and scrubbing, fall under this broad definition; however, most of the decontaminants contain reactive components to detoxify

Y. C. Yang; J. A. Baker; J. R. Ward

1992-01-01

394

Planning guidance for nuclear-power-plant decontamination. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

Direct and indirect costs of decontamination are considered in the benefit-cost analysis. A generic form of the benefit-cost ratio is evaluated in monetary and nonmonetary terms, and values of dollar per man-rem are cited. Federal and state agencies that may have jurisiction over various aspects of decontamination and waste disposal activities are identified. Methods of decontamination, their general effectiveness, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are outlined. Dilute or concentrated chemical solutions are usually used in-situ to dissolve the contamination layer and a thin layer of the underlying substrate. Electrochemical techniques are generally limited to components but show high decontamination effectiveness with uniform corrosion. Mechanical agents are particularly appropriate for certain out-of-system surfaces and disassembled parts. These processes are catagorized and specific concerns are discussed. The treatment, storage, and disposal or discharge or discharge of liquid, gaseous, and solid wastes generated during the decontamination process are discussed. Radioactive and other hazardous chemical wastes are considered. The monitoring, treatment, and control of radioactive and nonradioactive effluents, from both routine operations and possible accidents, are discussed. Protecting the health and safety of personnel onsite during decontamination is of prime importance and should be considered in each facet of the decontamination process. The radiation protection philosophy of reducing exposure to levels as low as reasonably achievable should be stressed. These issues are discussed.

Munson, L.F.; Divine, J.R.; Martin, J.B.

1983-06-01

395

A Serendipitous, Long-Term Infiltration Experiment: Water and Tritium Circulation Beneath the CAMBRIC Ditch at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site introduced numerous radionuclides that may be used to characterize subsurface hydrologic transport processes in arid climates. A sixteen year pumping experiment designed to examine radionuclide migration away from the CAMBRIC nuclear test, conducted in groundwater beneath Frenchman Flat in 1965, gave rise to an unintended second experiment involving radionuclide infiltration through the vadose zone, as induced by seepage of pumping effluents beneath an unlined discharge trench. The combined experiments have been reanalyzed using a detailed, three-dimensional numerical model of transient, variably saturated flow and mass transport, tailored specifically for large scale and efficient calculations. Simulations have been used to estimate radionuclide travel and residence times in various parts of the system for comparison with observations in wells. Model predictions of mass transport were able to clearly demonstrate radionuclide recycling behavior between the ditch and pumping well previously suggested by isotopic age dating information; match travel time estimates for radionuclides moving between the ditch, the water table, and monitoring wells; and provide more realistic ways in which to interpret the pumping well elution curves. Collectively, the results illustrate the utility of integrating detailed numerical modeling with diverse observational data in developing accurate interpretations and forecasts of contaminant migration processes.

Maxwell, R M; Tompson, A B; Kollet, S J

2008-11-20

396

System Chemical Decontamination Technology by the IF7 Gas  

SciTech Connect

When we decommission the equipments contaminated by the uranium, both the dismantling process of the equipments and the disposal process of the radioactive waste will be carried out. However, costs of these processes will be very expensive because the dismantling facilities are required in the dismantling process and many radioactive wastes are generated. Here, if it is possible to decontaminate the equipments below the clearance level, the amount of radioactive wastes is reduced very much. As a result, costs of the disposal will be able to reduce extremely. Moreover, if it is possible to decontaminate the equipments before dismantling, costs of the dismantling will be reduced, too. In other words, the total costs of the dismantling process and the disposal process will be minimized by decontaminating below the clearance level without dismantling. So, we have developed new decontamination technology to decontaminate below the clearance level without dismantling. In this paper, as an example, we tried to decontaminate the uranium enrichment plant in order to reveal the practicality of our technology. In conclusion: we proposed new decontamination technology by the IF7 gas. And, as an example, we tried to decontaminate the uranium enrichment plant. As a result, we could reveal that our technology has the high performance which can decontaminate below the assumed clearance level: 1.0 Bq/g in the limited time. Finally, we simulated the amount of the radioactive waste for decommissioning the uranium enrichment plant. As a result, though a lot of radioactive wastes will usually be generated, we obtained the prospect that it is possible to reduced 85% of the radioactive waste by using our technology.

Ema, Akira; Sugitsue, Noritake; Zaitsu, Tomohisa [Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1550, Kamisaibara, Kagamino, Okayama, 708-0698 (Japan)

2008-01-15

397

Comparison and Evaluation of Various Tritium Decontamination Techniques and Processes  

SciTech Connect

In support of fusion energy development, various techniques and processes have been developed over the past two decades for the removal and decontamination of tritium from a variety of items, surfaces, and components. Tritium decontamination, by chemical, physical, mechanical, or a combination of these methods, is driven by two underlying motivational forces. The first of these motivational forces is safety. Safety is paramount to the established culture associated with fusion energy. The second of these motivational forces is cost. In all aspects, less tritium contamination equals lower operational and disposal costs. This paper will discuss and evaluate the various processes employed for tritium removal and decontamination.

C.A. Gentile; S.W. Langish; C.H. Skinner; L.P. Ciebiera

2004-09-10

398

Modified titania nanotubes for decontamination of sulphur mustard.  

PubMed

Modified titania nanotubes have been studied as powder decontaminants against sulphur mustard (HD), a deadliest chemical warfare agent. Decontamination reactions were carried out at room temperature (30+/-2 degrees C) and monitored by gas chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry techniques. Reactions displayed first order kinetics. HD underwent accelerated hydrolysis on Ag(+)-titania nanotubes when compared to Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+) and Ru(3+)-titania nanotubes depicting catalysis. Thiodiglycol, 1,4-oxathiane were observed to be major products formed except on Ru(3+)-titania nanotubes. Sulphur mustard sulphoxide formed on Ru(3+)-titania nanotubes indicating oxidative decontamination of HD. PMID:19272696

Prasad, G K; Singh, Beer; Ganesan, K; Batra, Anirudh; Kumeria, Tushar; Gutch, P K; Vijayaraghavan, R

2009-02-07

399

Comparison and Evaluation of Various Tritium Decontamination Techniques and Processes  

SciTech Connect

In support of fusion energy development, various techniques and processes have been developed over the past two decades for the removal and decontamination of tritium from a variety of items, surfaces, and components. The motivational force for tritium decontamination by chemical, physical, mechanical, or a combination of these methods, is driven by two underlying forces. The first of these motivational forces is safety. Safety is paramount to the established culture associated with fusion energy. The second of these motivational forces is cost. In all aspects, less tritium contamination equals lower operational and disposal costs. This paper will discuss and evaluate the various processes employed for tritium removal and decontamination.

Gentile, C.A.; Langish, S.W.; Skinner, C.H.; Ciebiera, L.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States)

2005-07-15

400

Site Characterization Work Plan for the Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico (Rev. 1, January 2002)  

SciTech Connect

Project Gnome was the first nuclear experiment conducted under the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Plowshare Program. The Plowshare Program focused on developing nuclear devices exclusively for peaceful purposes. The intent of the Gnome experiment was to evaluate the effects of a nuclear detonation in a salt medium. Historically, Project Gnome consisted of a single detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1961 with the Salado Formation. Since the Gnome detonation, the AEC/DOE has conducted surface restoration, site reconnaissance, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the site. In addition, annual groundwater sampling is performed under a long-term hydrological monitoring program begun in 1972. Coach, an experiment to be located near the Gnome project, was initially scheduled for 1963. Although construction and rehabilitation were completed for Coach, the experiment was canceled and never executed. Known collectively as Project Gnome-Coach, the site is located approximately 25 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in Eddy County, and is comprised of nearly 680 acres, of which approximately 60 acres are disturbed from the combined AEC/DOE operations. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the project. The subsurface at the Gnome-Coach site has two contaminant sources that are fundamentally different in terms of both their stratigraphic location and release mechanism. The goal of this characterization is to collect data of sufficient quantity and quality to establish current site conditions and to use the data to identify and evaluate if further action is required to protect human health and the environment and achieve permanent closure of the site. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2002-01-14

401

Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine  

DOEpatents

Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

Simpson, William E. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01

402

Remanent and rock magnetic properties at the Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification site: Hanna II phases 2 and 3 experiment  

SciTech Connect

Several underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been conducted in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam. During the fall, 1980, the Laramie Energy Technology Center performed a post-burn field study of the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 experiment at the Hanna UCG site. The field work consisted of high resolution seismic, drilling, coring, and geophysical logging. The Paleomagnetism Laboratory, Department of Geology, Colorado School of Mines, contributed to the post-burn study by doing remanent and rock magnetic measurement laboratory work on the core material. Funding was provided by the Laramie Energy Technology Center. The purpose of the study was to determine the nature of the remanent magnetism of the overburden Hanna Formation and changes in the remanence and magnetic mineralogy attending underground coal gasification experiments. With this information, further estimates of the thermal and chemical conditions reached during the conversion experiment could be made. The magnetization data, together with previous petrographic observations, suggest that magnetite is being formed in a reducing process at the expense of detrital ferromagnesian silicates and possible hematite and geothite in the overburden sediments. Thermal gradients immediately above the burn cavity are difficult to estimate; changes in magnetic properties of unaltered Hanna Formation overburden are activated at temperatures as low as 300/sup 0/C. The magnetic expression of the burn cavity should be able to be modelled as being due to a thin slab overlying the cavity. Pyrometamorphosed material that has collapsed into the cavity, should have any magnetization which is randomized due to collapse and therefore should be able to be incorporated into a magnetic anomaly model. 32 references, 27 figures.

Geissman, J.W.; Callian, J.; Youngberg, A.D.

1983-09-01

403

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D&D is devoted to S&M at each of the sites. Our S&M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S&M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01

404

ONLINE MEASUREMENT OF THE PROGRESS OF DECONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine if the sensor technology and the decontamination technology will face problems once integrated, a feasibility study (see Appendix B) was produced in which the effect of motion on the efficiency of a radiation sensor was measured. It was found that the effect is not negligible; however, it is not catastrophic, and if the sensors are properly calibrated, this obstacle can be overcome. During the first year of this project, many important tasks have been accomplished. The search for radiation sensors provided knowledge on the technologies commercially available. This, in turn, allowed for a proper assessment of the properties, limitations, different methods of measurement, and requirements of a large number of sensors. The best possible characterization and data collection instrument and decontamination technologies were chosen using the requirement information in Appendix A. There are technical problems with installing sensors within the blasting head, such as steel shot and dust interference. Therefore, the sensor array is placed so that it will measure the radioactivity after the blasting. Sensors are rather sensitive, and therefore it is not feasible to place the sensor windows in such an abrasive environment. Other factors, such as the need for radiation hardening in extreme cases, and the possible interference of gamma rays with the radio frequency modem, have been considered. These factors are expected to be negligible and can be revisited at the time of prototype production. Factors that need to be addressed are the vibrations of the blasting unit and how to isolate the sensor array from these. In addition, an electromagnetic survey must be performed to ensure there will be no interference with the electronic component that will be integrated. The integration design is shown in section 4.0.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01

405

Decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) Reactor, the first reactor built on the Argonne National Laboratory-East site, followed a rich history that had begun in 1942 with Enrico Fermi's original pile built under the west stands at the Stagg Field Stadium of The University of Chicago. CP-5 was a 5-megawatt, heavy water-moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research from 1954--79. The reactor was shut down and defueled in 1979, and placed into a lay-up condition pending funding for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). In 1990, work was initiated on the D and D of the facility in order to alleviate safety and environmental concerns associated with the site due to the deterioration of the building and its associated support systems. A decision was made in early Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 to direct focus and resources to the completion of the CP-5 Reactor D and D Project. An award of contract was made in December 1998 to Duke Engineering and Services (Marlborough, MA), and a D and D crew was on site in March 1999 to begin work, The project is scheduled to be completed in July 2000. The Laboratory has determined that the building housing the CP-5 facility is surplus to the Laboratory's needs and will be a candidate for demolition. In addition to a photographic chronology of FY 1999 activities at the CP-5 Reactor D and D Project, brief descriptions of other FY 1999 activities and of projects planned for the future are provided in this photobriefing book.

NONE

2000-03-08

406

Carbon steel and related alloy corrosion in LOMI (low oxidation state metal ion) decontamination solvents  

SciTech Connect

In 1985 UNC Nuclear Industries, now Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), began the evaluation of the proprietary LOMI decontamination procedure for its application to the Hanford N Reactor. The LOMI (low oxidation state metal ion) procedure uses the vanadous ion to reduce ferric ion to ferrous ion, thus increasing the ease of dissolution of the iron oxide in the reactor primary cooling system during decontamination. The dissolved oxide is retained in solution by picolinic acid, a weak chelant, until it has been removed from the system. WHC retained London Nuclear Limited, now LN Technologies (LNT), as a consultant to provide information, materials, corrosion testing, and development of the method for applying the LOMI procedure to N Reactor. LNT in turn obtained the assistance of Ontario Research Foundation (ORF) to perform detailed corrosion studies. In addition, the Chemical Waste Treatment Engineering group, WHC, performed initial laboratory and pilot plant testing of the LOMI decontamination procedure at the anticipated N Reactor application conditions to gain experience in handling and control of the solutions. This document reports the results of the corrosion data obtained during both the ORF and the WHC tests.

Larrick, A.P.; Kratzer, W.K.; Richardson, C.A.

1988-01-01

407

Decontamination and decarburization of stainless and carbon steel by melt refining  

SciTech Connect

With many nuclear reactors and facilities being decommissioned in the next ten to twenty years the concern for handling and storing Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) is growing. Upon direction of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) is developing technologies for the conditioning of spent fuels and high-level wastes for interim storage and repository acceptance, including the recycling of Radioactive Scrap Metals (RSM) for beneficial reuse with the DOE complex. In February 1993, Montana Tech of the University of Montana was contracted to develop and demonstrate technologies for the decontamination of stainless steel RSM. The general objectives of the Montana Tech research program included conducting a literature survey, performing laboratory scale melt refining experiments to optimize decontaminating slag compositions, performing an analysis of preferred melting techniques, coordinating pilot scale and commercial scale demonstrations, and producing sufficient quantities of surrogate-containing material for all of the laboratory, pilot and commercial scale test programs. Later on, the program was expanded to include decontamination of carbon steel RSM. Each research program has been completed, and results are presented in this report.

Mizia, R.E.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Webber, D.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1996-09-05

408

Oxidative decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents using L-Gel.  

PubMed

A decontamination method has been developed using a single reagent that is effective both against chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents. The new reagent, "L-Gel", consists of an aqueous solution of a mild commercial oxidizer, Oxone, together with a commercial fumed silica gelling agent, Cab-O-Sil EH-5. L-Gel is non-toxic, environmentally friendly, relatively non-corrosive, maximizes contact time because of its thixotropic nature, clings to walls and ceilings, and does not harm carpets or painted surfaces. The new reagent also addresses the most demanding requirements for decontamination in the civilian sector, including availability, low maintenance, ease of application and deployment by a variety of dispersal mechanisms, minimal training and acceptable expense. Experiments to test the effectiveness of L-Gel were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and independently at four other locations. L-Gel was tested against all classes of chemical warfare agents and against various biological warfare agent surrogates, including spore-forming bacteria and non-virulent strains of real biological agents. Testing showed that L-Gel is as effective against chemical agents and biological materials, including spores, as the best military decontaminants. PMID:12137994

Raber, Ellen; McGuire, Raymond

2002-08-01

409

Metal retention on pine bark and blast furnace slag--on-site experiment for treatment of low strength landfill leachate.  

PubMed

Treatment of landfill leachate using blast furnace slag and pine bark as reactive sorbents was studied in an in situ column experiment at the Lilla Nyby landfill site in Eskilstuna, Sweden. The columns were filled with approximately 101 of each sorbent and leachate was supplied at three different flow rates during a period of 4 months. Samples of inflow and outflow were collected three times a week and were analyzed for physical and chemical parameters, including concentrations of some metals, and toxicity. It was found that pine bark removed metals more efficiently than did the blast furnace slags; that Zn was most efficiently retained in the filters and that both retention time and initial concentration played an important role in the sorption process. It was also observed that the pine bark column did not release COD. No toxicity of the untreated or the treated leachate was found with the test organisms and test responses used. PMID:17462882

Nehrenheim, Emma; Waara, Sylvia; Johansson Westholm, Lena

2007-04-25

410

From Penicillin-Streptomycin to Amikacin-Vancomycin: Antibiotic Decontamination of Cardiovascular Homografts in Singapore  

PubMed Central

Background In February 2012, the National Cardiovascular Homograft Bank (NCHB) became the first tissue bank outside of North America to receive accreditation from the American Association of Tissue Banks. From 2008 to 2009, NCHB had been decontaminating its cardiovascular homografts with penicillin and streptomycin. The antibiotic decontamination protocol was changed in January 2010 as amikacin and vancomycin were recommended, in order to cover bacteria isolated from post-recovery and post- antibiotic incubation tissue cultures. Aim The objective of this study is to determine the optimal incubation conditions for decontamination of homografts by evaluating the potencies of amikacin and vancomycin in different incubation conditions. Retrospective reviews of microbiological results were also performed for homografts recovered from 2008 to 2012, to compare the effectiveness of penicillin-streptomycin versus the amikacin-vancomycin regimens. Methods Based on microbiological assays stated in United States Pharmacopeia 31, potency of amikacin was evaluated by turbidimetric assay using Staphylococcus aureus, while vancomycin was by diffusion assay using Bacillus subtilis sporulate. Experiments were performed to investigate the potencies of individual antibiotic 6-hours post incubation at 4°C and 37°C and 4°C for 24 hours, after the results suggested that amikacin was more potent at lower temperature. Findings Tissue incubation at 4°C for 24 hours is optimal for both antibiotics, especially for amikacin, as its potency falls drastically at 37°C. Conclusion The decontamination regimen of amikacin-vancomycin at 4°C for 24 hours is effective. Nevertheless, it is imperative to monitor microbiological trends closely and evaluate the efficacy of current antibiotics regimen against emerging strains of micro-organisms.

Heng, Wee Ling; Lim, Chong Hee; Tan, Ban Hock; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr; Lee, Winnie Hui Ling; Seck, Tracy; Lim, Yeong Phang

2012-01-01

411

Destruction of Spores on Building Decontamination Residue in a Commercial Autoclave?  

PubMed Central

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted an experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial autoclave for treating simulated building decontamination residue (BDR). The BDR was intended to simulate porous materials removed from a building deliberately contaminated with biological agents such as Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) in a terrorist attack. The purpose of the tests was to assess whether the standard operating procedure for a commercial autoclave provided sufficiently robust conditions to adequately destroy bacterial spores bound to the BDR. In this study we investigated the effects of several variables related to autoclaving BDR, including time, temperature, pressure, item type, moisture content, packing density, packing orientation, autoclave bag integrity, and autoclave process sequence. The test team created simulated BDR from wallboard, ceiling tiles, carpet, and upholstered furniture, and embedded in the BDR were Geobacillus stearothermophilus biological indicator (BI) strips containing 106 spores and thermocouples to obtain time and temperature profile data associated with each BI strip. The results indicated that a single standard autoclave cycle did not effectively decontaminate the BDR. Autoclave cycles consisting of 120 min at 31.5 lb/in2 and 275°F and 75 min at 45 lb/in2 and 292°F effectively decontaminated the BDR material. Two sequential standard autoclave cycles consisting of 40 min at 31.5 lb/in2 and 275°F proved to be particularly effective, probably because the second cycle's evacuation step pulled the condensed water out of the pores of the materials, allowing better steam penetration. The results also indicated that the packing density and material type of the BDR in the autoclave could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the decontamination process.

Lemieux, P.; Sieber, R.; Osborne, A.; Woodard, A.

2006-01-01

412

Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination  

SciTech Connect

DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the US nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCBs, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay, and fission products of DOE operations. To allow disposal, the asbestos must be converted chemically, followed by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives. An attempt was made to apply techniques that have already proved successful in the mining, oil, and metals processing industries to the development of a multi-stage process to remove and separate hazardous chemical radioactive materials from asbestos. This process uses three methods: ABCOV chemicals which converts the asbestos to a sanitary waste; dielectric heating to volatilize the organic materials; and electrochemical processing for the removal of heavy metals, RCRA wastes and radionuclides. This process will result in the destruction of over 99% of the asbestos; limit radioactive metal contamination to 0.2 Bq alpha per gram and 1 Bq beta and gamma per gram; reduce hazardous organics to levels compatible with current EPA policy for RCRA delisting; and achieve TCLP limits for all solidified waste.

Kasevich, R.S.; Nocito, T.; Vaux, W.G.; Snyder, T.

1994-12-31

413

Safety analysis factors for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration (ER) and facility decontamination/decommissioning (D&D) operations can be grouped into two general categories. ``Nonstationary cleanup`` or simply ``cleanup`` activities are where the operation must relocate to the site of new contaminated material at the completion of each task (i.e., the operation moves to the contaminated material). ``Stationary production`` or simply ``production`` activities are where the contaminated material is moved to a centralized location (i.e., the contaminated material is moved to the operation) for analysis, sorting, treatment, storage, and disposal. This paper addresses the issue of nonstationary cleanup design. The following are the specific assigned action items: Collect and compile a list of special safety-related ER/D&D design factors, especially ones that don`t follow DOE Order 6430.1A requirements. Develop proposal of what makes sense to recommend to designers; especially consider recommendations for short-term projects. Present proposal at the January meeting. To achieve the action items, applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) design requirements, and cleanup operations and differences from production activities are reviewed and summarized; basic safety requirements influencing design are summarized; and finally, approaches, considerations, and methods for safe, cost-effective design of cleanup activities are discussed.

Ellingson, D.R.

1993-04-01

414

The non-proliferation experiment and gas sampling as an on-site inspection activity: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Non-proliferation Experiment (NPE) is contributing to the development of gas sampling methods and models that may be incorporated into future on-site inspection (OSI) activities. Surface gas sampling and analysis, motivated by nuclear test containment studies, have already demonstrated the tendency for the gaseous products of an underground nuclear test to flow hundreds of meters to the surface over periods ranging from days to months. Even in the presence of a uniform sinusoidal pressure variation, there will be a net flow of cavity gas toward the surface. To test this barometric pumping effect at Rainier Mesa, gas bottles containing sulfur hexaflouride and {sup 3}He were added to the pre-detonation cavity for the 1 kt chemical explosives test. Pre-detonation measurements of the background levels of both gases were obtained at selected sites on top of the mesa. The background levels of both tracers were found to be at or below mass spectrographic/gas chromatographic sensitivity thresholds in the parts-per-trillion range. Post-detonation, gas chromatographic analyses of samples taken during barometric pressure lows from the sampling sites on the mesa indicate the presence of significant levels (300--600 ppt) of sulfur hexaflouride. However, mass spectrographic analyses of gas samples taken to date do not show the presence of {sup 3}He. To explain these observations, several possibilities are being explored through additional sampling/analysis and numerical modeling. For the NPE, the detonation point was approximately 400 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa and the event did not produce significant fracturing or subsidence on the surface of the mesa. Thus, the NPE may ultimately represent an extreme, but useful example for the application and tuning of cavity gas detection techniques.

Carrigan, C.R.

1994-03-01

415

Data collection and field experiments at the Apache Leap research site. Annual report, May 1995--1996  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the research performed during the period May 1995-May 1996 for a project of the U.S. Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-051) by the University of Arizona. The project manager for this research in Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this research were to examine hypotheses and test alternative conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. Each chapter in this report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. Topics include: crosshole pneumatic and gaseous tracer field and modeling experiments designed to help validate the applicability of contiuum geostatistical and stochastic concepts, theories, models, and scaling relations relevant to unsaturated flow and transport in fractured porous tuffs; use of geochemistry and aquifer testing to evaluate fracture flow and perching mechanisms; investigations of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U fractionation to evaluate leaching selectivity; and transport and modeling of both conservative and non-conservative tracers.

Woodhouse, E.G. [ed.; Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Chen, G. [and others

1997-08-01

416

Release of organic chelating agents from solidified decontamination wastes  

SciTech Connect

In order to provide technical information needed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the adequacy of near-surface disposal of decontamination wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory has measured the release of organic complexing agents from simulated decontamination resin wastes solidified in cement and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated waste consisted of either mixed bed ion-exchange resins or anion exchange resins equilibrated with EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, picolinic acid, formic acid, simulated LOMI reagent or the LND-101A decontamination reagent. The standard procedure ANS 16.1 appeared to be adequate for determining a leachability index for organic acids for comparing the leach resistance of decontamination waste forms. Leachability indexes appeared to be specific for each organic acid. Further, the apparent diffusivities were generally less than those observed for Cs releases from cement wastes forms. The finder material and the composition of the simulated wastes affected the release of the reagents.

Piciulo, P.L.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.W.

1986-01-01

417

Decontamination of Radionuclides from Concrete during and after Thermal Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective was to clarify from the theoretical viewpoint the mechanical, diffusional, thermodynamic and electromagnetic aspects of the decontaminations problem, by means of developing a powerful computational model to evaluate the effect of a very rapi...

R. F. Hirsch K. C. Chang

2003-01-01

418

Chemical Warfare Agent Decontaminant Solution Using Quaternary Ammonium Complexes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A chemical warfare agent decontamination solution made up of about 20% of a quaternary ammonium complex containing benzyltrimethylammonium chloride and benzyltriethylammonium chloride and about 20% by weight of an oxidizer, dissolved in a solvent, such as...

D. T. Crounce

1997-01-01

419

Planetary protection protocol using multi-jet cold plasma decontamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection of extraterrestrial life in-situ assumes that a positive indication is the result of an indigenous life form, and not the result of forward contamination from Earth. Atmospheric discharge cold plasma jets have proven effective in the decontamination of a wide range of microorganisms, including Deinococcus radiodurans, through multiple modes of action, yet the effect is relatively gentle on surfaces being decontaminated. An individual plasma jet may have a beam diameter of only a few millimeters, requiring extensive decontamination time for a given surface area. Techniques are discussed for assembling large area multi-jet arrays, and their mechanisms of decontamination. Application to back contamination in sample return missions is also considered.

Konesky, Gregory A.

2010-08-01

420

Bionanoconjugate-based composites for decontamination of nerve agents.  

PubMed

We have developed enzyme-based composites that rapidly and effectively detoxify simulants of V- and G-type chemical warfare nerve agents. The approach was based on the efficient immobilization of organophosphorus hydrolase onto carbon nanotubes to form active and stable conjugates that were easily entrapped in commercially available paints. The resulting catalytic-based composites showed no enzyme leaching and rendered >99% decontamination of 10 g/m(2) paraoxon, a simulant of the V-type nerve agent, in 30 minutes and >95% decontamination of diisopropylfluorophosphate, a simulant of G-type nerve agent, in 45 minutes. The formulations are expected to be environmentally friendly and to offer an easy to use, on demand, decontamination alternative to chemical approaches for sustainable material self-decontamination. PMID:20859933

Borkar, Indrakant V; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Zhu, Guangyu; Kane, Ravi S; Dordick, Jonathan S

2010-09-21

421

Decontaminating Apparatus, Power-Driven, Vehicular or Skid-Mounted.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes a method for evaluation of decontamination equipment operational and functional performance characteristics. It identifies supporting tests, facilities, and equipment required, and provides procedures for functional suitability tests....

1972-01-01

422

Demonstration of Alternative Decontamination Techniques at Three Mile Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper discusses the following decontamination techniques: immersion electropolishing, in-situ electropolishing, barrel electropolishing, vibratory finishing, high-pressure freon spray, centrifugation, acid adsorption, and solidification. (ERA citatio...

H. W. Arrowsmith R. P. Allen

1979-01-01

423

Molecular Backwash for Decontamination and Rejuvenation of Membranes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In studies of osmotic and electroosmotic backwash to decontaminate hyperfiltration membranes, it was found that the direction and magnitude of electroosmotic flow in asymmetric cellulose-acetate membranes in sodium-chloride solutions depends on the concen...

K. S. Spegler

1978-01-01

424

Decontamination and Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities: A Literature Search.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This bibliography includes 429 unclassified references to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The references are arranged in chronological order and cover the period from 1944 through 1974. Subject and author indexes are provide...

W. E. Sande H. D. Freeman M. S. Hanson R. L. McKeever

1975-01-01

425

Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications  

SciTech Connect

Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM); Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM); Levin, Bruce L. (Tijeras, NM); Leonard, Jonathan (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-06

426

Equipment and Facilities Decontamination and Disposal at Army Ammunition Plants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The only proven and defensible method to effectively: desensitize explosive contanimants within buildings and equipment, decontaminate production and R&D equipment/piping, and flash (5X) residual agent and energetics in/on munitions and materials.

P. Ihrke

2010-01-01

427

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01

428

Evaluation of destructive methods for managing decontamination wastes  

SciTech Connect

Results are discussed of a laboratory evaluation of destructive methods for processing chemical decontamination wastes. Incineration, acid digestion and wet-air oxidation are capable of degrading decontamination reagents and organic ion-exchange resins. The extent of destruction as a function of operating parameters was waste specific. The reagents used in the testing were: EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, picolinic acid and LND-101A.

Piciulo, P.L.; Adams, J.W.

1986-01-01

429

Low solubility iron nitrosyl compounds for radioactive cesium decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The cesium salt of iron dinitrosothiosulfate, CsFe(NO)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/, is too soluble for large-scale decontamination processes based on cesium precipitation, and it slowly decomposes in solution. An incompletely characterized compound, thought to be similar to the black salt of Roussin, has a low solubility and might be useful for cesium decontamination. 18 refs., 2 figs.

Silver, G.L.

1986-09-30

430

Cesium powder and pellets inner container decontamination method determination  

SciTech Connect

The cesium powder and pellets inner container is to be performance tested per the criteria specified in Section 4.0 of HNF-2399, ``Design, Fabrication, and Assembly Criteria for Cesium Powder and Pellet Inner Container.`` The test criteria specifies that the inner container be water tight during decontamination of the exterior surface. Three prototypes will be immersed into a pool of water to simulate a water decontamination process.

Ferrell, P.C.

1998-07-09

431

METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES  

DOEpatents

A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

1959-03-10

432

METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES  

DOEpatents

A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

1959-03-10

433

Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods  

SciTech Connect

A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

1995-12-01

434

Reuse of Concrete within DOE from Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects  

SciTech Connect

A protocol has been developed for use in the disposition of concrete from Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) projects. The purpose of this protocol is to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites in releasing concrete for re-use within the DOE complex. Current regulations allow sites to release surface-contaminated m